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Sample records for plants toxic

  1. Toxic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reproductive performance is the single most important economic animal trait to the livestock industry and is reported to be 5 and 10 times more significant than carcass quality and growth traits respectively. Poisonous plants impact livestock reproductive function in a major way and have been shown...

  2. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed.

  3. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  4. Southeastern plants toxic to ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Steven S

    2011-07-01

    Selected toxic plants affecting cattle, sheep, and goats in the southeastern United States are presented. The author's intention is to provide veterinary practitioners and students with an overview of plant poisoning in the region. Plants are grouped by body system affected, based on clinical signs and/or lesions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Toxic plants: a chemist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Bryan A

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry has long been an integral part of toxicology, as the two fields originated in much the same way: the investigation of plants with interesting properties. In this chapter I review the role that chemistry has played in understanding toxic and medicinal plants. After some introductory remarks, three broad areas are addressed: the role of natural products in understanding plant taxonomy and evolution, recent developments in chemical synthesis, especially efforts to discover and efficiently synthesize novel structures based upon naturally occurring toxins, and finally, developments in the new field of systems toxicology, which seeks to integrate all aspects of an organism's response to toxic insult.

  6. Toxic plants of the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Karyn; Smith, Mary C

    2011-07-01

    This article lists commonly encountered toxic plants that affect ruminants in the Northeastern United States. Livestock are at risk for ingestion of a large variety of toxic plants. Plant poisonings are likely to be underdiagnosed because tests for most plant toxins are not routinely available at veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Prevention of access to poisonous plants is usually more effective and economical than treatment of plant poisonings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxic Plant Resources in Panxi Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun; SU Chunjiang; ZHENG Yuanchang

    2007-01-01

    Panxi Area is abundant in plant resources, among which toxic plants are of great value in terms of exploitation. This paper is an initiative study (via field as well as literature investigation) of the categories, distributions, and reserves of toxic plant resources in Panxi Area. The study reveals that there are 51 families (210 species) of toxic plants evenly distributed in Panxi Area, of which more than 40 species grow in all counties in the area, and more than 14 species total a reserve more than 1.0×105kg. These toxic plants are of great applications to medicine, gardening, biopesticide industry, environmental engineering, and oil manufacturing. Rhododendron molle, Anisodus acutangulus, Arisaema erubesocens, Stellera chamaejasme, Rhytolacca acinosa, Rheum officinale, and Azadiralta indica etc are the typical toxic plants with great value of exploitation in Panxi Area.

  8. Plant toxicity, adaptive herbivory, and plant community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilan Feng; Rongsong Liu; Donald L. DeAngelis; John P. Bryant; Knut Kielland; F. Stuart Chapin; Robert K. Swihart

    2009-01-01

    We model effects of interspecific plant competition, herbivory, and a plant's toxic defenses against herbivores on vegetation dynamics. The model predicts that, when a generalist herbivore feeds in the absence of plant toxins, adaptive foraging generally increases the probability of coexistence of plant species populations, because the herbivore switches more of...

  9. Plant toxicity, adaptive herbivory, and plant community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z.; Liu, R.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Bryant, J.P.; Kielland, K.; Stuart, Chapin F.; Swihart, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    We model effects of interspecific plant competition, herbivory, and a plant's toxic defenses against herbivores on vegetation dynamics. The model predicts that, when a generalist herbivore feeds in the absence of plant toxins, adaptive foraging generally increases the probability of coexistence of plant species populations, because the herbivore switches more of its effort to whichever plant species is more common and accessible. In contrast, toxin-determined selective herbivory can drive plant succession toward dominance by the more toxic species, as previously documented in boreal forests and prairies. When the toxin concentrations in different plant species are similar, but species have different toxins with nonadditive effects, herbivores tend to diversify foraging efforts to avoid high intakes of any one toxin. This diversification leads the herbivore to focus more feeding on the less common plant species. Thus, uncommon plants may experience depensatory mortality from herbivory, reducing local species diversity. The depensatory effect of herbivory may inhibit the invasion of other plant species that are more palatable or have different toxins. These predictions were tested and confirmed in the Alaskan boreal forest. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  10. Evaluation of toxicity of trichloroethylene for plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, S.B.; Davis, L.C.; Dana, J.; Selk, K.; Erickson, L.E. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure of several species of plants was studied. Although earlier studies indicated that the root systems of plants could tolerate an aqueous phase concentration of 1 mM for a day, toxicity to whole plants was observed at somewhat lower levels in the gas phase in this study. The tested species included pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), sweet potato (Dioscoria batata), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), soybean (Glycine max L. Merr), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Damage was observable as wilting or failure of the gravitropic response of shoots at levels above about 0.2 mM in the gas phase, which corresponds to 0.5 mM in the aqueous phase. Plants were usually killed quickly at gas phase concentrations above 0.4 mM.

  11. [Allergic and toxic cutaneous reactions to plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambillara, Eleonora; Spertini, Francois; Leimgruber, Annette

    2010-04-21

    Numerous professional or leisure activities expose individuals to plants susceptible to provoke contact allergies. The immunological mechanisms that are responsible for these ailments (delayed cellular reaction linked to allergic dermatitis or immediate IgE mediated reaction of the allergic urticaria) differ according to the plant families involved. A differential diagnosis must be made in the case of the even more frequent non-allergic reactions implying either a simple mechanical irritation, or a contact with toxic substances. The role of UV (phytophotodermatosis), as well as the contact allergy to wood is also evoked in this paper.

  12. Boron in Plants: Deficiency and Toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan J. Camacho-Crist6bal; Jesus Rexach; Agustin González-Fontess

    2008-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for normal growth of higher plants, and B availability in soil and irrigation water is an important determinant of agricultural production. To date, a primordial function of B is undoubtedly its structural role in the cell wall; however, there is increasing evidence for a possible role of B in other processes such as the maintenance of plasma membrane function and several metabolic pathways. In recent years, the knowledge of the molecular basis of B deficiency and toxicity responses in plants has advanced greatly. The aim of this review is to provide an update on recent findings related to these topics, which can contribute to a better understanding of the role of B in plants.

  13. Food plant toxicants and safety - Risk assessment and regulation of inherent toxicants in plant foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essers, A.J.A.; Alink, G.M.; Speijers, G.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The ADI as a tool for risk management and regulation of food additives and pesticide residues is not readily applicable to inherent food plant toxicants: The margin between actual intake and potentially toxic levels is often small; application of the default uncertainty factors used to derive ADI...... values, particularly when extrapolating from animal data, would prohibit the utilisation of the food, which may have an overall beneficial health effect. Levels of inherent toxicants are difficult to control; their complete removal is not always wanted, due to their function for the plant or for human...... health. The health impact of the inherent toxicant is often modified by factors in the food, e.g. the bioavailability from the matrix and interaction with other inherent constituents. Risk-benefit analysis should be made for different consumption scenarios, without the use of uncertainty factors. Crucial...

  14. Do toxic ions induce hormesis in plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Cabot, Catalina; Martos, Soledad; Gallego, Berta; Barceló, Juan

    2013-11-01

    The concept of hormesis in plants is critically reviewed, taking growth stimulation by low concentrations of toxic trace elements as a reference. The importance of both non-adaptive and adaptive mechanisms underlying ion-induced hormetic growth responses is highlighted. The activation of defense mechanisms by metal ions and pathogenic elicitors and the cross talk between the signals induced by metal ions and biotic stressors are considered. The production of reactive oxygen species and, consequently, the induction of stress-induced antioxidants, are key mechanisms in metal ion-induced hormesis in plants. It is concluded that in the current scientific literature, hormesis is used as an "umbrella" term that includes a wide range of different mechanisms. It is recommended that the term hormesis be used in plant toxicology as a descriptive term for the stimulated phase in growth response curves that is induced by low concentrations of toxic metal ions without evidence of the underlying mechanisms. If the mechanisms underlying the stimulated growth phase have been identified, specific terms, such as amelioration, defense gene activation, priming or acclimation, should be used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cruciferous plants: phytochemical toxicity versus cancer chemoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assayed, Mohamed E; Abd El-Aty, A M

    2009-11-01

    The Cruciferae (also known as the Brassicaceae) are the family of plants that include the various familiar members of the species Brassica oleracea (e.g., broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts) as well as many other plants that are widely consumed in various parts of the world. Forage and root brassicas are widely used as winter feeds for cattle and sheep. A striking and characteristic chemical property of cruciferous plants is their high content of glucosinolates (more than 120 types), which often approaches 1% or more of their dry weight. The interest devoted to this group of natural products is caused by the appreciable biological effects of both the intact glucosinolates (GSLs) and especially the complex group of glucosinolate transformation products produced in non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions. Depending on the concentration and structural types of these compounds, their biological effects can be toxic, anti-nutritional or beneficial to health. Most serious economic problems in livestock seem to result from rapeseed meal; arising from GSLs or their breakdown products. In contrast, GSLs and their isothiocyanate (ITC) hydrolysis products are reportedly well-known protectors against carcinogenesis. GSLs play further protective and evolutionarily important roles in plants. These include allelopathy (suppression of growth of neighboring plants), specific positive and negative feeding cues for some insects and broad antibiotic properties including nematocidal, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal and insecticidal activities. The controversy in the referred actions contributed to crucifers' phytochemicals has been exclusively discussed.

  16. EFFECTS OF SILICON ON ALLEVIATING ARSENIC TOXICITY IN MAIZE PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Airon José da Silva; Clístenes Williams Nascimento; Artur da Silva Gouveia Neto; Elias Arcanjo Silva Junior

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid highly toxic to plants and animals, causing reduced plant growth and various health problems for humans and animals. Silicon, however, has excelled in alleviating stress caused by toxic elements in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Si in alleviating As stress in maize plants grown in a nutrient solution and evaluate the potential of the spectral emission parameters and the red fluorescence (Fr) and far-red fluorescence (FFr) ratio obtained ...

  17. Detoxification Mechanisms of Mercury Toxicity in Plants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Shrivastava

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the most toxic heavy metals present in the earth’s crust. It has been considered as environmental pollutant because of its potent toxicity to plants and humans. In this review, we discuss mercury toxicity responses on plant metabolism and its detoxification mechanism by phytochelatins and antioxidant enzymes. Some light is also shed on selenium antagonistic study with mercury. Due to its potential toxicity, it has attracted attention in fields of soil science and plant nutrition. Mercury has harmful toxic effects on the molecular and physiobiochemical behavior of plants. Mostly research work has been done on seed germination, and shoot, root, and leaf morphology. Enzyme responses with respect to mercury as a result Hg accumulated in food chain is also reviewed here. Hence, this review may provide a compiled data for other researches in this direction, to provide a better mechanism or details about mercury’s noxious effect in the ecosystem.

  18. Ethnobotanical survey of toxic plants and plant parts in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adediwura A Fred-Jaiyesimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several plants considered toxic are sometimes identified in traditional medicinal recipes. This study identified and inventoried the plants and plant parts identified as toxic in targeted local government areas of Ogun State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: By administering tested questionnaires, information on the poisonous or toxic plants, poisonous parts, poisonous effects, modes of poisoning, and antidotes was obtained. Results and Conclusion: Ninety-two species belonging to 43 families were identified as toxic plants and these were mainly members of the Euphorbiaceae and Fabaceae families. The botanical names, poisonous parts, common names, vernacular names, modes of poisoning, antidotes, and poisonous effects are presented in a table.

  19. Effects of calcium at toxic concentrations of cadmium in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danlian; Gong, Xiaomin; Liu, Yunguo; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Bashir, Hassan; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Dafei; Xu, Piao; Cheng, Min; Wan, Jia

    2017-05-01

    This review provides new insight that calcium plays important roles in plant growth, heavy metal accumulation and translocation, photosynthesis, oxidative damage and signal transduction under cadmium stress. Increasing heavy metal pollution problems have raised word-wide concerns. Cadmium (Cd), being a highly toxic metal, poses potential risks both to ecosystems and human health. Compared with conventional technologies, phytoremediation, being cost-efficient, highly stable and environment-friendly, is believed to be a promising green technology for Cd decontamination. However, Cd can be easily taken up by plants and may cause severe phytotoxicity to plants, thus limiting the efficiency of phytoremediation. Various researches are being done to investigate the effects of exogenous substances on the mitigation of Cd toxicity to plants. Calcium (Ca) is an essential plant macronutrient that involved in various plant physiological processes, such as plant growth and development, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming, photosynthesis and intracellular signaling transduction. Due to the chemical similarity between Ca and Cd, Ca may mediate Cd-induced physiological or metabolic changes in plants. Recent studies have shown that Ca could be used as an exogenous substance to protect plants against Cd stress by the alleviation of growth inhibition, regulation of metal uptake and translocation, improvement of photosynthesis, mitigation of oxidative damages and the control of signal transduction in the plants. The effects of Ca on toxic concentrations of Cd in plants are reviewed. This review also provides new insight that plants with enhanced Ca level have improved resistance to Cd stress.

  20. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic.

  1. Toxic plants used in ethnoveterinary medicine in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegi, Lucia; Vangelisti, Roberta

    2011-07-01

    This study was conducted to document the use of toxic or potentially toxic plants for the treatment of ailments in livestock and pets in ethnoveterinary practice in Italy. More than 250 of the entities used (81% for curative purposes) can be toxic unless dosed appropriately. Many (55%) are dietary supplements. The list included 186 species (45%) for internal and 175 (55%) for external use, many used in places where animals are kept. The species belong to 71 families, among which the Fabaceae predominate. The purpose of the study was to provide information that can be validated and associated with correct determination, permitting even potentially dangerous plants to be used in veterinary practice.

  2. Genus identification of toxic plant by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shuji; Nishi, Katsuji

    2011-03-01

    Some plants have toxicities that are dangerous for humans. In the case of poisoning by toxic plants, a rapid and easy screening test is required for accurate medical treatment or forensic investigation. In this study, we designed specific primer pairs for identification of toxic plants, such as subgenus Aconitum, genus Ricinus, genus Illicium, and genus Scopolia, by internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Allied species of target plants, foods, and human DNA were not detected, but each primer pair provided a specific PCR product from the target plant using real-time PCR. This method can detect the subgenus Aconitum, genus Ricinus, and genus Scopolia with template DNA of 10 pg, respectively, and genus Illicium with 1 pg. Furthermore, each primer pair provided the exact PCR product from digested target plants in artificial gastric fluid. When a trace unknown plant sample in forensic investigation is collected from stomach contents, this PCR assay may be useful for screening toxic plants.

  3. Vanadium bioavailability and toxicity to soil microorganisms and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maja A; Baken, Stijn; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Hadialhejazi, Golshid; Smolders, Erik

    2013-10-01

    Vanadium, V, is a redox-sensitive metal that in solution, under aerobic conditions, prevails as the oxyanion vanadate(V). There is little known regarding vanadium toxicity to soil biota, and the present study was set up to determine the toxicity of added vanadate to soil organisms and to investigate the relationship between toxicity and vanadium sorption in soils. Five soils with contrasting properties were spiked with 7 different doses (3.2-3200 mg V kg(-1)) of dissolved vanadate, and toxicity was measured with 2 microbial and 3 plant assays. The median effective concentration (EC50) thresholds of the microbial assays ranged from 28 mg added V kg(-1) to 690 mg added V kg(-1), and the EC50s in the plant assays ranged from 18 mg added V kg(-1) to 510 mg added V kg(-1). The lower thresholds were in the concentration range of the background vanadium in the untreated control soils (15-58 mg V kg(-1)). The vanadium toxicity to plants decreased with a stronger soil vanadium sorption strength. The EC50 values for plants expressed on a soil solution basis ranged from 0.8 mg V L(-1) to 15 mg V L(-1) and were less variable among soils than corresponding values based on total vanadium in soil. It is concluded that sorption decreases the toxicity of added vanadate and that soil solution vanadium is a more robust measure to determine critical vanadium concentrations across soils. © 2013 SETAC.

  4. EFFECTS OF SILICON ON ALLEVIATING ARSENIC TOXICITY IN MAIZE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airon José da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a metalloid highly toxic to plants and animals, causing reduced plant growth and various health problems for humans and animals. Silicon, however, has excelled in alleviating stress caused by toxic elements in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Si in alleviating As stress in maize plants grown in a nutrient solution and evaluate the potential of the spectral emission parameters and the red fluorescence (Fr and far-red fluorescence (FFr ratio obtained in analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence in determination of this interaction. An experiment was carried out in a nutrient solution containing a toxic rate of As (68 μmol L-1 and six increasing rates of Si (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mmol L-1. Dry matter production and concentrations of As, Si, and photosynthetic pigments were then evaluated. Chlorophyll fluorescence was also measured throughout plant growth. Si has positive effects in alleviating As stress in maize plants, evidenced by the increase in photosynthetic pigments. Silicon application resulted in higher As levels in plant tissue; therefore, using Si for soil phytoremediation may be a promising choice. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis proved to be a sensitive tool, and it can be successfully used in the study of the ameliorating effects of Si in plant protection, with the Fr/FFr ratio as the variable recommended for identification of temporal changes in plants.

  5. Predicting molybdenum toxicity to higher plants: Estimation of toxicity threshold values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, S.P., E-mail: steve.mcgrath@bbsrc.ac.u [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Function, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Mico, C.; Zhao, F.J.; Stroud, J.L. [Soil Science Department, Centre for Soils and Ecosystems Function, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Zhang, H.; Fozard, S. [Division of Environmental Science, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Four plant species (oilseed rape, Brassica napus L.; red clover, Trifolium pratense L.; ryegrass, Lolium perenne L.; and tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum L.) were tested on ten soils varying widely in soil properties to assess molybdenum (Mo) toxicity. A larger range (66-fold-609-fold) of added Mo concentrations resulting in 50% inhibition of yield (ED{sub 50}) was found among soils than among plant species (2-fold-38-fold), which illustrated that the soils differed widely in the expression of Mo toxicity. Toxicity thresholds based on soil solution Mo narrowed the variation among soils compared to thresholds based on added Mo concentrations. We conclude that plant bioavailability of Mo in soil depends on Mo solubility, but this alone did not decrease the variability in observed toxicity enough to be used in risk assessment and that other soil properties influencing Mo toxicity to plants need to be considered. - Mo toxicity thresholds varied widely in different soils and therefore soil properties need to be taken into account in order to assess the risk of Mo exposure.

  6. Evaluation of Municipal Effluent Toxicity Using Higher Plants and Invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Žaltauskaitė

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available   Toxicity of Kaunas municipal effluent was evaluated using bioassays with aquatic invertebrates and terrestrial higher plants. Toxicity tests were performed on samples of both untreated and mechanically and biologically treated wastewater. Wastewater toxicity was assessed using seed germination and short-term early seedling growth tests of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. and acute microcrustaceans Thamnocephalus platyurus (24 h assays. Undiluted untreated wastewater was severely toxic to T.platyurus and led to death of all exposed organisms. Twofold decrease in wastewater concentration in the solution (from 100 % to 50 % led to sharp transition between extremely toxic to medium toxic to tested organisms. In four and more times diluted wastewater only 10-20 % of the total exposed T. platyurus died. Measured endpoints in higher plants tests were: seed germination, root length, shoot height and total biomass. Raw sewage was slightly toxic (0.6 TU to the root growth of lettuce, but mechanically and biologically treated effluents exhibited no adverse effects or even started to stimulate the growth. The growth of shoots and total biomass were stimulated due to exposure to effluents. Stimulation effect was determined by sufficiently high concentrations of nutrients. 

  7. Toxicity Tests for Ensuring Succesful Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cěbere, B.; Faltiņa, E.; Zelčāns, N.; Kalniņa, D.

    2009-01-01

    Industrial wastewaters are complex and can be polluted by non-biodegradable end toxic organic compounds and are a serious threat to the environment. Chemical procedure alone cannot provide sufficient information. A complete evaluation of wastewaters should include ecotoxicological tests too, especially concerning the complex wastewaters. In the literature review the authors attempted to establish which is the more promising and suitable aquatic toxicology test for sewage treatment plant influent toxicity monitoring. A variety of types of organisms representing different trophic levels and many different species are used for aquatic toxicity testing. Toxicity characterization would be needed both for influents and effluents of wastewater treatment plant. For the purpose of screening biological wastewater treatment influent, toxicity to activated sludge microorganisms is important and toxicology tests here used are respirometry and bioluminescence toxicology tests. Respirometry toxicity tests are easy, fast and inexpensive compared to other approaches. Bioluminescence has been widely used, the most thoroughly investigated test system is the Microtox. The toxicity tests have also been compared by different authors. International, national and regional authorities use these tools to meet various regulatory and legislative requirements. Importance of biotesting has been emphasized also in EU legislation.

  8. Physiological highlights of manganese toxicity symptoms in soybean plants: Mn toxicity responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elcio Ferreira; Kondo Santini, José Mateus; Paixão, Amanda Pereira; Júnior, Enes Furlani; Lavres, José; Campos, Marcelo; Reis, André Rodrigues Dos

    2017-04-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for plants; however, high concentrations in certain soil conditions can cause toxicity symptoms in the plant tissue. Here, we describe Mn toxicity symptoms and Mn toxicity responses in soybean plants. Soybean plants exposed to excess Mn showed reductions in the CO2 assimilation rate and stomatal conductance, which in turn resulted in decreased shoot biomass. Furthermore, peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activity were higher in plants grown with the highest Mn concentration. The Mn doses increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as CAT, POD, and SOD. The toxicity symptoms presented by the leaves included hypertrophying of the adaxial epidermis and the formation of necrotic areas with purple-colored veins. Dramatic movement of calcium from the healthy region to the purple-colored necrotic region was observed, as was the exit of potassium from the necrotic area to the healthy region of the tissue. The high activities of POD and SOD in the presence of high Mn compartmented in the roots was the main physiological responses at high Mn uptake by soybean plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular and physiological mechanisms of plant tolerance to toxic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants have evolved a myriad of adaptive mechanisms based on a number of genes to deal with the different toxic metals they encounter in the soils worldwide. These genes encode a range of different metal and organic compound transporters and enzyme pathways for the synthesis of metal detoxifying lig...

  10. Organic Matter Application Can Reduce Copper Toxicity in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Copper fungicides and bactericides are often used in tomato cultivation and can cause toxic Cu levels in soils. In order to combat this, organic matter can be applied to induce chelation reactions and form a soluble complex by which much of the Cu can leach out of the soil profile or be taken up safely by plants. Organic acids such as citric,…

  11. Organic Matter Application Can Reduce Copper Toxicity in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Copper fungicides and bactericides are often used in tomato cultivation and can cause toxic Cu levels in soils. In order to combat this, organic matter can be applied to induce chelation reactions and form a soluble complex by which much of the Cu can leach out of the soil profile or be taken up safely by plants. Organic acids such as citric,…

  12. Use of higher plants as screens for toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristen, U

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with the use of entire plants, seedlings, cell suspension cultures and pollen tubes for the estimation of potential toxicity in the environment, and for risk assessment of chemicals and formulations of human relevance. It is shown that the roots of onions and various crop seedlings, as well as in vitro growing pollen tubes of some mono- and dicotyledonous plants, are most frequently used to obtain toxicity data by determination of root and tube growth inhibition. Both roots and pollen tubes are chloroplast free, non-photosynthetic systems and, therefore, with regard to their cytotoxic reactions are closer to vertebrate tissues and cells than are chloroplast-containing plant organs. Root tips and anthers of flower buds are shown to be applicable to genotoxicity screening by microscopic analysis of mitotic or meiotic aberrations during cell division or microspore development, respectively. The processes of mitosis and meiosis are similar in plants and animals. Therefore, meristematic and sporogenic tissues of plants generally show patterns of cytotoxic response similar to those of embryogenic and spermatogenic tissues of vertebrates. The suitability of root tips, cell suspensions and pollen tubes for the investigation of mechanisms of toxic action and for the analysis of structure-activity relationships is also demonstrated. Two plant-based assays, the Allium test and the pollen tube growth test, both currently being evaluated alongside with established mammalian in vivo and in vitro protocols, are emphasized with regard to their potential use as alternatives to animal in vivo toxicity tests. For both assays, preliminary results indicate that the tips of growing roots and the rapidly elongating pollen tubes of certain higher plant species are as reliable as mammalian cell lines for detecting basal cytotoxicity. It is suggested that seeds and pollen grains, in particular, provide easily storable and convenient systems for inexpensive, relatively

  13. Toxicity Evaluation of Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents Using Daphnia magna

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    H Movahedian, B Bina, GH Asghari

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity evaluation is an important parameter in wastewater quality monitoring as it provides the complete response of test organisms to all compounds in wastewater. The water flea Daphnia magna straus is the most commonly used zooplankton in toxicological tests. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of effluents from different units of Isfahan Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP. The samples were taken from four different physical and biological units. The acute toxicity tests were determined using Daphnia magna. The immobility of Daphnia was determined after 48h. Toxicity results showed that 48h-LC50 and ATU values for raw wastewater were 30% (v/v and 3.33, respectively. It was also found that LC50 values after 48 h for preliminary, primary, and secondary effluents were 32%, 52% and 85% (v/v, respectively. The ATU values for these effluents were 3.1, 1.9, and 1.8, correspondingly. The efficiency levels of preliminary, primary, and secondary units for removal of toxicity were found as 6%, 38.9% and 8%, in that order. Overall, the present investigation indicated that toxicity removal by up to 50% might be achieved in IWPT. Based on the obtained results and regarding the improvement of water quality standards, coupled with public expectations in Iran, it is necessary to consider more stringent water quality policies for regular monitoring and toxicity assessment.

  14. Transgenic plants for enhanced phytoremediation of toxic explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aken, Benoit

    2009-04-01

    Phytoremediation of organic pollutants, such as explosives, is often a slow and incomplete process, potentially leading to the accumulation of toxic metabolites that can be further introduced into the food chain. During the past decade, plants have been genetically modified to overcome the inherent limitations of plant detoxification capabilities, following a strategy similar to the development of transgenic crop. Bacterial genes encoding enzymes involved in the breakdown of explosives, such as nitroreductase and cytochrome P450, have been introduced in higher plants, resulting in significant enhancement of plant tolerance, uptake, and detoxification performances. Transgenic plants exhibiting biodegradation capabilities of microorganisms bring the promise of an efficient and environmental-friendly technology for cleaning up polluted soils.

  15. Toxicity of a plant based mosquito repellent/killer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Singh, Prakash Raj; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The mission to make humans less attractive to mosquitoes has fuelled decades of scientific research on mosquito behaviour and control. The search for the perfect topical insect repellent/killer continues. This analysis was conducted to review and explore the scientific information on toxicity produced by the ingredients/contents of a herbal product. In this process of systemic review the following methodology was applied. By doing a MEDLINE search with key words of selected plants, plant based insect repellents/killers pertinent articles published in journals and authentic books were reviewed. The World Wide Web and the Extension Toxicity Network database (IPCS-ITOX) were also searched for toxicology data and other pertinent information. Repellents do not all share a single mode of action and surprisingly little is known about how repellents act on their target insects. Moreover, different mosquito species may react differently to the same repellent. After analysis of available data and information on the ingredient, of the product in relation to medicinal uses, acute and chronic toxicity of the selected medicinal plants, it can be concluded that the ingredients included in the herbal product can be used as active agents against mosquitoes. If the product which contains the powder of the above said plants is applied with care and safety, it is suitable fo use as a mosquito repellent/killer.

  16. MicroRNAs as regulators in plant metal toxicity response

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    Ana Belen Mendoza-Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a major stress affecting crop production. This includes metals that are essential for plants (copper, iron, zinc, manganese, and non-essential metals (cadmium, aluminum, cobalt, mercury. A primary common effect of high concentrations of metals such as aluminum, cooper, cadmium or mercury, is root growth inhibition. Metal toxicity triggers the accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to damage of lipids, proteins and DNA. The plants response to metal toxicity involves several biological processes that require fine and precise regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 21 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A miRNA, incorporated into a RNA induced silencing complex, promotes cleavage of its target mRNA that is recognized by an almost perfect base complementarity. In plants miRNA regulation has been involved in development and also in biotic and abiotic stress responses. We review novel advances in identifying miRNAs related to metal toxicity responses and their potential role according to their targets. Most of the targets for plant metal-responsive miRNAs are transcription factors. Information about metal-responsive miRNAs in different plants points to important regulatory roles of miR319, miR390, miR393 and miR398. The target of miR319 is the TCP transcription factor, implicated in growth control. MiR390 exerts its action through the biogenesis of trans-acting small interference RNAs that, in turn, regulate auxin responsive factors. MiR393 targets the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs and a bHLH transcription factor. Increasing evidence points to the crucial role of miR398 and its targets Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in the control of the oxidative stress generated after high metal copper or iron exposure.

  17. Regulatory Actions - Final Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page describes Federal regulatory actions.

  18. Regulatory Actions - Proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) for power plants to limit mercury, acid gases and other toxic pollution from power plants. This page includes supporting documentation and

  19. Nickel: an overview of uptake, essentiality and toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, M; Fariduddin, Q; Hayat, S; Ahmad, A

    2011-01-01

    Nickel even though recognized as a trace element, its metabolism is very decisive for certain enzyme activities, maintaining proper cellular redox state and various other biochemical, physiological and growth responses. Study of the aspects related with uptake, transport and distributive localization of Ni is very important in various cellular metabolic processes particularly under increased nitrogen metabolism. This review article, in core, encompasses the dual behavior of Ni in plants emphasizing its systemic partitioning, essentiality and ill effects. However, the core mechanism of molecules involved and the successive physiological conditions required starting from the soil absorption, neutralization and toxicity generated is still elusive, and varies among the plants.

  20. Parameters Symptomatic for Boron Toxicity in Leaves of Tomato Plants

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    Luis M. Cervilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of boron (B toxicity has risen in areas of intensive agriculture close to the Mediterranean sea. The objective of this research was to study the how B toxicity (0.5 and 2 mM B affects the time course of different indicators of abiotic stress in leaves of two tomato genotypes having different sensitivity to B toxicity (cv. Kosaco and cv. Josefina. Under the treatments of 0.5 and 2 mM B, the tomato plants showed a loss of biomass and foliar area. At the same time, in the leaves of both cultivars, the B concentration increased rapidly from the first day of the experiment. These results were more pronounced in the cv. Josefina, indicating greater sensitivity than in cv. Kosaco with respect to excessive B in the environment. The levels of O2 •− and anthocyanins presented a higher correlation coefficient (r>0.9 than did the levels of B in the leaf, followed by other indicators of stress, such as GPX, chlorophyll b and proline (r>0.8. Our results indicate that these parameters could be used to evaluate the stress level as well as to develop models that could help prevent the damage inflicted by B toxicity in tomato plants.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF TOXICITY OF INDUSTRIAL WASTES USING CROP PLANT ASSAYS

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    Carmen Alice Teacă

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution has a harmful action on bioresources, including agricultural crops. It is generated through many industrial activities such as mining, coal burning, chemical technology, cement production, pulp and paper industry, etc. The toxicity of different industrial wastes and heavy metals excess was evaluated using crop plant assays (germination and hydroponics seedlings growth tests. Experimental data regarding the germination process of wheat (from two cultivars and rye seeds in the presence of industrial wastes (thermal power station ash, effluents from a pre-bleaching stage performed on a Kraft cellulose – chlorinated lignin products or chlorolignin, along with use of an excess of some heavy metals (Zn and Cu are presented here. Relative seed germination, relative root elongation, and germination index (a factor of relative seed germination and relative root elongation were determined. Relative root elongation and germination index were more sensitive indicators of toxicity than seed germination. The toxic effects were also evaluated in hydroponics experiments, the sensitivity of three crop plant species, namely Triticum aestivum L. (wheat, Secale cereale (rye, and Zea mays (corn being compared. Physiological aspects, evidenced both by visual observation and biometric measurements (mean root, aerial part and plant length, as well as the cellulose and lignin content were examined.

  2. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of magnesium in alleviation of aluminium toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Rengel, Zed

    2011-04-01

    Magnesium is pivotal for activating a large number of enzymes; hence, magnesium plays an important role in numerous physiological and biochemical processes affecting plant growth and development. Magnesium can also ameliorate aluminium phytotoxicity, but literature reports on the dynamics of magnesium homeostasis upon exposure to aluminium are rare. Herein existing knowledge on the magnesium transport mechanisms and homeostasis maintenance in plant cells is critically reviewed. Even though overexpression of magnesium transporters can alleviate aluminium toxicity in plants, the mechanisms governing such alleviation remain obscure. Possible magnesium-dependent mechanisms include (i) better carbon partitioning from shoots to roots; (ii) increased synthesis and exudation of organic acid anions; (iii) enhanced acid phosphatase activity; (iv) maintenance of proton-ATPase activity and cytoplasmic pH regulation; (v) protection against an aluminium-induced cytosolic calcium increase; and (vi) protection against reactive oxygen species. Future research should concentrate on assessing aluminium toxicity and tolerance in plants with overexpressed or antisense magnesium transporters to increase understanding of the aluminium-magnesium interaction.

  4. OCCURRENCE OF INTOXICATION BY TOXIC PLANTS IN BRAZIL

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    Claudio Junior Getter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The toxic plants are those that by means of contact or ingestion, provoke damage to human and animal health, same times causing death. This study has as purpose, to realize an analysis of the accidents occurs with toxicant plants in Brazil. Many control centers, are working to diminish the cases, that Just during the 1991 to 2000, registered a total of 14774 cases of intoxication and poisoning (I/P in the country. The result show that male is most committed, the age who most show the cases of poisoning is between 01-09 years old, this age prevailed on all country regions. The urban areas is where most occurs often. In the biggest part of the registers the intoxication was accidentally when children’s are playing game with the plants. On this period the number of death were of about 48 cases, a surprise was that the northeast region show almost 50% of the cases. Although wait of the control Center and the scientific community to realize a educative, looking for the sensibilization of the society.

  5. Toxicity of five Sudanese plants to young ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barri, M E; Onsa, T O; Elawad, A A; Elsayed, N Y; Wasfi, I A; Abdul-Bari, E M; Adam, S E

    1983-10-01

    The toxicity of 5 Sudanese plants credited with medicinal value for man, i.e. Citrullus colocynthis, Jatropha aceroides, J. glauca, Solanum dubium and Lagenaria siceraria, was studied by giving the dried or minced plants to Nubian goats, Desert sheep or Zebu calves by mouth or stomach tube. The clinical, haematological and pathological changes indicated that all five plants reduced the ability of the liver to synthesize protein, although there was no evidence of interference with the excretion of bilirubin. Kidney dysfunction and haemoconcentration also occurred. Citrullus colocynthis and Jatropha species in doses of 0.5 to 10 g per kg per day killed goats after dosing for periods ranging from 1 day to 2 weeks. Calves were less susceptible. The fruits and leaves of L. siceraria, in doses of 1 to 5 g per kg per day, caused death after a similar period but with less regularity. The seeds were less toxic. The fruits of S. dubium in doses of 2.5 to 10 g per kg per day killed goats in 2 to 5 days. Similar doses of the leaves caused deaths in 8 to 36 days. In sheep, both fruits and leaves required a longer period of dosing to cause death.

  6. Penetration and Toxicity of Nanomaterials in Higher Plants

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    Giuseppe Chichiriccò

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials (NMs comprise either inorganic particles consisting of metals, oxides, and salts that exist in nature and may be also produced in the laboratory, or organic particles originating only from the laboratory, having at least one dimension between 1 and 100 nm in size. According to shape, size, surface area, and charge, NMs have different mechanical, chemical, electrical, and optical properties that make them suitable for technological and biomedical applications and thus they are being increasingly produced and modified. Despite their beneficial potential, their use may be hazardous to health owing to the capacity to enter the animal and plant body and interact with cells. Studies on NMs involve technologists, biologists, physicists, chemists, and ecologists, so there are numerous reports that are significantly raising the level of knowledge, especially in the field of nanotechnology; however, many aspects concerning nanobiology remain undiscovered, including the interactions with plant biomolecules. In this review we examine current knowledge on the ways in which NMs penetrate plant organs and interact with cells, with the aim of shedding light on the reactivity of NMs and toxicity to plants. These points are discussed critically to adjust the balance with regard to the risk to the health of the plants as well as providing some suggestions for new studies on this topic.

  7. Nutritional and toxic factors in selected wild edible plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guil, J L; Rodríguez-García, I; Torija, E

    1997-01-01

    Nutritional (ascorbic acid, dehydroascorbic acid and carotenes); antinutritional and toxic components (oxalic acid, nitrate and erucic acid) were determined in sixteen popular species of wild edible plants which are collected for human consumption in southeast Spain. Ascorbic + dehydroascorbic acids contents were very high in several species, especially in Chenopodium album L. (155 mg/100 g). Carotenoid content ranged from 4.2 mg/100 g (Stellaria media Villars) to 15.4 mg/100 g (Amaranthus viridis L.). A range of values was found for oxalic acid from absence to 1100 mg/100 g of plant material. Nitrate contents ranged from 47 mg/100 g (Salicornia europaea L.) to 597 mg/100 g (Amaranthus viridis L.). Low amounts of erucic acid were found in the Cruciferae family (Sisymbrium irio L. 1.73%; Cardaria draba L. 1.23%) and Plantago major L. 3.45%.

  8. Plants as Useful Vectors to Reduce Environmental Toxic Arsenic Content

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    Nosheen Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, application of municipal sludge on land, combustion of fossil fuels, As additives to livestock feed, coal fly ash, and use of arsenical pesticides in agricultural sector. Phytoremediation can be viewed as biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system that enhances the natural ecosystems for subsequent productive use. The present review presents recent scientific developments regarding phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated environments and its possible detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  9. Plants as useful vectors to reduce environmental toxic arsenic content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Nosheen; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Sultan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity in soil and water is an increasing menace around the globe. Its concentration both in soil and environment is due to natural and anthropogenic activities. Rising arsenic concentrations in groundwater is alarming due to the health risks to plants, animals, and human beings. Anthropogenic As contamination of soil may result from mining, milling, and smelting of copper, lead, zinc sulfide ores, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons, electroplating, gas exhaust, application of municipal sludge on land, combustion of fossil fuels, As additives to livestock feed, coal fly ash, and use of arsenical pesticides in agricultural sector. Phytoremediation can be viewed as biological, solar-driven, pump-and-treat system with an extensive, self-extending uptake network (the root system) that enhances the natural ecosystems for subsequent productive use. The present review presents recent scientific developments regarding phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated environments and its possible detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  10. Minimising toxicity of cadmium in plants--role of plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgher, Mohd; Khan, M Iqbal R; Anjum, Naser A; Khan, Nafees A

    2015-03-01

    A range of man-made activities promote the enrichment of world-wide agricultural soils with a myriad of chemical pollutants including cadmium (Cd). Owing to its significant toxic consequences in plants, Cd has been one of extensively studied metals. However, sustainable strategies for minimising Cd impacts in plants have been little explored. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are known for their role in the regulation of numerous developmental processes. Among major PGRs, plant hormones (such as auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid), nitric oxide (a gaseous signalling molecule), brassinosteroids (steroidal phytohormones) and polyamines (group of phytohormone-like aliphatic amine natural compounds with aliphatic nitrogen structure) have gained attention by agronomist and physiologist as a sustainable media to induce tolerance in abiotic-stressed plants. Considering recent literature, this paper: (a) overviews Cd status in soil and its toxicity in plants, (b) introduces major PGRs and overviews their signalling in Cd-exposed plants, (c) appraises mechanisms potentially involved in PGR-mediated enhanced plant tolerance to Cd and (d) highlights key aspects so far unexplored in the subject area.

  11. Toxicity and tolerance of aluminum in plants: tailoring plants to suit to acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Hemalatha; Meriga, Balaji; Surapu, Varalakshmi; Gadi, Jogeswar; Sunita, M S L; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kavi Kishor, P B

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) stress is one of the serious limiting factors in plant productivity in acidic soils, which constitute about 50 % of the world's potentially arable lands and causes anywhere between 25 and 80 % of yield losses depending upon the species. The mechanism of Al toxicity and tolerance has been examined in plants, which is vital for crop improvement and enhanced food production in the future. Two mechanisms that facilitate Al tolerance in plants are Al exclusion from the roots and the ability to tolerate Al in the symplast or both. Although efforts have been made to unravel Al-resistant factors, many aspects remain unclear. Certain gene families such as MATE, ALMT, ASR, and ABC transporters have been implicated in some plants for resistance to Al which would enhance the opportunities for creating crop plants suitable to grow in acidic soils. Though QTLs have been identified related to Al-tolerance, no crop plant that is tolerant to Al has been evolved so far using breeding or molecular approaches. The remarkable changes that plants experience at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level under Al stress, the vast array of genes involved in Al toxicity-tolerance, the underlying signaling events and the holistic image of the molecular regulation, and the possibility of creating transgenics for Al tolerance are discussed in this review.

  12. Dynamics of a plant-herbivore-predator system with plant-toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhilan; Qiu, Zhipeng; Liu, Rongsong; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    A system of ordinary differential equations is considered that models the interactions of two plant species populations, an herbivore population, and a predator population. We use a toxin-determined functional response to describe the interactions between plant species and herbivores and use a Holling Type II functional response to model the interactions between herbivores and predators. In order to study how the predators impact the succession of vegetation, we derive invasion conditions under which a plant species can invade into an environment in which another plant species is co-existing with a herbivore population with or without a predator population. These conditions provide threshold quantities for several parameters that may play a key role in the dynamics of the system. Numerical simulations are conducted to reinforce the analytical results. This model can be applied to a boreal ecosystem trophic chain to examine the possible cascading effects of predator-control actions when plant species differ in their levels of toxic defense.

  13. A meta-analysis of medicinal plants to assess the evidence for toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sarah; Vieira, Amandio

    2010-06-01

    Toxicity of phytochemicals, plant-based extracts and dietary supplements, and medicinal plants in general, is of medical importance and must be considered in phytotherapy and other plant uses. We show in this report how general database analyses can provide a quantitative assessment of research and evidence related to toxicity of medicinal plants or specific phytochemicals. As examples, several medicinal plants are analyzed for their relation to nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The results of analyses in different databases are similar, and reveal the two best-established toxic effects among the group of plants that were examined: nephrotoxicity of Aristolochia fangchi and hepatotoxicity of Larrea tridentata.

  14. Veterinary drugs in the environment and their toxicity to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártíková, Hana; Podlipná, Radka; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-02-01

    Veterinary drugs used for treatment and prevention of diseases in animals represent important source of environmental pollution due to intensive agri- and aquaculture production. The drugs can reach environment through the treatment processes, inappropriate disposal of used containers, unused medicine or livestock feed, and manufacturing processes. Wide scale of veterinary pharmaceuticals e.g. antibiotics, antiparasitic and antifungal drugs, hormones, anti-inflammatory drugs, anaesthetics, sedatives etc. enter the environment and may affect non-target organisms including plants. This review characterizes the commonly used drugs in veterinary practice, outlines their behaviour in the environment and summarizes available information about their toxic effect on plants. Significant influence of many antibiotics and hormones on plant developmental and physiological processes have been proved. However, potential phytotoxicity of other veterinary drugs has been studied rarely, although knowledge of phytotoxicity of veterinary drugs may help predict their influence on biodiversity and improve phytoremediation strategies. Moreover, additional topics such as long term effect of low doses of drugs and their metabolites, behaviour of mixture of veterinary drugs and other chemicals in ecosystems should be more thoroughly investigated to obtain complex information on the impact of veterinary drugs in the environment.

  15. NATURAL PLANT TOXICANT – CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDE AMYGDALIN: CHARACTERISTIC, METABOLISM AND THE EFFECT ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Eduard Kolesár; Marek Halenár; Adriana Kolesárová; Peter Massányi

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cyanogenic glycosides, as natural plant toxicants, in plants varies with plant species and environmental effects. Cyanogenic glycoside as an amygdalin was detected in apricot kernels, bitter almonds and peach, plum, pear and apple seeds. Amygdalin itself is non-toxic, but its HCN production decomposed by some enzymes is toxic substance. Target of this review was to describe the characteristic, metabolism and possible effects of amygdalin on reproductive processes. Previous studi...

  16. Do Plant-Bound Masked Mycotoxins Contribute to Toxicity?

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    Silvia W. Gratz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Masked mycotoxins are plant metabolites of mycotoxins which co-contaminate common cereal crops. Since their discovery, the question has arisen if they contribute to toxicity either directly or indirectly through the release of the parent mycotoxins. Research in this field is rapidly emerging and the aim of this review is to summarize the latest knowledge on the fate of masked mycotoxins upon ingestion. Fusarium mycotoxins are the most prevalent masked mycotoxins and evidence is mounting that DON3Glc and possibly other masked trichothecenes are stable in conditions prevailing in the upper gut and are not absorbed intact. DON3Glc is also not toxic per se, but is hydrolyzed by colonic microbes and further metabolized to DOM-1 in some individuals. Masked zearalenone is rather more bio-reactive with some evidence on gastric and small intestinal hydrolysis as well as hydrolysis by intestinal epithelium and components of blood. Microbial hydrolysis of ZEN14Glc is almost instantaneous and further metabolism also occurs. Identification of zearalenone metabolites and their fate in the colon are still missing as is further clarification on whether or not masked zearalenone is hydrolyzed by mammalian cells. New masked mycotoxins continuously emerge and it is crucial that we gain detailed understanding of their individual metabolic fate in the body before we can assess synergistic effects and extrapolate the additive risk of all mycotoxins present in food.

