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Sample records for plasma cell dyscrasias

  1. Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; LCDD vs Immunotactoid glomerulopathy

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    Jabur Wael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Light chain deposit disease is a plasma cell disorder characterized by production of a large amount of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain or part of it, which is usually deposited as an amorphous substance in the kidneys. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy is an uncommon disease, which might be related to plasma cell dyscrasia, and characteristically manifest as organized glomerular ultra structural fibrils or microtubules. In this article, we report a case of a combined presentation of light chain disease and immunotactoid glomerulopathy in a patient with multiple myeloma and reversible advanced renal failure.

  2. Rheumatic masks of plasma cell dyscrasias

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    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider clinical practice problems in the differential diagnosis of different types of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD. Subjects and methods. Fourteen patients (8 men and 6 women aged 52±12 years, in whom rheumatic diseases (RD were ruled out and who were diagnosed as having primary PCD: different types of myeloma in 7 patients, myeloma + AL-amyloidosis in 2, AL-amyloidosis in 3, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia in 2, were examined. Results and discussion. The most common maldiagnosed RDs in patients with PCD were seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s disease, and different forms of vasculitis. The most frequent masks of RD were kidney (78% and osteoarticular system (64% lesions, vascular disorders (36%, peripheral polyneuropathies (36%, and enlarged salivary glands with xerostomia (28.5%. Serum and urine immunochemical study should be performed in all patients who have clinical manifestations of seropositive RA, spondyloarthritis, intensive bone pain syndrome, ulceronecrotic vasculitis, enlarged submandibular salivary glands with macroglossia in the absence of markers of autoimmune disease for the timely diagnosis of PCD and the exclusion of RD. The paper estimates the sensitivity and specificity of main methods used to diagnose different types of PCD.

  3. Diagnosis and management of neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias.

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    Rosenbaum, Evan; Marks, Douglas; Raza, Shahzad

    2017-04-10

    Neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias are a major cause of morbidity for patients managed by medical oncologists. Because of similarities in clinical presentation and on nerve conduction studies, identifying the underlying disease leading to a paraproteinemic neuropathy can often be difficult. In addition, the degree of neurologic deficit does not strictly correlate with the extent of abnormalities on common clinical laboratory testing. Fortunately, with increasing understanding into the biologic mechanisms of underlying hematologic diseases, additional biomarkers have recently been developed, thus improving our diagnostic capacity. Neuropathies associated with plasma cells dyscrasias are seen with Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) particularly IgM subtype, followed by IgG and IgA MGUS, multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, amyloid, Castleman's disease, and POEMS syndrome. The mechanisms of neuronal injury associated with plasma cell dyscrasia vary based on underlying diagnosis and include malignant infiltration, immune-mediated antibody deposition, or local compression of nerve roots. The polyneuropathies are frequently demyelinating, although axonal and mixed neuropathies can also be seen. As demonstrated by the cases included in this review, patients frequently present with symmetric sensory disturbance, followed by progressive motor weakness. Unfortunately, because of the complexity of diagnostic testing, patients are frequently examined late, often after receiving several ineffective therapies. The aim of this case-based review is to provide clinicians with insight on how to properly recognize these atypical neuropathies and send the appropriate diagnostic work, increasing the likelihood of accurately classify the patient's underlying hematologic disorder. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. C-src enriched serum microvesicles are generated in malignant plasma cell dyscrasia.

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    Giuseppe Di Noto

    Full Text Available Plasma cell dyscrasias are immunosecretory disorders that can lead to hematological malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM. MM accounts for 15% of all hematologic cancers, and those diagnosed with MM typically become severely ill and have a low life expectancy. Monoclonal immunoglobulin Free Light Chains (FLC are present in the serum and urine of many patients with plasma cell diseases. The biological differences between monoclonal FLCs, produced under malignant or benign dyscrasias, has not yet been characterized. In the present study, we show that endothelial and heart muscle cell lines internalize kappa and lambda FLCs. After internalization, FLCs are rerouted in the extracellular space via microvesicles and exosomes that can be re-internalized in contiguous cells. Only FLCs secreted from malignant B Lymphocytes were carried in Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src positive vesicles. In both MM and AL Amyloidosis patients we observed an increase in microvesicle and exosome production. Isolated serum vesicles from MM, AL Amyloidosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS patients contained FLCs. Furthermore MM and AL amyloidosis vesicles were strongly positive for Hsp70, annexin V, and c-src compared to MGUS and control patients. These are the first data implying that FLCs reroute via microvesicles in the blood stream, and also suggest a potential novel mechanism of c-src activation in plasma cell dyscrasia.

  5. The potential role of curcumin (diferuloylmethane in plasma cell dyscrasias/paraproteinemia

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    Terry Golombick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Terry Golombick, Terry DiamondDepartment of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah, AustraliaAbstract: Plasma cell dyscrasias, most commonly associated with paraproteinemia, are a diverse group of diseases. Monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS can precede multiple myeloma, a progressive neoplastic disease. MGUS occurs in association with a variety of other diseases and currently no treatment is recommended but rather “watchful waiting”. Given that the size of the M-protein is a risk factor for disease progression, early intervention with the aim of reducing the paraprotein load would provide an innovative therapeutic tool. Preliminary results from our pilot study show a drop of between 5% and 30% serum paraprotein in patients taking curcumin compared with patients on placebo. Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane present in extracts of the rhizome of the Curcuma longa plant. As a natural product, this has exciting potential in the treatment of plasma cell dyscrasias.Keywords: plasma cell dyscrasias, MGUS, myeloma, curcumin, paraproteinemia

  6. Performance goals for immunoglobulins and serum free light chain measurements in plasma cell dyscrasias can be based on biological variation

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    Hansen, Charlotte Toftmann

    2016-01-01

    , data based on biological variation is a good and reliable method for setting desirable performance standards; this also applies for the measurements of paraprotein and sFLC. The benefits of this approach are several. Among others, it is independent of the clinician, and it provides us with information......Measurements of immunoglobulins and serum free light chains (sFLC) are frequently used in patients with monoclonal plasma cell dyscrasia (PCD). For optimum patient care, well-defined performance standards or goals for the measured concentrations of immunoglobulins and sFLC are required. Generally...... of immunoglobulins and sFLC, studies accounting for number of individuals, samples, and replicates, as well as time length of the studies are needed....

  7. Performance goals for immunoglobulins and serum free light chain measurements in plasma cell dyscrasias can be based on biological variation.

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    Hansen, Charlotte Toftmann

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of immunoglobulins and serum free light chains (sFLC) are frequently used in patients with monoclonal plasma cell dyscrasia (PCD). For optimum patient care, well-defined performance standards or goals for the measured concentrations of immunoglobulins and sFLC are required. Generally, data based on biological variation is a good and reliable method for setting desirable performance standards; this also applies for the measurements of paraprotein and sFLC. The benefits of this approach are several. Among others, it is independent of the clinician, and it provides us with information about reference change value and index of individuality. Several studies on biological variation of both immunoglobulins and sFLC have been published, and mostly the studies are well performed. The studies normally show small within-subject biological variation resulting in strict analytical goals, which in most cases are difficult to meet. Nevertheless, we still need further information on biological variation of immunoglobulins and sFLC in patients with PCD and in the elderly, which are the main target populations for the two measurands. Furthermore, to improve data on biological variation of immunoglobulins and sFLC, studies accounting for number of individuals, samples, and replicates, as well as time length of the studies are needed.

  8. Advances in the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties: The emerging role of targeted therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias

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    Aldo M Roccaro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Aldo M Roccaro1, Irene M Ghobrial1, Simona Blotta1, Steven P Treon1, Michele Malagola2, Kenneth C Anderson1, Paul G Richardson1, Domenico Russo21Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Unit of Blood Diseases and Cell Therapies, University of Brescia Medical School, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: The paradigm for the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties has dramatically changed: therapeutic options in multiple myeloma (MM have evolved from the introduction of melphalan and prednisone in the 1960s, high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in the late 1980s and 1990s, to the rapid introduction of small novel molecules within the last seven years. Based on the understanding of the complex interaction of the MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment and the signaling pathways that are dysregulated in this process, a number of novel therapeutic agents are now available. Specifically, three novel agents with a specific-targeted anti-MM activity, have been FDA-approved for the treatment of this disease, namely Bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide which are now all playing a key role in the treatment of MM. The success of targeted therapy in MM has since led to the development and investigation of more than 30 new compounds in this disease and in other plasma cell dyscrasias such as Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and primary amyloidosis, both in the preclinical settings and as part of clinical trials.Keywords: monoclonal gammopaties, targeted therapies

  9. Molecular spectrum of TP53 mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias by next generation sequencing: an Italian cohort study and overview of the literature.

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    Lionetti, Marta; Barbieri, Marzia; Manzoni, Martina; Fabris, Sonia; Bandini, Cecilia; Todoerti, Katia; Nozza, Filomena; Rossi, Davide; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-19

    The prevalence of TP53 mutations greatly varies between tumor types; in multiple myeloma (MM) they were rarely detected at presentation, while increased frequency was reported with disease progression. Using next-generation sequencing, we analyzed TP53 exons 4-9 in a large representative cohort comprising patients with MM at diagnosis and more aggressive forms of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasia, identifying mutations in 4/129 (3%) MM, 6/24 (25%) primary PC leukemia, and 2/10 (20%) secondary PC leukemia cases. A similar increase in prevalence associated with disease aggressiveness (5%, 29.2% and 44%, respectively) was observed for TP53 deletion. Interestingly, in five patients mutations were not concomitant with TP53 deletion. Furthermore, longitudinal analysis revealed the acquisition of TP53 mutations in three of nineteen cases analyzed at relapse. Identified variants were mostly missense mutations concentrated in the DNA binding domain, only partly reflecting the pattern globally observed in human cancers. Our data confirm that TP53 mutations are rare in MM at presentation and rather represent a marker of progression, similarly to del(17p); however, their occurrence even in absence of deletions supports the importance of their assessment in patients with PC dyscrasia, in terms of both risk stratification and therapeutic implications.

  10. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is frequently associated with high response rate and superior survival in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias.

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    Zou, Dehui; An, Gang; Zhu, Guoqing; Wang, Jinhong; Shi, Lihui; Meng, Hengxing; Xu, Yan; Sui, Weiwei; Deng, Shuhui; Zhan, Fenghuang; Qiu, Lugui

    2014-03-01

    Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a special phenomenon that occurs during the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The incidence, biological characteristics, and prognostic value of secondary MGUS in patients with MM remain undefined. We proceed with a retrospective systematic review of serum immunofixation electrophoresis studies performed in 438 cases of patients with plasma cell dyscrasias, including 409 cases of newly diagnosed MM and 29 cases of primary plasma cell leukemia. Secondary MGUS was more common in patients with myeloma who had undergone stem cell transplantation than in those who had not (17 [29.8%] of 57 versus 5 [1.4%] of 352, P < .001). The clinical parameters and cytogenetic characteristics in patients with or without secondary MGUS were comparable. The complete response rates in patients with or without secondary MGUS were 81.8% and 21.8% respectively (P < .01). For the cohort as a whole, secondary MGUS was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median, 52.0 months versus 22.5 months; P = .002) and overall survival (median, not reached versus 35.0 months; P < .001). The presence of secondary MGUS retained independent prognostic value with a moderate impact on overall survival (hazard ratio .128 [95% confidence interval .018 to .922]; P = .041) in the multivariate Cox regression model. However, when analysis was restricted to patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, no statistical differences in progression-free survival and overall survival were found. In conclusion, we observe that secondary MGUS was frequently observed in MM patients after transplantation and conferred a survival prolongation. The favorable survival in patients with secondary MGUS may be explained by beneficial effect from myeloablative therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy--POEMS syndrome presenting with vasculitic skin lesions and responding to combination chemotherapy.

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    Sharabi, Y; Raanani, P; Shenkar, A; Thaler, M; Grossman, E

    2000-12-01

    We report a 61-year-old male patient who presented with severe sensorimotor neuropathy, leg edema and skin lesions with M-paraprotein and 50% plasma cells in the bone marrow. The POEMS (Crow-Fukase) syndrome was diagnosed and the skin lesions were compatible with vasculitis according to the histopathology. The patient was treated with aggressive combined chemotherapy, which induced improvement in both the clinical and laboratory parameters of his disease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a vasculitic process underlying the skin changes in the POEMS syndrome. Our findings may shed light on the unknown pathogenesis of this syndrome and the successful results of treatment support the adoption of an aggressive therapeutic approach in symptomatic patients.

  12. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

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    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  13. Differential diagnosis of plasma cell dyscrasias in rheumatological practice

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    V I Vasilyev

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion. Many clinical and laboratory manifestations of primary PCD and RD are similar and only the absence of classical laboratory markers of autoimmune disease, as well as the presence of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins and urinary Bence Jones protein suggest the presence of PCD, both primary PCDs and those with RD.

  14. Differential diagnosis of plasma cell dyscrasias in rheumatological practice

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    V I Vasilyev

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. Many clinical and laboratory manifestations of primary PCD and RD are similar and only the absence of classical laboratory markers of autoimmune disease, as well as the presence of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins and urinary Bence Jones protein suggest the presence of PCD, both primary PCDs and those with RD.

  15. Reduced Intensity Preparative Regimen Followed by Stem Cell Transplant (FAB)

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    2016-03-29

    Myelodysplastic and Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Hematologic Diseases

  16. Primary plasma cell leukemia: A report of two cases of a rare and aggressive variant of plasma cell myeloma with the review of literature

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    Prithal Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma accounting for 2-3% of all plasma cell dyscrasias characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. The diagnosis is based on the % (≥20% and absolute number (≥2x10 9 /L of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. The incidence of primary PCL (pPCL is very rare and reported to occur in <1 in a million. It is classified as either pPCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. pPCL is a distinct clinicopathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. We report two cases of pPCL, both having acute onset of illness, varied clinical presentation with one of them showing "hairy cell morphology," with rapidly progressing renal failure, and was not suspected to be plasma cell dyscrasia clinically. A detailed hematopathological evaluation clinched the diagnosis in this case. It is recommended that techniques such as immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and protein electrophoresis must be performed for confirmatory diagnosis. A detailed report of two cases and a review of PCL are presented here.

  17. Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuritis and dermato-endocrine alterations. Report of a new case outside Japan.

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    Moya-Mir, M. S.; Martin-Martin, F.; Barbadillo, R.; Cuervas-Mons, V.; Martin-Jimenez, T.; Sanchez-Miro, I.; Garcia-Merino, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    A new syndrome has been described comprising polyneuropathy, oedema, hyperpigmentation and thickening of the skin, gynaecomastia in males and amenorrhoea in females, monoclonal gammopathy, papilloedema and diabetes. There is frequent osteosclerosis with or without plasmacytoma, hepatosplenomegaly and polycythaemia. There is a good response to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and occasionally to excision or irradiation of the plasmacytoma. This syndrome was first described in Japan, and is still seen predominantly there, and only occasionally in other areas. An example in a 51-year-old Spanish female is described: she had a spectacular response to prednisone and melphalan. The aetiopathogenic possibilities are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7413545

  18. Leukemias and blood dyscrasias following exposure to chlordane and heptachlor.

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    Epstein, S S; Ozonoff, D

    1987-01-01

    We present 25 new cases of blood dyscrasia, including leukemias, production defects, and thrombocytopenic purpura, generally following home termite treatment with the chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides chlordane and heptachlor (C/H). These newly reported cases are consistent with 34 previously published case reports associating blood dyscrasias with C/H exposure. Additionally, the newly reported leukemias are consistent with epidemiologic evidence of excess risk of leukemia and other cancers in C/H-exposed populations and with the carcinogenic action of C/H in animals. The importance of case reports in warning of the association of blood dyscrasias to C/H exposure is emphasized. Until the voluntary halt in production in July 1987, millions of homes in the United States were treated with chlordane and heptachlor for termites even though their agricultural uses were phased out in 1978, largely on the grounds of "imminent hazard" because of carcinogenicity. In view of the recognized myelotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and other chronic toxic effects of these pesticides, a national program for monitoring all homes treated is urgently needed to detect persistent contamination.

  19. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

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    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  20. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

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    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  1. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis

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    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nadia Aparecida; Netto, Jose Fillus

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  2. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

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    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  3. Whole-exome sequencing of primary plasma cell leukemia discloses heterogeneous mutational patterns.

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    Cifola, Ingrid; Lionetti, Marta; Pinatel, Eva; Todoerti, Katia; Mangano, Eleonora; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Fabris, Sonia; Mosca, Laura; Simeon, Vittorio; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Morabito, Fortunato; Offidani, Massimo; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Falcone, Antonietta; Caravita, Tommaso; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Palumbo, Antonio; Musto, Pellegrino; Neri, Antonino

    2015-07-10

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive form of plasma cell dyscrasia and may represent a valid model for high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). To provide novel information concerning the mutational profile of this disease, we performed the whole-exome sequencing of a prospective series of 12 pPCL cases included in a Phase II multicenter clinical trial and previously characterized at clinical and molecular levels. We identified 1, 928 coding somatic non-silent variants on 1, 643 genes, with a mean of 166 variants per sample, and only few variants and genes recurrent in two or more samples. An excess of C > T transitions and the presence of two main mutational signatures (related to APOBEC over-activity and aging) occurring in different translocation groups were observed. We identified 14 candidate cancer driver genes, mainly involved in cell-matrix adhesion, cell cycle, genome stability, RNA metabolism and protein folding. Furthermore, integration of mutation data with copy number alteration profiles evidenced biallelically disrupted genes with potential tumor suppressor functions. Globally, cadherin/Wnt signaling, extracellular matrix and cell cycle checkpoint resulted the most affected functional pathways. Sequencing results were finally combined with gene expression data to better elucidate the biological relevance of mutated genes. This study represents the first whole-exome sequencing screen of pPCL and evidenced a remarkable genetic heterogeneity of mutational patterns. This may provide a contribution to the comprehension of the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with this aggressive form of PC dyscrasia and potentially with high-risk MM.

  4. Plasma Cell Cheilitis

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    Thami Gurvinder P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plasma cell cheilitis with good response to glucocorticoids, is described for its rarity and probable aetiological correlation with habit of use of nasal snuff is discussed.

  5. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  6. Plasma Cell Disorders.

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    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of bone marrow plasma cell infiltrates in multiple myeloma: the added value of CD138 immunohistochemistry.

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    Al-Quran, Samer Z; Yang, Lijun; Magill, James M; Braylan, Raul C; Douglas-Nikitin, Vonda K

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of bone marrow involvement by malignant plasma cells is an important element in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias. Microscope-based differential counts of bone marrow aspirates are used as the primary method to evaluate bone marrow plasma cell percentages. However, multiple myeloma is often a focal process, a fact that impacts the accuracy and reliability of the results of bone marrow plasma cell percentages obtained by differential counts of bone marrow aspirate smears. Moreover, the interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of counting bone marrow plasma cells microscopically has not been adequately tested. CD138 allows excellent assessment of plasma cell numbers and distribution in bone marrow biopsies. We compared estimates of plasma cell percentages in bone marrow aspirates and in hematoxylin-eosin- and CD138-stained bone marrow biopsy sections (CD138 sections) in 79 bone marrows from patients with multiple myeloma. There was a notable discrepancy in bone marrow plasma cell percentages using the different methods of observation. In particular, there was a relatively poor concordance of plasma cell percentage estimation between aspirate smears and CD138 sections. Estimates of plasma cell percentage using CD138 sections demonstrated the highest interobserver concordance. This observation was supported by computer-assisted image analysis. In addition, CD138 expression highlighted patterns of plasma cell infiltration indicative of neoplasia even in the absence of plasmacytosis. We conclude that examination of CD138 sections should be considered for routine use in the estimation of plasma cell load in the bone marrow.

  8. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

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    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  9. [History of scrofula: from humoral dyscrasia to consumption].

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    Duarte G, Ignacio; Chuaqui F, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The term “scrofula” was used for a long time to designate a chronic swelling of cervical lymph nodes. This paper outlines the prevalent ideas on the nature, pathogenesis and the treatment of this disorder, from classical Greek medicine up to the 18th century. A Hippocratic treatise regarded scrofula as produced by an accumulation of phlegm, with a consequent imbalance or dyscrasia of the body humors. It was believed that it could heal spontaneously; but it could also soften, open through the skin and have an obstinate course. The treatment consisted mainly on local applications, incision to evacuate the soft content, or extirpation of the abnormal mass. In France and England, crowds of scrofulous patients were touched by the kings who were supposed to have a hereditary miraculous power to cure the disease. A Medieval text mentioned that scrofula could also affect other parts of the body. In the 17th century, scrofula was reputed as a frequent condition and was attributed to blood acrimony which coagulated in spongy organs. It was associated to phthisis or consumption due to the lethal outcome in some patients and to a cheese-like appearance of the pulmonary and the scrofulous lesions.

  10. Plasma cell granuloma of lip

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    B Sabarinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are medium-sized round-to-oval cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, usually found in the red pulp of the spleen, tonsils, medulla of the lymph nodes, nasal mucosa, upper airway, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and sites of inflammation. Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive tumor-like proliferation composed chiefly of plasmacytic infiltrate. Here, we present a case of plasma cell granuloma of lip in a female patient.

  11. Plasma cell granuloma of gingiva

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    Balaji Manohar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion characterized by the infiltration of plasma cells; primarily occurring in the lungs. It is also seen to occur in the brain, kidney stomach, heart, and so on. In the intraoral region it is seen to involve the tongue, oral mucosa, and gingiva. This case presents a 42-year-old female, with an enlargement in the maxillary anterior region, treated by excisional biopsy. Histological evaluation revealed plasma cell infiltrates in the connective tissue. The immunohistochemistry revealed kappa and lambda light chains with a polyclonal staining pattern, which confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  12. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  13. Can we prevent blood dyscrasia (leucopenia, thrombocytopenia) and epileptic seizures induced by clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Miroslav; Muzinić, Lana; Jukić, Vlado

    2010-03-01

    Clozapine is associated with various haematological adverse effects, including leukopenia, neutropenia, agarnulocytosis, leukocytosis, anaemia, eosinophilia, thrombocytopenia and thrombocythaemia. Recognition and treatment of clozapine-related seizures also will become increasingly important as clozapine use grows in the 1990s. The decision to stop clozapine as a result of haematological adverse effects or seizures is a frustrating one for the clinician, and frequently disastrous for the patient. Cessation of treatment results in relapse. In case that patient is unresponsive to other antipsychotic, restarting clozapine should be consider, despite the risk involved. As the risk of a second agranulocytosis is much higher in those patients, various methods of militating against repeat blood dyscrasias have been treated, including granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and lithium. The decision to restart clozapine should be taken on case-by-case basis and should take into account the likely risks and benefits of restarting. Prior response to clozapine and magnitude of patient deterioration on stopping treatment are important factors to take into this consideration. Clozapine-related seizures did not preclude successful treatment with clozapine. A strategy that has been proposed to reduce the occurrence of seizures is the addition of an anticonvulsant agent. However, clozapine does induce a variety of adverse effects, most of which are of limited duration and either preventable or manageable if a number of simple clinical procedures are followed. With careful haematologyc control, the risk of agranulocytosis can be minimized and in case of clozapine related seizures recommendations include dose reduction, electroencephalogram (EEG), plasma-level monitoring and prophylactic antiepileptic treatment. Re-exposure to clozapine may rarely be attempted where there are facilities for very close and frequent monitoring.

  14. Bone morphogenic protein 6: a member of a novel class of prognostic factors expressed by normal and malignant plasma cells inhibiting proliferation and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, Anja; Meissner, Tobias; Moreaux, Jérôme; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Benner, Axel; Hundemer, Michael; Rème, Thierry; Shaughnessy, John D.; Barlogie, Bart; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Ho, Anthony D.; Pantesco, Véronique; Jauch, Anna; De Vos, John; Rossi, Jean-François; Möhler, Thomas; Klein, Bernard; Hose, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pathogenesis of multiple myeloma is associated with an aberrant expression of pro-proliferative, pro-angiogenic and bone-metabolism modifying factors by malignant plasma cells. Given the frequently long time-span from diagnosis of early-stage plasma cell dyscrasias to overt myeloma and the mostly low proliferation rate of malignant plasma cells, we hypothesize these likewise to express a novel class of inhibitory factors of potential prognostic relevance. Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) represent possible candidates as they inhibit proliferation, stimulate bone formation, and have impact on the survival of cancer patients. We assessed expression of BMPs and their receptors by Affymetrix DNA-microarrays (n=779) including CD138-purified primary myeloma cell samples (n=635) of previously untreated patients. BMP6 is the only BMP expressed by malignant and normal plasma cells. Its expression is significantly lower in proliferating myeloma cells, myeloma cell lines, or plasmablasts. BMP6 significantly inhibits proliferation of myeloma cell lines, survival of primary myeloma cells, and in vitro angiogenesis. High BMP6-expression in primary myeloma cell samples delineates significantly superior overall survival for patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy independent of conventional prognostic factors (ISS-stage, beta-2-microglobulin). PMID:19718049

  15. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  16. Prevalence of Oral and Craniofacial Manifestations of Hematological Dyscrasias at Shiraz Nemazee Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janan Ghapanchi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematological disorders may present with a number of non-specific orofacial manifestations that must be diagnosed and referred to specialists for treatment. Since the orofacial manifestations can be the first clinical presentation which indicates the presence of an underlying disease, it is important for dentists to be aware of these manifestations. The present study aims to evaluate the orofacial presentations of some hematological diseases in order to familiarize dentists with these manifestations. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study evaluated the oral conditions of patients recently hospitalized with histories of blood dyscrasia and bone marrow transplantation in Shiraz Nemazee Hospital during 2010-2011. From 50 patients, there were 33 (66% males and 17 (34% females. The age of participants ranged from 12-77 years of age. Results: Examined patients had the following manifestations: head and neck region lymphadenopathy (42%, hairy tongue, atrophy of the oral mucosa, ulcers, red and white lesions, Candida albicans infection and gingival lesions that included spontaneous gingival bleeding, gingival hypertrophy and ecchymosis, in addition to diffuse herpetic infections on the buccal mucosa and bony lesions. The most common blood dyscrasia in the study patients was acute myeloid leukemia (AML (48%. Our findings determined that lymphadenopathy (42% was the most common orofacial manifestation of hematological diseases. Conclusion:On occasion, dentists maybe the first medical professional to encounter hematological diseases. Since early detection of these disorders can increase patient survival, it is necessary for dentists to become completely familiar with these oral manifestations.

  17. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  18. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  19. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  20. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  1. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  3. CD229 is expressed on the surface of plasma cells carrying an aberrant phenotype and chemotherapy-resistant precursor cells in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Sara; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Salama, Mohamed E; Bhardwaj, Neelam; Steinbach, Mary; Langemo, Amanda; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Marvin, James; Binder, Mascha; Panse, Jens; Kröger, Nicolaus; Luetkens, Tim; Atanackovic, Djordje

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell (PC) malignancy, which despite significant therapeutic advances, is still considered incurable. This is due to the persistence of chemotherapy-resistant minimal residual disease in the patients' bone marrow (BM) after an effective induction therapy. Immunotherapies targeting surface molecules expressed on the bulk of tumor cells and the chemotherapy-resistant, myeloma-propagating cells could play a central role in this clinical setting. We recently described surface molecule CD229 as a potential therapeutic target for MM. In our current study we assessed the expression of CD229 on different PC subtypes and on cells with a myeloma-propagating phenotype in a total of 77 patients with PC dyscrasias independently at 2 different cancer centers. We found that CD229 was strongly and homogeneously overexpressed on the PC of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma, MM, and PC leukemia. CD229 was particularly overexpressed on those PC showing an abnormal phenotype such as expression of CD56. Most importantly, CD229 was also highly expressed on those cells in the patients' BM displaying the phenotype of chemotherapy-resistant and myeloma-propagating cells. In conclusion, our combined findings suggest that immunotherapies targeting CD229 will not only be effective for the bulk of tumor cells but will also help to eradicate chemotherapy-resistant cells remaining in the patients' BM after induction treatment. Hopefully, the design of CD229-specific monoclonal antibodies or chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells will help to achieve prolonged remissions or even cures in MM patients.

  4. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  5. Selecting B cells and plasma cells to memory

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Humoral immunity appears to be based on immunological memory provided by memory plasma cells, which secrete protective antibodies, and memory B cells, which react to antigen challenge by differentiating into plasma cells. How these differentiation pathways relate to each other, how cells are selected into these memory populations, and how these populations are maintained remains enigmatic.

  6. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carboni, Rodrigo; Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their ow...

  7. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  8. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  9. Plasma Cells For Hire: Prior Experience Required

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Activation of IgG+ memory B cells accounts for much of the antibodies in secondary immune responses. Here, Khometani et al. (2013) demonstrate that reduced amounts of Bach2 in antigen-experienced memory B cells control the robust production of IgG1+ plasma cells.

  10. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    OpenAIRE

    Elidiane C. Rangel; Souza,Eduardo S. de; Francine S. de Moraes; Eliana A. R. Duek; Carolina Lucchesi; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P-Ar, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchang...

  11. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their own movies in MPEG format. The programs were written in Fortran and C. There are two versions of the program (GNUPLOT and OpenGL). GNUPLOT and OpenGL are used to display the simulation.

  12. Lenalidomide enhances antigen-specific activity and decreases CD45RA expression of T cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, Brigitte; Herth, Isabelle; Tolliver, Claudia; Schoenland, Stefan; Hegenbart, Ute; Hose, Dirk; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the specific T cell response against the multiple myeloma Ag HM1.24 is enhanced by the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide (Revlimid). Ag-specific CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells against the HM1.24 Ag were expanded in vitro by dendritic cells in 29 healthy donors and 26 patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. Ag-specific activation was analyzed by IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin secretion using ELISA, ELISPOT assay, and intracellular staining, and generation of Ag-specific T cells was analyzed by tetramer staining. Expression of T cell maturation markers (CD45RA, CD45R0, CCR7, and CD28) was investigated by flow cytometry. We found that activation of HM1.24-specific T cells from healthy donors and patients with plasma cell dyscrasias was enhanced significantly by lenalidomide and furthermore that the impact of lenalidomide on T cells depends on the duration of the exposure. Notably, lenalidomide supports the downregulation of CD45RA on T cells upon activation, observed in healthy donors and in patients in vitro and also in patients during lenalidomide therapy in vivo. We showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that lenalidomide enhances the Ag-specific activation of T cells and the subsequent downregulation of CD45RA expression of T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  13. 重视浆细胞疾病的临床研究%Pay attention to the clinical study of plasma cell disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈世伦

    2009-01-01

    浆细胞病(包括多发性骨髓瘤、意义未明的单克隆免疫球蛋白血症、华氏巨球蛋白血症、淀粉样变性、POEMS综合征等)是血液系统常见的恶性疾病,发病率逐年增高.深入地研究该病的临床过程,制订合理的治疗方法 是延长患者生存期,改善预后的重要途径.%Plasma cell dyscrasia including multiple myeloma, monoelonal gammopathy of undetermined significance(MGUS), Waldenstrom s macroglobulinemia, amyloidosis and POEMS syndrome is a common malignant disease of hematological system and its incidence is increased by year. Deeply study the clinical process of this kind of disease and make reasonable therapies is an important approach for extending the life span and improving the prognosis of patients.

  14. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  15. Cytology of plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhait, Debasis; Dey, Pranab; Verma, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma resulting in malignant effusion is rarely described in literature. Aims: In this paper, we have studied the seven rare cases of plasma cell infiltration in effusion fluid. Materials and Methods: We studied six cases of pleural fluid and one case of ascetic fluid. Detailed cytological features, clinical history, bone marrow examinations, serum electrophoresis, and immunofixation data were analyzed. Result: There were two cases of plasmacytoma, four cases of multiple myeloma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. On cytology, all the cases showed excess plasma cells along with mesothelial cells and lymphocytes on effusion cytology smear. Conclusion: Plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell tumor is rare. However, on cytology these cases do not pose much problem if relevant history is known.

  16. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  17. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  18. High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with POEMS syndrome: a retrospective study of the Plasma Cell Disorder sub-committee of the Chronic Malignancy Working Party of the European Society for Blood & Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gordon; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Ziagkos, Dimitris; LeBlond, Veronique; Abraham, Julie; McQuaker, Grant; Schoenland, Stefan; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Halaburda, Kazimierz; Rovira, Maria; Sica, Simona; Byrne, Jenny; Sanz, Ramon Garcia; Nagler, Arnon; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Sinisalo, Marjatta; Cook, Mark; Kröger, Nicolaus; De Witte, Theo; Morris, Curly; Garderet, Laurant

    2017-01-01

    POEMS syndrome is a rare para-neoplastic syndrome secondary to a plasma cell dyscrasia. Effective treatment can control the disease-related symptom complex. We describe the clinical outcome of autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with POEMS syndrome, determining the impact of patient- and disease-specific factors on prognosis. One hundred and twenty-seven patients underwent an autologous stem cell transplantation between 1997–2010 with a median age of 50 years (range 26–69 years). Median time from diagnosis to autologous stem cell transplantation was 7.5 months with 32% of patients receiving an autologous stem cell transplantation more than 12 months from diagnosis. Engraftment was seen in 97% patients and engraftment syndrome was documented in 23% of autologous stem cell transplantation recipients. Hematologic response was characterized as complete response in 48.5%, partial response in 20.8%, less than partial repsonse in 30.7%. With a median follow up of 48 months (95%CI: 38.3, 58.6), 90% of patients are alive and 16.5% of patients have progressed. The 1-year non-relapse mortality was 3.3%. The 3-year probabilities of progression-free survival and overall survival are 84% and 94%, respectively, with 5-year probabilities of progression-free survival and overall survival of 74% and 89%. In a cohort of graft recipients, detailed organ-specific symptom response demonstrated clear symptom benefit after autologous stem cell transplantation especially in relation to neurological symptom control. The data analyzed in this study demonstrate the clinical utility of autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with POEMS syndrome. PMID:27634201

  19. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  20. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally, comp

  1. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  2. Cyberknife radiosurgery for cranial plasma cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafaci, Cetty; Grasso, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Caffo, Mariella; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Tomasello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cranial and intracranial involvement by myelomatous disease is relatively uncommon. Furthermore, systemic manifestations of multiple myeloma are present in the majority of these cases at the time of symptom onset. The authors report the case of a patient with serial appearance of multiple intracranial plasma cell tumor localizations as the first manifestations of a multiple myeloma. The patient was treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery for a lesion localized at the clivus and sella turcica with complete local control. With such a technique, based on high-dose conformality, the tumor was centered with an ablative dose of radiation and, at the same time, with a low dose spreading to the surrounding critical structures. The radiosensitivity of plasma cell tumors renders this treatment modality particularly advantageous for their localized manifestation. A technical description of this case is provided. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful Cyberknife radiosurgery of multifocal intracranial plasmacytoma.

  3. Human plasma cells express granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Narayanan, Priya; Kang, Ning; Clayton, Sandra; Ohne, Yoichiro; Shi, Peiqing; Herve, Marie-Cecile; Balderas, Robert; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oh, Sangkon; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    While studying the plasma cell (PC) compartment in human tonsils, we identified that immunoglobulin kappa or lambda chain-expressing PCs are the main cells expressing granzyme B (GrzB). In vitro studies revealed that activated B cells differentiated into GrzB-expressing PCs when co-cultured with macrophages and follicular helper T cells. This effect could be reproduced on combined stimulation of IL-15 (produced by macrophages) and IL-21 (produced by T follicular helper cells) in a STAT3-dependent manner. Whereas IL-21 triggers the transcription of mRNA of GrzB, IL-15 synergizes the translation of GrzB proteins. The precise role of GrzB in PC biology remains to be understood and studies in mice will not help as their PCs do not express GrzB.

  4. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways.

  5. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  6. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane C. Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  7. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  8. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  9. Localized Castleman disease of plasma cell type in the abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhi-hua; WU Mei

    2011-01-01

    Castleman disease is a relatively rare entity,with the hyaline-vascular type the predominant form.Although the plasma cell type is uncommon,it still comprises approximately 10% of cases of localized diseases.In addition,the abdomen is a rare site for involvement and localized Castleman disease of the plasma cell type in the abdomen is rare.The radiologic features of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen are mostly limited to case reports.In addition to the conventional imaging findings,we present some new imaging findings of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen.