  17. The Capability of Several Toxic Plants to Condition Taste Aversions in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazing livestock frequently ingest toxic plants, occasionally with fatal results. Behavioral adjustments by livestock may reduce toxin intake; for example they can develop food aversions which may protect animals from over-ingestion of toxic plants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three...

  18. Toxicity of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine in Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, R.W.; Malca, G.; Glenn, A.; Sharon, D.; Nilsen, B.; Parris, B.; Dubose, D; Ruiz, D.; Saleda, J.; Martinez, M.; Carillo, L.; Walker, K.; Kuhlman, A.; Townesmith, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim The plant species reported here are traditionally used in Northern Peru for a wide range of illnesses. Most remedies are prepared as ethanol or aqueous extracts and then ingested. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of these extracts. Materials and methods The toxicity of ethanolic and water extracts of 341 plant species was determined using a Brine-Shrimp assay. Results Overall 24% of the species in water extract and 76% of the species in alcoholic extract showed elevated toxicity levels to brine-shrimp. Although in most cases multiple extracts of the same species showed very similar toxicity values, in some cases the toxicity of different extracts of the same species varied from non-toxic to highly toxic. Conclusions Traditional preparation methods take different toxicity levels in aqueous and ethanol extracts into account when choosing the appropriate solvent for the preparation of a remedy. PMID:21575699

  19. Determination of toxic heavy metals in indigenous medicinal plants used in Rawalpindi and Islamabad cities, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Adeel; Rashid, Sadia; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2013-06-21

    History of medicinal plants used in local healthcare systems dates back centuries as the user considers them safe from toxic effects. Present study was aimed to document the commonly used indigenous medicinal plants and to investigate the metal toxicity and impact of pollution load in most frequently used medicinal plants from study area. Semi-structured interviews and rapid appraisal approach were employed to record the ethnomedicinal information and toxic metals were analyzed through flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A total of 21 wild medicinal plants was reported, and 7 were screened for toxic metal analysis. Oral mode of application (93%) was the chief route of herbal remedy administration, and leaves were found to be used as major plant part against different diseases. Main sources of remedies were wild herb (68%) followed by wild trees (18%), wild spiny shrubs (09%) and wild shrubs (5%). Trend of metal concentration was found as Fe>Ni>Cr>Pb>Cu>Zn>Mn>Cd. Indigenous medicinal plants of both cities posed the toxicity risk for Ni, Cu, Fe and crossed the safety limits set by WHO. Medicinal plants of Rawalpindi were more toxic compared to the medicinal plants of Islamabad. Prolonged intake or over dose of these medicinal plants may lead to chronic accumulation of various elements that may cause severe hazardous effect upon human health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxic metal accumulation, responses to exposure and mechanisms of tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, S

    2006-11-01

    Over the past 200 years emissions of toxic heavy metals have risen tremendously and significantly exceed those from natural sources for practically all metals. Uptake and accumulation by crop plants represents the main entry pathway for potentially health-threatening toxic metals into human and animal food. Of major concern are the metalloids arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), and the metals cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb). This review discusses the molecular mechanisms of toxic metal accumulation in plants and algae, the responses to metal exposure, as well as our understanding of metal tolerance and its evolution. The main emphasis will be on cadmium, which is by far the most widely studied of the non-essential toxic metals/metalloids. Entry via Zn2+, Fe2+, and Ca2+ transporters is the molecular basis of Cd2+ uptake into plant cells. Much less is known about the partitioning of non-essential metals and about the genes underlying the enormous diversity among plants with respect to Cd accumulation in different tissues. Numerous studies have described symptoms and responses of plants upon toxic metal exposure. Mysterious are primary targets of toxicity, the degree of specificity of responses, the sensing and the signaling events that lead to transcriptional activation. All plants apparently possess a basal tolerance of toxic non-essential metals. For Cd and As, this is largely dependent on the phytochelatin pathway. Not understood is the molecular biology of Cd hypertolerance in certain plant species such as the metallophytes Arabidopsis halleri or Thlaspi caerulescens.

  1. Monofluoroacetate-containing plants that are potentially toxic to livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen T; Cook, Daniel; Pfister, James A; Allen, Jeremy G; Colegate, Steven M; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Taylor, Charlotte M

    2014-07-30

    Many plants worldwide contain monofluoroacetate and cause sudden death in livestock. These plants are primarily found in the southern continents of Africa, Australia, and South America, where they negatively affect livestock production. This review highlights past and current research investigating (1) the plants reported to contain monofluoroacetate and cause sudden death; (2) the mode of action, clinical signs, and pathology associated with poisoning by monofluoroacetate-containing plants; (3) chemical methods for the analysis of monofluoroacetate in plants; (4) the coevolution of native flora and fauna in Western Australia with respect to monofluoroacetate-containing plants; and (5) methods to mitigate livestock losses caused by monofluoroacetate-containing plants.

  2. Arsenic: A Review of the Element's Toxicity, Plant Interactions, and Potential Methods of Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettick, Bryan E; Cañas-Carrell, Jaclyn E; French, Amanda D; Klein, David M

    2015-08-19

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring element with a long history of toxicity. Sites of contamination are found worldwide as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic activities. The broad scope of arsenic toxicity to humans and its unique interaction with the environment have led to extensive research into its physicochemical properties and toxic behavior in biological systems. The purpose of this review is to compile the results of recent studies concerning the metalloid and consider the chemical and physical properties of arsenic in the broad context of human toxicity and phytoremediation. Areas of focus include arsenic's mechanisms of human toxicity, interaction with plant systems, potential methods of remediation, and protocols for the determination of metals in experimentation. This assessment of the literature indicates that controlling contamination of water sources and plants through effective remediation and management is essential to successfully addressing the problems of arsenic toxicity and contamination.

  3. Biological screening of selected Pacific Northwest forest plants using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity bioassay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karchesy, Yvette M; Kelsey, Rick G; Constantine, George; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay was used to screen 211 methanol extracts from 128 species of Pacific Northwest plants in search of general cytotoxic activity. Strong toxicity (LC50 < 100 µg/ml...

  4. Toxicity of Bauhinia variegata and Mimusops elengi with plant molluscicides against Lymnaea acuminata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Lata Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molluscicidal activity of binary combination of Bauhinia variegata and Mimusops elengi with other plant molluscicides Saraca asoca and Thuja orientalis against snail Lymnaea acuminata have been studied. It was observed that toxicity of binary combinations of plant molluscicides with other plant molluscicides were toxic against fresh water snail L. acuminata. Among all combinations of toxicity Mimusops elengi leaf + Saraca asoca bark (24h LC50: 98.25 mg/l; 96h LC50: 40.40 mg/l and Bauhinia variegata leaf powder + Saraca asoca leaf (24h LC50: 123.98 mg/l; 96h LC50: 57.91 mg/l was more toxic than other binary combinations of plant molluscicides. Mimusops elengi leaf powder + Saraca asoca leaf powder and Bauhinia variegata leaf powder + Saraca asoca leaf powder are more potent molluscicides.

  5. Impact of toxic chemicals on local wastewater treatment plant and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary F.

    1989-05-01

    Because toxic chemicals being discharged to sewers were simultaneously interfering with wastewater treatment processes of municipal, biological treatment plants and were passing through these plants to negatively impact the bodies of water to which these plants were discharging, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations governing industrial discharges to municipal sewers. These “Pretreatment Regulations” limit industrial discharges to municipal sewers of heavy metals, oil and grease, acids and bases, and toxic organic chemicals. This paper discusses the evolution of these regulations, the basis for them, the types of regulations (categorical and local), and the rationale for their promulgation based on the impacts of toxics chemicals on the treatment plant and receiving system. Finally, the expected results of these regulations in reducing industrial discharges of toxic chemicals is discussed.

  6. Environmental Health Risks and Housing Values: Evidence from 1,600 Toxic Plant Openings and Closings†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet; Davis, Lucas; Greenstone, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory oversight of toxic emissions from industrial plants and understanding about these emissions’ impacts are in their infancy. Applying a research design based on the openings and closings of 1,600 industrial plants to rich data on housing markets and infant health, we find that: toxic air emissions affect air quality only within 1 mile of the plant; plant openings lead to 11 percent declines in housing values within 0.5 mile or a loss of about $4.25 million for these households; and a plant’s operation is associated with a roughly 3 percent increase in the probability of low birthweight within 1 mile. PMID:27134284

  7. A note on averting goats to a toxic but palatable plant, Leucaena leucocephala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conditioned taste aversions are a useful tool to reduce livestock consumption of toxic plants. The forage legume Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena) is both toxic and palatable. The objective of this study was to determine if goats could be aversively conditioned to avoid leucaena. Adult and juvenil...

  8. Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    use plant extracts, parts and powders to protect stored food commodities from insect pests. The widely used plants .... fast growing hardwood tall tree, 30 to 55 m in height; with diameter at ..... aggressive advertisement by commercial pesticides.

  9. Contact and fumigant toxicity of oriental medicinal plant extracts against Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Dermanyssidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon-Il; Na, Young-Eun; Yi, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Seok; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2007-04-30

    The acaricidal activity of methanolic extracts from 40 oriental medicinal plant species and a steam distillate of Cinnamomum camphora towards poultry house-collected adult Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer was examined using direct contact and vapour phase toxicity bioassays. Results were compared with those of 15 acaricides currently used. In filter paper contact toxicity bioassays using adult D. gallinae, C. camphora steam distillate (0.0051 mgcm(-2)) was the most toxic material, followed by extracts from Asarum sieboldii var. seoulens whole plant, Eugenia caryophyllata flower bud and Mentha arvensis var. piperascens whole plant (0.0063-0.0072 mgcm(-2)), based upon 24h LD(50) values. The acaricidal activity of these four plant preparations was almost comparable to that of profenofos (LD(50), 0.003 mgcm(-2)) but less effective than dichlorvos (LD(50), 0.0004 mgcm(-2)). The toxicity of Illicium verum fruit and Lysimachia davurica leaf extracts (0.09 mgcm(-2)) was almost comparable to that of benfuracarb, prothiofos, propoxur and fenthion (0.053-0.070mgcm(-2)). In vapour phase toxicity tests, these plant preparations were more effective in closed containers than in open ones, indicating that the mode of delivery of these plant extracts was largely a result of action in the vapour phase. Plants described herein merit further study as potential D. gallinae control agents.

  10. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  11. The combined toxic and genotoxic effects of Cd and As to plant bioindicator Trifolium repens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghiani

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd and arsenic (As on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg-1 or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg-1 as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage.

  12. Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Martina

    2009-08-01

    A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  13. On the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor the work of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorić Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor influent and effluent wastewaters of wastewater treatment plants. The information obtained through these tests is used to prevent toxic pollutants from entering wastewater treatment plants and discharge of toxic pollutants into the recipient. Samples of wastewaters from the wastewater treatment plants of Kragujevac and Gornji Milanovac, as well as from the Lepenica and Despotovica Rivers immediately before and after the influx of wastewaters from the plants, were collected between October 2004 and June 2005. Used as the test organism in these tests was the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio Hamilton - Buchanon (Cyprinidae. The acute toxicity test of 96/h duration showed that the tested samples had a slight acutely toxic effect on B. rerio, except for the sample of influent wastewater into the Cvetojevac wastewater treatment plant, which had moderately acute toxicity, indicating that such water should be prevented from entering the system in order to eliminate its detrimental effect on the purification process.

  14. Investigation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles toxicity and uptake by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larue, C; Carriere, M [Laboratoire de Structure et Dynamique par Resonance Magnetique UMR 9956 CEA-CNRS-IRAMIS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Khodja, H [Laboratoire d' Etude des Elements Legers, UMR 9956 CEA-CNRS-IRAMIS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Herlin-Boime, N [Laboratoire Francis Perrin URA 2453 CEA-CNRS-IRAMIS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brisset, F [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire et des Materiaux d' Orsay, UMR8182 CNRS-University Paris sud, Orsay (France); Flank, A M [LUCIA beamline, SOLEIL synchrotron, Saint-Aubin (France); Fayard, B [Laboratoire de Physique du solide, Orsay, France and ID21 beamline, ESRF, Grenoble (France); Chaillou, S, E-mail: marie.carriere@cea.fr [Unite de Nutrition Azotee des Plantes, INRA, Versailles (France)

    2011-07-06

    Nanoparticles (NP) are introduced in a growing number of commercial products and their production may lead to their release in the environment. Plants may be a potential entry point for NP in the food chain. Up to now, results describing NP phytotoxical effects and plant accumulation are scarce and contradictory. To increase knowledge on titanium dioxide NP (TiO{sub 2}-NPs) accumulation and impact on plants, we designed a study on three plant species, namely wheat (Triticum aestivum), oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and Arabidopsis thaliana. These plants were exposed in hydroponics to a panel of well-characterized TiO{sub 2}-NPs, with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. Their accumulation in plant tissues is currently being assessed by complementary imaging techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}-XRF) imaging and micro-particle induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) imaging. Moreover, the impact of TiO{sub 2}-NP exposure on germination rate, root elongation, dry biomass and evapotranspiration is evaluated. Preliminary results are presented here, with data collected on wheat plants exposed to 12 nm and 25 nm anatase TiO{sub 2}-NPs. These results show that TiO{sub 2}-NPs are taken up by plants, and do not significantly alter their germination and root elongation. These results underline the necessity of deeper evaluation of nanoparticle ecotoxicity, and particularly on their interaction with plants.

  15. Induction of rat hepatic cytochromes P450 by toxic ingredients in plants: lack of correlation between toxicity and inductive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Nakamura, T; Oguri, K

    1998-12-01

    "Animal-Plant Warfare" is one of the hypotheses for the evolution of drug-metabolizing P450s. To address the validity of this hypothesis, we examined the induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing P450s by 12 plant toxins in rats, using hepatic activity for testosterone metabolism as the index. The compounds tested were aconitine, morphine, tubocurarine, physostigmine, pilocarpine, muscarine, cocaine, atropine, amygdalin, digitonin, nicotine and solanine. Drinking water containing a test compound was given to rats for 4 days, and the hepatic activity of testosterone metabolism was determined together with monitoring body weight gain and liver weight as the indices of toxicity. The results showed that while cocaine and nicotine have a minor ability to increase testosterone 16 beta-hydroxylase activity, a marker activity for the CYP2B1 and 2, all other compounds did not have any such effect. No correlation was observed between a change in 16 beta-hydroxylase and toxicity caused by toxins. Therefore, these results did not support the idea that the inducibility of the CYP2B subfamily in animals is acquired through "Animal-Plant Warfare". Several compounds examined here increased or decreased hepatic activities of testosterone 2 alpha-, 6 beta-, 7 alpha- and 16 alpha-hydroxylation and 17-oxidation, indicating a possible effect on the CYP2A, 2C and 3A subfamily. Of these effects, a moderate correlation (r toxicity. It is therefore suggested that inhibition or suppression of the expression of CYP2C11 is one of the mechanisms in the toxicity of plant toxins for rats, although it comes from an examination using limited numbers of compounds.

  16. Toxicоlogical evaluation of the plant products using Brine Shrimp (Artemia salina L. model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Меntor R. Hamidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many natural products could serve as the starting point in the development of modern medicines because of their numerous biological and pharmacological activities. However, some of them are known to carry toxicological properties as well. In order to achieve a safe treatment with plant products, numerous research studies have recently been focused on both pharmacology and toxicity of medicinal plants. Moreover, these studies employed efforts for alternative biological assays. Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay is the most convenient system for monitoring biological activities of various plant species. This method is very useful for preliminary assessment of toxicity of the plant extracts. Rapidness, simplicity and low requirements are several advantages of this assay. However, several conditions need to be completed, especially in the means of standardized experimental conditions (temperature, pH of the medium, salinity, aeration and light. The toxicity of herbal extracts using this assay has been determined in a concentration range of 10, 100 and 1000 µg/ml of the examined herbal extract. Most toxicity studies which use the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay determine the toxicity after 24 hours of exposure to the tested sample. The median lethal concentration (LC50 of the test samples is obtained by a plot of percentage of the dead shrimps against the logarithm of the sample concentration. LC50 values are estimated using a probit regression analysis and compared with either Meyer’s or Clarkson’s toxicity criteria. Furthermore, the positive correlation between Meyer’s toxicity scale for Artemia salina and Gosselin, Smith and Hodge’s toxicity scale for higher animal models confirmed that the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay is an excellent predictive tool for the toxic potential of plant extracts in humans.

  17. A new mechanism of macrophyte mitigation: how submerged plants reduce malathion's acute toxicity to aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2014-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that aquatic plants can mitigate the toxicity of insecticides to sensitive aquatic animals. The current paradigm is that this ability is driven primarily by insecticide sorption to plant tissues, especially for hydrophobic compounds. However, recent work shows that submerged plants can strongly mitigate the toxicity of the relatively hydrophilic insecticide malathion, despite the fact that this compound exhibits a slow sorption rate to plants. To examine this disparity, we tested the hypothesis that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity is driven primarily by the increased water pH from plant photosynthesis causing the hydrolysis of malathion, rather than by sorption. To do this, we compared zooplankton (Daphnia magna) survival across five environmentally relevant malathion concentrations (0, 1, 4, 6, or 36 μg L(-1)) in test containers where we chemically manipulated water pH in the absence of plants or added the submerged plant (Elodea canadensis) but manipulated plant photosynthetic activity via shading or no shading. We discovered that malathion was equally lethal to Daphnia at all concentrations tested when photosynthetically inactive (i.e. shaded) plants were present (pH at time of dosing=7.8) or when pH was chemically decreased (pH=7.7). In contrast, when photosynthetically active (i.e. unshaded) plants were present (pH=9.8) or when pH was chemically increased (pH=9.5), the effects of 4 and 6 μg L(-1) of malathion on Daphnia were mitigated strongly and to an equal degree. These results demonstrate that the mitigating effect of submerged plants on malathion's toxicity can be explained entirely by a mechanism of photosynthesizing plants causing an increase in water pH, resulting in rapid malathion hydrolysis. Our findings suggest that current ecotoxicological models and phytoremediation strategies may be overlooking a critical mechanism for mitigating pesticides.

  18. MAIN TOXIC PLANTS AND THEIR DELETERIOUS EFFECTS ON SMALL RUMINANTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this literature review, we gather scientific articles about plants that are poisonous to small ruminants. In Brazil the most importants regions of goat and sheep is in northeast and there is a increasing local economy importance. In this context, shows the importance of poisonous plants´ research since 2000 of many research papers have been developed.

  19. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing toxic plants (Senecio, Crotalaria, Cynoglossum, Amsinckia, Heliotropium, and Echium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelmeier, Bryan L

    2011-07-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants are found throughout the world and are probably the most common plant cause of poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. PAs are potent liver toxins that under some conditions can be carcinogenic. This article briefly introduces high-risk North American PA-containing plants, summarizing their toxicity and subsequent pathology. Current diagnostic techniques, treatments, and strategies to avoid losses to PA poisoning are also reviewed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Toxicity of some essential oils and plant extracts against Sitophilus oryzea, Aconthocelides obtectus and Rhizoperta dominica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Şeyda; Yaman, Cennet; Yarımoǧlu, Berkan; Yılmaz, Ayşegül

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, experiments were conducted to investigate fumigant toxicity of the essential oil from Myrtus sp plants for adult Aconthocelides obtectus, Sitophilus oryzea and Rhizoperta dominica in vitro conditions. The essential oils were isolated with the water distillation method by Neo-Clevenger apparatus. During the study 10% (v/v) doses of oils in 20 cc of compressed rubber-capped glass tubes were used. After 24 hours mortality rates of the essential oil were compared. Myrtus sp essential oil showed the highest fumigant toxicity on A. obtectus (46.66%). The lowest fumigant toxicity on S. oryzea (8.88%). The contact toxicity plant extracts (Prangos ferulacea, Alkanna orientalis, Myrtus communis) were tested against S. oryzea under laboratory conditions. Single dose contact toxicity effects of plant extracts were tested on S. oryzea adults via applying 1 µl extract suspension (10% w/v) to individual insect. The greatest contact toxicity to S. oryzea adults was observed with M. communis (43.33%) and A. orientalis (41.11%) extracts. P. ferulacea (34.44%) extracts produced moderate toxicity to S. oryzea adults.

  1. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants.

  2. Mechanisms of silicon-mediated alleviation of heavy metal toxicity in plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat; Farid, Mujahid; Qayyum, Muhammad Farooq; Irshad, Muhammad Kashif

    2015-09-01

    In present era, heavy metal pollution is rapidly increasing which present many environmental problems. These heavy metals are mainly accumulated in soil and are transferred to food chain through plants grown on these soils. Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in the soil. It has been widely reported that Si can stimulate plant growth and alleviate various biotic and abiotic stresses, including heavy metal stress. Research to date has explored a number of mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants at both plant and soil levels. Here we reviewed the mechanisms through which Si can alleviate heavy metal toxicity in plants. The key mechanisms evoked include reducing active heavy metal ions in growth media, reduced metal uptake and root-to-shoot translocation, chelation and stimulation of antioxidant systems in plants, complexation and co-precipitation of toxic metals with Si in different plant parts, compartmentation and structural alterations in plants and regulation of the expression of metal transport genes. However, these mechanisms might be associated with plant species, genotypes, metal elements, growth conditions, duration of the stress imposed and so on. Further research orientation is also discussed.

  3. Metalaxyl toxicity, uptake, and distribution in several ornamental plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P C; Whitwell, T; Klaine, S J

    2001-01-01

    Phytoremediation depends on the ability of plants to tolerate and assimilate contaminants. This research characterized the interaction between several ornamental plant species and the fungicidal active ingredient, metalaxyl [N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-N-(methoxyacetyl)alanine methyl ester]. Species evaluated included sweetflag (Acorus gramineus Sol. ex Aiton), canna (Canna hybrida L. 'Yellow King Humbert'), parrotfeather [Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc.], and pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata L.). Metalaxyl tolerance levels for each species were determined by exposing plants for 7 d to solutions containing 0, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg metalaxyl L-1 aqueous nutrient media. Response endpoints included fresh mass production after 7 d exposure and 7 d post-exposure and quantum efficiency using dark-adapted (Fv/Fm) and light-adapted (fluorescence yields) plants. Metalaxyl uptake and distribution within the plant was determined by growing plants in aqueous nutrient media containing 1.18 x 10(6) Bq L-1 [14C]metalaxyl (0.909 mg L-1) for 1, 3, 5, or 7 d. Plant tissues were combusted and analyzed by liquid scintillation counting. Metalaxyl had no effects on the endpoints measured, except for fresh mass production of sweetflag at the 75 and 100 mg L-1 treatment levels. However, leaf necrosis was apparent in most species after 5 d exposure to concentrations greater than 25 mg L-1. Metalaxyl removal from the spiked nutrient media ranged from 15 to 60% during the 7-d exposure period. The majority of metalaxyl removed from the solution was detected within individual plants. In nearly all cases, activity from the radiolabeled pesticide accumulated in the leaves. Uptake of metalaxyl was correlated with water uptake throughout the 7 d. These results suggest that all species examined may be good candidates for incorporation into a phytoremediation scheme for metalaxyl.

  4. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: review and database value to resource sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published toxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils and aquatic plants. The historical phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for ...

  5. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: review and database value to resource sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published toxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils and aquatic plants. The historical phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for ...

  6. Lessons learned: Are engineered nanomaterials toxic to terrestrial plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Venkata Laxma; Hernandez-Viezcas, J A; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2016-10-15

    The expansion of nanotechnology and its ubiquitous applications has fostered unavoidable interaction between engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and plants. Recent research has shown ambiguous results with regard to the impact of ENMs in plants. On one hand, there are reports that show hazardous effects, while on the other hand, some reports highlight positive effects. This uncertainty whether the ENMs are primarily hazardous or whether they have a potential for propitious impact on plants, has raised questions in the scientific community. In this review, we tried to demystify this ambiguity by citing various exposure studies of different ENMs (nano-Ag, nano-Au, nano-Si, nano-CeO2, nano-TiO2, nano-CuO, nano-ZnO, and CNTs, among others) and their effects on various groups of plant families. After scrutinizing the most recent literature, it seems that the divergence in the research results may be possibly attributed to multiple factors such as ENM properties, plant species, soil dynamics, and soil microbial community. The analysis of the literature also suggests that there is a knowledge gap on the effects of ENMs towards changes in color, texture, shape, and nutritional aspects on ENM exposed plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Functions and toxicity of nickel in plants: recent advances and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cuiyun [Institute of Molecular Ecology, Key Laboratory of Arid and Grassland Ecology, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Huang, Dejun [School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Jianquan

    2009-04-15

    Nickel is an essential nutrient for plants. However, the amount of Ni required for normal growth of plants is very low. Hence, with the level of Ni pollution in the environment increasing, it is essential to understand the functional roles and toxic effects of Ni in plants. We briefly review advances in relevant research over the past 20 years. Based on the available data, two new indirect pathways of Ni toxicity in plants are proposed. These are (i) interference with other essential metal ions and (ii) induction of oxidative stress. Research should focus on these mechanisms at the protein and molecular levels. Further research should also be directed at plant species that are capable of accumulating Ni at high concentration, so-called hyperaccumulators. Such species can provide model systems to study the mechanisms of Ni tolerance and can also be used for phytoremediation by removing nickel from polluted environment. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Biological screening of some Turkish medicinal plant extracts for antimicrobial and toxicity activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, A U; Usta, C

    2008-01-20

    Screening of antibacterial activity and toxicity of 22 aqueous plant extracts from 17 Turkish plants was conducted. Antibacterial activity was performed with six bacteria including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Extracts of Tussilago farfara leaves, Helichyrsum plicatum flowers, Solanum dulcamara aerial parts and Urtica dioica leaves gave the best inhibitory activity against S. pyogenes, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Of the 22 plant extracts, 20 extracts displayed toxicity (LC50 was radish seed bioassay, two different determinations (root length and seed germination) were performed with a comparison between two concentrations (50,000 mg L(-1) and 10,000 mg L(-1)). At low concentration (10,000 mg L(-1)), S. dulcamara aerial parts and Primula vulgaris leaf extracts were observed to inhibit the root length more than the other plant extracts. Also, the most inhibitive plant extract for seed germination was obtained with S. dulcamara aerial parts.

  9. Phytobarriers: Plants capture particles containing potentially toxic elements originating from mine tailings in semiarid regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Ariadna S; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen Angeles; Rosas-Saito, Greta Hanako; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-10-01

    Retention of particles containing potentially toxic elements (PTEs) on plants that spontaneously colonize mine tailings was studied through comparison of washed and unwashed shoot samples. Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Mn concentrations were determined in plant samples. Particles retained on leaves were examined by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis. Particles containing PTEs were detected on both washed and unwashed leaves. This indicates that the thorough washing procedure did not remove all the particles containing PTEs from the leaf surface, leading to an overestimation of the concentrations of PTEs in plant tissues. Particularly trichomes and fungal mycelium were retaining particles. The quantity and composition of particles varied among plant species and place of collection. It is obvious that plants growing on toxic mine tailings form a physical barrier against particle dispersion and hence limit the spread of PTEs by wind. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lithium toxicity in plants: Reasons, mechanisms and remediation possibilities - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Babar; Tanveer, Mohsin; Hassan, Waseem; Shah, Adnan Noor; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Cheema, Sardar Alam; Ali, Iftikhar

    2016-10-01

    Lithium (Li) is a naturally occurring element; however, it is one of the non-essential metals for life. Lithium is becoming a serious matter of discussion for the people who do research on trace metals and environmental toxicity in plants. Due to limited information available regarding its mobility from soil to plants, the adverse effects of Li toxicity to plants are still unclear. This article briefly discusses issues around Li, its role and its essentiality in plants and research directions that may assist in inter-disciplinary studies to evaluate the importance of Li's toxicity. Further, potential remediation approaches will also be highlighted in this review. Briefly, Li influenced the growth of plants in both stimulation and reduction ways, depending on the concentration of Li in growth medium. On the negative side, Li reduces the plant growth by interrupting numerous physiological processes and altering metabolism in plant. The contamination of soil by Li is becoming a serious problem, which might be a threat for crop production in the near future. Additionally, lack of considerable information about the tolerance mechanisms of plants further intensifies the situation. Therefore, future research should emphasize in finding prominent and approachable solutions to minimize the entry of Li from its sources (especially from Li batteries) into the soil and food chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Toxic element profiles in selected medicinal plants growing on serpentines in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Dolja; Karadjova, Irina

    2013-12-01

    Populations of medicinal plants growing on serpentines and their respective soils were analyzed for Fe, Ni, Mn, Cr, Co, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Pb using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Aqua regia extraction and 0.43 M acetic acid extraction were used for the quantification of pseudototal and bioavailable fractions, respectively, of elements in soil and nitric acid digestion for determination of total element content in plants. Screening was performed to (1) document levels of toxic metals in herbs extensively used in preparation of products and standardized extracts, (2) compare accumulation abilities of ferns and seed plants, and (3) estimate correlations between metal content in plants and their soils. The toxic element content of plants varied from site to site on a large scale. The concentrations of Fe and Ni were elevated while those of Cu, Zn, and Pb were close to average values usually found in plants. The highest concentrations for almost all elements were measured in both Teucrium species. Specific differences in metal accumulation between ferns and seed plants were not recorded. The investigated species are not hyperaccumulators but can accumulate toxic elements, in some cases exceeding permissible levels proposed by the World Health Organization and European Pharmacopoeia. The harvesting of medicinal plants from serpentines could be hazardous to humans.

  12. Role of silicon in alleviation of iron deficiency and toxicity in hydroponically-grown rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants

    OpenAIRE

    A Abdol Zadeh; z Kiani Chalmardi

    2013-01-01

    Silicon (Si) nutrition may alleviate biotic and abiotic stresses including heavy metal deficiency and toxicity in plants. Iron deficiency and toxicity are important limiting factors in growth of rice. In the present study, role of Si nutrition on alleviation of iron deficiency and toxicity was investigated in rice plants. Plants were cultivated in greenhouse in hydroponics, using Yoshida solution, under different iron treatments (0, 2, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 250 mg/L as Fe- EDTA) and Si nutritio...

  13. NATURAL PLANT TOXICANT – CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDE AMYGDALIN: CHARACTERISTIC, METABOLISM AND THE EFFECT ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kolesár

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The amount of cyanogenic glycosides, as natural plant toxicants, in plants varies with plant species and environmental effects. Cyanogenic glycoside as an amygdalin was detected in apricot kernels, bitter almonds and peach, plum, pear and apple seeds. Amygdalin itself is non-toxic, but its HCN production decomposed by some enzymes is toxic substance. Target of this review was to describe the characteristic, metabolism and possible effects of amygdalin on reproductive processes. Previous studies describe the effects of natural compound amygdalin on female and male reproductive systems focused on process of steroidogenesis, spermatozoa motility and morphological abnormalities of spermatozoa. In accordance to the previous studies on amygdalin its benefit is controversial.

  14. Influence of soil properties and soil leaching on the toxicity of ionic silver to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Kate A; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Merrington, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Silver (Ag) has been shown to exhibit antimicrobial properties; as a result, it is being used increasingly in a wide range of consumer products. With these uses, the likelihood that Ag may enter the environment has increased, predominately via land application of biosolids or irrigation with treated wastewater effluent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of Ag to 2 plant species: barley (Hordeum vulgare L. CV Triumph) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) in a range of soils under both leached and unleached conditions. The concentrations that resulted in a 50% reduction of plant growth (EC50) were found to vary up to 20-fold across the soils, indicating a large influence of soil type on Ag toxicity. Overall, barley root elongation was found to be the least sensitive to added Ag, with EC50 values ranging from 51 mg/kg to 1030 mg/kg, whereas the tomato plant height showed higher sensitivity with EC50 values ranging from 46 mg/kg to 486 mg/kg. The effect of leaching was more evident in the barley toxicity results, where higher concentrations of Ag were required to induce toxicity. Variations in soil organic carbon and pH were found to be primarily responsible for mitigating Ag toxicity; therefore, these properties may be used in future risk assessments for Ag to predict toxicity in a wide range of soil types.

  15. Plant species forbidden in health food and their toxic constituents, toxicology and detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-Lin; Shang, Yu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Many plants with pharmacological efficacies are widely used as ingredients in so-called "health foods", but many of them are toxic. In order to ensure the safety of "health food", the Chinese Ministry of Health has listed 59 materials that are forbidden from being used in health food and are called health food forbidden species (HFFS). This review focuses on 47 plants among the HFFS to discuss research regarding their pharmacology, toxicology, and detoxification methods. According to the literature published in the last 2 decades, the main constituents and the pharmacology of such plants are described here, especially their toxic constituents and toxicology. The toxicity mechanisms of several typical toxic components from the 47 plants are outlined and some effective detoxification methods are introduced. Although all HFFS are poisonous, they are considered to be useful in the treatment of many diseases. How to keep their pharmacological effects and at the same time decrease their toxicity is a great challenge. In the future, more attention should be paid to the application of modern science and technology in the exploration of the toxicology and detoxification of HFFS.

  16. Toxicity of 2,4-dinitrotoluene to terrestrial plants in natural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Simini, Mike; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2010-07-15

    The presence of energetic materials (used as explosives and propellants) at contaminated sites is a growing international issue, particularly with respect to military base closures and demilitarization policies. Improved understanding of the ecotoxicological effects of these materials is needed in order to accurately assess the potential exposure risks and impacts on the environment and its ecosystems. We studied the toxicity of the nitroaromatic energetic material 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli L. Beauv.), and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) using four natural soils varying in properties (organic matter, clay content, and pH) that were hypothesized to affect chemical bioavailability and toxicity. Amended soils were subjected to natural light conditions, and wetting and drying cycles in a greenhouse for 13 weeks prior to toxicity testing to approximate field exposure conditions in terms of bioavailability, transformation, and degradation of 2,4-DNT. Definitive toxicity tests were performed according to standard protocols. The median effective concentration (EC(50)) values for shoot dry mass ranged from 8 to 229 mg kg(-1), depending on the plant species and soil type. Data indicated that 2,4-DNT was most toxic in the Sassafras (SSL) and Teller (TSL) sandy loam soils, with EC(50) values for shoot dry mass ranging between 8 to 44 mg kg(-1), and least toxic in the Webster clay loam soil, with EC(50) values for shoot dry mass ranging between 40 to 229 mg kg(-1). The toxicity of 2,4-DNT for each of the plant species was significantly (p < or = 0.05) and inversely correlated with the soil organic matter content. Toxicity benchmark values determined in the present studies for 2,4-DNT weathered-and-aged in SSL or TSL soils will contribute to development of an Ecological Soil Screening Level for terrestrial plants that can be used for ecological risk assessment at contaminated sites.

  17. Plant defense using toxic inorganic ions: conceptual models of the defensive enhancement and joint effects hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    The concept of plant defense using toxic mineral elements originated as an explanation for extremely elevated concentrations of some elements (termed hyperaccumulation) in some plant tissues. The Defensive Enhancement Hypothesis suggests that hyperaccumulation evolved because, after an initial defensive benefit accrued from a relatively low initial concentration, increased concentration of an element provided increased plant fitness and drove evolution of higher element concentrations until hyperaccumulation was achieved. The Joint Effects Hypothesis postulates that additive or synergistic effects between element-based defenses, or between toxic element and organic chemical defenses, may have contributed to the evolution of hyperaccumulation. By lessening the concentration of an element necessary to provide an initial defensive benefit to a plant, joint effects could decrease the level of an element that provides an initial defensive benefit, allowing additive or synergistic defensive enhancement to take effect. Recent experimental tests have demonstrated defense at relatively low element concentrations, and tests of metal/metal and metal/organic compound combinations have shown joint effects. These hypotheses suggest how hyperaccumulator plants may have evolved in response to plant-herbivore interactions, and suggest that toxic element levels below those used to define hyperaccumulation may be ecologically effective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanoscale copper in the soil–plant system – toxicity and underlying potential mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjum, Naser A., E-mail: anjum@ua.pt [CESAM-Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Adam, Vojtech [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University in Brno, Zemedelska 1, CZ-613 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kizek, Rene [Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Duarte, Armando C.; Pereira, Eduarda [CESAM-Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Iqbal, Muhammad [Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Hamdard University, New Delhi 110062 (India); Lukatkin, Alexander S. [Department of Botany, Plant Physiology and Ecology, N.P. Ogarev Mordovia State University, Bolshevistskaja Str., 68. Saransk 430005 (Russian Federation); Ahmad, Iqbal, E-mail: ahmadr@ua.pt [CESAM-Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM-Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies & Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-04-15

    Nanoscale copper particles (nano-Cu) are used in many antimicrobial formulations and products for their antimicrobial activity. They may enter deliberately and/or accidentally into terrestrial environments including soils. Being the major ‘eco-receptors’ of nanoscale particles in the terrestrial ecosystem, soil–microbiota and plants (the soil–plant system) have been used as a model to dissect the potential impact of these particles on the environmental and human health. In the soil–plant system, the plant can be an indirect non-target organism of the soil-associated nano-Cu that may in turn affect plant-based products and their consumers. By all accounts, information pertaining to nano-Cu toxicity and the underlying potential mechanisms in the soil–plant system remains scanty, deficient and little discussed. Therefore, based on some recent reports from (bio)chemical, molecular and genetic studies of nano-Cu versus soil–plant system, this article: (i) overviews the status, chemistry and toxicity of nano-Cu in soil and plants, (ii) discusses critically the poorly understood potential mechanisms of nano-Cu toxicity and tolerance both in soil–microbiota and plants, and (iii) proposes future research directions. It appears from studies hitherto made that the uncontrolled generation and inefficient metabolism of reactive oxygen species through different reactions are the major factors underpinning the overall nano-Cu consequences in both the systems. However, it is not clear whether the nano-Cu or the ion released from it is the cause of the toxicity. We advocate to intensify the multi-approach studies focused at a complete characterization of the nano-Cu, its toxicity (during life cycles of the least-explored soil–microbiota and plants), and behavior in an environmentally relevant terrestrial exposure setting. Such studies may help to obtain a deeper insight into nano-Cu actions and address adequately the nano-Cu-associated safety concerns in the ‘soil–plant

  19. Proteus mirabilis alleviates zinc toxicity by preventing oxidative stress in maize (Zea mays) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Faisal; Yasmeen, Tahira; Riaz, Muhammad; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Ali, Shafaqat; Raza, Syed Hammad

    2014-12-01

    Plant-associated bacteria can have beneficial effects on the growth and health of their host. However, the role of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPR), under metal stress, has not been widely investigated. The present study investigated the possible mandatory role of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in protecting plants from zinc (Zn) toxicity. The exposure of maize plants to 50µM zinc inhibited biomass production, decreased chlorophyll, total soluble protein and strongly increased accumulation of Zn in both root and shoot. Similarly, Zn enhanced hydrogen peroxide, electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation as indicated by malondaldehyde accumulation. Pre-soaking with novel Zn tolerant bacterial strain Proteus mirabilis (ZK1) isolated zinc (Zn) contaminated soil, alleviated the negative effect of Zn on growth and led to a decrease in oxidative injuries caused by Zn. Furthermore, strain ZK1 significantly enhanced the activities of catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbic acid but lowered the Proline accumulation in Zn stressed plants. The results suggested that the inoculation of Zea mays plants with P. mirabilis during an earlier growth period could be related to its plant growth promoting activities and avoidance of cumulative damage upon exposure to Zn, thus reducing the negative consequences of oxidative stress caused by heavy metal toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Urban agriculture in Portugal: Availability of potentially toxic elements for plant uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, N.; Rodriguez, S.M.; Coelho, C.; Carvalho, L.; Duarte, A.C.; Pereira, E.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Soils from urban areas often contain enhanced pseudo-total levels of potentially toxic elements (PTEs). Considering the expanding tendency of urban agricultural practices it is necessary to understand if these contaminants are available for plant uptake and if they pose risks to animal and human

  1. Biological screening of selected Pacific Northwest forest plants using the brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchesy, Yvette M; Kelsey, Rick G; Constantine, George; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    The brine shrimp (Artemia salina) bioassay was used to screen 211 methanol extracts from 128 species of Pacific Northwest plants in search of general cytotoxic activity. Strong toxicity (LC50  1000 µg/ml). Our subsequent studies of conifer heartwoods with strong activity confirm the assay's value for identifying new investigational leads for materials with insecticidal and fungicidal activity.

  2. From the Lab Bench: Should you plant a non-toxic endophyte tall fescue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    A column was written to discuss planting novel endophyte tall fescue for alleviating fescue toxicosis. Endophyte-free tall fescue cultivars can be grazed as a non-toxic alternative, but it maust be understood that it is the endophyte, through production of alkaloids other than ergot alkaloids, that...

  3. EPA Announces National Limits to Reduce Toxic Pollutants Discharged into Waterways by Steam Electric Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today finalized a rule that will reduce the discharge of toxic pollutants into America's waterways from steam electric power plants by 1.4 billion pounds annually, as well as reduce water w

  4. Toxicity of Mexican native plant extracts against larvae of Aedes aegypti(Diptera: Culicidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosario; Ruiz-Guerrero; Mario; Alberto; Rodríguez-Pérez; Mariano; Norzagaray-Campos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate five indigenous Mexican plants [Hippocratea excelsa, Hippocratea celastroides, Argemone mexicana(A. mexicana), Tagetes lucida, and Pseudosmodingium perniciosum(P. perniciosum)] toxicity against the fourth instar larvae of the dengue primary vector, Aedes aegypti(A. aegypti).Methods: Each plant part was treated successively with hexane, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol to extract potential active components of the plants against the dengue vector.Results: There was a range of toxicity at 24 or 48 h post-exposure for the different plant parts and organic solvent used(LC50 values ranged between 20 and 890 μg/mL). Extracts from seeds of A. mexicana(hexane washing with methanol and acetone) and stem-bark of P. perniciosum(hexane) showed highest toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae at 48 h post-exposure(LC50 values were80, 50, and 20 μg/mL, respectively), thus making them potential candidates as biolarvicides.Efforts are on-going to characterize the bioactive components of the extracts, through chromatography, for their use as biological tools for the control of the primary dengue vector.Conclusions: A. mexicana and P. perniciosum are good candidates to combat the dengue vector, Ae. aegypti, as they were highly toxic to the larvae.

  5. Toxicity of plant essential oils to Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Byeoung-Ryeol; Park, Hyung-Man; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2003-10-01

    A total of 53 plant essential oils were tested for their insecticidal activities against eggs, nymphs, and adults of Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood, using an impregnated filter paper bioassays without allowing direct contact. Responses varied according to oil type and dose, and developmental stage of the insect. Bay, caraway seed, clove leaf, lemon eucalyptus, lime dis 5 F, pennyroyal, peppermint, rosewood, spearmint, and tea tree oils were highly effective against T. vaporariorum adults, nymphs, and eggs at 0.0023, 0.0093, and 0.0047 microl/ml air, respectively. These results indicate that the mode of delivery of these essential oils was largely a result of action in the vapor phase. Significant correlations among adulticidal, nymphicidal, and ovicidal activities of the test oils were observed. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential fumigants for T. vaporariorum control.

  6. Environmental interactions with the toxicity of plant essential oils to the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Sparagano, O A E; Port, G; Okello, E; Shiel, R S; Guy, J H

    2010-03-01

    The toxicity of a range of plant essential oils to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens throughout Europe and elsewhere, was assessed in the laboratory. Dermanyssus gallinae may cause losses in egg production, anaemia and, in extreme cases, death of hens. With changes in legislation and consumer demand, alternatives to synthetic acaricides are needed to manage this pest. Fifty plant essential oils were selected for their toxicity to arthropods reported in the literature. Twenty-four of these essential oils were found to kill > 75% of adult D. gallinae in contact toxicity tests over a 24-h period at a rate of 0.21 mg/cm(2). Subsequent testing at lower rates showed that the essential oils of cade, manuka and thyme were especially toxic to adult D. gallinae. The toxicity of the seven most acaricidal essential oils was found to be stable at different temperatures likely to be encountered in commercial poultry housing (15 degrees C, 22 degrees C and 29 degrees C), although results suggest that humidity and dust might influence the toxicity of some of the oils tested. The toxicity of clove bud essential oil to D. gallinae, for example, was increased at high humidity and dust levels compared with ambient levels. The results suggest that certain essential oils may make effective botanical pesticides for use against D. gallinae, although it is likely that issues relating to the consistency of the toxic effect of some oils will determine which oils will be most effective in practice.