  10. Plasmoacanthoma of oral cavity and plasma cell cheilitis: two sides of same disorder “oral plasma cell mucositis” ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Khatri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmoacanthoma and plasma cell cheilitis are rare disorders of obscure etiology characterized by a plasma cell infiltrate an 80-year-old woman presented with a verrucous, fleshy, skin colored plaque over lips, gingiva, and the palate and painful swallowing for over a period of 6 months. Histopathology of the lesion showed dense infiltrate of plasma cells. The lesions resolved completely after intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. Another 52-year-old male had progressively enlarging, erosive lesion over vermilion border of lower lip for 6months resembling actinic cheilitis. Histology was diagnostic of plasma cell cheilitis. Treatment with topical clobetasol propionate was effective. Plasma cell cheilitis and plasmoacanthoma perhaps represent a spectrum of oral ”plasma cell mucositis” with plasmoacanthoma being an advanced version of the former.

  11. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  12. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Egan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder.

  13. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  14. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC. The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of plasma treatment on cell adhesion and viability was evaluated with cell viability assay (MTT assay. The results showed the highest metabolic activity of HUVEC on PCL samples treated with O2 and NH3 plasma. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphology on O2 and NH3 plasma-treated PCL samples already at 3 h. Moreover, treatment with O2 and NH3 plasma even stimulated endothelial cell proliferation on PCL surfaces by 60% as measured at 24 h, showing significant improvement in endothelialization of this material. Contrarily, SO2 plasma appeared to be less promising in comparison with O2 and NH3 plasma; however, it was still better than without any plasma treatment. Thus, our results importantly contribute to the biocompatibility improvement of the PCL polymer, commonly used for scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  15. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  16. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  17. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  18. Evolution of Externally Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma, and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally in the `scrape-off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface ionization. Its interaction...

  19. Awakening acceleration: AWAKE’s plasma cell arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Productions Service; Paola Catapano; Jacques Fichet; Paola Catapano

    2016-01-01

    Interview with Edda Gschwendtner, project leader of the AWAKE collaboration, on the day the AWAKE's plasma cell is transported from the surface hall were it was tested (EHN1 on CERN Prevessin) to the AWAKE tunnel in CERN's SPS decay tunnel. The Plasma Cell was built by the Max Planck Institute in Munich.

  20. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  1. Plasma-cell-predominant B-cell pseudolymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervi, Stephen J; Schwartz, R A

    2008-10-15

    A 46-year-old woman with no history of foreign travel presented to the New Jersey Medical School Dermatology Clinic in July, 2007, with pruritic ulcerating facial masses that had been present since October, 2006. Clinical and histopathologic findings were most consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasma cell predominant B cell pseudolymphoma. An extensive search using special stains for an etiologic organism was negative. The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma has been coined to describe the accumulation of either T or B cell lymphocytes in the skin that is caused by a nonmalignant stimulus and encompasses several different terms depending on etiology. In cases of cutaneous pseudolymphoma where a cause is identified, treatment entails removing the underlying causative agent. Idiopathic cases tend to be recalcitrant to treatment.

  2. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  3. Immunophenotype of normal and myelomatous plasma cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eRobillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cells are essentially characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood or cell suspensions from tissues. These terminally differentiated B-cells may lose the expression of surface CD19 and that of CD20 while retaining CD27. When malignant, they can gain a number of other markers such as CD28, CD33, CD56 or CD117 and lose CD27. Moreover, since each plasma cell is only able to produce a single type of immunoglobulins, they display isotypic restriction and clonal malignant plasma cells can be further characterized by their homogeneous expression of either kappa or lambda light chains. In multiple myeloma (MM, such plasma cell clones produce the immunoglobulin identified in plasma as an abnormal peak. In the bone marrow where they essentially accumulate, these plasma cells may however display various immunophenotypes. The latter were explored in a two-way approach. Firstly the various subsets delineated by the selective or common expression of CD19 together with combined CD56/CD28 were explored in normal and MM bone marrow. Then other aberrant markers’ expression was investigated, i.e. CD20, CD27, CD33, CD56, CD117. These data were compared to literature information. They underline the vast heterogeneity of MM plasma cells possibly accounting for the various answers to therapy of MM patients.

  4. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  5. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  6. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  7. Interleukin-24 inhibits the plasma cell differentiation program in human germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarof, Ghyath; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Gary-Gouy, Hélène; Durand-Gasselin, Ingrid; Krzysiek, Roman; Dalloul, Ali

    2010-03-04

    Complex molecular mechanisms control B-cell fate to become a memory or a plasma cell. Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a class II family cytokine of poorly understood immune function that regulates the cell cycle. We previously observed that IL-24 is strongly expressed in leukemic memory-type B cells. Here we show that IL-24 is also expressed in human follicular B cells; it is more abundant in CD27(+) memory B cells and CD5-expressing B cells, whereas it is low to undetectable in centroblasts and plasma cells. Addition of IL-24 to B cells, cultured in conditions shown to promote plasma cell differentiation, strongly inhibited plasma cell generation and immunoglobulin G (IgG) production. By contrast, IL-24 siRNA increased terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. IL-24 is optimally induced by BCR triggering and CD40 engagement; IL-24 increased CD40-induced B-cell proliferation and modulated the transcription of key factors involved in plasma cell differentiation. It also inhibited activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and inhibited the transcription of IL-10. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-24 is a novel cytokine involved in T-dependent antigen (Ag)-driven B-cell differentiation and suggest its physiologic role in favoring germinal center B-cell maturation in memory B cells at the expense of plasma cells.

  8. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic characteristics of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kruk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to define the flow cytometric characteristics of simultaneously investigated bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma cells antigens expression in 36 plasma cell leukemia (PCL patients. The immunophenotypic profile of plasma cells was determined with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The antigen expression intensity was calculated as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI. Bone marrow plasma cells showed expression of particular antigens in the following proportion of cases: CD49d 100%, CD29 94%, CD54 93%, CD44 83%, CD56 60%, CD18 26%, CD11b 29%, CD11a 19%, CD117 27%, CD71 30%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%, while the expression of those antigens on peripheral blood plasma cells was present in the following percentage of patients: CD49d 100%, CD29 96%, CD54 93%, CD44 95%, CD56 56%, CD18 50%, CD11b 53%, CD11a 29%, CD117 26%, CD71 28%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%. The expression of CD54 was significantly higher than that of adhesion molecules belonging to the integrin b2 family: CD11a, CD18 and CD11b, on both bone marrow and peripheral blood cells (p < 0.01. Expression of CD18, CD11a and CD11b was differential between two cell compartments: lower on bone marrow and higher on peripheral blood cells. We found that plasma cells in the bone marrow of patients with plasma cell leukaemia showed significantly greater granularity and size than those in the peripheral blood (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.04, respectively. However, no differences in cell size or granularity were revealed between bone marrow plasma cells from patients with PCL and multiple myeloma. In conclusion, impaired expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1 or CD56 may explain hematogenic dissemination characterizing PCL. The following pattern of adhesion molecule expression according to the proportion of plasma cells expressing a given antigen in peripheral blood and bone marrow and arranged in diminishing order may be established: CD49d > CD44 > CD54

  9. AWAKE’s plasma cell arrives at its destination

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by a proton beam in a plasma cell, the AWAKE project aims to produce accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current machines. Far from being just a dream, the AWAKE tunnel is progressively being filled with its vital components. This week, the plasma cell has been moved to its final position.   AWAKE's 10-metre-long plasma cell in the experiment tunnel. The proof-of-principle AWAKE experiment is being installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driven with protons and that its acceleration will be extremely powerful, hundreds of times more powe...

  10. Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells are separated into apical and basolateral domains. The apical domain is usually modified into microvilli with a molecular structure similar to other animals. Nevertheless, the microvillar structure should differ in some insects to permit the traffic inside them of secretory vesicles that may budd laterally or pinch-off from the tips of microvilli. Other microvillar modifications are associated with proton-pumping or with the interplay with an ensheathing lipid membrane (the perimicrovilllar membrane observed in the midgut cells of hemipterans (aphids and bugs. The perimicrovillar membranes are thought to be involved in amino acid absorption from diluted diets. The microvillar and perimicrovillar membranes have densities (and protein content that depend on the insect taxon. The role played by the microvillar and perimicrovillar proteins in insect midgut physiology is reviewed here trying to provide a coherent picture of data and highlighting further research areas.As membranas plasmáticas das células intestinais dos insetos apresentam um domínio apical e outro basal. O domínio apical é geralmente modificado em microvilosidades com organização molecular similar a de outros animais, embora possam diferir naqueles insetos que apresentam vesículas secretoras em trânsito que brotam lateralmente ou destacam-se das extremidades das microvilosidades. Outras modificações microvilares estão associadas a bombeamento de prótons ou a interrelações com uma membrana lipídica (a membrana perimicrovilar que reveste as microvilosidades de células intestinais de hemípteros (pulgões e percevejos. Admite-se que as membranas perimicrovilares estejam envolvidas na absorção de aminoácidos a partir de dietas diluídas. As membranas microvilares e perimicrovilares tem densidades distintas (e conteúdo protéico que dependem do táxon do inseto. O papel desempenhado pelas proteínas microvilares e

  11. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  13. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  14. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  15. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Savelyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs’ fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  16. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  17. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  18. CD27-triggering on primary plasma cell leukaemia cells has anti-apoptotic effects involving mitogen activated protein kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Abdulahad, WH; Hovenga, S; Bos, NA

    2004-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) is a rare plasma cell malignancy, which is related to multiple myeloma (MM) and is characterized by a poor prognosis. In a previous study we demonstrated that PCL plasma cells display a high expression of CD27, in contrast to MM plasma cells. The present study was

  19. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  20. B cells and plasma cells in coronaries of chronically rejected cardiac transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jennifer R; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Halushka, Marc K; Ellis, Carla; Zachary, Andrea A; Baldwin, William M

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Previously, we reported that transcripts of immunoglobulins were increased in coronary arteries dissected from cardiac transplants with arteriopathy, but the prevelance and patterns of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in cardiac allografts has not been documented. METHODS.: In this study, we documented the frequency and distribution of B cells and plasma cells in 16 cardiac transplants with advanced chronic rejection that were explanted during a second transplant procedure. Coronary arteries with pathologically confirmed allograft vasculopathy and controls with native atherosclerosis were immunohistologically stained for markers of T cells, B cells, plasma cells, IgG subclasses, C4d, CD21, and CXCL13. RESULTS.: We found that B cells and plasma cells were prevalent in most of the samples analyzed (14 of 16) and were distributed in three patterns: adventitial nodules, diffuse adventitial infiltrates, and neointimal infiltrates. These cells were found most frequently in nodules, some of which had distinct compartmentalization and granular C4d deposits on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) that typify tertiary lymphoid nodules. FDCs also stained for CD21 and CXCL13. Diffuse infiltrates of B cells and plasma cells were found in fibrotic areas of the neointima and adventitia. Only a minority of control coronaries with atherosclerosis contained B cells. CONCLUSIONS.: B cells and plasma cell infiltrates are consistent findings in and around coronary arteries with allograft vasculopathy and are significantly more frequent than in coronaries with native atherosclerosis. The presence of C4d on FDCs in tertiary lymphoid nodules suggests active antigen presentation.

  1. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  2. CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells but not B cells in some multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, N; Matsuoka, Y; Kishida, S; Nakata, J; Mizutani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Mugitani, A; Ichihara, H; Aoyama, Y; Nishida, S; Tsuboi, A; Fujiki, F; Tatsumi, N; Nakajima, H; Hino, M; Kimura, T; Yata, K; Abe, M; Oka, Y; Oji, Y; Kumanogoh, A; Sugiyama, H

    2012-09-01

    Clonogenic multiple myeloma (MM) cells reportedly lacked expression of plasma cell marker CD138. It was also shown that CD19(+) clonotypic B cells can serve as MM progenitor cells in some patients. However, it is unclear whether CD138-negative clonogenic MM plasma cells are identical to clonotypic CD19(+) B cells. We found that in vitro MM colony-forming cells were enriched in CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells, while CD19(+) B cells never formed MM colonies in 16 samples examined in this study. We next used the SCID-rab model, which enables engraftment of human MM in vivo. CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells engrafted in this model rapidly propagated MM in 3 out of 9 cases, while no engraftment of CD19(+) B cells was detected. In 4 out of 9 cases, CD138(+) plasma cells propagated MM, although more slowly than CD138(-) cells. Finally, we transplanted CD19(+) B cells from 13 MM patients into NOD/SCID IL2Rγc(-/-) mice, but MM did not develop. These results suggest that at least in some MM patients CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells rather than B cells, and that MM plasma cells including CD138(-) and CD138(+) cells have the potential to propagate MM clones in vivo in the absence of CD19(+) B cells.

  3. Effects of Nonequilibrium Plasmas on Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    with cellulosic plates under their cell membrane, the diatom C. hystrix has a siliceous cell wall and organic layer, while A. sanguinea is an...unarmored (naked) dinoflagellate, i.e. without the cellulosic plates (see SEM micrographs below). Some non-motile cells recovered their motility and...formed a somewhat reticulate or porous structure as a cell covering. In the A. sanguinea sample where pH was adjusted to 3.0 (corresponds to the pH

  4. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  5. Plasma cell gingivitis associated with cheilitis: A diagnostic dilemma!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presanthila Janam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare condition characterized by diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial connective tissue. Clinically, it appears as a diffuse reddening and edematous swelling of the gingiva with a sharp demarcation along the mucogingival border. Though considered as a hypersensitive reaction to an allergen, the etiology of this bizarre condition is still not properly understood. Here, we present an interesting case of plasma cell gingivitis associated with an enlarged and fissured upper lip, which is quite a rarity. The condition was diagnosed based on clinical and histopathologic findings and treated by gingivectomy. The associated cheilitis has dramatically reduced after treatment of the gingival lesion.

  6. Intrinsic Constraint on Plasmablast Growth and Extrinsic Limits of Plasma Cell Survival

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    B cells recruited into splenic antibody responses grow exponentially, either in extrafollicular foci as plasmablasts, or in follicles where they form germinal centers. Both responses yield plasma cells. Although many splenic plasma cells survive

  7. Compromiso pleural en la leucemia de células plasmáticas: Reporte de un caso Pleural effusion in plasma cell leukemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE YÁÑEZ V

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El mieloma múltiple es una neoplasia maligna de células plasmáticas que invade la médula ósea y otros tejidos. Las manifestaciones extramedulares son relativamente raras. El derrame pleural en el mieloma múltiple es poco frecuente (6% de los casos, y el derrame pleural neoplásico es extremadamente raro. La leucemia de células plasmáticas, que se produce de novo o en pacientes con mieloma múltiple, es la variedad menos común de discrasia de células plasmáticas. Los autores describen el cuadro clínico de un paciente de 63 años con leucemia de células plasmáticas, donde la primera manifestación de la enfermedad fue una neumonía neumocócica bacteriémica asociado a un derrame pleural contralateral, que correspondió a un exudado predominio mononuclear. El examen citológico reveló abundantes células plasmáticas inmaduras en el líquido pleural y la sangre periférica. El derrame pleural desapareció después del primer ciclo de quimioterapia (vincristina, adriamicina, dexametasona. Después de tres meses de remisión, la enfermedad neoplásica recidivó, siendo el paciente sometido a trasplante autólogo de médula ósea. El paciente se ha mantenido en remisión completa un año después del diagnóstico. El derrame pleural es una complicación poco común, pero importante, del mieloma múltiple y no necesariamente conlleva un mal pronóstico.Multiple myeloma is a low malignant, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow by clonal proliferation of atypical plasma cells. Extramedullary manifestations are relatively rare. Serous effusions in multiple myeloma are uncommon (6% of cases but a myelomatous pleural effusion occurring in these patients is extremely rare. Plasma cell leukemia, occurring either de novo or in patients with long standing multiple myeloma, is the least common type of plasma cell dyscrasia. The authors describe the course of plasmacellular leukemia in a 63-year-old male

  8. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  9. Disturbed B cell subpopulations and increased plasma cells in myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Siegfried; Keil, Thomas Oskar Philipp; Swierzy, Marc; Hoffmann, Sarah; Schaffert, Hanne; Ismail, Mahmoud; Rückert, Jens Carsten; Alexander, Tobias; Hiepe, Falk; Gross, Christian; Thiel, Andreas; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-11-15

    Whether there is a general perturbation of B and plasma cell subsets in myasthenia gravis (MG) has not been investigated so far. Here we performed a detailed flow cytometric analysis of blood and if available thymic tissue in order to detect MG-specific and therapy-induced changes. We observed significant differences in the distribution of B cell subsets in MG patients, yet these were mainly attributable to medical treatment. Furthermore MG is associated with significantly increased frequencies of plasma cells that were especially activated in purely ocular disease manifestation. In contrast to thymoma, B cell subset distribution in hyperplastic thymus could be distinguished from peripheral blood, however both tissues were not significantly enriched with plasma cells. Thus B cell differentiation in general is not defective in MG, but modified by therapy and enhanced frequencies of plasma cells can be detected in MG patients.

  10. Novel recurrent chromosomal aberrations detected in clonal plasma cells of light chain amyloidosis patients show potential adverse prognostic effect: first results from a genome-wide copy number array analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Bochtler, Tilmann; Hemminki, Kari; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Schönland, Stefan O; Jauch, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a rare plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by the deposition of abnormal amyloid fibrils in multiple organs, thus impairing their function. In the largest cohort studied up to now of 118 CD138-purified plasma cell samples from previously untreated immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis patients, we assessed in parallel copy number alterations using high-density copy number arrays and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH). We used fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the IgH translocations t(11;14), t(4;14), and t(14;16) or any other IgH rearrangement as well as numerical aberrations of the chromosome loci 1q21, 8p21, 5p15/5q35, 11q22.3 or 11q23, 13q14, 15q22, 17p13, and 19q13. Recurrent gains included chromosomes 1q (36%), 9 (24%), 11q (24%), as well as 19 (15%). Recurrent losses affected chromosome 13 (29% monosomy) and partial losses of 14q (19%), 16q (14%) and 13q (12%), respectively. In 88% of patients with translocation t(11;14), the hallmark chromosomal aberration in AL amyloidosis, a concomitant gain of 11q22.3/11q23 detected by iFISH was part of the unbalanced translocation der(14)t(11;14)(q13;q32) with the breakpoint in the CCND1/MYEOV gene region. Partial loss of chromosome regions 14q and 16q were significantly associated to gain 1q. Gain 1q21 detected by iFISH almost always resulted from a gain of the long arm of chromosome 1 and not from trisomy 1, whereas deletions on chromosome 1p were rarely found. Overall and event-free survival analysis found a potential adverse prognostic effect of concomitant gain 1q and deletion 14q as well as of deletion 1p. In conclusion, in the first whole genome report of clonal plasma cells in AL amyloidosis, novel aberrations and hitherto unknown potential adverse prognostic effects were uncovered. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  11. Shorter Course Tacro After NMA, Related Donor PBSCT With High-dose Posttransplant Cy for Hard-to-Engraft Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Essential Thrombocythemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia

  12. Long-lived plasma cells in autoimmunity: lessons from B-cell depleting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2013-12-27

    A large number of auto-immune diseases are treated with rituximab, an antibody against CD20 that depletes most of the B-cells in the organism. The response to this treatment depends largely on the disease and the type of lymphoid cells involved in the auto-immune process. We recently reported that B-cell depletion in immune thrombocytopenia induced the appearance of pathogenic long-lived plasma cells in the spleen, which were not present before treatment or in non-auto-immune conditions. The spleen of treated patients produced an excess of the cytokine B-cell activating factor, which in in vitro-cultured splenic cells, could increase the longevity of plasma cells. Our results suggested that, paradoxically, the B-cell depletion itself, by altering the splenic milieu, promoted the differentiation of short-lived auto-immune plasma cells into long-lived ones. We describe the cellular and cytokinic components of the splenic plasma cell niche, notably CD4(+) T cells and discuss possible survival factors that could be targeted simultaneously with rituximab-mediated B-cell depletion to interfere with plasma cell persistence.

  13. Controls to validate plasma samples for cell free DNA quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Niels; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund;

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however, are diver...

  14. Calculated characteristics of an ac plasma display panel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeuf, J.P.; Pitchford, L.C. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1996-02-01

    Equipotential contours and contours of constant power deposition into excitation of xenon, calculated from a two-dimensional (2-D) fluid model, are presented at times during the evolution of a single discharge event in an ac plasma display panel cell with a dielectric barrier rib geometry.

  15. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  16. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138(-) and CD138(+) plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Bos, Nico A.; Johnsen, Hans E.; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naive-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cy

  17. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F; Schett, Georg; Mielenz, Dirk; David, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-20

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell-specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression.

  18. Surgical treatment of unicentric plasma cell histological type Castleman's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Castleman’s disease or angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia is a rare disease with two identified clinical forms. Unicentric or localized form is characterized by isolated growth of lymph nodes, most often in mediastinum, and multicentric form is expressed as systemic disease with spread lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and presence of general symptoms of the disease. Histological types are hyalovascular, plasma-cell and transitive (mixed cell. Case report. This case report shows a woman, 59 years old, with unicentric form of plasma-cell type of Castleman’s disease. Unicentric form is usually shown as hyalovascular histological type, extremely rare as plasma-cell type, and transitive (mixed cell type was never described in literature as localized clinical form. The disease was manifested with chest pain, loss of body weight, exhaustion and weakness of legs. Further diagnostic procedures found the presence of enlarged lymph nodes paratracheally right, in a close contact with vena cava superior. The disease was confirmed by histopathological analysis of bioptated mediastinal lymph node after mediastinoscopy. Surgical treatment included extirpation of enlarged lymph nodes. After the regular postoperative condition, a full therapy effect was confirmed. Conclusion. Unicentric form of Castleman’s disease is expressed with enlarged lymph nodes on predilected places, usually in mediastinum. Surgical treatment is best method for the management of the disease and brings a full recovery of patient.

  19. The glycome of normal and malignant plasma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Moehler

    Full Text Available The glycome, i.e. the cellular repertoire of glycan structures, contributes to important functions such as adhesion and intercellular communication. Enzymes regulating cellular glycosylation processes are related to the pathogenesis of cancer including multiple myeloma. Here we analyze the transcriptional differences in the glycome of normal (n = 10 and two cohorts of 332 and 345 malignant plasma-cell samples, association with known multiple myeloma subentities as defined by presence of chromosomal aberrations, potential therapeutic targets, and its prognostic impact. We found i malignant vs. normal plasma cells to show a characteristic glycome-signature. They can ii be delineated by a lasso-based predictor from normal plasma cells based on this signature. iii Cytogenetic aberrations lead to distinct glycan-gene expression patterns for t(11;14, t(4;14, hyperdiploidy, 1q21-gain and deletion of 13q14. iv A 38-gene glycome-signature significantly delineates patients with adverse survival in two independent cohorts of 545 patients treated with high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation. v As single gene, expression of the phosphatidyl-inositol-glycan protein M as part of the targetable glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchor-biosynthesis pathway is associated with adverse survival. The prognostically relevant glycome deviation in malignant cells invites novel strategies of therapy for multiple myeloma.

  20. Successful treatment of plasma cell cheilitis with topical tacrolimus: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanami, Yuka; Motoki, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-02-15

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an uncommon chronic inflammatory dermatitis that presents with flat to slightly elevated erosive erythematous plaques. It is histologically characterized by plasma cell infiltrates into the mucosa. Other than the lip, genital areas are often involved, which is called plasma cell balanitis or vulvitis. Plasma cell cheilitis is sometimes resistant to conventional topical corticosteroid therapy. Other choices include oral griseofulvin, topical cyclosporine, and intralesional corticosteroid injection, all of which occasionally fail to produce satisfactory results. Recent reports show that topical calcineurin inhibitors are effective for plasma cell cheilitis, balanitis, and vulvitis. However, there are so far only 2 reports of plasma cell cheilitis successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus. We present herein two cases of plasma cell cheilitis, in which topical tacrolimus showed beneficial effects, suggesting that this immunomodulatory agent is a promising option for plasma cell cheilitis.

  1. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  3. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G. [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A. [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); El Disoki, T. M. [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ∼0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions

  4. High affinity germinal center B cells are actively selected into the plasma cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tri Giang; Paus, Didrik; Chan, Tyani D; Turner, Marian L; Nutt, Stephen L; Basten, Antony; Brink, Robert

    2006-10-30

    A hallmark of T cell-dependent immune responses is the progressive increase in the ability of serum antibodies to bind antigen and provide immune protection. Affinity maturation of the antibody response is thought to be connected with the preferential survival of germinal centre (GC) B cells that have acquired increased affinity for antigen via somatic hypermutation of their immunoglobulin genes. However, the mechanisms that drive affinity maturation remain obscure because of the difficulty in tracking the affinity-based selection of GC B cells and their differentiation into plasma cells. We describe a powerful new model that allows these processes to be followed as they occur in vivo. In contrast to evidence from in vitro systems, responding GC B cells do not undergo plasma cell differentiation stochastically. Rather, only GC B cells that have acquired high affinity for the immunizing antigen form plasma cells. Affinity maturation is therefore driven by a tightly controlled mechanism that ensures only antibodies with the greatest possibility of neutralizing foreign antigen are produced. Because the body can sustain only limited numbers of plasma cells, this "quality control" over plasma cell differentiation is likely critical for establishing effective humoral immunity.

  5. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138- and CD138+ plasma cells. : Blood B-lymphocytes and plasma cells in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10(+)CD27(-)CD38(+), 6+/-6 cell...

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  7. Lipid signalling dynamics at the β-cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are clustered in islets of Langerhans and secrete insulin in response to increased concentrations of circulating glucose. Insulin in turn acts on liver, muscle and fat tissue to store energy and normalize the blood glucose level. Inappropriate insulin release may lead to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In addition to glucose, other nutrients, neural stimuli and hormonal stimuli control insulin secretion. Many of these signals are perceived at the plasma membrane, which is also the site where insulin granules undergo exocytosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that membrane lipids play an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion. β-cells release insulin in a pulsatile fashion. Signalling lipids integrate the nutrient and neurohormonal inputs to fine-tune, shape and co-ordinate the pulsatility. An important group of signalling lipids are phosphoinositides and their downstream messengers. This MiniReview will discuss new insights into lipid signalling dynamics in β-cells obtained from live-cell imaging experiments with fluorescent translocation biosensors. The plasma membrane concentration of several phosphoinositides and of their downstream messengers changes rapidly upon nutrient or neurohormonal stimulation. Glucose induces the most complex spatio-temporal patterns, typically involving oscillations of messenger concentrations, which sometimes are locally restricted. The tightly controlled levels of lipid messengers can mediate specific binding of downstream effectors to the plasma membrane, contributing to the appropriate regulation of insulin secretion.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Kikuchi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plasma cells in spleen increased by 100 fold after transplantation. Plasma cell numbers correlated with the detection of human IgM and IgG in serum, indicating that human B cells had differentiated into mature plasma cells in the murine spleen. In addition to CD19+ plasma cells, a distinct CD19- plasma cell population was detected, suggesting that downregulation of CD19 associated with maturation of plasma cells occurred. When purified human B cells were transplanted, those findings were not observed. Our results indicate that differentiation and maturation of human B cells and plasma cells can be investigated by transplantation of human PBMC into the spleen of NOD/SCID mice. The model will be useful for studying the differentiation of human B cells and generation of plasma cells.

  1. Plasma Cell Gingivits-A Conflict of Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutyap, Divya Aishwarya; Pantula, Veerandranath Reddy; Akula, Shilpa; Chinthapalli, Bhargavi

    2016-01-01

    Plasma Cell Gingivitis (PCG) is a rare condition of the gingiva which is benign in nature. In this condition there is enlargement of the marginal and attached gingiva. It is not only unaesthetic in appearance but also causes difficulty in speech and mastication. Hence, it creates an area for plaque accumulation because of which there is difficulty in carrying out the routine oral hygiene procedures. The aetiology is unknown and is thought to be a hypersensitive reaction to an allergen. This condition is characterized by massive infiltration of the plasma cells into the sub-epithelial connective tissue layers. Here we are presenting two cases of PCG associated with swollen lips, which is an uncommon condition. These cases were treated by gingivectomy and followed up to six months. PMID:28050510

  2. Hepatic failure caused by plasma cell infiltration in multiple Myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fadi E Rahhal; Robert R Schade; Asha Nayak; Teresa A Coleman

    2009-01-01

    Although plasma cell infiltration is not rare in autopsy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), it is very rarely detected in living patients. This is because MM rarely causes significant liver dysfunction that requires further evaluation. A 49-year-old man presented with acute renal failure and was diagnosed with kappa light chain MM stage ?B. Thalidomide and dexamethasone were initiated. The patient developed a continuous increase in bilirubin that led to severe cholestasis. A liver biopsy revealed plasma cell infiltration. He then rapidly progressed to liver failure and died. Treatment options are limited in MM with significant liver dysfunction.Despite new drug therapies in MM, those patients with rapidly progressive liver failure appear to have a dismal outcome.

  3. Transcription factor ABF-1 suppresses plasma cell differentiation but facilitates memory B cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Kai; Lin, I-Ying; Su, Shin-Tang; Wang, Kuan-Hsiung; Yang, Shii-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Lin, Kuo-I

    2014-09-01

    Ag-primed B cells that result from an immune response can form either memory B cells or Ab-secreting plasma cells; however, the molecular machinery that controls this cellular fate is poorly understood. In this study, we show that activated B cell factor-1 (ABF-1), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, participates in this regulation. ABF-1 was prevalently expressed in purified memory B cells and induced by T follicular helper cell-mediated signals. ABF-1 expression declined by the direct repression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 during differentiation. Ectopic expression of ABF-1 reduced the formation of Ab-secreting cells in an in vitro differentiation system of human memory B cells. Accordingly, knockdown of ABF-1 potentiates the formation of Ab-secreting cells. A transgenic mouse that expresses inducible ABF-1 in a B cell-specific manner was generated to demonstrate that the formation of germinal center and memory B cells was augmented by induced ABF-1 in an immune response, whereas the Ag-specific plasma cell response was dampened. This effect was associated with the ability of ABF-1 to limit cell proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that ABF-1 facilitates formation of memory B cells but prevents plasma cell differentiation.

  4. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  5. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  6. Nanodomain stabilization dynamics in plasma membranes of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tamal; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-02-01

    We discover that a synergistically amplifying role of stabilizing membrane proteins and continuous lipid recycling can explain the physics governing the stability, polydispersity, and dynamics of lipid raft domains in plasma membranes of biological cells. We establish the conjecture using a generalized order parameter based on theoretical formalism, endorsed by detailed scaling arguments and domain mapping. Quantitative agreements with morphological distributions of raft complexes, as obtained from Förster resonance energy transfer based visualization, support the present theoretical conjecture.

  7. Refraction of $e^-$ beams due to plasma lensing at a plasma-vacuum interface -- applied to beam deflection in a Copper cell with electrical RF-breakdown plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a possible description of the deflection of a relativistic $e^-$ beam in an inhomogeneous copper plasma, encountered by the beam when propagating through a accelerating cell that has undergone a high electric-field RF-breakdown. It is well known that an inhomogeneous plasma forms and may last for up to a few micro-seconds, until recombination in an accelerating structure where a field-emission triggers melting and ionization of RF-cell wall deformity. We present a preliminary model for the beam deflection due to collective plasma response based upon the beam density, plasma density and interaction length.

  8. Evaluation of non-thermal plasma-induced anticancer effects on human colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jeongho; Hong, Young-Jun; Bae, Woom-Yee; Choi, Eun Ha; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma has been introduced in various applications such as sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and other biomedical applications. The most attractive application of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is in cancer treatment, where the plasma is used to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to facilitate cell apoptosis. We investigate the effects of different durations of exposure to dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on colon cancer cells using measurement of cell viability and ROS levels, western blot, immunocytochemistry, and Raman spectroscopy. Our results suggest that different kinds of plasma-treated cells can be differentiated from control cells using the Raman data. PMID:28663896

  9. Effect of Wall Charge on Striation in Plasma Display Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; OUYANG Jiting; CAO Jing; FENG Shuo; MIAO Jinsong; WANG Jianqi

    2007-01-01

    Different configurations and driving voltages have been employed to investigate the effect of the wall charge on the striations in macroscopic plasma display panel (PDP) cells.The experimental results show that a discharge channel near the dielectric layer is indispensable to striation occurring in the anode area during a discharge,while the pre-accumulated charge on the dielectric layer and the surface state are not important.The origin of the striation is related only to the physical process in the cell.The dielectric layer acts as a charge collector during a PDP discharge.

  10. Fat, Stem Cells, and Platelet-Rich Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Isaac B; Coleman, Sydney R; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-07-01

    The ideal filler for aesthetic surgery is inexpensive and easy to obtain, natural in appearance and texture, immunologically compatible, and long lasting without risk of infection. By most metrics, autologous fat grafts meet these criteria perfectly. Although facial fat grafting is now a commonly accepted surgical procedure, there has been a wave of activity applying stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapies to aesthetic practice. This article addresses technical considerations in the use of autologous fat transfer for facial rejuvenation, and also explores the current evidence for these stem cell and PRP therapies in aesthetic practice.

  11. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  12. Thermal plasma treatment of cell-phone waste : preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruj, B. [Central Mechanical Engineering Research Inst., Durgapur (India). Thermal Engineering Group; Chang, J.S.; Li, O.L. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Pietsch, G. [RWTH Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The cell phone is an indispensable service facilitator, however, the disposal and recycling of cell phones is a major problem. While the potential life span of a mobile phone, excluding batteries, is over 10 years, most of the users upgrade their phones approximately four times during this period. Cell phone waste is significantly more hazardous than many other municipal wastes as it contains thousands of components made of toxic chemicals and metals like lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, polyvinyl chlorides (PVC), brominated flame retardants, beryllium, antimony and phthalates. Cell phones also use many expensive rare metals. Since cell phones are made up of plastics, metals, ceramics, and trace other substances, primitive recycling or disposal of cell phone waste to landfills and incinerators creates irreversible environmental damage by polluting water and soil, and contaminating air. In order to minimize releases into the environment and threat to human health, the disposal of cell phones needs to be managed in an environmentally friendly way. This paper discussed a safer method of reducing the generation of syngas and hydrocarbons and metal recovery through the treatment of cell phone wastes by a thermal plasma. The presentation discussed the experiment, with particular reference to sample preparation; experimental set-up; and results four samples with different experimental conditions. It was concluded that the plasma treatment of cell phone waste in reduced condition generates gaseous components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons which are combustible. Therefore, this system is an energy recovery system that contributes to resource conservation and reduction of climate change gases. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  13. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  14. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  15. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  16. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138- and CD138+ plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M; Bos, Nico A; Johnsen, Hans E; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10(+)CD27(-)CD38(+), 6+/-6 cells/microL), naïve (CD10(-)CD27(-)CD38(-), 125+/-90 cells/microL), memory B lymphocytes (CD10(-)CD27(+)CD38(-), 58+/-42 cells/microL), and plasma cells (CD10(-)CD27(++)CD38(++), 2.1+/-2.1 cells/microL) within circulating CD19(+) cells. From these four subsets, only memory B lymphocytes and plasma cells decreased with age, both in relative and absolute counts. Circulating plasma cells split into CD138(-) (57+/-12%) and CD138(+) (43+/-12%) cells, the latter displaying a more mature phenotypic profile: absence of surface immunoglobulin, lower CD45 positivity and higher amounts of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, CD38 and CD27. Unlike B lymphocytes, both populations of plasma cells are KI-67(+) and show weak CXCR4 expression.

  17. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  18. The effect of tuning cold plasma composition on glioblastoma cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Cheng

    Full Text Available Previous research in cold atmospheric plasma (CAP and cancer cell interaction has repeatedly proven that the cold plasma induced cell death. It is postulated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS play a major role in the CAP cancer therapy. In this paper, we seek to determine a mechanism of CAP therapy on glioblastoma cells (U87 through an understanding of the composition of the plasma, including treatment time, voltage, flow-rate and plasma-gas composition. In order to determine the threshold of plasma treatment on U87, normal human astrocytes (E6/E7 were used as the comparison cell line. Our data showed that the 30 sec plasma treatment caused 3-fold cell death in the U87 cells compared to the E6/E7 cells. All the other compositions of cold plasma were performed based on this result: plasma treatment time was maintained at 30 s per well while other plasma characteristics such as voltage, flow rate of source gas, and composition of source gas were changed one at a time to vary the intensity of the reactive species composition in the plasma jet, which may finally have various effect on cells reflected by cell viability. We defined a term "plasma dosage" to summarize the relationship of all the characteristics and cell viability.