  7. Role of silicon in alleviation of iron deficiency and toxicity in hydroponically-grown rice (Oryza sativa L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abdol Zadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si nutrition may alleviate biotic and abiotic stresses including heavy metal deficiency and toxicity in plants. Iron deficiency and toxicity are important limiting factors in growth of rice. In the present study, role of Si nutrition on alleviation of iron deficiency and toxicity was investigated in rice plants. Plants were cultivated in greenhouse in hydroponics, using Yoshida solution, under different iron treatments (0, 2, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 250 mg/L as Fe- EDTA and Si nutrition (0 and 1.5 mM as sodium silicate. Results revealed that both iron deficiency and toxicity imposed significant reduction in fresh and dry weight and length of plants. The activity of catalase was decreased in shoots due to iron deficiency. Activity of catalase in roots and cell wall peroxidase in shoots increased under iron toxicity compared with control plants. Si nutrition increased Si content in plants and improved plant growth in both iron deficiency (not in the absence of iron and toxicity. Application of Si increased the activity of catalase in shoots and polyphenol oxidase in both roots and shoots under iron deficiency. Also, the activity of catalase in roots and polyphenol oxidase in shoots raised following iron toxicity. This in turn may reduce the oxidative stress in plants. In addition, increase of lignin in extreme iron toxicity due to Si nutrition may enhance sites of iron absorption in plant cell walls and decrease iron toxicity. The results indicated that Si nutrition could ameliorate harmful effects of iron deficiency and toxicity in rice plants possibly through improvement of antioxidant enzyme activity and reduction of oxidative stress.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of Ethiopian local plant Phytolacca dodecandra extract for its toxicity effectiveness against aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxicity effectiveness of berries crude extract of Endod [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Phytolacca dodecandra] against aquatic macroinvertebrates Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant, berries of Phytolacca dodecandra are being commonly used for washing clothes and to control fresh water snails. Macroinvertebrates are useful biological indicators of change in the aquatic ecosystems. The present study clearly revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for berries crude extract of Phytolacca dodecandra against Baetidae were 181.94 and 525.78 mg/l and lethal doses (LC50 and LC90) required for Hydropsychidae were 1060.69 and 4120.4 mg/l respectively. The present investigation demonstrated that Baetidae was more susceptible than Hydropsychidae, even at shorter exposure period of 2 h. From our preliminary investigation the toxicity effectiveness of crude extracts of Phytolacca dodecandra has been clearly shown. In addition, it requires further explorations which address both the toxicity activity and the active principles that are responsible for its toxicity effectiveness. Ultimately, the release/introduction of Phytolacca dodecandra plant berries extracts into the river/streams leads to disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, at this moment preserving the aquatic ecosystem is extremely essential and inevitable.

  9. Role of GSH homeostasis under Zn toxicity in plants with different Zn tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrameda-Medina, Yurena; Montesinos-Pereira, David; Romero, Luis; Blasco, Begoña; Ruiz, Juan M

    2014-10-01

    Tripepthide glutathione (GSH) is a pivotal molecule in tolerance to heavy metals, including Zinc (Zn). The aim of our work is to examine the role of GSH metabolism in two different horticultural plants under Zn toxicity in order to select and/or generate plants tolerant to Zn toxicity. We show a comparative analysis of the toxic effect of 0.5mM Zn between Lactuca sativa cv. Phillipus and Brassica oleracea cv. Bronco. In L. sativa the accumulation of Zn resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), while enzymes of GSH metabolism and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes were negatively affected. On the contrary, B. oleracea showed the existence of a detoxification mechanism of these ROS. Moreover, while in L. sativa increased the oxidized GSH (GSSG) and phytochelatins (PCs) concentration with the reduction of leaves biomass, in B. oleracea the higher concentration of reduced GSH and its use in the detoxification of ROS seems to be a major mechanism to provide tolerance to Zn toxicity without reducing leaf biomass. Our results suggested that under Zn toxicity, B. oleracea is more efficient and tolerant than L. sativa through the detoxification of lipid peroxidation products due to the reduced GSH.

  10. Fertilizers and Mixed Crop Cultivation of Chromium Tolerant and Sensitive Plants under Chromium Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dheeba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zea mays (maize and Vigna radiata (green gram are found to be the chromium (Cr tolerant and sensitive plants, respectively. In the present paper, we investigate the reduction of the toxicity of Cr in the sensitive plants by the mixed crop cultivation in the field using various amendments. Further, the potassium dichromate was used as the source of hexavalent Cr. The results indicated that Cr adversely affects both the growth and yield of plants. The soil properties vary with Cr and different fertilizer amendments and the yield of both plants were affected by Cr. We conclude that metal accumulation of seeds of green gram was higher than corn and the application of single fertilizer either farm yard manure (FYM or nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (NPK enhances the growth and yield of both the tolerant and sensitive plants in the mixed crop cultivations.

  11. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death.

  12. Amelioration of iron toxicity: A mechanism for aluminum-induced growth stimulation in tea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiboland, Roghieh; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Tolrà, Roser

    2013-11-01

    Tea plants (Camellia sinensis) are well adapted to acid soils with high Al availability. These plants not only accumulate high leaf Al concentrations, but also respond to Al with growth stimulation. Decreased oxidative stress has been associated with this effect. Why tea plants not exposed to Al suffer from oxidative stress has not been clarified. In this study, hydroponically grown tea plants treated with 0 to 300 μM Al were analyzed for growth, Al and Fe accumulation, and Al distribution by means of morin and hematoxylin staining. Roots of control plants stained black with hematoxylin. This indicates the formation of a Fe-hematoxylin complex. Young leaves of controls accumulated more than 1000 mg Fe kg(-1) dry weight. This concentration is above the Fe-toxicity threshold in most species. Supply of Al stimulated growth and reduced Fe uptake and transport. These results indicate that Al-induced growth stimulation might be due to alleviation of a latent Fe toxicity occurring in tea plants without Al supply.

  13. Antileishmanial, Toxicity, and Phytochemical Evaluation of Medicinal Plants Collected from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Ali Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is an important parasitic problem and is in focus for development of new drugs all over the world. Objective of the present study was to evaluate phytochemical, toxicity, and antileishmanial potential of Jurinea dolomiaea, Asparagus gracilis, Sida cordata, and Stellaria media collected from different areas of Pakistan. Dry powder of plants was extracted with crude methanol and fractionated with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water solvents in escalating polarity order. Qualitative phytochemical analysis of different class of compounds, that is, alkaloids, saponins, terpenoids, anthraquinones, cardiac glycosides, coumarins, phlobatannins, flavonoids, phenolics, and tannins, was tested. Its appearance was observed varying with polarity of solvent used for fractionation. Antileishmanial activity was performed against Leishmania tropica KWH23 promastigote. Potent antileishmanial activity was observed for J. dolomiaea methanol extract (IC50=10.9±1.1 μg/mL in comparison to other plant extracts. However, J. dolomiaea “ethyl acetate fraction” was more active (IC50=5.3±0.2 μg/mL against Leishmania tropica KWH23 among all plant fractions as well as standard Glucantime drug (6.0±0.1 μg/mL. All the plants extract and its derived fraction exhibited toxicity in safety range (LC50 >100 in brine shrimp toxicity evaluation assay.

  14. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  15. Eliminating Aluminum Toxicity in an Acid Sulfate Soil for Rice Cultivation Using Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB, ground magnesium limestone (GML and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0 at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM. Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB, GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  16. In vitro and in vivo toxicity evaluation of plant virus nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Agnese; Lico, Chiara; Baschieri, Selene; Barberini, Lanfranco; Cirotto, Carlo; Blasi, Paolo; Santi, Luca

    2015-05-01

    The use of biological self-assembling materials, plant virus nanoparticles in particular, appears very intriguing as it allows a great choice of symmetries and dimensions, easy chemical and biological engineering of both surface and/or internal cavity as well as safe and rapid production in plants. In this perspective, we present an initial evaluation of the safety profile of two structurally different plant viruses produced in Nicotiana benthamiana L. plants: the filamentous Potato virus X and the icosahedral Tomato bushy stunt virus. In vitro haemolysis assay was used to test the cytotoxic effects, which could arise by pVNPs interaction with cellular membranes, while early embryo assay was used to evaluate toxicity and teratogenicity in vivo. Data indicates that these structurally robust particles, still able to infect plants after incubation in serum up to 24h, have neither toxic nor teratogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. This work represents the first safety-focused characterization of pVNPs in view of their possible use as drug delivery carriers.

  17. Trichothecene toxicity in eukaryotes: cellular and molecular mechanisms in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Chanemougasoundharam; Doohan, Fiona M

    2013-02-27

    Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid mycotoxins commonly found as contaminants in cereal grains and are a major health and food safety concern due to their toxicity to humans and farm animals. Trichothecenes are predominantly produced by the phytopathogenic Fusarium fungus, and in plants they act as a virulence factor aiding the spread of the fungus during disease development. Known for their inhibitory effect on eukaryotic protein synthesis, trichothecenes also induce oxidative stress, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest and affect cell membrane integrity and function in eukaryotic cells. In animals, trichothecenes can be either immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive and induce apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated or -independent pathway. In plants, trichothecenes induce programmed cell death via production of reactive oxygen species. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to the elucidation of signal transduction pathways that manifest trichothecene toxicity in eukaryotes. In animals, trichothecenes induce mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades via ribotoxic stress response and/or endoplasmic reticulum stress response. The upstream signalling events that lead to the activation trichothecene-induced ribotoxic stress response are discussed. In plants, trichothecenes exhibit elicitor-like activity leading to the inductions MAPKs and genes involved in oxidative stress, cell death and plant defence response. Trichothecenes might also modulate hormone-mediated defence signalling and abiotic stress signalling in plants.

  18. Toxicity and biotransformation of uncoated and coated nickel hydroxide nanoparticles on mesquite plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Gonzalez, Christina M; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2010-05-01

    Nanomaterials are of particular interest in environmental chemistry due to their unknown toxicity to living organisms. Reports indicate that nanoparticles (NPs) affect seed germination, but the uptake and biotransformation of metal nanoparticles is not well understood. The present study investigated the toxicity and biotransformation of Ni(OH)2 NPs by mesquite plants (Prosopis sp.). Three sets of plants were treated for four weeks with 0.01, 0.05, or 0.10 g of either uncoated or sodium citrate coated NPs before and after synthesis. Nickel concentrations in plants were determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and the form and oxidation state of Ni was determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Results showed that uncoated NPs had an average size of 8.7 nm, whereas coated NPs before and after synthesis had an average of 2.5 and 0.9 nm, respectively. The ICP-OES results showed that plants treated with 0.10 g of uncoated and coated NPs before and after synthesis had 803, 764, and 400 mg Ni kg dry weight, in the leaves, respectively. The XAS analyses showed Ni NPs in roots and shoots of plants treated with uncoated NPs, whereas leaves showed a Ni(II)-organic acid type complex. However, plants treated with coated NPs before or after synthesis showed Ni NPs only in roots and a Ni(II)-organic acid complex in shoots and leaves. Results also showed that none of the treatments reduced plant size or chlorophyll production. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that the biotransformation of nanoparticles by a plant system is reported. Copyright (c) 2010 SETAC.

  19. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for toxics best available control technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This document provides information on toxic air pollutant emissions to support the Notice of Construction for the proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) to be built at the the Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Because approval must be received prior to initiating construction of the facility, state and federal Clean Air Act Notices of construction are being prepared along with necessary support documentation.

  20. Toxic Effects of Nickel Oxide Bulk and Nanoparticles on the Aquatic Plant Lemna gibba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Oukarroum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs and nickel(II oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk. Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0–1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L. These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing.

  1. Toxic effects of nickel oxide bulk and nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid; Dewez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0-1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing.

  2. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Under the Fine Particulate Control/Air Toxics Program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been performing comprehensive assessments of toxic substance emissions from coal-fired electric utility units. An objective of this program is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in evaluating hazardous air pollutant emissions as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has also performed comprehensive assessments of emissions from many power plants and provided the information to the EPA. The DOE program was implemented in two. Phase 1 involved the characterization of eight utility units, with options to sample additional units in Phase 2. Radian was one of five contractors selected to perform these toxic emission assessments.Radian`s Phase 1 test site was at southern Company Service`s Plant Yates, Unit 1, which, as part of the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, was demonstrating the CT-121 flue gas desulfurization technology. A commercial-scale prototype integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) power plant was selected by DOE for Phase 2 testing. Funding for the Phase 2 effort was provided by DOE, with assistance from EPRI and the host site, the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI) project This document presents the results of that effort.

  3. The toxicity of extracts of plant parts of Moringa stenopetala in HEPG2 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Negussu; Houghton, Peter; Timbrell, John

    2005-10-01

    The cytotoxicity of extracts from a widely used species of plant, Moringa stenopetala, was assessed in HEPG2 cells, by measuring the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cell viability. The functional integrity of extract-exposed cells was determined by measuring intracellular levels of ATP and glutathione (GSH). The ethanol extracts of leaves and seeds increased significantly (p leaf and seed extracts. At a concentration of 500 microg/mL, the water extract of leaves increased (p leaf extract decreased GSH levels at a concentration of 500 microg/mL (p Moringa stenopetala show that they contain toxic substances that are extractable with organic solvents or are formed during the process of extraction with these solvents. The significant depletion of ATP and GSH only occurred at concentrations of extract that caused leakage of LDH. Further investigation with this plant in order to identify the constituents extracted and their individual toxic effects both in vivo and in vitro is warranted. This study also illustrates the utility of cell culture for screening plant extracts for potential toxicity.

  4. Effect of Common Species of Florida Landscaping Plants on the Efficacy of Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits Against Aedes albopictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Kelly E; Scott, Jodi M; Muller, Gunter C; Qualls, Whitney A; Xue, Rui-De

    2017-06-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) was applied to 5 different types of commonly found plants in landscaping of northeastern Florida. The ATSB applications were assessed for possible plant effects and preference against Aedes albopictus in semifield evaluations. Positive and negative controls consisted of plants sprayed with attractive sugar bait (no toxicant) and plants with nothing applied. Bioassays were conducted on stems with leaf clippings and on full plants to assess any difference in mosquito mortality on the different plants. Plants utilized in these evaluations were Indian hawthorne, Yaupon holly, Japanese privet, Loropetalum ruby, and podocarpus. In both assays, no significant difference was observed in the effect of ATSBs on adult female mosquitoes based on the type of plant. ATSB could be applied to common landscape plants for adult Ae. albopictus control.

  5. Modulation of copper toxicity-induced oxidative damage by excess supply of iron in maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Parma Nand

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we examined the modulation of Cu toxicity-induced oxidative stress by excess supply of iron in Zea mays L. plants. Plants receiving excess of Cu (100 microM) showed decreased water potential and simultaneously showed wilting in the leaves. Later, the young leaves exhibited chlorosis and necrotic scorching of lamina. Excess of Cu suppressed growth, decreased concentration of chloroplastic pigments and fresh and dry weight of plants. The activities of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7; POD), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11; APX) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD) were increased in plants supplied excess of Cu. However, activity of catalase (EC 1.11.1.6; CAT), was depressed in these plants. In gel activities of isoforms of POD, APX and SOD also revealed upregulation of these enzymes. Excess (500 microM)-Fe-supplemented Cu-stressed plants, however, looked better in their phenotypic appearance, had increased concentration of chloroplastic pigments, dry weight, and improved leaf tissue water status in comparison to the plants supplied excess of Cu. Moreover, activities of antioxidant enzymes including CAT were further enhanced and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and H(2)O(2) concentrations decreased in excess-Fe-supplemented Cu-stressed plants. In situ accumulation of H(2)O(2), contrary to that of O(2)(*-) radical, increased in both leaf and roots of excess-Cu-stressed plants, but Cu-excess plants supplied with excess-Fe showed reduced accumulation H(2)O(2) and little higher of O(2)(*-) in comparison to excess-Cu plants. It is, therefore, concluded that excess-Cu (100 microM) induces oxidative stress by increasing production of H(2)O(2) despite of increased antioxidant protection and that the excess-Cu-induced oxidative damage is minimized by excess supply of Fe.

  6. Toxicity Identification and Evaluation for the Effluent from Wastewater Treatment Plant in Industrial Complex using D.magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Keum, H.; Chun Sang, H.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the interests on the impacts of industrial wastewater on aquatic ecosystem have increased with concern about ecosystem protection and human health. Whole effluent toxicity tests are used to monitor toxicity by unknown toxic chemicals as well as conventional pollutants from industrial effluent discharges. This study describes the application of TIE (toxicity identification evaluation) procedures to an acutely toxic effluent from a wastewater treatment plant in industrial complex which was toxic to Daphnia magna. In TIE phase I (characterization step), the toxic effects by heavy metals, organic compounds, oxidants, volatile organic compounds, suspended solids and ammonia were screened and revealed that the source of toxicity is far from these toxicants group. Chemical analysis (TIE phase II) on TDS showed that the concentration of chloride ion (6,900 mg/L) was substantially higher than that predicted from EC50 for D. magna. In confirmation step (TIE phase III), chloride ion was demonstrated to be main toxicant in this effluent by the spiking approach, species sensitivity approach and deletion approach. Calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, fluorine, sulfate ion concentration (450, 100, 80, 5,300, 0.66, 2,200mg/L) was not shown toxicity from D. magna. Finally, we concluded that chloride was the most contributing toxicant in the waste water treatment plant. Further research activities are needed for technical support of toxicity identification and evaluation on the various types of wastewater treatment plant discharge in Korea. Keywords : TIE, D. magna, Industrial waste water Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  7. Exogenously applied calcium alleviates cadmium toxicity in Matricaria chamomilla L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadfar, Soudeh; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Modarres-Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Hojati, Mostafa

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) toxicity in plants leads to serious disturbances of physiological processes, such as inhibition of chlorophyll synthesis, oxidative injury to the plant cells and water and nutrient uptake. Response of Matricaria chamomilla L. to calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) enrichment in growth medium for reducing Cd toxicity were studied in this study. Hydroponically cultured seedlings were treated with 0, 0.1, 1, and 5 mM CaCl(2), under 0, 120, and 180 μM CdCl(2) conditions, respectively. The study included measurements pertaining to physiological attributes such as growth parameters, Cd concentration and translocation, oxidative stress, and accumulation of phenolics. Addition of CaCl(2) to growth media decreased the Cd concentration, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and reactive oxygen species accumulation in the plants treated with different CdCl(2), but increased the growth parameters. Malondialdehyde and total phenolics in shoots and roots were not much affected when plants were treated only with different CaCl(2) levels, but it showed a rapid increase when the plants were exposed to 120 and 180 CdCl(2) levels. CaCl(2) amendment also ameliorated the CdCl(2)-induced stress by reducing oxidative injury. The beneficial effects of CaCl(2) in ameliorating CdCl(2) toxicity can be attributed to the Ca-induced reduction of Cd concentration, by reducing the cell-surface negativity and competing for Cd(2+) ion influx, activity enhancement of antioxidant enzymes, and biomass accumulation.

  8. Levels of toxic arsenic species in native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salgado, Sara; Quijano, M Ángeles

    2014-03-01

    Ten native terrestrial plants from soils polluted by former mining activities (Mónica mine, NW Madrid, Spain), with high total arsenic concentration levels (up to 3500 μg g(-1)), have been studied to determine the fraction of arsenic present as toxic forms (inorganic and methylated species), which present a higher mobility and therefore the potential risk associated with their reintegration into the environment is high. Roots and aboveground parts were analyzed separately to assess possible transformations from translocation processes. Extractions were carried out with deionized water by microwave-assisted extraction at a temperature of 90 °C and three extraction steps of 7.5 min each. Total extracted arsenic concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, showing extraction percentages from 9 to 39% (calculated as the ratio between total extracted arsenic (Asext) and total arsenic (AsT) concentrations in plants). Speciation studies, performed by high performance liquid chromatography-photo-oxidation-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry, showed the main presence of arsenate (As(v)) (up to 350 μg g(-1)), followed by arsenite (As(iii)), in both plant parts. Monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) were also found only in some plants. On the other hand, the use of 0.5 mol L(-1) acetic acid as an extractant led to higher extraction percentages (33-87%), but lower column recoveries, probably due to the extraction of arsenic compounds different to the toxic free ions studied, which may come from biotransformation mechanisms carried out by plants to reduce arsenic toxicity. However, As(v) concentrations increased up to 800 μg g(-1) in acid medium, indicating the probable release of As(v) from organoarsenic compounds and therefore a higher potential risk for the environment.

  9. Plant regeneration of non-toxic Jatropha curcas—impacts of plant growth regulators, source and type of explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2011-01-28

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel plant, however, oil and deoiled cake are toxic. A non-toxic variety of J. curcas is reported from Mexico. The present investigation explores the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) viz. 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ) individually and in combination with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), on regeneration from in vitro and field-grown mature leaf explants, in vitro and glasshouse-grown seedlings cotyledonary leaf explants of non-toxic J. curcas. In all the tested parameters maximum regeneration efficiency (81.07%) and the number of shoot buds per explants (20.17) was observed on 9.08 μM TDZ containing Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) medium from in vitro cotyledonary leaf explants. The regenerated shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 μM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 μM BAP and 5.5 μM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 μM BAP and 8.5 μM IAA. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing different concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA and NAA for four days followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg/l activated charcoal. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of wastewater collected at different treatment stages from a pharmaceutical industrial park wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ke; Qin, Zhe; Zhao, Zhongqing; Zhao, Chunxia; Liang, Shuxuan

    2016-09-01

    The toxicity of water-receiving bodies, the effluent and other treatment stages in wastewater treatment plants has recently been of interest to the public due to the lack of a regulated toxicity-based index for wastewater discharge in China. This study aimed to evaluate the conventional pollution parameters and toxicities of wastewaters collected at different treatment stages from a pharmaceutical industrial park wastewater treatment plant through dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio qinghaiensis) tests. The results of an analysis of conventional parameters indicated that the total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), ammonia nitrogen (NH3N), and total phosphorus (TP) were largely removed after various treatments. However, the TN, NH3N and COD still exceeded the regulated standards. The tested pharmaceutical park effluents were mainly polluted with organic pollutants and nitrogenous. The toxicity test results indicated that the toxicities could be markedly reduced after treatment, with the toxicities of two out of the six effluent samples at different treatment stages being greater than the influent toxicity. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated a significantly positive correlation between the toxicity values obtained using the DHA and Vibrio qinghaiensis tests. Compared with the DHA measurement, the Vibrio qinghaiensis test was faster and more sensitive. Meanwhile, the toxicity indicators were significantly and positively correlated with the TSS, TN, TP and COD concentrations. These results may aid the understanding of the toxicity of pharmaceutical industrial park wastewaters and toxicity removal using the treatment techniques that are currently utilized in China.

  11. Endophytic bacteria in toxic South African plants: identification, phylogeny and possible involvement in gousiekte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Brecht; Van Elst, Daan; Steyn, Hester; Van Wyk, Braam; Lemaire, Benny; Smets, Erik; Dessein, Steven

    2011-04-26

    from different regions indicating that these plants will also be toxic to ruminants in other African countries.

  12. Toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid to plants and aquatic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2009-02-01

    Acute toxicities of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were tested on four freshwater species and three plant species. PFOS was more toxic than PFOA for all species tested in this study. Similar time-response patterns of PFOS and PFOA toxicity were observed for each tested species. Values of the 48-h LC(50) of PFOS for all test species ranged from 27 to 233 mg/L and values of the 96-h LC(50) for three of the species ranged from 10 to 178 mg/L. Values of the 48-h LC(50) of PFOA for all test species ranged from 181 to 732 mg/L and values of the 96-h LC(50) for three of the species ranged from 337 to 672 mg/L. The most sensitive freshwater species to PFOS was green neon shrimp (Neocaridina denticulate) with a 96-h LC(50) of 10 mg/L. Of the aquatic organisms tested, the aquatic snail (Physa acuta) always has the highest resistance to PFOS or PFOA toxicity over each exposure period. Both PFOS and PFOA had no obvious adverse effect on seed germination for all three plant species. Five-day EC(50) of root elongation was more sensitive to LC(50) of seed germination in this study. Based on EC(10), EC(50), and NOECs, the 5-day root elongation sensitivity of test plants to both PFOS and PFOA was in the order of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) > pakchoi (Brassica rapa chinensis) > cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Based on the results of this study and other published literature, it is suggested that current PFOS and PFOA levels in freshwater may have no acute harmful ecological impact on the aquatic environment. However, more research on the long-term ecological effects of PFOS and PFOA on aquatic fauna are needed to provide important information to adequately assess ecological risk of PFOS and PFOA.

  13. Ni2+ toxicity in rice: effect on membrane functionality and plant water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, Andreu; Ullrich, Cornelia I; Sanz, Amparo

    2008-10-01

    The heavy metal nickel is an essential mineral trace nutrient found at low concentrations in most natural soils. However, it may reach toxic levels in certain areas and affect a number of biochemical and physiological processes in plants. Wilting and leaf necrosis have been described as typical visible symptoms of Ni(2+) toxicity. The plasma membrane (PM) of root cells constitutes the first barrier for the entry of heavy metals but also a target of their toxic action. This work studies the relationship between disturbances of membrane functionality and the development of the typical symptoms of Ni(2+) toxicity. Rice plants (Oryza sativa L. cv. Bahia) grown in nutrient medium containing 0.5mM Ni(2+) showed a significant decrease in water content as a consequence of the stress. Addition of Ni(2+) to the solution bathing the roots induced a concentration-dependent PM depolarization but the activity of the PM-H(+)-ATPase was not inhibited by the presence of Ni(2+) and the initial resting potential recovered in less than 1h. In the short term (hours), membrane permeability of root cells was not significantly affected by Ni(2+) treatments. However, in the long term (days) a drastic loss of K(+) was measured in roots and shoots, which should be responsible for the changes in the water content measured, since stomatal conductance and the transpiration rate remained unaffected by Ni(2+) treatment. The effects induced by Ni(2+) were not permanent and could be reverted, at least in part, by transferring the plants to a medium without Ni(2+).

  14. Interference of Nickel with Copper and Iron Homeostasis Contributes to Metal Toxicity Symptoms in the Nickel Hyperaccumulator Plant Alyssum inflatum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rasoul Ghasemi; S. Majid Ghaderian; Ute Krämer

    2009-01-01

    .... To better understand the role of interactions between transition metals in the development of metal toxicity symptoms in plants, the effects of exposure to excess nickel (Ni) on copper (Cu) and iron (Fe...

  15. Toxicity and repellence of African plants traditionally used for the protection of stored cowpea against Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Baumgart, I.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.; Kossou, D.K.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for botanical products to control the main insect pest of stored cowpea, Callosobruchus maculatus, 33 traditionally used African plants were tested in the laboratory for their toxic and repellent effects against this beetle. Toxicity was evaluated measuring life history parameters in a n

  16. Toxicity and repellence of African plants traditionally used for the protection of stored cowpea against Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Baumgart, I.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.; Kossou, D.K.

    2004-01-01

    In a search for botanical products to control the main insect pest of stored cowpea, Callosobruchus maculatus, 33 traditionally used African plants were tested in the laboratory for their toxic and repellent effects against this beetle. Toxicity was evaluated measuring life history parameters in a

  17. Multiple mitigation mechanisms: Effects of submerged plants on the toxicity of nine insecticides to aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, William R; Relyea, Rick A

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the processes that regulate contaminant impacts in nature is an increasingly important challenge. For insecticides in surface waters, the ability of aquatic plants to sorb, or bind, hydrophobic compounds has been identified as a primary mechanism by which toxicity can be mitigated (i.e. the sorption-based model). However, recent research shows that submerged plants can also rapidly mitigate the toxicity of the less hydrophobic insecticide malathion via alkaline hydrolysis (i.e. the hydrolysis-based model) driven by increased water pH resulting from photosynthesis. However, it is still unknown how generalizable these mitigation mechanisms are across the wide variety of insecticides applied today, and whether any general rules can be ascertained about which types of chemicals may be mitigated by each mechanism. We quantified the degree to which the submerged plant Elodea canadensis mitigated acute (48-h) toxicity to Daphnia magna using nine commonly applied insecticides spanning three chemical classes (carbamates: aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran; organophosphates: malathion, diazinon, chlorpyrifos; pyrethroids: permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin). We found that insecticides possessing either high octanol-water partition coefficients (log Kow) values (i.e. pyrethroids) or high susceptibility to alkaline hydrolysis (i.e. carbamates and malathion) were all mitigated to some degree by E. canadensis, while the plant had no effect on insecticides possessing intermediate log Kow values and low susceptibility to hydrolysis (i.e. chlorpyrifos and diazinon). Our results provide the first general insights into which types of insecticides are likely to be mitigated by different mechanisms based on known chemical properties. We suggest that current models and mitigation strategies would be improved by the consideration of both mitigation models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plant-soil distribution of potentially toxic elements in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Benjamin D; Dijkstra, Paul; Natali, Susan M; Megonigal, J Patrick; Ketterer, Michael E; Drake, Bert G; Lerdau, Manuel T; Gordon, Gwyneth; Anbar, Ariel D; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-04-01

    The distribution of contaminant elements within ecosystems is an environmental concern because of these elements' potential toxicity to animals and plants and their ability to hinder microbial ecosystem services. As with nutrients, contaminants are cycled within and through ecosystems. Elevated atmospheric CO2 generally increases plant productivity and alters nutrient element cycling, but whether CO2 causes similar effects on the cycling of contaminant elements is unknown. Here we show that 11 years of experimental CO2 enrichment in a sandy soil with low organic matter content causes plants to accumulate contaminants in plant biomass, with declines in the extractable contaminant element pools in surface soils. These results indicate that CO2 alters the distribution of contaminant elements in ecosystems, with plant element accumulation and declining soil availability both likely explained by the CO2 stimulation of plant biomass. Our results highlight the interdependence of element cycles and the importance of taking a broad view of the periodic table when the effects of global environmental change on ecosystem biogeochemistry are considered.

  19. Toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Milletia ferruginea (Hochst) seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Birbira [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Milletia ferruginea] seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates, Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant; Milletia ferruginea pulverized seeds have been used for fish poisoning since time immemorial. Macroinvertebrates are important biological indicators of alteration in the natural water sources. Milletia ferruginea seed extract was applied at concentrations of 125, 250, 500 1000 and 2000 ppm on Hydropsychididae whereas Baetidae were exposed at various concentrations viz., 31.25, 62.5, 125, 250 & 500 ppm. Milletia ferruginea seeds crude extract of lethal doses (LCso and LC90) required for Baetidae 49.29 mg/l and 172.52 mg/l were respectively and the respective doses (LC50 and LC90) against Hydropsychidae were 679.64 mg/l and 2383.93 mg/l. The present investigation end result demonstrated that Milletia ferruginea seed extracts were extremely toxic to Baetidae than Hydropsychididae. As a result, application of Milletia ferruginea seed extracts into the rivers/streams for fish poisoning possibly leads to contamination and disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, the concerned authorities should launch appropriate awareness campaign among the local inhabitants and fisherman about adverse effect of Birbira seed extracts. Furthermore, providing alternative ecofriendly techniques for fish harvesting may possibly bring constructive out come in the near future.

  20. Toxicity of selected plant volatiles in microbial and mammalian short-term assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammati, A; Bonsi, P; Zucco, F; Moezelaar, R; Alakomi, H L; von Wright, A

    1999-08-01

    In this study, several short-term microbial and mammalian in vitro assays were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four plant volatiles showing antifungal activity: cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol and S(+)-carvone. All inhibited viability and proliferation of Hep-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. IC50 ranged from 0.3 mM (cinnamaldehyde) to 0.7 mM (thymol) in viability tests and from 0.2 mM (carvacrol) to 0.9 mM (carvone) in the proliferation test. The morphological analysis suggested an involvement of apoptosis in the cases of carvone, carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde. At nontoxic doses, carvacrol and thymol increased the number of revertants in the Ames test by 1.5-1.7 times, regardless of metabolic activation. In the SOS-chromotest, none of the four plant volatiles caused DNA damage at non-toxic doses. In the DNA repair test, a marked dose-dependent differential toxicity was observed with carvone and, to a lesser extent, with cinnamaldehyde, while with thymol and carvacrol, this effect was less pronounced. In conclusion, the considered in vitro cytotoxicity assays have shown to be sensitive enough to highlight a variety of toxic effects at the cellular level, which can be rather different between chemically closely related compounds, such as isomers.

  1. Chemical and biological investigations of a toxic plant from Central Africa, Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangwa, C; Esters, V; Frédérich, M; Tits, M; Kadima, J N; Damas, J; Noirfalise, A; Angenot, L

    2006-02-20

    Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana (Chrysobalanaceae) is known, in the Great Lakes Region, to possess toxicological properties. In this paper, we investigated the acute toxicity (dose levels 50-1600 mg/kg) of its aqueous extract, administered orally to adult Wistar rats. This study demonstrated that the freeze-dried aqueous extract (5%, w/w) possesses high toxicity. The extract caused hypothermia, neurological disorders, including extensor reflex of maximal convulsive induced-seizures at about 2 h after the administered dose, and death occurred (LD50=370 mg/kg) in a dose dependent manner. Blood parameter evaluation revealed slight variations, but these might not have clinical relevance. Histological examination of internal organs (lungs, liver, heart and kidneys) did not reveal any abnormality in the treated group compared to the control. Therefore, it can be concluded that Magnistipula butayei subsp. montana aqueous extract, given orally, is toxic and that its target is the central nervous system. General phytochemical screening revealed that the plant did not contain significant amounts of products known to be toxic, such as alkaloids or cardioactive glycosides, but only catechic tannins, amino acids, saponins and other aphrogen principles in the three parts of the species (fruit, leave and bark).

  2. Toxic Heavy Metal and Metalloid Accumulation in Crop Plants and Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Stephan; Ma, Jian Feng

    2016-04-29

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury are toxic elements that are almost ubiquitously present at low levels in the environment because of anthropogenic influences. Dietary intake of plant-derived food represents a major fraction of potentially health-threatening human exposure, especially to arsenic and cadmium. In the interest of better food safety, it is important to reduce toxic element accumulation in crops. A molecular understanding of the pathways responsible for this accumulation can enable the development of crop varieties with strongly reduced concentrations of toxic elements in their edible parts. Such understanding is rapidly progressing for arsenic and cadmium but is in its infancy for lead and mercury. Basic discoveries have been made in Arabidopsis, rice, and other models, and most advances in crops have been made in rice. Proteins mediating the uptake of arsenic and cadmium have been identified, and the speciation and biotransformations of arsenic are now understood. Factors controlling the efficiency of root-to-shoot translocation and the partitioning of toxic elements through the rice node have also been identified.

  3. Use of the aquatic plant Elodea canadensis to assess toxicity and genotoxicity of Yenisei River sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotina, Tatiana A; Trofimova, Elena A; Medvedeva, Marina Yu; Dementyev, Dmitry V; Bolsunovsky, Alexander Ya

    2015-10-01

    The toxicity, cytotoxicity, and genotoxicity of bulk sediments from the Yenisei River (Siberia, Russia) were estimated in laboratory bioassays based on several endpoints in the aquatic plant Elodea canadensis. The bottom sediment samples were collected in the Yenisei River upstream and downstream of the sources of chemical and radioactive contamination. The testing revealed different sensitivities of Elodea endpoints to the quality of the bottom sediment: weight of shoots Elodea) was the highest in sediments with chemical pollution, whereas the highest inhibition of toxicity endpoints (shoot and root length) occurred in sediments with the highest level of radioactive pollution. The extreme response of Elodea endpoints to the quality of certain sediment samples may be regarded as related to the possible presence of unknown toxicants. The results show that E. canadensis can be used as an indicator species in laboratory contact testing of bottom sediment. The responses of shoot and root length growth endpoints of Elodea can be recommended as basic sensitivity indicators of bottom sediment toxicity. Analysis of cells carrying abnormal chromosomes in the apical root meristem of Elodea can be performed optionally in the same test to assess the genotoxicity of sediments.

  4. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired gasification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.; Behrens, G. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Toxic emissions were measured in the gaseous, solid and aqueous effluent streams in a coal-fired gasification plant. Several internal process streams were also characterized to assess pollution control device effectiveness. The program, consisted of three major phases. Phase I was the toxics emission characterization program described above. phase II included the design, construction and shakedown testing of a high-temperature, high-pressure probe for collecting representative trace composition analysis of hot (1200{degrees}F) syngas. Phase III consisted of the collection of hot syngas samples utilizing the high-temperature probe. Preliminary results are presented which show the emission factors and removal efficiencies for several metals that are on the list of compounds defined by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  5. Comprehensive assessment of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T D; Schmidt, C E [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Radziwon, A S [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has two current investigations, initiated before passage of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), that will determine the air toxic emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. DOE has contracted with Battelle Memorial Institute and Radian corporation to conduct studies focusing on the potential air toxics, both organic and inorganic, associated with different size fractions of fine particulate matter emitted from power plant stacks. Table 2 indicates the selected analytes to be investigated during these studies. PETC is also developing guidance on the monitoring of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) to be incorporated in the Environmental Monitoring plans for the demonstration projects in its Clean Coal Technology Program.

  6. Use of fly ash in reducing heavy metal toxicity to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, A.; Juwarkar, A.S; Dara, S.S. (National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur (India))

    1994-11-01

    An alkaline fly ash was used to reduce metal toxicity of contaminated soil through immobilization of heavy metals. Pot culture studies were carried out with maize (Zea mays) crop grown in acidic sandy loam (pH 4.9) and calcareous silty clay (pH 7.9) soils treated with known concentrations of heavy metals (viz, cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc). Fly ash was mixed in metal-treated soil at the rate of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%. The possible variation in metal toxicity to the plants due to fly ash treatment was ascertained through changes in growth patterns. Application of 2% and 5% of fly ash to the calcareous soil shows better growth response as compared to control soil. However, when the fly ash application exceeds 5%, the crop growth was significantly reduced. On the contrary, acidic soil shows positive response with a fly ash addition up to 20% but the resultant crop growth was lesser as compared to growth of plants in the virgin soil (i.e. soil as such, without fly ash and metal treatment). Fly ash addition effectively raised the pH of acidic soil and thus helped to reduce the metal solubility and availability to plants. 14 refs., 6 tabs.

  7. Comparative toxicity of Paraquat herbicide and some plant extracts in Lymnaea natalensis snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Fayez A; Eleiwa, Mona E; Taha, Samir A; Ismil, Somya M

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat has been shown to be a highly toxic compound for humans and animals, and many cases of acute poisoning and death have been reported over the past few decades. The present study was undertaken to evaluate comprehensively herbicides (Paraquat) and some plant extracts to biochemical aspects of Lymnaea natalensis snails. It was found that the exposure of L. natalensis to Paraquat and plant extracts led to a significant reduction in the infectivity of Fasciola gigantica miracidia to the snail. The glucose level in hemolymph of exposed snails was elevated, while the glycogen showed a decrease in soft tissues when compared with the control group. In addition, the activity level of some enzymes representing glycolytic enzymes as hexokinase (HK), pyruvate kinase (PK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) in snail's tissues were reduced in response to the treatment. It was concluded that the pollution of the aquatic environment by herbicide would adversely affect the metabolism of the L. natalensis snails. Snails treated with Agave attenuate, Ammi visnaga, and Canna iridiflora plant had less toxic effect compared to snails treated with Paraquat.

  8. Horizontal acquisition of toxic alkaloid synthesis in a clade of plant associated fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Clavicipitaceae is a fungal group that comprises species that closely interact with plants as pathogens, parasites or symbionts. A key factor in these interactions is the ability of these fungi to synthesize toxic alkaloid compounds that contribute to the protection of the plant host against herbivores. Some of these compounds such as ergot alkaloids are toxic to humans and have caused important epidemics throughout history. The gene clusters encoding the proteins responsible for the synthesis of ergot alkaloids and lolines in Clavicipitaceae have been elucidated. Notably, homologs to these gene clusters can be found in distantly related species such as Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium expansum, which diverged from Clavicipitaceae more than 400 million years ago. We here use a phylogenetic approach to analyze the evolution of these gene clusters. We found that the gene clusters conferring the ability to synthesize ergot alkaloids and loline emerged first in Eurotiomycetes and were then likely transferred horizontally to Clavicipitaceae. Horizontal gene transfer is known to play a role in shaping the distribution of secondary metabolism clusters across distantly related fungal species. We propose that HGT events have played an important role in the capability of Clavicipitaceae to produce two key secondary metabolites that have enhanced the ability of these species to protect their plant hosts, therefore favoring their interactions.

  9. Silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticle toxicity in plants: A review of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ashley; Venkatachalam, P; Sahi, Shivendra; Sharma, Nilesh

    2016-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have become widely used in recent years for many manufacturing and medical processes. Recent literature suggests that many metallic nanomaterials including those of silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) cause significant toxic effects in animal cell culture and animal models, however, toxicity studies using plant species are limited. This review examines current progress in the understanding of the effect of silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on plant species. There are many facets to this ongoing environmental problem. This review addresses the effects of NPs on oxidative stress-related gene expression, genotoxicity, seed germination, and root elongation. It is largely accepted that NP exposure results in the cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to both positive and negative effects on plant growth. However, factors such as NP size, shape, surface coating and concentration vary greatly among studies resulting in conflicting reports of the effect at times. In addition, plant species tend to differ in their reaction to NP exposure, with some showing positive effects of NP augmentation while many others showing detrimental effects. Seed germination studies have shown to be less effective in gauging phytotoxicity, while root elongation studies have shown more promise. Given the large increase in nanomaterial applications in consumer products, agriculture and energy sectors, it is critical to understand their role in the environment and their effects on plant life. A closer look at nanomaterial-driven ecotoxicity is needed. Ecosystem-level studies are required to indicate how these nanomaterials transfer at the critical trophic levels affecting human health and biota.

  10. Sulfite Reductase Protects Plants against Sulfite Toxicity1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Brychkova, Galina; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Plant sulfite reductase (SiR; Enzyme Commission 1.8.7.1) catalyzes the reduction of sulfite to sulfide in the reductive sulfate assimilation pathway. Comparison of SiR expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Rheinlands Ruhm’) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants revealed that SiR is expressed in a different tissue-dependent manner that likely reflects dissimilarity in sulfur metabolism between the plant species. Using Arabidopsis and tomato SiR mutants with modified SiR expression, we show here that resistance to ectopically applied sulfur dioxide/sulfite is a function of SiR expression levels and that plants with reduced SiR expression exhibit higher sensitivity than the wild type, as manifested in pronounced leaf necrosis and chlorophyll bleaching. The sulfite-sensitive mutants accumulate applied sulfite and show a decline in glutathione levels. In contrast, mutants that overexpress SiR are more tolerant to sulfite toxicity, exhibiting little or no damage. Resistance to high sulfite application is manifested by fast sulfite disappearance and an increase in glutathione levels. The notion that SiR plays a role in the protection of plants against sulfite is supported by the rapid up-regulation of SiR transcript and activity within 30 min of sulfite injection into Arabidopsis and tomato leaves. Peroxisomal sulfite oxidase transcripts and activity levels are likewise promoted by sulfite application as compared with water injection controls. These results indicate that, in addition to participating in the sulfate assimilation reductive pathway, SiR also plays a role in protecting leaves against the toxicity of sulfite accumulation. PMID:23221833

  11. Milkweed butterfly resistance to plant toxins is linked to sequestration, not coping with a toxic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschenka, Georg; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2015-11-07

    Insect resistance to plant toxins is widely assumed to have evolved in response to using defended plants as a dietary resource. We tested this hypothesis in the milkweed butterflies (Danaini) which have progressively evolved higher levels of resistance to cardenolide toxins based on amino acid substitutions of their cellular sodium-potassium pump (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase). Using chemical, physiological and caterpillar growth assays on diverse milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) and isolated cardenolides, we show that resistant Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases are not necessary to cope with dietary cardenolides. By contrast, sequestration of cardenolides in the body (as a defence against predators) is associated with the three levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase resistance. To estimate the potential physiological burden of cardenolide sequestration without Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase adaptations, we applied haemolymph of sequestering species on isolated Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase of sequestering and non-sequestering species. Haemolymph cardenolides dramatically impair non-adapted Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, but had systematically reduced effects on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase of sequestering species. Our data indicate that major adaptations to plant toxins may be evolutionarily linked to sequestration, and may not necessarily be a means to eat toxic plants. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase adaptations thus were a potential mechanism through which predators spurred the coevolutionary arms race between plants and insects.

  12. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntie-Kang F

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fidele Ntie-Kang,1,2,* Conrad Veranso Simoben,1,2,* Berin Karaman,1 Valery Fuh Ngwa,3 Philip Neville Judson,4 Wolfgang Sippl,1 Luc Meva’a Mbaze5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Martin-Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale, Germany; 2Department of Chemistry, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; 3Interuniversity Institute For Biostatistics and Statistical Bioinformatics (I-BioStat, University of Hasselt, Hasselt, Belgium; 4Chemical Bioactivity Information Centre, Harrogate, UK; 5Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants, along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world. Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek, showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising

  13. Role of nanomaterial physicochemical properties on fate and toxicity in bacteria and plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomberg, Danielle

    Nanomaterials, defined as those having at least one dimension beneficial (e.g., drug delivery to bacterial pathogens) and detrimental (e.g., death of terrestrial plants), thus warranted. Herein, I present the evaluation of nitric oxide-releasing nanomaterial toxicity to bacteria and silica particle toxicity to plants as a function of nanomaterial physicochemical properties. Nanomaterial toxicity toward planktonic (i.e., free-floating) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was evaluated as a function of scaffold size, shape, and exterior functionality using nitric oxide-releasing (NO) silica particles, dendrimers, and chitosan oligosaccharides. Improved bactericidal efficacy was observed for silica particles with decreased size and increased aspect ratio (i.e., rod-like) due to improved particle-cell interactions. Likewise, better nanomaterial-bacteria association and biocidal action was noted for more hydrophobic NO-releasing dendrimers and chitosan oligosaccharides. Planktonic bacterial killing was not dependent on chitosan molecular weight due to rapid association between the cationic scaffolds and negatively-charged bacterial cell membranes. Given the importance of nanomaterial physicochemical properties in planktonic bacterial killing, the NO-releasing scaffolds were also evaluated against clinically-relevant bacterial biofilms. Similar to planktonic studies, smaller particle sizes proved more efficient in delivering NO throughout the biofilm. Particles with rod-like shape also eradicated biofilms more effectively. The role of NO-releasing dendrimer and chitosan oligosaccharide hydrophobicity was prominent in scaffold diffusion through the biofilm and subsequent NO delivery, with hydrophobic functionalities generally exhibiting better bacterial association. Lastly, biofilm eradication was more effective for NO-releasing dendrimers exhibiting sustained NO-release compared to delivery of NO via an intial burst. Phytotoxicity and uptake of

  14. Potential Medicinal Application and Toxicity Evaluation of Extracts from Bamboo Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panee, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Bamboo plants play a significant role in traditional Asian medicine, especially in China and Japan. Biomedical investigations on the health-benefiting effects as well as toxicity of different parts and species of bamboo have been carried out worldwide since the 1960s, and documented a wide range of protective effects of bamboo-derived products, such as protection against oxidative stress, inflammation, lipotoxicity, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Some of these products may interfere with male and female reproductive function, thyroid hormone metabolism, and hepatic xenobiotransformation enzymes. The diversity of bamboo species, parts of the plants available for medicinal use, and different extraction methods suggest that bamboo has great potential for producing a range of extracts with functional utility in medicine.