  19. Evidence for local expansion of IgA plasma cell precursors in human ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuvaraj, S.; Dijkstra, G.; Burgerhof, J.G.M.; Dammers, P.M.; Stoel, M.; Visser, Annie; Kroese, F.G.M.; Bos, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    IgA plays a crucial role in establishment and maintenance of mucosal homeostasis between host cells and commensal bacteria. To this end, numerous IgA plasma cells are located in the intestinal lamina propria. Whether the (immediate) precursor cells for these plasma cells can expand locally is not

  20. The hormesis effect of plasma-elevated intracellular ROS on HaCaT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szili, Endre J.; Harding, Frances J.; Hong, Sung-Ha; Herrmann, Franziska; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Short, Robert D.

    2015-12-01

    We have examined the link between ionized-gas plasma delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and cell fate, defined in terms of cell viability versus death. Phospholipid vesicles were used as cell mimics to measure the possible intracellular ROS concentration, [ROSi], delivered by various plasma treatments. Cells were exposed to a helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet for different plasma exposure times (5-60 s) and gas flow rates (50-1000 ml min-1). Based upon the [ROSi] data we argue that plasma-generated ROS in the cell culture medium can readily diffuse into real cells. Plasma exposure that equated to an [ROSi] in the range of 3.81  ×  10-10-9.47  ×  10-8 M, measured at 1 h after the plasma exposure, resulted in increased cell viability at 72 h; whereas a higher [ROSi] at 1 h decreased cell viability after 72 h of culture. This may be because of the manner in which the ROS are delivered by the plasma: HaCaT cells better tolerate a low ROS flux over an extended plasma exposure period of 1 min, compared to a high flux delivered in a few seconds, although the final [ROSi] may be the same. Our results suggest that plasma stimulation of HaCaT cells follows the principle of hormesis.

  1. Regulation of germinal center responses, memory B cells and plasma cell formation-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Lynn M; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-04-01

    Progress in understanding humoral immunity has been accelerated by the powerful experimental approaches of genetics, genomics and imaging. Excellent reviews of these advances appeared in 2015 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cell and T cell lineages in the chicken. Here we provide a contemporary model of B cell differentiation, highlighting recent publications illuminating germinal center (GC), memory B cell and antibody-secreting plasma cell biology. The important contributions of CD4T cells to antibody responses have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  2. Identification and characterization of plasma cells in normal human bone marrow by high-resolution flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.; Johnsen, Steen; Segers-Nolten, Ine M.J.; Loken, Michael R.

    1990-01-01

    The low frequency of plasma cells and the lack of specific cell surface markers has been a major obstacle for a detailed characterization of plasma cells in normal human bone marrow. Multiparameter flow cytometry enabled the identification of plasma cells in normal bone marrow aspirates. The plasma

  3. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Gersende; Hussein, Mourad; Kulis, Marta; Delaloy, Céline; Chatonnet, Fabrice; Pignarre, Amandine; Avner, Stéphane; Lemarié, Maud; Mahé, Elise A; Verdaguer-Dot, Núria; Queirós, Ana C; Tarte, Karin; Martín-Subero, José I; Salbert, Gilles; Fest, Thierry

    2015-11-03

    Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-?1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxy)methylation, and cell fate determination.

  4. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Caron

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxymethylation, and cell fate determination.

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-02-03

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  6. Plasma cell endocytosis: is it related to immunoglobulin secretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakoff, A; Vassalli, P; Montesano, R

    1981-12-01

    Mouse plasma cells have been exposed to a wide range of soluble and adsorptive macromolecular tracers for 10 min to 4 h to explore the possibility of membrane recycling related to the high secretory rate of these nonregulated secretory cells. Electron microscopic examination showed in all cases labeling of multivesicular and multilamellar bodies and a lesser labeling of smooth-surfaced vesicles. Using cationized ferritin as tracer, an additional very restricted labeling of Golgi cisternae was observed. Comparable labeling patterns were observed when immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion was blocked with the Golgi-specific pertrurbant, monensin, and in the case of poorly differentiated B immunoblasts which secrete little or no Ig. Our observations therefore emphasize that available approaches cannot yet determine whether a mandatory circuit of vesicular traffic couples Ig exocytosis to endocytosis.

  7. Plasma membrane repair: the adaptable cell life-insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Joaquina; Perez, Franck

    2017-08-01

    The plasma membrane is the most basic element necessary for the cell to exist and be distinguishable from its environment. Regulated mechanisms allow tightly controlled communication between intacellular and extracellular medium allowing the maintenance of a specific biochemical environment, optimized for cellular functions. The anarchic and uncontrolled opening of a hole in the PM induces a change in the concentration of ions and oxidizing agents perturbing homeostasis. Fortunately, the cell possesses mechanisms that are capable of reacting to sudden extracellular medium entry and to block the leakage locally. Here we summarize the known mechanisms of membrane repair and how the size of the wound and the resulting calcium entry activates preferentially one or another mechanism adapted to the magnitude of the injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Simplex-in-Cell Technique for Collisionless Plasma Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids (Abel et al. 2012; Hahn et al. 2012) to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function $f(\\mathbf x,\\mathbf v)$ is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream insta...

  9. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  10. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  11. Plasma cell gingivitis - A rare case related to Colocasia (arbi leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Bali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell gingivitis is an uncommon inflammatory condition of uncertain etiology often flavoured chewing gum, spices, foods, candies, or dentifrices. The diagnosis of plasma cell gingivitis is based on comprehensive history taking, clinical examination, and appropriate diagnostic tests. Here we are presenting a rare case of plasma cell gingivitis caused by consumption of colocasia (arbi leaves. Colocasia is a kind of vegetable, very commonly consumed in the regions of North India.

  12. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  13. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  14. Plasma cell cheilitis, successfully treated with topical 0.03% tacrolimus ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seon Pil; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Huh, Chang Hun

    2010-05-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is a rare, idiopathic mucosal condition. The treatment of plasma cell cheilitis is often disappointing. It is often resistant to various topical treatments. We present a 65-year-old woman who had a painful, eroded area on her lower lip, which responded poorly to various topical treatments. A biopsy revealed a band-like infiltration composed mainly of plasma cells in the dermis. She was diagnosed as having plasma cell cheilitis, and was successfully treated with 0.03% topical tacrolimus ointment.

  15. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lizard, G; Fournel, S; Genestier, L; Dhedin, N; Chaput, C; Flacher, M; Mutin, M; Panaye, G; Revillard, J P

    1995-01-01

    ... of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display an early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria...

  16. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyang; Cheng, Cheng; Gao, Peng; Li, Shaopeng; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Yu, Yongqiang; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  17. Cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma treatment of C6 glioma cells: effects of reactive oxygen species in the medium produced by the plasma on cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyang, Wang; Cheng, Cheng; Peng, Gao; Shaopeng, Li; Jie, Shen; Yan, Lan; Yongqiang, Yu; Paul, K. Chu

    2017-02-01

    An atmospheric-pressure air plasma is employed to treat C6 glioma cells in vitro. To elucidate on the mechanism causing cell death and role of reactive species (RS) in the medium produced by the plasma, the concentration of the long-lived RS such as hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and ozone in the plasma-treated liquid (phosphate-buffered saline solution) is measured. When vitamin C is added to the medium as a ROS quencher, the viability of C6 glioma cells after the plasma treatment is different from that without vitamin C. The results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2, and O3 constitute the main factors for inactivation of C6 glioma cells and the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) may only play an auxiliary role in cell death.

  18. Study on the effects of physical plasma on in-vitro cultivates cells; Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von physikalischem Plasma auf in vitro kultivierte Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strassenburg, Susanne

    2014-03-15

    This study focused on the interactions of non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on in vitro cultured keratinocytes (HaCaT keratinocytes) and melanoma cells (MV3). Three different plasma sources were used: a plasma jet (kINPen 09), a surface DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) and a volume DBD. For analyzing basic effects of plasma on cells, influence of physical plasma on viability, on DNA and on induction of ROS were investigated. Following assays were used: -- Viability: - neutral red uptake assay, cell counting (number of viable cells, cell integrity) - BrdU assay (proliferation) - Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, flow cytometry (induction of apoptosis), -- DNA: - alkaline comet assay (detection of DNA damage) - staining of DNA with propidium iodide, flow cytometry (cell cycle analysis), -- ROS: - H2DCFDA assay, flow cytometry (detection of ROS-positive cells). In addition to the effects which where induced by the plasma sources, the influence of the plasma treatment regime (direct, indirect and direct with medium exchange), the working gas (argon, air) and the surrounding liquids (cell culture medium: RPMI, IMDM; buffer solutions: HBSS, PBS) on the extent of the plasma cell effects were investigated. All plasma sources induced treatment time-dependent effects in HaCaT keratinocytes and melanoma cells (MV3): - loss of viable cells and reduced proliferation - induction of apoptosis after the longest treatment times - DNA damage 1 h after plasma treatment, 24 h after plasma treatment DNA damage was present only after the longest treatment times, evidence for DNA damage repair - due to accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, cell count in G1 phase (24 h) is lower - increase of ROS-positive cells 1 h and 24 h after plasma treatment. It was shown that cells which were cultured in RPMI showed stronger effects (stronger loss of viability and more DNA damage) than cells which were cultured in IMDM. Also plasma-treated buffer solutions (HBSS, PBS) induced DNA

  19. Long-Lived Plasma Cells in Autoimmunity: Lessons from B-Cell Depleting Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A large number of autoimmune diseases are treated with rituximab, an antibody against CD20 that depletes most of the B cells in the organism. The response to this treatment depends largely on the disease and the type of lymphoid cells involved in the autoimmune process. We recently reported that B-cell depletion in immune thrombocytopenia induced the appearance of pathogenic long-lived plasma cells in the spleen, which were not present before treatment or in non-autoimmune conditions. The spl...

  20. CD28–B7 Interaction Modulates Short- and Long-Lived Plasma Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of CD28, which is constitutively expressed on T cells, with B7.1/B7.2 expressed on APCs is critical for T cell activation. CD28 is also expressed on murine and human plasma cells but its function on these cells remains unclear. There are two types of plasma cells: short-lived ones that appear in the secondary lymphoid tissue shortly after Ag exposure, and long-lived plasma cells that mainly reside in the bone marrow. We demonstrate that CD28-deficient murine short- and long-li...

  1. Hydrogen production by coal plasma gasification for fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvita, V. [Max-Planck-Institute, Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Sandtorstrasse 1, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany); Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Research Department of Plasmotechnics, 22 Zvereva str., 050100 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2007-11-15

    Coal gasification in steam and air atmosphere under arc plasma conditions has been investigated with Podmoskovnyi brown coal, Kuuchekinski bituminous coal and Canadian petrocoke. It was found that for those coals the gasification degree to synthesis gas were 92.3%, 95.8 and 78.6% correspondingly. The amount of produced syngas was 30-40% higher in steam than in air gasification of the coal. The reduction of the carbon monoxide content in the hydrogen-rich reformate gas for low-temperature fuel cell applications normally involves high- and low-temperature water gas shift reactors followed by selective oxidation of residual carbon monoxide. It is shown that the carbon monoxide content can be reduced in one single reactor, which is based on an iron redox cycle. During the reduction phase of the cycle, the raw gas mixture of H{sub 2} and CO reduces a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} sample, while during the oxidation phase steam re-oxidizes the iron and simultaneously hydrogen is being produced. The integration of the redox iron process with a coal plasma gasification technology in future allows the production of CO{sub x}-free hydrogen. (author)

  2. Deletion(20q) as the sole abnormality in plasma cell myeloma is not associated with plasma cells as identified by cIg FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joanne S; Zordan, Adrian; Batzios, Crisoula; Campbell, Lynda J

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of 20q is a common finding in myeloid disorders but it is also observed in plasma cell myeloma (PCM). As a del(20q) in a patient receiving treatment for myeloma may indicate therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS), it is important to differentiate chromosome abnormalities associated with myeloma from those reflecting t-MDS. We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a 20q12 probe (D20S108) in conjunction with cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining in 20 PCM cases with a del(20q) in order to confirm the cell type involved. Of the nine cases studied with a clone showing a del(20q) as the sole abnormality, 8 of 9 demonstrated loss of the D20S108 signals in non-plasma cells only and 5 of 9 had either a confirmed myeloid malignancy in addition to PCM or showed evidence of dysplastic changes in the marrow; however, of the 11 patients with a del(20q) within a complex PCM karyotype, 4 of 11 showed loss of the D20S108 signals in plasma cells only and 7 of 11 showed no significant loss in either plasma cells or non-plasma cells. Therefore, our results indicate that a del(20q) as the sole abnormality in PCM is present in non-plasma cells and, therefore, suggests the presence of an associated myeloid malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Tarlinton, David M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L

    2014-10-20

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell-promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1-IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation.

  4. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Benjamin G; Scharer, Christopher D; Bally, Alexander P R; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-10-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody-secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell-division-dependent manner. Analysis of B cells differentiating in vivo stratified by cell division revealed a fivefold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs for the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for the transcription factors IRF and Oct-2 and was coincident with activation and differentiation gene-expression programs in a cell-division-dependent manner. These data provide mechanistic insight into cell-division-coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest that DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation.

  5. Graphene Oxide Modulates B Cell Surface Phenotype and Impairs Immunoglobulin Secretion in Plasma Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaohai; Xu, Shengmin; Chen, Shaopeng; Fan, Huadong; Luo, Xun; Yang, Xiaoyao; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Hang; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-04-01

    Since discovery, graphene oxide (GO) has been used in all aspects of human life and revealed promising applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the potential risks of GO were always being revealed. Although GO was found to induce immune cell death and innate immune response, little is known regarding its toxicity to the specific adaptive immune system that is crucial for protecting against exotic invasion. The B-cell mediated adaptive immune system, which composed of highly specialized cells (B and plasma cell) and specific immune response (antibody response) is the focus in our present study. Using diverse standard immunological techniques, we found that GO modulated B cell surface phenotype, both costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86 and especially CD40) and antigen presenting molecules (both classical and nonclassical) under the condition without causing cell death. Meanwhile, the terminal differentiated immunoglobulin (Ig) secreting plasma cell was affected by GO, which displayed a less secretion of Ig and more severe ER stress caused by the retention of the secreted form of Ig in cell compartment. The combined data reveal that GO has a particular adverse effect to B cell and the humoral immunity, directly demonstrating the potential risk of GO to the specific adaptive immunity.

  6. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H.; Gan, L.; Yang, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com, E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Lu, R. [School Hospital of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Xian, Y.; Lu, X., E-mail: luxinpei@hotmail.com, E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-kB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  7. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Gan, L.; Lu, X.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-кB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  8. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Coutanceau; Marc Reinholdt; Jean Durand; Valérie Flaud; Serguei Martemianov; Alina Ilie; Eric Beche; Stéphanie Roualdès; Mauricio Schieda; Jérémy Frugier

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, com...

  9. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaq, M., E-mail: ishaqmusarat@gmail.com [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia); Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bazaka, K. [Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ostrikov, K. [Comonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  10. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M., E-mail: mlarouss@odu.edu; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H. [Plasma Engineering and Medicine Institute, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  13. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  14. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Coutanceau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  15. (poly)Phosphoinositide phosphorylation is a marker for plasma membrane in Friend erythroleukaemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawyler, A.J.; Roelofsen, B.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Kamp, J.A.F. op den

    1982-01-01

    Upon subcellular fractionation of (murine) Friend erythroleukaemic cells (FELCs), purified plasma membranes were identified by their high enrichment in specific marker enzymes and typical plasma membrane lipids. When FELCs were incubated for short periods with 32Pi before cell fractionation, the

  16. (poly)Phosphoinositide phosphorylation is a marker for plasma membrane in Friend erythroleukaemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawyler, A.J.; Roelofsen, B.; Wirtz, K.W.A.; Kamp, J.A.F. op den

    1982-01-01

    Upon subcellular fractionation of (murine) Friend erythroleukaemic cells (FELCs), purified plasma membranes were identified by their high enrichment in specific marker enzymes and typical plasma membrane lipids. When FELCs were incubated for short periods with 32Pi before cell fractionation, the lip

  17. Frequency of cell treatment with cold microwave argon plasma is important for the final outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysolyatina, E.; Vasiliev, M.; Kurnaeva, M.; Kornienko, I.; Petrov, O.; Fortov, V.; Gintsburg, A.; Petersen, E.; Ermolaeva, S.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the influence of a regime of cold microwave argon plasma treatments on the physiological characteristics of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We used three regimes of plasma application: a single treatment, double treatment with a 48 h interval, and daily treatments for 3 d. Cell proliferation after plasma application was quantified in real time, and immunohistochemistry was used to establish the viability of the cells and determine changes in their physiology. It was established that the frequency of cell treatments is important for the outcome. In the samples treated with single plasma application and double plasma applications with a 48 h interval, a 42.6% and 32.0% increase was observed in the number of cells, respectively. In addition, there were no signs of deoxyribonucleic acid breaks immediately after plasma application. In contrast, plasma application increased the accumulation of cells in the active phases of the cell cycle. The activation of proliferation correlated with a decrease in the level of β-galactosidase, a senescence marker. This could be due to cell renovation after plasma application. Daily treatment decreased cell proliferation up to 29.1% in comparison with the control after 3 d.

  18. [Plasma cell granuloma in the lung and mediastino-pulmonary sarcoid lesions (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, A; Amouroux, J; de Saint-Florent, G; Letinier, J Y; Valeyre, D; Battesti, J P

    1980-01-01

    The authors report a case of inflammatory plasma cell pseudo-tumor in the lung associated with mediastino-pulmonary sarcoid histological lesions. Diffusion of the latter to pulmonary parenchyma, the intensity of the follicular reaction in mediastinal lymph nodes together with a positive Kveim test suggest the fortuitous association of a mediastinal-pulmonary sarcoidosis with a plasma cell granuloma.

  19. Dysmegakaryocytopoiesis and maintaining platelet count in patients with plasma cell neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Mair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysmegakaryocytopoiesis in patients with the plasma cell neoplasm (PCN is rarely discussed in the literature. The puzzling phenomenon, which PCN patients maintaining normal platelet count even when the marrow is mostly replaced by plasma cells, is hardly explored. Aim: This study was aimed to determine the frequency of dysmegakaryocytopoiesis in PCN and the relationships between bone marrow (BM plasma cell percentage, plasma cell immunomarkers, the severity of dysmegakaryocytopoiesis, and peripheral blood platelet count in PCN. Materials and Methods: We randomly selected 16 cases of PCN, among which 4 were with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and 12 were with plasma cell myeloma. Results: Our study showed that: (1 Dysmegakaryocytopoiesis was present in all the selected cases of PCN and its severity was not correlated with the percentage of the plasma cells in BM; (2 almost all patients maintained normal platelet count even when BM was mostly replaced by plasma cells; (3 immunomarkers of the neoplastic plasma cells were not associated with dysmegakaryocytopoiesis or maintaining of platelet count. The possible mechanisms behind dysmegakaryocytopoiesis and maintaining of platelet count were also discussed. Conclusion: Despite the universal presence of dysmegakaryocytopoiesis in PCN, the platelet count is maintained at normal range.

  20. Tendon Stem Cells and Platelet-Rich Plasma%Tendon Stem Cells and Piatelet-Rich Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James H-C.Wang

    2011-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendon injuries(i.e.tendinopathy)are common,yet current treatments cannot restore normal structure and function to injured tendons.This problem mainly stems from our incomplete understanding of tendon cell properties and responses to biomechanical and biochemical environments surrounding the cells.However,significant progress has been made in recent years on two fronts.The first is the new discovery that tendons contain a population of multi-potent tendon stem cells(TSCs).The second is the wide application of platelet-rich plasma(PRP)in orthopaedics and sports medicine to treat injured tendons.This mini-review aims to discuss the studies on TSCs,with a focus on their differential properties with respect to tenocytes and their differential mechano-responses when subjected to small and large mechanical loading conditions.In light of the critical importance of the safety and efficacy of PRP treatment in clinic,basic scientific research related to PRP effects on TSCs,particularly on their differentiation,is also presented.Finally,the urgent need for rigorous basic scientific research to justify PRP applications in clinic settings is proposed.

  1. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskii, Vitalii; Churpita, Olexander; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma has been recognized as a promising tool across a vast variety of biomedical applications, with the potential to create novel therapeutic methods. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind non-thermal plasma cellular effects remains a significant challenge. In this study, we show how two types of different non-thermal plasmas induce cell death in mammalian cell cultures via the formation of multiple intracellular reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Our results showed a discrepancy in the superoxide accumulation and lysosomal activity in response to air and helium plasma, suggesting that triggered signalling cascades might be grossly different between different plasmas. In addition, the effects of ozone, a considerable component of non-thermal plasma, have been simultaneously evaluated and have revealed much faster and higher cytotoxic effects. Our findings offer novel insight into plasma-induced cellular responses, and provide a basis for better controlled biomedical applications.

  2. Efficient Methods To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies from Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we highlight the advantages of isolating human monoclonal antibodies from the human memory B cells and plasma cell repertoires by using high-throughput cellular screens. Memory B cells are immortalized with high efficiency using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, while plasma cells are maintained in single-cell cultures by using interleukin 6 (IL-6) or stromal cells. In both cases, multiple parallel assays, including functional assays, can be used to identify rare cells that produce antibodies with unique properties. Using these methods, we have isolated potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against a variety of viruses, in particular, a pan-influenza-A-neutralizing antibody and an antibody that neutralizes four different paramyxoviruses. Given the high throughput and the possibility of directly screening for function (rather than just binding), these methods are instrumental to implement a target-agnostic approach to identify the most effective antibodies and, consequently, the most promising targets for vaccine design. This approach is exemplified by the identification of unusually potent cytomegalovirus-neutralizing antibodies that led to the identification of the target, a pentameric complex that we are developing as a candidate vaccine.

  3. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Virard

    Full Text Available Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial.Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells.These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy.

  4. Long and short term effects of plasma treatment on meristematic plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puač, N.; Živković, S.; Selaković, N.; Milutinović, M.; Boljević, J.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we will present results of plasma treatments of meristematic cells of Daucus carota. Plasma needle was used as an atmospheric pressure/gas composition source of non-equilibrium plasma in all treatments. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was measured immediately after plasma treatment and after two weeks following the treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in samples immediately after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, catalase activity was much higher in treated samples when measured two weeks after plasma treatment. These results show that there is a direct proof of the triggering of signal transduction in the cells by two reactive oxygen species H2O2 and O2-, causing enzyme activity and short and long term effects even during the growth of calli, where the information is passed to newborn cells over the period of two weeks.

  5. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  6. Effect of cold plasma on glial cell morphology studied by atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    Full Text Available The atomic force microscope (AFM is broadly used to study the morphology of cells. The morphological characteristics and differences of the cell membrane between normal human astrocytes and glial tumor cells are not well explored. Following treatment with cold atmospheric plasma, evaluation of the selective effect of plasma on cell viability of tumor cells is poorly understood and requires further evaluation. Using AFM we imaged morphology of glial cells before and after cold atmospheric plasma treatment. To look more closely at the effect of plasma on cell membrane, high resolution imaging was used. We report the differences between normal human astrocytes and human glioblastoma cells by considering the membrane surface details. Our data, obtained for the first time on these cells using atomic force microscopy, argue for an architectural feature on the cell membrane, i.e. brush layers, different in normal human astrocytes as compared to glioblastoma cells. The brush layer disappears from the cell membrane surface of normal E6/E7 cells and is maintained in the glioblastoma U87 cells after plasma treatment.

  7. A rare case of plasma cell leukemia in a 35 year old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal V Dosi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia is a rare, aggressive form of multiple myeloma. A 35-year-old male presented with backache, generalized weakness, and facial puffiness. His complete blood count showed anemia and a high WBC count with atypical cells on peripheral smear. Bone marrow examination showed more than 90% of atypical plasma cells, confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia. Patient also had azotemia, hypercalcemia, and hyperuricemia. The patient was started on chemotherapy along with supportive care. Patient improved dramatically and he was discharged on regular follow-up.

  8. From the regulatory functions of B cells to the identification of cytokine-producing plasma cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Van Duc; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Ries, Stefanie; Shen, Ping; Fillatreau, Simon

    2014-06-01

    B lymphocytes have a unique role as antibody-producing cells. Antibodies are key mediators of humoral immunity against infections, and are thought to account for the protection afforded by successful vaccines. B cells can also secrete cytokines and subsequently regulate immune responses mediated by T and innate cells. Remarkably, recent studies identified plasma blasts/plasma cells as the main types of activated B cells producing the cytokines interleukin (IL)-10, IL-35, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17, and GM-CSF in various contexts in mice. Here, we discuss these observations, which suggest the existence of various subsets of plasma blast/plasma cells distinguishable through their cytokine expression pattern.

  9. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the Plasma Pencil Against Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Razavi, Hamid; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    The plasma pencil generates low temperature and atmospheric pressure plasma. To generate the plasma, high voltage pulses with short width (from nanosecond to microsecond) are applied to a noble gas. The working gas can be helium, argon or a mixture of these with air or oxygen. Generating plasma with helium provides a tolerable temperature for biological cells and tissues. Diagnostic measurements on the plasma plume has revealed the presence of active agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive species (RNS), which are known to have biological implications. Recently, low temperature plasma has drawn attention to its potential in cancer therapy. In our lab, the plasma pencil has been used to treat leukemia, prostate and epithelial cancer cells. The cancer cell line used here is the SCaBER (ATCC®HTB3™) cell line originating from a human bladder cancer. The results indicate that specific species induce the molecular mechanisms associated with cell death. The death of cells after plasma treatment will be studied using assays, such as DNA laddering and Caspase-3 activation, to elucidate the mechanism of the apoptotic or necrotic pathways.

  10. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  11. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma generated in DI water on Cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by means of indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma stimulated solution. The objective of this study is to reveal the effects of plasma-stimulated media (PSM) on breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) and gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). In our experiments, cold atmospheric plasma is generated in water using helium as carrier gas. The plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast and gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment.

  12. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  13. Circulating plasma cells in multiple myeloma: characterization and correlation with disease stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, A C; Owen, R G; Davies, F E; Johnson, R J; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Evans, P A; Child, J A; Smith, G M; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric test to quantitate low levels of circulating myeloma plasma cells, and to determine the relationship of these cells with disease stage. Cells were characterized using five-parameter flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies, and results were evaluated by comparison with fluorescent consensus-primer IgH-PCR. Bone marrow myeloma plasma cells, defined by high CD38 and Syndecan-1 expression, did not express CD10, 23, 30, 34 or 45RO, and demonstrated weak expression of CD37 and CD45. 65% of patients had CD19- 56+ plasma cells, 30% CD19- 56(low), and 5% CD19+ 56+, and these two antigens discriminated myeloma from normal plasma cells, which were all CD19+ 56(low). Peripheral blood myeloma plasma cells had the same composite phenotype, but expressed significantly lower levels of CD56 and Syndecan-1, and were detected in 75% (38/51) of patients at presentation, 92% (11/12) of patients in relapse, and 40% (4/10) of stem cell harvests. Circulating plasma cells were not detectable in patients in CR (n = 9) or normals (n = 10), at a sensitivity of up to 1 in 10,000 cells. There was good correlation between the flow cytometric test and IgH-PCR results: myeloma plasma cells were detectable by flow cytometry in all PCR positive samples, and samples with no detectable myeloma plasma cells were PCR negative. Absolute numbers decreased in patients responding to treatment, remained elevated in patients with refractory disease, and increased in patients undergoing relapse. We conclude that flow cytometry can provide an effective aternative to IgH-PCR that will allow quantitative assessment of low levels of residual disease.

  14. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Brun

    Full Text Available Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and

  15. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaklamani, Georgia, E-mail: g.kaklamani@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dong, Hanshan [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M. [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Chemical Engineering, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stamboulis, Artemis [University of Birmingham, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of C-N, C=N, and C≡N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  16. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  17. Improvement of cell adhesion on poly(L-lactide) by atmospheric plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Masafumi; Teraoka, Fumio; Fujimoto, Shinji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kibayashi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Junzo

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the interaction between the cell and the surface of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) samples, which were modified using a low-temperature plasma treatment apparatus at atmospheric pressure. The plasma treatments were carried out in the atmospheres of air, carbon dioxide (CO2), and perfluoro propane (C3F8) gas. The PLLA samples before and after the plasma treatment were analyzed by XPS and their contact angles with water. Furthermore, the cell adhesion capability and cell mass culturing tests on the PLLA samples were carried out using MC3T3-E1 cells. The results showed that the contact angle of the samples, which was plasma treated in air or in CO2 gas, decreased compared with that of the untreated samples. On the other hand, the contact angle of the samples, which was plasma treated in the C3F8 gas, increased compared with the untreated plasma samples. The cell response on the PLLA samples plasma treated in air or in the CO2 gas were significantly superior to that of the PLLA samples, which was plasma treated in the C3F8 gas.

  18. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  19. Plasma treatment of biomaterials to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Erik

    In this work, we explore how embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation patterns are affected by surface interactions with plasma-processed materials. We hypothesize that mouse embryonic stem-cell exposure to certain plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces will direct their differentiation into endothelial cells. R1 mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were plated on surfaces onto which tetraglyme was deposited by plasma polymerization. In addition, tissue-treated polystyrene and control glass cover slips were also examined. Some samples were fixed three days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with platelet endothelial-cell adhesion molecule, while the others were fixed seven days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with von Willebrand Factor. Positive results seen by ES cell derivatives precociously expressing the vWF and PECAM genetic markers on the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme treated surfaces suggest that the plasma-polymerized surfaces direct differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells. Research goals of this dissertation include: characterization of the material properties of the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces that induce directed differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells, optimization of the plasma-polymerization process to maximize the number of endothelial cells derived from R1 ES cells, and biological experimentation to characterize properties of the mechanism of directed differentiation. A potential application of this work is in the design and construction of an artificial blood vessel. Current small-scale arterial substitutes have proved inadequate because of thrombogenicity and infection. Moreover, the lower blood flow velocities of smaller vessels pose a different set of design criteria and introduce new problems not encountered in large arterial substitutes. By utilizing a tissue engineering approach that incorporates embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells, the longevity of the prosthesis can be ensured.

  20. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet...... concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG...... and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing...

  1. Particle-In-Cell Modeling of Plasma-Based Accelerators in Two and Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hemker, Roy G

    2015-01-01

    In this dissertation, a fully object-oriented, fully relativistic, multi-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code was developed and applied to answer key questions in plasma-based accelerator research. The simulations increase the understanding of the processes in laser plasma and beam-plasma interaction, allow for comparison with experiments, and motivate the development of theoretical models. The simulations support the idea that the injection of electrons in a plasma wave by using a transversely propagating laser pulse is possible. The beam parameters of the injected electrons found in the simulations compare reasonably with beams produced by conventional methods and therefore laser injection is an interesting concept for future plasma-based accelerators. Simulations of the optical guiding of a laser wakefield driver in a parabolic plasma channel support the idea that electrons can be accelerated over distances much longer than the Rayleigh length in a channel. Simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration in the ...

  2. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Glatman Zaretsky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived plasma cells (PCs in the bone marrow (BM are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP+ cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  3. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry.

  4. The adaptor protein TRAF3 inhibits interleukin-6 receptor signaling in B cells to limit plasma cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wai W; Yi, Zuoan; Stunz, Laura L; Maine, Christian J; Sherman, Linda A; Bishop, Gail A

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is an adaptor protein that inhibits signaling by CD40 and by the receptor for B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and negatively regulates homeostatic B cell survival. Loss-of-function mutations in TRAF3 are associated with human B cell malignancies, in particular multiple myeloma. The cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) supports the differentiation and survival of normal and neoplastic plasma cells. We found that mice with a deficiency in TRAF3 specifically in B cells (B-Traf3(-/-) mice) had about twice as many plasma cells as did their littermate controls. TRAF3-deficient B cells had enhanced responsiveness to IL-6, and genetic loss of IL-6 in B-Traf3(-/-) mice restored their plasma cell numbers to normal. TRAF3 inhibited IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)-mediated signaling by facilitating the association of PTPN22 (a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase) with the kinase Janus-activated kinase 1 (Jak1), which in turn blocked phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Consistent with these results, the number of plasma cells in the PTPN22-deficient mice was increased compared to that in the wild-type mice. Our findings identify TRAF3 and PTPN22 as inhibitors of IL-6R signaling in B cells and reveal a previously uncharacterized role for TRAF3 in the regulation of plasma cell differentiation.

  5. Appearance of Human Plasma Cells Following Differentiation of Human B Cells in NOD/SCID Mouse Spleen

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Relatively little is known for the differentiation and maturation process of human B cells to plasma cells. This is particularly important in reconstitution work involving transfer of autoantibodies. To address this issue, we transplanted human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly into the spleen of irradiated NOD/SCID mice depleted of natural killer cell activity. Within 6 weeks, naïve B cells differentiated into memory B cells and, importantly, the numbers of human CD138+ plas...

  6. A balance between B cell receptor and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-07-15

    Signaling through the BCR can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into Ab-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. In this study, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is downregulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3K, Btk, IKK2, and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP1) or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling, thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells.

  7. Skeletal cell differentiation is enhanced by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla J Steinbeck

    Full Text Available Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS

  8. Skeletal cell differentiation is enhanced by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Marla J; Chernets, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  9. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  10. Prophylactic Plasma Transfusion Is Not Associated With Decreased Red Blood Cell Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Matthew A; Chandran, Arun; Jenkins, Gregory; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-05-01

    Critically ill patients frequently receive plasma transfusion under the assumptions that abnormal coagulation test results confer increased risk of bleeding and that plasma transfusion will decrease this risk. However, the effect of prophylactic plasma transfusion remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients. This is a retrospective cohort study of adults admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) at a single academic institution between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included age ≥18 years and an international normalized ratio measured during ICU admission. Multivariable propensity-matched analyses were used to evaluate associations between prophylactic plasma transfusion and outcomes of interest with a primary outcome of red blood cell transfusion in the ensuing 24 hours and secondary outcomes of hospital- and ICU-free days and mortality within 30 days of ICU discharge. A total of 27,561 patients were included in the investigation with 2472 (9.0%) receiving plasma therapy and 1105 (44.7%) for which plasma transfusion was prophylactic in nature. In multivariable propensity-matched analyses, patients receiving plasma had higher rates of red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 3.3-5.7], P plasma in the critically ill was not associated with improved clinical outcomes. Further investigation examining the utility of plasma transfusion in this population is warranted.

  11. Plasma cell alloantigen ENPP1 is expressed by a subset of human B cells with potential regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeongheon; Wang, Hongsheng; Kim, Yong Chan; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Abbasi, Sadia; Morse Iii, Herbert C

    2016-09-01

    Plasma cell alloantigen 1 (PC1), also known as ENPP1 (ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1), is an enzyme involved primarily in hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate at the cell surface. Although the expression pattern of PC1 is relatively broad, its expression in B cells is found at significant levels only in terminally differentiated germinal center B cells, plasma cells and a subset of B-1a cells in mice. Here we describe studies designed to determine whether expression of PC1 might define novel populations of human B cells with similarities to mouse B cells. We found that PC1 is expressed in small populations of human B lineage cells in peripheral blood, cord blood, tonsils, bone marrow and pediatric peritoneal fluid, with the highest levels in plasma cells. The characteristics of human PC1(+) B cells differ from mouse peritoneal B-1a subsets and from features of the human CD20(+)CD27(+)CD43(+)CD70(-) B-cell subset proposed to be human B-1 cells. Expression of PC1 was greatly increased in B cells stimulated with the combination of CD40 ligand, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-21. In addition, PC1(+) B cells activated CD4(+) T regulatory cells. ENPP1 thus defines a subset of human B cells that differs significantly from mouse peritoneal B-1a and proposed human B-1 cells.

  12. Plasma from preeclamptic women activates endothelial cells via monocyte activation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, Marijke M.; van Pampus, Maria G.; Anninga, Zwanine A.; Salomons, Jet; Westra, Inge M.; Donker, Rogier B.; Aarnoudse, Jan G.; de Vos, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In this study we tested whether plasma from preeclamptic women contains factors that can activate endothelial cells in the presence of monocytes in vitro. Plasma from preeclamptic women (n = 6), healthy pregnant women (n = 6) and nonpregnant women (n = 6) was incubated with mono-cultures and co-cult

  13. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  14. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  15. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  16. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734 inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy.

  17. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  18. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  19. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Joh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549 and human bladder cancer cell (EJ were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  20. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengyu Liu; Staffan Persson; Yi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosyn-thesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  1. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  2. Plasma membrane ubiquinone controls ceramide production and prevents cell death induced by serum withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, M P; Gómez-Díaz, C; Villalba, J M; Burón, M I; López-Lluch, G; Navas, P

    1997-06-01

    Serum provides cultured cells with survival factors required to maintain growth. Its withdrawal induces the development of programmed cell death. HL-60 cells were sensitive to serum removal, and an increase of lipid peroxidation and apoptosis was observed. Long-term treatment with ethidium bromide induced the mitochondria-deficient rho(o)HL-60 cell line. These cells were surprisingly more resistant to serum removal, displaying fewer apoptotic cells and lower lipid peroxidation. HL-60 cells contained less ubiquinone at the plasma membrane than rho(o)HL-60 cells. Both cell types increased plasma membrane ubiquinone in response to serum removal, although this increase was much higher in rho(o) cells. Addition of ubiquinone to both cell cultures in the absence of serum improved cell survival with decreasing lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Ceramide was accumulated after serum removal in HL-60 but not in rho(o)HL-60 cells, and exogenous ubiquinone reduced this accumulation. These results demonstrate a relationship between ubiquinone levels in the plasma membrane and the induction of serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis, and ceramide accumulation. Thus, ubiquinone, which is a central component of the plasma membrane electron transport system, can represent a first level of protection against oxidative damage caused by serum withdrawal.

  3. Evaluation of the sensitivity of bacterial and yeast cells to cold atmospheric plasma jet treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Michael A; Chebbi, Ahmed; McDonnell, Kevin A; Staunton, Claire; Dowling, Denis P

    2015-06-07

    The focus of this research was first to determine the influence of the atmospheric plasma drive frequency on the generation of atomic oxygen species and its correlation with the reduction of bacterial load after treatment in vitro. The treatments were carried out using a helium-plasma jet source called PlasmaStream™. The susceptibility of multiple microbial cell lines was investigated in order to compare the response of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as a yeast cell line to the atmospheric plasma treatment. It was observed for the source evaluated that at a frequency of 160 kHz, increased levels of oxygen-laden active species (i.e., OH, NO) were generated. At this frequency, the maximum level of bacterial inactivation in vitro was also achieved. Ex vivo studies (using freshly excised porcine skin as a human analog) were also carried out to verify the antibacterial effect of the plasma jet treatment at this optimal operational frequency and to investigate the effect of treatment duration on the reduction of bacterial load. The plasma jet treatment was found to yield a 4 log reduction in bacterial load after 6 min of treatment, with no observable adverse effects on the treatment surface. The gram-negative bacterial cell lines were found to be far more susceptible to the atmospheric plasma treatments than the gram-positive bacteria. Flow cytometric analysis of plasma treated bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) was conducted in order to attain a fundamental understanding of the mode of action of the treatment on bacteria at a cellular level. This study showed that after treatment with the plasma jet, E. coli cells progressed through the following steps of cell death; the inactivation of transport systems, followed by depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane, and finally permeabilization of the cell wall.

  4. Direct protein introduction into plant cells using a multi-gas plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Kawano, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Protein introduction into cells is more difficult in plants than in mammalian cells, although it was reported that protein introduction was successful in shoot apical meristem and leaves only together with a cell-penetrating peptide. In this study, we tried to introduce superfolder green fluorescent protein (sGFP)-fused to adenylate cyclase as a reporter protein without a cell-penetrating peptide into the cells of tobacco leaves by treatment with atmospheric non-thermal plasmas. For this purpose, CO2 or N2 plasma was generated using a multi-gas plasma jet. Confocal microscopy indicated that sGFP signals were observed inside of leaf cells after treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma without substantial damage. In addition, the amount of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formed by the catalytic enzyme adenylate cyclase, which requires cellular calmodulin for its activity, was significantly increased in leaves treated with CO2 or N2 plasma, also indicating the introduction of sGFP-fused adenylate cyclase into the cells. These results suggested that treatment with CO2 or N2 plasma could be a useful technique for protein introduction into plant tissues.

  5. Gas-liquid interfacial plasmas producing reactive species for cell membrane permeabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Sasaki, Shota; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Gas-liquid interfacial atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (GLI-APPJ) are used medically for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization. In an attempt to identify the dominant factors induced by GLI-APPJ responsible for enhancing cell-membrane permeability, the concentration and distribution of plasma-produced reactive species in the gas and liquid phase regions are measured. These reactive species are classified in terms of their life-span: long-lived (e.g., H2O2), short-lived (e.g., O2•−), and extremely-short-lived (e.g., •OH). The concentration of plasma-produced •OHaq in the liquid phase region decreases with an increase in solution thickness (plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization is found to decay markedly as the thickness of the solution increases. Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of •OHaq, resulting from the center-peaked distribution of •OH in the gas phase region, corresponds with the distribution of the permeabilized cells upon APPJ irradiation, whereas the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species such as H2O2aq in solution exhibit a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that •OHaq is likely one of the dominant factors responsible for plasma-induced cell-membrane permeabilization. PMID:28163376

  6. Reactional Plasmacytosis In Plasma Cell Orificial mucositis In A Patient Of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose Sumit Kumar

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin biopsy of a 50 year old Moroccan male patient with labial and oro-pharyngeal plasmocytosis showed hyperplastic, with papillomatous eroded epithelium. Dense infiltrates of plasma cells were seen in the dermis, with perivascular prominence. Hypopharynx, epiglottis, adenoids, and tonsils showed the same type of infiltration. Immunofluorescence (IF and peroxidase antiperoxidase (PAP techniques demonstrated the presence of mostly and infiltrate of plasma cells showing IgA (30 â€" 40%, IgM (20-30%, IgG(10-20% after staining with polyclonal antibodies along with T4 & T8 Iymphocytes with monoclonal staining. Electron microscopy showed absence of atypical plasma cells with abundant endoplasmic reticulum. Patient’s symptoms of stomtitis, dysphonia and pharyngitis were temporarily relieved by systemic corticosteroids of plasma cells suggesting a reactive type of benign plasmocytosis.

  7. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  8. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells.

  9. Plasma Treatment to Enhance Fuel Cell Water Management Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to further define the potential for plasma treatment technology, developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to modify and...

  10. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generated by NO-plasma treatment modulates osteoprogenitor cells early differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaadany, Mostafa; Subramanian, Gayathri; Ayan, Halim; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) generated using a non-thermal plasma system can mediate osteoblastic differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells without creating toxicity. Our objective was to create an NO delivery mechanism using NO-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma that can generate and transport NO with controlled concentration to the area of interest to regulate osteoprogenitor cell activity. We built a non-thermal atmospheric pressure DBD plasma nozzle system based on our previously published design and similar designs in the literature. The electrical and spectral analyses demonstrated that N2 dissociated into NO under typical DBD voltage-current characteristics. We treated osteoprogenitor cells (MC3T3-E1) using NO-plasma treatment system. Our results demonstrated that we could control NO concentration within cell culture media and could introduce NO into the intracellular space using NO-plasma treatment with various treatment times. We confirmed that NO-plasma treatment maintained cell viability and did not create any toxicity even with prolonged treatment durations. Finally, we demonstrated that NO-plasma treatment induced early osteogenic differentiation in the absence of pro-osteogenic growth factors/proteins. These findings suggest that through the NO-plasma treatment system we are able to generate and transport tissue-specific amounts of NO to an area of interest to mediate osteoprogenitor cell activity without subsequent toxicity. This opens up the possibility to develop DBD plasma-assisted tissue-specific NO delivery strategies for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of bone diseases.

  11. Generalized Plasma Skimming Model for Cells and Drug Carriers in the Microvasculature

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tae-Rin; Yang, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    In microvascular transport, where both blood and drug carriers are involved, plasma skimming has a key role on changing hematocrit level and drug carrier concentration in capillary beds after continuous vessel bifurcation in the microvasculature. While there have been numerous studies on modeling the plasma skimming of blood, previous works lacked in consideration of its interaction with drug carriers. In this paper, a generalized plasma skimming model is suggested to predict the redistributions of both the cells and drug carriers at each bifurcation. In order to examine its applicability, this new model was applied on a single bifurcation system to predict the redistribution of red blood cells and drug carriers. Furthermore, this model was tested at microvascular network level under different plasma skimming conditions for predicting the concentration of drug carriers. Based on these results, the applicability of this generalized plasma skimming model is fully discussed and future works along with the model'...

  12. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  13. E-cadherin expression and its clinical significance in 41 cases of spinal plasma cell myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liangzhe; Liu Huimin; He Jin; Li Yuli; Xu Yi; Chen Bing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression level of E-cadherin in spinal plasma cell myeloma and its relationship with the clinicopathological indexes of spinal plasma cell myeloma. Methods: The expression of E-cadherin was detected in 41 cases of spinal plasma cell myeloma and 14 cases of simple bone cysts by using S-P (streptavidin-perosidase) immunohistochemical staining. The relationship between E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features was analyzed. Results: In spinal plasma cell myelomas, the positive expression rate of E-cadherin (46.34 %) was higher than that in simple bone cyst tissues (all negative) (P0.05), but had relationship with the classification of light chain. The expression rate in lambda chain subgroup was lower than that in the others (P<0.05). We also found the E-cadherin negative patients had a higher overall survival rate than those who had strong E-cadherin expression (P<0.05). Conclusion: E-cadherin expressed higher in spinal plasma cell myelomas than in simple bone cyst tissues and its expression had relationship with the light chain classification in spinal plasma cell myeloma. The patients with no stain of E-cadherin may have a poor prognosis. Detecting the type of light chain associated with expression of E-cadherin might be helpful in evaluating the outcome of spinal PCM patients.

  14. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  15. Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet with floating electrode on murine melanoma and fibroblast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Liu, J.; Yao, C.; Chen, S.; Lin, F.; Li, P.; Shi, X.; Zhang, Guan-Jun

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma jets have been recently shown as a highly promising tool in certain cancer therapies. In this paper, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with a one inner floating and two outer electrode configuration using helium gas for medical applications is developed. Subjected to a range of applied voltages with a frequency of 19.8 kHz at a fixed rate of gas flow (i.e., 3 l/min), electrical and optical characteristics of the APPJ are investigated. Compared with the device only with two outer electrodes, higher discharge current, longer jet, and more active species in the plasma plume at the same applied voltage together with the lower gas breakdown voltage can be achieved through embedding a floating inner electrode. Employing the APPJ with a floating electrode, the effects of identical plasma treatment time durations on murine melanoma cancer and normal fibroblast cells cultured in vitro are evaluated. The results of cell viability, cell apoptosis, and DNA damage detection show that the plasma can inactivate melanoma cells in a time-dependent manner from 10 s to 60 s compared with the control group (p melanoma cells at the same treatment time. The different basal reactive oxygen species level and antioxidant superoxide dismutase level of two kinds of cells may account for their different responses towards the identical plasma exposure.

  16. Plasma-cell cheilitis: successful treatment with intralesional injections of corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, J T-P; Cheng, C-J; Lee, W-R; Wang, K-H

    2009-03-01

    Plasma-cell cheilitis is a rare inflammatory disorder of the lip characterized histologically by a band-like infiltrate of plasma cells in the upper dermis. It is considered an oral counterpart of plasma-cell balanitis. Clinically, it presents as a circumscribed, flat to slightly raised, eroded area of the lip. The cause of plasma-cell cheilitis is unknown, and the treatment is often disappointing. We describe a 55-year-old woman who had a long-lasting painful, swollen, and eroded area on her lips, which responded poorly to various topical treatments. Biopsy showed a band-like infiltrate composed mainly of mature plasma cells in the dermis. A diagnosis of plasma-cell cheilitis was made after excluding contact dermatitis, lichen planus, bacterial, fungal and spirochaete infections, and an extramedullary plasmacytoma. Dramatic improvements were observed after intralesional injections of corticosteroids. The lesion cleared up after two treatments, and there has been no recurrence in 1 year of follow-up.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of mouse B cell terminal differentiation defines a signature for antibody-secreting plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Liao, Yang; Willis, Simon N; Taubenheim, Nadine; Inouye, Michael; Tarlinton, David M; Smyth, Gordon K; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L; Corcoran, Lynn M

    2015-06-01

    When B cells encounter an antigen, they alter their physiological state and anatomical localization and initiate a differentiation process that ultimately produces antibody-secreting cells (ASCs). We have defined the transcriptomes of many mature B cell populations and stages of plasma cell differentiation in mice. We provide a molecular signature of ASCs that highlights the stark transcriptional divide between B cells and plasma cells and enables the demarcation of ASCs on the basis of location and maturity. Changes in gene expression correlated with cell-division history and the acquisition of permissive histone modifications, and they included many regulators that had not been previously implicated in B cell differentiation. These findings both highlight and expand the core program that guides B cell terminal differentiation and the production of antibodies.

  18. Hemorheological alterations of red blood cells induced by non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Kim, Jae Hyung; Chang, Boksoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been introduced in various applications such as wound healing, sterilization of infected tissues, blood coagulation, delicate surgeries, and so on. The non-thermal plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), including ozone. Various groups have reported that the produced ROS influence proliferation and differentiation of cells, as well as apoptosis and growth arrest of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of non-thermal plasma on rheological characteristics of red blood cells (RBC). We experimentally measured the extent of hemolysis, deformability, and aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) with respect to exposure times of non-thermal plasma. RBC morphology was also examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The absorbance of hemoglobin released from the RBCs increased with increasing exposure time of the non-thermal plasma. Values of the elongation index and aggregation index were shown to decrease significantly with increasing plasma exposure times. Therefore, hemorheological properties of RBCs could be utilized to assess the performance of various non-thermal plasmas.

  19. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben [Immunomodulation Group, School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University (Ireland); Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot [School of Biotechnology and National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University (Ireland); Loscher, Christine E., E-mail: christine.loscher@dcu.ie [Immunomodulation Group, School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University (Ireland)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  20. New Treatment Options for Osteosarcoma - Inactivation of Osteosarcoma Cells by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümbel, Denis; Gelbrich, Nadine; Weiss, Martin; Napp, Matthias; Daeschlein, Georg; Sckell, Axel; Ender, Stephan A; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Stope, Matthias B

    2016-11-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma has been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth and induce tumor cell death. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric plasma treatment on proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells and to characterize the underlying cellular mechanisms. Human osteosarcoma cells (U2-OS and MNNG/HOS) were treated with cold atmospheric plasma and seeded in culture plates. Cell proliferation, p53 and phospho-p53 protein expression and nuclear morphology were assessed. The treated human osteosarcoma cell lines exhibited attenuated proliferation rates by up to 66%. The cells revealed an induction of p53, as well as phospho-p53 expression, by 2.3-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, compared to controls. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation following cold atmospheric plasma treatment. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment significantly attenuated cell proliferation in a preclinical in vitro osteosarcoma model. The resulting increase in p53 expression and phospho-activation in combination with characteristic nuclear changes indicate this was through induction of apoptosis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Prognostic impact of tumour-infiltrating B cells and plasma cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Jonna; Nodin, Björn; Eberhard, Jakob; Micke, Patrick; Jirström, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Multiple studies have described associations between infiltrating immune cells and prognosis in cancer; however, the clinical relevance has most often been attributed to the T-cell linage. This study aimed to further investigate the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic impact of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in CRC. Immunohistochemical expression of CD20, CD138 and immunoglobulin kappa C (IGKC) was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 incident cases of CRC from a prospective population-based cohort. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the impact of CD20, CD138 and IGKC expression on 5-year overall survival. Immune cell-specific CD20, CD138, and IGKC expression correlated significantly with lower T-stage (p cells correlated significantly with an improved OS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.78), remaining significant in multivariable analysis adjusted for age, TNM stage, differentiation grade and vascular invasion (HR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.33-0.80). Immune cell-specific CD138 and IGKC expression correlated significantly with an improved OS in univariable Cox regression analysis; however, these associations did not remain significant in multivariable analysis. Finally, tumour cell-specific CD138 expression was found to be an independent factor of poor prognosis (HR 1.52; 95% CI 1.03-2.24). The results from the present study demonstrate that B cell infiltration in CRC has a significant impact on tumour progression and prognosis. These findings supplement and extend the current knowledge of the immune landscape in colorectal cancer, and merit further study.

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists suppress interleukin-6 expression by bone marrow stromal cells: an immunotoxicology study

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Bone marrow stromal cells produce cytokines required for the normal growth and development of all eight hematopoietic cell lineages. Aberrant cytokine production by stromal cells contributes to blood cell dyscrasias. Consequently, factors that alter stromal cell cytokine production may significantly compromise the development of normal blood cells. We have shown that environmental chemicals, such as aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, suppress B lymphopoiesis by ...

  3. Immunoglobulin M concentration in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: correlation with bone marrow B cells and plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tute, Ruth M; Rawstron, Andy C; Owen, Roger G

    2013-04-01

    Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels vary considerably among patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and previous studies have failed to demonstrate a correlation with overall bone marrow disease burden. In this study, bone marrow B cells and plasma cells were enumerated by flow cytometry and correlated with serum IgM concentrations. Monotypic B cells comprised a median of 6% of bone marrow leukocytes but did not correlate with IgM levels (r = 0.071, P = .5). Plasma cells, although typically present in lower numbers (median, 0.52%) did show a correlation with IgM (r = 0.452, P = .01). IgM levels in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, at least in part, correlate with the degree of plasma cell differentiation seen within the tumor.

  4. Prognostic value of plasma and urine glycosaminoglycan scores in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gatto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC vastly improved since the introduction of antiangiogenic targeted therapy. However, it is still unclear which biological processes underlie ccRCC aggressiveness and affect prognosis. Here, we checked whether a recently discovered systems biomarker based on plasmatic or urinary measurements of glycosaminoglycans aggregated into diagnostic scores correlated with ccRCC prognosis.Thirty-one patients with a diagnosis of ccRCC (23 metastatic were prospectively enrolled and their urine and plasma biomarker scores were correlated to progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS as either a dichotomous (Low vs. High or a continuous variable in a multivariate survival analysis.The survival difference between High vs. Low-scored patients was significant in the case of urine scores (2-year PFS rate = 53.3% vs. 100%, p = 310-4 and 2-year OS rate = 73.3% vs. 100%, p = 0.0078 and in the case of OS for plasma scores (2-year PFS rate = 60% vs. 84%, p = 0.0591 and 2-year OS rate = 66.7% vs. 90%, p = 0.0206. In multivariate analysis, the urine biomarker score was an independent predictor of PFS (HR: 4.62, 95% CI: 1.66 to 12.83, p = 0.003 and OS (HR: 10.13, 95% CI: 1.80 to 57.04, p = 0.009.This is the first report on an association between plasma or urine GAG scores and the prognosis of ccRCC patients. Prospective trials validating the prognostic and predictive role of this novel systems biomarker are warranted.

  5. Improved recovery of bisulphite-treated cell-free DNA in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Krarup, H.B.; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.;

    Detection of cell-free methylated DNA in plasma is a promising tool for tumour diagnosis and monitoring. Due to the very low amount of cell-free DNA in plasma, sensitivity of the detection methods are of utmost importance. The vast majority of currently available methods for analysing DNA...... of PCR amplifying methylated and umethylated MEST. This procedure allows low levels of DNA to be easily and reliably analysed, a prerequisite for the clinical usefulness of cell-free methylated DNA detection in plasma........ The analytical sensitivity of the method was analysed by detection of methylated/unmethylated copies of the imprinted (and hemimethylated) gene MEST in a dilution series of plasma DNA. The method is based on an accelerated deamination step and magnetic silica purification of DNA in combination with a first round...

  6. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  7. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  8. How plasma induced oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation influences viability of skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Strudwick, Xanthe; Short, Robert D.; Ogawa, Kotaro; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Gaur, Nishtha; Hong, Sung-Ha; Cowin, Allison J.; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Ito, Masafumi; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.; Bradley, James W.; Graves, David B.; Szili, Endre J.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation arising from He gas jet and He plasma jet treatments on the viability of skin cells cultured in vitro has been investigated. He gas jet treatment de-oxygenated cell culture medium in a process referred to as "sparging." He plasma jet treatments oxidized, as well as oxygenated or de-oxygenated cell culture medium depending on the dissolved oxygen concentration at the time of treatment. He gas and plasma jets were shown to have beneficial or deleterious effects on skin cells depending on the concentration of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules at the time of treatment. Different combinations of treatments with He gas and plasma jets can be used to modulate the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules to influence cell viability. This study highlights the importance of a priori knowledge of the concentration of dissolved oxygen at the time of plasma jet treatment, given the potential for significant impact on the biological or medical outcome. Monitoring and controlling the dynamic changes in dissolved oxygen is essential in order to develop effective strategies for the use of cold atmospheric plasma jets in biology and medicine.

  9. Cold atmospheric plasma jet effects on V79-4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Andreea-Roxana; Georgescu, N

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cold plasmas are due to charged particles, reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), UV photons, and intense electric field. In order to obtain a more efficient action on mammalian cells (useful for cancer therapy), we used in our studies chemically activated cold plasma (He and O2 gas mixture). V79-4 cells were exposed to plasma jet for different time periods (30, 60, 90, 120 and 150s), using different combinations of helium and oxygen inputs (He:2.5l/min + 02:12.5ml/min; He:2.51/min + O2:25ml/min; He:2.51/min + O2:37.5 ml/min). Using MTT test we demonstrated that plasma jet induced cell viability decrease in all cases. The effect of chemically activated cold plasma--apoptosis or necrosis--depends on gas mixture and treatment period. Taking into account that ROS density in cell microenvironment is related to O2 percent in the gas mixture and treatment period, we can presume that cell death is due to ROS produced in plasma jet.

  10. Characterization of subpopulation lacking both B-cell and plasma cell markers in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Naoki; Zhan, Maosheng; Hori, Yumiko; Honma, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells with tumorigenic potential are limited to a small population known as cancer-initiating cells (CICs). To date, CICs have not been identified in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Here, we investigated a candidate of CICs of an indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM), using WM cell line MWCL-1. WM tumor expresses both B-cell and plasma cell markers, CD20 and CD138. When stained with anti-CD20 and anti-CD138 antibodies, MWCL-1 cells were classified into three subpopulations: CD20⁻ CD138⁻, CD20⁺ CD138⁻, and CD20⁺ CD138⁺. When cultured, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells yielded all three subpopulations, but CD20⁺ cells did not yield CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells. Higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) expelling and in vitro colony formation activities were detected in CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells than in CD20⁺ CD138⁻ and CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells. When cultured in the absence of serum or with anti-cancer drug, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells were resistant to apoptosis. In contrast, CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells were vulnerable to apoptosis in the same condition. In fact, the immunohistochemical analysis with clinical samples revealed that tumor cells in apoptosis were CD138-positive. The production of all three subpopulations, the efficient ROS expelling and in vitro colony-forming activities, and the resistance to apoptosis suggested that the CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cell might be a candidate of CICs in WM.

  11. Parametric studies of AC plasma display panel cells in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punset, C.; Boeuf, J.P.; Pitchford, L.C. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). CPAT

    1996-12-31

    The authors have developed a two-dimensional fluid model of AC plasma panel cells. This model was used to study the operation of a plasma panel cell in a barrier rib geometry in single pulse operation. In this communication, they report results from calculations in several different geometries and for a series of applied voltage pulses. The purpose of this work is to study the effect of geometry on the electrical characteristics of AC plasma display panel cells. The calculations reported here are representative of actual device operation. They have also used the model to study the effect of the geometrical parameters of the cell, to optimize the discharge efficiency in producing UV photons and to study cross-talk, i.e., interaction between adjacent cells. The conclusions of these parametric studies will be presented.

  12. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  13. Determination of the optimum conditions for lung cancer cells treatment using cold atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Morteza; Rajaei, Hajar; Mashayekh, Amir Shahriar; Shafiae, Mojtaba; Mahdikia, Hamed; Khani, Mohammadreza; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Shokri, Babak

    2016-10-01

    Cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) can affect live cells and organisms due to the production of different reactive species. In this paper, the effects of various parameters of the CAP such as the treatment time, gas mixture, gas flow rate, applied voltage, and distance from the nozzle on the LL/2 lung cancer cell line have been studied. The probable effect of UV radiation has also been investigated using an MgF2 filter. Besides the cancerous cells, the 3T3 fibroblast cell line as a normal cell has been treated with the CAP. The Methylthiazol Tetrazolium assay showed that all parameters except the gas flow rate could impress effectively on the cancer cell viability. The cell proliferation seemed to be stopped after plasma treatment. The flow cytometry assay revealed that apoptosis and necrosis were appreciable. It was also found that treating time up to 2 min will not exert any effect on the normal cells.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma gel in combination with Schwann cells for repair of sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fagang Ye; Haiyan Li; Guangxi Qiao; Feng Chen; Hao Tao; Aiyu Ji; Yanling Hu

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits,culture-expanded and differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells.Autologous platelet-rich plasma and Schwann cell-like cells were mixed in suspension at a density of 1 × 106 cells/mL,prior to introduction into a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit.Fabricated tissue-engineered nerves were implanted into rabbits to bridge 10 mm sciatic nerve defects (platelet-rich plasma group).Controls were established using fibrin as the seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells at identical density to construct tissue-engineered nerves (fibrin group).Twelve weeks after implantation,toluidine blue staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to demonstrate an increase in the number of regenerating nerve fibers and thickness of the myelin sheath in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group.Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling revealed that the number of Fluoro-gold-positive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and the spinal cord anterior horn was greater in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the fibrin group.Electrophysiological examination confirmed that compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were superior in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group.These results indicate that autologous platelet-rich plasma gel can effectively serve as a seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells to construct tissue-engineered nerves to promote peripheral nerve regeneration.

  15. O2 plasma sintering study of TiO2 photoelectrodes in dye solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, R. S.; Gonçalves, A. D.; Stegemann, C.; da Silva Sobrinho, A. S.; Miyakawa, W.; Massi, M.

    2017-08-01

    The development of more efficient photoelectrochemical solar cells has been, over the years, the subject of many scientific researches. In this paper a methodology was established to carry out the sintering process of nanoporous TiO2 layer by using plasma, which was compared with sintered layers made by the conventional sintering process in a furnace. The TiO2 commercial paste was spread by doctor-blading technique and subjected to different sintering processes. Porous layer samples were subjected to structural and morphological analyses. Then photoelectrodes dye-loading was measured by optical spectrophotometry. The quality of the layers under plasma sintering process in terms of weight loss and removal of organic compounds was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The results showed that the plasma sintering process favors the adsorption of dye on the layer surface due to the creation of active states caused by O2 reactive plasma. Furthermore the O2 plasma process provides enough energy for removing organic compounds arising from the TiO2 paste and for providing nanoparticle sintering. Solar cells assembled with the plasma-sintered layers had a power conversion efficiency 20.1% higher than the obtained in solar cells sintered in a conventional furnace, proving the efficiency of the plasma sintering process.

  16. Clinical and Prognostic Effect of Plasma Fibrinogen in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mei; Jing, Suoshi; Liu, Xingchen; Wang, Hanzhang; Wang, Xinping; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although numerous studies have shown that plasma fibrinogen is linked to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk, the consistency and magnitude of the effect of plasma fibrinogen are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the association between plasma fibrinogen and RCC prognosis. Methods. An electronic search of Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and the Cochrane databases was performed to identify relevant studies published prior to June 1, 2016. Results. A total of 3744 patients with RCC from 7 published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prognostic and clinical relevance of plasma fibrinogen are evaluated in RCC patients. Statistical significance of the combined hazard ratio (HR) was detected for overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and disease-free survival. Our pooled results showed that elevated plasma fibrinogen was significantly associated with clinical stage and Fuhrman grading. The level of plasma fibrinogen was not found to be associated with tumor type and gender. Conclusions. Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a strong indicator of poorer prognosis of patients with RCC, whereas the plasma fibrinogen is not significantly associated with tumor type. Therefore, plasma fibrinogen could be used in patients with RCC for risk stratification and decision providing a proper therapeutic strategy.

  17. Clinical and Prognostic Effect of Plasma Fibrinogen in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuejun; Hong, Mei; Jing, Suoshi; Liu, Xingchen; Wang, Hanzhang; Wang, Xinping; Kaushik, Dharam; Rodriguez, Ronald; Wang, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although numerous studies have shown that plasma fibrinogen is linked to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk, the consistency and magnitude of the effect of plasma fibrinogen are unclear. The aim of the study was to explore the association between plasma fibrinogen and RCC prognosis. Methods. An electronic search of Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and the Cochrane databases was performed to identify relevant studies published prior to June 1, 2016. Results. A total of 3744 patients with RCC from 7 published studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prognostic and clinical relevance of plasma fibrinogen are evaluated in RCC patients. Statistical significance of the combined hazard ratio (HR) was detected for overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and disease-free survival. Our pooled results showed that elevated plasma fibrinogen was significantly associated with clinical stage and Fuhrman grading. The level of plasma fibrinogen was not found to be associated with tumor type and gender. Conclusions. Elevated plasma fibrinogen is a strong indicator of poorer prognosis of patients with RCC, whereas the plasma fibrinogen is not significantly associated with tumor type. Therefore, plasma fibrinogen could be used in patients with RCC for risk stratification and decision providing a proper therapeutic strategy.

  18. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  19. Factors regulating immunoglobulin production by normal and disease-associated plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David A; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-01-21

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  20. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Choi, Eun H; Kim, Sun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified "cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development" and "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development" as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option.

  1. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Bin Park

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p < 0.05 by plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified "cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development" and "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development" as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option.

  2. Early Growth Response-1 Plays a Non-redundant Role in the Differentiation of B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Eunkyeong; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2015-06-01

    Early growth response (Egr)-1 is a Cys2-His2-type zincfinger transcription factor. It has been shown to induce survival and proliferation of immature and mature B cells, respectively, but its role in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells remains unclear. To examine the effects of Egr-1 deficiency on the activation of B cells, naive B cells from Egr1 (-/-) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were activated to proliferate and differentiate, and then assayed by FACS. Proportions of cells undergoing proliferation and apoptosis did not differ between Egr1 (-/-) and WT mice. However, Egr1 (-/-) B cells gave rise to fewer plasma cells than WT B cells. Consistently, Egr1 (-/-) mice produced significantly lower titer of antigen-specific IgG than their WT littermates upon immunization. Our results demonstrate that Egr-1 participates in the differentiation program of B cells into plasma cells, while it is dispensable for the proliferation and survival of mature B cells.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID-STATE DRIVERS FOR THE NIF PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P A; McHale, G B; James, G; Brown, G; Cook, E G; Hickman, B C

    2008-05-14

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPC) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cell allows the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, configured in a 4 x 1 array, form an optical switch that is key to achieving multi-pass operation. Solid-state Plasma Pulse Generators (PPGs) and high current high voltage solid-state Switch Pulse Generators (SPGs) have been developed for use in the PEPC. The solid-state plasma pulse generators initiate and maintain plasma within the cells; each pulser is capable of delivering 60J of energy to each plasma channel. Deployment of the solid-state PPGs has been completed in NIF. The MOSFET-switched SPG is capable of delivering a requisite fast rise time, 17kV flattop pulse to the cells nonlinear crystals. A complete software and hardware control system has been developed and is currently being tested for use on the solid-state SPGs. Also a transmission line modeling, development, and testing effort is in process, in support of NIFs Advanced Radiographic Capabilities (ARC). Work is scheduled for completion by the end of the calendar year.

  4. Low-temperature plasma needle effects on cultured metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael; Brubaker, Timothy; Wilson, Michael; Cook, Ian; Czesak, Nicholas; Hipkins, Garret

    2015-11-01

    The Penn State Low-Temperature Plasma group is presently investigating the applications of low-temperature plasma for biomedical applications, including the effects on MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells. A plasma needle system has been designed and constructed that consists of a 22-gauge stainless steel syringe needle, which acts as the high-voltage electrode, covered with PEEK tubing as the dielectric with a ring ground electrode on the outside. The system is driven by a low-frequency AC voltage amplifier, with typical operating conditions of 2-5 kV peak voltage at 5 kHz. Helium is used as the working fluid and produces a plasma jet with ~ cm's visible extent. Cultured breast cancer cells were provided by our collaborator and exposed to the plasma needle for varying doses and detachment of cells was observed. The effects are attributed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation and transport through the cell culture medium. Plasma needle characterization and the results of the breast cancer experiments will be presented.

  5. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of tunneling ionization effects in plasma-based accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhwiler, D L; Cary, J R; Esarey, E; Leemans, W; Giacone, R E

    2003-01-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can sustain accelerating gradients on the order of 100 GV/m. If the plasma is not fully ionized, fields of this magnitude will ionize neutral atoms via electron tunneling, which can completely change the dynamics of the plasma wake. Particle-in-cell simulations of a high-field plasma wakefield accelerator, using the OOPIC code, which includes field-induced tunneling ionization of neutral Li gas, show that the presence of even moderate neutral gas density significantly degrades the quality of the wakefield. The tunneling ionization model in OOPIC has been validated via a detailed comparison with experimental data from the l'OASIS laboratory. The properties of a wake generated directly from a neutral gas are studied, showing that one can recover the peak fields of the fully ionized plasma simulations, if the density of the electron drive bunch is increased such that the bunch rapidly ionized the gas.

  7. Adhesion and receptor clustering stabilizes lateral heterogeneity in cell plasma membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of plasma membrane lipids play a vital role in many functions that initiate at the mammalian cell surface. Some functions are thought to occur, at least in part, because plasma membrane lipids have a tendency to separate into two distinct liquid phases, called liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered. We find that isolated cell plasma membranes are poised near a miscibility critical point separating these two liquid phases, and postulate that critical composition fluctuations provide the physical basis of functional membrane heterogeneity in intact cells. In this talk I will describe several possible mechanisms through which dynamic fluctuations can be stabilized in super-critical membranes, and will present some preliminary evidence suggesting that these structures can be visualized in intact cells using quantitative super-resolution fluorescence localization imaging.

  8. A microfluidic platform for probing single cell plasma membranes using optically trapped Smart Droplet Microtools (SDMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Peter M P; Ninkovic, Tanja; Chan, Karen; de Mello, Andrew J; Willison, Keith R; Klug, David R; Templer, Richard H; Neil, Mark A A; Ces, Oscar

    2009-04-21

    We recently introduced a novel platform based upon optically trapped lipid coated oil droplets (Smart Droplet Microtools-SDMs) that were able to form membrane tethers upon fusion with the plasma membrane of single cells. Material transfer from the plasma membrane to the droplet via the tether was seen to occur. Here we present a customised version of the SDM approach based upon detergent coated droplets deployed within a microfluidic format. These droplets are able to differentially solubilise the plasma membrane of single cells with spatial selectivity and without forming membrane tethers. The microfluidic format facilitates separation of the target cells from the bulk SDM population and from downstream analysis modules. Material transfer from the cell to the SDM was monitored by tracking membrane localized EGFP.