  15. Repellency and toxicity of aromatic plant extracts against the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Abdallah F; El-Haj, Samih; Tueni, Marie; Taoubi, Khalil; Nader, Natalie Abi; Mrad, Abir

    2005-06-01

    The insecticidal activities of essential oil extracts from leaves, flowers and roots of aromatic plants against fourth-instar larvae of the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus Forskal were determined. Extracts of Foeniculum vulgare Mill were the most toxic, followed by those of Ferula hermonis Boiss, Citrus sinensis Osbeck, Pinus pinea L, Laurus nobilis L and Eucalyptus spp with LC50 values of 24.5, 44.0, 60.0, 75.0, 117.0 and 120.0 mg litre(-1), respectively. Combination tests between the LC50 and the maximum sub-lethal concentration (MSLC) were determined. Over 20 major components were identified in extracts from each plant species tested. Five essential oils and nine pure components were studied for their repellency against mosquito bites. Terpineol and 1,8-cineole were the most effective against Culex pipiens molestus bites offering complete protection for 1.6 and 2 h, respectively.

  16. Relative importance of deterministic and stochastic processes in driving arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal assemblage during the spreading of a toxic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guoxi; Liu, Yongjun; Mao, Lin; Jiang, Shengjing; Zhang, Qi; Cheng, Gang; An, Lizhe; Du, Guozhen; Feng, Huyuan

    2014-01-01

    Both deterministic and stochastic processes are expected to drive the assemblages of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, but little is known about the relative importance of these processes during the spreading of toxic plants. Here, the species composition and phylogenetic structure of AM fungal communities colonizing the roots of a toxic plant, Ligularia virgaurea, and its neighborhood plants, were analyzed in patches with different individual densities of L. virgaurea (represents the spreading degree). Community compositions of AM fungi in both root systems were changed significantly by the L. virgaurea spreading, and also these communities fitted the neutral model very well. AM fungal communities in patches with absence and presence of L. virgaurea were phylogenetically random and clustered, respectively, suggesting that the principal ecological process determining AM fungal assemblage shifted from stochastic process to environmental filtering when this toxic plant was present. Our results indicate that deterministic and stochastic processes together determine the assemblage of AM fungi, but the dominant process would be changed by the spreading of toxic plants, and suggest that the spreading of toxic plants in alpine meadow ecosystems might be involving the mycorrhizal symbionts.

  17. Relative importance of deterministic and stochastic processes in driving arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal assemblage during the spreading of a toxic plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxi Shi

    Full Text Available Both deterministic and stochastic processes are expected to drive the assemblages of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi, but little is known about the relative importance of these processes during the spreading of toxic plants. Here, the species composition and phylogenetic structure of AM fungal communities colonizing the roots of a toxic plant, Ligularia virgaurea, and its neighborhood plants, were analyzed in patches with different individual densities of L. virgaurea (represents the spreading degree. Community compositions of AM fungi in both root systems were changed significantly by the L. virgaurea spreading, and also these communities fitted the neutral model very well. AM fungal communities in patches with absence and presence of L. virgaurea were phylogenetically random and clustered, respectively, suggesting that the principal ecological process determining AM fungal assemblage shifted from stochastic process to environmental filtering when this toxic plant was present. Our results indicate that deterministic and stochastic processes together determine the assemblage of AM fungi, but the dominant process would be changed by the spreading of toxic plants, and suggest that the spreading of toxic plants in alpine meadow ecosystems might be involving the mycorrhizal symbionts.

  18. The heavy metal ions (Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd+) toxic compounds influence on triticale plants growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezoczki, V. M.; Filip, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of the heavy metals toxic compounds (CuSO4 · 5H2O, ZnSO4 · 7H2O and 3CdSO4·8H2O) in water and soil can be observed by their negative effects on the germination and growth process for different vegetable (barley, oat, maize) who are used for human and animal consumption. This paper it aims the determination of germination and growth inhibition negative effects for triticale plants in the heavy metals ions presence by ecotoxicological laboratory tests. The triticale plants was chosen for their different characteristics to the other grasses respectively: a very good resistance for a wide range of diseases, an accelerated growth and a very good tolerance for aluminum ions presents in acid soils. The determinations were conducted step by step, first, we put the triticale grains in contact with the heavy metal solutions with different concentration then for 3 days we noticed the triticale germination inhibition effects and finally we noticed the growth inhibition process for triticale plants respectively in 7th and 9th day from the start of the experiment. At the end of the tests we can conclude that the triticale roots have a very great sensibility to a CuSO4 solutions compared to the effects for their stalks. A positive effect for triticale stalks we can see for low CuSO4 solution concentrations thus for 5 mg Cu/l the growth is 19,44%. A positive effect for triticale roots it can see for low ZnSO4 solution concentrations so for 5 - 15 mg Zn/l the growth is 24,4%. In the presence of the CdSO4 solution all the processes are inhibited (germination and growth for triticale plants) even for a low concentrations for this toxic.

  19. Assessment of genotoxicity and acute toxic effect of the imatinib mesylate in plant bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Clemens; Filipič, Metka; Kundi, Michael; Rainer, Bernhard; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Mišík, Miroslav

    2014-11-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is at present one of the most widely used cytostatic drugs in developed countries but information on its ecotoxicological activities is scarce. This article describes the results of the first investigation in which genotoxic and acute toxic properties of the drug were studied in higher plants. IM was tested in two widely used plant bioassays namely in micronucleus (MN) assays with meiotic tetrad cells of Tradescantia (clone #4430) and in mitotic root tip cells of Allium cepa. Additionally, acute toxic effects (inhibition of cell division and growth of roots) were monitored in the onions. Furthermore, we studied the impact of the drug on the fertility of higher plants in pollen abortion experiments with three wildlife species (Chelidonium majus, Tradescantia palludosa and Arabidopsis thaliana). In MN assays with Tradesacantia a significant effect was seen with doses ⩾10μM; the Allium MN assay was even more sensitive (LOEL⩾1.0μM). A significant decrease of the mitotic indices was detected at levels ⩾10μM in the onions and reduction of root growth with ⩾100μM. In the pollen fertility assays clear effects were observed at doses ⩾147.3mgkg(-1). Data concerning the annual use of the drug in European countries (France, Germany, Slovenia) enable the calculation of the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) values which are in the range between 3.3 and 5.0ngL(-1). Although comparisons with the genotoxic potencies of other commonly used cytostatic drugs and with highly active heavy metal compounds show that IM is an extremely potent genotoxin in higher plants, it is evident that the environmental concentrations are ⩾5 orders of magnitude lower as the levels which are required to cause adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aqueous extracts of some medicinal plants are as toxic as Imidacloprid to the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyyat, Mazen A; Al-Mazra'awi, Mohammad; Abu-Rjai, Talal; Shatnawi, Mohamad A

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of nine plants, known to have medicinal activity, were tested for their toxicity against the sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Genn. (Homoptera: Aleurodidae) compared to the toxicity of the insecticide, Imidacloprid. Extracts of Lepidiuim sativum L. (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) killed 71 % of early stage nymphs, which was not significantly different from mortality caused by Imidacloprid. Treatment of pupae with three plant extracts, L. sativum, Achillea biebersteinii L. (Asterales: Asteraceae), or Retama raetam (Forssk.) Webb and Berthel (Fabales: Fabaceae) prevented adult development, and treatment with R. raetam extract killed adults, at levels that were not significantly different from Imidacloprid. None of the other plants showed significant toxicity. However extracts of four plants, Pimpinella anisum L. (Apiales: Apiaceae), Galium longifolium (Sibth. and SM.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), R. raetam and Ballota undulata Bentham (Lamiales: Lamiaceae) had a repellent effect.

  1. Interactions between salinity and boron toxicity in tomato plants involve apoplastic calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Elizabeth; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Martínez-Ballesta, M Carmen; Bolaños, Luis; Carvajal, Micaela

    2010-01-01

    The lack of consensus about the mutual relations between salinity and boron (B) toxicity with respect to the physiological response of plants necessitates investigation of the interactions of soluble B with salinity. In this investigation, the effect of B was compared with Ca in order to elucidate whether the two nutrients have similar effects and/or to elucidate a relationship under salinity. Following addition of B or Ca, salinity was applied to tomato plants and the cell wall and plasma membrane permeability, measured as water permeability and electrolyte leakage, in relation to amino acid and ion cell wall composition, were determined. As the relationship between B and salinity was complex, several hypotheses are established. The increase of aquaporin functionality due to the presence of B and Ca compared with NaCl-treated plants could be the most feasible, whereas there is currently no satisfactory explanation for the results for the cell wall amino acid composition. In addition, the elemental composition results revealed that, in addition the known interactions between B and Ca with respect to cell wall stability, Mg and Mn were also increased in NaCl+B and NaCl+Ca treatments, suggesting their possible involvement in the cell wall function necessary for plant growth.

  2. Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Roveré Franz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Stored grains are subject to losses in quality nutritional value and in sanitation from the time they are stored to the time they are consumed. Botanical insecticides may offer an alternative solution for pest control. The objective was to test the insecticidal properties of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus (leaf, Zingiber officinale (root and Mentha sp. (leaf. The efficacy of these oils was tested to control the rice weevil, S. oryzae, using hydrodistillation. Chemical analysis of the essential oils was carried out by gas chromatography. Major components of C. citratus were geranial (48% and neral (31%, of Z. officinale were α-zingibereno (13%, geranial (16%, neral (10% and α-farneseno (5% and of Mentha sp. was menthol (92%. Bioassays were carried out by fumigation and topical application. In topical application assays, the essential oil of C. citratus had greater toxicity (LC50 0.027 µL mL-1 and shorter exposure time than the oils of the other two plants. After 24 h and 48 h, 70% and 100% mortality of S. oryzae occurred, respectively. In fumigation assays, essential oil of Z. officinale had a lower LC50 (1.18 µL cm-2 and 70% mortality after 24 h exposure. Therefore, we recommend the use of essential oils of C. citratus and Z. officinale to control the rice weevil S. oryzae.

  3. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae.

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    Nicoletta Faraone

    Full Text Available Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender and Thymus vulgaris (thyme and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer (Hemiptera: Aphididae. The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids were exposed by direct sprays, but were non-toxic by exposure to treated leaf discs. In synergism experiments, the toxicity of imidacloprid was synergized 16- to 20-fold by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, but far less synergism occurred with linalool and thymol, indicating that secondary constituents of the oils were probably responsible for the observed synergism. In contrast to results with imidacloprid, the insecticidal activity of spirotetramat was antagonized by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, and linalool and thymol. Our results demonstrate the potential of plant essential oils as synergists of insecticides, but show that antagonistic action against certain insecticides may occur.

  4. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Nicoletta; Hillier, N Kirk; Cutler, G Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids were exposed by direct sprays, but were non-toxic by exposure to treated leaf discs. In synergism experiments, the toxicity of imidacloprid was synergized 16- to 20-fold by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, but far less synergism occurred with linalool and thymol, indicating that secondary constituents of the oils were probably responsible for the observed synergism. In contrast to results with imidacloprid, the insecticidal activity of spirotetramat was antagonized by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, and linalool and thymol. Our results demonstrate the potential of plant essential oils as synergists of insecticides, but show that antagonistic action against certain insecticides may occur.

  5. Disinfection in Wastewater Treatment Plants: Evaluation of Effectiveness and Acute Toxicity Effects

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    Maria Cristina Collivignarelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, urban wastewater disinfection is regulated in the third part of Legislative Decree n. 152/2006, which states that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs must include a disinfection unit, with a capacity exceeding 2000 Population Equivalent (PE. This treatment shall ensure microbial quality and health security. The legislation provides the following limits for wastewater: Escherichia coli (E. coli concentration below 5000 CFU 100 mL−1 (recommended value, active chlorine concentration below 0.2 mg L−1 and lack of acute toxicity. The compliance with these conditions is shown by means of the study of correct disinfectant dosage, which also depends on wastewater characteristics. An investigation at the regional level (from 2013 to 2016 shows a correlation between acute toxicity discharge and disinfection treatment through chemical reagents (mainly with the use of chlorine compounds and peracetic acid. The experimental work concerns two active sludge WWTPs in northern Italy with small capacity (10,000–12,000 PE. The activities provide the assessment of microbiological quality and toxicity of WWTPs effluents in relation to the dosage of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid, by means of the use of batch tests. The results show that with similar disinfectant dosage and comparable initial E. coli concentration, peracetic acid exhibits the best performance in terms of microbial removal (with removal yields up to 99.99%. Moreover, the acute toxicity was evident at higher doses and therefore with higher residuals of peracetic acid (2.68 mg L−1 compared to the free residual chlorine (0.17 mg L−1.

  6. Fumigant toxicity of plant essential oils against Camptomyia corticalis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Ran; Haribalan, Perumalsamy; Son, Bong-Ki; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of 98 plant essential oils against third instars of cecidomyiid gall midge Camptomyia corticalis (Loew) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) was examined using a vapor-phase mortality bioassay. Results were compared with that of a conventional insecticide dichlorvos. Based on 24-h LC50 values, all essential oils were less toxic than dichlorvos (LC50, 0.027 mg/cm3). The LC50 of caraway (Carum carvi L.) seed, armoise (Artemisia vulgaris L.), clary sage (Salvia sclarea L.), oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf], niaouli (Melaleuca viridiflora Gaertner), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.), cassia especial (Cinnamomum cassia Nees ex Blume), Dalmatian sage (Salvia offcinalis L.), red thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), bay [Pimenta racemosa (P. Mill.) J.W. Moore], garlic (Allium sativum L.), and pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.) oils is between 0.55 and 0.60 mg/cm3. The LC50 of cassia (C. cassia, pure and redistilled), white thyme (T. vulgaris), star anise (Illicium verum Hook.f.), peppermint (Mentha X piperita L.), wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens L.), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) bark, sweet marjoram (Origanum majorana L.), Roman chamomile [Chamaemelum nobile (L.) All.], eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.),Virginian cedarwood (Juniperus virginiana L.), pimento berry [Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr.], summer savory (Satureja hortensis L.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.), and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) oils is between 0.61 and 0.99 mg/cm3. All other essential oils tested exhibited low toxicity to the cecidomyiid larvae (LC50, >0.99 mg/cm3). Global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on the active essential oils as potential larvicides for the control of C. corticalis populations as fumigants with contact action.

  7. Protective effect of some plant oils on diazinon induced hepatorenal toxicity in male rats

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    Atef M. Al-Attar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution and exposure to environmental pollutants are still some of the major global health issues. Pesticides have been linked to a wide range of health hazards. The toxicity of pesticides depends on several factors such as its chemical properties, doses, exposure period, exposure methods, gender, genetics, age, nutritional status and physiological case of exposed individuals. Medicinal plants, natural products and nutrition continue to play a central role in the healthcare system of large proportions of the world’s population. Alternative medicine plays an important role in health services around the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of olive, sesame and black seed oils on hepatorenal toxicity induced by diazinon (DZN in male rats. The experimental animals were divided into nine groups. The first group served as control. The second group was exposed to DZN. The third group was treated with olive oil and DZN. Rats of the fourth group were subjected to sesame oil and DZN. Rats of the fifth group were exposed to black seed oil and DZN. The sixth, seventh and eighth groups were supplemented with olive, sesame and black seed oils respectively. Rats of the ninth group were treated with corn oil. Levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyl transferase, total bilirubin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and malondialdehyde were significantly increased in rats exposed to DZN. Moreover, levels of serum glutathione and superoxide dismutase were significantly decreased. Several histopathological changes were observed in the structures of liver and kidney due to DZN exposure. This study showed that these oils attenuated the physiological disturbances and histopathological alterations induced by DZN intoxication. Moreover, the antioxidant properties of these oils support the bioactive roles of its protective effects on DZN toxicity. This study therefore

  8. Repellence of plant essential oils to Dermanyssus gallinae and toxicity to the non-target invertebrate Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Sparagano, O A E; Port, G; Okello, E; Shiel, R S; Guy, J H

    2009-05-26

    With changes in legislation and consumer demand, alternatives to synthetic acaricides to manage the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) in laying hen flocks are increasingly needed. These mites may cause losses in egg production, anaemia and even death of hens. It may be possible to use plant-derived products as D. gallinae repellents, especially if such products have a minimal impact on non-target organisms. An experiment was conducted with D. gallinae to assess the repellence of a range of plant essential oils, previously found to be of varying toxicity (relatively highly toxic to non-toxic) to this pest. Experiments were also undertaken to assess the toxicity of these products to mealworm beetles (Tenebrio molitor L.), a non-target invertebrate typical of poultry production systems. Results showed that all seven essential oils tested (manuka, thyme, palmarosa, caraway, spearmint, black pepper and juniper leaf) were repellent to D. gallinae at 0.14mg oil/cm(3) (initial concentration) during the first 2 days of study. Thyme essential oil appeared to be the most effective, where repellence lasted until the end of the study period (13 days). At the same concentration toxicity to T. molitor differed, with essential oils of palmarosa and manuka being no more toxic to adult beetles than the control. There was neither a significant association between the rank toxicity and repellence of oils to D. gallinae, nor the toxicity of oils to D. gallinae (as previously determined) and T. molitor.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Invasive Plants in Response to Mineral Toxicity of Reclaimed Coal-Mine Soil in the Appalachian Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, Thangasamy; Malkaram, Sridhar A; Patel, Dharmesh; Taylor, Kaitlyn; Hass, Amir; Nimmakayala, Padma; Huber, David H; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-09-01

    Efficient postmining reclamation requires successful revegetation. By using RNA sequencing, we evaluated the growth response of two invasive plants, goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria L.) and mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), grown in two Appalachian acid-mine soils (MS-I and -II, pH ∼ 4.6). Although deficient in macronutrients, both soils contained high levels of plant-available Al, Fe and Mn. Both plant types showed toxicity tolerance, but metal accumulation differed by plant and site. With MS-I, Al accumulation was greater for mugwort than goutweed (385 ± 47 vs 2151 ± 251 μg g-1). Al concentration was similar between mine sites, but its accumulation in mugwort was greater with MS-I than MS-II, with no difference in accumulation by site for goutweed. An in situ approach revealed deregulation of multiple factors such as transporters, transcription factors, and metal chelators for metal uptake or exclusion. The two plant systems showed common gene expression patterns for different pathways. Both plant systems appeared to have few common heavy-metal pathway regulators addressing mineral toxicity/deficiency in both mine sites, which implies adaptability of invasive plants for efficient growth at mine sites with toxic waste. Functional genomics can be used to screen for plant adaptability, especially for reclamation and phytoremediation of contaminated soils and waters.

  10. Anticancer activities against cholangiocarcinoma, toxicity and pharmacological activities of Thai medicinal plants in animal models

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    Plengsuriyakarn Tullayakorn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA, a devastating cancer with increasing worldwide incidence and mortality rates, is largely ineffective. The discovery and development of effective chemotherapeutics is urgently needed. Methods/Design The study aimed at evaluating anticancer activities, toxicity, and pharmacological activities of the curcumin compound (CUR, the crude ethanolic extracts of rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Ginger: ZO and Atractylodes lancea thung. DC (Khod-Kha-Mao: AL, fruits of Piper chaba Hunt. (De-Plee: PC, and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai formulation (a mixture of parts of 18 Thai medicinal plants: PPF were investigated in animal models. Anti-cholangiocarcinoma (anti-CCA was assessed using CCA-xenograft nude mouse model. The antihypertensive, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and anti-ulcer activities and effects on motor coordination were investigated using Rota-rod test, CODA tail-cuff system, writhing and hot plate tests, carrageenan-induced paw edema test, brewer's yeast test, and alcohol-induced gastric ulcer test, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity tests were performed according to the OECD guideline for testing of chemicals with modification. Results Promising anticancer activity against CCA in nude mouse xenograft model was shown for the ethanolic extract of AL at all oral dose levels (1000, 3000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight as well as the extracts of ZO, PPF, and CUR compound at the highest dose level (5000, 4000, and 5000 mg/kg body weight, respectively. PC produced no significant anti-CCA activity. Results from acute and subacute toxicity tests both in mice and rats indicate safety profiles of all the test materials in a broad range of dose levels. No significant toxicity except stomach irritation and general CNS depressant signs were observed. Investigation of pharmacological activities of the test materials revealed promising anti-inflammatory (ZO, PPF, and AL, analgesic (CUR and

  11. Exogenous salicylic acid alleviates the toxicity of chlorpyrifos in wheat plants (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Zhang, Qingming

    2017-03-01

    The role of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in protecting wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) from contamination by the insecticide chlorpyrifos was investigated in this study. The wheat plants were grown in soils with different concentrations (5, 10, 20, and 40mgkg(-1)) of chlorpyrifos. When the third leaf emerged, the wheat leaves were sprayed with 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16mgL(-1) of SA once a day for 6 days. The results showed that wheat exposed to higher concentrations of chlorpyrifos (≥20mgkg(-1)) caused declines in growth and chlorophyll content and altered the activities of a series of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Interestingly, treatments with different concentrations of SA mitigated the stress generated by chlorpyrifos and improved the measured parameters to varying degrees. Furthermore, a reverse transcription and quantitative PCR experiment revealed that the activities of SOD and CAT can be regulated by their target gene in wheat when treated with SA. We also found that SA is able to block the accumulation of chlorpyrifos in wheat. However, the effect of SA was related to its concentration. In this study, the application of 2mgL(-1) of SA had the greatest ameliorating effect on chlorpyrifos toxicity in wheat plants.

  12. Toxicities of oils, dispersants and dispersed oils to algae and aquatic plants: review and database value to resource sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael; Pryor, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    Phytotoxicity results are reviewed for oils, dispersants and dispersed oils. The phytotoxicity database consists largely of results from a patchwork of reactive research conducted after oil spills to marine waters. Toxicity information is available for at least 41 crude oils and 56 dispersants. As many as 107 response parameters have been monitored for 85 species of unicellular and multicellular algae, 28 wetland plants, 13 mangroves and 9 seagrasses. Effect concentrations have varied by as much as six orders of magnitude due to experimental diversity. This diversity restricts phytotoxicity predictions and identification of sensitive species, life stages and response parameters. As a result, evidence-based risk assessments for most aquatic plants and petrochemicals and dispersants are not supported by the current toxicity database. A proactive and experimentally-consistent approach is recommended to provide threshold toxic effect concentrations for sensitive life stages of aquatic plants inhabiting diverse ecosystems.

  13. The plant decapeptide OSIP108 prevents copper-induced toxicity in various models for Wilson disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spincemaille, Pieter [Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics (CMPG), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Pham, Duc-Hung [Laboratory for Molecular Biodiscovery, KU Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, O and N2, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Chandhok, Gursimran [Clinic for Transplantation Medicine, Münster University Hospital, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A14, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Verbeek, Jef [Department of Hepatology and Metabolic Center, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Zibert, Andree [Clinic for Transplantation Medicine, Münster University Hospital, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A14, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Libbrecht, Louis [Department of Hepatology and Metabolic Center, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Pathology, University Hospital Ghent, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Schmidt, Hartmut [Clinic for Transplantation Medicine, Münster University Hospital, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Building A14, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Esguerra, Camila V.; Witte, Peter A.M. de [Laboratory for Molecular Biodiscovery, KU Leuven, Campus Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, O and N2, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Cammue, Bruno P.A., E-mail: bruno.cammue@biw.kuleuven.be [Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics (CMPG), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Technologiepark 927, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Cassiman, David [Department of Hepatology and Metabolic Center, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Thevissen, Karin [Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics (CMPG), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2014-10-15

    Background: Wilson disease (WD) is caused by accumulation of excess copper (Cu) due to a mutation in the gene encoding the liver Cu transporter ATP7B, and is characterized by acute liver failure or cirrhosis and neuronal cell death. We investigated the effect of OSIP108, a plant derived decapeptide that prevents Cu-induced apoptosis in yeast and human cells, on Cu-induced toxicity in various mammalian in vitro models relevant for WD and in a Cu-toxicity zebrafish larvae model applicable to WD. Methods: The effect of OSIP108 was evaluated on viability of various cell lines in the presence of excess Cu, on liver morphology of a Cu-treated zebrafish larvae strain that expresses a fluorescent reporter in hepatocytes, and on oxidative stress levels in wild type AB zebrafish larvae. Results: OSIP108 increased not only viability of Cu-treated CHO cells transgenically expressing ATP7B and the common WD-causing mutant ATP7B{sup H1069Q}, but also viability of Cu-treated human glioblastoma U87 cells. Aberrancies in liver morphology of Cu-treated zebrafish larvae were observed, which were further confirmed as Cu-induced hepatotoxicity by liver histology. Injections of OSIP108 into Cu-treated zebrafish larvae significantly increased the amount of larvae with normal liver morphology and decreased Cu-induced production of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions: OSIP108 prevents Cu-induced toxicity in in vitro models and in a Cu-toxicity zebrafish larvae model applicable to WD. General significance: All the above data indicate the potential of OSIP108 as a drug lead for further development as a novel WD treatment. - Highlights: • Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by accumulation of toxic copper (Cu). • OSIP108 increases viability of Cu-treated cellular models applicable to WD. • OSIP108 injections preserve liver morphology of Cu-treated zebrafish larvae. • OSIP108 injections into zebrafish larvae abrogates Cu-induced oxidative stress.

  14. Repellent, irritant and toxic effects of 20 plant extracts on adults of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deletre, Emilie; Martin, Thibaud; Campagne, Pascal; Bourguet, Denis; Cadin, Andy; Menut, Chantal; Bonafos, Romain; Chandre, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce an excito-repellent effect that reduces contact between humans and mosquitoes. Insecticide use is expected to lower the risk of pathogen transmission, particularly when impregnated on long-lasting treated bednets. When applied at low doses, pyrethroids have a toxic effect, however the development of pyrethroid resistance in several mosquito species may jeopardize these beneficial effects. The need to find additional compounds, either to kill disease-carrying mosquitoes or to prevent mosquito contact with humans, therefore arises. In laboratory conditions, the effects (i.e., repellent, irritant and toxic) of 20 plant extracts, mainly essential oils, were assessed on adults of Anopheles gambiae, a primary vector of malaria. Their effects were compared to those of DEET and permethrin, used as positive controls. Most plant extracts had irritant, repellent and/or toxic effects on An. gambiae adults. The most promising extracts, i.e. those combining the three types of effects, were from Cymbopogon winterianus, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Thymus vulgaris. The irritant, repellent and toxic effects occurred apparently independently of each other, and the behavioural response of adult An. gambiae was significantly influenced by the concentration of the plant extracts. Mechanisms underlying repellency might, therefore, differ from those underlying irritancy and toxicity. The utility of the efficient plant extracts for vector control as an alternative to pyrethroids may thus be envisaged.

  15. Reduction in toxicity of wastewater from three wastewater treatment plants to alga (Scenedesmus obliquus) in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Qing; Zhou, Jiti; Masunaga, Shigeki; Ma, Fang

    2015-09-01

    The toxicity of municipal wastewater to the receiving water bodies is still unknown, due to the lack of regulated toxicity based index for wastewater discharge in China. Our study aims at gaining insight into the acute toxic effects of local municipal wastewater on alga, Scenedesmus obliquus. Four endpoints, i.e. cell density, chlorophyll-A concentration, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and cell membrane integrity, of alga were analyzed to characterize the acute toxicity effects of wastewater from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment techniques: sequencing batch reactor (SBR), Linpor and conventional activated sludge. Influent and effluent from each treatment stage in these three WWTPs were sampled and evaluated for their acute toxicity. Our results showed that all three techniques can completely affect the algal chlorophyll-A synthesis stimulation effects of influent; the algal cell growth stimulation effect was only completely removed by the secondary treatment process in conventional activated sludge technique; toxic effects on cell membrane integrity of two influents from WWTPs with SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques were completely removed; the acute toxicity on SOD activity was partially reduced in SBR and conventional activated sludge techniques while not significantly reduced by Linpor system. As to the disinfection unit, NaClO disinfection enhanced wastewater toxicity dramatically while UV radiation had no remarkable influence on wastewater toxicity. Our results illustrated that SOD activity and chlorophyll-A synthesis were relatively sensitive to municipal wastewater toxicity. Our results would aid to understand the acute toxicity of municipal wastewater, as well as the toxicity removal by currently utilized treatment techniques in China.

  16. Antibacterial, antioxidant and acute toxicity tests on flavonoids extracted from some medicinal plants

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    Akroum Souâd

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are well-known for their many therapeutic and pharmaceutical effects. In this study, we tested the antibacterial activity of 11 flavonoids extracted from some medicinal plants by the agar diffusion method. Then, we measured their antioxidant activity using the DPPH (2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical assay and we also tested their acute toxicity effect on mice. The results showed that apigenin-7-O-glucoside was more active against the Gram-positive bacteria and quercetin was more active against the Gram-negative ones. Also, quercetin and diosmin showed the best antioxidant activity. Quercetin, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and luteolin-3′-O-glucuronide gave the best acute toxicity values. It can be concluded that quercetin was the most interesting compound for all the tested activities. Also, we observed that the presence or the absence of substitutions in flavonoids influenced significantly the results obtained, whereas the substitution type had a low impact.

  17. Concentrations and Toxic Equivalency of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Polish Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbaniak, Magdalena; Kiedrzyńska, Edyta

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are widely recognized as important sources of toxic contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). An example is given in the present paper, where concentrations of 12 dioxin-like PCBs (dl-PCBs) congeners were investigated in effluents from 14 WWTPs of different sizes, using gas chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. The results obtained demonstrate that the smallest WWTPs are characterized by the highest total dl-PCB concentration of 102.69 pg/L, roughly twice those of medium-size and large WWTPs, i.e. 41.14 and 48.29 pg/L, respectively. In all cases, the concentrations obtained were generated mostly by increased contributions of PCB-77, PCB-105 and PCB-118 which constituted 48 %-59 % of the mean dl-PCB concentration. The results also reveal a predominance of mono-ortho over non-ortho PCBs. All three types of WWTP effluent were found to have similar toxic equivalency (TEQ) values, ranging from 0.31 for large to 0.37 pg TEQ/L for medium WWTPs.

  18. Acute toxicity and mutagenic activity of Mexican plants used in traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Angeles-López, Guadalupe E; Navarrete, Andrés; Mata, Rachel

    2007-03-21

    The present work was undertaken to determine safety parameters of selected Mexican medicinal plants chosen on the basis of their frequency of medicinal use and commercial importance. The medicinal herbs included Amphipteryngium adstringens, Hintonia standleyana, Hintonia latiflora, Piper sanctum, Haemathoxylon brasiletto, Iostephane heterophylla, Valeriana procera, Arracacia tolucensis, Brickellia veronicaefolia, Scaphyglottis livida, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri, Poliomintha longiflora and Gnaphalium sp. In the acute toxicity studies in mice performed according to the Lorke procedure, Exostema caribaeum, Hippocratea excelsa, Ligusticum porteri and Poliomintha longiflora were the most toxic with LD(50) values between 1085 and 2mg/kg. The Ames test revealed that Gnaphalium sp. and Valeriana procera extracts induced mutations of S. typhimurium TA98 with or without the S9 microsomal fraction, and TA100 in the presence of the enzymatic fraction, respectively. The tincture of Valeriana procera, however, was non-mutagenic. Finally, in the Artemia salina lethality test Brickellia veronicaefolia, Arracacia tolucensis, Poliomintha longiflora and Piper sanctum caused significant mortality of the crustacean larvae with LC(50) in the range of 37-227 microg/mL.

  19. ATP-binding cassette and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters in plants: a common theme among diverse detoxification mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tsubasa

    2014-01-01

    Plants have developed elaborate detoxification mechanisms to cope with a large number of potentially toxic compounds, which include exogenous xenobiotics and endogenous metabolites, especially secondary metabolites. After enzymatic modification or synthesis, such compounds are transported and accumulated in apoplastic cell walls or central vacuoles in plant cells. Membrane transporters actively catalyze translocation of a diverse range of these compounds across various membranes within cells. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic studies have begun to reveal functions of a handful of ATP-binding cassette and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family transporters engaged in transport of organic xenobiotics, heavy metals, metalloids, aluminum, alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, terpenoid-derived phytohormones, cuticle lipids, and monolignols in plants. This detoxification versatility and metabolic diversity may underlie the functional diversification in plants of these families of transporters, which are largely involved in multidrug resistance in microorganisms and animals. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A survey of toxic plants on the market in the district of Bamako, Mali: traditional knowledge compared with a literature search of modern pharmacology and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Ababacar; Diallo, Drissa; Fane, Seydou; Sanogo, Rokia; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Cisse, Boubacar

    2005-01-04

    In Mali, the empirical knowledge on plant medicine is held by traditional practioners. Scientific studies have been carried on some plants and they have confirmed their local uses, but few data are available on the toxicity of Malian medicinal plants. In the present work, we record the toxic plants used as medicines in the Bamako district, Mali, with the aim to evaluate the knowledge of traditional healers and herbalists on the toxicity of the plant used. A survey was carried out on the market places in the Bamako district and 106 healers and herbalists were interviewed. A survey of the scientific literature was conducted to verify or sustain the claimed toxicological data. Nineteen plants are arranged according to their frequency of quotation based on the questionnaire. The information includes the botanical name, literature survey on the pharmacology of the plants, the healers' knowledge on plant toxicity and its prevention by some of the healers.

  1. Brine shrimp toxicity and antimalarial activity of some plants traditionally used in treatment of malaria in Msambweni district of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguta, J M; Mbaria, J M

    2013-07-30

    In Kenya, most people especially in rural areas use traditional medicine and medicinal plants to treat many diseases including malaria. Malaria is of national concern in Kenya, in view of development of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to drugs especially chloroquine, which had been effective and affordable. There is need for alternative and affordable therapy. Many antimalarial drugs have been derived from medicinal plants and this is evident from the reported antiplasmodial activity. The present study reports on the in vivo antimalarial activity and brine shrimp lethality of five medicinal plants traditionally used to treat malaria in Msambweni district, Kenya. A total of five aqueous crude extracts from different plant parts used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria were evaluated for their in vivo antimalarial activity using Plasmodium berghei infected Swiss mice and for their acute toxicity using Brine shrimp lethality test. The screened crude plant extracts suppressed parasitaemia as follows: Azadirachta indica (L) Burm. (Meliaceae), 3.1%; Dichrostachys cinerea (L) Wight et Arn (Mimosaceae), 6.3%; Tamarindus indica L. (Caesalpiniaceae), 25.1%; Acacia seyal Del. (Mimosaceae) 27.8% and Grewia trichocarpa Hochst ex A.Rich (Tiliaceae) 35.8%. In terms of toxicity, A.indica root bark extract had an LC50 of 285.8 µg/ml and was considered moderately toxic. T.indica stem bark extract and G.trichocarpa root extract had an LC50 of 516.4 and 545.8 µg/ml respectively and were considered to be weakly toxic while A.seyal and D.cinerea root extracts had a LC50>1000 µg/ml and were therefore considered to be non toxic. The results indicate that the aqueous extracts of the tested plants when used alone as monotherapy had antimalarial activity which was significantly different from that of chloroquine (P≤0.05). The results also suggest that the anecdotal efficacy of the above plants reported by the study community is related to synergism of

  2. Toxicity of Nitro-Heterocyclic and Nitroaromatic Energetic Materials to Terrestrial Plants in a Natural Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    TNB, RDX, HMX, and heavy metals to cucumber and radish. They determined that toxicity was mostly related to TNT and TNB, with a LOEC of 7 to 19 mg kg...species exposed to TNB, 2,4-DNT, and 2,6-DNT. Hormesis has been reported in plants exposed to heavy metals and aromatic hydrocarbons (Stebbing, 1982...Watermilfoil and duckweed ), and terrestrial plant species (i.e., yellow nutsedge, poplar, lettuce, and tall fescue (Schott and Worthley, 1974; Palazzo and

  3. Systemic Nicotinoid Toxicity against the Predatory Mirid Pilophorus typicus : Residual Side Effect and Evidence for Plant Sucking

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahira, Kengo; Kashitani, Ryoya; Tomoda, Masafumi; Kodama, Rika; Ito, Katsura; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Momoshita, Mitsutoshi; Arakawa, Ryo; Takagi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    The predatory mirid Pilophorus typicus (Heteroptera: Miridae) is a potential biological control agent against Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), but the sucking for host plant is unknown. To investigate collaboration use of P. typicus and nicotinoid granules and to confirm the sucking for pepper plant, residual harmful toxicity of 4 nicotinoids: acetamiprid; imidacloprid; nitempyram; and thiamethoxam on P. typicus adult were investigated at 7, 14 21, 28 and 35 d after treatment of the n...

  4. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  5. Toxic cyanobacterial breakthrough and accumulation in a drinking water plant: a monitoring and treatment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyadi, Arash; MacLeod, Sherri L; Fan, Yan; McQuaid, Natasha; Dorner, Sarah; Sauvé, Sébastien; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-04-01

    The detection of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins has intensified in recent years in both drinking water sources and the raw water of drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). The objectives of this study were to: 1) estimate the breakthrough and accumulation of toxic cyanobacteria in water, scums and sludge inside a DWTP, and 2) to determine whether chlorination can be an efficient barrier to the prevention of cyanotoxin breakthrough in drinking water. In a full scale DWTP, the fate of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins was studied after the addition of coagulant and powdered activated carbon, post clarification, within the clarifier sludge bed, after filtration and final chlorination. Elevated cyanobacterial cell numbers (4.7 × 10(6)cells/mL) and total microcystins concentrations (up to 10 mg/L) accumulated in the clarifiers of the treatment plant. Breakthrough of cells and toxins in filtered water was observed. Also, a total microcystins concentration of 2.47 μg/L was measured in chlorinated drinking water. Cyanobacterial cells and toxins from environmental bloom samples were more resistant to chlorination than results obtained using laboratory cultured cells and dissolved standard toxins.

  6. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Target or barrier? The cell wall of early- and later- diverging plants vs cadmium toxicity: differences in the response mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eParrotta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing industrialization and urbanization result in emission of pollutants in the environment including toxic heavy metals, as cadmium and lead. Among the different heavy metals contaminating the environment, cadmium raises great concern, as it is ecotoxic and as such can heavily impact ecosystems. The cell wall is the first structure of plant cells to come in contact with heavy metals. Its composition, characterized by proteins, polysaccharides and in some instances lignin and other phenolic compounds, confers the ability to bind non-covalently and/or covalently heavy metals via functional groups. A strong body of evidence in the literature has shown the role of the cell wall in heavy metal response: it sequesters heavy metals, but at the same time its synthesis and composition can be severely affected. The present review analyzes the dual property of plant cell walls, i.e. barrier and target of heavy metals, by taking Cd toxicity as example. Following a summary of the known physiological and biochemical responses of plants to Cd, the review compares the wall-related mechanisms in early- and later-diverging land plants, by considering the diversity in cell wall composition. By doing so, common as well as unique response mechanisms to metal/cadmium toxicity are identified among plant phyla and discussed. After discussing the role of hyperaccumulators’ cell walls as a particular case, the review concludes by considering important aspects for plant engineering.

  8. Protective Effects of Some Medicinal Plants from Lamiaceae Family Against Beta-Amyloid Induced Toxicity in PC12 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Saeidnia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive accumulation of beta-amyliod peptide (Aβ, the major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD, causes neuronal cell death through induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidants may be of use in the treatment of AD. The medicinal plants from the Lamiaceae family have been widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. These plants contain compounds with antioxidant activity and some species in this family have been reported to have neuroprotective properties. In the present study, methanolic extract of seven plants from salvia and satureja species were evaluated for their protective effects against beta-amyloid induced neurotoxicity.Methods: Aerial parts of the plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively, by percolation at room temperature and subsequently, methanolic extracts of the plants were prepared. PC12 cells were incubated with different concentrations of the extracts in culture medium 1h prior to incubation with Aβ. Cell toxicity was assessed 24h after addition of Aβ by MTT assay.Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Salvia officinalis and Salvia macrosiphon methanolic extracts exhibited high protective effects against Aβ induced toxicity (P<0.001. Protective effects of Satureja bachtiarica and Salvia officinalis were dose-dependent.Conclusion: The main constituents of these extracts are polyphenolic and flavonoid compounds such as rosmarinic acid, naringenin, apigenin and luteolin which have antioxidant properties and may have a role in neuroprotection. Based on neuroprotective effect of these plants against Aβ induced toxicity, we recommend greater attention to their use in the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  9. Snake venom induced local toxicities: plant secondary metabolites as an auxiliary therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Hemshekhar, M; Sunitha, K; Thushara, R M; Jnaneshwari, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2013-01-01

    Snakebite is a serious medical and socio-economic problem affecting the rural and agricultural laborers of tropical and sub-tropical region across the world leading to high morbidity and mortality. In most of the snakebite incidences, victims usually end up with permanent tissue damage and sequelae with high socioeconomic and psychological impacts. Although, mortality has been reduced markedly due to anti-venom regimen, it is associated with several limitations. Snake venom metalloprotease, hyaluronidase and myotoxic phospholipase A2 are the kingpins of tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation. Thus, inhibition of these enzymes is considered to be the rate limiting step in the management of snakebite. Unfortunately, tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation persists even after the administration of anti-venom. At present, inhibitors from snake serum and plasma, several synthetic compounds and their analogs have been demonstrated to possess anti-snake venom activities, but the use of plant metabolites for this purpose has an added advantage of traditional knowledge and will make the treatment cheaper and more accessible to the affected population. Therefore, the clinical and research forums are highly oriented towards plant metabolites and interestingly, certain phytochemicals are implicated as the antibody elicitors against venom toxicity that can be exploited in designing effective anti-venoms. Based on these facts, we have made an effort to enlist plant based secondary metabolites with antiophidian abilities and their mechanism of action against locally acting enzymes/toxins in particular. The review also describes their functional groups responsible for therapeutic beneficial and certainly oblige in designing potent inhibitors against venom toxins.

  10. Selection of a bioassay battery to assess toxicity in the affluents and effluents of three water-treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bohórquez-Echeverry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of water quality includes the analysis of both physical-chemical and microbiological parameters. However,none of these evaluates the biological effect that can be generated in ecosystems or humans. In order to define the most suitable organismsto evaluate the toxicity in the affluent and effluent of three drinking-water treatment plants, five acute toxicity bioassays were used,incorporating three taxonomic groups of the food chain. Materials and methods. The bioassays used were Daphnia magna and Hydraattenuata as animal models, Lactuca sativa and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as plant models, and Photobacterium leioghnathi asbacterial model. To meet this objective, selection criteria of the organisms evaluated and cluster analysis were used to identify the mostsensitive in the affluent and effluent of each plant. Results. All organisms are potentially useful in the assessment of water quality bymeeting four essential requirements and 17 desirable requirements equivalent to 100% acceptability, except P. leioghnathi which doesnot meet two essential requirements that are the IC50 for the toxic reference and the confidence interval. The animal, plant and bacterialmodels showed different levels of sensitivity at the entrance and exit of the water treatment systems. Conclusions. H. attenuata, P.subcapitata and P. leioghnathi were the most effective organisms in detecting toxicity levels in the affluents and D. magna, P. subcapitataand P. leioghnathi in the effluents.

  11. Toxicities of Oils, Dispersants and Dispersed Oils to Aquatic Plants: Summary and Database Value to Resource Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the phytotoxicities of crude and dispersed oils is important for near-shore ecosystem management, particularly post-oil spills. One source of information is toxicity data summaries which are scattered and outdated for aquatic plants and petrochemicals. As a resu...

  12. Toxicities of Oils, Dispersants and Dispersed Oils to Aquatic Plants: Summary and Database Value to Resource Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the phytotoxicities of crude and dispersed oils is important for near-shore ecosystem management, particularly post-oil spills. One source of information is toxicity data summaries which are scattered and outdated for aquatic plants and petrochemicals. As a resu...

  13. Ecotoxicological risk of pharmaceuticals from wastewater treatment plants in Korea: occurrence and toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guk H; Hur, Hor G; Kim, Sang D

    2006-01-01

    The overall ecotoxicological effect of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) detected in the effluents of Korean wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to Daphnia magna was investigated using biological and chemical analyses. The bioassay results showed median lethal concentrations and no-observed-effect concentrations ranging from a few to tens of ppm levels for nine PhACs in 48-h acute and 21-d chronic tests. The mixture effects of pharmaceuticals also were examined by other acute and chronic tests, which showed no significant toxicity despite a slightly increased combined effect of approximately twofold. The residual concentrations of nine PhACs were analyzed at concentrations ranging from 10 ng/L to 89 microg/L in the influents and from 10 ng/L to 11 microg/L in the effluents from four metropolitan cities in South Korea between January and November of 2004. Through repeated investigations of the influents and the effluents from different WWTPs, relatively higher removal efficiencies (23.9-91.3%) compared with those of previous surveys performed in other countries were observed for most pharmaceuticals, with the exception of acetaminophen (8.7%). The present study showed no significant risk effects of the effluents from WWTPs containing pharmaceuticals (i.e., hazard quotient risk assessment factor of 1,000 was applied. Therefore, it can be concluded that the potential risk of pharmaceuticals should be monitored carefully with more bioassay data, because many uncertainties still exist in the determination and toxicity of metabolites in water environments. No significant risk was observed, however, from the selected PhACs in the effluents from WWTPs discharged into surface waters.