  9. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  10. Treatment of gastric cancer cells with non-thermal atmospheric plasma generated in water

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Gjika, Eda; Keidar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) can be applied to living tissues and cells as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Even though studies report on the successful use of NTAP to directly irradiate cancer cells, this technology can cause cell death only in the upper 3-5 cell layers. We report on a NTAP argon solution generated in DI water for treating human gastric cancer cells (NCl-N87). Our findings showed that the plasma generated in DI water during a 30-minute treatment had the strongest affect in inducing apoptosis in cultured human gastric cancer cells. This result can be attributed to presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced in water during treatment. Furthermore, the data showed that elevated levels of RNS may play an even more significant role than ROS in the rate of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  11. Normal chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells with a depolarized plasma membrane potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, Bert van; Vogelzang, Sake A.; Ypey, Dirk L.; Molen, Loek G. van der; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1990-01-01

    We examined a possible role for the plasma membrane potential in signal transduction during cyclic AMP-induced chemotaxis in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Chemotaxis, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses in cells with a depolarized membrane potential were measured. Cells can be

  12. 2-Methoxyestradiol induce the conversion of human peripheral blood memory B lymphocytes into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Drouin, Mathieu; Proulx, Maryse; Jung, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an end-metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, is an antiproliferative agent that is currently being tested in clinical trials for cancer treatment. We hereby report that sub-cytotoxic concentrations of 2ME influence the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. More surprisingly, we have observed that 2ME induces the conversion of CD138(-) B lymphocytes into CD138(+) cells of phenotype similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-secreting plasma cells. Normal human B lymphocytes expressing CD138 increased in response to 2ME in a dose-dependent fashion, from 2% at baseline up to 31% in cells cultured in the presence of 0.75 microM 2ME. Moreover, most of the converted cells were also CD27(+) and secreted high levels of IgG (151 microg/10(6)cells/24h). IEF studies revealed that conversion occurred in a polyclonal manner. We then exploited this effect of 2ME to gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern changes in transcription factors involved in plasma cells differentiation. Plasma cells generated by 2ME treatment of normal human B lymphocytes expressed elevated levels of IRF4 and reduced levels of Pax5 and Bcl-6. Similarly, levels of XBP-1 and Blimp-1 transcripts were increased. Our results suggest that the differentiation of peripheral blood B lymphocytes into plasma cells requires a similar modulation of transcription factors expression that for tonsil and bone marrow B lymphocytes.

  13. Volume regulatory hormones and plasma volume in pregnant women with sickle cell disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosede B Afolabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sickle cell disease (haemoglobin SS (HbSS mainly affects those of West African origin and is associated with hypervolaemia. Plasma volume rises by up to 50% in normal pregnancy but was previously found to be paradoxically contracted in late sickle cell pregnancy. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is activated very early in human pregnancy to support the plasma volume expansion. We hypothesised that activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system would be blunted in pregnant women with sickle cell disease. Materials and methods: We measured plasma volume and concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensinogen, aldosterone and other volume-related hormones in a cross-sectional study of pregnant and non-pregnant Nigerian women with HbSS or HbAA. Results: Plasma volume was higher in non-pregnant HbSS than HbAA women, but had not risen by 16 weeks, unlike plasma volume in HbAA women. The concentration of plasma renin also rose significantly less by 16 weeks in HbSS; angiotensinogen and aldosterone concentrations increased. Conclusions: The lower plasma renin concentration at 16 weeks with HbSS could be either primary or secondary to vasoconstriction related to inadequate vasodilator activity. The contracted plasma volume might then stimulate aldosterone synthesis by non-angiotensin II dependent stimulation. Studies of vasodilators such as nitric oxide, vasodilator eicosanoids or the PlGF/VEGF/sFlT-1 axis in pregnant HbSS and HbAA women will test this hypothesis.

  14. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-03-31

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy.

  15. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy. PMID:28361987

  16. Intrinsic Plasma Cell Differentiation Defects in B Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T Cell Anergy Patient B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadhinya Arjunaraja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available B cell Expansion with NF-κB and T cell Anergy (BENTA disease is a novel B cell lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline, gain-of-function mutations in the lymphocyte scaffolding protein CARD11, which drives constitutive NF-κB signaling. Despite dramatic polyclonal expansion of naive and immature B cells, BENTA patients also present with signs of primary immunodeficiency, including markedly reduced percentages of class-switched/memory B cells and poor humoral responses to certain vaccines. Using purified naive B cells from our BENTA patient cohort, here we show that BENTA B cells exhibit intrinsic defects in B cell differentiation. Despite a profound in vitro survival advantage relative to normal donor B cells, BENTA patient B cells were severely impaired in their ability to differentiate into short-lived IgDloCD38hi plasmablasts or CD138+ long-lived plasma cells in response to various stimuli. These defects corresponded with diminished IgG antibody production and correlated with poor induction of specific genes required for plasma cell commitment. These findings provide important mechanistic clues that help explain both B cell lymphocytosis and humoral immunodeficiency in BENTA disease.

  17. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.;

    2004-01-01

    Micro scale patterning of bioactive surfaces is desirable for numerous biochip applications. Polyethyleneoxide-like (PEO-like) coating with non-fouling functionality has been deposited using low frequency AC plasma polymerization. The non-fouling properties of the coating were tested with human...... cells ( HeLa) and fluorescence labeled proteins (isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, i.e. FITC-BSA). The PEO-like coatings were fabricated by plasma polymerization of 12-crown-4 (ppCrown) with plasma polymerized hexene (ppHexene) as adhesion layer. The coatings were micro patterned using...

  18. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S.; Gaus, Katharina;

    2009-01-01

    domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate...... and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation...

  19. Implementations of mesh refinement schemes for particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.

    2003-10-20

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations and present two implementations in more detail, with examples.

  20. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGHong; ZHUHesun; 等

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene(PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia.The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement.The results show that low temperature ammonia plasma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity.Chinese hamster ovary(CHO)cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  1. Reactive oxygen species in plasma against E. coli cells survival rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ren-Wu; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Zong, Zi-Chao; Li, Jun-Xiong; Yang, Zhou-Bin; Liu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Si-Ze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the contrastive analysis of inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution with different disinfection methods. Compared with the hydrogen peroxide solution and the ozone gas, the atmospheric-pressure He plasma can completely kill the E. coli cells in the shortest time. The inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the C-O or C=O content of the inactivated E. coli cell surface by plasma is predominantly increased, indicating the quantity of oxygen-containing species in plasma is more than those of two other methods, and then the C-C or C-H bonds can be broken, leading to the etching of organic compounds. Analysis also indicates that plasma-generated species can play a crucial role in the inactivation process by their direct reactions or the decompositions of reactive species, such as ozone into OH radicals in water, then reacting with E. coli cells. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), and the Funds from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  2. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into the cells, response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  3. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Plasma Membrane Ca2+ ATPase and the Plasma Membrane Sodium Calcium Exchanger Cooperate in the Regulation of Cell Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is an ambivalent signal: it is essential for the correct functioning of cell life, but may also become dangerous to it. The plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase (PMCA) and the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) are the two mechanisms responsible for Ca2+ extrusion. The NCX has low Ca2+ affinity but high capacity for Ca2+ transport, whereas the PMCA has a high Ca2+ affinity but low transport capacity for it. Thus, traditionally, the PMCA pump has been attributed a housekeeping role in maintaining cytosolic Ca2+, and the NCX the dynamic role of counteracting large cytosolic Ca2+ variations (especially in excitable cells). This view of the roles of the two Ca2+ extrusion systems has been recently revised, as the specific functional properties of the numerous PMCA isoforms and splicing variants suggests that they may have evolved to cover both the basal Ca2+ regulation (in the 100 nM range) and the Ca2+ transients generated by cell stimulation (in the μM range). PMID:21421919

  5. Measurement of plasma cell-free DNA concentrations in dogs with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Goggs, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To determine if cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was identifiable in canine plasma, to evaluate 3 techniques for the measurement of plasma cfDNA concentrations in dogs presented to an emergency service, and to compare the plasma cfDNA concentrations of healthy dogs to those with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia. Retrospective study of banked canine plasma samples collected between May 2014 and December 2014. Dogs presented to the emergency service of a university veterinary teaching hospital. Plasma cfDNA was measured on residual plasma samples obtained from 15 dogs with sepsis, 15 dogs with moderate-severe trauma, 15 dogs diagnosed with a sarcoma. Plasma cfDNA was also measured in 15 healthy dogs. None. Assay linearity, repeatability, and reproducibility were evaluated. Quantification of cfDNA was performed in duplicate on diluted citrated plasma and following DNA purification using 2 fluorescence assays (SYBR-Gold; Quant-iT) and by ultraviolet absorbance spectroscopy. Fluorescence intensities (FIs) were converted to cfDNA concentrations using standard curves. Median FI values and cfDNA concentrations were compared to healthy controls using the Kruskal-Wallis test, with adjustment for multiple comparisons. Alpha was set at 0.05. Both assays had excellent linearity, and acceptable repeatability and reproducibility. Compared to controls, plasma cfDNA concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma with both assays (P ≤ 0.003). Dogs with neoplasia had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations with the Quant-iT assay only (P = 0.003). When measurements were performed on purified DNA, only dogs with moderate-severe trauma had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations (P plasma using 2 fluorescence assays. DNA extraction offers no advantage over direct measurement. Compared to healthy controls, dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma have significantly increased plasma cfDNA concentrations. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care

  6. Feed gas humidity: a vital parameter affecting a cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jet and plasma-treated human skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, J.; Wende, K.; Masur, K.; Iseni, S.; Dünnbier, M.; Hammer, M. U.; Tresp, H.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, the effect of feed gas humidity on the reactive component generation of an atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet and its effect on human skin cells are investigated. Feed gas humidity is identified as one key parameter that strongly influences stability and reproducibility of plasma medical studies. The plasma jet is investigated by absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and infrared spectral region for its ozone production depending on the humidity concentration in the feed gas. By optical emission spectroscopy the dependence of present excited plasma species such as hydroxyl radicals, molecular nitrogen, argon and atomic oxygen on the feed gas humidity is investigated. As an interface layer between the plasma jet effluent and the biological cell, a buffer solution is treated and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production is studied with two independent colorimetric assays as a function of humidity admixture to the feed gas. Ultimately, the effect of varying feed gas humidity on the cell viability of indirect plasma treated adherent HaCAT cells is investigated. The highest viability is found for the driest feed gas condition. Furthermore, this work shows answers for the relevance of unwanted—or intended—feed gas humidity in plasma medical experiments and their comparatively large relevance with respect to ambient humidity. The findings will lead to more reproducible experiments in the field of plasma medicine.

  7. Quantifying changes in the cellular thiol-disulfide status during differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa Rebecca Erritzøe; Otsu, Mieko; Braakman, Ineke

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cells produce and secrete massive amounts of disulfide-containing antibodies. To accommodate this load on the secretory machinery, the differentiation of resting B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells is accompanied by a preferential expansion of the secretory compartments of the cells...... and by an up-regulation of enzymes involved in redox regulation and protein folding. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated proteins in whole cells. The results show that while the global thiol-disulfide state is affected to some extent...... by the differentiation, steady-state levels of glutathionylated protein thiols are less than 0.3% of the total protein cysteines, even in fully differentiated cells, and the overall protein redox state is not affected until late in differentiation, when large-scale IgM production is ongoing. A general expansion...

  8. General protocol for the culture of cells on plasma-coated electrospun scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex, A Géraldine; Fortunato, Giuseppino; Hegemann, Dirk; Tevaearai, Hendrik T; Giraud, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to culture on standard tissue-treated plastic, cell culture on three-dimensional scaffolds impedes additional challenges with respect to substrate preparation, cell seeding, culture maintenance, and analysis. We herewith present a general route for the culture of primary cells, differentiated cells, or stem cells on plasma-coated, electrospun scaffolds. We describe a method to prepare and fix the scaffolds in culture wells and discuss a convenient method for cell seeding and subsequent analysis by scanning electron microscopy or immunohistology.

  9. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events.

  10. Mechanistic insights into the impact of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on human epithelial cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezest, Marlène; Chavatte, Laurent; Bourdens, Marion; Quinton, Damien; Camus, Mylène; Garrigues, Luc; Descargues, Pascal; Arbault, Stéphane; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Casteilla, Louis; Clément, Franck; Planat, Valérie; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) has potential as a new cancer therapy. However, knowledge about cellular signaling events and toxicity subsequent to plasma treatment is still poorly documented. The aim of this study was to focus on the interaction between 3 different types of plasma (He, He-O2, He-N2) and human epithelial cell lines to gain better insight into plasma-cell interaction. We provide evidence that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are inducing cell death by apoptosis and that the proteasome, a major intracellular proteolytic system which is important for tumor cell growth and survival, is a target of (He or He-N2) CAPP. However, RONS are not the only actors involved in cell death; electric field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP. By differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis we found that CAPP triggers antioxidant and cellular defense but is also affecting extracellular matrix in keratinocytes. Moreover, we found that malignant cells are more resistant to CAPP treatment than normal cells. Taken together, our findings provide insight into potential mechanisms of CAPP-induced proteasome inactivation and the cellular consequences of these events. PMID:28120925

  11. LONG-LIVED BONE MARROW PLASMA CELLS DURING IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALPHA (1→3 DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernyshova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production kinetics and some functional properties of long-lived marrow plasma cells were studied in mice immunized with T-independent type 2 antigens. Alpha (1→3 dextran was used as an antigen for immunization. The mice were immunized by dextran, and the numbers of IgM antibody producing cells were determined by ELISPOT method. The cell phenotype was determined by cytofluorimetric technique. In the area of normal bone marrow lymphocytes ~4% of T and ~85% of B cells were detected. About 35% of the cells expressed a plasmocyte marker (CD138; 3% were CD138+IgM+, and about 6% of the lymphocytes were double-positive for CD138+IgA+. Among spleen lymphocytes, 50% of T and 47% of B cells were detected. About 1.5% lymphocytes were CD138+, and 0.5% were positive for CD138 and IgM. Time kinetics of antibody-producing cells in bone marrow and spleen was different. In spleen populations, the peak amounts of antibody-secreting cells have been shown on the day 4; the process abated by the day 28. Vice versa, the numbers of the antibody-producing cells in bone marrow started to increase on the day 4. The process reached its maximum on day 14, and after 28th day became stationary. The in vitro experiments have shown that supplementation of bone marrow cells from immune mice with dextran did not influence their functional activity. It was previously shown for cells responding to T-dependent antigens only. A specific marker for the long-lived plasma cells is still unknown. However, these cells possess a common CD138 marker specific for all plasma cells. A method for isolation of bone marrow CD138+ cells was developed. The CD138+ cells were of 87-97% purity, being enriched in long-lived bone marrow cells, and produced monospecific antibodies. 

  12. Oxygen plasma-treated thermoresponsive polymer surfaces for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    Although cell sheet tissue engineering is a potent and promising method for tissue engineering, an increase of mechanical strength of a cell sheet is needed for easy manipulation of it during transplantation or 3D tissue fabrication. Previously, we developed a cell sheet-polymer film complex that had enough mechanical strength that can be manipulated even by tweezers (Fujita et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 103(2): 370-377). We confirmed the polymer film involving a temperature sensitive polymer and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins could be removed by lowering temperature after transplantation, and its potential use in regenerative medicine was demonstrated. However, the use of ECM proteins conflicted with high stability in long-term storage and low cost. In the present study, to overcome these drawbacks, we employed the oxygen plasma treatment instead of using the ECM proteins. A cast and dried film of thermoresponsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) was fabricated and treated with high-intensity oxygen plasma. The cells became possible to adhere to the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, whereas could not to the inherent surface of bulk PNIPAAm without treatment. Characterizations of the treated surface revealed the surface had high stability. The surface roughness, wettability, and composition were changed, depending on the plasma intensity. Interestingly, although bulk PNIPAAm layer had thermoresponsiveness and dissolved below lower critical solution temperature (LCST), it was found that the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface lost its thermoresponsiveness and remained insoluble in water below LCST as a thin layer. Skeletal muscle C2C12 cells could be cultured on the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, a skeletal muscle cell sheet with the insoluble thin layer could be released in the medium, and thus the possibility of use of the cell sheet for transplantation was demonstrated.

  13. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, Alena, E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, Silvie [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. - Highlights: • Plasma activation of LDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE • Study of surface properties by several techniques: ARXPS, AFM, zeta-potential, and goniometry • Investigation of adhesion and spreading of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and mouse fibroblasts (L929)

  14. Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by non-thermal, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Duval

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions.

  15. Radiographic features of plasma cell leukemia in the maxilla: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Phillip; Kashtwari, Deeba; Nair, Madhu K. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diagnostic Sciences/Radiology, Colleges of Dentistry/Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an aggressive form of multiple myeloma where there is hematogenous spread of abnormal plasma cells into the periphery. This is opposed to multiple myeloma, where the abnormal plasma cells stay in the bone marrow. PCL is more common in males than females, and is also more common in African-Americans than Caucasians. Signs and symptoms of PCL include, but are not limited to, renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, anemia, lytic bone lesions, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Here, we discussed a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian female recently diagnosed with primary PCL with radiographic features of this disease throughout the body, with an emphasis on the maxillofacial skeleton and relevance from a dental standpoint.

  16. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P; Hinz, A; Zacharias, R; Ollis, C; Fulkerson, E; Mchale, B; Runtal, A; Bishop, C

    2007-07-27

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007.

  17. Radiographic features of plasma cell leukemia in the maxilla: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Phillip; Kashtwari, Deeba

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an aggressive form of multiple myeloma where there is hematogenous spread of abnormal plasma cells into the periphery. This is opposed to multiple myeloma, where the abnormal plasma cells stay in the bone marrow. PCL is more common in males than females, and is also more common in African-Americans than Caucasians. Signs and symptoms of PCL include, but are not limited to, renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, anemia, lytic bone lesions, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Here, we discussed a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian female recently diagnosed with primary PCL with radiographic features of this disease throughout the body, with an emphasis on the maxillofacial skeleton and relevance from a dental standpoint. PMID:28035306

  18. Polymorphous silicon thin films produced in dusty plasmas: application to solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Chaabane, N; Kharchenko, A V; Tchakarov, S [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UMR 7647), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2004-12-01

    We summarize our current understanding of the optimization of PIN solar cells produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from silane-hydrogen mixtures. To increase the deposition rate, the discharge is operated under plasma conditions close to powder formation, where silicon nanocrystals contribute to the deposition of so-called polymorphous silicon thin films. We show that the increase in deposition rate can be achieved via an accurate control of the plasma parameters. However, this also results in a highly defective interface in the solar cells due to the bombardment of the P-layer by positively charged nanocrystals during the deposition of the I-layer. We show that decreasing the ion energy by increasing the total pressure or by using silane-helium mixtures allows us to increase both the deposition rate and the solar cells efficiency, as required for cost effective thin film photovoltaics.

  19. Polymorphous silicon thin films produced in dusty plasmas: application to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chaâbane, N.; Kharchenko, A. V.; Tchakarov, S.

    2004-12-01

    We summarize our current understanding of the optimization of PIN solar cells produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition from silane hydrogen mixtures. To increase the deposition rate, the discharge is operated under plasma conditions close to powder formation, where silicon nanocrystals contribute to the deposition of so-called polymorphous silicon thin films. We show that the increase in deposition rate can be achieved via an accurate control of the plasma parameters. However, this also results in a highly defective interface in the solar cells due to the bombardment of the P-layer by positively charged nanocrystals during the deposition of the I-layer. We show that decreasing the ion energy by increasing the total pressure or by using silane helium mixtures allows us to increase both the deposition rate and the solar cells efficiency, as required for cost effective thin film photovoltaics.

  20. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  1. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  2. Roles of charged particles and reactive species on cell membrane permeabilization induced by atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Shota; Kanzaki, Makoto; Hokari, Yutaro; Tominami, Kanako; Mokudai, Takayuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-07-01

    As factors that influence cell membrane permeabilization during direct and indirect atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation, charged particle influx, superoxide anion radicals (O2 -•), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plasma-irradiated solution were evaluated. These are the three strong candidate factors and might multiply contribute to cell membrane permeabilization. In particular, a shorter plasma diffusion distance leads to the enhancement of the direct effects such as charged particle influx and further increase cell membrane permeability. In addition, O2 -• dissipates over time (a life span of the order of minutes) in plasma-irradiated water, and the deactivation of a plasma-irradiated solution in term of cell membrane permeabilization occurs in a life span of the same order. These results could promote the understanding of the mechanism of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization.

  3. Wnt11 controls cell contact persistence by local accumulation of Frizzled 7 at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Sabine; Zimyanin, Vitaly; Carreira-Barbosa, Filipa; Tada, Masazumi; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-12-04

    Wnt11 is a key signal, determining cell polarization and migration during vertebrate gastrulation. It is known that Wnt11 functionally interacts with several signaling components, the homologues of which control planar cell polarity in Drosophila melanogaster. Although in D. melanogaster these components are thought to polarize cells by asymmetrically localizing at the plasma membrane, it is not yet clear whether their subcellular localization plays a similarly important role in vertebrates. We show that in zebrafish embryonic cells, Wnt11 locally functions at the plasma membrane by accumulating its receptor, Frizzled 7, on adjacent sites of cell contacts. Wnt11-induced Frizzled 7 accumulations recruit the intracellular Wnt signaling mediator Dishevelled, as well as Wnt11 itself, and locally increase cell contact persistence. This increase in cell contact persistence is mediated by the local interaction of Wnt11, Frizzled 7, and the atypical cadherin Flamingo at the plasma membrane, and it does not require the activity of further downstream effectors of Wnt11 signaling, such as RhoA and Rok2. We propose that Wnt11, by interacting with Frizzled 7 and Flamingo, modulates local cell contact persistence to coordinate cell movements during gastrulation.

  4. Cell Attachment and Viability Study of PCL Nano-fiber Modified by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Fereshteh; Irani, Shiva; Zandi, Mojgan; Mivehchi, Houri; Nagheh, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is an emerging discipline which applies the basic principles of life sciences and engineering to repair and restore living tissues and organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold and non-thermal plasma surface modification of poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds on fibroblast cell behavior. Nano-fiber PCL was fabricated through electrospinning technique, and some fibers were then treated by cold and non-thermal plasma. The cell-biomaterial interactions were studied by culturing the fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL. Scaffold biocompatibility test was assessed using an inverted microscope. The growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL were analyzed by MTT viability assay. Cellular attachment on the nano-fiber and their morphology were evaluated using scanning electron microscope. The result of cell culture showed that nano-fiber could support the cellular growth and proliferation by developing three-dimensional topography. The present study demonstrated that the nano-fiber surface modification with cold plasma sharply enhanced the fibroblast cell attachment. Thus, cold plasma surface modification greatly raised the bioactivity of scaffolds.

  5. A gestational profile of placental exosomes in maternal plasma and their effects on endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Carlos; Torres, Maria Jose; Kobayashi, Miharu; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Sobrevia, Luis; Dobierzewska, Aneta; Illanes, Sebastian E; Mitchell, Murray D; Rice, Gregory E

    2014-01-01

    Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n = 20 per pregnant group) were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in the first (FT, 6-12 weeks), second (ST, 22-24 weeks) and third (TT, 32-38 weeks) trimester. The number of exosomes and placental exosome contribution were determined by quantifying immunoreactive exosomal CD63 and placenta-specific marker (PLAP), respectively. The effect of exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT on endothelial cell migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte). Exosome plasma concentration was more than 50-fold greater in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (pexosomes present in maternal plasma increased significantly with gestational age by more that two-fold (pExosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT increased endothelial cell migration by 1.9±0.1, 1.6±0.2 and 1.3±0.1-fold, respectively compared to the control. Pregnancy is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of exosomes present in plasma and maternal plasma exosomes are bioactive. While the role of placental cell-derived exosome in regulating maternal and/or fetal vascular responses remains to be elucidated, changes in exosome profile may be of clinical utility in the diagnosis of placental dysfunction.

  6. A gestational profile of placental exosomes in maternal plasma and their effects on endothelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n = 20 per pregnant group were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in the first (FT, 6-12 weeks, second (ST, 22-24 weeks and third (TT, 32-38 weeks trimester. The number of exosomes and placental exosome contribution were determined by quantifying immunoreactive exosomal CD63 and placenta-specific marker (PLAP, respectively. The effect of exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT on endothelial cell migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte. Exosome plasma concentration was more than 50-fold greater in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (p<0.001. During normal healthy pregnancy, the number of exosomes present in maternal plasma increased significantly with gestational age by more that two-fold (p<0.001. Exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT increased endothelial cell migration by 1.9±0.1, 1.6±0.2 and 1.3±0.1-fold, respectively compared to the control. Pregnancy is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of exosomes present in plasma and maternal plasma exosomes are bioactive. While the role of placental cell-derived exosome in regulating maternal and/or fetal vascular responses remains to be elucidated, changes in exosome profile may be of clinical utility in the diagnosis of placental dysfunction.

  7. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  8. Plasma monitoring and PECVD process control in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Onno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key process in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD of the active layers. The deposition process can be monitored in situ by plasma diagnostics. Three types of complementary diagnostics, namely optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and non-linear extended electron dynamics are applied to an industrial-type PECVD reactor. We investigated the influence of substrate and chamber wall temperature and chamber history on the PECVD process. The impact of chamber wall conditioning on the solar cell performance is demonstrated.

  9. Plasma treatment for improving cell biocompatibility of a biodegradable polymer scaffold for vascular graft applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valence, Sarra de; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Chaabane, Chiraz; Gurny, Robert; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Walpoth, Beat H; Möller, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds are being evaluated by many groups for the application of vascular tissue engineering. In addition to the choice of the material and the structure of the scaffold, tailoring the surface properties can have an important effect on promoting adequate tissue regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an increased hydrophilicity of a polycaprolactone vascular graft by treatment with a cold air plasma. To this end, treated and untreated scaffolds were characterized, evaluated in vitro with smooth muscle cells, and implanted in vivo in the rat model for 3 weeks, both in the subcutaneous location and as an aortic replacement. The plasma treatment significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the scaffold, with complete wetting after a treatment of 60 sec, but did not change fiber morphology or mechanical properties. Smooth muscle cells cultured on plasma treated patches adopt a spread out morphology compared to a small, rounded morphology on untreated patches. Subcutaneous implantation revealed a low foreign body reaction for both types of scaffolds and a more extended and dense cellular infiltrate in the plasma treated scaffolds. In the vascular position, the plasma treatment induced a better cellularization of the graft wall, while it did not affect endothelialization rate or intimal hyperplasia. Plasma treatment is therefore an accessible tool to easily increase the biocompatibility of a scaffold and accelerate tissue regeneration without compromising mechanical strength, which are valuable advantages for vascular tissue engineering.

  10. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-11-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients.

  11. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients. PMID:27599779

  12. Resolving mixed mechanisms of protein subdiffusion at the T cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Yonatan; Sherman, Eilon

    2017-06-01

    The plasma membrane is a complex medium where transmembrane proteins diffuse and interact to facilitate cell function. Membrane protein mobility is affected by multiple mechanisms, including crowding, trapping, medium elasticity and structure, thus limiting our ability to distinguish them in intact cells. Here we characterize the mobility and organization of a short transmembrane protein at the plasma membrane of live T cells, using single particle tracking and photoactivated-localization microscopy. Protein mobility is highly heterogeneous, subdiffusive and ergodic-like. Using mobility characteristics, we segment individual trajectories into subpopulations with distinct Gaussian step-size distributions. Particles of low-to-medium mobility consist of clusters, diffusing in a viscoelastic and fractal-like medium and are enriched at the centre of the cell footprint. Particles of high mobility undergo weak confinement and are more evenly distributed. This study presents a methodological approach to resolve simultaneous mixed subdiffusion mechanisms acting on polydispersed samples and complex media such as cell membranes.

  13. Influence of plasma etching in a multi chamber system on a-Si solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausche, H.; Moeller, M.; Plaettner, R.

    The plasma-CVD deposition system consisting of two chambers and developed at Siemens can deposit 9 pin solar cells of 100 sq cm simultaneously. Cleaning of the internal surfaces coated with a-Si is performed by plasma etching. The etch gases CF4+O2, SF6 and NF3 were investigated with respect to their etch rates, their efficacy in cleaning 'hidden' parts in the chamber, and with respect to the etching reaction products affecting the performance of the subsequently deposited cells. Mass spectrometric cell performance measurements were therefore taken. The sequence of etching with CF4+O2 or NF3, glow discharge in Ar+H2, pre-deposition of a-Si and cell deposition proved to be a suitable method for achieving high cell performance.

  14. Risk stratification of plasma cell neoplasm: insights from plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin fluorescence in situ hybridization (cIg FISH) vs. conventional FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Henry; Yang, Hai-Su; Jagannath, Sundar; Stephenson, Christine F; Brenholz, Pauline; Mazumder, Amitabha; Chari, Ajai

    2012-10-01

    We directly compared the results of routine fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) FISH from 75 paired samples for myeloma risk stratification. CIg FISH improves test specificity and sensitivity and tends to eliminate borderline results. It proves that most plasma cells (PCs) consistently carry the abnormality in myelomas with an IGH translocation, whereas routine FISH detects these cells only at variably low levels. Routine cytogenetic analysis of plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs) has a low sensitivity. Conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not plasma cell (PC) specific and results are diluted by other cells in the sample. Although PC-specific FISH testing has been recommended for multiple myeloma (MM) risk stratification, eg, by combining cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining with FISH, the benefits of cIg FISH have never been directly demonstrated in a controlled study. Seventy-five samples from patients with PCNs were analyzed by concomitant conventional FISH and cIg FISH with probes for t(4;14), t(11;14), t(14;16), -13, 17p-, and +3. The results were compared for their reliability, specificity, and consistency. Apart from marginally improving detection threshold in samples with low PC burden, cIg FISH identified more abnormal cases (50 vs. 47 cases) and more chromosome abnormalities (113 vs. 103 events) than did conventional FISH. It differentiated del(13q) in myelodysplasia from MM. Remarkably, cIg FISH consistently identified a high percentage of abnormal PCs in all cases. It detected IGH translocation in 78% to 100% of PCs in all but 2 positive cases, whereas conventional FISH detected 0% to 46% in these cases (median, 91% vs. 9%). The abnormal cells found in patients with 17p- were 19% to 96% by cIg FISH vs. 0% to 13% by conventional FISH (median, 54% vs. 9%). Cases with insufficient PCs for cIg FISH had only normal conventional FISH results. CIg FISH improves reliability of

  15. Particle-in-Cell Codes for plasma-based particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Basic principles of particle-in-cell (PIC ) codes with the main application for plasma-based acceleration are discussed. The ab initio full electromagnetic relativistic PIC codes provide the most reliable description of plasmas. Their properties are considered in detail. Representing the most fundamental model, the full PIC codes are computationally expensive. The plasma-based acceler- ation is a multi-scale problem with very disparate scales. The smallest scale is the laser or plasma wavelength (from one to hundred microns) and the largest scale is the acceleration distance (from a few centimeters to meters or even kilometers). The Lorentz-boost technique allows to reduce the scale disparity at the costs of complicating the simulations and causing unphysical numerical instabilities in the code. Another possibility is to use the quasi-static approxi- mation where the disparate scales are separated analytically.

  16. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled GEC Reference Cell Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, J. O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of electron number density, electron temperature, and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) using a compensated Langmuir probe have been performed on an inductively (transformer ) coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell plasma. The plasma source is operated with CH4, CF4, or their mixtures with argon. The effect of independently driving the electrode supporting the wafer on the probe data is studied. In particular, we find that the plasma structure depends on the phase in addition to the magnitude of the power coupled to the electrode relative to that of the transformer coil. The Langmuir probe is translated in a plane parallel to the electrode to investigate the spatial structure of the plasma. The probe data is also compared with fluid model predictions.

  17. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  18. Surface modification by allylamine plasma polymerization promotes osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2014-06-25

    Tuning the material properties in order to control the cellular behavior is an important issue in tissue engineering. It is now well-established that the surface chemistry can affect cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. In this study, plasma polymerization, which is an appealing method for surface modification, was employed to generate surfaces with different chemical compositions. Allylamine (AAm), acrylic acid (AAc), 1,7-octadiene (OD), and ethanol (ET) were used as precursors for plasma polymerization in order to generate thin films rich in amine (-NH2), carboxyl (-COOH), methyl (-CH3), and hydroxyl (-OH) functional groups, respectively. The surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the wettability was determined by measuring the water contact angles (WCA) and the surface topography was imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effects of surface chemical compositions on the behavior of human adipose-derive stem cells (hASCs) were evaluated in vitro: Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis for cell proliferation, F-actin staining for cell morphology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis, and Alizarin Red S staining for osteogenic differentiation. The results show that AAm-based plasma-polymerized coatings can promote the attachment, spreading, and, in turn, proliferation of hASCs, as well as promote the osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, suggesting that plasma polymerization is an appealing method for the surface modification of scaffolds used in bone tissue engineering.

  19. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency.

  20. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  1. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  2. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  3. Therapeutic effect of bortezomib for primary plasma cell leukemia followed by auto/allo stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozasa R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ryotaro Ozasa, Masaaki Hotta, Hideaki Yoshimura, Takahisa Nakanishi, Takeshi Tamaki, Shinya Fujita, Naoto Nakamichi, Michihiko Miyaji, Kazuyoshi Ishii, Tomoki Ito, Shosaku NomuraFirst Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare disease that represents approximately 4% of plasma cell malignant disorders. PCL consists of two variants: primary PCL presents in patients with no previous history of multiple myeloma, while secondary PCL consists of a leukemic transformation in a previously recognized multiple myeloma. Primary PCL is an extremely resistant, rapidly progressive, fatal disease, with a median overall survival of 6.8 months. There is no standard therapeutic strategy, because no treatment option has been prospectively evaluated. We describe a successful case of newly diagnosed primary PCL, treated with a regimen that included bortezomib, followed by auto stem cell transplantation and nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Our patient has maintained remission status for over 12 months since undergoing the allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This strategy is promising for PCL, which, though an extremely resistant disease, may become curable.Keywords: plasma cell leukemia, multiple myeloma, bortezomib, stem cell transplantation

  4. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acheva, A; Georgieva, R; Rupova, I; Boteva, R [Laboratory Molecular Radiobiology and Epidemiology, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, 132 Kliment Ohridski blvd, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Lyng, F [Radiation and Environmental Science Center, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin st, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: anjin_a@mail.bg

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  5. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheva, A.; Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Boteva, R.; Lyng, F.

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  6. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  7. Plasma membrane organization and dynamics is probe and cell line dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuangru; Lim, Shi Ying; Gupta, Anjali; Bag, Nirmalya; Wohland, Thorsten

    2017-09-01

    The action and interaction of membrane receptor proteins take place within the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane, however, is not a passive matrix. It rather takes an active role and regulates receptor distribution and function by its composition and the interaction of its lipid components with embedded and surrounding proteins. Furthermore, it is not a homogenous fluid but contains lipid and protein domains of various sizes and characteristic lifetimes which are important in regulating receptor function and signaling. The precise lateral organization of the plasma membrane, the differences between the inner and outer leaflet, and the influence of the cytoskeleton are still debated. Furthermore, there is a lack of comparisons of the organization and dynamics of the plasma membrane of different cell types. Therefore, we used four different specific membrane markers to test the lateral organization, the differences between the inner and outer membrane leaflet, and the influence of the cytoskeleton of up to five different cell lines, including Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1), Human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), fibroblast (WI-38) and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells by Imaging Total Internal Reflection (ITIR)-Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). We measure diffusion in the temperature range of 298-310K to measure the Arrhenius activation energy (EArr) of diffusion and apply the FCS diffusion law to obtain information on the spatial organization of the probe molecules on the various cell membranes. Our results show clear differences of the FCS diffusion law and EArr for the different probes in dependence of their localization. These differences are similar in the outer and inner leaflet of the membrane. However, these values can differ significantly between different cell lines raising the question how molecular plasma membrane events measured in different cell lines can be compared. This article is part of a Special Issue

  8. Biophoton emissions from cell cultures: biochemical evidence for the plasma membrane as the primary source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Blake T; Buckner, Carly A; Cameron, Dianne; Lafrenie, Robert F; Persinger, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Photon emissions were measured at ambient temperature (21°C) in complete darkness once per min from cultures of 10(6) cells during the 12 h following removal from 37°C. The energy of emission was about 10(-20) J/s/cell. Of 8 different cell lines, B16-BL6 (mouse melanoma cells) demonstrated the most conspicuous emission profile. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide indicated the membranes were intact with no indication of (trypan blue) cell necrosis. Treatments with EGF and ionomycin produced rapid early (first 3 h) increases in energy emission while glutamine-free, sodium azide and wortmanin-treated cells showed a general diminishment 3 to 9 h later. The results suggested the most probable origin of the photon emission was the plasma cell membrane. Measures from cells synchronized at the M- and S-phase supported this inference.