  14. Foliar heavy metal uptake, toxicity and detoxification in plants: A comparison of foliar and root metal uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Muhammad; Dumat, Camille; Khalid, Sana; Schreck, Eva; Xiong, Tiantian; Niazi, Nabeel Khan

    2017-03-05

    Anthropologic activities have transformed global biogeochemical cycling of heavy metals by emitting considerable quantities of these metals into the atmosphere from diverse sources. In spite of substantial and progressive developments in industrial processes and techniques to reduce environmental emissions, atmospheric contamination by toxic heavy metals and associated ecological and health risks are still newsworthy. Atmospheric heavy metals may be absorbed via foliar organs of plants after wet or dry deposition of atmospheric fallouts on plant canopy. Unlike root metal transfer, which has been largely studied, little is known about heavy metal uptake by plant leaves from the atmosphere. To the best of our understanding, significant research gaps exist regarding foliar heavy metal uptake. This is the first review regarding biogeochemical behaviour of heavy metals in atmosphere-plant system. The review summarizes the mechanisms involved in foliar heavy metal uptake, transfer, compartmentation, toxicity and in plant detoxification. We have described the biological and environmental factors that affect foliar uptake of heavy metals and compared the biogeochemical behaviour (uptake, translocation, compartmentation, toxicity and detoxification) of heavy metals for root and foliar uptake. The possible health risks associated with the consumption of heavy metal-laced food are also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Saprobe fungi decreased the sensitivity to the toxic effect of dry olive mill residue on arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, I; Aranda, E; Díaz, R; García-Sanchez, M; Ocampo, J A; García-Romera, I

    2008-02-01

    We studied the influence of olive mill dry residue (DOR) treated with saprobe fungi on growth of tomato and alfalfa colonized by Glomus deserticola. The application of 25g kg(-1) of dry DOR to soil decreased the shoot and root dry weight of tomato and alfalfa. Plants were more sensitive to the toxicity of DOR when colonized with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. The sensitivity of both plants to the toxicity of DOR differed according to whether they were colonized by G. deserticola or by indigenous AM fungi. The phytotoxicity of DOR towards tomato and alfalfa was decreased by incubation the residue before planting with saprobe fungi for 20wk. The beneficial effects of AM fungi on plant growth added with DOR incubated with saprobe fungi depend of the type of the plant and AM fungi. The contribution of AM fungi to the beneficial effect of DOR incubated with saprobe fungi varied according to the type of the plant and AM fungi. G. deserticola increased the shoot and root dry weight of plants when they were grown in the presence of DOR incubated with saprobe fungi for 20wk. The beneficial effect of saprobe fungi on the dry weight and the level of AM mycorrhization of plants seem to be related to the decrease caused by these fungi in the phenol concentration in DOR. However, the toxicity of DOR due to substances other than phenols can not be ignored. The use of certain saprobe and AM fungi allows the possibility of using DOR as an organic fertilizer.

  16. Species-specific enzymatic tolerance of sulfide toxicity in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole M; Maricle, Brian R

    2015-03-01

    Toxic effects of sulfide come from a poisoning of a number of enzymes, especially cytochrome c oxidase, which catalyzes the terminal step in mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Despite this, some estuarine plants live in sulfide-rich sediments. We hypothesized estuarine and flooding-tolerant species might be more tolerant of sulfide compared to upland species, and this was tested by measures of root cytochrome c oxidase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities in extracts exposed to sulfide. Enzyme activities were measured in 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 μM sodium sulfide, and compared among 17 species of plants. Activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were both reduced by increasing sulfide concentration, but cytochrome c oxidase was more sensitive to sulfide compared to alcohol dehydrogenase. Activities of cytochrome c oxidase were reduced to near zero at 5-10 μM sulfide whereas alcohol dehydrogenase activities were only reduced by about 50% at 10 μM sulfide. All species were sensitive to increasing sulfide, but to different degrees. Cytochrome c oxidase in flooding-sensitive species was decreased to near zero activity at 5 μM sulfide, whereas activities in some flooding-tolerant species were still detectable until 15 μM sulfide. Cytochrome c oxidase activities in some estuarine species were low even in the absence of sulfide, perhaps an adaptation to avoid sulfide vulnerability in their native, sulfide-rich habitat. This illustrates the potent metabolic effects of sulfide, and this is the first demonstration of varying sensitivities of cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide across organisms, making these data of novel importance.

  17. Toxicity of two plant powders as biopesticides in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-02-28

    Feb 28, 2015 ... management of Callosobruchus maculatus F. on two stored grain legumes. 7900. Toxicity of two ... development of pest resistance, toxic residue problems .... ambrosioides powder is the most toxic product (Tables 5 and 6). .... Post Harvest News ... Innovative Pest Management, Pergamon Press,. Oxford ...

  18. Toxicity of twenty-two plant essential oils against pathogenic bacteria of vegetables and mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović, Biljana; Potočnik, Ivana; Rekanović, Emil; Stepanović, Miloš; Kostić, Miroslav; Ristić, Mihajlo; Milijašević-Marčić, Svetlana

    2016-12-01

    ASBTRACT Toxicity of twenty-two essential oils to three bacterial pathogens in different horticultural systems: Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli (causing blight of bean), Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (bacterial wilt and canker of tomato), and Pseudomonas tolaasii (causal agent of bacterial brown blotch on cultivated mushrooms) was tested. Control of bacterial diseases is very difficult due to antibiotic resistance and ineffectiveness of chemical products, to that essential oils offer a promising alternative. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations are determined by applying a single drop of oil onto the inner side of each plate cover in macrodilution assays. Among all tested substances, the strongest and broadest activity was shown by the oils of wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens), oregano (Origanum vulgare), and lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus. Carvacrol (64.0-75.8%) was the dominant component of oregano oils, while geranial (40.7%) and neral (26.7%) were the major constituents of lemongrass oil. Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli was the most sensitive to plant essential oils, being susceptible to 19 oils, while 11 oils were bactericidal to the pathogen. Sixteen oils inhibited the growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis and seven oils showed bactericidal effects to the pathogen. The least sensitive species was Pseudomonas tolaasii as five oils inhibited bacterial growth and two oils were bactericidal. Wintergreen, oregano, and lemongrass oils should be formulated as potential biochemical bactericides against different horticultural pathogens.

  19. TOXIC ACTIVITIES OF HEXANE EXTRACT AND COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY FRACTIONS OF RODENT TUBER PLANT (Typhonium flagelliforme Lodd. ON Artemia salina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesti F. Sianipar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rodent tuber (Typhonium flagelliforme Lodd. is a medicinal plant  particularly found in Java. The plant is used as an ingredient for  conventional cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the toxic activities of crude extracts and column chromatography fractions of  rodent tuber on Artemia salina larvae. Rodent tuber plant was obtained  from the Indonesian Spice and Medicinal Crops Research Institute in  Bogor, West Java. The experiment was conducted in the Biology  Laboratory of Universitas Pelita Harapan, Tangerang, Banten. Leaves and petioles of the plant were macerated with acetone and the filtrates were evaporated (40°C to obtain crude extracts. The crude extracts were partitioned with ethyl acetate, followed with hexane, chloroform and  butanol. Toxicity test of the extracts was performed using the Brine Shrimp Lethality Test (BSLT method on A. salina larvae. Extract showing the most toxic was fractioned using column chromatography and then tested on the larvae. The experiment was designed in a completely randomized  factorial, four replicates for crude extracts and two replicates for the fractions. Treatments were different types of extracts (hexane, chloroform and butanol at various concentrations (500, 1,000 and 1,500 μg ml-1 of 5% Tween solution. Fractions of the column chromatography used were taken from the column number 1, 3 and 10, and tested their toxicities at 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1,000 μg ml-1 of 5% Tween solution. Parameters observed were the death of A. salina expressed as LC50. The study  showed that hexane extract of the petioles had the most toxic to A. salina (LC50 = 762.08 μg ml-1. Fraction number 10 showed the highest toxic (LC50 = 381.07 μg ml-1, whereas the lowest was fraction number 3 (LC50 = 653.13 μg ml-1. The study indicates that rodent tuber plant from Bogor is toxic to A. salina and further test for its cytotoxic activity is justified.

  20. The toxicity of herbicides to non-target aquatic plants and algae: assessment of predictive factors and hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergreen, Nina; Streibig, Jens C

    2005-12-01

    Widely used herbicides sometimes inadvertently contaminate surface waters. In this study we evaluate the toxicity of herbicides to aquatic plants and algae and relate it to environmental herbicide concentrations and exposure scenarios, herbicide formulation and mode of action. This was done experimentally for ten herbicides, using the aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor L. and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (Korshikov) Hindak, supplemented with a database study comprising algae toxicity data for 146 herbicides. The laboratory study showed that herbicide formulations in general did not enhance herbicide efficacy in the aquatic environment. The Roundup formulation of glyphosate proved to be the only exception, decreasing the EC(50) of the technical product for both L. minor and P. subcapitata approximately fourfold. Comparison of the sensitivity of L. minor and P. subcapitata revealed up to 1000-fold higher sensitivity of L. minor for the herbicides categorized as weak acids (pK(a) action, was significantly more toxic than another. Synthetic auxins were the exception as they are virtually non-toxic to unicellular algae. There was no strong correlation between toxicity to algae and K(ow) of the herbicides, not even within groups having the same site of action. Evaluating all data, few herbicides were toxic at concentrations below 1 microg l(-1), which is the 99.9th percentile of the herbicide concentrations measured in the Danish surveillance programme. Joint action of several herbicides cannot however be excluded.

  1. Toxicity of TiO(2) nanoparticles to cladocerans, algae, rotifers and plants - effects of size and crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Laura; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials. However, the data on the potential environmental effects of nanoparticles are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of particle size and crystal structure (anatase and rutile) of titanium dioxide on their toxicity. Thus, acute and chronic toxicity tests included a modified acute test (72 h) using daphnies and algae, rotifers and plants as model organisms. Gradient of toxicity varied with the tested biological organisms. Our results revealed that TiO(2) nanoparticles in anatase crystal structure are toxic in the entire set of tests conducted. However, at highconcentration, through their antimicrobial properties, they significantly promoted growth of roots. Because of its lipophilicity, the rutile crystalline structure of TiO(2) NPs form larger aggregates in aqueous medium; then they have less effect on biological organisms, and thus a lower toxicity than the anatase crystalline form of TiO(2). We also demonstrated that exposure duration, aggregation and concentrations are contributing factors in nanoparticles-mediated toxicity.

  2. In vivo assessment of the toxic potential of Dissotis rotundifolia whole plant extract in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Ansah; Michael Buenor Adinortey; Jerry Asiedu-Larbi; Benjamin Aboagye; Du-Bois Asante; Alexander Kwadwo Nyarko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the toxic potential of Dissotis rotundifolia (D. rotundifolia) whole plant extract in Spraque–Dawley rats within a 2-week period of administration. Methods: Methanolic extract of D. rotundifolia was administered orally once daily at dose levels of 0, 100, 300 and 1 000 mg/kg body weight for 14 days. Toxicity was assessed using mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, hematological indices, serum chemistry parameters and histopathological analyses. Results: There were no treatment-related mortalities or differences in clinical signs, hematology and serum biochemistry. This was confirmed by micrographs obtained from histopathological analysis. Conclusions: The results obtained from the sub-acute toxicological assessment of D. rotundifolia extract suggest that the extract is non-toxic at doses up to 1 000 mg/kg/day administered for a period of 14 days.

  3. In vivo assessment of the toxic potential of Dissotis rotundifolia whole plant extract in Sprague–Dawley rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Ansah; Michael Buenor Adinortey; Jerry Asiedu-Larbi; Benjamin Aboagye; Du-Bois Asante; Alexander Kwadwo Nyarko

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the toxic potential of Dissotis rotundifolia(D.rotundifolia) whole plant extract in Spraque–Dawley rats within a 2-week period of administration.Methods: Methanolic extract of D. rotundifolia was administered orally once daily at dose levels of 0,100, 300 and 1 000 mg/kg body weight for 14 days. Toxicity was assessed using mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, hematological indices,serum chemistry parameters and histopathological analyses.Results: There were no treatment-related mortalities or differences in clinical signs,hematology and serum biochemistry. This was confirmed by micrographs obtained from histopathological analysis.Conclusions: The results obtained from the sub-acute toxicological assessment of D. rotundifolia extract suggest that the extract is non-toxic at doses up to 1 000 mg/kg/day administered for a period of 14 days.

  4. Mechanism of Aluminum Toxicity and Resistance in Plant%植物铝毒害及抗铝毒机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王月平; 章艺; 吴玉环; 徐根娣; 王小平; 刘鹏

    2011-01-01

    铝毒是酸性土壤中作物生长最重要的限制因素和森林大面积退化的重要原因,严重影响着全世界和中国大约40%和21%耕作土壤的作物生产.介绍了铝在土壤和植物体中的存在形态,重点综述了铝毒机理和耐铝机制.%Aluminum toxicity is the most important factor limiting crop growth in acid soils and one of the important reasons of forest degeneration, which greatly affects the crop productivity by about 40% of cultivated soils in the world and 21% of cultivated soils in China. The form of aluminum in soil and plant, and the mechanisms of aluminum toxicity and resistance of plant were reviewed.

  5. Determination of toxic metals by ICP-MS in Asiatic and European medicinal plants and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak-Szok, Anna; Kurzawa, Marzanna; Szłyk, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The potentially toxic metals content was determined in selected plants, used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (Angelica sinensis, Bacopa monnieri, Bupleurum sinensis, Curcuma longa, Cola accuminata, Emblica officinalis, Garcinia cambogia, Mucuna pruriens, Ocimum sanctum, Panax ginseng, Pueraria lobata, Salvia miltiorrhiza, Schisandra sinensis, Scutellaria baicalensis, Siraitia grosvenorii, Terminalia arjuna and Terminalia chebula), and some European herbs (Echinacea purpurea, Hypericum perforatum, Vitis vinifera). Samples were mineralized in a closed microwave system using HNO3 and the concentrations of Cd, Pb, Al, As, Ba, Ni and Sb were determined by ICP-MS method. Some relevant aspects of potential toxicity of metallic elements and their compounds were also discussed. Results of metal content analysis in dietary supplements available on Polish market, containing studied plants, are presented as well. The results were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of phytoextraction potential of plant speciesfor toxic elements in soils of abandoned sulphide-mining areas

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, M.C.; Pacheco, A.M.G.; Anawar, H. M.; Dionísio, I.; Dung, H.M.; Canha, N; Bettencourt, A.; Henriques, F.; Pinto-Gomes, Carlos; Capelo, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    This study has determined contamination levels in soils and plants from the Sa˜o Domingos mining area, Portugal, by k0-INAA. Total concentrations of As, Sb, Cr, Hg, Cu, Zn and Fe in soils were very high, exceeding the maximum limits in Portuguese legislation. Concentrations of toxic elements like As, Sb and Zn were highest in roots of Erica andevalensis, Juncus acutus, Agrostis castellana and Nicotiana glauca. Additionally, As, Br, Cr, Fe, Sb and Zn in all organs of most plants were above tox...

  7. Protective Effect of the Plant Extracts of Erythroxylum sp. against Toxic Effects Induced by the Venom of Lachesis muta Snake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coriolano de Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Snake venoms are composed of a complex mixture of active proteins that induce toxic effects, such as edema, hemorrhage, and death. Lachesis muta has the highest lethality indices in Brazil. In most cases, antivenom fails to neutralize local effects, leading to disabilities in victims. Thus, alternative treatments are under investigation, and plant extracts are promising candidates. The objective of this work was to investigate the ability of crude extracts, fractions, or isolated products of Erythroxylum ovalifolium and Erythroxylum subsessile to neutralize some toxic effects of L. muta venom. All samples were mixed with L. muta venom, then in vivo (hemorrhage and edema and in vitro (proteolysis, coagulation, and hemolysis assays were performed. Overall, crude extracts or fractions of Erythroxylum spp. inhibited (20%–100% toxic effects of the venom, but products achieved an inhibition of 4%–30%. However, when venom was injected into mice before the plant extracts, hemorrhage and edema were not inhibited by the samples. On the other hand, an inhibition of 5%–40% was obtained when extracts or products were given before venom injection. These results indicate that the extracts or products of Erythroxylum spp. could be a promising source of molecules able to treat local toxic effects of envenomation by L. muta venom, aiding in the development of new strategies for antivenom treatment.

  8. Assessment of the quality and toxicity of the discharges of a wastewater treatment plant and alternatives to improve its operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Vargas, Daniel; Montoya-Castillo, Sandra Margarita; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Jauregui-Rincón, Juan; Rodríguez-Valadez, Francisco Javier; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Wastewater discharges into freshwater bodies represent a serious ecological problem worldwide. In underdeveloped and developing countries wastewater treatment plants (WTP) only count with basic treatment, leading to the pollution of important aquatic reservoirs causing critical situations. In the present work, a one year evaluation of toxicity and main physical and chemical parameters of one of the major WTP of the state of Aguascalientes was conducted fortnightly, and to assess treatment alternatives for this WTP we tested: a) three white rot fungi (WRF), b) a photo-electrochemical process, c) ion-exchangers resins and activated carbon. The 3 WRF exhibited high COD removal from influents (72 - 95 %) but only Phanerochaete chrysosporium reached significant toxicity removals (70 and 55 %, for an influent and an effluent, respectively). Treatments with electrochemical advanced oxidation processes resulted with the highest toxicity and COD removals (96 % for both parameters) in comparison to biological and physicochemical treatments. Adsorption with activated carbon, zeolite and chelex ion-exchange resins removed 60 - 90 % of COD and 60 - 99 % toxicity. These results could be used to improve operation of the Industrial Park WTP and to plan future modifications to the plant.

  9. Potentially toxic element contamination in soil and accumulation in maize plants in a smelter area in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannoni, Francesco; Rossi, Sara; Protano, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A biogeochemical field study was carried out in the industrial area of Kosovska Mitrovica in northern Kosovo, where agricultural soils were contaminated by potentially toxic elements due to smelting activity. Total and bioavailable contents of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Sb, U and Zn in soil and their concentrations in maize roots and grains were determined. Soil contamination by As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb and Zn was variable from slightly to highly contaminated soils and influenced both the bioavailable fraction and accumulation of these potentially toxic elements in maize tissues. The comparison between potentially toxic element concentrations in roots and grains indicated that maize is able to limit the transfer of non-essential elements to edible parts. The plant-to-soil bioconcentration indices suggested that the transfer of potentially toxic elements from soil to plant was predicted better by bioavailable concentrations than by the total contents. These indices further identified some competitions and interactions among these elements in root uptake and root-to-grain translocation.

  10. Attractive toxic sugar baits mixed with pyriproxyfen sprayed on plants against adult and larval Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Ali; Scott, Jodi M; Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Günter C; Xue, Rui-De

    2014-07-01

    The effect of spraying a mixture of the insect growth regulator (IGR) pyriproxyfen (1 mg/liter) and either 1% boric acid sugar bait or eugenol sugar bait on croton petra plants (Codiaeum variegatum L.) was evaluated against the container-inhabiting mosquito, Aedes albopictus (Skuse). Treatments were applied to plants and evaluated against adult and larval Ae. albopictus in the laboratory through contact and wash off experiments, respectively. The control treatment lacked an active ingredient and were treated with an attractive sugar bait. The plants treated with attractive toxic sugar baits plus the IGR resulted in 60-100% mortality of laboratory-reared adult Ae. albopictus. The pyriproxyfen solutions collected from the plant wash experiment resulted in 80-100% emergence inhibition to the exposed third- and fourth-instar larvae, compared with the untreated control. Attractive toxic sugar baits mixed with the IGR not only provide effective control of adult mosquitoes, but also provide additional control of larval mosquitoes after being washed off from the treated plants.

  11. Vermicomposting eliminates the toxicity of Lantana (Lantana camara) and turns it into a plant friendly organic fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, N.; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S.A., E-mail: prof.s.a.abbasi@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • It is shown for the first time that Lantana can lose its toxicity when vermicomposted. • The Lantana vermicompost is shown to be a good organic fertilizer. • FTIR studies identified Lantana’s toxic constituents destroyed by vermicomposting. • The findings have far-reaching implications in the gainful use of harmful weeds. - Abstract: In evidently the first study of its kind, vermicompost derived solely from a weed known to possess plant and animal toxicity was used to assess its impact on the germination and early growth of several plant species. No pre-composting or supplementation of animal manure was done to generate the vermicompost in order to ensure that the impact is clearly attributable to the weed. Whereas the weed used in this study, Lantana (Lantana camara), is known to possess strong negative allelopathy, besides plant/animal toxicity in other forms, its vermicompost was seen to be a good organic fertilizer as it increased germination success and encouraged growth of all the three botanical species explored by the authors – green gram (Vigna radiata), ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In terms of several physical, chemical and biochemical attributes that were studied, the vermicompost appeared plant-friendly, giving best results in general when employed at concentrations of 1.5% in soil (w/w). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry revealed that the phenols and the sesquiterpene lactones that are responsible for the allelopathic impact of Lantana were largely destroyed in the course of vermicomposting. There is also an indication that lignin content of Lantana was reduced during its vermicomposting. The findings open up the possibility that the billions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by Lantana and other invasives can be gainfully utilized in generating organic fertilizer via vermicomposting.

  12. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of Brazilian plants extracts against Paenibacillus larvae and toxicity in bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Piana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available American foulbrood (AFB is a serious worldwide spreading disease in bees caused by Paenibacillus larvae. Plants extracts are known to decrease or inhibit the growth of these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Calendula. officinalis, Cariniana domestica, and Nasturtium officinale extracts against the P. larvae and to evaluate the toxicity of the extracts in bees. In vitro activity against P. larvae of the extracts was evaluated by micro dilution method and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs were also determined. The concentrations used in the toxicity test were established based on the MIC values and by the spraying application method. The P. larvae was susceptible to the evaluated crude extract of C. officinalis and N. officinale. To C. domestica, only the ethyl acetate (EtAc fraction and n-butanol (BuOH fractions had activity against P. larvae. Toxicity analysis in bees showed no toxicity for N. officinale crude extract and for C. domestica BuOH fraction during 15 days of treatment, however, some deaths of bees occurred during the first three days of treatment with C. officinalis and C. domestica EtAc fraction. The results with these species were firstly described and showed that N. officinale crude extract and C. domestica BuOH fraction both presented not toxic effects in the concentration tested by the spraying application method, and can be a useful alternative for treatment or prevention of AFB.

  13. Determination of acute and early life stage toxicity of fat-plant effluent using zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sişman, Turgay; Incekara, Umit; Yildiz, Yalçin Sevki

    2008-08-01

    The present study examines the effects of an effluent from a fat plant (FP) on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae using the whole effluent toxicity testing methods (WET). The method is based on acute toxicity using 96-h larval mortality and chronic toxicity using endpoints such as the time to hatch, hatching success, deformity, growth rate, swim-up failure, accumulative mortality, and sex ratio. On the basis of larval mortality the 96-h LC(50) (the concentration was lethal to 50% of newly hatching zebrafish larvae) was 68.9%. In chronic toxicity test, newly fertilized embryos (effluent concentrations in a 24-h static renewal system at (27 +/- 0.5) degrees C until 15-day posthatch. The results showed that all chronic endpoints were significantly different from the control at 50% dilution. Embryos began to show lesions on third day at higher concentrations (12, 25, 50% FP effluent concentrations). Treatment group of 25% dilution showed delayed time to hatch. Morphological abnormalities were observed in newly hatched larvae at 25 and 50% FP effluent concentrations. At 25% dilution, sex ratio of larvae was alternated and there was feminization phenomenon. On the basis of the study, the FP effluent tested here may cause increasing embryotoxicity in the zebrafish embryos. We conclude that the test using zebrafish is feasible to evaluate both acute and chronic toxicities of industrial effluents.

  14. Toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater and effects on constructed wetland plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calheirosa, C.S.C.; Silva, G.; Quitério, P.V.B.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater produced after an activated sludge secondary treatment on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium pratense, a species used as indicator in toxicity tests, was evaluated. Growth was inhibited by wastewater concentrations >25% and undiluted...

  15. Cement dust pollution induces toxicity or deficiency of some essential elements in wild plants growing around a cement factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Salih; Atici, Ökkes; Gülen, Yasir

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to determine the effects of cement dust pollution on contents of some significant essential elements (P, S, K, Ca, Fe and Cl) in wild plants (Medigago varia, Anchusa leptophylla, Euphorbia orientalis, Lactuca serriola, Artemisia spicigera, Crambe orientalis, Convolvulus sepium and Senecio vernalis) using wavelength-dispersive spectrometer X-ray fluorescence technique. Plant samples were collected from different locations around a cement factory which is located at Askale about 50 km from Erzurum (Turkey). The element contents in the plant specimens that existed in both 0-100 m (dense dusted) and 2000 m (undusted) areas were compared. P, S, K and Cl contents were found to be high in the plants growing in areas 0-100 m from the cement factory, compared to same plants at 2000 m far from the factory. However, Ca and Fe contents were determined to be low in plants growing in 0-100 m area from the factory. Results of the study can contribute to understand how mineral deficiency and toxicity lead to detrimental effects on plant growth and development in the fields contaminated by cement dust.

  16. The toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataee, Alireza; Movafeghi, Ali; Nazari, Fatemeh; Vafaei, Fatemeh; Dadpour, Mohammad Reza; Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo

    2014-12-01

    Plants play an important role in the fate of nanoparticles in the environment through their uptake, bioaccumulation, and transfer to trophic chains. However, the impacts of nanoparticles on plants as essential components of all ecosystems are not well documented. In the present study, the toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles on Spirodela polyrrhiza as an aquatic higher plant species were studied. l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrothermal method and their characteristics were determined by XRD, SEM, HR-TEM, and FT-IR techniques. The diameter of majority of synthesized nanoparticles was about 15-20 nm. Subsequently, the uptake of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles by the plant species was confirmed using epifluorescence microscopy. The activity of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as antioxidant enzymes was assayed and the relative frond number was calculated in the presence of different concentrations of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles. The obtained results revealed the toxic effects of the synthesized nanoparticles on S. polyrrhiza, leading to growth reduction and significant changes in antioxidant enzymes' activity.

  17. Vermicomposting eliminates the toxicity of Lantana (Lantana camara) and turns it into a plant friendly organic fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, N; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2015-11-15

    In evidently the first study of its kind, vermicompost derived solely from a weed known to possess plant and animal toxicity was used to assess its impact on the germination and early growth of several plant species. No pre-composting or supplementation of animal manure was done to generate the vermicompost in order to ensure that the impact is clearly attributable to the weed. Whereas the weed used in this study, Lantana (Lantana camara), is known to possess strong negative allelopathy, besides plant/animal toxicity in other forms, its vermicompost was seen to be a good organic fertilizer as it increased germination success and encouraged growth of all the three botanical species explored by the authors - green gram (Vigna radiata), ladies finger (Abelmoschus esculentus) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In terms of several physical, chemical and biochemical attributes that were studied, the vermicompost appeared plant-friendly, giving best results in general when employed at concentrations of 1.5% in soil (w/w). Fourier transform infrared spectrometry revealed that the phenols and the sesquiterpene lactones that are responsible for the allelopathic impact of Lantana were largely destroyed in the course of vermicomposting. There is also an indication that lignin content of Lantana was reduced during its vermicomposting. The findings open up the possibility that the billions of tons of phytomass that is generated annually by Lantana and other invasives can be gainfully utilized in generating organic fertilizer via vermicomposting.

  18. The toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrrhiza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khataee, Alireza, E-mail: ar_khataee@yahoo.com [University of Tabriz, Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movafeghi, Ali [University of Tabriz, Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazari, Fatemeh [University of Tabriz, Research Laboratory of Advanced Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vafaei, Fatemeh [University of Tabriz, Department of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadpour, Mohammad Reza [University of Tabriz, Department of Horticultural Science, Faculty of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hanifehpour, Younes; Joo, Sang Woo, E-mail: swjoo@yu.ac.kr [Yeungnam University, School of Mechanical Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Plants play an important role in the fate of nanoparticles in the environment through their uptake, bioaccumulation, and transfer to trophic chains. However, the impacts of nanoparticles on plants as essential components of all ecosystems are not well documented. In the present study, the toxic effects of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles on Spirodela polyrrhiza as an aquatic higher plant species were studied. l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles were synthesized using hydrothermal method and their characteristics were determined by XRD, SEM, HR-TEM, and FT-IR techniques. The diameter of majority of synthesized nanoparticles was about 15–20 nm. Subsequently, the uptake of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles by the plant species was confirmed using epifluorescence microscopy. The activity of peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as antioxidant enzymes was assayed and the relative frond number was calculated in the presence of different concentrations of l-Cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles. The obtained results revealed the toxic effects of the synthesized nanoparticles on S. polyrrhiza, leading to growth reduction and significant changes in antioxidant enzymes’ activity.Graphical Abstract.

  19. An Improved Hybrid Genetic Algorithm for Chemical Plant Layout Optimization with Novel Non-overlapping and Toxic Gas Dispersion Constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; WANG Zhenyu; ZHU Qunxiong

    2013-01-01

    New approaches for facility distribution in chemical plants are proposed including an improved non-overlapping constraint based on projection relationships of facilities and a novel toxic gas dispersion constraint.In consideration of the large number of variables in the plant layout model,our new method can significantly reduce the number of variables with their own projection relationships.Also,as toxic gas dispersion is a usual incident in a chemical plant,a simple approach to describe the gas leakage is proposed,which can clearly represent the constraints of potential emission source and sitting facilities.For solving the plant layout model,an improved genetic algorithm (GA) based on infeasible solution fix technique is proposed,which improves the globe search ability of GA.The case study and experiment show that a better layout plan can be obtained with our method,and the safety factors such as gas dispersion and minimum distances can be well handled in the solution.

  20. The red mud accident in ajka (hungary): plant toxicity and trace metal bioavailability in red mud contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyters, Stefan; Mertens, Jelle; Vassilieva, Elvira; Dehandschutter, Boris; Poffijn, André; Smolders, Erik

    2011-02-15

    The red mud accident of October 4, 2010, in Ajka (Hungary) contaminated a vast area with caustic, saline red mud (pH 12) that contains several toxic trace metals above soil limits. Red mud was characterized and its toxicity for plants was measured to evaluate the soil contamination risks. Red mud radioactivity (e.g., (238)U) is about 10-fold above soil background and previous assessments revealed that radiation risk is limited to indoor radon. The plant toxicity and trace metal availability was tested with mixtures of this red mud and a local noncontaminated soil up to a 16% dry weight fraction. Increasing red mud applications increased soil pH to maximally 8.3 and soil solution EC to 12 dS m(-1). Shoot yield of barley seedlings was affected by 25% at 5% red mud in soil and above. Red mud increased shoot Cu, Cr, Fe, and Ni concentrations; however, none of these exceed toxic limits reported elsewhere. Moreover, NaOH amended reference treatments showed similar yield reductions and similar changes in shoot composition. Foliar diagnostics suggest that Na (>1% in affected plants) is the prime cause of growth effects in red mud and in corresponding NaOH amended soils. Shoot Cd and Pb concentrations decreased by increasing applications or were unaffected. Leaching amended soils (3 pore volumes) did not completely remove the Na injury, likely because soil structure was deteriorated. The foliar composition and the NaOH reference experiment allow concluding that the Na salinity, not the trace metal contamination, is the main concern for this red mud in soil.

  1. Plant Mediated Green Synthesis of CuO Nanoparticles: Comparison of Toxicity of Engineered and Plant Mediated CuO Nanoparticles towards Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Saif

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on green production methods for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs is growing, with the objective to overcome the potential hazards of these chemicals for a safer environment. In this study, facile, ecofriendly synthesis of copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles was successfully achieved using aqueous extract of Pterospermum acerifolium leaves. P. acerifolium-fabricated CuO nanoparticles were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Plant-mediated CuO nanoparticles were found to be oval shaped and well dispersed in suspension. XPS confirmed the elemental composition of P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles as comprised purely of copper and oxygen. DLS measurements and ion release profile showed that P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles were more stable than the engineered CuO NPs. Copper oxide nanoparticles are used in many applications; therefore, their potential toxicity cannot be ignored. A comparative study was performed to investigate the bio-toxic impacts of plant-synthesized and engineered CuO nanoparticles on water flea Daphnia. Experiments were conducted to investigate the 48-h acute toxicity of engineered CuO NPs and plant-synthesized nanoparticles. Lower EC50 value 0.102 ± 0.019 mg/L was observed for engineered CuO NPs, while 0.69 ± 0.226 mg/L was observed for plant-synthesized CuO NPs. Additionally, ion release from CuO nanoparticles and 48-h accumulation of these nano CuOs in daphnids were also calculated. Our findings thus suggest that the contribution of released ions from nanoparticles and particles/ions accumulation in Daphnia needs to be interpreted with care.

  2. Plant Mediated Green Synthesis of CuO Nanoparticles: Comparison of Toxicity of Engineered and Plant Mediated CuO Nanoparticles towards Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Sadia; Tahir, Arifa; Asim, Tayyaba; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-11-09

    Research on green production methods for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is growing, with the objective to overcome the potential hazards of these chemicals for a safer environment. In this study, facile, ecofriendly synthesis of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles was successfully achieved using aqueous extract of Pterospermum acerifolium leaves. P. acerifolium-fabricated CuO nanoparticles were further characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Plant-mediated CuO nanoparticles were found to be oval shaped and well dispersed in suspension. XPS confirmed the elemental composition of P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles as comprised purely of copper and oxygen. DLS measurements and ion release profile showed that P. acerifolium-mediated copper nanoparticles were more stable than the engineered CuO NPs. Copper oxide nanoparticles are used in many applications; therefore, their potential toxicity cannot be ignored. A comparative study was performed to investigate the bio-toxic impacts of plant-synthesized and engineered CuO nanoparticles on water flea Daphnia. Experiments were conducted to investigate the 48-h acute toxicity of engineered CuO NPs and plant-synthesized nanoparticles. Lower EC50 value 0.102 ± 0.019 mg/L was observed for engineered CuO NPs, while 0.69 ± 0.226 mg/L was observed for plant-synthesized CuO NPs. Additionally, ion release from CuO nanoparticles and 48-h accumulation of these nano CuOs in daphnids were also calculated. Our findings thus suggest that the contribution of released ions from nanoparticles and particles/ions accumulation in Daphnia needs to be interpreted with care.

  3. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection and Quantitation of Monofluoroacetate in Plants Toxic to Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Barbosa, Joyce M; Lee, Stephen T; Cook, Daniel; Gardner, Dale R; Viana, Luis Henrique; Ré, Nilva

    2017-02-22

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatization of MFA with n-propanol in the presence of sulfuric acid to form propyl fluoroacetate was developed. This method compared favorably to a currently employed high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants. The GC-MS method was applied to the analysis of MFA in herbarium specimens of Fridericia elegans, Niedenzuella stannea, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and Aenigmatanthera lasiandra. This is the first report of MFA being detected in F. elegans, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and A. lasiandra, some of which have been reported to cause sudden death or that are toxic to livestock.

  4. Complexation and Toxicity of Copper in Higher Plants. I. Characterization of Copper Accumulation, Speciation, and Toxicity in Crassula helmsii as a New Copper Accumulator1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Hendrik; Götz, Birgit; Mijovilovich, Ana; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    The amphibious water plant Crassula helmsii is an invasive copper (Cu)-tolerant neophyte in Europe. It now turned out to accumulate Cu up to more than 9,000 ppm in its shoots at 10 μm (=0.6 ppm) Cu2+ in the nutrient solution, indicating that it is a Cu hyperaccumulator. We investigated uptake, binding environment, and toxicity of Cu in this plant under emerged and submerged conditions. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on frozen-hydrated samples revealed that Cu was bound almost exclusively by oxygen ligands, likely organic acids, and not any sulfur ligands. Despite significant differences in photosynthesis biochemistry and biophysics between emerged and submerged plants, no differences in Cu ligands were found. While measurements of tissue pH confirmed the diurnal acid cycle typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism, Δ13C measurements showed values typical for regular C3 photosynthesis. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis mainly affected the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center, but with some unusual features. Most obviously, the degree of light saturation of electron transport increased during Cu stress, while maximal dark-adapted PSII quantum yield did not change and light-adapted quantum yield of PSII photochemistry decreased particularly in the first 50 s after onset of actinic irradiance. This combination of changes, which were strongest in submerged cultures, shows a decreasing number of functional reaction centers relative to the antenna in a system with high antenna connectivity. Nonphotochemical quenching, in contrast, was modified by Cu mainly in emerged cultures. Pigment concentrations in stressed plants strongly decreased, but no changes in their ratios occurred, indicating that cells either survived intact or died and bleached quickly. PMID:19641032

  5. Complexation and toxicity of copper in higher plants. I. Characterization of copper accumulation, speciation, and toxicity in Crassula helmsii as a new copper accumulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Hendrik; Götz, Birgit; Mijovilovich, Ana; Küpper, Frithjof C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2009-10-01

    The amphibious water plant Crassula helmsii is an invasive copper (Cu)-tolerant neophyte in Europe. It now turned out to accumulate Cu up to more than 9,000 ppm in its shoots at 10 microm (=0.6 ppm) Cu(2+) in the nutrient solution, indicating that it is a Cu hyperaccumulator. We investigated uptake, binding environment, and toxicity of Cu in this plant under emerged and submerged conditions. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on frozen-hydrated samples revealed that Cu was bound almost exclusively by oxygen ligands, likely organic acids, and not any sulfur ligands. Despite significant differences in photosynthesis biochemistry and biophysics between emerged and submerged plants, no differences in Cu ligands were found. While measurements of tissue pH confirmed the diurnal acid cycle typical for Crassulacean acid metabolism, Delta(13)C measurements showed values typical for regular C3 photosynthesis. Cu-induced inhibition of photosynthesis mainly affected the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center, but with some unusual features. Most obviously, the degree of light saturation of electron transport increased during Cu stress, while maximal dark-adapted PSII quantum yield did not change and light-adapted quantum yield of PSII photochemistry decreased particularly in the first 50 s after onset of actinic irradiance. This combination of changes, which were strongest in submerged cultures, shows a decreasing number of functional reaction centers relative to the antenna in a system with high antenna connectivity. Nonphotochemical quenching, in contrast, was modified by Cu mainly in emerged cultures. Pigment concentrations in stressed plants strongly decreased, but no changes in their ratios occurred, indicating that cells either survived intact or died and bleached quickly.

  6. Copper toxicity in Chinese cabbage is not influenced by plant sulphur status, but affects sulphur metabolism-related gene expression and the suggested regulatory metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahbaz, M.; Stuiver, C. E. E.; Posthumus, F. S.; Parmar, S.; Hawkesford, M. J.; De Kok, L. J.

    The toxicity of high copper (Cu) concentrations in the root environment of Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis) was little influenced by the sulphur nutritional status of the plant. However, Cu toxicity removed the correlation between sulphur metabolism-related gene expression and the suggested

  7. Hydroponics: A Versatile System to Study Nutrient Allocation and Plant Responses to Nutrient Availability and Exposure to Toxic Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga T; McInturf, Samuel A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G

    2016-07-13

    Hydroponic systems have been utilized as one of the standard methods for plant biology research and are also used in commercial production for several crops, including lettuce and tomato. Within the plant research community, numerous hydroponic systems have been designed to study plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we present a hydroponic protocol that can be easily implemented in laboratories interested in pursuing studies on plant mineral nutrition. This protocol describes the hydroponic system set up in detail and the preparation of plant material for successful experiments. Most of the materials described in this protocol can be found outside scientific supply companies, making the set up for hydroponic experiments less expensive and convenient. The use of a hydroponic growth system is most advantageous in situations where the nutrient media need to be well controlled and when intact roots need to be harvested for downstream applications. We also demonstrate how nutrient concentrations can be modified to induce plant responses to both essential nutrients and toxic non-essential elements.

  8. Effects of a phospholipase A/sub 2/ inhibitor on uptake and toxicity of liposomes containing plant phosphatidylinositol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, M.; Alving, C.R.

    1986-05-01

    Plant phosphatidylinositol (PI) has been shown by us to have a direct cytotoxic effect on cultured tumor cells but not on normal cells. Synthetic PI containing /sup 14/C-linoleic acid in the sn-2 position, also showed the same pattern of selective cytotoxicity. When the metabolic fate of synthetic PI was examined with tumor cells, the radioactivity which no longer occurred as PI, was found as either products of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (93%, free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine) or phospholipase C (7%, diglycerides). Uptake of liposomal PI was directly correlated with cytotoxicity. They tested a variety of inhibitors to see the effect on uptake and/or cytotoxicity of plant PI. General metabolic inhibitors such as metrizamide or sodium azide did not alter cellular uptake of the plant PI liposomes. Inhibitors of lipoxygenase formation, such as indomethacin, also did not alter the uptake or cytotoxicity induced by plant PI. Quinacrine, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/, decreased the uptake of the PI containing liposomes to 50% of that seen in the presence or absence of any other inhibitor. Although quinacrine is itself toxic to cells, at low concentrations of quinacrine, plant PI did not show the same degree of cytotoxicity as in the absence of quinacrine. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that plant PI exerts cytotoxicity by serving as a substrate for phospholipase A/sub 2/.

  9. Toxic effects of coastal and marine plant extracts on mosquito larvae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Solimabi; DeSouza, L.; Kamat, S.Y.

    (Halophila ovalis, Syringodium isoetifolium), and a lichen (Umbilicaria aprine) were studied for their toxicity against larvae of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Petroleum-ether fractions (PE) were more effective than chloroform fractions (C) in all...

  10. Toxicity of six plant extracts and two pyridone alkaloids from Ricinus communis against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachira, Sabina Wangui; Omar, Sabar; Jacob, Julia Wanjiru; Wahome, Martin; Alborn, Hans T; Spring, David R; Masiga, Daniel K; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-07-04

    The African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s., is known to feed selectively on certain plants for sugar sources. However, the adaptive significance of this behaviour especially on how the extracts of such plants impact on the fitness of this vector has not been explored. This study determined the toxicity and larvicidal activity on this vector of extracts from six selected plants found in Kenya and two compounds identified from Ricinus communis: 3-carbonitrile-4-methoxy-N-methyl-2-pyridone (ricinine), and its carboxylic acid derivative 3-carboxy-4-methoxy-N-methyl-2-pyridone, the latter compound being reported for the first time from this plant. Feeding assays tested for toxic effects of extracts from the plants Artemisia afra Jacq. ex Willd, Bidens pilosa L., Parthenium hysterophorus L., Ricinus coummunis L., Senna didymobotrya Fresen. and Tithonia diversifolia Hemsl. on adult females and larvicidal activity was tested against third-instar larvae of Anopheles gambiae s.s. Mortality of larvae and adult females was monitored for three and eight days, respectively; Probit analysis was used to calculate LC50. Survival was analysed with Kaplan-Meier Model. LC-MS was used to identify the pure compounds. Of the six plants screened, extracts from T. diversifolia and R. communis were the most toxic against adult female mosquitoes after 7 days of feeding, with LC50 of 1.52 and 2.56 mg/mL respectively. Larvicidal activity of all the extracts increased with the exposure time with the highest mortality recorded for the extract from R. communis after 72 h of exposure (LC50 0.18 mg/mL). Mosquitoes fed on solutions of the pure compounds, 3-carboxy-4-methoxy-N-methyl-2-pyridone and ricinine survived almost as long as those fed on the R. communis extract with mean survival of 4.93 ± 0.07, 4.85 ± 0.07 and 4.50 ± 0.05 days respectively. Overall, these findings demonstrate that extracts from the six plant species exhibit varying bioactivity against the larvae

  11. Are There Toxic Plants in Your Classroom? A Resource for Teachers of Children with Exceptional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Retha M.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2008-01-01

    In elementary and secondary classrooms, educators use plants for various reasons. Plants are often used during learning activities and science experiments. Also, educators frequently decorate their classrooms with plants to make the room more inviting and comfortable. Few new educators have been informed of the potential hazards of commonly known…

  12. Two-generation reproductive toxicity study of plant stanol esters in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittaker, M.H.; Frankos, V.H.; Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Plant stanol esters are intended for use as an ingredient in food to reduce the absorption of cholesterol from the gastrointestinal tract. Consumption of plant stanol esters has a demonstrated diet-derived public health benefit, as shown by numerous clinical studies. Plant stanol esters are

  13. Comparison of toxic heavy metals concentration in medicinal plants and their respective branded herbal formulations commonly available in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Waheed Ali; Zakiullah; Khuda, Fazli; Khan, Faridullah; Saeed, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted on fifteen medicinal plants and their respective branded formulations, commonly used in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, for the evaluation of toxic heavy metals. The purpose of the study was to assess the toxic profile of the crude medicinal plants with respect to the worldwide permissible limits of metal concentrations and to correlate it with their respective herbal formulations available on the market. Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), Manganese (Mn) and Nickel (Ni) content were evaluated using wet digestion and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry technique. The results exhibited that in 100% of the analyzed medicinal plants Cr and Ni are present in excess of the maximum limits, Cu and Pb in 73% and 60% respectively, while Mn is in the normal range. Likewise in the respective branded formulations Cr and Ni exceed the normal limit in 100% of the products, Cu and Pb in 27% and 20% of the products respectively, while Mn is in the normal range. It indicates that majority of people in Pakistan who frequently use herbal drugs in various forms are exposed to the hazardous elements, which may pose serious health effects. Regulatory measures should therefore be taken to protect the general public from their hazardous health effects.