  9. THz spectroscopy of whole blood, plasma and cells in mice of SHR line with various pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, A.; Tyndyk, M.; Smolyanskaya, O.; Sulatskiy, M.; Kravtsenyuk, O.; Balbekin, N.; Khodzitsky, M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is devoted to studying of optical properties of whole blood and blood plasma in SHR mice grafted Ehrlich's carcinoma and mice with chronic inflammation at the terahertz frequency range. Additionally physiological saline solution suspension of ascites Ehrlich's carcinoma cells was explored.

  10. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations in sickle cell disease are related to the hemolytic phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landburg, P. P.; Teerlink, T.; Biemond, B. J.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Muskiet, F. A. J.; Duits, A. J.; Schnog, J. B.; Grp, C. U. R. A. M. A. Study

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is associated with pulmonary hypertension (PHT) in sickle cell disease (SCD). We studied the relationship of ADMA to other SCD-related complications. Plasma ADMA and associated parameters were determined in 52 HbSS/HbS beta(0)-thalassemia and 24 HbSC/HbS beta(+)-th

  11. BEHAVIOR OF CHO CELLS ON MODIFIED POLYPROPYLENE BY LOW TEMPERATURE AMMONIA PLASMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong; YU Yaoting; PAN Jilun; XU Yuanping; ZHU Hesun

    2001-01-01

    The surface of polypropylene (PP) membrane was modified by low temperature plasma with ammonia. The effect of exposure time was investigated by means of contact angle measurement. The results show that low temperature ammonia plcsma treatment can enhance its hydrophilicity. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells attachment on the modified membrane was enhanced and the growth rate on the membrane was faster than unmodified one.

  12. Multiparametric flow cytometry profiling of neoplastic plasma cells in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans E; Bøgsted, Martin; Klausen, Tobias W;

    2010-01-01

    The clinical impact of multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) in multiple myeloma (MM) is still unclear and under evaluation. Further progress relies on multiparametric profiling of the neoplastic plasma cell (PC) compartment to provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation. The primary...

  13. Cell-free plasma microRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and disease controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Anting Liu; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Knudsen, Steen;

    2013-01-01

    There are no tumor-specific biochemical markers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Tissue-specific gene expression including microRNA (miRNA) profiling, however, identifies specific PDAC signatures. This study evaluates associations between circulating, cell-free plasma-miRNA profiles...

  14. Plasma contact system activation drives anaphylaxis in severe mast cell-mediated allergic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala-Cunill, Anna; Björkqvist, Jenny; Senter, Riccardo; Guilarte, Mar; Cardona, Victoria; Labrador, Moises; Nickel, Katrin F; Butler, Lynn; Luengo, Olga; Kumar, Parvin; Labberton, Linda; Long, Andy; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Kenne, Ellinor; Jämsä, Anne; Krieger, Thorsten; Schlüter, Hartmut; Fuchs, Tobias; Flohr, Stefanie; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Cumin, Frederic; McCrae, Keith; Maas, Coen; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially lethal, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mast cell-derived mediators into the circulation. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We report here that a plasma protease cascade, the factor XII-driven contact system, critically contributes to

  15. Plasma HER2 amplification in cell-free DNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Troels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is an evolving technique in breast cancer, enabling liquid biopsies and treatment monitoring. The present study investigated the dynamics of plasma HER2 gene copy number and amplification in...... in cfDNA during neoadjuvant chemotherapy....

  16. Effect of Cold Plasma on Cell Viability and Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Murine Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingmin; Cai, Jingfen; Xu, Guimin; Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sile; Chang, Zhengshi; Liu, Jinren; Huang, Chongya; Zhang, Guanjun; Wu, Xili

    2016-04-01

    An argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet was employed to treat L929 murine fibroblasts cultured in vitro. Experimental results showed that, compared with the control cells, the treatment of fibroblasts with 15 s of plasma led to a significant increase of cell viability and collagen synthesis, while the treatment of 25 s plasma resulted in a remarkable decrease. Exploration of related mechanisms suggested that cold plasma could up-regulate CyclinD1 gene expression and down-regulate p27 gene expression at a low dose, while it could down-regulate CyclinD1 expression and up-regulate p27 expression at a higher dose, thus altering the cell cycle progression, and then affecting cell viability and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. supported partly by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81372076, 51307133 and 51221005), China National Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (No. 51125029), the Sci-Tech Project of Shaanxi Province of China (No. 2010K16-04), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. xkjc2013004)

  17. Efficient replacement of plasma membrane outer leaflet phospholipids and sphingolipids in cells with exogenous lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangtao; Kim, JiHyun; Huang, Zhen; St Clair, Johnna R; Brown, Deborah A; London, Erwin

    2016-12-06

    Our understanding of membranes and membrane lipid function has lagged far behind that of nucleic acids and proteins, largely because it is difficult to manipulate cellular membrane lipid composition. To help solve this problem, we show that methyl-α-cyclodextrin (MαCD)-catalyzed lipid exchange can be used to maximally replace the sphingolipids and phospholipids in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of living mammalian cells with exogenous lipids, including unnatural lipids. In addition, lipid exchange experiments revealed that 70-80% of cell sphingomyelin resided in the plasma membrane outer leaflet; the asymmetry of metabolically active cells was similar to that previously defined for erythrocytes, as judged by outer leaflet lipid composition; and plasma membrane outer leaflet phosphatidylcholine had a significantly lower level of unsaturation than phosphatidylcholine in the remainder of the cell. The data also provided a rough estimate for the total cellular lipids residing in the plasma membrane (about half). In addition to such lipidomics applications, the exchange method should have wide potential for investigations of lipid function and modification of cellular behavior by modification of lipids.

  18. Why Do Some T Cell Receptor Cytoplasmic Domains Associate with the Plasma Membrane?

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Anton evan der Merwe; Hao eZhang; Shaun-Paul eCordoba

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies in model systems it has been proposed that the cytoplasmic domains of T cell receptor signaling subunits that have polybasic motifs associate with the plasma membrane, and that this regulates their phosphorylation. Recent experiments in more physiological systems have confirmed membrane association but raised questions as to its function.

  19. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  20. Post-transfusion purpura treated with plasma exchange by haemonetics cell separator. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B; Morling, N; Rosenkvist, J;

    1978-01-01

    A case of post-transfusion purpura in a 61-year-old, multiparous female with a platelet alloantibody (anti-Zwa) in her serum is reported. The patient was successfully treated with plasma exchange by means of a Haemonetics 30 cell separator and corticosteroids. Compared with other therapeutic meas...

  1. Lenalidomide, Melphalan, and Prednisone Association Is an Effective Salvage Therapy in Relapsed Plasma Cell Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasina Guglielmelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare and aggressive plasma cell disorder, characterized by the presence of a peripheral blood absolute plasma cell count of at least 2×109/l and more than 20% circulating plasma cells. The prognosis of PCL patients remains poor. Even by using autologous or allogenic transplant procedures, median survival does not exceed 3 years (Saccaro et al., 2005. Thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide (Revlimid have emerged as high active agents in the treatment of PCL (Johnston and abdalla, 2002; Musto et al., 2007; Finnegan et al., 2006. In particular, Lenalidomide is a structural analogue of thalidomide with similar but more potent biological activity; it is used as first line therapy in MM (Palumbo et al., 2007; Niesvizky et al., 2007, although information regarding its associated use with dexamethasone use as salvage therapy in PCL derives from anecdotal single case reports (Musto et al., 2008. We would like to describe a case of primary PCL with adverse cytogenetic in which excellent response was achieved with the combination of lenalidomide, melphalan, and prednisone as salvage therapy.

  2. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Nedela, T; Urbassek, H;

    2002-01-01

     The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  3. Plume expansion of a laser-induced plasma studied with the particle-in-cell method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Nedelea, T.; Schou, Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    The initial stage of laser-induced plasma plume expansion from a solid in vacuum and the effect of the Coulomb field have been studied. We have performed a one-dimensional numerical calculation by mapping the charge on a computational grid according to the particle-in-cell (PIC) method of Birdsall...

  4. Direct covalent coupling of proteins to nanostructured plasma polymers: a route to tunable cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnichuk, Iurii, E-mail: iurii.melnichuk@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Choukourov, Andrei, E-mail: choukourov@kmf.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Bilek, Marcela, E-mail: m.bilek@physics.usyd.edu.au [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Weiss, Anthony, E-mail: tony.weiss@sydney.edu.au [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Vandrovcová, Marta, E-mail: Marta.Vandrovcova@fgu.cas.cz [Institute of Physiology of Czech Academy of Science, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Bačáková, Lucie, E-mail: Lucie.Bacakova@fgu.cas.cz [Institute of Physiology of Czech Academy of Science, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Hanuš, Jan, E-mail: jan.hanus@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Kousal, Jaroslav, E-mail: jarda@kmf.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Shelemin, Artem, E-mail: artem.shelemin@gmail.com [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); Solař, Pavel, E-mail: pawell.solar@seznam.cz [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Macromolecular Physics, Prague 18000 (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Flat and nanostructured interfaces were overcoated by hydrocarbon plasma polymer. • Linker-free covalent attachment of proteins to resultant surfaces was validated. • Ultra-thin hydrocarbon overcoat (<2 nm) secured prolonged effective binding. • Pre-adsorbed tropoelastin promoted proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. • Nanostructured films were multi-affine and impeded cell adhesion. - Abstract: Flat and nanostructured thin films were fabricated by deposition of ultra-thin (<2 nm) layer of hydrocarbon plasma polymer over polished silicon and over a pattern of 8 nm-thick poly(ethylene) islands on silicon. Linker-free radical-based covalent binding of bovine serum albumin and tropoelastin was confirmed for both types of films. The binding capability of albumin was found to be stable over many days of ambient air storage time. Tropoelastin-mediated flat plasma polymers favored adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. Nanostructured plasma polymers were multi-affine and their hierarchical surface represented an additional barrier for cell attachment.

  5. Evaluation of prenatal RHD typing strategies on cell-free fetal DNA from maternal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.H.M. Grootkerk-Tax; A.A. Soussan; M. de Haas; P.A. Maaskant-van Wijk; C.E. van der Schoot

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma led to the development of assays to predict the fetal D status with RHD-specific sequences. Few assays are designed in such a way that the fetus can be typed in RHD psi mothers and that RHD psi fetuses are correctly typed. Owing to

  6. Exosome-associated hepatitis C virus in cell cultures and patient plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziqing; Zhang, Xiugen; Yu, Qigui; He, Johnny J

    2014-12-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects its target cells in the form of cell-free viruses and through cell-cell contact. Here we report that HCV is associated with exosomes. Using highly purified exosomes and transmission electron microscopic imaging, we demonstrated that HCV occurred in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. Exosome-associated HCV was infectious and resistant to neutralization by an anti-HCV neutralizing antibody. There were more exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV detected in the plasma of HCV-infected patients. These results suggest exosome-associated HCV as an alternative form for HCV infection and transmission.

  7. Nanoscale crystallinity modulates cell proliferation on plasma sprayed surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alan M. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom); Paxton, Jennifer Z.; Hung, Yi-Pei; Hadley, Martin J.; Bowen, James; Williams, Richard L. [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Grover, Liam M., E-mail: l.m.grover@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied to the surface of metallic prostheses to mediate hard and soft tissue attachment for more than 40 years. Most coatings are formed of high purity hydroxyapatite, and coating methods are often designed to produce highly crystalline surfaces. It is likely however, that coatings of lower crystallinity can facilitate more rapid tissue attachment since the surface will exhibit a higher specific surface area and will be considerably more reactive than a comparable highly crystalline surface. Here we test this hypothesis by growing a population of MC3T3 osteoblast-like cells on the surface of two types of hip prosthesis with similar composition, but with differing crystallinity. The surfaces with lower crystallinity facilitated more rapid cell attachment and increased proliferation rate, despite having a less heterogeneous surface topography. This work highlights that the influence of the crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale is dominant over macro-scale topography for cell adhesion and growth. Furthermore, crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity. These findings could facilitate designing novel coated calcium phosphate surfaces that more rapidly bond tissue following implantation. - Highlights: • Crystallinity of HA at the nano-scale was dominant over macro-scale topography. • Lower crystallinity caused rapid cell attachment and proliferation rate. • Crystallinity could be easily adjusted by without compromising coating purity.

  8. Trans-activity of plasma membrane-associated ganglioside sialyltransferase in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilcaes, Aldo A; Demichelis, Vanina Torres; Daniotti, Jose L

    2011-09-09

    Gangliosides are acidic glycosphingolipids that contain sialic acid residues and are expressed in nearly all vertebrate cells. They are synthesized at the Golgi complex by a combination of glycosyltransferase activities followed by vesicular delivery to the plasma membrane, where they participate in a variety of physiological as well as pathological processes. Recently, a number of enzymes of ganglioside anabolism and catabolism have been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. In particular, it was observed that CMP-NeuAc:GM3 sialyltransferase (Sial-T2) is able to sialylate GM3 at the plasma membrane (cis-catalytic activity). In this work, we demonstrated that plasma membrane-integrated ecto-Sial-T2 also displays a trans-catalytic activity at the cell surface of epithelial and melanoma cells. By using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay combined with confocal fluorescence microscopy, we observed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to sialylate hydrophobically or covalently immobilized GM3 onto a solid surface. More interestingly, we observed that ecto-Sial-T2 was able to sialylate GM3 exposed on the membrane of neighboring cells by using both the exogenous and endogenous donor substrate (CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid) available at the extracellular milieu. In addition, the trans-activity of ecto-Sial-T2 was considerably reduced when the expression of the acceptor substrate was inhibited by using a specific inhibitor of biosynthesis of glycolipids, indicating the lipidic nature of the acceptor. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that an ecto-sialyltransferase is able to trans-sialylate substrates exposed in the plasma membrane from mammalian cells, which represents a novel insight into the molecular events that regulate the local glycosphingolipid composition.

  9. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  10. The plasma concentration of the B cell activating factor is increased in children with acute malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduati, Eunice; Gwela, Agnes; Karanja, Henry; Mugyenyi, Cleopatra; Langhorne, Jean; Marsh, Kevin; Urban, Britta C

    2011-09-15

    Malaria-specific antibody responses in children often appear to be short-lived but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and its receptors expressed on B cells with antibody responses during and after acute malaria in children. Our results demonstrate that BAFF plasma levels increased during acute malarial disease and reflected disease severity. The expression profiles for BAFF receptors on B cells agreed with rapid activation and differentiation of a proportion of B cells to plasma cells. However, BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) expression was reduced on all peripheral blood B cells during acute infection, but those children with the highest level of BAFF-R expression on B cells maintained schizont-specific immunoglobin G (IgG) over a period of 4 months, indicating that dysregulation of BAFF-R expression on B cells may contribute to short-lived antibody responses to malarial antigens in children. In summary, this study suggests a potential role for BAFF during malaria disease, both as a marker for disease severity and in shaping the differentiation pattern of antigen-specific B cells.

  11. Altered Plasma Profile of Antioxidant Proteins as an Early Correlate of Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Taiyi; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2016-04-29

    Insulin resistance and β cell dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Unlike insulin resistance, β cell dysfunction remains difficult to predict and monitor, because of the inaccessibility of the endocrine pancreas, the integrated relationship with insulin sensitivity, and the paracrine effects of incretins. The goal of our study was to survey the plasma response to a metabolic challenge in order to identify factors predictive of β cell dysfunction. To this end, we combined (i) the power of unbiased iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification) mass spectrometry with (ii) direct sampling of the portal vein following an intravenous glucose/arginine challenge (IVGATT) in (iii) mice with a genetic β cell defect. By so doing, we excluded the effects of peripheral insulin sensitivity as well as those of incretins on β cells, and focused on the first phase of insulin secretion to capture the early pathophysiology of β cell dysfunction. We compared plasma protein profiles with ex vivo islet secretome and transcriptome analyses. We detected changes to 418 plasma proteins in vivo, and detected changes to 262 proteins ex vivo The impairment of insulin secretion was associated with greater overall changes in the plasma response to IVGATT, possibly reflecting metabolic instability. Reduced levels of proteins regulating redox state and neuronal stress markers, as well as increased levels of coagulation factors, antedated the loss of insulin secretion in diabetic mice. These results suggest that a reduced complement of antioxidants in response to a mixed secretagogue challenge is an early correlate of future β cell failure.

  12. Atmospheric plasma surface modifications of electrospun PCL/chitosan/PCL hybrid scaffolds by nozzle type plasma jets for usage of cell cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surucu, Seda [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Atilim University, Incek, Golbasi, 06836, Ankara (Turkey); Masur, Kai [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (Germany); Turkoglu Sasmazel, Hilal, E-mail: hilal.sasmazel@atilim.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Atilim University, Incek, Golbasi, 06836, Ankara (Turkey); Von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus Dieter [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electrospun PCL/chitosan/PCL scaffolds introduced to the literature by us were modified with atmospheric pressure plasma jets. • Plasma was fed into the system with different gas flow rates, time and distances. • Topographical and functional changes were examined by various characterization methods. • Optimum plasma treatment parameters for enhanced topography and functionality were determined. • Electrospun hybrid plasma surface modified samples showed the increased biocompatibility performance of L929 fibroblast cells. - Abstract: This paper reports Ar gas, Ar + O{sub 2}, Ar + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} gas mixtures and dry air plasma modifications by atmospheric pressure argon driven kINPen and air driven Diener (PlasmaBeam) plasma jets to alter surface properties of three dimensional (3D), electrospun PCL/Chitosan/PCL layer by layer hybrid scaffolds to improve human fibroblast (MRC5) cell attachment and growth. The characterizations of the samples were done by contact angle (CA) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results showed that the plasma modification carried out under dry air and Ar + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} gas mixtures were altered effectively the nanotopography and the functionality of the material surfaces. It was found that the samples treated with Ar + O{sub 2} + N{sub 2} gas mixtures for 1 min and dry air for 9 min have better hydrophilicity 78.9° ± 1.0 and 75.6° ± 0.1, respectively compared to the untreated samples (126.5°). Biocompatibility performance of the scaffolds was determined with alamarBlue (aB) assay and MTT assay methods, Giemsa staining, fluorescence microscope, confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The results showed that plasma treated samples increased the hydrophilicity and oxygen functionality and topography of the surfaces significantly, thus affecting the cell viability and proliferation on

  13. Plasma and BIAS Modeling: Self-Consistent Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell with Low-Density Argon Plasma for TiC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Geiser

    2011-01-01

    processes. In this paper we present a new model taken into account a self-consistent electrostatic-particle in cell model with low density Argon plasma. The collision model are based of Monte Carlo simulations is discussed for DC sputtering in lower pressure regimes. In order to simulate transport phenomena within sputtering processes realistically, a spatial and temporal knowledge of the plasma density and electrostatic field configuration is needed. Due to relatively low plasma densities, continuum fluid equations are not applicable. We propose instead a Particle-in-cell (PIC method, which allows the study of plasma behavior by computing the trajectories of finite-size particles under the action of an external and self-consistent electric field defined in a grid of points.

  14. Effects of air transient spark discharge and helium plasma jet on water, bacteria, cells, and biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Karol; Kučerová, Katarína; Tarabová, Barbora; Janda, Mário; Machala, Zdenko; Sano, Kaori; Mihai, Cosmin Teodor; Ciorpac, Mitică; Gorgan, Lucian Dragos; Jijie, Roxana; Pohoata, Valentin; Topala, Ionut

    2015-06-06

    Atmospheric pressure DC-driven self-pulsing transient spark (TS) discharge operated in air and pulse-driven dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet (PJ) operated in helium in contact with water solutions were used for inducing chemical effects in water solutions, and the treatment of bacteria (Escherichia coli), mammalian cells (Vero line normal cells, HeLa line cancerous cells), deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA), and protein (bovine serum albumin). Two different methods of water solution supply were used in the TS: water electrode system and water spray system. The effects of both TS systems and the PJ were compared, as well as a direct exposure of the solution to the discharge with an indirect exposure to the discharge activated gas flow. The chemical analysis of water solutions was performed by using colorimetric methods of UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometry. The bactericidal effects of the discharges on bacteria were evaluated by standard microbiological plate count method. Viability, apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed in normal and cancerous cells. Viability of cells was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion test, apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide assay, and cell cycle progression by propidium iodide/RNase test. The effect of the discharges on deoxyribonucleic acid and protein were evaluated by fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy. The results of bacterial and mammalian cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle clearly show that cold plasma can inactivate bacteria and selectively target cancerous cells, which is very important for possible future development of new plasma therapeutic strategies in biomedicine. The authors found that all investigated bio-effects were stronger with the air TS discharge than with the He PJ, even in indirect exposure.

  15. In-vitro derived germinal centre B cells differentially generate memory B or plasma cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Takuya; Haniuda, Kei; Moutai, Tatsuya; Matsudaira, Moeko; Mizokawa, Sho; Shiratori, Ikuo; Azuma, Takachika; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2011-09-06

    In response to T cell-dependent antigens, B cells proliferate extensively to form germinal centres (GC), and then differentiate into memory B (B(mem)) cells or long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show a new culture system in which mouse naïve B cells undergo massive expansion and isotype switching, and generate GC-phenotype B (iGB) cells. The iGB cells expressing IgG1 or IgM/D, but not IgE, differentiate into B(mem) cells in vivo after adoptive transfer and can elicit rapid immune responses with the help of cognate T cells. Secondary culture with IL-21 maintains the proliferation of the iGB cells, while shifting their in vivo developmental fate from B(mem) cells to LLPCs, an outcome that can be reversed by withdrawal of IL-21 in tertiary cultures. Thus, this system enables in vitro manipulation of B-cell fate, into either B(mem) cells or LLPCs, and will facilitate dissection of GC-B cell differentiation programs.

  16. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Damgaard; Karin Magnussen; Christian Enevold; Martin Nilsson; Tim Tolker-Nielsen; Palle Holmstrup; Claus Henrik Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Design Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-sus...

  17. Structure-function relationships of ErbB RTKs in the plasma membrane of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt-Jovin, Donna J; Botelho, Michelle G; Jovin, Thomas M

    2014-04-01

    We review the states of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), primarily the EGF receptor (EGFR, ErbB1, HER1) and the orphan receptor ErbB2 as they exist in living mammalian cells, focusing on four main aspects: (1) aggregation state and distribution in the plasma membrane; (2) conformational features of the receptors situated in the plasma membrane, compared to the crystallographic structures of the isolated extracellular domains; (3) coupling of receptor disposition on filopodia with the transduction of signaling ligand gradients; and (4) ligand-independent receptor activation by application of a magnetic field.

  18. Plasma cell-free DNA levels are elevated in acute Puumala hantavirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuula K Outinen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Puumala hantavirus (PUUV causes a hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome called nephropathia epidemica (NE. The aim of the present study was to evaluate plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA levels and urinary cf-DNA excretion in acute NE as well as their associations with the severity of the disease. METHODS: Total plasma cf-DNA was quantified directly in plasma of 61 patients and urine of 20 patients with acute NE. We also carried out a qualitative high-sensitivity lab-on-a-chip DNA assay in 20 patients to elucidate the appearance of cf-DNA in plasma and urine. RESULTS: The maximum plasma cf-DNA values taken during acute NE were significantly higher than the control values taken after the hospitalization period (median 1.33 µg/ml, range 0.94-3.29 µg/ml vs. median 0.77 µg/ml, range 0.55-0.99 µg/ml, P<0.001. The maximum plasma cf-DNA levels correlated positively with maximum blood leukocyte count (r = 0.388, P = 0.002 and the length of hospital stay (r = 0.376, P = 0.003, and inversely with minimum blood platelet count (r = -0.297, P = 0.020. Qualitative analysis of plasma cf-DNA revealed that in most of the patients cf-DNA displayed a low-molecular weight appearance, corresponding to the size of apoptotic DNA (150-200 bp. The visually graded maximum cf-DNA band intensity correlated positively with the maximum quantity of total plasma cf-DNA (r = 0.513, P = 0.021. Maximum urinary excretion of cf-DNA in turn was not markedly increased during the acute phase of NE and did not correlate with any of the variables reflecting severity of the disease or with the maximum plasma cf-DNA level. CONCLUSIONS: The plasma levels of cf-DNA are elevated during acute PUUV infection and correlate with the apoptotic cf-DNA-band intensity. The plasma cf-DNA concentration correlates with some variables reflecting the severity of the disease. The urinary excretion of cf-DNA does not reflect the degree of inflammation in the kidney.

  19. Cell Proliferation on Polyethylene Terephthalate Treated in Plasma Created in SO2/O2 Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Samples of polymer polyethylene terephthalate were exposed to a weakly ionized gaseous plasma to modify the polymer surface properties for better cell cultivation. The gases used for treatment were sulfur dioxide and oxygen of various partial pressures. Plasma was created by an electrodeless radio frequency discharge at a total pressure of 60 Pa. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed weak functionalization of the samples’ surfaces with the sulfur, with a concentration around 2.5 at %, whereas the oxygen concentration remained at the level of untreated samples, except when the gas mixture with oxygen concentration above 90% was used. Atomic force microscopy revealed highly altered morphology of plasma-treated samples; however, at high oxygen partial pressures this morphology vanished. The samples were then incubated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Biological tests to determine endothelialization and possible toxicity of the plasma-treated polyethylene terephthalate samples were performed. Cell metabolic activity (MTT and in vitro toxic effects of unknown compounds (TOX were assayed to determine the biocompatibility of the treated substrates. The biocompatibility demonstrated a well-pronounced maximum versus gas composition which correlated well with development of the surface morphology.

  20. Active screen plasma surface modification of polycaprolactone to improve cell attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Sammons, Rachel L; Bertóti, Imre; Jenkins, Mike J; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    To tailor polycaprolactone (PCL) surface properties for biomedical applications, film samples of PCL were surface modified by the active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) technique. The chemical composition and structure were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wettability of the surface modified polymers was investigated by contact angle and surface energy methods. Biocompatibility of the prepared PCL samples was evaluated in vitro using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells. The degradability was assessed by determining the self-degradation rate (catalyzed by lipase). The results show that ASPN surface modification can effectively improve osteoblast cell adhesion and spreading on the surface of PCL. The main change in chemical composition is the exchange of some carboxyl groups on the surface for hydroxyl groups. The active-screen plasma nitriding technique has been found to be an effective and practical method to effectively improve osteoblast cell adhesion and spreading on the PCL surface. Such changes have been attributed to the increase in wettablity and generation of new hydroxyl groups by plasma treatment. After active-screen plasma treatment, the PCL film is still degradable, but the enzymatic degradation rate is slower compared with untreated PCL film. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Plasma markers of B-cell activation and clonality in pediatric liver and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Eric A.; Savoldo, Barbara; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Costello, Rene; Zingone, Adriana; Heslop, Helen E.; Landgren, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Transplant recipients are at risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Methods: Thirty-six pediatric transplant recipients were evaluated (18 hematopoietic stem cell and 18 liver recipients; 12 had PTLD). We studied 207 longitudinal plasma samples from these recipients for three markers of B-cell activation or clonality: immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs), soluble CD30 (sCD30), and monoclonal immunoglobulins (M-proteins). Results Kappa FLCs, lambda FLCs, and sCD30 were elevated in 20.8%, 28.0%, and 94.2% of plasma specimens, respectively. FLC and sCD30 levels increased significantly 1.18–1.82 fold per log10 Epstein Barr virus (EBV) load in peripheral blood. Five PTLD cases manifested elevated FLCs with an abnormal kappa/lambda ratio, suggesting monoclonal FLC production. M-proteins were present in 91% of PTLD cases, vs. 50–67% of other recipients with high or low EBV loads (p=0.13). Concordance of FLCs, M-proteins, and PTLD tumor light chain restriction was imperfect. For example, one PTLD case with an IgG lambda M-protein had a tumor that was kappa restricted, and another case with an M-protein had a T-cell PTLD. In an additional case, an IgM kappa M-protein and excess kappa FLCs were both detected in plasma at PTLD diagnosis; while the tumor was not restricted at diagnosis, kappa restriction was present 5 years later when the PTLD relapsed. Discussion Plasma markers of B-cell dysfunction are frequent following transplantation and associated with poor EBV control. These abnormal markers may be produced by oligoclonal B-cell populations or PTLD tumor cells, and could potentially help identify recipients at high risk of PTLD. PMID:23222884

  2. Impact on cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a in patients with acute leukemia: in vivo assessment of cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Masami

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasma microRNA (miRNA has become a promising biomarker for detecting cancer; however, it remains uncertain whether miRNA expression levels in plasma reflect those in tumor cells. Our aim was to determine the biological relevance of miR-92a, which has been implicated as an oncomiR in both plasma and leukemia cells in patients with acute leukemia and to evaluate whether it could be a novel biomarker for monitoring these patients. Results We quantified the expression level of miR-92a in both cells and plasma by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 91 patients with acute leukemia. We also determined miR-92a expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC from normal controls. We compared miR-92a expression in plasma with its expression in leukemia cells. Synthetic anti-miR-92a inhibitor was transfected into Raji and OM9;22 cells, and apoptosis was assessed. For in vivo assessment, 6-week-old female nude mice were injected with U937 cells, and miR-92a expression in plasma and tumors was measured. The level of miR-92a expression in fresh leukemia cells was highly variable compared with PBMNC, but significantly lower compared with CD34-positive cells obtained from healthy volunteers. We also noticed that miR-92a was preferentially expressed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells in comparison with acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. More specifically, cellular miR-92a expression was significantly increased in a subset of ALL cells, and ALL patients with overexpressed miR-92a had poor prognoses. The anti-miR-92a inhibitor-treated Raji and OM9;22 cells revealed an increase of apoptotic cells. Notably, the cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a expression was significantly higher in both AML and ALL cells compared with PBMNC from healthy volunteers. In tumor-bearing mice, the plasma miR-92a level was significantly decreased in accordance with tumor growth, while tumor tissue was strongly positive for miR-92a

  3. Pro-apoptotic NOXA is implicated in atmospheric-pressure plasma-induced melanoma cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) has been successfully used to treat several types of cancers in vivo and in vitro, with the effect being primarily attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanisms by which APP induces apoptosis in cancer cells require further elucidation. In this study, the effects of APP on the expression of 500 genes in melanoma Mel007 cancer cells were examined. Pro-apoptotic phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein (PMAIP1), also known as NOXA, was highly expressed as a result of APP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking of ROS using scavenger NAC or silencing of NOXA gene by RNA interference inhibited the APP-induced NOXA genes upregulation and impaired caspases 3/7 mediated apoptosis, confirming the important role plasma-generated ROS species and pro-apoptotic NOXA play in APP-induced cancer cell death.

  4. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-01-01

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a “sunny-side up egg” appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development. PMID:26657027

  5. Experimental and computational characterization of a modified GEC cell for dusty plasma experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Victor; Smith, Bernard; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent fluid model developed for simulations of micro- gravity dusty plasma experiments has for the first time been used to model asymmetric dusty plasma experiments in a modified GEC reference cell with gravity. The numerical results are directly compared with experimental data and the experimentally determined dependence of global discharge parameters on the applied driving potential and neutral gas pressure is found to be well matched by the model. The local profiles important for dust particle transport are studied and compared with experimentally determined profiles. The radial forces in the midplane are presented for the different discharge settings. The differences between the results obtained in the modified GEC cell and the results first reported for the original GEC reference cell are pointed out.

  6. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-12-11

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a "sunny-side up egg" appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development.

  7. Effect of film quality improvement on a-Si solar cell performance by horizontal plasma furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Y.; Nonomura, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Okamoto, H.; Hamakawa, Y.

    Plasma decomposition mechanism has been investigated by emission spectroscopy, and its spatial distribution with the cross field mode glow discharge of SiH4 has also been investigated. On the basis of these experimental studies, a separated three-chamber system of horizontal plasma mode furnace has been developed. This system has been used to prepare a-Si solar cells, and these have been compared with those prepared by using a single-chamber system from several points of view. Through an analysis of photovoltaic performance, a clear improvement has been verified in the cells prepared using the separated system. It is believed that the difference between these two systems was caused by the influence of cross-contamination. In the course of this investigation, a-SiC/a-Si/microcrystalline Si heterojunction solar cells having more than 9-percent conversion efficiency have been developed.

  8. Exosome-associated hepatitis C virus in cell cultures and patient plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ziqing [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Zhang, Xiugen [Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Yu, Qigui [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); He, Johnny J., E-mail: johnny.he@unthsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • HCV occurs in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. • Exosome-associated HCV is infectious and resistant to neutralizing antibodies. • More exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV is present in patient plasma. - Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects its target cells in the form of cell-free viruses and through cell–cell contact. Here we report that HCV is associated with exosomes. Using highly purified exosomes and transmission electron microscopic imaging, we demonstrated that HCV occurred in both exosome-free and exosome-associated forms. Exosome-associated HCV was infectious and resistant to neutralization by an anti-HCV neutralizing antibody. There were more exosome-associated HCV than exosome-free HCV detected in the plasma of HCV-infected patients. These results suggest exosome-associated HCV as an alternative form for HCV infection and transmission.

  9. Inhibition of cell adhesion by xARVCF indicates a regulatory function at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintsch, Wolfgang E; Mandato, Craig A; McCrea, Pierre D; Fagotto, François

    2008-09-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of cadherins is thought to regulate the strength and dynamics of cell-cell adhesion. Part of its regulatory activity has been attributed to a membrane-proximal region, the juxtamembrane domain (JMD), and its interaction with members of the p120 catenin subfamily. We show that titration of xARVCF, a member of this family, to the plasma membrane disrupts adhesion in the early embryo. Adhesion can be restored by coexpression of constitutively active Rac, suggesting that intracellular signaling is the primary cause in the loss of adhesion phenotype. Our observations suggest that the recruitment of p120 type catenins to the plasma membrane by the cadherin cytoplasmic tail may create protein complexes, which actively modulate the adhesion "status" of embryonic cells.

  10. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  11. Strategies to target long-lived plasma cells for treating hemophilia A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-03-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) can persistently produce anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies which disrupt therapeutic effect of FVIII in hemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The migration of plasma cells to BM where they become LLPCs is largely controlled by an interaction between the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4. AMD3100 combined with G-CSF inhibit their interactions, thus facilitating the mobilization of CD34(+) cells and blocking the homing of LLPCs. These reagents were combined with anti-CD20 to reduce B-cells and the specific IL-2/IL-2mAb (JES6-1) complexes to induce Treg expansion for targeting anti-FVIII immune responses. Groups of mice primed with FVIII plasmid and protein respectively were treated with the combined regimen for six weeks, and a significant reduction of anti-FVIII inhibitor titers was observed, associated with the dramatic decrease of circulating and bone marrow CXCR4(+) plasma cells. The combination regimens are highly promising in modulating pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies in FVIII primed subjects.

  12. Progression of cutaneous plasmacytoma to plasma cell leukemia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Emily D; Shank, Alba Maria M; Waite, Angharad H K; Siegel, Andrea; Avery, Anne C; Avery, Paul R

    2017-02-10

    A 5-year-old male neutered Bernese Mountain Dog was presented for cutaneous plasmacytoma, which was treated by surgical excision. Four months later, the dog developed multiple skin masses, hyphema, pericardial and mild bicavitary effusions, myocardial masses, and marked plasmacytosis in the peripheral blood. Circulating plasma cells expressed CD34 and MHC class II by flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these cells were strongly positive for multiple myeloma oncogene 1/interferon regulatory factor 4 (MUM-1) and weakly to moderately positive for Pax5. The dog was hypoglobulinemic but had a monoclonal IgA gammopathy detected by serum immunofixation electrophoresis. The PCR analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology revealed that plasmacytoid cells in the original cutaneous plasmacytoma and peripheral blood had an identical immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) rearrangement, indicating that both populations were derived from the same neoplastic clone. Canine cutaneous plasmacytoma rarely progresses to a malignant form and plasma cell leukemia is rarely diagnosed in the dog. This report describes a case of cutaneous plasmacytoma progressing to plasma cell leukemia with a rapid and aggressive clinical course. This report also highlights the utility of flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, immunofixation electrophoresis, and PARR by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology in the diagnosis of this hematopoietic neoplasm.