  14. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  15. Transcriptome analysis highlights changes in the leaves of maize plants cultivated in acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al(3+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello, Lucia; Begcy, Kevin; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Jorge, Renato A; Menossi, Marcelo

    2014-12-01

    Soil acidity limits crop yields worldwide and is a common result of aluminum (Al) phytotoxicity, which is known to inhibit root growth. Here, we compared the transcriptome of leaves from maize seedlings grown under control conditions (soil without free Al) and under acidic soil containing toxic levels of Al. This study reports, for the first time, the complex transcriptional changes that occur in the leaves of maize plants grown in acidic soil with phytotoxic levels of Al. Our data indicate that 668 genes were differentially expressed in the leaves of plants grown in acidic soil, which is significantly greater than that observed in our previous work with roots. Genes encoding TCA cycle enzymes were upregulated, although no specific transporter of organic acids was differentially expressed in leaves. We also provide evidence for positive roles for auxin and brassinosteroids in Al tolerance, whereas gibberellin and jasmonate may have negative roles. Our data indicate that plant responses to acidic soil with high Al content are not restricted to the root; tolerance mechanisms are also displayed in the aerial parts of the plant, thus indicating that the entire plant responds to stress.

  16. Greatly reduced bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to Hyalella azteca in sediments from manufactured-gas plant sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitinger, Joseph P; Neuhauser, Edward F; Doherty, Francis G; Hawthorne, Steven B

    2007-06-01

    The toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to Hyalella azteca, was measured in 34 sediment samples collected from four manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites ranging in total PAH16 (sum of 16 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutant PAHs) concentrations from 4 to 5700 mg/kg, total organic carbon content from 0.6 to 11%, and soot carbon from 0.2 to 5.1%. The survival and growth of H. azteca in 28-d bioassays were unrelated to total PAH concentration, with 100% survival in one sediment having 1,730 mg/kg total PAH16, whereas no survival was observed in sediment samples with concentrations as low as 54 mg/kg total PAH16. Twenty-five of the 34 sediment samples exceeded the probable effects concentration screening value of 22.8 mg/kg total PAH13 (sum of 13 PAHs) and equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmarks for PAH mixtures (on the basis of the measurement of 18 parent PAHs and 16 groups of alkylated PAHs, [PAH34]); yet, 19 (76%) of the 25 samples predicted to be toxic were not toxic to H. azteca. However, the toxicity of PAHs to H. azteca was accurately predicted when either the rapidly released concentrations as determined by mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) or the pore-water concentrations were used to establish the bioavailability of PAHs. These results demonstrate that the PAHs present in many sediments collected from MGP sites have low bioavailability and that both the measurement of the rapidly released PAH concentrations with mild SFE and the dissolved pore-water concentrations of PAHs are useful tools for estimating chronic toxicity to H. azteca.

  17. Mode of action and variability in efficacy of plant essential oils showing toxicity against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Smith, T J; Shiel, R S; Sparagano, O A E; Guy, J H

    2009-05-12

    This paper describes a series of experiments to examine the mode of action and toxicity of three plant essential oils (thyme, manuka and pennyroyal) to the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), a serious ectoparasitic pest of laying hens. All three oils were found to be toxic to D. gallinae in laboratory tests with LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values below 0.05, 0.20 and 0.30mg/cm(3), respectively, suggesting that these products may make for effective acaricides against this pest. Further experiments demonstrated that when mites were exposed to only the vapour phase of the essential oil without contact with the oil itself, mortality was consistently higher in closed arenas than in arenas open to the surrounding environment, or in control arenas. This suggests that all three essential oils were toxic to D. gallinae by fumigant action. In addition, in an experiment where mites were allowed contact with the essential oil in either open or closed arenas, mortality was always reduced in the open arenas where this was comparable to control mortality for thyme and pennyroyal essential oil treatments. This supports the findings of the previous experiment and also suggests that, with the possible exception of manuka, the selected essential oils were not toxic to D. gallinae on contact. Statistical comparisons were made between the toxicity of the selected essential oils to D. gallinae in the current work and in a previous study conducted in the same laboratory. The results demonstrated considerable variation in LC(50), LC(90) and LC(99) values. Since both the essential oils and the mites were obtained from identical sources in the two studies, it is hypothesized that this variation resulted from the use of different 'batches' of essential oil, which could have varied in chemistry and hence acaricidal activity.

  18. Investigating the formation and toxicity of nitrogen transformation products of diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole in wastewater treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Victoria; Sanchís, Josep [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Abad, Jose Luís [RUBAM-IIQAC-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, Barcelona (Spain); Ginebreda, Antoni; Farré, Marinella [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Pérez, Sandra, E-mail: spsqam@idaea.csic.es [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Barceló, Damià [Water and Soil Quality Research Group, Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, Emili Grahit 101, Girona (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Environmental monitoring of recently discovered TPs of diclofenac in wastewater and surface water. • Quantitative determination of non-detected TPs of sulfamethoxazole in wastewater and impacted surface waters. • Toxicity assessment of diclofenac and its TPs in a panel of standard assays of aquatic organism. • Only nitro-diclofenac proved to be more toxic than the parent compound. - Abstract: Diclofenac (DCF) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) are highly consumed pharmaceuticals and concentrated in effluents from conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) since they are not completely eliminated. Under microbial mediated nitrification/denitrification processes occurring in nitrifying activated sludge DCF biotransformed into its nitroso and nitro derivatives (NO-DCF and NO{sub 2}-DCF, respectively). SMX was biotransformed under denitrification conditions in water/sediment batch reactors into its nitro and desamino derivatives (NO{sub 2}-SMX and Des-SMX, respectively). Four transformation products (TPs) from DCF and SMX were analized in wastewaters (WW) and receiving surface waters (SW). Nitrifying/denitrifying-derivatives of DCF and SMX were detected for the first time in WW and SW at one order of magnitude lower than their parent compounds. Relationships observed among levels of NO-DCF, NO{sub 2}-DCF and nitrogen-species tentatively suggested that nitrification/denitrification processes are involved in nitration and nitrosation of DCF during biological WW treatment. Acute toxicity of analytes to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri was assessed individually and in mixtures with other relevant micropollutants. Individual effects showed these compounds as not harmful and not toxic. However, synergism effects observed in mixtures evidenced that contribution of these compounds to overall toxicity of complex environmental samples, should not be dismissed.

  19. Toxicity Testing of Soil Samples from Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    and 20 radish seeds were planted in the other pot. After germination , the seedlings were thinned to the 10 most uniform per pot. "Day 1" of treatment...terrestrial community, it is important to determine effects at several trophic levels. Plants ( seed germination and early seedling growth test...and radish seeds were sorted to remove broken or malformed seeds and to obtain seeds of similar size. There were 20 cucumber seeds planted in one pot

  20. Determination of toxicity of subacute treatment of some plant growth regulators on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ismail; Tuluce, Yasin

    2007-12-01

    The effects of some plant growth regulators (PGRs), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-Dichlorofenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), at sublethal concentrations on antioxidant defense system [glutathione peroxidases (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)], immune potential enzymes [adenosine deaminase (ADA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO)], and lipid peroxidation content [Malondialdehyde, (MDA)] were investigated in lung and speen tissues of rats. Sprague-Dawley albino rats were exposed to 0, 50, or 100 ppm (parts per million) TIBA, NAA, or 2,4-D in drinking water ad libitum for 25 days continuously. According to the results, MDA concentration significantly increased in the tissues treated with 100 ppm dosage of NAA or 2,4-D without any change in the tissues of rats treated with both dosage of TIBA. The GSH depletion in the spleen tissue of rats treated with both the dosage of NAA and 2,4-D were found to be significant. Also, GSH level in the spleen was significantly reduced with 100 ppm of 2,4-D and NAA. The activity of antioxidant enzymes were also seriously affected by PGRs; GPx significantly decreased in the lung of rats treated with both dosages of the PGRs, whereas GPx activity in the spleen were significantly increased with 100 ppm dosage of 2,4-D and NAA. On the other hand, CAT activity significantly decreased in the lung of rats treated with both dosages of NAA, 100 ppm of 2,4-D and 50 ppm of TIBA, and also in the spleen treated with 50 ppm NAA and 2,4-D. The ancillary enzyme GR activity significantly decreased in the spleen with both doses of the PGRs, also in the lung treated with both dosages of 2,4-D, 50 ppm of NAA and 100 ppm of TIBA. The drug metabolizing enzyme GST activity significantly reduced in the lung of rats treated with both dosages of the PGRs and also in the spleen treated with 100 ppm dosage of 2,4-D and TIBA and 50 ppm of NAA. Meanwhile, immune

  1. A lucrative technique to reduce Ni toxicity in Raphanus sativus plant by phosphate amendment: Special reference to plant metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2015-09-01

    Nickel (Ni) contamination is one of the serious environmental problems. It creates hazard in soil environment and also in crop quality. In the present study, response of Raphanus sativus (radish) to Ni (50mgkg(-1) soil) under different concentrations (100, 200, 500 and 1000 DAPmgkg(-1) soil) of phosphate as soil amendment was investigated after 40 days of growth. Ni-treated plants without amendment showed reduction in their growth as a result of appreciable decrease in the photosynthetic activity. Under this treatment, Ni accumulation significantly enhanced lipid peroxidation and level of oxidants showing oxidative stress and it was also associated with decrease in the activities of antioxidative enzymes except super oxide dismutase (SOD). Application of phosphate in Ni contaminated soil resulted into significant improvement in plant growth. Under phosphate amendment, the status of oxidative biomarkers: SOR, TBARS and H2O2 were under control by the higher activity of antioxidants: APX, CAT, POD, GST and DHAR compared to Ni contaminated soil without amendment. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to show the significant changes in biochemical traits under control and phosphate amendment. The values of PS II transient kinetics: Phi-E0, Psi-0 and PIABS increased and values of energy fluxes: ABC/RC, Tro/RC, Eto/RC and Dio/RC decreased in plants grown in Ni contaminated soil under phosphate amendment as compared to without amendment. Among all doses of phosphate amendment soil amended at 500mg DAPkg(-)(1) soil the yield of plant was the highest and Ni accumulation was the lowest. As compared to plants grown in Ni treated soil without amendment the yield of plant at 500mg DAPkg(-1) soil showed about 70% increment and the reduction in Ni accumulation was 63% in shoot and 64% in root. Because of these beneficial effects this technique can be easily applied at metal contaminated agricultural fields to reduce food chain contamination and to improve food quality.

  2. Plant toxic proteins with insecticidal properties. A review on their potentialities as bioinsecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Célia R; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2002-11-01

    To meet the demands for food of the expanding world population, there is need of new ways for protecting plant crops against predators and pathogens while avoiding the use of environmentally aggressive chemicals. A milestone in this field was the introduction into crop plants of genes expressing Bacillus thuringiensis entomotoxic proteins. In spite of the success of this new technology, however, there are difficulties for acceptance of these 'anti-natural' products by the consumers and some concerns about its biosafety in mammals. An alternative could be exploring the plant's own defense mechanisms, by manipulating the expression of their endogenous defense proteins, or introducing an insect control gene derived from another plant. This review deals with the biochemical features and mechanisms of actions of plant proteins supposedly involved in defense mechanisms against insects, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, enzymes inhibitors, arcelins, chitinases, ureases, and modified storage proteins. The potentialities of genetic engineering of plants with increased resistance to insect predation relying on the repertoire of genes found in plants are also discussed. Several different genes encoding plant entomotoxic proteins have been introduced into crop genomes and many of these insect resistant plants are now being tested in field conditions or awaiting commercialization. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Effects of zinc toxicity on sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants grown in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagardoy, R; Morales, F; López-Millán, A-F; Abadía, A; Abadía, J

    2009-05-01

    The effects of high Zn concentration were investigated in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants grown in a controlled environment in hydroponics. High concentrations of Zn sulphate in the nutrient solution (50, 100 and 300 microm) decreased root and shoot fresh and dry mass, and increased root/shoot ratios, when compared to control conditions (1.2 microm Zn). Plants grown with excess Zn had inward-rolled leaf edges and a damaged and brownish root system, with short lateral roots. High Zn decreased N, Mg, K and Mn concentrations in all plant parts, whereas P and Ca concentrations increased, but only in shoots. Leaves of plants treated with 50 and 100 microm Zn developed symptoms of Fe deficiency, including decreases in Fe, chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations, increases in carotenoid/chlorophyll and chlorophyll a/b ratios and de-epoxidation of violaxanthin cycle pigments. Plants grown with 300 microm Zn had decreased photosystem II efficiency and further growth decreases but did not have leaf Fe deficiency symptoms. Leaf Zn concentrations of plants grown with excess Zn were high but fairly constant (230-260 microg.g(-1) dry weight), whereas total Zn uptake per plant decreased markedly with high Zn supply. These data indicate that sugar beet could be a good model to investigate Zn homeostasis mechanisms in plants, but is not an efficient species for Zn phytoremediation.

  4. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing toxic plants (Scenecio, Crotalaria, Cynoglossum, Amsinckia, Heliotropium, and Echium spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) containing plants are found throughout the world and are probably the most common plant cause of poisoning of livestock, wildlife and humans. PAs are potent liver toxins that under some conditions can be carcinogenic. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce hi...

  5. Repellence and toxicity of plant essential oils to the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke, M.E.; Bruin, de A.; Moskal, J.R.; Tol, van R.W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Several plant essential oils were tested for their effect on behaviour and mortality of M. euphorbiae. Olfactory and contact experiments were performed to study these effects. We found that host plant and formulation of the different oils have a strong influence on repellence and mortality of the

  6. Secondary compounds in floral rewards of toxic rangeland plants: impacts on pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Rebecca E; Cook, Daniel; Richardson, Leif L; Manson, Jessamyn S; Gardner, Dale R

    2014-07-30

    The study of plant secondary chemistry has been essential in understanding plant consumption by herbivores. There is growing evidence that secondary compounds also occur in floral rewards, including nectar and pollen. Many pollinators are generalist nectar and pollen foragers and thus are exposed to an array of secondary compounds in their diet. This review documents secondary compounds in the nectar or pollen of poisonous rangeland plants of the western United States and the effects of these compounds on the behavior, performance, and survival of pollinators. Furthermore, the biochemical, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms by which pollinators cope with secondary compound consumption are discussed, drawing parallels between pollinators and herbivores. Finally, three avenues of future research on floral reward chemistry are proposed. Given that the majority of flowering plants require animals for pollination, understanding how floral reward chemistry affects pollinators has implications for plant reproduction in agricultural and rangeland habitats.

  7. Protective activity of medicinal plants and their isolated compounds against the toxic effects from the venom of Naja (cobra) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabbir, Arham; Shahzad, Muhammad; Masci, Paul; Gobe, Glenda C

    2014-11-18

    Various medicinal plants have protective properties against the toxicities of the venom of cobra snake (Naja species). They may be used as local first aid for the treatment of snakebite victims, and can significantly inhibit lethality, cardio-, neuro-, nephro- and myotoxicity, hemorrhage, and respiratory paralysis induced by the cobra snake venom. The plants or their extracts may also complement the benefits of conventional anti-serum treatment. This review provides information on the protective, anti-venom, properties of medicinal plants against snakebites from cobras. In addition, it identifies knowledge gaps and suggests further research opportunities. The literature was searched using databases including Google Scholar, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Web of Science. The searches were limited to peer-reviewed journals written in English with the exception of some books and a few articles in foreign languages. The plants possess neutralization properties against different cobra venom enzymes, such as hyaluronidase, acetylcholinesterase, phospholipase A2 and plasma proteases. Different active constituents that show promising activity against the effects of cobra venom include lupeol acetate, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, rediocides A and G, quercertin, aristolochic acid, and curcumin, as well as the broad chemical groups of tannins, glycoproteins, and flavones. The medicinal plants can increase snakebite victim survival time, decrease the severity of toxic signs, enhance diaphragm muscle contraction, block antibody attachment to venom, and inhibit protein destruction. In particular, the cardiovascular system is protected, with inhibition of blood pressure decline and depressed atrial contractility and rate, and prevention of damage to heart and vessels. The designs of experimental studies that show benefits, or otherwise, of use of medicinal plants have some limitations: deficiency in identification and isolation of active constituents responsible for

  8. Tier-1 assays for assessing the toxicity of insecticidal proteins produced by genetically engineered plants to non-target arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-He; Romeis, Jörg; Wu, Kong-Ming; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2014-04-01

    In assessing an insect-resistant genetically engineered (IRGE) crop before its commercialization, researchers normally use so-called "Tier-1 assays" as the initial step to determine the effects of the crop on non-target organisms. In these tests, the insecticidal proteins (IPs) produced by the IRGEs are added to the diets of test organisms in the laboratory. Test organisms in such assays can be directly exposed to much higher concentrations of the test IPs than they would encounter in the field. The results of Tier-1 assays are thus more conservative than those generated in studies in which the organisms are exposed to the IPs by feeding on IRGE plant tissue or in the case of predators or parasites, by feeding on invertebrate prey or hosts that have fed on IRGE plant tissue. In this report, we consider three important factors that must be considered in Tier-1 assays: (i) methods for delivery of the IP to the test organisms; (ii) the need for and selection of compounds used as positive controls; and (iii) methods for monitoring the concentration, stability and bioactivity of the IP during the assay. We also analyze the existing data from Tier-1 assays regarding the toxicity of Bt Cry proteins to non-target arthropod species. The data indicate that the widely used Bt proteins have no direct toxicity to non-target organisms.

  9. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  10. Toxicity of heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-08-01

    Plants are under the continual threat of changing climatic conditions that are associated with various types of abiotic stresses. In particular, heavy metal contamination is a major environmental concern that restricts plant growth. Plants absorb heavy metals along with essential elements from the soil and have evolved different strategies to cope with the accumulation of heavy metals. The use of proteomic techniques is an effective approach to investigate and identify the biological mechanisms and pathways affected by heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles. The present review focuses on recent advances and summarizes the results from proteomic studies aimed at understanding the response mechanisms of plants under heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress. Transport of heavy metal ions is regulated through the cell wall and plasma membrane and then sequestered in the vacuole. In addition, the role of different metal chelators involved in the detoxification and sequestration of heavy metals is critically reviewed, and changes in protein profiles of plants exposed to metal-containing nanoparticles are discussed in detail. Finally, strategies for gaining new insights into plant tolerance mechanisms to heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  11. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Taylor

    Full Text Available We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake.

  12. Toxicity to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri of Kraft bleach plant effluents treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Albin; Besson, Michèle; Gallezot, Pierre; Gibert, Janine; Martin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Two Kraft-pulp bleaching effluents from a sequence of treatments which include chlorine dioxide and caustic soda were treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) at T=463 K in trickle-bed and batch-recycle reactors packed with either TiO2 extrudates or Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst. Chemical analyses (TOC removal, color, HPLC) and bioassays (48-h and 30-min acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, respectively) were used to get information about the toxicity impact of the starting effluents and of the treated solutions. Under the operating conditions, complex organic compounds are mostly oxidized into carbon dioxide and water, along with short-chain carboxylic acids. Bioassays were found as a complement to chemical analyses for ensuring the toxicological impact on the ecosystem. In spite of a large decrease of TOC, the solutions of end products were all more toxic to Daphnia magna than the starting effluents by factors ranging from 2 to 33. This observation is attributed to the synergistic effects of acetic acid and salts present in the solutions. On the other hand, toxicity reduction with respect to Vibrio fischeri was achieved: detoxification factors greater than unity were measured for end-product solutions treated in the presence of the Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst, suggesting the absence of cumulative effect for this bacteria, or a lower sensitivity to the organic acids and salts. Bleach plant effluents treated by the CWAO process over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst were completely biodegradable.

  13. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Emissions from Lime Manufacturing Plants Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Lime Manufacturing Plants. This document provides a summary of the information for this NESHAP.

  14. Production of a toxic metabolite in 2,4-D-resistant GM crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, Paul F

    2016-06-01

    This Note questions the safety of crop plants engineered with transgenes coding for the degradation of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) into its cytotoxic metabolite 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP).

  15. Toxicities of TNT and RDX to Terrestrial Plants in Five Soils with Contrasting Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    soils because the majority of plant dry matter consists of assimilates (i.e., carbohydrates , proteins , and lipids ) that are synthesized during...trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) for terrestrial plants. The physical and chemical properties of different soils may... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Five Field Soils (n = 3) Soil Property TSL Soil SSL Soil KCL Soil RCL Soil WCL Soil Sand (%) 65 (1.0

  16. Foliar application of brassinosteroids alleviates adverse effects of zinc toxicity in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Bellamkonda; Rao, S Seeta Ram

    2015-03-01

    Growth chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the comparative effect of 24-epibrassinolide (EBL) and 28-homobrassinolide (HBL) at 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 μM concentrations by foliar application on radish plants growing under Zn(2+) stress. In radish plants exposed to excess Zn(2+), growth was substantially reduced in terms of shoot and root length, fresh and dry weight. However, foliar application of brassinosteroids (BRs) was able to alleviate Zn(2+)-induced stress and significantly improve the above growth traits. Zinc stress decreased chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids levels in radish plants. However, follow-up treatment with BRs increased the photosynthetic pigments in stressed and stress-free plants. The treatment of BRs led to reduced levels of H2O2, lipid peroxidation and, electrolyte leakage (ELP) and improved the leaf relative water content (RWC) in stressed plants. Increased levels of carbonyls indicating enhanced protein oxidation under Zn(2+) stress was effectively countered by supplementation of BRs. Under Zn(2+) stress, the activities of catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and superoxidase dismutase (SOD) were increased but peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reductase (GR) decreased. Foliar spraying of BRs enhanced all these enzymatic activities in radish plants under Zn(2+) stress. The BRs application greatly enhanced contents of ascorbate (ASA), glutathione (GSH), and proline under Zn(2+) stress. The decrease in the activity of nitrate reductase (NR) caused by Zn(2+) stress was restored to the level of control by application of BRs. These results point out that BRs application elevated levels of antioxidative enzymes as well as antioxidants could have conferred resistance to radish plants against Zn(2+) stress resulting in improved plant growth, relative water content and photosynthetic attributes. Of the two BRs, EBL was most effective in amelioration of Zn(2+) stress.

  17. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva; Godofredo Cesar Vitti; Anderson Ricardo Trevizam

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different re...

  18. Heavy metal toxicity in rice and soybean plants cultivated in contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lígia de Souza Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals can accumulate in soil and cause phytotoxicity in plants with some specific symptoms. The present study evaluated the specific symptoms on rice and soybeans plants caused by excess of heavy metals in soil. Rice and soybean were grown in pots containing soil with different levels of heavy metals. A completely randomized design was used, with four replications, using two crop species and seven sample soils with different contamination levels. Rice and soybean exhibited different responses to the high concentrations of heavy metals in the soil. Rice plants accumulated higher Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn concentrations and were more sensitive to high concentrations of these elements in the soil, absorbing them more easily compared to the soybean plants. However, high available Zn concentrations in the soil caused phytotoxicity symptoms in rice and soybean, mainly chlorosis and inhibited plant growth. Further, high Zn concentrations in the soil reduced the Fe concentration in the shoots of soybean and rice plants to levels considered deficient.

  19. Survival strategies of plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on toxic mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, H M; Ye, Z H; Wong, M H

    2007-01-01

    A field survey of metal concentrations and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) components of plants growing on five mining sites was conducted in Chenzhou City, Hunan Province, Southern China and a control site in Hong Kong. Significant differences were observed in the average concentrations of total heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd) and one metalloid (As) in contaminated soils compared with the control site. Gramineae and Compositae were the dominant plant families growing on mine tailings, with Chrysanthemum moritolium (common chrysanthemum), Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass), Miscanthus florodulus (Sword grass) and Pteris vittata (Ladder brake fern) commonly found at all sites. AM fungal colonization was detected in most of the plants. Comparing the four common plant species, three components of mycorrhizal colonization (arbuscules, vesicles and coiled hyphae) were found in the roots of C. dactylon and P. vittata growing at Do Shun Long (DSL) mine site. Concentrations of As in fronds were 24-fold higher than in roots of P. vittata with the highest mycorrhizal colonization rate (73%) among all sampling sites. Extensive mycorrhizal colonization (85%) was also recorded in the roots of C. dactylon with As accumulation 57 times higher than in shoots. The four common plants found in metal contaminated sites had developed different strategies for survival in the contaminated sites with the aid of indigenous AM fungi.

  20. The Role of the Plasma Membrane in the Response of Plant Roots to Aluminum Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Sung-Ju; Matsumoto, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    Al3+, the predominant form of solubilized aluminum at pH values below 5.0, has been shown to exert a profound inhibitory effect on root elongation. Al is known to accumulate at the root apex. The plasma membrane represents the first potential target for Al toxicity, due to its pronounced binding to phospholipids. Al appears to alter both the structure and functions of the plasma membrane, and a great deal of research has been conducted concerning the interactions between Al and the plasma mem...

  1. Remediation and reclamation of soils heavily contaminated with toxic metals as a substrate for greening with ornamental plants and grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelusic, Masa; Lestan, Domen

    2015-11-01

    Soils highly contaminated with toxic metals are currently treated as waste despite their potential inherent fertility. We applied EDTA washing technology featuring chelant and process water recovery for remediation of soil with 4037, 2527, and 26 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively in a pilot scale. A high EDTA dose (120 mmol kg(-1) of soil) removed 70%, 15%, and 58% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, and reduced human oral bioaccessibility of Pb below the limit of quantification and that of Zn and Cd 3.4 and 3.2 times. In a lysimeters experiment, the contaminated and remediated soils were laid into two garden beds (4×1×0.15 m) equipped with lysimeters, and subjected to cultivation of ornamental plants: Impatiens walleriana, Tagetes erecta, Pelargonium×peltatum, and Verbena×hybrida and grasses: Dactylis glomerata, Lolium multiflorum, and Festuca pratensis. Plants grown on remediated soil demonstrated the same or greater biomass yield and reduced the uptake of Pb, Zn and Cd up to 10, 2.5 and 9.5 times, respectively, compared to plants cultivated on the original soil. The results suggest that EDTA remediation produced soil suitable for greening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute toxic and genotoxic activities of widely used cytostatic drugs in higher plants: Possible impact on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišík, Miroslav; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard; Filipic, Metka; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2014-11-01

    Cytostatic drugs are highly toxic pharmaceuticals and it was repeatedly postulated that they may cause adverse effects in ecosystems. The acute toxic and genotoxic properties of these drugs have not been adequately investigated in higher plants so far; therefore, we studied the most widely used drugs (5-flurouracil, 5FU; etoposide, Et; cisplatin, CisPt; carboplatin, CaPt; vincristine sulfate, VinS and cyclophosphamide monohydrate, CP) in micronucleus (MN) assays with meiotic pollen tetrad cells of Tradescantia and with root cells from Allium cepa. MNi are formed as a consequence of chromosome breaks and aneuploidy. We monitored also the acute toxic properties of the drugs, i.e. inhibition of cell division (mitotic indices and retardation of root growth) in the latter species. All compounds caused in both indicator plants genotoxic effects. The order of genotoxic potencies expressed as NOELs in µM was CisPt (0.1)≥ Et (0.5)>CP (1.0)>CaPt (10)>5FU (30)>VinS (100) in Tradescantia. A similar order was seen in Allium MN but Et was less active (5.0µM). Four compounds caused alterations of the mitotic indices under the present conditions namely CisPt (0.5), Et (10.0), 5FU (10.0) and VinS (100). Inhibition of root growth decreased in the order CisPt (0.5)>Et (1.0)≥VinS (1.0)>5FU (5.0)>CaPt (33.0)>CP (>1000). Comparisons of the NOELs with the predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) show that the latter values are at least 5 orders of magnitude lower and indicate that it is unlikely that their release in the environment may cause adverse effects in higher plants. However, it is notable that the levels of both platinum compounds and of 5FU in hospital effluents may reach levels which may induce damage of the genetic material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxicity of selected plant volatiles in microbial and mammalian short-term assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stammati, A.; Bonsi, P.; Zucco, F.; Moezelaar, R.; Alakomi, H.L.; von Wright, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, several short-term microbial and mammalian in vitro assays were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four plant volatiles showing antifungal activity: cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol and S(+)-carvone. All inhibited viability and proliferation of Hep-2 cells in a dose-de

  4. Study of element uptake in plants from the soil to assess environmental contamination by toxic elements

    CERN Document Server

    En, Z; Tsipin, V V; Tillaev, T; Jumaniyazova, G I

    2003-01-01

    Uptake of various elements by plants through the root system from the soil was studied. Vegetation experiments with cotton and white beet were carried out in the control and test fields. The test fields were enriched with phyto-bacterial strains capable of dissolving insoluble phosphate compounds. Analytical work involved analysis of blank, control and test soil samples and analysis of plants sampled in different growing periods: periods of first sprouts, florescence and ripening of the plants. Multielement analyses of soil and plant samples were carried out by instrumental neutron activation techniques using our WWR-SM research reactor. Results of the measurements have shown that macro- and microelement composition of the analyzed soil samples were consistent to clark contents except for copper. Our experiments have resulted that the concentration levels of copper in the soils were within 300-450 mg/kg, and its average concentration in cotton leaves was about similar to 35 mg/kg while in beet leaves it reach...

  5. Toxicity and Treatment of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products Using Exotic Plants - A Laboratory Scale Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez Vargas, Carlos Andrés; Paredes, Diego; Cubillos, Janneth

    alternative systems. Constructed wetlands (CWs) have showed satisfactory results for PPCPs removal (Avila et al., 2013). The aim of the study was to assess the tolerance and removal capacity of Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Cis-MDJM, Galaxolide, Tonalide, Caffeine, Naproxen, Ketoprofen and Diclofenac, by exotic plants...

  6. Convergently Evolved Toxic Secondary Metabolites in Plants Drive the Parallel Molecular Evolution of Insect Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschenka, Georg; Wagschal, Vera; von Tschirnhaus, Michael; Donath, Alexander; Dobler, Susanne

    2017-08-01

    Natural selection imposed by natural toxins has led to striking levels of convergent evolution at the molecular level. Cardiac glycosides represent a group of plant toxins that block the Na,K-ATPase, a vital membrane protein in animals. Several herbivorous insects have convergently evolved resistant Na,K-ATPases, and in some species, convergent gene duplications have also arisen, likely to cope with pleiotropic costs of resistance. To understand the genetic basis and predictability of these adaptations, we studied five independent lineages of leaf-mining flies (Diptera: Agromyzidae). These flies have colonized host plants in four botanical families that convergently evolved cardiac glycosides of two structural types: cardenolides and bufadienolides. We compared each of six fly species feeding on such plants to a phylogenetically related but nonadapted species. Irrespective of the type of cardiac glycoside in the host plant, five out of six exposed species displayed substitutions in the cardiac glycoside-binding site of the Na,K-ATPase that were previously described in other insect orders; in only one species was the gene duplicated. In vitro assays of nervous tissue extractions confirmed that the substitutions lead to increased resistance of the Na,K-ATPase. Our results demonstrate that target site insensitivity of Na,K-ATPase is a common response to dietary cardiac glycosides leading to highly predictable amino acid changes; nonetheless, convergent evolution of gene duplication for this multifunctional enzyme appears more constrained.

  7. Characterizing the Uptake, Accumulation and Toxicity of Silver Sulfide Nanoparticles in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used in a wide range of everyday products, leading to increasing concerns regarding their accumulation in soils and subsequent impact on plants. Using single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) and synchrotron-based t...

  8. Toxicity of selected plant volatiles in microbial and mammalian short-term assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stammati, A.; Bonsi, P.; Zucco, F.; Moezelaar, R.; Alakomi, H.L.; Wright, von A.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, several short-term microbial and mammalian in vitro assays were used to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of four plant volatiles showing antifungal activity: cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, thymol and S(+)-carvone. All inhibited viability and proliferation of Hep-2 cells in a dose-de

  9. Resistance to toxic plants: The right animal in the right pasture at the right time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurotoxic poisonous plants negatively impact livestock on many western rangelands, which results in annual economic losses of millions of dollars from animal deaths, increased management and treatment costs, and if animals are deferred from grazing, the underutilization of otherwise highly nutritio...

  10. Trichobaris weevils distinguish amongst toxic host plants by sensing volatiles that do not affect larval performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gisuk; Joo, Youngsung; Diezel, Celia; Lee, Eun Ju; Baldwin, Ian T; Kim, Sang-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    Herbivorous insects use plant metabolites to inform their host plant selection for oviposition. These host-selection behaviours are often consistent with the preference-performance hypothesis; females oviposit on hosts that maximize the performance of their offspring. However, the metabolites used for these oviposition choices and those responsible for differences in offspring performance remain unknown for ecologically relevant interactions. Here, we examined the host-selection behaviours of two sympatric weevils, the Datura (Trichobaris compacta) and tobacco (T. mucorea) weevils in field and glasshouse experiments with transgenic host plants specifically altered in different components of their secondary metabolism. Adult females of both species strongly preferred to feed on D. wrightii rather than on N. attenuata leaves, but T. mucorea preferred to oviposit on N. attenuata, while T. compacta oviposited only on D. wrightii. These oviposition behaviours increased offspring performance: T. compacta larvae only survived in D. wrightii stems and T. mucorea larvae survived better in N. attenuata than in D. wrightii stems. Choice assays with nicotine-free, JA-impaired, and sesquiterpene-over-produced isogenic N. attenuata plants revealed that although half of the T. compacta larvae survived in nicotine-free N. attenuata lines, nicotine did not influence the oviposition behaviours of both the nicotine-adapted and nicotine-sensitive species. JA-induced sesquiterpene volatiles are key compounds influencing T. mucorea females' oviposition choices, but these sesquiterpenes had no effect on larval performance. We conclude that adult females are able to choose the best host plant for their offspring and use chemicals different from those that influence larval performance to inform their oviposition decisions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toxic tetrapyrrole accumulation in protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase-overexpressing transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunyo; Lee, Hye-Jung; Lee, Yonghyuk; Kang, Kiyoon; Kim, Young Soon; Grimm, Bernhard; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2008-07-01

    We generated transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa cv. Dongjin) over-expressing human protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPO) with the aim to increase mitochondrial PPO activity and confer herbicide resistance (Lee et al., Pestic Biochem Physiol 80:65-74, 2004). The transgenic plants showed during further leaf development the formation of severe necrotic spots and growth retardation. Several experiments were performed to examine the reasons for the formation of necrotic leaf lesions. Human PPO is normally located in mitochondria. An in vitro organellar import experiment revealed translocation of human PPO into pea chloroplasts, but not into mitochondria. Using a specific antibody raised against human PPO confirmed its plastidic localisation. The heme and chlorophyll contents were lower in necrotic leaves than wild-type leaves. Interestingly, mature and necrotic leaves of 12-week-old transgenic plants contained up to 14- and 24-fold more protoporphyrin IX, respectively, than mature wild-type leaves. Enhanced levels of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, Mg-Protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester and protochlorophyllide were concurrently observed in transgenic plants relative to wild type. Accumulated porphyrins and Mg-porphyrins likely act as photosensitizers and cause high formation of the reactive oxygen species. These high levels of tetrapyrrole intermediates correlated with increased rates of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthesis in transgenic plants. Tetrapyrrole-induced photooxidation was confirmed by increased lipid peroxidation and subsequent cell death. The transgenic phenotype is the consequence of a highly modified tetrapyrrole metabolism due to additional expression of human PPO. A possible regulatory role of PPO in graminaceous seedlings is discussed.

  12. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szandra Klátyik

    2017-09-01

    between the active ingredients and their additives in formulated products; moreover, toxicity has been evidenced for various additives. Therefore, toxicological evaluation of surfactants and other additives is essential for proper environmental risk assessment of formulations used in agriculture including animal husbandry and plant protection.

  13. Authorization and Toxicity of Veterinary Drugs and Plant Protection Products: Residues of the Active Ingredients in Food and Feed and Toxicity Problems Related to Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klátyik, Szandra; Bohus, Péter; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    active ingredients and their additives in formulated products; moreover, toxicity has been evidenced for various additives. Therefore, toxicological evaluation of surfactants and other additives is essential for proper environmental risk assessment of formulations used in agriculture including animal husbandry and plant protection. PMID:28929103

  14. Sub-acute toxicity of a hydro-ethanolic whole plant extract of Synedrella nodiflora (L Gaertn in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adjei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Synedrella nodiflora (L Gaertn (family Asteraceae is traditionally used in Ghana for the management of epilepsy, hiccup and threatened abortion. The anticonvulsant and other related neuro-pharmacological effects of a hydro-ethanolic extract in murine models have been established. To this end, we evaluated a sub-acute toxicity of the hydro-ethanolic whole plant extract in rats. Materials and Methods: The effects of a continuous 14-day oral administration of the extract (100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg on haematological and serum biochemical parameters were measured. Results: The extract produced no mortality in the rats treated during the study period. The extract also did not significantly affect any of the haematological and serum biochemical indices measured. Conclusion: This result suggests that a 14-day oral administration of the hydro-ethanolic extract of Synedrella nodiflora is relatively safe in Sprague-Dawley male rats under the present laboratory conditions.

  15. The mungbean yellow mosaic begomovirus transcriptional activator protein transactivates the viral promoter-driven transgene and causes toxicity in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2007-12-01

    The Begomovirus transcriptional activator protein (TrAP/AC2/C2) is a multifunctional protein which activates the viral late gene promoters, suppresses gene silencing, and determines pathogenicity. To study TrAP-mediated transactivation of a stably integrated gene, we generated transgenic tobacco plants with a Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AV1 late gene promoter-driven reporter gene and supertransformed them with the MYMV TrAP gene driven by a strong 35S promoter. We obtained a single supertransformed plant with an intact 35S-TrAP gene that activated the reporter gene 2.5-fold. However, 10 of the 11 supertransformed plants did not have the TrAP region of the T-DNA, suggesting the likely toxicity of TrAP in plants. Upon transformation of wild-type tobacco plants with the TrAP gene, six of the seven transgenic plants obtained had truncated T-DNAs which lacked TrAP. One plant, which had the intact TrAP gene, did not express TrAP. The apparent toxic effect of the TrAP transgene was abolished by mutations in its nuclear-localization signal or zinc-finger domain and by deletion of its activation domain. Therefore, all three domains of TrAP, which are required for transactivation and suppression of gene silencing, also are needed for its toxic effect.

  16. [Toxicity and accumulation of copper and nickel in wheat plants cropped on alkaline and acidic field soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin-Sun; Wei, Dong-Pu; Guo, Xue-Yan; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2012-04-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the toxicity of added copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) in soils to wheat and metal accumulation in wheat plants. The results showed that the yields of wheat straw and grain were decreased with the increasing concentration of Cu and Ni added to soils. The added Cu concentrations yielding 10% inhibition of wheat yield (EC10) were 499.6 mg x kg(-1) for alkaline soils (Dezhou, pH 8.90), and 55.7 mg x kg(-1) for acidic soils (Qiyang, pH 5.31). The toxicity of Cu or Ni in acidic soils were significantly higher than that in alkaline soils. With increasing addition of Cu or Ni, the contents of Cu in wheat grains initially increased and then keep at constant level, while the accumulation of Ni in grains linearly increased. The contents of Cu and Ni in Qiyang wheat grains were 6.07-9.26 mg x kg(-1) and 0.53-31.78 mg x kg(-1), and those of in Dezhou were 5.24-10. 52 mg x kg(-1) and 0.16-25.33 mg x kg(-1). In both field experimental sites, the contents of Cu in wheat grains meet the national standard for food safety. These findings showed that Cu is more relevant to ecological risk assessments than to food safety assessments for wheat grown in soils that have been contaminated with Cu.

  17. Toxicity of sucrose octanoate to egg, nymphal, and adult Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) using a novel plant-based bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, C L; Weathersbee, A A; Puterka, Gary J

    2005-08-01

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), B biotype, presents a unique problem for vegetable growers by serving as a vector of plant viruses and by inducing physiological disorders of leaves and fruit. An action threshold of a single whitefly is necessary because of the threat of disease in many areas and growers rely heavily on a single class of insecticides (neonicotinoids) for whitefly control. Additional control methods are needed to manage this pest in commercial vegetables. Extracts of wild tobacco contain natural sugar esters that have previously been shown effective in controlling many soft-bodied insects. We developed a novel tomato leaf bioassay system to assess a synthetic sugar ester derivative, sucrose octanoate, for insecticidal activity against the eggs, nymphs, and adults of B. tabaci. The LC50 values for sucrose octanoate against adults, second instars, and fourth instars of the whitefly were 880, 686, and 1,571 ppm, respectively. The LC50 against whitefly eggs was higher (11,446 ppm) but indicated that some egg mortality occurred at the recommended application rate of 0.8-1.2% (3,200-4,800 ppm [Al]). Toxicity of sugar esters to whitefly eggs has not been reported previously. The tomato leaf bioassay produced reliable and repeatable results for whitefly toxicity studies and predicted that effective nymph and adult whitefly control can be achieved with sucrose octanoate at application rates < or = 1% (4,000 ppm [AI]). Field efficacy studies are warranted to determine whether this biorational pesticide has application in commercial tomato production.

  18. Virulence evolution in response to anti-infection resistance: toxic food plants can select for virulent parasites of monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roode, J C; de Castillejo, C Lopez Fernandez; Faits, T; Alizon, S

    2011-04-01

    Host resistance to parasites can come in two main forms: hosts may either reduce the probability of parasite infection (anti-infection resistance) or reduce parasite growth after infection has occurred (anti-growth resistance). Both resistance mechanisms are often imperfect, meaning that they do not fully prevent or clear infections. Theoretical work has suggested that imperfect anti-growth resistance can select for higher parasite virulence by favouring faster-growing and more virulent parasites that overcome this resistance. In contrast, imperfect anti-infection resistance is thought not to select for increased parasite virulence, because it is assumed that it reduces the number of hosts that become infected, but not the fitness of parasites in successfully infected hosts. Here, we develop a theoretical model to show that anti-infection resistance can in fact select for higher virulence when such resistance reduces the effective parasite dose that enters a host. Our model is based on a monarch butterfly-parasite system in which larval food plants confer resistance to the monarch host. We carried out an experiment and showed that this environmental resistance is most likely a form of anti-infection resistance, through which toxic food plants reduce the effective dose of parasites that initiates an infection. We used these results to build a mathematical model to investigate the evolutionary consequences of food plant-induced resistance. Our model shows that when the effective infectious dose is reduced, parasites can compensate by evolving a higher per-parasite growth rate, and consequently a higher intrinsic virulence. Our results are relevant to many insect host-parasite systems, in which larval food plants often confer imperfect anti-infection resistance. Our results also suggest that - for parasites where the infectious dose affects the within-host dynamics - vaccines that reduce the effective infectious dose can select for increased parasite virulence.

  19. RESPONSE OF PHENOLIC METABOLISM INDUCED BY ALUMINIUM TOXICITY IN FAGOPYRUM ESCULENTUM MOENCH. PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, O E; Kosyan, A M; Kosyk, O I; Taran, N Yu

    2015-01-01

    Buckwheat genus (Fagopyrum Mill.) is one of the aluminium tolerant taxonomic units of plants. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the aluminium (50 μM effect on phenolic accumulation in various parts of buckwheat plants (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench). Detection of increasing of total phenolic content, changes in flavonoid and anthocyanin content and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity (PAL) were revealed over a period of 10 days of exposure to aluminium. The most significant effects of aluminium treatment on phenolic compounds accumulation were total phenolic content increasing (by 27.2%) and PAL activity rising by 2.5 times observed in leaves tissues. Received data could be helpful to understand the aluminium tolerance principles and relationships of phenolic compounds to aluminium phytotoxicity.

  20. Neutralization of local and systemic toxicity of Daboia russelii venom by Morus alba plant leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekara, K T; Nagaraju, S; Nandini, S Usha; Kemparaju, K

    2009-08-01

    Antivenom therapy is the current best therapy available for the treatment of fatal snake envenomation. However, the antivenom offers less or no protection against local effects such as extensive edema, hemorrhage, dermo-, myonecrosis and inflammation at the envenomed region. Viperidae snakes are highly known for their violent local effects and such effects have been commonly treated with plant extracts without any scientific validation in rural India. In this investigation Morus alba plant leaf extract has been studied against the Indian Vipera/Daboia russelii venom induced local and systemic effects. The extract completely abolished the in vitro proteolytic and hyaluronolytic activities of the venom. Edema, hemorrhage and myonecrotic activities were also neutralized efficiently. In addition, the extract partially inhibited the pro-coagulant activity and completely abolished the degradation of Aalpha chain of human fibrinogen. Thus, the extract processes potent antisnake venom property, especially against the local and systemic effects of Daboia russelii venom.

  1. Nickel and Copper Toxicity and Plant Response Mechanisms in White Birch (Betula papyrifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriault, Gabriel; Nkongolo, Kabwe

    2016-08-01

    Nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) are the most prevalent metals found in the soils in the Greater Sudbury Region (Canada) because of smelting emissions. The main objectives of the present study were to (1) determine the toxicity of nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) at different doses in Betula papyrifera (white birch), (2) Characterize nickel resistance mechanism, and (3) assess segregating patterns for Ni and Cu resistance in B. papyrifera populations. This study revealed that B. papyrifera is resistant to Ni and Cu concentrations equivalent to the levels reported in metal-contaminated stands in the GSR. Resistant genotypes (RG) accumulate Ni in roots but not in leaves. Moderately susceptible (MSG) and susceptible genotypes (SG) show a high level of Ni translocation to leaves. Gene expression analysis showed differential regulation of genes in RG compared to MSG and SG. Analysis of segregation patterns suggests that resistance to Ni and Cu is controlled by single recessive genes.

  2. Toxicity of molybdenum and its trace analysis in animal tissues and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, S A

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive, selective, rapid and reproducible method is presented for the analysis of submicrogram levels of molybdenum in animal tissues (Liver) and plants. The method is based on solvent extraction of Molybdenum (VI) using isoamyl alcohol solution of N-o-tolyl-o-methoxy-benzohydroxamic acid at pH 1.5-2.5, and subsequent spectrophotometric determination of the yellow extract at 350 nm.

  3. Toxic metals in aquatic plants surviving in surface water polluted by copper mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samecka-Cymerman, A; Kempers, A J

    2004-09-01

    Concentrations of the metals Al, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn, as well as the macronutrients N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S were measured in water, sediments, and the aquatic macrophytes Potamogeton pectinatus and Myriophyllum spicatum, growing in surface water receiving sewages and solid wastes from a copper smelter and a copper ore processing factory located in the Legnica-Glogow copper district in Southwest Poland. The deposition of mineral wastes in this area belong to the largest repository in Europe. The plants were able to survive at heavily contaminated sites. The concentrations of Cd (up to 0.6-1.7 microg/L in water and up to 10.1-12.9 mg/kg in sediments), Cu (up to 29-48 microg/L in water and up to 4.6-5.6g/kg in sediments), Pb (up to 1.5-2.2 g/kg in sediments), and Zn (up to 167-200 microg/L in water and up to 1.4-1.8 g/kg in sediments) seriously exceeded background values. P. pectinatus was able to survive tissue concentrations (in mg/kg) of up to 920 Cu, 6240 Mn, 98 Co, and 59 Ni, while M. spicatum survived tissue concentrations up to 1040 Cu, 6660 Mn, and 57 Co for. Enrichment ratios of elements in plant tissue and in water were much higher than those between plant tissue and sediments.

  4. Toxicity assessment of cerium oxide nanoparticles in cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) plants grown in organic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria Isabel; Rico, Cyren M; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose Angel; Nunez, Jose E; Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Tafoya, Alejandro; Flores-Marges, Juan Pedro; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2013-07-03

    Studies have shown that CeO₂ nanoparticles (NPs) can be accumulated in plants without modification, which could pose a threat for human health. In this research, cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) plants were germinated and grown for 30 days in soil amended with 0 to 500 mg kg⁻¹ CeO₂ NPs and analyzed by spectroscopic techniques and biochemical assays. At 125 mg kg⁻¹, plants produced longer roots (p ≤ 0.05), and at 500 mg kg⁻¹, there was higher Ce accumulation in tissues (p ≤ 0.05). At 125 mg, catalase activity significantly increased in shoots and ascorbate peroxidase in roots (p ≤ 0.05). The FTIR analyses revealed that at 125 mg kg⁻¹ the CeO₂ NPs changed the chemical environment of carbohydrates in cilantro shoots, for which changes in the area of the stretching frequencies were observed. This suggests that the CeO₂ NPs could change the nutritional properties of cilantro.

  5. Uptake and accumulation of potentially toxic metals (Zn, Cu and Pb) in soils and plants of Durgapur industrial belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisku, Ganesh Chandra; Pandey, Poonam; Negi, Mahendra Pratap Singh; Misra, Virendra

    2011-11-01

    Uptake and accumulation of metals in crops may cause possible health risks through food chain. A field survey was conducted to investigate the accumulation of potentially toxic metals contamination in soil and plants irrigated with complexed industrial effluents. Concentration of Zn, Cu and Pb was 205-255,101-130,118-177 microg g(-1) in rhizosphere soils and 116-223, 57-102 and 63-95 microg g(-1) d. wt. in root and 95-186, 44-75 and 27-58 microg g(-1) d. wt. in shoot, respectively. The trend in Cu and Pb was in the order: soil > root > shoot > seed while in Zn it was soil > root > seed > shoot. Roots accumulated a larger fraction of soil Cu (70%) > Zn (67%) > Pb (54%). Bioaccumulation coefficient of soil to root ranged from 51-98 for Zn, 54-85 for Cu and 43-63 for Pb.Analysis of variance showed marginal change in bioaccumulation coefficient, noticed between plants (p > 0.05) while it varied significantly (p shoot > seed/fruit) while decreased between metals from Zn to Pb (Zn > Cu > Pb). Out of the three, two Cu and Pb accumulated to phyotoxic levels while Zn was within threshold limit of phytotoxicity.

  6. Differential antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles to bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, and toxicity to crop plant Zea mays and beneficial B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Michael A.; Wang, Dengjun; Bais, Harsh P.; Jin, Yan

    2016-10-01

    As silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have become increasingly used in commercial antimicrobial agents and industrial and military products, concerns are increasing over their broad environmental and health impacts and risks because they are finding their way to the environment. This study was designed to quantify the antimicrobial activity of citrate-coated AgNPs (c-AgNPs; transmission electron microscope size of 44.9 ± 7.2 nm) to two species of bacteria, i.e., Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and toxicity to a major crop plant Zea mays and beneficial bacteria-inoculated plant (i.e., B. subtilis-inoculated Z. mays symbiont). Our results reveal that the exposure of c-AgNPs significantly inhibited bacteria growth and altered their growth kinetics. Z. mays experienced significant sublethal effects including reduced root length and biomass, and hyper-accumulation of Ag in roots. The beneficial interactions between B. subtilis and Z. mays were weakened as well because both species suffered sublethal effects. Potential mechanisms leading to the antimicrobial activity and toxicity of c-AgNPs to the bacteria, plant, and plant-bacteria symbiont examined in this study were discussed. Taken together, our findings advance the current knowledge of AgNPs antimicrobial property or toxicity to bacteria, crop plant, and beneficial plant-bacteria symbiotic interaction, which is a critical component for NPs environmental impact and risk assessment.

  7. Identification of the primary lesion of toxic aluminum in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopittke, Peter M; Moore, Katie L; Lombi, Enzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Ferguson, Brett J; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W; Nicholson, Timothy M; McKenna, Brigid A; Wang, Peng; Gresshoff, Peter M; Kourousias, George; Webb, Richard I; Green, Kathryn; Tollenaere, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Despite the rhizotoxicity of aluminum (Al) being identified over 100 years ago, there is still no consensus regarding the mechanisms whereby root elongation rate is initially reduced in the approximately 40% of arable soils worldwide that are acidic. We used high-resolution kinematic analyses, molecular biology, rheology, and advanced imaging techniques to examine soybean (Glycine max) roots exposed to Al. Using this multidisciplinary approach, we have conclusively shown that the primary lesion of Al is apoplastic. In particular, it was found that 75 µm Al reduced root growth after only 5 min (or 30 min at 30 µm Al), with Al being toxic by binding to the walls of outer cells, which directly inhibited their loosening in the elongation zone. An alteration in the biosynthesis and distribution of ethylene and auxin was a second, slower effect, causing both a transient decrease in the rate of cell elongation after 1.5 h but also a longer term gradual reduction in the length of the elongation zone. These findings show the importance of focusing on traits related to cell wall composition as well as mechanisms involved in wall loosening to overcome the deleterious effects of soluble Al.

  8. Development and evaluation of a photochemical chamber to examine the toxicity of coal-fired power plant emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pablo A. Ruiz; Joy E. Lawrence; Jack M. Wolfson; Stephen T. Ferguson; Tarun Gupta; Choong-Min Kang; Petros Koutrakis [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Exposure, Epidemiology, and Risk Program, Department of Environmental Health

    2007-06-15

    When investigating the toxicity of individual particle sources, it is important to consider the contribution of both primary and secondary particles. In this article, we present the design of a new photochemical chamber that can be used to form secondary sulfuric acid particles from diluted coal-fired power plant emissions. The chamber is a relatively small, well-mixed flow reactor that can fit in a mobile reaction laboratory. It produces high concentrations of hydroxyl radical (OH) from the photolysis of ozone (O{sub 3}) in the presence of water vapor. Two chambers were built and tested. A pilot chamber was tested in the laboratory, using mixtures of NO and SO{sub 2} in air, at concentrations that are approximately 100 times lower than those in power plant stack emissions. This chamber was able to oxidize about 20% of the SO{sub 2}, thereby producing 1350 {mu}g m{sup -3} of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles. Further tests showed that increasing O{sub 3} concentrations and residence time increased the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} production. A field chamber was built subsequently and used in a toxicological study. Diluted coal-fired power plant emissions were introduced in the chamber. Over 19 days of exposure, the chamber, on average, converted 17% of the supplied SO{sub 2} emissions and produced an average of 350 {mu}g m{sup -3} of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles. Particle losses were determined for the pilot chamber, using artificial particles whose size ranged from 50 to 1000 nm. The determined losses ranged from 21 to 42%, with no trend between the amount of particle loss and particle size. Losses for the field chamber, estimated using model calculations, were found to be similar to those of the pilot chamber.

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Tolerance in Plants: Central Role of Glutathione in Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species and Methylglyoxal and in Heavy Metal Chelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Anwar Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal (HM toxicity is one of the major abiotic stresses leading to hazardous effects in plants. A common consequence of HM toxicity is the excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and methylglyoxal (MG, both of which can cause peroxidation of lipids, oxidation of protein, inactivation of enzymes, DNA damage and/or interact with other vital constituents of plant cells. Higher plants have evolved a sophisticated antioxidant defense system and a glyoxalase system to scavenge ROS and MG. In addition, HMs that enter the cell may be sequestered by amino acids, organic acids, glutathione (GSH, or by specific metal-binding ligands. Being a central molecule of both the antioxidant defense system and the glyoxalase system, GSH is involved in both direct and indirect control of ROS and MG and their reaction products in plant cells, thus protecting the plant from HM-induced oxidative damage. Recent plant molecular studies have shown that GSH by itself and its metabolizing enzymes—notably glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II—act additively and coordinately for efficient protection against ROS- and MG-induced damage in addition to detoxification, complexation, chelation and compartmentation of HMs. The aim of this review is to integrate a recent understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms of HM-induced plant stress response and tolerance based on the findings of current plant molecular biology research.

  10. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops.

  11. Toxicity of indoxacarb to the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera:Miridae), and the big-eyed bug, Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of Steward, a formulation of indoxacarb, was studied for the tarnished plant bug [Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)], a pest of cotton, and the big-eyed insect [Geocoris punctipes (Say)], a predator of pests in cotton. Both insects responded similarly to Steward in topical, tarsal ...

  12. The oxidative toxicity of Ag and ZnO nanoparticles towards the aquatic plant Spirodela punctuta and the role of testing media parameters: Conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thwala, Melusi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity effects of silver (nAg) and zinc oxide (nZnO) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) on the duckweed Spirodela punctuta were studied to investigate the potential risks posed by these ENPs towards higher aquatic plants. The influence of media...

  13. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/wet FGD system. Final report, Volume 2 of 2 - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This volume contains the appendices for a coal-fired power plant toxic emissions study. Included are Process data log sheets from Coal Creek, Auditing information, Sampling protocol, Field sampling data sheets, Quality assurance/quality control, Analytical protocol, and Uncertainty analyses.

  14. The oxidative toxicity of Ag and ZnO nanoparticles towards the aquatic plant Spirodela punctuta and the role of testing media parameters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thwala, Melusi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity effects of silver (nAg) and zinc oxide (nZnO) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) on the duckweed Spirodela punctuta were studied to investigate the potential risks posed by these ENPs towards higher aquatic plants. The influence of media...

  15. Comparison of the Artemia salina and Artemia fransiscana bioassays for toxicity of Indian medicinal plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thangapandi Veni; Thambusamy Pushpanathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate leaves extract of Azima tetracantha and Gmelina asiatica for lethality to brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina and Artemia fransiscana). Methods: The plant materials were extracted based on polarity gradients of petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform, acetone, ethanol and methanol. The extracts were investigated for their cytotoxic potential. Results: In the brine shrimp lethality assay of all extracts, exception of acetone, ethanol and petroleum ether extracts Gmelina asiatica displayed 100%mortality at 1 000 μg/mL by Artemia salina and Artemia fransiscana. Chloroform extract was the most potent and presented the highest percentage of mortality with the lowest LC50 values by both assay too. Conclusions:The results of the present study suggest the presence of photochemical possessing cytotoxic agents.

  16. Auditing of sampling methods for air toxics at coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbede, R.O.; Clements, J.L.; Grunebach, M.G. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) with subcontract assistance from international Technology Corporation (IT) has provided external audit activities for Phase II of the Department of Energy-Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center`s air emission test program. The objective of the audits is to help ensure that the data obtained from the emission tests are precise, accurate, representative, scientifically sound and legally defensible. This paper presents the criteria that were used to perform the external audits of the emission test program. It also describes the approach used by ATS and It in performing their audits. Examples of findings of the audits along with the actions take to correct problems and the subsequent effect of those actions on the test data are presented. The results of audit spikes performed at the Plant 1 test site are also discussed.

  17. Effect of chlorination and ozone pre-oxidation on the photobacteria acute toxicity for dissolved organic matter from sewage treatment plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The effect of chlorination and ozone pre-oxidation on the photobacteria acute toxicity for dissolved organic matter(DOM) from sewage treatment plants was investigated in this study.The results show that ozone pre-oxidation enhanced the photobacteria acute toxicity of the water samples.DOM before and after ozone pre-oxidation was fractionated by resins into six kinds of hydrophobic and hydrophilic organics.The six fractions were chlorinated individually and the photobacteria acute toxicity before and after chlorination was tested.It was found that the percentage of hydrophilic organics in DOM significantly increased after ozone pre-oxidation and hydrophilic organics exhibited remarkably higher acute toxicity than hydrophobic organics.In view of potentiometric titration and fourier transform infrared(FTIR) analysis,the hydrophilic organics showed a rather higher content of ph-OH structures than hydrophobic organics.

  18. How do physicochemical properties influence the toxicity of silver nanoparticles on freshwater decomposers of plant litter in streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Daniela; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2017-06-01

    AgNP physicochemical properties may affect AgNP toxicity, but their effects on plant litter decomposition and the species driving this key ecosystem process in freshwaters have been poorly investigated. We assessed the impacts of AgNPs with different size and surface coating (100nm PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone)-dispersant, 50-60nm and 35nm uncoated) on freshwater decomposers of leaf litter by exposing leaf associated microbial assemblages to increasing concentrations of AgNPs (up to 200mgL(-1)) and of AgNO3 (up to 25mgL(-1)). We further conducted a feeding preference experiment with a common invertebrate shredder, Limnephilus sp., which was allowed to feed on microbially-colonized leaves previously exposed to AgNPs and AgNO3. Leaf decomposition and microbial activity and diversity were inhibited when exposed to increased concentrations of 100nm AgNPs (≥25mgL(-1)), while microbial activity was stimulated by exposure to 35nm AgNPs (≥100mgL(-1)). Invertebrate shredders preferred leaves exposed to 35nm AgNPs (25mgL(-1)) and avoided leaves exposed to AgNO3 (≥2mgL(-1)). Results from the characterization of AgNPs by dynamic light scattering revealed that AgNps with PVP-dispersant were more stable than the uncoated AgNPs. Our results highlight the importance of considering the physicochemical properties of NPs when assessing their toxicity to litter decomposers in freshwaters.

  19. Melatonin and resveratrol reverse the toxic effect of high boron (B) and modulate biochemical parameters in pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafi, Eleana; Tsouvaltzis, Pavlos; Chatzissavvidis, Christos; Siomos, Anastasios; Therios, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this research were to test a possible involvement of melatonin (MEL) and resveratrol (RES) in restoring growth and to control boron (B) toxicity in peppers. The plants were subjected to four different nutrient solution treatments as following: 1) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution (Control), 2) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM B (100 μMB), 3) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM boron+100 μMresveratrol (100 μMRES), and 4) half-strength Hoagland's nutrient solution+100 μM B+1 μMmelatonin (1 μM MEL). Pepper plants subjected to B excess (100 μM) for 68 days (d) exhibited visible B toxicity symptoms, reduced rate of photosynthesis (Pn) and reduced dry weight (DW), while their leaf and fruit had the greatest increase of B concentration. The reduction of photosynthesis was restored, the reduction of DW was prevented, while the B leaf and fruit accumulation was moderated with the application of both 100 μMresveratrol (RES) and 1 μMmelatonin (MEL). Moreover, plants exposed to MEL and/or RES displayed no visible B toxicity symptoms. The present study revealed a novel role of MEL and/or RES in the adaptation of pepper plants to B excess based on plant growth, physiological and biochemical criteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of some plant growth regulators on lindane and alpha-endosulfan toxicity to Brassica chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouychai, Waraporn

    2012-07-01

    The effect of indolebutyric acid (IBA) and gibberellic acid (GA3), to alleviate the organochlorine phytotoxicity were studied in Brassica chinensis. Presence of organochlorine decreased Brassica chinensis seedlings growth in contaminated alkaline soil. One mg l(-1) IBA could enhance 14 and 26% shoot and root length of B. chinensis seedlings grown at 40 mg kg(-1) lindane contaminated soil, respectively. Ten mg l(-1) IBA also increased 80 and 40% root fresh weight of seedling grown in 40 mg kg(-1) lindane and alpha-endosulfan contaminated soils, respectively. However, IBAhad no effect on shoot and root length of seedlings grown in endosulfan contaminated soil. On the other hand, 10 mg l(-1) GA3 only increased 80% of shoot and root fresh weigh of B. chinensisin 40 mg kg(-1) endosulfan contaminated soil. External auxin addition could increase B. chinensis growth in lindane more than endosulfan contaminated soil. External gibberellin was less effective than external auxin to increase B. chinensis growth in organochlorine contaminated soil. There is possibility that auxin could decrease organochlorine phytotoxicity in plants and hence can be useful for organochlorine phytoremediation.

  1. Effect of metabolic regulators on aluminium uptake and toxicity in Matricaria chamomilla plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčik, Jozef; Stork, František; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Grúz, Jiři; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic metabolism of Al-exposed Matricaria chamomilla plants was modulated with four regulators: 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), salicylic acid (SA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and dithiothreitol (DTT). Physiological parameters (tissue water content, soluble proteins, reducing sugars, K+ content), root lignin content and free amino acids (increase in root proline and alanine) were the most affected in SA + Al variant, indicating negative impact of SA on Al-induced changes. SNP showed the least visible impact, suggesting protective effect of nitric oxide. Complex comparison between Al alone and combined treatments revealed that SA and DTT stimulated increase in shoot phenolic acids (mainly vanillic acid), sum of flavonols and soluble phenols but decreased the levels of coumarin-related compounds (Z- and E-2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acids), leading to elevation of shoot Al. Positive correlation between phenolic acids (mainly ferulic and chlorogenic acids), soluble phenols and total Al was found in the roots of SA and DTT variants. These events were not observed in AIP and SNP treatments. These data, to our knowledge for the first time, exactly confirm that phenolic metabolites may affect shoot Al uptake and this relation is rather positive in terms of simple phenols (and negative in terms of coumarin-related compounds).

  2. Sampling of power plant stacks for air toxic emissions: Final report for Phases 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-28

    A test program to collect and analyze size-fractionated stack gas particulate samples for selected inorganic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) was conducted . Specific goals of the program are (1) the collection of one-gram quantities of size-fractionated stack gas particulate matter for bulk (total) and surface chemical characterization, and (2) the determination of the relationship between particle size, bulk and surface (leachable) composition, and unit load. The information obtained from this program identifies the effects of unit load, particle size, and wet FGD system operation on the relative toxicological effects of exposure to particulate emissions. Field testing was conducted in two phases. The Phase I field program was performed over the period of August 24 through September 20, 1992, at the Tennessee Valley Authority Widows Creek Unit 8 Power Station, located near Stevenson (Jackson County), Alabama, on the Tennessee River. Sampling activities for Phase II were conducted from September 11 through October 14, 1993. Widows Creek Unit 8 is a 575-megawatt plant that uses bituminous coal averaging 3.7% sulfur and 13% ash. Downstream of the boiler, a venture wet scrubbing system is used for control of both sulfur dioxide and particulate emissions. There is no electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in this system. This system is atypical and represents only about 5% of the US utility industry. However, this site was chosen for this study because of the lack of information available for this particulate emission control system.

  3. Gene duplications circumvent trade-offs in enzyme function: Insect adaptation to toxic host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, Safaa; Dobler, Susanne

    2016-12-01

    Herbivorous insects and their adaptations against plant toxins provide striking opportunities to investigate the genetic basis of traits involved in coevolutionary interactions. Target site insensitivity to cardenolides has evolved convergently across six orders of insects, involving identical substitutions in the Na,K-ATPase gene and repeated convergent gene duplications. The large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, has three copies of the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit gene that bear differing numbers of amino acid substitutions in the binding pocket for cardenolides. To analyze the effect of these substitutions on cardenolide resistance and to infer possible trade-offs in gene function, we expressed the cardenolide-sensitive Na,K-ATPase of Drosophila melanogaster in vitro and introduced four distinct combinations of substitutions observed in the three gene copies of O. fasciatus. With an increasing number of substitutions, the sensitivity of the Na,K-ATPase to a standard cardenolide decreased in a stepwise manner. At the same time, the enzyme's overall activity decreased significantly with increasing cardenolide resistance and only the least substituted mimic of the Na,K-ATPase α1C copy maintained activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. Our results suggest that the Na,K-ATPase copies in O. fasciatus have diverged in function, enabling specific adaptations to dietary cardenolides while maintaining the functionality of this critical ion carrier. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Analysis of Swainsonine and Swainsonine N-Oxide as Trimethylsilyl Derivatives by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Their Relative Occurrence in Plants Toxic to Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Dale R; Cook, Daniel

    2016-08-10

    There are limited data concerning the occurrence of swainsonine N-oxide in plants known to contain swainsonine and its relative impact on toxicity of the plant material. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method based on a solvent partitioning extraction procedure followed by trimethylsilylation and analysis using reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the analysis of swainsonine and its N-oxide. The concentrations of each were measured in several swainsonine-containing taxa as well as two endophytic isolates that produce swainsonine. In vegetative samples the relative percent of N-oxide to free base ranged from 0.9 to 18%. In seed samples the N-oxide to free base ratio ranged from 0 to 10%. The measured concentrations of swainsonine N-oxide relative to swainsonine only slightly increases the actual toxicity of the various plant samples in a combined assay of both compounds.

  5. Plantas tóxicas para suínos Toxic plants for swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Dias Timm

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Revisam-se as intoxicações por plantas que ocorrem em suínos no Brasil, Uruguai e Argentina. Descrevem-se a intoxicação por sementes de Senna occidentalis, que causa necrose muscular segmentar e lesões hepáticas, e a intoxicação por sementes de Aeschynomene sp., caracterizada por áreas de degeneração focais e simétricas na substância branca do cerebelo. Mencionam-se, também, a intoxicação por Wedelia glauca e Xantium spp., que causam necrose centrolobular no fígado; a intoxicação por Amaranthus spp., que produz necrose tubular tóxica; a intoxicação por Solanum malacoxylon, caracterizada por calcificação dos tecidos moles; a intoxicação por frutos maduros de Melia azedarach, que causa sinais nervosos, digestivos e musculares; e a intoxicação por Crotalaria spectabilis, estudada experimentalmente no Brasil como causa de hepatite crônica.Poisonous plants for swine in Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina are reviewed. Poisoning by seeds of Senna occidentalis, as a cause segmentar muscle necrosis, and by seeds of Aeschynomene sp., as a cause of symmetric focal degeneration in the white matter of the cerebellum, are described. Nefrosis due to Amaranthus spp., soft tissue calcification caused by Solanum malacoxylon, acute periacinar liver necrosis caused by Wedelia glauca and Xanthium spp., and nervous, digestive and muscular signs caused by the fruits of Melia azedarach, are also mentioned. The intoxication by Crotalaria spectabilis, studied experimentally in Brazil as a cause of chronic hepatitis, is also reveiwed.

  6. Fumigant toxicity and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of 4 Asteraceae plant essential oils and their constituents against Japanese termite (Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seon-Mi; Kim, Junheon; Kang, Jaesoon; Koh, Sang-Hyun; Ahn, Young-Joon; Kang, Kyu-Suk; Park, Il-Kwon

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the fumigant toxicity of 4 Asteraceae plant essential oils and their constituents against the Japanese termite Reticulitermes speratus Kolbe. Fumigant toxicity varied with plant essential oils or constituents, exposure time, and concentration. Among the tested essential oils, those from Chamaemelum nobile exhibited the strongest fumigant toxicity, followed by those from Santolina chamaecyparissus, Ormenis multicaulis, and Eriocephalus punctulatus at 2 days after treatment. In all, 15, 24, 19, and 9 compounds were identified in the essential oils from C. nobile, E. punctulatus, O. multicaulis, and S. chamaecyparissus, respectively, by using gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, or open-column chromatography. The identified compounds were tested individually for their fumigant toxicity against Japanese termites. Among the test compounds, trans-pinocarveol, caryophyllene oxide, sabinene hydrate, and santolina alcohol showed strong fumigant toxicity against Japanese termites. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition activity of the identified compounds from C. nobile, E. punctulatus, O. multicaulis, and S. chamaecyparissus essential oils were tested to determine the mode of their action. The IC50 values of (+)-α-pinene, (-)-limonene, (-)-α-pinene, β-pinene, and β-phellandrene against Japanese termite AChE were 0.03, 0.13, 0.41, 0.42, and 0.67mg/mL, respectively. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential of these essential oils and their constituents as fumigants for termite control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphology, ultrastructure and mineral uptake is affected by copper toxicity in young plants of Inga subnuda subs. luschnathiana (Benth.) T.D. Penn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Tielle Abreu; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; de Almeida, Alex-Alan Furtado; de Oliveira, Sérgio José Ribeiro; de Jesus, Raildo Mota; Souza, Vânia Lima; Dos Santos Silva, José Victor; Mangabeira, Pedro Antônio

    2015-10-01

    Toxic effects of copper (Cu) were analyzed in young plants of Inga subnuda subs. luschnathiana, a species that is highly tolerant to flooding and found in Brazil in wetlands contaminated with Cu. Plants were cultivated in fully nutritive solution, containing different concentrations of Cu (from 0.08 μmol to 0.47 mmol L(-1)). Symptoms of Cu toxicity were observed in both leaves and roots of plants cultivated from 0.16 mmol Cu L(-1). In the leaves, Cu clearly induced alterations in the thickness of the epidermis, mesophyll, palisade parenchyma, and intercellular space of the lacunose parenchyma. Also, this metal induced disorganization in thylakoid membranes, internal and external membrane rupture in chloroplasts, mitochondrial alterations, and electrodense material deposition in vacuoles of the parenchyma and cell walls. The starch grains disappeared; however, an increase of plastoglobule numbers was observed according to Cu toxicity. In the roots, destruction of the epidermis, reduction of the intercellular space, and modifications in the format of initial cells of the external cortex were evident. Cell walls and endoderm had been broken, invaginations of tonoplast and vacuole retractions were found, and, again, electrodense material was observed in these sites. Mineral nutrient analysis revealed higher Cu accumulation in the roots and greater macro- and micronutrients accumulation into shoots. Thus, root morphological and ultrastructural changes induced differential nutrients uptake and their translocations from root toward shoots, and this was related to membrane and endoderm ruptures caused by Cu toxicity.

  8. Aluminium Toxicity to Plants as Influenced by the Properties of the Root Growth Environment Affected by Other Co-Stressors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siecińska, Joanna; Nosalewicz, Artur

    Aluminium toxicity to crops depends on the acidity of the soil and specific plant resistance. However, it is also strongly affected by other environmental factors that have to be considered to properly evaluate the resultant effects on plants. Observed weather perturbations and predicted climate changes will increase the probability of co-occurrence of aluminium toxicity and other abiotic stresses.In this review the mechanisms of plant-aluminium interactions are shown to be influenced by soil mineral nutrients, heavy metals, organic matter, oxidative stress and drought. Described effects of aluminium toxicity include: root growth inhibition, reduction in the uptake of mineral nutrients resulting from the inhibition of transport processes through ion channels; epigenetic changes to DNA resulting in gene silencing. Complex processes occurring in the rhizosphere are highlighted, including the role of soil organic matter and aluminium detoxification by mucilage.There is a considerable research gap in the understanding of root growth in the soil environment in the presence of toxic aluminium concentrations as affected by interactions with abiotic stressors. This knowledge is important for the selection of feasible methods aimed at the reduction of negative consequences of crop production in acidic soils affected by adverse growth environment.

  9. In vitro assessment of the pulmonary toxicity and gastric availability of lead-rich particles from a lead recycling plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzu, Gaëlle; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Riediker, Michael; Hohl, Magdalena Sánchez Sandoval; Val, Stéphanie; Tack, Karine; Denys, Sébastien; Pradère, Philippe; Dumat, Camille

    2011-09-15

    Epidemiological studies in urban areas have linked increasing respiratory and cardiovascular pathologies with atmospheric particulate matter (PM) from anthropic activities. However, the biological fate of metal-rich PM industrial emissions in urban areas of developed countries remains understudied. Lead toxicity and bioaccessibility assessments were therefore performed on emissions from a lead recycling plant, using complementary chemical acellular tests and toxicological assays, as a function of PM size (PM(10-2.5), PM(2.5-1) and PM(1)) and origin (furnace, refining and channeled emissions). Process PM displayed differences in metal content, granulometry, and percentage of inhalable fraction as a function of their origin. Lead gastric bioaccessibility was relatively low (maximum 25%) versus previous studies; although, because of high total lead concentrations, significant metal quantities were solubilized in simulated gastrointestinal fluids. Regardless of origin, the finest PM(1) particles induced the most significant pro-inflammatory response in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, this biological response correlated with pro-oxidant potential assay results, suggesting some biological predictive value for acellular tests. Pulmonary effects from lead-rich PM could be driven by thiol complexation with either lead ions or directly on the particulate surface. Finally, health concern of PM was discussed on the basis of pro-inflammatory effects, accellular test results, and PM size distribution.

  10. Uptake and toxicity of nano-ZnO in the plant-feeding nematode, Xiphinema vuittenezi: the role of dissolved zinc and nanoparticle-specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sávoly, Zoltán; Hrács, Krisztina; Pemmer, Bernhard; Streli, Christina; Záray, Gyula; Nagy, Péter István

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticulate ZnO is one of the most commonly applied nanomaterials. As ZnO is more soluble than many other oxide nanoparticles, its toxicity beyond the nanoparticle-specific effects can be attributed to the dissolved ionic zinc. The investigation of uptake and toxicity of nano-ZnO in the plant-feeding nematode, Xiphinema vuittenezi, which was used in previous studies as a biological model organism, was aimed. The establishment of the role of dissolved zinc and nanoparticle-specific effects in the toxicity was also the objective of our study. Zn uptake was found to be significantly higher for bulk and nano-ZnO than for ZnSO4 solution; however, treatments caused loss of potassium in the worms in a dissolved-zinc-dependent manner. The toxicity was the lowest for bulk ZnO, and it was very similar for nano-ZnO and ZnSO4 solution. Accordingly, the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles is a combination of dissolved-zinc-caused toxicity and nanoparticle-specific effects.

  11. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing synthetic Cry1Ac and Cry1le genes are more toxic to cotton bollworm than those containing one gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAN Yun; JIA ZhiWei; HE KangLai; LIU YunJun; SONG FuPing; WANG BaoMin; WANG GuoYing

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants carrying Cry1Ac, Crylle or both genes were obtained. In the leaves of transgenic plants carrying both genes, the contents of CrylAc and Cry1le proteins were 0.173% and 0.131% of the total proteins, respectively, Cry1Ac protein content was 0.182 % and Cry1le protein con-tent was 0.124% of the total proteins in the leaves of transgenic plants containing only one Bt gone. Fresh leaves of transgenic tobacco and wild-type plants were used for the insect bioassay against wild-type and Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera). The bioassay results showed that transgenic plants carrying both genes were significantly more toxic to wild-type and Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm than those carrying Cry1Ac or Cry1le alone. This study indicates that the higher toxicity of transgenic tobacco plants carrying both genes is caused by the cooperative function of both Bt proteins, thus providing a potential way to delay the development of insect resis-tance to transgenic crops.

  12. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP while demonstrating the ICCT CT-121 FGD Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-16

    The US Department of Energy is performing comprehensive assessments of toxic emissions from eight selected coal-fired electric utility units. This program responds to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which require the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utility power plants for Potential health risks. The resulting data will be furnished to EPA utility power plants and health risk determinations. The assessment of emissions involves the collection and analysis of samples from the major input, process, and output streams of each of the eight power plants for selected hazardous Pollutants identified in Title III of the Clean Air Act. Additional goals are to determine the removal efficiencies of pollution control subsystems for these selected pollutants and the Concentrations associated with the particulate fraction of the flue gas stream as a function of particle size. Material balances are being performed for selected pollutants around the entire power plant and several subsystems to identify the fate of hazardous substances in each utility system. Radian Corporation was selected to perform a toxics assessment at a plant demonstrating an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) Project. The site selected is Plant Yates Unit No. 1 of Georgia Power Company, which includes a Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 demonstration project.

  13. Successful startup of a full-scale acrylonitrile wastewater biological treatment plant (ACN-WWTP) by eliminating the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds on nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Feng; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-01-01

    During the startup of a full-scale anoxic/aerobic (A/O) biological treatment plant for acrylonitrile wastewater, the removal efficiencies of NH(3)-N and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) were 1.29 and 0.83% on day 30, respectively. The nitrification process was almost totally inhibited, which was mainly caused by the inhibitory effects of toxic compounds. To eliminate the inhibition, cultivating the bacteria that degrade toxic compounds with patience was applied into the second startup of the biological treatment plant. After 75 days of startup, the inhibitory effects of the toxic compounds on nitrification were eliminated. The treatment plant has been operated stably for more than 3 years. During the last 100 days, the influent concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(3)-N, TKN and total cyanide (TCN) were 831-2,164, 188-516, 306-542 and 1.17-9.57 mg L(-1) respectively, and the effluent concentrations were 257 ± 30.9, 3.30 ± 1.10, 31.6 ± 4.49 and 0.40 ± 0.10 mg L(-1) (n = 100), respectively. Four strains of cyanide-degrading bacteria which were able to grow with cyanide as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were isolated from the full-scale biological treatment plant. They were short and rod-shaped under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and were identified as Brevundimonas sp., Rhizobium sp., Dietzia natronolimnaea and Microbacterium sp., respectively.

  14. Assessment of toxicity of radioactively contaminated sediments of the Yenisei River for aquatic plants in laboratory assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotina, T.; Trofimova, E.; Medvedeva, M.; Bolsunovsky, A. [Institute of Biophysic SB RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The Yenisei River has been subjected to radioactive contamination due to the operation of the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (Rosatom) (MCC) producing weapon-grade plutonium for more than fifty years (1958-2010). As a result, high activities of long-lived artificial radionuclides (Cs-137, Pu-238, 239, 241, Am-241) were deposited in sediments of the river. Bottom sediments of the Yenisei River downstream of the Krasnoyarsk city are also polluted with heavy metals because of industrial discharges and from the water catchment area. The purpose of this research was to estimate the ability of submersed macrophytes Elodea canadensis and Myriophyllum spicatum to serve as indicators of toxicity of bottom sediments of the Yenisei River. Activities of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of aquatic plants sampled in the Yenisei River upstream of the MCC were below detection limit (< 0.5 Bq/kg of dry mass for Cs-137). The activities of artificial radionuclides in the biomass of macrophytes sampled in the Yenisei River in the vicinity of the MCC in autumn 2012 were (Bq/kg of dry mass): 67±4 for Co-60, 16±2 for Cs-137, and 8±1 for Eu-152. For eco-toxicological experiments, top 20-cm layers of bottom sediments (BS) were collected from the Yenisei River at three sites in the vicinity of the MCC (No. 2-4) and at one site upstream of the MCC (No. 1). Samples of sediments contained natural isotope K-40 (240-330 Bq/kg, fresh mass) and artificial radionuclides: Co-60 (up to 70 Bq/kg), Cs-137 (0.8-1400 Bq/kg), Eu-152, 154 (up to 220 Bq/kg), Am-241 (up to 40 Bq/kg). The total activity concentration of radionuclides measured on an HPGe-Gamma-spectrometer (Canberra, U.S.) in samples of BS No. 1-4 was 330, 500, 880 and 1580 Bq/kg of fresh mass, respectively. Apical shoots of submersed macrophytes were planted in sediments (6-9 shoots per sediment sub-sample in three replicates). Endpoints of shoot and root growth were used as toxicity indicators; the number of cells with chromosome

  15. Contrasting effects of biochar, compost and farm manure on alleviation of nickel toxicity in maize (Zea mays L.) in relation to plant growth, photosynthesis and metal uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Muhammad Zia-Ur; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Fatima, Nida; Yousaf, Balal; Naeem, Asif; Sabir, Muhammad; Ahmad, Hamaad Raza; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-11-01

    Nickel (Ni) toxicity in agricultural crops is a widespread problem while little is known about the role of biochar (BC) and other organic amendments like farm manure (FM) from cattle farm and compost (Cmp) on its alleviation. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of BC, Cmp and FM on physiological and biochemical characteristics of maize (Zea mays L.) under Ni stress. Maize was grown in Ni spiked soil without and with two rates of the amendments (equivalent to 1% and 2% organic carbon, OC) applied separately to the soil. After harvest, plant height, root length, dry weight, chlorophyll contents, gas exchange characteristics and trace elements in plants were determined. In addition, post-harvest soil characteristics like pHs, ECe and bioavailable Ni were also determined. Compared to the control, all of the amendments increased plant height, root length, shoot and root dry weight with the maximum increase in all parameters by FM (2% OC) treatment. Similarly, total chlorophyll contents and gas exchange characteristics significantly increased with the application of amendments being maximum with FM (2% OC) application. Amendments significantly increased copper, zinc, manganese and iron concentrations and decreased Ni concentrations in the plants. The highest reduction in shoot Ni concentration was recorded with FM (2% OC) followed by BC (2% OC) being 73.2% and 61.1% lower compared to the control, respectively. The maximum increase in soil pH and decrease in AB-DTPA extractable Ni was recorded with BC (2% OC) followed by FM (2% OC). It is concluded that FM (2% OC) was the most effective in reducing Ni toxicity to plants by reducing Ni uptake while BC (2% OC) was the most effective in decreasing bioavailable Ni in the soil through increasing soil pH. However, long-term field studies are needed to evaluate the effects of these amendments in reducing Ni toxicity in plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pb, Cu botanogeochemical anomalies and toxic effects on plant cells in Pb-Zn (Sn) ore fields, Northeast Guangxi Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ci'an; LEI Liangqi; YANG Qijun

    2007-01-01

    In the Lingchuan-Daoping and Xinglu Pb-Zn ore fields in northern and eastern Guangxi Autonomous Region, Pb, Cu botanogeochemical anomalies may be ascribed to the excessive amounts of Pb and Cu taken up by the root system of plants, such as China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata Lamb. Hook), mason pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) and bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum var. latiusculum). Under transmission electron microscope (TEM), the excess Pb, Cu in the leaf cells of the plants are present as high electron-density substances, which were precipitated in the leaf cells, causing phytotoxic effects by deforming and injuring cellular tissues. The sorts of toxic elements accumulating in the leaf cells are consistent with those of the botanogeochemically anomalous elements in the polluted soil where the plants grow. In addition, the plants may also be capable of resisting the invasion of excess Cu (and Pb) .

  17. Subchronic oral toxicity evaluation of ethanolic whole plant extract of Eleucine indica on haematological and biochemical indices in Wistar albino rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ette Okon Ettebong; PaulAlozie Nwafor

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of ingestion of ethanolic whole plant extract of Eleucine indica on haematological and biochemical parameters of Wistar albino rats. Methods: Subchronic toxicity study was carried out by oral administration of different doses (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg body weight) of the extract on alternate-day basis to different groups of rats for 28 days. The animals were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture for haematological and biochemical analyses. Results: Haematological indices were preserved and the extract showed significant (P Conclusions: The results obtained indicated that ingestion of Eleucine indica whole plant extract for a long period of time reduces both bleeding and clotting times, reduces blood sugar and shows no apparent toxic effect on liver and kidneys. The results of this study may be useful as a basis for clinical trials in humans.

  18. Toxicity of a formulation of the insecticide indoxacarb to the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae), and the big-eyed bug, Geocoris punctipes (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P Glynn; Hammes, Glenn G; Sacher, Matthew; Connair, Michael; Brady, E Angela; Wing, Keith D

    2002-01-01

    Indoxacarb is a new oxadiazine insecticide that has shown outstanding field insecticidal activity. The toxicity of a 145 g litre-1 indoxacarb SC formulation (Steward) was studied on the tarnished plant bug Lygus lineolaris and the big-eyed bug Geocoris punctipes. Both insect species responded very similarly to indoxacarb in topical, tarsal contact and plant feeding toxicity studies. The topical LD50 of the formulation was c 35 ng AI per insect for both species. Prolonged tarsal contact with dry indoxacarb residues did not result in mortality for either insect species. However, both species were susceptible to feeding through dried residues of indoxacarb after spraying on young cotton plants. Feeding on water-washed plants resulted in lower mortality than that observed with unwashed plants, and toxicity declined even more dramatically after a, detergent rinse, indicating that much of the indoxacarb probably resides on the cotton leaf surface or in the waxy cuticle. These results were corroborated by HPLC-mass spectrometry measurements of indoxacarb residues on the plants. Greater mortality for both species was observed in a higher relative humidity environment. Higher levels of accumulated indoxacarb and its active metabolite were detected in dead G punctipes than in L lineolaris after feeding on sprayed, unwashed plants. When female G punctipes ate indoxacarb-treated Heliothis zea eggs, there was significant toxicity. However, only c 15% of the females consumed indoxacarb-treated eggs, and the rest of the females showed a significant diminution of feeding in response to the insecticide. Cotton field studies have shown that indoxacarb treatments at labelled rates lead to a dramatic decline in L lineolaris, with negligible declines in beneficial populations. A major route of intoxication of L lineolaris in indoxacarb-treated cotton fields thus appears to be via oral, and not cuticular, uptake of residues from treated cotton plants. The mechanisms for selectivity

  19. Colour and toxic characteristics of metakaolinite-hematite pigment for integrally coloured concrete, prepared from iron oxide recovered from a water treatment plant of an abandoned coal mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram; Thomas, Hywel Rhys

    2016-07-01

    A metakaolinite-hematite (KH) red pigment was prepared using an ocherous iron oxide sludge recovered from a water treatment plant of an abandoned coal mine. The KH pigment was prepared by heating the kaolinite and the iron oxide sludge at kaolinite's dehydroxylation temperature. Both the raw sludge and the KH specimen were characterised for their colour properties and toxic characteristics. The KH specimen could serve as a pigment for integrally coloured concrete and offers a potential use for the large volumes of the iron oxide sludge collected from mine water treatment plants.

  20. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  1. Monitoring of contaminated toxic and heavy metals, from mine tailings through age accumulation, in soil and some wild plants at Southeast Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, M N

    2010-06-15

    This study includes tailing from gold mine, at Allaqi Wadi Aswan, Egypt, used by incident Egyptian and after by some English companies. Tailings, soils and wild plants (Acia Raddiena and Aerva Javanica) were sampled and analysed for toxic metals (Hg, Cd, Pb and As) and associated heavy metals (Cr, Ag, Ni, Au, Mo, Zn, Mn and Cu) using ICP-MS, ICP-AES, CVAAS and FAAS techniques. The present work concerns the distribution and mobility of these metals from tailing to the surrounding soils and wild flora. The results reveal that Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ag, Au, Mn, Hg, As, Ag, Au and Pb in soil decreased as faraway from the tailing, after then irregular trends as a result of input from surrounding rocks. Acia Raddiena plant accumulated As, Cd and Pb in higher levels than Aerva Javanica. Quantification of soil and plant pollution was studied using enrichment factors, contamination factor, pollution index and bioaccumulation factors and show good interpretations of the results. The overall results of this study show that the soil and plants near the gold mine tailing were highly toxic, and the plants and soil must not be uses for grazing or agriculture. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased Suicide Risk among Workers following Toxic Metal Exposure at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant From 1952 to 2003: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a problem worldwide and occupation is an important risk factor. In the last decade, 55 200 deaths in the US were attributed to occupational risk factors. Objective: To determine if toxic metal exposure was associated with suicide risk among Paducah gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP) workers. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM) was used to determine metal exposure likelihood. Uranium...