  13. γ-secretase directly sheds the survival receptor BCMA from plasma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Sarah A.; Hoffmann, Franziska S.; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Cheng, Qingyu; Chu, Yuanyuan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Schuh, Elisabeth; Krumbholz, Markus; Rübsamen, Heike; Wanngren, Johanna; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Alexander, Tobias; Hiepe, Falk; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Weber, Frank; Jenne, Dieter; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Meinl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Survival of plasma cells is regulated by B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a membrane-bound receptor activated by its agonist ligands BAFF and APRIL. Here we report that γ-secretase directly cleaves BCMA, without prior truncation by another protease. This direct shedding is facilitated by the short length of BCMA's extracellular domain. In vitro, γ-secretase reduces BCMA-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, γ-secretase releases soluble BCMA (sBCMA) that acts as a decoy neutralizing APRIL. In vivo, inhibition of γ-secretase enhances BCMA surface expression in plasma cells and increases their number in the bone marrow. Furthermore, in multiple sclerosis, sBCMA levels in spinal fluid are elevated and associated with intracerebral IgG production; in systemic lupus erythematosus, sBCMA levels in serum are elevated and correlate with disease activity. Together, shedding of BCMA by γ-secretase controls plasma cells in the bone marrow and yields a potential biomarker for B-cell involvement in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26065893

  14. Expression of SLAM (CD150) cell-surface receptors on human B-cell subsets: from pro-B to plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salort, Jose; Sintes, Jordi; Llinàs, Laia; Matesanz-Isabel, Jessica; Engel, Pablo

    2011-01-30

    The SLAM (CD150) family receptors are leukocyte cell-surface glycoproteins involved in leukocyte activation. These molecules and their adaptor protein SAP contribute to the effective germinal center formation, generation of high-affinity antibody-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells, thereby facilitating long-term humoral immune response. Multi-color flow cytometric analysis was performed to determine the expression of CD48 (SLAMF2), CD84 (SLAMF5), CD150 (SLAM or SLAMF1), CD229 (Ly9 or SLAMF3), CD244 (2B4 or SLAMF4), CD319 (CRACC, CS1, or SLAMF7), and CD352 (NTB-A or SLAMF6) on human cell lines and B-cell subsets. The following subsets were assessed: pro-B, pre-B, immature-B, and mature-B cells from bone marrow; transitional and B1/B2 subsets from peripheral blood; and naïve, pre-germinal center, germinal center, memory, plasmablasts, and plasma cells from tonsil and spleen. All receptors were expressed on B cells, with the exception of CD244. SLAM family molecules were widely distributed during B-cell development, maturation and terminal differentiation into plasmablasts and plasma cells, but their expression among various B-cell subsets differed significantly. Such heterogeneous expression patterns suggest that SLAM molecules play an essential and non-redundant role in the control of humoral immune responses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Combinatorial plasma polymerization approach to produce thin films for testing cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, V; Torrengo, S; Marocchi, L; Minati, L; Dalla Serra, M; Bao, G; Speranza, G

    2014-01-01

    Plasma enhanced physical vapor depositions are extensively used to fabricate substrates for cell culture applications. One peculiarity of the plasma processes is the possibility to deposit thin films with reproducible chemical and physical properties. In the present work, a combinatorial plasma polymerization process was used to deposit thin carbon based films to promote cell adhesion, in the interest of testing cell proliferation as a function of the substrate chemical properties. Peculiarity of the combinatorial approach is the possibility to produce in just one deposition experiment, a set of surfaces of varying chemical moieties by changing the precursor composition. A full characterization of the chemical, physical and thermodynamic properties was performed for each set of the synthesized surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the concentration of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amine functional groups on the substrate surfaces. A perfect linear trend between polar groups' density and precursors' concentration was found. Further analyses reveled that also contact angles and the correspondent surface energies of all deposited thin films are linearly dependent on the precursor concentration. To test the influence of the surface composition on the cell adhesion and proliferation, two cancer cell lines were utilized. The cell viability was assessed after 24 h and 48 h of cell culture. Experiments show that we are able to control the cell adhesion and proliferation by properly changing the thin film deposition conditions i.e. the concentration and the kind of chemical moiety on the substrate surface. The results also highlight that physical and chemical factors of biomaterial surface, including surface hydrophobicity and free energy, chemical composition, and topography, can altered cell attachment.

  16. Seminal plasma enhances cervical adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumour growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Sutherland

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women in sub-Saharan Africa. Extensive evidence has shown that cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although the vast majority of HPV infections are naturally resolved, failure to eradicate infected cells has been shown to promote viral persistence and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, following neoplastic transformation, exposure of cervical epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators either directly or via the systemic circulation may enhance progression of the disease. It is well recognised that seminal plasma contains an abundance of inflammatory mediators, which are identified as regulators of tumour growth. Here we investigated the role of seminal plasma in regulating neoplastic cervical epithelial cell growth and tumorigenesis. Using HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cells, we found that seminal plasma (SP induced the expression of the inflammatory enzymes, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS1 and PTGS2, cytokines interleukin (IL -6, and -11 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. To investigate the role of SP on tumour cell growth in vivo, we xenografted HeLa cells subcutaneously into the dorsal flank of nude mice. Intra-peritoneal administration of SP rapidly and significantly enhanced the tumour growth rate and size of HeLa cell xenografts in nude mice. As observed in vitro, we found that SP induced expression of inflammatory PTGS enzymes, cytokines and VEGF-A in vivo. Furthermore we found that SP enhances blood vessel size in HeLa cell xenografts. Finally we show that SP-induced cytokine production, VEGF-A expression and cell proliferation are mediated via the induction of the inflammatory PTGS pathway.

  17. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  18. Constitutive CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminates germinal center response and leads to augmented plasma cell production in T cell areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T-B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction.

  19. Regulation of B lymphocytes and plasma cells by innate immune mechanisms and stromal cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Damian; Bonami, Rachel H; Crofford, Leslie J

    2014-06-01

    B cells mediate multiple functions that influence immune and inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. Production of a diverse array of autoantibodies can happen at different stages of the disease, and are important markers of disease outcome. In turn, the magnitude and quality of acquired humoral immune responses is strongly dependent on signals delivered by innate immune cells. Additionally, the milieu of cells and chemokines that constitute a niche for plasma cells rely strongly on signals provided by stromal cells at different anatomical locations and times. The chronic inflammatory state therefore importantly impacts the developing humoral immune response and its intensity and specificity. We focus this review on B cell biology and the role of the innate immune system in the development of autoimmunity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Irvalec inserts into the plasma membrane causing rapid loss of integrity and necrotic cell death in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Molina-Guijarro

    Full Text Available Irvalec is a marine-derived antitumor agent currently undergoing phase II clinical trials. In vitro, Irvalec induces a rapid loss of membrane integrity in tumor cells, accompanied of a significant Ca(2+ influx, perturbations of membrane conductivity, severe swelling and the formation of giant membranous vesicles. All these effects are not observed in Irvalec-resistant cells, or are significantly delayed by pretreating the cells with Zn(2+. Using fluorescent derivatives of Irvalec it was demonstrated that the compound rapidly interacts with the plasma membrane of tumor cells promoting lipid bilayer restructuration. Also, FRET experiments demonstrated that Irvalec molecules localize in the cell membrane close enough to each other as to suggest that the compound could self-organize, forming supramolecular structures that likely trigger cell death by necrosis through the disruption of membrane integrity.

  1. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2 and flotillin-1 (FLOT1, were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle. Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary h

  2. Temperature measurement of a dust particle in a RF plasma GEC reference cell

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary differences between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from the unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. This last contribution does not include random motion and is therefore separable from the random motion in a normal temperature measurement. In this paper, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motion of a dust particle confined in a glass box in a Gaseous Electronic Conference radio frequency reference cell employing experimentally determined dust particle fluctuation data analyzed using the mean square displacement technique.

  3. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, C [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ramdutt, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Brault, P [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Caillard, A [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bulla, D [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Boswell, R [Space Plasma, Power, and Propulsion group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Rabat, H [GREMI-CNRS Laboratory, University of Orleans, BP 6744, F-45067, Orleans (France); Dicks, A [School of Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2007-05-15

    A low energy ({approx}30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm{sup -2}, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm{sup -2}) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm{sup -2}). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  4. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, C.; Ramdutt, D.; Brault, P.; Caillard, A.; Bulla, D.; Boswell, R.; Rabat, H.; Dicks, A.

    2007-05-01

    A low energy (~30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm-2, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm-2) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm-2). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  5. Thrombolytic therapy reduces red blood cell aggregation in plasma without affecting intrinsic aggregability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ami, R; Sheinman, G; Yedgar, S; Eldor, A; Roth, A; Berliner, A S; Barshtein, G

    2002-03-15

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation may contribute to occlusion of the coronary microcirculation during myocardial infarction. We studied the effect of thrombolytic therapy on RBC aggregation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Compared with patients with myocardial infarction who did not receive thrombolytic therapy, those treated with systemic thrombolysis exhibited significantly reduced RBC aggregation, reduced plasma fibrinogen levels and increased plasma D-dimer levels. Using measurement of RBC aggregation in a standardized dextran-500 solution, reduction in RBC aggregation after thrombolysis was shown to be plasma dependent. Thrombolytic therapy had no direct effect on intrinsic RBC aggregability in patients with AMI. We conclude that thrombolytic therapy has rheologic consequences that may contribute to its overall efficacy. Inhibition of RBC aggregation by thrombolytic therapy may result from the degradation of fibrinogen, a key factor in the formation of RBC aggregates, and from the generation of fibrinogen degradation products capable of disaggregating RBCs.

  6. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  7. Particle-in-cell investigation on the resonant absorption of a plasma surface wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Chao-Hui; Hu Xi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The resonant absorption of a plasma surface wave is supposed to be an important and efficient mechanism of power deposition for a surface wave plasma source.In this paper,by using the particle-in-cell method and Monte Carlo simulation,the resonance absorption mechanism is investigated.Simulation results demonstrate the existence of surface wave resonance and show the high efficiency of heating electrons.The positions of resonant points,the resonance width and the spatio-temporal evolution of the resonant electric field are presented,which accord well with the theoretical results.The paper also discusses the effect of pressure on the resonance electric field and the plasma density.

  8. Plasma and EBC microRNAs as early biomarkers of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzoni, Paola; Banda, Iris; Goldoni, Matteo; Corradi, Massimo; Tiseo, Marcello; Acampa, Olga; Balestra, Valeria; Ampollini, Luca; Casalini, Angelo; Carbognani, Paolo; Mutti, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of death in Western countries. Current screening methods are invasive and still lead to a high percentage of false positives. There is, therefore, a need to find biomarkers that increase the probability of detecting lung cancer early. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are stable molecules in blood plasma and exhaled breath condensate (EBC). We quantified miRNA-21 and miRNA-486 expression from plasma and EBC samples from patients with a diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and controls. miRNA-21 was significantly higher in plasma and in EBC of the NSCLC patients and miRNA-486 was significantly lower. This difference indicates a significantly improved diagnostic value, and suggests that these miRNAs could be clinically used as a first-line screening test in high-risk subjects.

  9. A cell-free assay to determine the stoichiometry of plasma membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Cesar; Vivar, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Plasma membrane receptors, transporters, and ion channel molecules are often found as oligomeric structures that participate in signaling cascades essential for cell survival. Different states of protein oligomerization may play a role in functional control and allosteric regulation. Stochastic GFP-photobleaching (SGP) has emerged as an affordable and simple method to determine the stoichiometry of proteins at the plasma membrane. This non-invasive optical approach can be useful for total internal reflection of fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), where signal-to-noise ratio is very high at the plasma membrane. Here, we report an alternative methodology implemented on a standard laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). The simplicity of our method will allow for its implementation in any epifluorescence microscope of choice.

  10. Electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma: Particle-in-Cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico; 10.1088/0004-637X/710/2/1848

    2010-01-01

    We perform fully-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of an hot plasma that expands radially in a cylindrical geometry. The aim of the paper is to study the consequent development of the electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma flow as found in a collisionless stellar wind. Kinetic plasma theory and simulations have shown that the electron temperature anisotropy is controlled by fluctuations driven by electromagnetic kinetic instabilities. In this study the temperature anisotropy is driven self-consistently by the expansion. While the expansion favors an increase of parallel anisotropy ($T_\\parallel>T_\\perp$), the onset of the firehose instability will tend to decrease it. We show the results for a supersonic, subsonic, and static expansion flows, and suggest possible applications of the results for the solar wind and other stellar winds.

  11. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel Particle-in-Cell method

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, Igor A; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods that are commonly used in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion, and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  12. Bone marrow plasma cells are a primary source of serum HIV-1-specific antibodies in chronically infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Buckner, Clarisa M; Louie, Aaron; Kim, Leo J Y; Santich, Brian H; Wang, Wei; Fankuchen, Olivia R; Diaz, Gabriella; Daub, Janine R; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Chun, Tae-Wook; Li, Yuxing; Braylan, Raul C; Calvo, Katherine R; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-03-15

    Several potent and broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 have been isolated recently from peripheral blood B cells of infected individuals, based on prescreening of Ab activity in the serum. However, little is known regarding the cells that make the Abs that circulate in the blood. Accordingly, we investigated the most likely source, the bone marrow, of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Increased frequencies of plasma cells, as well as B cell precursors, namely preB-I and preB-II, and decreased frequencies of mature B cells were observed in bone marrow aspirates of these individuals compared with HIV-negative counterparts. Increased frequencies of bone marrow plasma cells are consistent with known hallmarks of HIV-1 infection, namely hypergammaglobulinemia and increased frequencies of peripheral blood plasmablasts. Levels of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-binding and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs were measured in serum, and corresponding frequencies of Ab-secreting or Env-binding cells were measured in the blood (plasmablasts and memory B cells) and in the bone marrow (plasma cells). A strong correlation was observed between serum HIV-1-specific Abs and Env-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells, but not circulating plasmablasts or memory B cells. These findings demonstrate that, despite HIV-1-induced phenotypic and functional B cell dysregulation in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues, bone marrow plasma cells remain a primary source for circulating HIV-1-specific Abs in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  13. Cell adhesion property of cathodic arc plasma deposited CrN thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Kyu; Pham, Vuong Hung

    2009-09-01

    The interaction between human osteoblast cells and CrN thin film was studied in vitro. CrN thin films were produced by cathodic arc plasma deposition. The surface was characterized by atomic force microscopy. Cell adhesion on the coatings was assessed by MTT assay and visualization. Cell cytoskeleton organization was studied by analyzing microtubule and actin cytoskeleton organization. Focal contact adhesion was monitored by analyzing vinculin density. The study found that the CrN thin film is a potential candidate as a protective coating on implantable devices that require minimal cellular adhesion.

  14. Upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased cytotoxicity in glial cells treated with Alzheimer's disease plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharusha Jayasena

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Markers of increased protein, lipid and nucleic acid oxidation and reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes have been reported in AD plasma. Amyloid plaques in the AD brain elicit a range of reactive inflammatory responses including complement activation and acute phase reactions, which may also be reflected in plasma. Previous studies have shown that human AD plasma may be cytotoxic to cultured cells. We investigated the effect of pooled plasma (n = 20 each from healthy controls, individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI and Alzheimer's disease (AD on cultured microglial cells. AD plasma and was found to significantly decrease cell viability and increase glycolytic flux in microglia compared to plasma from healthy controls. This effect was prevented by the heat inactivation of complement. Proteomic methods and isobaric tags (iTRAQ found the expression level of complement and other acute phase proteins to be altered in MCI and AD plasma and an upregulation of key enzymes involved in the glycolysis pathway in cells exposed to AD plasma. Altered expression levels of acute phase reactants in AD plasma may alter the energy metabolism of glia.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell.

  16. Safety and efficient ex vivo expansion of stem cells using platelet-rich plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the cell culture media supplements used in the ex vivo expansion of stem cells intended for cell therapy. Currently, the gold standard is the culture supplemented with fetal bovine serum, however, their use in cell therapy raises many concerns. The alternatives to its use are presented, ranging from the use of human serum to platelet-rich plasma (PRP), to serum-free media or extracellular matrix components. Finally, various growth factors present in PRP are described, which make it a safe and effective stem cell expansion supplement. These growth factors could be responsible for their efficiency, as they increase both stem cell proliferation and survival. The different PRP formulations are also discussed, as well as the need for protocol standardization.

  17. Heterogeneity of Arabinogalactan-Proteins on the Plasma Membrane of Rose Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, M. D.; Nothnagel, E. A.

    1996-11-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) have been purified from the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured Paul's Scarlet rose (Rosa sp.) cells. The two most abundant and homogeneous plasma membrane AGP fractions were named plasma membrane AGP1 (PM-AGP1) and plasma membrane AGP2 (PM-AGP2) and had apparent molecular masses of 140 and 217 kD, respectively. Both PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 had [beta]-(1-3)-, [beta]-(1,6)-, and [beta]-(1,3,6)-galactopyranosyl residues, predominantly terminal [alpha]-arabinofuranosyl residues, and (1,4)- and terminal glucuronopyranosyl residues. The protein moieties of PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were both rich in hydroxyproline, alanine, and serine, but differed in the abundance of hydroxyproline, which was 1.6 times higher in PM-AGP2 than in PM-AGP1. Another difference was the overall protein content, which was 3.7% (w/w) in PM-AGP1 and 15% in PM-AGP2. As judged by their behavior on reverse-phase chromatography, PM-AGP1 and PM-AGP2 were not more hydrophobic than AGPs from the cell wall or culture medium. In contrast, a minor plasma membrane AGP fraction eluted later on reverse-phase chromatography and was more negatively charged at pH 5 than either PM-AGP1 or PM-AGP2. The more negatively charged fraction contained molecules with a glycosyl composition characteristic of AGPs and included at least two different macromolecules. The results of this investigation indicate that Rosa plasma membrane contains at least four distinct AGPs or AGP-like molecules. These molecules differed from each other in size, charge, hydrophobicity, amino-acyl composition, and/or protein content.

  18. Limited clonal relatedness between gut IgA plasma cells and memory B cells after oral immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemark, Mats; Hazanov, Helena; Strömberg, Anneli; Komban, Rathan; Holmqvist, Joel; Köster, Sofia; Mattsson, Johan; Sikora, Per; Mehr, Ramit; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-09-06

    Understanding how memory B cells are induced and relate to long-lived plasma cells is important for vaccine development. Immunity to oral vaccines has been considered short-lived because of a poor ability to develop IgA B-cell memory. Here we demonstrate that long-lived mucosal IgA memory is readily achieved by oral but not systemic immunization in mouse models with NP hapten conjugated with cholera toxin and transfer of B1-8(high)/GFP(+) NP-specific B cells. Unexpectedly, memory B cells are poorly related to long-lived plasma cells and less affinity-matured. They are α4β7-integrin(+)CD73(+)PD-L2(+)CD80(+) and at systemic sites mostly IgM(+), while 80% are IgA(+) in Peyer's patches. On reactivation, most memory B cells in Peyer's patches are GL7(-), but expand in germinal centres and acquire higher affinity and more mutations, demonstrating strong clonal selection. CCR9 expression is found only in Peyer's patches and appears critical for gut homing. Thus, gut mucosal memory possesses unique features not seen after systemic immunization.

  19. Differences between real and particle-in-cell plasmas: effects of coarse-graining

    CERN Document Server

    Melzani, Mickaël; Folini, Doris; Winisdoerffer, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The PIC model relies on two building blocks. The first stems from the capability of computers to handle only up to $\\sim10^{10}$ particles, while real plasmas contain from $10^4$ to $10^{20}$ particles per Debye sphere: a coarse-graining step must be used, whereby of the order of $p\\sim10^{10}$ real particles are represented by a single computer superparticle. The second is field storage on a grid with its subsequent finite superparticle size. We introduce the notion of coarse-graining dependent quantities, i.e. physical quantities depending on the number $p$. They all derive from the plasma parameter $\\Lambda$, which we show to be proportional to $1/p$. We explore three examples: the rapid collision- and fluctuation-induced thermalization of plasmas with different temperatures, that scale with the number of superparticles per grid cell and are a factor $p\\sim10^{10}$ faster than in real plasmas; the high level of electrostatic fluctuations in a thermal plasma, with corrections due to the finite superparticle...

  20. Sulfonated polystyrene-type plasma-polymerized membranes for miniature direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roualdes, Stéphanie; Topala, Ionut; Mahdjoub, Habiba; Rouessac, Vincent; Sistat, Philippe; Durand, Jean

    Sulfonated polystyrene-type membranes were synthesized by plasma polymerization of a mixture of styrene and trifluoromethane sulfonic acid monomers in a low-frequency after-glow discharge plasma reactor. Such a deposition process enables the preservation of the monomers structure, which was confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. The synthesized plasma-polymerized membranes are dense and uniform with a few microns thickness. Their structure determined by Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is very rich in sulfonic acid groups (up to 5%) and stable up to 120 °C. Even if their intrinsic proton conductivity is low (10 -1 mS cm -1), directly related to their disorganized and highly cross-linked structure, plasma-polymerized membranes present a proton conduction ability similar to Nafion ® because of their low thickness. Due to their highly cross-linked structure, these membranes enable a reduction of the methanol crossover in a factor 10 by comparison with Nafion ®. Thus, the integration of plasma-polymerized films in miniaturized direct methanol fuel cells as proton-exchange membranes seems promising.

  1. Phospholipid flippase associates with cisplatin resistance in plasma membrane of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fusion of the liposomes containing N-(7-nitro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)-i ,2-hexadecanoylSn-glycero-3-1abeled phosphatidylethanolamine (NBD-PE) with A549 and A549/DDP cells was performed, and the activity of the phospholipid flippase in the plasma membrane of the cells was measured by fluorescence intensity change of NBDPE in the outer membrane. When A549 or A549/DDP cells containing N BD-PE were incubated at 37 C for 0, 30, 60 and 90 min, the fluorescence intensities in the outer membrane of the cells were 0%, 1.4%, 2.9% and 7.8% for A59cells, and 0%, 10.5 %, 15. 5 % and 18.3 % for A549/DDP cells respectively, demonstrating that the phospholipid flippase was distributed in the plasma membrane of As49 cells, but its activity in the drug-resistant A549/DDP cells was much higher than that in the A549 cells. When the A549/DDP cells were incubated with a multidrug resistance reverse agent, verapamil, for 60 min at 37C, the results showed that the NBD-PE in outer membrane decreased by 25.0% compared with the control's. Furthermore, when A549/DDP cells were incubated with 25 μmol/L cisplatin, which is a specific anticancer drug, the flippase activity decreased by 31.6%, and it further decreased with the increase of cisplatin concentration, suggesting that phospholipid flippase in the membrane might be related to the cisplatin-resistance of human lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells.

  2. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Seop; Choi, Changrok; Kim, Soo Heon; Choi, Kun oh [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Min [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sanghak [R and D Center, ELBIO Incorporation, 426-5 Gasan-dong Geumchun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH{sub 3}) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH{sub 3}) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  3. The amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells on wound healing process affected by spirulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Purnama Dewi Iskandar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spirulina which grows abundantly in tropical seas have been investigated to enhance immune system. The administration of spirulina in tooth extraction sockets was expected to optimise the function of immunocompetent cells. Therefore, wound healing process would be improved. Purpose: The aim of this study was to prove that administration of spirulina could influence immune system in tooth extraction sockets. Method: There were 28 Cavia cobayas used in this study and were put in group of four. Mandibular left incisive were extracted from each of them. The basis made from mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 and PEG 4000 was administrated into each socket in control group (TG0. In addition, spirulina 12% was administrated into group TG1, spirulina 24% was administrated into group TG2, and spirulina 48% was administrated into group TG3. All of the Cavia cobaya were decapitated and the jaws were removed in day 5 after tooth extraction. The jaws were decalcified in EDTA solution, formed into paraffin block, processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H & E and immunohistochemistry staining afterwards. Datas were analysed statistically using Anova method. Result: There was an augmentation in the number of macrophages and activated plasma cells after spirulina application. The administration of higher concentrations of Spirulina leads to greater amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells in each groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, spirulina is able to increase the amount of macrophages and activated plasma cells which play important role in healing process.

  4. The interaction of the carbon nanoparticles with human cell plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overchuk, M.; Prylutska, S.; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Prylutsky, Yu.; Ritter, U.

    2013-09-01

    The study of carbon nanostructures is a highly topical branch of bionanotechnology because of their potential application in biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known for their ability to kill tumor cells causing hyperthermia shock and can be used in photothermal therapy respectively. Also chemically modified CNTs can be used for drug delivery. The needle-like shape of CNTs allows them to penetrate into the cell plasma membrane without killing the cell. C60 fullerenes are regarded as valuable nanocarriers for different hydrophobic molecules as well as potential antiviral agents or photosensitizers. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that all types of carbon nanoparticles cause externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner to the outer layer of the cell membrane in the small local patches (points of contact), leaving the other parts of plasma membrane PS-negative. In the current work there were studied the interactions of pristine C60 fullerenes and different types of CNTs with human blood cells (erythrocytes and Jurkat T-cells). We have shown, that carbon nanoparticles do not have any hemolytic effects, if judged by the dynamics of acidic hemolysis, although they are capable of permeabilizating the cells and facilitating the internalization of propidium iodide into the nuclei.

  5. Distinct kinetics of memory B-cell and plasma-cell responses in peripheral blood following a blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice W Nduati

    Full Text Available B cell and plasma cell responses take place in lymphoid organs, but because of the inaccessibility of these organs, analyses of human responses are largely performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. To determine whether PBMC are a useful source of memory B cells and plasma cells in malaria, and whether they reflect Plasmodium-specific B cell responses in spleen or bone marrow, we have investigated these components of the humoral response in PBMC using a model of Plasmodium chabaudi blood-stage infections in C57BL/6 mice. We detected memory B cells, defined as isotype-switched IgD(- IgM(- CD19(+ B cells, and low numbers of Plasmodium chabaudi Merozoite Surface Protein-1 (MSP1-specific memory B cells, in PBMC at all time points sampled for up to 90 days following primary or secondary infection. By contrast, we only detected CD138(+ plasma cells and MSP1-specific antibody-secreting cells within a narrow time frame following primary (days 10 to 25 or secondary (day 10 infection. CD138(+ plasma cells in PBMC at these times expressed CD19, B220 and MHC class II, suggesting that they were not dislodged bone-marrow long-lived plasma cells, but newly differentiated migratory plasmablasts migrating to the bone marrow; thus reflective of an ongoing or developing immune response. Our data indicates that PBMC can be a useful source for malaria-specific memory B cells and plasma cells, but extrapolation of the results to human malaria infections suggests that timing of sampling, particularly for plasma cells, may be critical. Studies should therefore include multiple sampling points, and at times of infection/immunisation when the B-cell phenotypes of interest are likely to be found in peripheral blood.

  6. Colorectal resection is associated with persistent proangiogenic plasma protein changes: postoperative plasma stimulates in vitro endothelial cell growth, migration, and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, H M C Shantha; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Feingold, Daniel; Kalady, Matthew; Dujovny, Nadav; Senagore, Anthony; Hyman, Neil; Cekic, Vesna; Whelan, Richard L

    2009-06-01

    Plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels are elevated for weeks after minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR). Decreased plasma angiopoietin-(Ang) 1 and increased Ang-2 levels have been noted on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3. These proangiogenic changes may stimulate tumor growth postoperatively (postop). This study's purpose was to track plasma VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 levels for 4 to 8 weeks after MICR for cancer and to assess the impact of preoperative (preop) and postop plasma on in vitro endothelial cell (EC) behavior. Blood samples from 105 MICR patients were taken preop, on POD 5 and at varying time points for 2 months. Samples from 7 day time blocks after POD 5 were bundled to permit statistical analysis. Plasma protein levels were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In vitro EC branch point formation, EC invasion, and EC migration assays were carried out with preop, POD 7 to 13 and 14 to 20 plasma. The t test and Bonferonni correction was used. VEGF levels were significantly elevated on POD 5 and 7 to 13; lesser increases were noted on POD 14 to 20 and 21 to 27. Ang-2 levels were significantly increased at all time points postop. No significant Ang-1 changes were noted. When compared to preop EC culture results, there was significantly more EC branch point formation, EC invasion, and EC migration assays noted with POD 7 to 13 and POD 14 to 20 plasma. MICR is associated with proangiogenic plasma changes for 2 to 4 weeks and plasma from POD 7 to 13 and 14 to 20 stimulated EC growth, invasion, and migration. Postop plasma may stimulate the growth of residual tumor.

  7. Cytokines in Endocrine Dysfunction of Plasma Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are classically associated with lytic bone lesions, hypercalcemia, anemia, and renal insufficiency. However, in some cases, symptoms of endocrine dysfunction are more prominent than these classical signs and misdiagnosis can thus be possible. This concerns especially the situation where the presence of M-protein is limited and the serum protein electrophoresis (sPEP) appears normal. To understand the origin of the endocrine symptoms associated with MG, we overview here the current knowledge on the complexity of interactions between cytokines and the endocrine system in MG and discuss the perspectives for both the diagnosis and treatments for this class of diseases. We also illustrate the role of major cytokines and growth factors such as IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, and VEGF in the endocrine system, as these tumor-relevant signaling molecules not only help the clonal expansion and invasion of the tumor cells but also influence cellular metabolism through autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine mechanisms. We further discuss the broader impact of these tumor environment-derived molecules and proinflammatory state on systemic hormone signaling. The diagnostic challenges and clinical work-up are illustrated from the point of view of an endocrinologist.

  8. Plasma lipid pattern and red cell membrane structure in β-thalassemia patients in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seruni K.U. Freisleben

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last 10 years, we have investigated thalassemia patients in Jakarta to obtain a comprehensive picture of iron overload, oxidative stress, and cell damage.Methods: In blood samples from 15 transfusion-dependent patients (group T, 5 non-transfused patients (group N and 10 controls (group C, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, lipid-soluble vitamin E, malondialdehyde (MDA and thiol status were measured. Isolated eryhtrocyte membranes were investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy using doxyl-stearic acid and maleimido-proxyl spin lables. Data were analyzed statistically with ANOVA.Results: Plasma triglycerides were higher and cholesterol levels were lower in thalassemic patients compared to controls. Vitamin E, group C: 21.8 vs T: 6.2 μmol/L and reactive thiols (C: 144 vs. T: 61 μmol/L were considerably lower in transfused patients, who exert clear signs of oxidative stress (MDA, C: 1.96 vs T: 9.2 μmol/L and of tissue cell damage, i.e., high transaminases plasma levels. Non-transfused thalassemia patients have slight signs of oxidative stress, but no significant indication of cell damage. Erythrocyte membrane parameters from EPR spectroscopy differ considerably between all groups. In transfusion-dependent patients the structure of the erythrocyte membrane and the gradients of polarity and fluidity are destroyed in lipid domains; binding capacity of protein thiols in the membrane is lower and immobilized.Conclusion: In tranfusion-dependent thalassemic patients, plasma lipid pattern and oxidative stress are associated with structural damage of isolated erythrocyte membranes as measured by EPR spectroscopy with lipid and proteinthiol spin labels. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:178-84Keywords: electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, erythrocyte membrane, lipoproteins, oxidative stress, thalassemia, plasma lipids.

  9. Microvesicles from the plasma of elderly subjects and from senescent endothelial cells promote vascular calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodega, Guillermo; Noci, María Victoria; Troyano, Nuria; Bohórquez, Lourdes; Luna, Carlos; Luque, Rafael; Carmona, Andrés; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen in elderly people, though it can also appear in middle-aged subjects affected by premature vascular aging. The aim of this work is to test the involvement of microvesicles (MVs) produced by senescent endothelial cells (EC) and from plasma of elderly people in vascular calcification. The present work shows that MVs produced by senescent cultured ECs, plus those found in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells. Only MVs from senescent ECs, and from elderly subjects' plasma, induced calcification. This ability correlated with these types of MVs' carriage of: a) increased quantities of annexins (which might act as nucleation sites for calcification), b) increased quantities of bone-morphogenic protein, and c) larger Ca contents. The MVs of senescent, cultured ECs, and those present in the plasma of elderly subjects, promote vascular calcification. The present results provide mechanistic insights into the observed increase in vascular calcification-related diseases in the elderly, and in younger patients with premature vascular aging, paving the way towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28278131

  10. Microbe-dependent CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells mediate robust early-phase intestinal IgA responses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun; Gohda, Masashi; Hashimoto, Eri; Ishikawa, Izumi; Higuchi, Morio; Suzuki, Yuji; Goto, Yoshiyuki; Panea, Casandra; Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Sumiya, Risa; Aayam, Lamichhane; Wake, Taichi; Tajiri, So; Kurashima, Yosuke; Shikata, Shiori; Akira, Shizuo; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal plasma cells predominantly produce immunoglobulin (Ig) A, however, their functional diversity remains poorly characterized. Here we show that murine intestinal IgA plasma cells can be newly classified into two populations on the basis of CD11b expression, which cannot be discriminated by currently known criteria such as general plasma cell markers, B cell origin and T cell dependence. CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells require the lymphoid structure of Peyer’s patches, produce more IgA than CD11b− IgA+ plasma cells, proliferate vigorously, and require microbial stimulation and IL-10 for their development and maintenance. These features allow CD11b+ IgA+ plasma cells to mediate early-phase antigen-specific intestinal IgA responses induced by oral immunization with protein antigen. These findings reveal the functional diversity of IgA+ plasma cells in the murine intestine. PMID:23612313

  11. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesus F; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138(+) microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥ 98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  12. Rapid Preparation of a Plasma Membrane Fraction: Western Blot Detection of Translocated Glucose Transporter 4 from Plasma Membrane of Muscle and Adipose Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Norio; Yamashita, Yoko; Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Nishiumi, Shin; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Membrane proteins account for 70% to 80% of all pharmaceutical targets, indicating their clinical relevance and underscoring the importance of identifying differentially expressed membrane proteins that reflect distinct disease properties. The translocation of proteins from the bulk of the cytosol to the plasma membrane is a critical step in the transfer of information from membrane-embedded receptors or transporters to the cell interior. To understand how membrane proteins work, it is important to separate the membrane fraction of cells. This unit provides a protocol for rapidly obtaining plasma membrane fractions for western blot analysis. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. The effect of cidofovir on adenovirus plasma DNA levels in stem cell transplantation recipients without T cell reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Oomen, Marloes A; Jol-van der Zijde, Cornelia M; Ball, Lynne M; Bresters, Dorine; Kollen, Wouter J W; Smiers, Frans J; Vermont, Clementien L; Bredius, Robbert G M; Schilham, Marco W; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C

    2015-02-01

    Cidofovir is frequently used to treat life-threatening human adenovirus (HAdV) infections in immunocompromised children after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, the antiviral effect irrespective of T cell reconstitution remains unresolved. Plasma HAdV DNA levels were monitored by real-time quantitative PCR during 42 cidofovir treatment episodes for HAdV viremia in 36 pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients. HAdV load dynamics were related to T and natural killer (NK) cell reconstitution measured by flow cytometry. To evaluate the in vivo antiadenoviral effect of cidofovir, we focused on 20 cidofovir treatment episodes lacking concurrent T cell reconstitution. During 2 to 10 weeks of follow-up in the absence of T cells, HAdV load reduction (n = 7) or stabilization (n = 8) was observed in 15 of 20 treatments. Although HAdV load reduction was always accompanied by NK cell expansion, HAdV load stabilization was measured in 2 children lacking both T and NK cell reconstitution. In cases with T cell reconstitution, rapid HAdV load reduction (n = 14) or stabilization (n = 6) was observed in 20 of 22 treatments. In the absence of T cells, cidofovir treatment was associated with HAdV viremia control in the majority of cases. Although the contribution of NK cells cannot be excluded, cidofovir has the potential to mediate HAdV load stabilization in the time pending T cell reconstitution.

  14. Aging effects of plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin films on cell-adhesive implant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testrich, H., E-mail: holger.testrich@uni-greifswald.de [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Rebl, H. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Finke, B.; Hempel, F. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Nebe, B. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Meichsner, J. [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Thin plasma polymer films from ethylenediamine were deposited on planar substrates placed on the powered electrode of a low pressure capacitively coupled 13.56 MHz discharge. The chemical composition of the plasma polymer films was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) as well as by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after derivatization of the primary amino groups. The PPEDA films undergo an alteration during the storage in ambient air, particularly, due to reactions with oxygen. The molecular changes in PPEDA films were studied over a long-time period of 360 days. Simultaneously, the adhesion of human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 (ATCC) was investigated on PPEDA coated corundum blasted titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), which is applied as implant material in orthopedic surgery. The cell adhesion was determined by flow cytometry and the cell shape was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to uncoated reference samples a significantly enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation were measured for PPEDA coated samples, which have been maintained after long-time storage in ambient air and additional sterilization by γ−irradiation. - Highlights: • Development of cell-adhesive nitrogen-rich coatings for biomedical applications. • Plasma polymer films from low pressure 13.56 MHz discharge in argon-ethylenediamine. • Enhanced osteoblast adhesion/proliferation on coated implant material (Ti-6Al-4V). • Despite film aging over 360 days the enhanced cell adhesion of the coating remains. • No influence of additional y-sterilization on the enhanced cell adhesion.

  15. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  16. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  17. Application of adaptive mesh refinement to particle-in-cell simulations of plasmas and beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Kwan, J.W.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.; Haber, I.

    2003-11-04

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation domain, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations, and present examples of application in Heavy Ion Fusion and related fields which illustrate the effectiveness of the approach. We also report on the status of a collaboration under way at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory between the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG) and the Heavy Ion Fusion group to upgrade ANAG's mesh refinement library Chombo to include the tools needed by Particle-In-Cell simulation codes.

  18. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-07-30

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL).

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis metachronously associated with retroperitoneal fibrosis with IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terumi Kamisawa; Pong Yui Chen; Yuyang Tu; Hitoshi Nakajima; Naoto Egawa

    2006-01-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is an uncommon disorder characterized by the formation of a dense plaque of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneum, and its etiology remains unknown. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis characterized by fibrosis with abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and lymphocytes and obliterative phlebitis in the pancreas. We present a case of autoimmune pancreatitis that developed 10 mo after the occurrence of retroperitoneal fibrosis. Histological findings of the resected retroperitoneal mass were marked periureteral fibrosis with abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and lymphocytes and obliterative phlebitis.These findings suggest a common pathophysiological mechanism for retroperitoneal fibrosis and autoimmune pancreatitis in this case. Some cases of retroperitoneal fibrosis might be a retroperitoneal lesion of IgG4-related sclerosing disease.

  20. MIXED HYALINE VASCULAR AND PLASMA CELL TYPE CASTLEMAN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Asgarani

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease (angiofollicular lymphoid hyperplasia includes a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders. The cause of this disease remains uncertain. There are two types of localized Castleman’s disease: the more common hyaline vascular and the plasma cell types. Mixed variant is an uncommon localized lesion in general population. The lesions can occur in any part of the body that contains lymphoid tissue, although seventy percent are found in the anterior mediastinum. We report a thirty years old boy with Castleman’s disease who presented with fever, anorexia, weight loss,sweating, anemia and abdominal mass. The histologic examination of the biopsy specimens revealed a mixed hyaline vascular and plasma cell type of Castleman’s disease.

  1. In vitro evaluation of cell proliferation and collagen synthesis on titanium following plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Paul; Matykina, Endzhe; Gough, Julie E; Skeldon, Peter; Thompson, George E

    2010-07-01

    Titania-based coatings produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation are being investigated as bioactive surfaces for titanium implants. In this study, plasma electrolytic oxidation was performed in calcium- and phosphorus-based electrolytes under DC conditions, resulting in coatings of thickness of approximately 8-15 mum. Coating morphologies, microstructures, and compositions were examined by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and electron probe microanalysis. The coatings revealed a cratered morphology, with incorporated calcium and phosphorus species. Proliferation rates of primary human osteoblasts cells on the coatings were up to approximately 37% faster than those for uncoated titanium and 316L stainless steel reference materials. Further, the coatings assisted cell adhesion and generation and anchorage of collagen. The amount of collagen was upto approximately 2.4 times greater than for the reference substrates. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. A Particle In Cell code development for high current ion beam transport and plasma simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N

    2016-01-01

    A simulation package employing a Particle in Cell (PIC) method is developed to study the high current beam transport and the dynamics of plasmas. This package includes subroutines those are suited for various planned projects at University of Frankfurt. In the framework of the storage ring project (F8SR) the code was written to describe the beam optics in toroidal magnetic fields. It is used to design an injection system for a ring with closed magnetic field lines. The generalized numerical model, in Cartesian coordinates is used to describe the intense ion beam transport through the chopper system in the low energy beam section of the FRANZ project. Especially for the chopper system, the Poisson equation is implemented with irregular geometries. The Particle In Cell model is further upgraded with a Monte Carlo Collision subroutine for simulation of plasma in the volume type ion source.

  4. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...

  5. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-irradiation inhibits mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm but promotes ectoderm differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Taichi; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Nishihara, Shoko

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation on living cells have been demonstrated, such as tissue sterilization, blood coagulation, angiogenesis, wound healing, and tumor elimination. However, the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) has not yet been clarified. A large number of reactive species are generated by plasma-irradiation in medium, of which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the main species generated. Here, we investigated the effect of plasma-irradiation on the differentiation of mESCs using an embryoid body (EB) formation assay with plasma-irradiated medium or H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium. Our findings demonstrated that plasma-irradiated medium potently inhibits the differentiation from mESCs to mesoderm and endoderm by inhibiting Wnt signaling as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. In contrast, both the plasma-irradiated medium and H2O2-supplemented non-irradiated medium enhanced the differentiation to epiblastoid, ectodermal, and neuronal lineages by activation of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) signaling, suggesting that these effects are caused by the H2O2 generated by plasma-irradiation in medium. However, in each case, the differentiation to glial cells remained unaffected. This study is the first demonstration that plasma-irradiation affects the differentiation of mESCs by the regulation of Wnt and FGF4 signaling pathways.

  6. Plasma membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during single-cell wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Eric; Mandato, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Wounding leads not only to plasma membrane disruption, but also to compromised cytoskeleton structures. This results not only in unwarranted exchanges between the cytosol and extracellular milieu, but also in loss of tensegrity, which may further endanger the cell. Tensegrity can be described as the interplay between the tensile forces generated by the apparent membrane tension, actomyosin contraction, and the cytoskeletal structures resisting those changes (e.g., microtubules). It is responsible for the structural integrity of the cell and for its ability to sense mechanical signals. Recent reviews dealing with single-cell healing mostly focused on the molecular machineries controlling the traffic and fusion of specific vesicles, or their role in different pathologies. In this review, we aim to take a broader view of the different modes of single cell repair, while focussing on the different ways the changes in plasmalemma surface area and composition, plasmalemma tension, and cytoskeletal dynamics may influence and affect single-cell repair.

  7. Flavivirus infection from mosquitoes in vitro reveals cell entry at the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vancini, Ricardo [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kramer, Laura D. [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, and School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY (United States); Ribeiro, Mariana; Hernandez, Raquel [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Brown, Dennis, E-mail: dennis_brown@ncsu.edu [Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Dengue and West Nile viruses are enveloped RNA viruses that belong to genus Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae) and are considered important mosquito-borne viral pathogenic agents worldwide. A potential target for intervention strategies is the virus cell entry mechanism. Previous studies of flavivirus entry have focused on the effects of biochemical and molecular inhibitors on viral entry leading to controversial conclusions suggesting that the process is dependent upon endocytosis and low pH mediated membrane fusion. In this study we analyzed the early events in the infection process by means of electron microscopy and immuno-gold labeling of viral particles during cell entry, and used as a new approach for infecting cells with viruses obtained directly from mosquitoes. The results show that Dengue and West Nile viruses may infect cells by a mechanism that involves direct penetration of the host cell plasma membrane as proposed for alphaviruses.

  8. Hundred joules plasma focus device as a potential pulsed source for in vitro cancer cell irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, J.; Moreno, J.; Andaur, R.; Armisen, R.; Morales, D.; Marcelain, K.; Avaria, G.; Bora, B.; Davis, S.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma focus devices may arise as useful source to perform experiments aimed to study the effects of pulsed radiation on human cells in vitro. In the present work, a table top hundred joules plasma focus device, namely "PF-400J", was adapted to irradiate colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1. For pulsed x-rays, the doses (energy absorbed per unit mass, measured in Gy) were measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLD-100 dosimeters). The neutron fluence and the average energy were used to estimate the pulsed neutron doses. Fifty pulses of x-rays (0.12 Gy) and fifty pulses of neutrons (3.5 μGy) were used to irradiate the cancer cells. Irradiation-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed at different time points after irradiation. Cell death was observed using pulsed neutron irradiation, at ultralow doses. Our results indicate that the PF-400J can be used for in vitro assessment of the effect of pulsed radiation in cancer cell research.

  9. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, David P.; Boss, Wendy F.; Trewavas, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [γ-32P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of Mr 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at Mr 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic 32P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16665936

  10. Rapid Changes in Plasma Membrane Protein Phosphorylation during Initiation of Cell Wall Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, D P; Boss, W F; Trewavas, A J

    1988-02-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles from wild carrot cells grown in suspension culture were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning, and ATP-dependent phosphorylation was measured with [gamma-(32)P]ATP in the presence and absence of calcium. Treatment of the carrot cells with the cell wall digestion enzymes, driselase, in a sorbitol osmoticum for 1.5 min altered the protein phosphorylation pattern compared to that of cells treated with sorbitol alone. Driselase treatment resulted in decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 80,000 which showed almost complete calcium dependence in the osmoticum treated cells; decreased phosphorylation of a band of M(r) 15,000 which showed little calcium activation, and appearance of a new band of calcium-dependent phosphorylation at M(r) 22,000. These effects appeared not to be due to nonspecific protease activity and neither in vivo nor in vitro exposure to driselase caused a significant loss of Coomassie blue-staining bands on the gels of the isolated plasma membranes. However, protein phosphorylation was decreased. Adding driselase to the in vitro reaction mixture caused a general decrease in the membrane protein phosphorylation either in the presence or absence of calcium which did not mimic the in vivo response. Cells labeled in vivo with inorganic (32)P also showed a response to the Driselase treatment. An enzymically active driselase preparation was required for the observed responses.

  11. IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway is activated in plasma cell mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Yu-Hui; Jiang, Yi-Na; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Jiang; Ren, Yu; Han, Shui-Ping; Liu, Pei-Jun; Xu, Jing; He, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell mastitis (PCM), a particular type of mastitis, mainly occurs in females at nonpregnant and nonlactating stages. The infiltration of abundant plasma cells and lymphocytes is the hallmark of the disease. The incidence rate of PCM increased gradually and its pathogenesis remained unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression of IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway, which is vital not only for the differentiation of plasma cells but also for survival of plasma cells and T lymphocytes, in 30 PCM cases, 10 acute mastitis cases and 10 normal breast tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. IL-6 level was significantly higher in PCM patients than in acute mastitis patients or normal group. The positive rate of IL-6 and p-STAT3 staining in PCM samples was 93.3% (28/30) and 70% (21/30), respectively, and there was a significant positive association between IL-6 and p-STAT3 staining (r=0.408, P=0.025). In PCM group, the rate of nipple retraction was 40% (12/30). Significantly higher IL-6 expression was found in PCM patients with nipple retraction than in other PCM patients. However, no significant difference in IL-6 or p-STAT3 staining was detected between PCM patients experiencing recurrence and other PCM patients. In addition, Bcl-2 level was higher in PCM patients than in acute mastitis patients or normal group, but there was no difference in Bcl-2 immunostaining between PCM patients experiencing recurrence and other PCM patients. These indicate that IL-6/STAT3 signaling is activated in PCM and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PCM.

  12. The relation between serum sex steroid levels and plasma cell infiltrates in endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnonen, R; Lehtinen, M; Teisala, K; Aine, R; Rantala, I; Heinonen, P K; Miettinen, A; Laine, S; Paavonen, J

    1989-01-01

    We measured serum levels of progesterone and estradiol among 35 patients with endometritis confirmed by endometrial biopsy. The onset of symptoms took place predominantly in the proliferative phase of the cycle. A negative correlation was found between the serum progesterone levels and the histopathologic severity of plasma cell endometritis. Our results suggest that the hormonal status contributes to the immune response and susceptibility to endometrial infection.

  13. Solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes produced via very low pressure suspension plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Fleetwood, James D

    2014-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a promising element of comprehensive energy policies due to their direct mechanism for converting the oxidization of fuel, such as hydrogen, into electrical energy. Both very low pressure plasma spray and electrophoretic deposition allow working with high melting temperature SOFC suspension based feedstock on complex surfaces, such as in non-planar SOFC designs. Dense, thin electrolytes of ideal composition for SOFCs can be fabricated with each of these proc...

  14. Thermal distortion and birefringence in repetition-rate plasma electrode Pockels cell for high average power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingxiang Cao; Xiongjun Zhang; Wanguo Zheng; Shaobo He; Zhan Sui

    2007-01-01

    We numerically study thermally induced birefringence and distortion in plasma electrode Pockels cell based on KD*P as the electro-optic material. This device can repetitively operate under the heat capacity mode.Simulation results indicate that the excellent switching performances and low wave-front distortion are achieved within several tens seconds working time at average power in excess of 1 kW.

  15. Refractory gastric ulcer with abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayoshi; Fujita; Takafumi; Ando; Masatoshi; Sakakibara; Waki; Hosoda; Hidemi; Goto

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 77-year-old man with refractory gastric ulcer that worsened after Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.Pathology showed marked infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the gastric lesions,which led us to suspect IgG4-related sclerosing disease.To the best of our knowledge,this is the first report of IgG4-related gastric ulcer without the main manifestation of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  16. The involvement of proteoglycans in the human plasma prekallikrein interaction with the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Lopes Veronez

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of human plasma prekallikrein assembly and processing in cells and to determine whether proteoglycans, along with high molecular weight kininogen (H-kininogen, influence this interaction. METHODS: We used the endothelial cell line ECV304 and the epithelial cell lines CHO-K1 (wild type and CHO-745 (deficient in proteoglycans. Prekallikrein endocytosis was studied using confocal microscopy, and prekallikrein cleavage/activation was determined by immunoblotting using an antibody directed to the prekallikrein sequence C364TTKTSTR371 and an antibody directed to the entire H-kininogen molecule. RESULTS: At 37°C, prekallikrein endocytosis was assessed in the absence and presence of exogenously applied H-kininogen and found to be 1,418.4±0.010 and 1,070.3±0.001 pixels/cell, respectively, for ECV304 and 1,319.1±0.003 and 631.3±0.001 pixels/cell, respectively, for CHO-K1. No prekallikrein internalization was observed in CHO-745 in either condition. Prekallikrein colocalized with LysoTracker in the absence and presence of exogenous H-kininogen at levels of 76.0% and 88.5%, respectively, for ECV304 and at levels of 40.7% and 57.0%, respectively, for CHO-K1. After assembly on the cell surface, a plasma kallikrein fragment of 53 kDa was predominant in the incubation buffer of all the cell lines studied, indicating specific proteolysis; plasma kallikrein fragments of 48-44 kDa and 34-32 kDa were also detected in the incubation buffer, indicating non-specific cleavage. Bradykinin free H-kininogen internalization was not detected in CHO-K1 or CHO-745 cells at 37°C. CONCLUSION: The prekallikrein interaction with the cell surface is temperature-dependent and independent of exogenously applied H-kininogen, which results in prekallikrein endocytosis promoted by proteoglycans. Prekallikrein proteolysis/activation is influenced by H-kininogen/glycosaminoglycans assembly and controls plasma kallikrein

  17. Adult Cells Combined With Platelet-Rich Plasma for Tendon Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Azpeitia, Eva; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego; Andia, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Background: The combination of cells with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may fulfill tendon deficits and help overcome the limited ability of tendons to heal. Purpose: To examine the suitability of 3 human cell types in combination with PRP and the potential impact of the tenocyte-conditioned media (CM) to enhance tendon healing. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Tenocytes, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells, and skin fibroblasts were cultured in 3-dimensional PRP hydrogels supplemented or not with CM, and cell proliferation and migration were examined. The effect of tendon-derived CM on matrix-forming phenotype and secretion of inflammatory proteins was determined through their administration to mesenchymal stem cells, tendon, and skin fibroblasts by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Results: Differences were found in the matrix-forming phenotype between each of the cell types. The ratio of collagen I:collagen III was greater in bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells than in skin fibroblasts and tenocytes. The bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells expressed increased levels of cartilage-related genes than tenocytes or skin fibroblasts. The presence of the tenocyte-CM stimulated basic healing mechanisms including proliferation and chemotaxis in all cell types. In addition, the tenocyte-CM modified the matrix-forming phenotype of every cell type when cultured in PRP hydrogels. Each cell type secreted interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in PRP hydrogels, but mesenchymal stem cells secreted less interleukin-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 than tenocytes or skin fibroblasts. Conclusion: The tenocyte-CM combined with PRP stimulated tenogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells and in skin fibroblasts and reduced the secretion of inflammatory proteins. Clinical Relevance: Modifying the target tissue with PRP prior to cell

  18. A practical guide for the identification of membrane and plasma membrane proteins in human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormeyer, W.; van Hoof, D.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.; Heck, A.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of (plasma) membrane proteins in cells can provide valuable insights into the regulation of their biological processes. Pluripotent cells such as human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and share many of the biological

  19. Multiple effects of the phenylhydrazone derivative FCCP on the secretory pathway in rat plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, J C; Jouanne, C

    1986-10-01

    We studied the sensitivity of the last steps of the secretory process of antibody-producing cells to carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and sodium azide (NaN3), agents which lower the cellular ATP content by inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial electron transport, respectively. Popliteal lymph node cells or purified plasma cells from rats immunized against horseradish peroxidase were incubated with the drugs. The rate of secretion of anti-HRP antibodies was measured by an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay or after biosynthetic labeling with L-[3H]fucose. FCCP as well as NaN3 were shown to rapidly inhibit (in less than 5 min) the secretion of immunoglobulins (Ig) and to partially block the release of fucosylated Ig. This indicates that the drugs inhibit the transport of Ig from the Golgi apparatus (GA) (where fucose is added to Ig) to the plasma membrane. However, the degree of inhibition reached 40 to 50% with NaN3 and 70 to 80% with FCCP, whereas both drugs similarly depleted ATP stores by 45 to 55%. These results are consistent with multiple effects of FCCP on the secretion pathway of Ig. As a tentative explanation, we suggest that FCCP, because of its protonophore properties, not only reduces cellular ATP levels but may also neutralize the Golgi or post-Golgi acidic compartments recently shown to be involved in the transport of plasma membrane and secretory proteins.

  20. Particle-in-cell simulation of an electronegative plasma under direct current bias studied in a large range of electronegativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudini, N. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire des plasmas de Decharges, Centre de Developement des Technologies Avancees, Cite du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Raimbault, J.-L.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Meige, A. [PRESANS / X-Technologies/Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    A one-dimensional electronegative plasma situated between two symmetrical parallel electrodes under DC bias is studied by Particle-In-Cell simulation with Monte Carlo Collisions. By varying the electronegativity {alpha}{identical_to}n{sub -}/n{sub e} from the limit of electron-ion plasmas (negative ion free) to ion-ion plasmas (electron free), the sheaths formation, the negative ion flux flowing towards the electrodes, and the particle velocities at the sheath edges are investigated. Depending on {alpha}, it is shown that the electronegative plasma behavior can be described by four regimes. In the lowest regime of {alpha}, i.e., {alpha} < 50, negative ions are confined by two positive sheaths within the plasma, while in the higher regimes of {alpha}, a negative sheath is formed and the negative ion flux can be extracted from the bulk plasma. In the two intermediate regimes of {alpha}, i.e., 50 < {alpha} < 10{sup 5}, both the electron and the negative ion fluxes are involved in the neutralization of the positive ions flux that leaves the plasma. In particular, we show that the velocity of the negative ions entering the negative sheath is affected by the presence of the electrons, and is not given by the modified Bohm velocity generally accepted for electronegative plasmas. For extremely high electronegativity, i.e., {alpha} > 10{sup 5}, the presence of electrons in the plasma is marginal and the electronegative plasma can be considered as an ion-ion plasma (electron free).

  1. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  2. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huixin; Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Weiwei; Chen, Fang; Zeng, Peng; Li, Xuchao; Xie, Yifan; Liu, Hongtai; Huang, Guodong; Chen, Dayang; Liu, Ping; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele information or are restricted to male fetuses. Methods In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%. Results Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935) between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2%) between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome. PMID:27662469

  3. Non-thermal plasma with 2-deoxy-D-glucose synergistically induces cell death by targeting glycolysis in blood cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Neha; Lee, Su Jae; Choi, Tae Gyu; Baik, Ku Youn; Uhm, Han Sup; Kim, Chung Hyeok; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show the selective and efficient anti-cancer effects of plasma (at a low dose) when cell metabolic modifiers are also included. 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, was used with effective doses of non-thermal plasma, synergistically attenuating cell metabolic viability and inducing caspase-dependent and independent cell death. The combination treatment decreased the intracellular ATP and lactate production in various types of blood cancer cells in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that 2-DG enhances the efficacy and selectivity of plasma and induces the synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth by targeting glycolysis and apoptosis. Specifically, this treatment strategy demonstrated an enhanced growth inhibitory effect of plasma in the presence of a metabolic modifier that was selective against cancer cells, not non-malignant cells. This is the first study to report the advantage of combining plasma with 2-DG to eradicate blood cancer cells. Finally, we conclude that 2-DG with non-thermal plasma may be used as a combination treatment against blood cancer cells.

  4. Influence of Low-Energy Ion Irradiation on Plasma MembranePermeability of Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong-Mei; CUI Fu-Zhai; SUN Su-Qin; LIN You-Bo; TIAN Min-Bo; CHEN Guo-Qiang

    2000-01-01

    Effect of low-energy ion irradiation on plasma membrane permeability has been investigated by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy of spin probe technique. The investigated system is plumule cells of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds implanted by 30keV N+ ions. ESR spectra indicated that plasmalemma permeability is sensitive to low-energyion irradiation. Ion irradiations with increasing fluences up to semi-lethal dose lead to gradual increase in plasmalemma permeability of the plumule cells. The possible factors relevant to the changes in membrane permeability are discussed in relation to the changes in the physical state and chemical nature of membranes.

  5. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Effect in Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell for High Average Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ding-Xiang; ZHANG Xiong-Jun; ZHENG Wan-Guo; HE Shao-Bo; SUI Zhan

    2006-01-01

    @@ The average power of a Pockels cell is limited by thermal effects arising from the optical absorption of the laser pulse. These thermal effects can be managed by configuring the switch as a plasma-electrode thin plate Pockels cell, which works under heat-capacity operation. Simulation results show that, based on KD*P (in thickness 0.5cm) at an average power loading of 1 kW, the aperture integrated depolarization loss at 1.06 um is less than 10% in 5min working time.

  6. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez M Carmen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective.

  7. Red blood cell engineering in stroma and serum/plasma-free conditions and long term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok; Baek, Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    In vitro generation of artificial red blood cells (RBCs) is very important to overcome insufficient and unsafe blood supply. Despite recent progresses in RBCs engineering from several stem cell sources, none of them could succeed in generation of functional RBCs in the absence of serum/plasma and feeder cells. Without the elimination of serum and plasma, human RBC engineering in a large scale is impossible, especially for the future bioreactor system. Using an appropriate combination of cost-effective and safe reagents, the present study demonstrated the terminal maturation of hematopoietic stem cells into enucleated RBCs, which were functional comparable to donated human RBCs. Surprisingly, the viability of erythroid cells was higher in our serum- and feeder-free culture condition than in the previous serum-added condition. This was possible by supplementation with vitamin C in media and hypothermic conditions. Also, our report firstly presents the storability of artificial RBCs, which possibility is essential for clinical application. In summary, our report demonstrates engineering of human applicable RBCs with a dramatically enhanced viability and shelf-life in both serum- and stroma-free conditions. This innovative culture technology could contribute to the realization of the large-scale pharming of human RBCs using bioreactor systems.

  8. Putting J chain back on the map: how might its expression define plasma cell development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Caitlin D; Flajnik, Martin F

    2014-10-01

    Joining chain (J chain) is a small polypeptide that regulates multimerization of secretory IgM and IgA, the only two mammalian Igs capable of forming multimers. J chain also is required for poly-Ig receptor-mediated transport of these Ig classes across the mucosal epithelium. It is generally assumed that all plasma cells express J chain regardless of expressed isotype, despite the documented presence of J chain(-) plasma cells in mammals, specifically in all monomeric IgA-secreting cells and some IgG-secreting cells. Compared with most other immune molecules, J chain has not been studied extensively, in part because of technical limitations. Even the reported phenotype of the J chain-knockout mouse is often misunderstood or underappreciated. In this short review, we discuss J chain in light of the various proposed models of its expression and regulation, with an added focus on its evolutionary significance, as well as its expression in different B cell lineages/differentiation states.

  9. Restoration of sensitivity in chemo-resistant glioma cells by cold atmospheric plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köritzer, Julia; Boxhammer, Veronika; Schäfer, Andrea; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klämpfl, Tobias G; Li, Yang-Fang; Welz, Christian; Schwenk-Zieger, Sabina; Morfill, Gregor E; Zimmermann, Julia L; Schlegel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults. Despite multimodal treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy the prognosis remains poor and relapse occurs regularly. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has been shown to improve the overall survival in patients with malignant gliomas, especially in tumors with methylated promoter of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance towards TMZ makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the prognosis of patients suffering from malignant gliomas. Cold atmospheric plasma is a new auspicious candidate in cancer treatment. In the present study we demonstrate the anti-cancer properties of different dosages of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) both in TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant cells by proliferation assay, immunoblotting, cell cycle analysis, and clonogenicity assay. Importantly, CAP treatment restored the responsiveness of resistant glioma cells towards TMZ therapy. Concomitant treatment with CAP and TMZ led to inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest, thus CAP might be a promising candidate for combination therapy especially for patients suffering from GBMs showing an unfavorable MGMT status and TMZ resistance.

  10. Restoration of sensitivity in chemo-resistant glioma cells by cold atmospheric plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Köritzer

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and aggressive brain tumor in adults. Despite multimodal treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy the prognosis remains poor and relapse occurs regularly. The alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ has been shown to improve the overall survival in patients with malignant gliomas, especially in tumors with methylated promoter of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT gene. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance towards TMZ makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the prognosis of patients suffering from malignant gliomas. Cold atmospheric plasma is a new auspicious candidate in cancer treatment. In the present study we demonstrate the anti-cancer properties of different dosages of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP both in TMZ-sensitive and TMZ-resistant cells by proliferation assay, immunoblotting, cell cycle analysis, and clonogenicity assay. Importantly, CAP treatment restored the responsiveness of resistant glioma cells towards TMZ therapy. Concomitant treatment with CAP and TMZ led to inhibition of cell growth and cell cycle arrest, thus CAP might be a promising candidate for combination therapy especially for patients suffering from GBMs showing an unfavorable MGMT status and TMZ resistance.

  11. Plasma deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells. Looking beyond the glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donker, M.N. van den

    2006-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon emerged in the past decade as highly interesting material for application in efficient and stable thin film silicon solar cells. It consists of nanometer-sized crystallites embedded in a micrometer-sized columnar structure, which gradually evolves during the SiH{sub 4} based deposition process starting from an amorphous incubation layer. Understanding of and control over this transient and multi-scale growth process is essential in the route towards low-cost microcrystalline silicon solar cells. This thesis presents an experimental study on the technologically relevant high rate (5-10 Aa s{sup -1}) parallel plate plasma deposition process of state-of-the-art microcrystalline silicon solar cells. The objective of the work was to explore and understand the physical limits of the plasma deposition process as well as to develop diagnostics suitable for process control in eventual solar cell production. Among the developed non-invasive process diagnostics were a pyrometer, an optical spectrometer, a mass spectrometer and a voltage probe. Complete thin film silicon solar cells and modules were deposited and characterized. (orig.)

  12. Research progress on plasma cell mastitis%浆细胞性乳腺炎的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡颖恺(综述); 徐红(审校)

    2016-01-01

    目前浆细胞性乳腺炎(plasma cell mastitis, PCM)的始发因素尚不明确,发病机制仍处于探索,各期的临床表现大相径庭。对于PCM治疗仍然以手术治疗为主,但是保守治疗正逐步发展起来,笔者就近年来对于PCM的病因及诊疗发展做一综述。%At present, initiating factor of plasma cell mastitis is still unclear, and pathogenesis is still in the exploration status, clinical manifestations for all stages are different. Now operative treatment is the main type of treatment for plasma cell mastitis, but conservative treatment is developing. The author reviewed the development of the etiology, diagnosis and treatment in plasma cell mastitis in the recent years.

  13. Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy Prior to and Following Treatment from Gas Discharge Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervoort, K. G.; Joaquin, J. C.; Kwan, C.; Bray, J. D.; Torrico, R.; Abramzon, N.; Brelles-Marino, G.

    2007-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, cell wall elasticity was studied by measuring force distance curves as the AFM tip was pressed into the cell surface. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  14. Aqueous two-phase partition applied to the isolation of plasma membranes and Golgi apparatus from cultured mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. M.; Morre, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Partitioning in dextran-poly(ethylene)glycol (PEG) aqueous-aqueous phase systems represents a mature technology with many applications to separations of cells and to the preparation of membranes from mammalian cells. Most applications to membrane isolation and purification have focused on plasma membranes, plasma membrane domains and separation of right side-out and inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. The method exploits a combination of membrane properties, including charge and hydrophobicity. Purification is based upon differential distributions of the constituents in a sample between the two principal compartments of the two phases (upper and lower) and at the interface. The order of affinity of animal cell membranes for the upper phase is: endoplasmic reticulum Golgi apparatusGolgi apparatus from transformed mammalian cells that combines aqueous two-phase partition and centrifugation. Also described is a periodic NADH oxidase, a new enzyme marker for right side-out plasma membrane vesicles not requiring detergent disruptions for measurement of activity.

  15. Imaging of mobile long-lived nanoplatforms in the live cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameshuber, Mario; Weghuber, Julian; Ruprecht, Verena; Gombos, Imre; Horváth, Ibolya; Vigh, László; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Kiss, Endre; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2010-12-31

    The plasma membrane has been hypothesized to contain nanoscopic lipid platforms, which are discussed in the context of "lipid rafts" or "membrane rafts." Based on biochemical and cell biological studies, rafts are believed to play a crucial role in many signaling processes. However, there is currently not much information on their size, shape, stability, surface density, composition, and heterogeneity. We present here a method that allows for the first time the direct imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the live cell plasma membrane. Our method senses these platforms by their property to assemble a characteristic set of fluorescent marker proteins or lipids on a time scale of seconds. A special photobleaching protocol was used to reduce the surface density of labeled mobile platforms down to the level of well isolated diffraction-limited spots without altering the single spot brightness. The statistical distribution of probe molecules per platform was determined by single molecule brightness analysis. For demonstration, we used the consensus raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP and the fluorescent lipid analog BODIPY-G(M1), which preferentially partitions into liquid-ordered phases. For both markers, we found cholesterol-dependent homo-association in the plasma membrane of living CHO and Jurkat T cells in the resting state, thereby demonstrating the existence of small, mobile, long-lived platforms containing these probes. We further applied the technology to address structural changes in the plasma membrane during fever-type heat shock: at elevated temperatures, the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric GFP homo-association disappeared, accompanied by an increase in the expression of the small heat shock protein Hsp27.

  16. Plasma fibrinogen levels are correlated with postoperative distant metastasis and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhong; Zhou, Xia; Bao, Wuan; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Lei; Qiu, Guoqin; Sheng, Liming; Ji, Yongling; Du, Xianghui

    2015-11-10

    This study investigated the correlation of preoperative plasma fibrinogen level with distant metastasis and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A total of 255 patients with ESCC who underwent surgery in Zhejiang cancer hospital (Hangzhou, China), between October 2006 and December 2009, were evaluated in this retrospective study. Population controls were selected from a pool of cancer-free subjects in the same region. Each patient and cancer-free people provided 3-mL pretreatment blood. Plasma fibrinogen level was measured by the Clauss method. The effects of hyperfibrinogenemia on locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Independent prognostic factors were identified in the multivariate Cox analysis. The proportion of hyperfibrinogenemia was higher in ESCC patients than those in controls (40.4% vs 13.6%). Subjects with hyperfibrinogenemia had a significantly higher risk of ESCC than those with normal plasma fibrinogen level (adjust OR = 4.61; 95% CI = 3.02-7.01, P fibrinogen level were independent prognostic factors of ESCC (P fibrinogen level was significantly associated with elevated risk of ESCC. Preoperative plasma fibrinogen level was a predictor of distant metastasis and independently associated with prognosis of patients with ESCC.

  17. Spray-dried plasma and fresh frozen plasma modulate permeability and inflammation in vitro in vascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wataha, K.; Menge, T.; Deng, X.; Shah, A.; Bode, A.; Holcomb, J.B.; Potter, D.; Kozar, R.; Spinella, P.C.; Pati, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After major traumatic injury, patients often require multiple transfusions of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to correct coagulopathy and to reduce bleeding. A spray-dried plasma (SDP) product has several logistical benefits over FFP use in trauma patients with coagulopathy. These benefits inc

  18. Cell immobilization on polymer by air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Om, Ji-yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-08-01

    The study of cell immobilization on delicate polymer by an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) is required for its medical application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AAPPJ treatment induce cell immobilization effect on delicate polymers without significant change of surface roughness by AAPPJ treatment. After surface roughness, dynamic contact angle, and chemical characteristics were investigated, the immobilization effect was evaluated with the mouse fibroblast L929 cell line. Surface roughness change was not observed (P > 0.05) in either delicate dental wax or polystyrene plate (PSP) as advancing and receding contact angles significantly decreased (P < 0.05), thanks to decreased hydrocarbon and formation of oxygen-related functional groups in treated PSP. Adherent L929 cells with elongated morphology were found in treated PSP along with the formation of immobilization markers vinculin and actin cytoskeleton. Increased PTK2 gene expression upregulated these markers on treated PSP.

  19. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  20. Identification and characterization of inward K ~+-channels in plasma membranes of Arabidopsis root cortex cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于川江; 武维华

    1999-01-01

    Patch clamping whole-cell reeording techniques were apphed to study the inward K+ channels in Arabidopsis root cortex cells. The inward K+-channels in the plasma membranes of the root cortex cell protoplasts were activated by hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The channels were highly selective tor K+ ions over Na+ ions. The channel activity was significantly inbibited by the external TEA(?) or Ba(?) The changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations did not affect the whole-cell inward K+-currents. The possible asso(?)ation betw(?)en the channel selectivity to K+ and Na(?) ions and plant salt-tolerance was also discussed.

  1. The biological response of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields is dependent on plasma membrane cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated nanopore formation in cell membranes following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We observed differences in sensitivity to nsPEF in both acute membrane injury and 24h lethality across multiple cells lines. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the biological response of cells to nsPEF is dependent on the physical properties of the plasma membrane (PM), including regional cholesterol content. Results presented in this paper show that depletion of membrane cholesterol disrupts the PM and increases the permeability of cells to small molecules, including propidium iodide and calcium occurring after fewer nsPEF. Additionally, cholesterol depletion concurrently decreases the "dose" of nsPEF required to induce lethality. In summary, the results of the current study suggest that the PM cholesterol composition is an important determinant in the cellular response to nsPEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanosecond-Pulsed DBD Plasma-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Immunogenic Cell Death in A549 Lung Carcinoma Cells through Intracellular Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham; Truong, Billy; Patel, Sohil; Kaushik, Nagendra; Choi, Eun Ha; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Miller, Vandana

    2017-01-01

    A novel application for non-thermal plasma is the induction of immunogenic cancer cell death for cancer immunotherapy. Cells undergoing immunogenic death emit danger signals which facilitate anti-tumor immune responses. Although pathways leading to immunogenic cell death are not fully understood; oxidative stress is considered to be part of the underlying mechanism. Here; we studied the interaction between dielectric barrier discharge plasma and cancer cells for oxidative stress-mediated immunogenic cell death. We assessed changes to the intracellular oxidative environment after plasma treatment and correlated it to emission of two danger signals: surface-exposed calreticulin and secreted adenosine triphosphate. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen and charged species were recognized as the major effectors of immunogenic cell death. Chemical attenuators of intracellular reactive oxygen species successfully abrogated oxidative stress following plasma treatment and modulated the emission of surface-exposed calreticulin. Secreted danger signals from cells undergoing immunogenic death enhanced the anti-tumo