  3. Influence of NaCl-Induced Salinity and Cd Toxicity on Respiration Activity and Cd Availability to Barley Plants in Farmyard Manure-Amended Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel R. A. Usman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the Cd availability and toxicity as affected by NaCl-induced salinity and farmyard manure addition. The Cd availability and toxicity were investigated in greenhouse pot and incubation experiments were conducted on a calcareous loamy sand soil contaminated with Cd (0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mg kg−1 of soil and amended with two rates of 0.0 and 30 g farmyard manure (FYM kg−1. Barley seeds (Hordeum vulgare L. were sown in pots and irrigated with water containing different levels of salinity (0, 30, 60, and 120 mM NaCl. The results revealed that the DTPA-extractable Cd and its content in barley plant shoots tended to increase in line as Cd was applied and salt levels increased. Elevated decreases in the soil basal respiration with increased Cd applied and NaCl-induced salinity were found. However, applying FYM significantly reduced Cd availability and increased plant growth and soil respiration activity. The results clearly showed that adding farmyard manure as soil organic amendment decreased the availability of Cd to barley plants and mitigated the toxicity of both Cd and salinity to soil microbial activity.

  4. Bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil to combat toxicity on Withania somnifera through seed priming with biosurfactant producing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amar Jyoti; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Soil contaminated by Petroleum oil cannot be utilized for agricultural purposes due to hydrocarbon toxicity. Oil contaminated soil induces toxicity affecting germination, growth and productivity. Several technologies have been proposed for bioremediation of oil contaminated sites, but remediation through biosurfactant producing plant growth promontory rhizobacteria (PGPR) is considered to be most promising methods. In the present study the efficacy of seed priming on growth and pigment of Withania somnifera under petroleum toxicity is explored. Seeds of W. somnifera were primed with biosurfactant producing Pseudomonas sp. AJ15 with plant growth promoting traits having potentiality to utilized petroleum as carbon source. Results indicates that plant arose from priming seeds under various petroleum concentration expressed high values for all the parameters studied namely germination, shoot length, root length, fresh and dry weight and pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoid) as compared to non primed seed. Hence, the present study signifies that petroleum degrarding biosurfactant producing PGPR could be further used for management and detoxification of petroleum contaminated soils for growing economically important crops.

  5. Biomarker responses of rice plants growing in a potentially toxic element polluted region: A case study in the Le'An Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaoli; Peng, Yongwen; Cai, Gaotang; Gao, Guiqing; Wu, Jianqiang; Liu, Jiali

    2017-08-22

    Rice plants, planted and grown in the field, were chosen in this study to evaluate the potentially toxic element pollution by combining pollutant analysis and a molecular biomarker response evaluation together in the Le'An Region, a highly polluted area due to anthropogenic activities. Soils and crops at 18 sites classified into four areas based on hydrological, geological and pollutant survey results were collected during the whole growth cycle for chemical and biological analysis. Sediment quality values and pollution indexes were combined with statistical analyses to assess the hazard of potentially toxic elements and evaluate ecological risks. As effective stress-related signals, chlorophyll (Chl), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), glutathione content (GSH) and lipoperoxidation (as TBARS) were also determined during the rice plant growth period. The results revealed that heavy metal concentrations were significantly higher than corresponding background values and significantly related to those of the soils. The maximum concentration of potentially toxic elements was observed at the tillering stage, followed by the grain filling stage and heading stage. As biomarkers in field monitoring, a significant increase or decrease in Chl, SOD, POD, CAT, GSH and TBARS in crops means a potential relationship between the indexes and pollutants. This study also demonstrates that the integrated biomarker response (IBR) calculated by combining different biomarkers could be used effectively to evaluate the pollutant-induced stress levels in different areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Agrobacterium-transformed rice plants expressing synthetic cryIA(b) and cryIA(c) genes are highly toxic to striped stem borer and yellow stem borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X; Sardana, R; Kaplan, H; Altosaar, I

    1998-03-17

    Over 2,600 transgenic rice plants in nine strains were regenerated from >500 independently selected hygromycin-resistant calli after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The plants were transformed with fully modified (plant codon optimized) versions of two synthetic cryIA(b) and cryIA(c) coding sequences from Bacillus thuringiensis as well as the hph and gus genes, coding for hygromycin phosphotransferase and beta-glucuronidase, respectively. These sequences were placed under control of the maize ubiquitin promoter, the CaMV35S promoter, and the Brassica Bp10 gene promoter to achieve high and tissue-specific expression of the lepidopteran-specific delta-endotoxins. The integration, expression, and inheritance of these genes were demonstrated in R0 and R1 generations by Southern, Northern, and Western analyses and by other techniques. Accumulation of high levels (up to 3% of soluble proteins) of CryIA(b) and CryIA(c) proteins was detected in R0 plants. Bioassays with R1 transgenic plants indicated that the transgenic plants were highly toxic to two major rice insect pests, striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis) and yellow stem borer (Scirpophaga incertulas), with mortalities of 97-100% within 5 days after infestation, thus offering a potential for effective insect resistance in transgenic rice plants.

  7. Apigenin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa Prevents β-Amyloid 25–35-Induces Toxicity in Rat Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells of cerebral capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β peptides are key pathological elements in the development of this disease. Apigenin (4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that can be isolated from several plant species. In the present study, effects of apigenin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae on primary cultured rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs mediated by amyloid-β peptide 25–35 (Aβ25–35 were examined. Aβ25–35 showed toxic effects on CMECs, involving reduction of cell viability, release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, increase of nuclear condensation, over-production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and breakage of the barrier integrity and function. Based on this model, we demonstrated that apigenin from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa protected cultured rat CMECs by increasing cell viability, reducing LDH release, relieving nuclear condensation, alleviating intracellular ROS generation, increasing SOD activity, and strengthening the barrier integrity through the preservation of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability property and characteristic enzymatic activity after being exposed to Aβ25–35. In conclusion, apigenin isolated from Elsholtzia rugulosa has the ability to protect rat CMECs against Aβ25–35-induced toxicity.

  8. Improved phytoaccumulation of cadmium by genetically modified tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Physiological and biochemical response of the transformants to cadmium toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorinova, N. [AgroBioInstitute, 8 Dragan Tzankov Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: noraig60@yahoo.co.uk; Nedkovska, M. [AgroBioInstitute, 8 Dragan Tzankov Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorovska, E. [AgroBioInstitute, 8 Dragan Tzankov Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Simova-Stoilova, L. [Institute of Plant Physiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoyanova, Z. [Institute of Plant Physiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgieva, K. [Institute of Plant Physiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Demirevska-Kepova, K. [Institute of Plant Physiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Atanassov, A. [AgroBioInstitute, 8 Dragan Tzankov Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Herzig, R. [Phytotech-Foundation PT-F, Quartiergasse 12, CH 3013 Bern (Switzerland)

    2007-01-15

    The response of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.)-non-transformed and transformed with a metallothionein gene MThis from Silene vulgaris L. - to increase cadmium supply in the nutrient solution was compared. The transgenic plants accumulated significantly more Cd both in the roots and the leaves. Visual toxicity symptoms and disturbance in water balance were correlated with Cd tissue content. Treatment with 300 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2} resulted in inhibition of photosynthesis and mobilization of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Treatment with 500 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2} led to irreversible damage of photosynthesis and oxidative stress. An appearance of a new peroxidase isoform and changes in the leaf polypeptide pattern were observed at the highest Cd concentration. The level of non-protein thiols gradually increased following the Cd treatment both in transgenic and non-transformed plants. - Genetic transformation of Nicotiana tabacum L. by metallothionein gene improved phytoaccumulation of cadmium.

  9. An assessment of chemical and physical parameters, several contaminants including metals, and toxicity in the seven major wastewater treatment plants in the state of Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Felix; Avelar-Gonzalez, Francisco Javier; Rico-Martinez, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Forty-eight hours acute toxicity tests were employed with Daphnia magna and Lecane quadridentata to assess the influents and effluents of the seven most important wastewater treatment plants (WTP) in the state of Aguascalientes, Mexico, during the 2006 dry and rainy seasons. The WTP of the City of Aguascalientes treated 1948 Ls(-1). The remaining six plants treated wastewater in the range from 28 to 93 Ls(-1). Plants efficiently removed toxicity when Daphnia magna was used as a model organism, but performed poorly when the freshwater rotifer Lecane quadridentata was employed. It was observed that biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)), chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, phenol, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), temperature, and total suspended solids (TSS) were within the maximum allowed levels (MAL) in the effluents during the rainy season. Whereas the BOD(5), total nitrogen, total dissolved solids (TDS) and TSS showed levels greater than the MAL in effluents during the dry season. The levels of BOD, MBAS, and total nitrogen were greater than the MAL in influents. In contrast, the values of TDS and TSS in influents were above the MAL during the rainy season. In the dry season the levels of aluminum (Al), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) in influents and Fe, Mn and Pb in effluents were above the MAL. During the rainy season the levels of Mn, Cr and Hg in influents and those of Mn in effluents were above the MAL. When D. magna was used as model organism, acute toxicity units (aTU) for influents ranged from 0.2 to 4.4 and from 0.1 to 0.2 for effluents. These values for effluents are acceptable according to international guidelines. However, when L. quadridentata was the model organism, ranges were from 2.0 to 8.3 aTU in influents and from 1.6 to 2.6 aTU in effluents. The treated water that discharges into the San Pedro River would be considered toxic. The results of the toxicity

  10. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant: Niles Station Boiler No. 2. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE-PETC) during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electrical utilities. The results of this study will be used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate whether regulation of HAPs emissions from utilities is warranted. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling/Results/Special Topics describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data. The Special Topics section of Volume 1 reports on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/particle distributions of toxic chemicals. Volume 2: Appendices include field sampling data sheets, quality assurance results, and uncertainty calculations. The chemicals measured at Niles Boiler No. 2 were the following: five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); ammonia and cyanide; elemental carbon; radionuclides; volatile organic compounds (VOC); semivolatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and polychlorinated dioxins and furans; and aldehydes.

  11. Ecological health assessments based on whole effluent toxicity tests and the index of biological integrity in temperate streams influenced by wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Jin Sung; Kim, Sang Don; Chang, Nam Ik; An, Kwang-Guk

    2007-09-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests and ecosystem health assessments, based on test guidelines of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and index of biological integrity (IBI), were conducted on various streams located in Youngsan River watershed, Korea. The WET tests showed that about 33 and 82% of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) exhibited significant toxicity to Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum, respectively. Small WWTPs with low discharge volumes contributed less than 1% to the total stream toxicity. Fish community compositions and trophic guild analysis showed that the diversity index was greater in the control than in impacted streams, and the proportion of omnivore species was less in the control. Also, ecosystem health assessments, based on the IBI, showed distinct differences between the control and impacted sites of WWTPs. Model values of the IBI, based on 12 stream data sets, averaged 28, which is judged as a fair to poor condition according to the U.S. EPA criteria. The mean IBI in the control sites was 42, indicating good stream condition, whereas the impacted sites was scored 21, indicating poor condition. Overall, WET tests and ecosystem health assessments suggested the WWTP effluents had evident toxic effects on the biota, and impacted the species compositions and trophic guilds, resulting in degradation of the stream ecosystem health.

  12. Inhibitory and toxic effects of extracellular self-DNA in litter : A mechanism for negative plant-soil feedbacks?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Termolino, Pasquale; Mingo, Antonio; Senatore, Mauro; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Rietkerk, Max; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Plant-soil negative feedback (NF) is recognized as an important factor affecting plant communities. The objectives of this work were to assess the effects of litter phytotoxicity and autotoxicity on root proliferation, and to test the hypothesis that DNA is a driver of litter autotoxicity and plant-

  13. Fumigant Toxicity of Lamiaceae Plant Essential Oils and Blends of Their Constituents against Adult Rice Weevil Sitophilus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woong Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To find a new and safe alternative to conventional insecticides, we evaluated the fumigant toxicity of eight Lamiaceae essential oils and their constituents against the adult rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae. Of the eight species tested, hyssop (Hyssopus offcinalis, majoram (Origanum majorana, and Thymus zygis essential oils showed strong fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae adults at 25 mg/L air concentration. Constituents of active essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector (FID and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 13, 15, and 17 compounds were identified from hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis essential oils, respectively. Pinocamphone and isopinocamphone were isolated by open column chromatography. Among the test compounds, pinocamphone and isopinocamphone showed the strongest fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae. Sabinene hydrate, linalool, α-terpineol, and terpinen-4-ol exhibited 100% fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae at 3.9 mg/L air concentration. The measured toxicity of the artificial blends of the constituents identified in hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis oils indicated that isopinocamphone, terpine-4-ol, and linalool were major contributors to the fumigant toxicity of the artificial blend, respectively.

  14. Fumigant Toxicity of Lamiaceae Plant Essential Oils and Blends of Their Constituents against Adult Rice Weevil Sitophilus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Woong; Lee, Hyo-Rim; Jang, Myeong-Jin; Jung, Chan-Sik; Park, Il-Kwon

    2016-03-16

    To find a new and safe alternative to conventional insecticides, we evaluated the fumigant toxicity of eight Lamiaceae essential oils and their constituents against the adult rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae. Of the eight species tested, hyssop (Hyssopus offcinalis), majoram (Origanum majorana), and Thymus zygis essential oils showed strong fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae adults at 25 mg/L air concentration. Constituents of active essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector (FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 13, 15, and 17 compounds were identified from hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis essential oils, respectively. Pinocamphone and isopinocamphone were isolated by open column chromatography. Among the test compounds, pinocamphone and isopinocamphone showed the strongest fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae. Sabinene hydrate, linalool, α-terpineol, and terpinen-4-ol exhibited 100% fumigant toxicity against S. oryzae at 3.9 mg/L air concentration. The measured toxicity of the artificial blends of the constituents identified in hyssop, majoram, and Thymus zygis oils indicated that isopinocamphone, terpine-4-ol, and linalool were major contributors to the fumigant toxicity of the artificial blend, respectively.

  15. Risk analysis of pyrolyzed biochar made from paper mill effluent treatment plant sludge for bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parmila; Saroha, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    The risk analysis was performed to study the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals in biochar obtained from pyrolysis of sludge of pulp and paper mill effluent treatment plant. The sludge was pyrolyzed at different temperatures (200-700°C) and the resultant biochar were analyzed for fractionation of heavy metals by sequential extraction procedure. It was observed that all the heavy metals get enriched in biochar matrix after pyrolysis, but the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of the heavy metals in biochar were significantly reduced as the mobile and bioavailable heavy metal fractions were transformed into the relatively stable fractions. Moreover, it was observed that the leaching potential of heavy metals decreased after pyrolysis and the best results were obtained for biochar pyrolyzed at 700°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemometrics applied to the analysis of induced phytochelatins in Hordeum vulgare plants stressed with various toxic non-essential metals and metalloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dago, Àngela; González, Inmaculada; Ariño, Cristina; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Hordeum vulgare plants were stressed with Hg, Cd and As and their phytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of growth inhibition and total metal uptake by the plant. The synthesised phytochelatins ((γ-Glu-Cys)n-Gly, n=2-5; PCs) were determined by HPLC with amperometric detection at a glassy carbon electrode. The results indicate that H. vulgare is a good phytostabilisation plant due to its capacity to accumulate heavy metals in roots. Cd and Hg are the most uptake toxic elements, being Cd the most potent inducer of PCs. The data obtained on the different PCs and related peptides induced by each heavy metal were used to perform a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the results as a function of the contaminating toxic element or its concentration level. The nature of the stressor element could be predicted from the pattern of PCs and related peptides identified by PCA. PCs were the most strongly induced peptides under Cd and Hg stress, whereas As only tended to synthesise small thiols such as glutathione and γ-glutamylcysteine, both precursors of PCs synthesis. This finding indicates that PCs are induced at different rates depending on the metal stressor used.

  17. Toxicity of arsenic (III) and (V) on plant growth, element uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The effects of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] on the growth of roots, stems, and leaves and the uptake of arsenic (As), micro- and macronutrients, and total amylolytic activity were investigated to elucidate the phytotoxicity of As to the mesquite plant (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina). The plant growth was evaluated by measuring the root and shoot length, and the element uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The root and leaf elongation decreased significantly with increasing As(III) and As(V) concentrations; whereas, stem elongation remained unchanged. The As uptake increased with increasing As(III) or As(V) concentrations in the medium. Plants treated with 50 mg/L As(III) accumulated up to 920 mg/kg dry weight (d wt) in roots and 522 mg/kg d wt in leaves, while plants exposed to 50 mg/L As(V) accumulated 1980 and 210 mg/kg d wt in roots and leaves, respectively. Increasing the As(V) concentration up to 20 mg/L resulted in a decrease in the total amylolytic activity. On the contrary, total amylolytic activity in As(III)-treated plants increased with increasing As concentration up to 20 mg/L. The macro- and micronutrient concentrations changed in As-treated plants. In shoots, Mo and K were reduced but Ca was increased, while in roots Fe and Ca were increased but K was reduced. These changes reduced the size of the plants, mainly in the As(III)-treated plants; however, there were no visible sign of As toxicity.

  18. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae), medicinal plants of Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, Kiessoun; Bassolé, Imaël Henri Nestor; Hilou, Adama; Aworet-Samseny, Raïssa R R; Souza, Alain; Barro, Nicolas; Dicko, Mamoudou H; Datté, Jacques Y; M'Batchi, Bertrand

    2012-08-11

    Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae) are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease) according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p <0.05) and a dose-dependent inhibition was observed. The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia .

  19. Toxicity assessment and analgesic activity investigation of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f . and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae, medicinal plants of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konaté Kiessoun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. (Malvaceae are traditionally used in Burkina Faso to treat several ailments, mainly pains, including abdominal infections and associated diseases. Despite the extensive use of these plants in traditional health care, literature provides little information regarding their toxicity and the pharmacology. This work was therefore designed to investigate the toxicological effects of aqueous acetone extracts of Sida acuta Burn f. and Sida cordifolia L. Furthermore, their analgesic capacity was assessed, in order to assess the efficiency of the traditional use of these two medicinal plants from Burkina Faso. Method For acute toxicity test, mice were injected different doses of each extract by intraperitoneal route and the LD50 values were determined. For the subchronic toxicity evaluation, Wistar albinos rats were treated by gavage during 28 days at different doses of aqueous acetone extracts and then haematological and biochemical parameters were determined. The analgesic effect was evaluated in mice by the acetic-acid writhing test and by the formalin test. Results For the acute toxicity test, the LD50 values of 3.2 g/kg and 3.4 g/kg respectively for S. acuta Burn f. and S. cordifolia L. were obtained. Concerning the haematological and biochemical parameters, data varied widely (increase or decrease according to dose of extracts and weight of rats and did not show clinical correlations. The extracts have produced significant analgesic effects by the acetic acid writhing test and by the hot plate method (p Conclusion The overall results of this study may justify the traditional uses of S. acuta and S. cordifolia .

  20. A mixed diet of toxic plants enables increased feeding and anti-predator defense by an insect herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, P A; Bernardo, M A; Singer, M S

    2014-10-01

    Some insect herbivores sequester plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) for their own defense, raising the interesting possibility that grazing herbivores are defended by combinations of PSMs from different plant species. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the grazing caterpillar, Grammia incorrupta, deters the ant, Aphaenogaster cockerelli, by eating a mixture of plants containing iridoid glycosides (IGs) and those containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and that this deterrence is greater than that attained by eating either plant alone. This hypothesis was tested against the non-mutually exclusive hypothesis that mixing plants containing PAs with those containing IGs improves growth performance. Caterpillar survival and growth were measured on three experimental diets: a PA plant, an IG plant, and a mixture of the two. We measured the degree of deterrence associated with these, and an additional experimental diet devoid of PSMs at naturally occurring A. cockerelli nests. Caterpillars fed both plants gained more mass than those fed either plant alone, but took longer to develop. These differences were not caused by diet-based variation in growth efficiency, but by eating more food when offered the mixed-plant diet relative to single-plant diets. The mixed diet was shown to provide deterrence to ants, whereas caterpillars fed single-plant diets were not significantly more deterrent than caterpillars that had eaten the PSM-free diet. We hypothesize that enhanced defense results from increased food consumption in response to multiple plant species, perhaps leading to greater PSM sequestration. Through this mechanism, bottom-up and top-down effects may mutually reinforce the grazing dietary strategy.

  1. Concentrations of potentially toxic elements in soils and vegetables from the macroregion of São Paulo, Brazil: availability for plant uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Araujo, Sabrina Novaes; Alleoni, Luís Reynaldo Ferracciú

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence and accumulation of heavy metals or so-called potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soils and plants have driven long-standing concerns about the adverse effects such metals have on the environment and human health. Furthermore, contaminated food products are known to be a leading source of exposure to heavy metals for the general population. It is crucial to accurately assess the concentrations of metals in crops and the bioavailable contents of these elements in the soil. The state of São Paulo is the largest consumer market of horticultural products in Brazil with production focused essentially on urban and industrial areas, which greatly increases the degree of exposure to contaminants. The objective of the authors in this study was to evaluate the soil-plant relationships between concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in vegetable and garden soils in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. To accomplish this, 200 soil (0-20 cm) and plant samples were collected from 25 species in the production areas. With the exception of Cd, there was positive correlation between pseudototals (USEPA 3051a) and bioavailable contents (extracted with DTPA) of heavy metals. However, the Cd and Pb contents in plants were not significantly correlated with any of the variables studied. All random forest and tree models proved to be good predictors of results generated from a regression model and provided useful information including covariates that were important for specifically forecasting Zn concentration in plants.

  2. TOXICITY OF METHYL-TERT BYTYL ETHER (MTBE) TO PLANTS (AVENA SATIVA, ZEA MAYS, TRITICUM AESTIVUM, AND LACTUCA SATIVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the germination of seeds and growth of the plant were studied in some laboratory experiments. Test plants were wild oat (Avena sative), sweet corn (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Seed germination,...

  3. TOXICITY OF METHYL-TERT BYTYL ETHER (MTBE) TO PLANTS (AVENA SATIVA, ZEA MAYS, TRITICUM AESTIVUM, AND LACTUCA SATIVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the germination of seeds and growth of the plant were studied in some laboratory experiments. Test plants were wild oat (Avena sative), sweet corn (Zea mays), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Seed germination,...

  4. Toxicity of six plant extracts and two pyridine alkaloids from Ricinus communis against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s., is known to feed selectively on certain plants for sugar sources. However, the adaptive significance of this behavior especially on how the extracts of such plants impact on the fitness of this vector has not been explored. This study determined th...

  5. In vivo assessment of the toxic potential of Dissotis rotundifolia whole plant extract in Sprague–Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Ansah

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The results obtained from the sub-acute toxicological assessment of D. rotundifolia extract suggest that the extract is non-toxic at doses up to 1000 mg/kg/day administered for a period of 14 days.

  6. Nickel-tolerant ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus albus ultramafic ecotype isolated from nickel mines in New Caledonia strongly enhance growth of the host plant Eucalyptus globulus at toxic nickel concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourand, Philippe; Ducousso, Marc; Reid, Robert; Majorel, Clarisse; Richert, Clément; Riss, Jennifer; Lebrun, Michel

    2010-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Pisolithus albus (Cooke & Massee), belonging to the ultramafic ecotype isolated in nickel-rich serpentine soils from New Caledonia (a tropical hotspot of biodiversity) and showing in vitro adaptive nickel tolerance, were inoculated to Eucalyptus globulus Labill used as a Myrtaceae plant-host model to study ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Plants were then exposed to a nickel (Ni) dose-response experiment with increased Ni treatments up to 60 mg kg( - )(1) soil as extractable Ni content in serpentine soils. Results showed that plants inoculated with ultramafic ECM P. albus were able to tolerate high and toxic concentrations of Ni (up to 60 μg g( - )(1)) while uninoculated controls were not. At the highest Ni concentration tested, root growth was more than 20-fold higher and shoot growth more than 30-fold higher in ECM plants compared with control plants. The improved growth in ECM plants was associated with a 2.4-fold reduction in root Ni concentration but a massive 60-fold reduction in transfer of Ni from root to shoots. In vitro, P. albus strains could withstand high Ni concentrations but accumulated very little Ni in its tissue. The lower Ni uptake by mycorrhizal plants could not be explained by increased release of metal-complexing chelates since these were 5- to 12-fold lower in mycorrhizal plants at high Ni concentrations. It is proposed that the fungal sheath covering the plant roots acts as an effective barrier to limit transfer of Ni from soil into the root tissue. The degree of tolerance conferred by the ultramafic P. albus isolates to growth of the host tree species is considerably greater than previously reported for other ECM. The primary mechanisms underlying this improved growth were identified as reduced Ni uptake into the roots and markedly reduced transfer from root to shoot in mycorrhizal plants. The fact that these positive responses were observed at Ni concentrations commonly observed in serpentinic soils suggests that

  7. Metal accumulation potential of wild plants in tannery effluent contaminated soil of Kasur, Pakistan: field trials for toxic metal cleanup using Suaeda fruticosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus-e Bareen; Tahira, Syeda Anjum

    2011-02-15

    The tannery effluent contaminated lands, adjacent to Depalpur Road, Kasur, Pakistan, have been rendered infertile due to long term effluent logging from the leather industry. The area has been colonized by twelve plant species among which Suaeda fruticosa, Salvadora oleoides and Calatropis procera have been found to be the most common and high biomass producing plants. S. fruticosa was subjected to further experimentation because of its high biomass and phytoextraction capabilities for metals. The pot and field experiments were carried out simultaneously. Pot experiments were conducted using the same field soil in column pots with stoppard bottoms to obtain the leachate. EDTA treatment caused a greater solubility of Cr in the soil pore water. In higher doses more amount of the heavy metal was leached. The increase in the amount of EDTA significantly caused a decrease in the biomass of plants without toxicity symptoms. A higher biomass of plants was observed in the field as compared to the pot experiment. The greatest amount of Na was accumulated by leaves of S. fruticosa followed by stem and roots. Similarly, the greatest amount of Cr was bioaccumulated by leaves of S. fruticosa, but followed by roots and then stem. S. fruticosa can be employed in rehabilitation of tannery effluent contaminated soil using small doses of EDTA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of potentially toxic heavy metals in traditionally used medicinal plants for HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatch, Harriet; Ngwenya, Barbara; Raletamo, Keleabetswe M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin

    2012-06-12

    The determination of four potentially toxic heavy metals, arsenic, chromium, lead and nickel in twelve plant species used for the treatment of perceived HIV and AIDS-associated opportunistic infections by traditional healers in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana, a metal mining area, was carried out using atomic absorption spectrometry. The medicinal plants; Dichrostachys cinerea, Maerua angolensis, Mimusops zeyheri, Albizia anthelmintica, Plumbago zeylanica, Combretum imberbe, Indigofera flavicans, Clerodendrum ternatum, Solanum panduriforme, Capparis tomentosa, Terminalia sericea and Maytenus senegalensis contained heavy metals in varying quantities: arsenic 0.19-0.54 μg g(-1), chromium 0.15-1.27 μg g(-1), lead 0.12-0.23 μg g(-1) and nickel 0.09-0.21 μg g(-1) of dry weight. Chromium was found to be the most abundant followed by arsenic and lead. Nickel was undetectable in nine plant species. M. senegalensis contained the largest amounts of arsenic, chromium and lead. All metals determined were below the WHO permissive maximum levels. The possible maximum weekly intakes of the heavy metals following treatment regimes were insignificant compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake levels recommended by WHO and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. This suggests that heavy metal exposure to patients originating from consumption of traditional medicinal plant preparations is within non health-compromising limits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Generalist Inside the Specialist: Gut Bacterial Communities of Two Insect Species Feeding on Toxic Plants Are Dominated by Enterococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Cristina; Baixeras, Joaquín; Latorre, Amparo; Porcar, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Some specialist insects feed on plants rich in secondary compounds, which pose a major selective pressure on both the phytophagous and the gut microbiota. However, microbial communities of toxic plant feeders are still poorly characterized. Here, we show the bacterial communities of the gut of two specialized Lepidoptera, Hyles euphorbiae and Brithys crini, which exclusively feed on latex-rich Euphorbia sp. and alkaloid-rich Pancratium maritimum, respectively. A metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the gut microbiota of both insects is dominated by the phylum Firmicutes, and especially by the common gut inhabitant Enterococcus sp. Staphylococcus sp. are also found in H. euphorbiae though to a lesser extent. By scanning electron microscopy, we found a dense ring-shaped bacterial biofilm in the hindgut of H. euphorbiae, and identified the most prominent bacterium in the biofilm as Enterococcus casseliflavus through molecular techniques. Interestingly, this species has previously been reported to contribute to the immobilization of latex-like molecules in the larvae of Spodoptera litura, a highly polyphagous lepidopteran. The E. casseliflavus strain was isolated from the gut and its ability to tolerate natural latex was tested under laboratory conditions. This fact, along with the identification of less frequent bacterial species able to degrade alkaloids and/or latex, suggest a putative role of bacterial communities in the tolerance of specialized insects to their toxic diet.

  10. Subchronic oral toxicity evaluation of ethanolic whole plant extract of Eleucine indica on haematological and biochemical indices in Wistar albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ette Okon Ettebong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of ingestion of ethanolic whole plant extract of Eleucine indica on haematological and biochemical parameters of Wistar albino rats. Methods: Subchronic toxicity study was carried out by oral administration of different doses (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg body weight of the extract on alternate-day basis to different groups of rats for 28 days. The animals were subsequently sacrificed and blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture for haematological and biochemical analyses. Results: Haematological indices were preserved and the extract showed significant (P < 0.01–0.001 haemostatic potentials. There was significant reduction (P < 0.05–0.001 in total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (P < 0.001, alanine transaminase (P < 0.05, alkaline phosphatase (P < 0.001 and blood glucose (P < 0.001 compared to control. The level of total protein increased significantly (P < 0.05–0.001. Kidney functions were, however, intact. Conclusions: The results obtained indicated that ingestion of Eleucine indica whole plant extract for a long period of time reduces both bleeding and clotting times, reduces blood sugar and shows no apparent toxic effect on liver and kidneys. The results of this study may be useful as a basis for clinical trials in humans.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT TEST SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF THE TOXICITY OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS. I. SENSITIVITY OF PLANT SPECIES TO HEAVY METAL STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andon VASSILEV

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of young bean, cucumber and lettuce plants to heavy metals stress was studied at control conditions in a climatic room. The plants were grown in pots with perlite and supplied daily by half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution. The plants were treated for 8 days with different heavy metal doses (full, ½ and ¼ starting at appearance of the fi rst true leaf (cucumber and bean or the full development of the second leaf (lettuce. The full dose consisted 500 μM Zn, 50 μM Cd and 20 μM Cu added to the nutrient solution. Based on the measured morphological (fresh weight, leaf area, root length and physiological parameters (photosynthetic pigments content and activity of guaiacol peroxidase in roots, the cucumber plants presented the highest sensitivity to heavy metal stress.

  12. Ethnobotanical survey and toxicity evaluation of medicinal plants used for fungal remedy in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbunde, Mourice Victor Nyangabo; Innocent, Ester; Mabiki, Faith; Andersson, Pher G.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim: Some of the antifungal drugs used in the current treatments regime are responding to antimicrobial resistance. In rural areas of Southern Tanzania, indigenous people use antifungal drugs alone or together with medicinal plants to curb the effects of antibiotic resistance. This study documented ethnobotanical information of medicinal plants used for managing fungal infections in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania and further assess their safety. Materials and Methods: Ethnobotanical survey was conducted in Makete and Mufindi districts between July 2014 and December 2015 using semi-structured questionnaires followed by two focus group discussions to verify respondents’ information. Cytotoxicity study was conducted on extracts of collected plants using brine shrimp lethality test and analyzed by MS Excel 2013 program. Results: During this survey about 46 plant species belonging to 28 families of angiosperms were reported to be traditionally useful in managing fungal and other health conditions. Among these, Terminalia sericea, Aloe nutii, Aloe lateritia, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, Zanthoxylum deremense, and Kigelia africana were frequently mentioned to be used for managing fungal infections. The preparation of these herbals was mostly by boiling plant parts especially the leaves and roots. Cytotoxicity study revealed that most of the plants tested were nontoxic with LC50 > 100 which implies that most compounds from these plants are safe for therapeutic use. The dichloromethane extract of Croton macrostachyus recorded the highest with LC50 value 12.94 µg/ml. The ethnobotanical survey correlated well with documented literature from elsewhere about the bioactivity of most plants. Conclusions: The ethnobotanical survey has revealed that traditional healers are rich of knowledge to build on for therapeutic studies. Most of the plants are safe for use; and thus can be considered for further studies on drug discovery. PMID:28163965

  13. Determination of potentially toxic heavy metals in traditionally used medicinal plants for HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okatch, Harriet, E-mail: okatchh@mopipi.ub.bw [Department of Chemistry, University of Botswana, Private Bag UB 00704, Gaborone (Botswana); Ngwenya, Barbara [Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana, Maun (Botswana); Raletamo, Keleabetswe M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Botswana, Private Bag UB 00704, Gaborone (Botswana); Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Botswana, Gaborone (Botswana); Centre for Scientific Research, Indigenous Knowledge and Innovation (CESRIKI), P.O. Box 758, Gaborone (Botswana)

    2012-06-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determine As, Cr, Ni and Pb in traditional plants used to treat HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal levels and provisional tolerable weekly intake levels lower than WHO permissive maximum levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr > Pb > As > Ni. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Consumption of traditional medicinal plants are not health-comprising with respect to metals. - Abstract: The determination of four potentially toxic heavy metals, arsenic, chromium, lead and nickel in twelve plant species used for the treatment of perceived HIV and AIDS-associated opportunistic infections by traditional healers in Ngamiland District in Northern Botswana, a metal mining area, was carried out using atomic absorption spectrometry. The medicinal plants; Dichrostachys cinerea, Maerua angolensis, Mimusops zeyheri, Albizia anthelmintica, Plumbago zeylanica, Combretum imberbe, Indigofera flavicans, Clerodendrum ternatum, Solanum panduriforme, Capparis tomentosa, Terminalia sericea and Maytenus senegalensis contained heavy metals in varying quantities: arsenic 0.19-0.54 {mu}g g{sup -1}, chromium 0.15-1.27 {mu}g g{sup -1}, lead 0.12-0.23 {mu}g g{sup -1} and nickel 0.09-0.21 {mu}g g{sup -1} of dry weight. Chromium was found to be the most abundant followed by arsenic and lead. Nickel was undetectable in nine plant species. M. senegalensis contained the largest amounts of arsenic, chromium and lead. All metals determined were below the WHO permissive maximum levels. The possible maximum weekly intakes of the heavy metals following treatment regimes were insignificant compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake levels recommended by WHO and the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. This suggests that heavy metal exposure to patients originating from consumption of traditional medicinal plant preparations is within non health-compromising limits.

  14. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  15. Deficiency and toxicity of nanomolar copper in low irradiance—A physiological and metalloproteomic study in the aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demersum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, George [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Andresen, Elisa [University of Konstanz, Department of Biology, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Department Plant Biophysics and Biochemistry, Biology Centre of the ASCR, Branišovská 31/1160, CZ-37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Mattusch, Jürgen [UFZ − Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hubáček, Tomáš [Institute of Hydrobiology, Department of Hydrochemistry and Ecosystem Modelling, Biology Centre of the ASCR, Na Sádkách 7, 37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); SoWa National Research Infrastructure, Biology Centre of the ASCR, Na Sádkách 7, 37005 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Environmentally relevant toxicity and limitation of Cu were investigated. • Copper > 50nM replaces Mg in the LHCII‐trimers. • Deficiency causes decreased electron flow through PSII via lack of plastocyanin. • Of all metabolic pathways, photosynthesis was most affected by Cu toxicity. • Detection of Cu in the Chl peaks of LHCII suggests the generation of [Cu]‐Chl. - Abstract: Essential trace elements (Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, etc) lead to toxic effects above a certain threshold, which is a major environmental problem in many areas of the world. Here, environmentally relevant sub-micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} and simulations of natural light and temperature cycles were applied to the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum a s a model for plant shoots. In this low irradiance study resembling non‐summer conditions, growth was optimal in the range 7.5–35 nM Cu, while PSII activity (F{sub v}/F{sub m}) was maximal around 7.5 nM Cu. Damage to the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII) was the first target of Cu toxicity (>50 nM Cu) where Cu replaced Mg in the LHCII-trimers. This was associated with a subsequent decrease of Chl a as well as heat dissipation (NPQ). The growth rate was decreased from the first week of Cu deficiency. Plastocyanin malfunction due to the lack of Cu that is needed for its active centre was the likely cause of diminished electron flow through PSII (Φ{sub PSII}). The pigment decrease added to the damage in the photosynthetic light reactions. These mechanisms ultimately resulted in decrease of starch and oxygen production.

  16. Differential Larval Toxicity and Oviposition Altering Activity of Some Indigenous Plant Extracts against Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Aedes albopictus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Yadav; Varun Tyagi; Tikar, Sachin N; Sharma, Ajay K.; Murlidhar J Mendki; Jain, Ashok K; Devanathan Sukumaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mosquitoes are well known as vectors of several disease causing pathogens. The extensive use of synthetic insecticides in the mosquito control strategies resulted to the development of pesticide resistance and fostered environmental deterioration. Hence in recent years plants become alternative source of mosquito control agents. The present study assessed the larvicidal and oviposition altering activity of six different plants species-Alstonia scholaris, Callistemon viminalis, Hyp...

  17. Local impacts of coal mines and power plants across Canada. II. Metals, organics and toxicity in sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheam, V.; Reynoldson, T.; Garbai, G.; Rajkumar, J.; Milani, D. [Environment of Canada, Burlington, ON (Canada). National Water Research Institute

    2000-07-01

    A Canada-wide survey was undertaken to study local impacts of coal mines and coal-fired electrical generating stations. The first part dealt with thallium in waters and sediments. This, Part II, deals with metals and organics in sediments as well as sediment toxicity to four different organisms. Several elevated metal and PAH concentrations as well as high toxicity (based on biological sediment guidelines) were observed compared to uncontaminated sites. Based on Ontario's sediment guidelines, most of the studied sediments fell in the 'marginally to significantly polluted' category of sediment quality, although two belonged to the 'grossly polluted' class due to the extremely high concentrations of some metals. The observed diversity of PAHs and near-unity carbon preference indices indicate non-biological origins of the studied sediments. In this initial study, four different organisms, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, Hexagenia spp. (Hexagenia limbata) and Tubifex tubifex were used to determine sediment toxicity, which showed 50% of the tested sites were highly stressed.

  18. Toxicity measurement in a waste water treatment plants using active sludge aerobic biological treatment. Medida de la toxicidad en una estacion depuradora de aguas residuales con tratamiento biologico aerobio por fangos activos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, J.E. (Surcis, Guadalajara (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    The need for reliability in the operation of waste water treatment plants is discussed. In aerobic biological treatments of whatever kind using active sludge, the bio toxicity can be determined by measuring the oxygen consumed in endogenous breathing. The difficulty lies in carrying out the bio toxicity test without effecting the concentration of the organic substrate of the wastes water. This is overcome by operating at maximum organic material load, thereby inducing maximun breathing. (Author)

  19. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinidi Mohan

    Full Text Available When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L. lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM, a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50 values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  20. A naturally occurring plant cysteine protease possesses remarkable toxicity against insect pests and synergizes Bacillus thuringiensis toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Srinidi; Ma, Peter W K; Williams, W Paul; Luthe, Dawn S

    2008-03-12

    When caterpillars feed on maize (Zea maize L.) lines with native resistance to several Lepidopteran pests, a defensive cysteine protease, Mir1-CP, rapidly accumulates at the wound site. Mir1-CP has been shown to inhibit caterpillar growth in vivo by attacking and permeabilizing the insect's peritrophic matrix (PM), a structure that surrounds the food bolus, assists in digestion and protects the midgut from microbes and toxins. PM permeabilization weakens the caterpillar defenses by facilitating the movement of other insecticidal proteins in the diet to the midgut microvilli and thereby enhancing their toxicity. To directly determine the toxicity of Mir1-CP, the purified recombinant enzyme was directly tested against four economically significant Lepidopteran pests in bioassays. Mir1-CP LC(50) values were 1.8, 3.6, 0.6, and 8.0 ppm for corn earworm, tobacco budworm, fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer, respectively. These values were the same order of magnitude as those determined for the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Bt-CryIIA. In addition to being directly toxic to the larvae, 60 ppb Mir1-CP synergized sublethal concentrations of Bt-CryIIA in all four species. Permeabilization of the PM by Mir1-CP probably provides ready access to Bt-binding sites on the midgut microvilli and increases its activity. Consequently, Mir1-CP could be used for controlling caterpillar pests in maize using non-transgenic approaches and potentially could be used in other crops either singly or in combination with Bt-toxins.

  1. Colour and toxic characteristics of metakaolinite–hematite pigment for integrally coloured concrete, prepared from iron oxide recovered from a water treatment plant of an abandoned coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram, E-mail: sadasivams@cardiff.ac.uk; Thomas, Hywel Rhys

    2016-07-15

    A metakaolinite-hematite (KH) red pigment was prepared using an ocherous iron oxide sludge recovered from a water treatment plant of an abandoned coal mine. The KH pigment was prepared by heating the kaolinite and the iron oxide sludge at kaolinite's dehydroxylation temperature. Both the raw sludge and the KH specimen were characterised for their colour properties and toxic characteristics. The KH specimen could serve as a pigment for integrally coloured concrete and offers a potential use for the large volumes of the iron oxide sludge collected from mine water treatment plants. - Graphical abstract: A kaolinite based red pigment was prepared using an ocherous iron oxide sludge recovered from an abandoned coal mine water treatment plant. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A red pigment was prepared by heating a kaolinite and an iron oxide sludge. • The iron oxide and the pigment were characterised for their colour properties. • The red pigment can be a potential element for integrally coloured concrete.

  2. Neutralization of Bacterial YoeBSpn Toxicity and Enhanced Plant Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana via Co-Expression of the Toxin-Antitoxin Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Abu Bakar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA systems have various cellular functions, including as part of the general stress response. The genome of the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors several putative TA systems, including yefM-yoeBSpn, which is one of four systems that had been demonstrated to be biologically functional. Overexpression of the yoeBSpn toxin gene resulted in cell stasis and eventually cell death in its native host, as well as in Escherichia coli. Our previous work showed that induced expression of a yoeBSpn toxin-Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP fusion gene apparently triggered apoptosis and was lethal in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-expression of the yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic A. thaliana. When co-expressed in Arabidopsis, the YefMSpn antitoxin was found to neutralize the toxicity of YoeBSpn-GFP. Interestingly, the inducible expression of both yefMSpn antitoxin and yoeBSpn toxin-GFP fusion in transgenic hybrid Arabidopsis resulted in larger rosette leaves and taller plants with a higher number of inflorescence stems and increased silique production. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a prokaryotic antitoxin neutralizing its cognate toxin in plant cells.

  3. Changes in non Protein Thiols, some Antioxidant Enzymes Activity and Ultrastructural Alteration in Radish Plant (Raphanus sativus L. Grown under Lead Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Saad EL-BELTAGI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Forty days old radish plants (Raphanus sativus L. were exposed to different regimes of lead stress as Pb(NO32 at the following concentrations 0, 25, 50, 100, 150, 250 and 500 ppm. The possible generation of oxidative stress, antioxidant metabolism and changes in the chloroplast and cell membrane ultrastructure were investigated. Greater loss of the photosynthetic pigments (Chl. a, Chl. b and total carotenoids were observed especially under 500 ppm lead (Pb. The accumulation of lead in roots and leaves of plant were measured and the results showed that lead accumulation increased with increasing of the metal treatment concentration. An increasing trend was observed in levels of ascorbate and decreasing trend in glutathione. Also, the antioxidant enzymes, viz., guaiacol peroxidase (GPX ascorbate peroxidase (APX, catalase (CAT and glutathione S-transferase (GST showed significant variation with the increase in lead stress compared to control (untreated plants. The rapid inducibility of some of these enzymes is useful early and sensitive indicators of heavy metal toxicity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed an increase in the isoenzymes profile of CAT in both leaves and roots. While POD isoenzymes bands prominently increased in leaves and slightly decreased in roots at the higher Pb concentration in the growth media. The ultrastructural studies at selected concentrations; 100 and 500 ppm of Pb showed distortion of the structure and cell membranes in roots. Therefore, the changes in the levels of some antioxidants may play an important role against oxidative injury.

  4. Toxic Effect of copper on growth, yield, Photosynthetic Pigments and Mineral composition of wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *A. Ghani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted with six different concentrations of copper (Cu viz., 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 (ppm to determine the the response of wheat plants grown in earthen pots lined with polythene bags under glass house conditions. The growth attributes like plant height, fresh and dry weight yield, percent dry matter enhanced with increasing Cu concentrations and was maximum at 30 (ppm Cu while the number of tillers was minimum at this level. The grain yield at 30 (ppm. Cu was enhanced by 65.2% from the control. The increase in weight of 1000 grains ranged from 45.95 to 48.49 g in comparison to control (3205 g. Harvest index (% also increased and ranged from 42.49 to 49.50 in different treatments in comparison to control (39.99. Both 1000 grain weight and harvest index were maximum in the plants at 30 (ppm copper. Cu concentrations in leaves, grain and straw enhanced with increasing levels of Cu application. The Fe concentration in leaves was significantly reduced by Cu application and the reduction was 11.5% at 50 (ppm Cu and was not influenced in by Cu application in grain and straw. The Mn concentration was not affected by Cu application in any of the plant part studied. However, Zn concentration decreased significantly at higher levels of Cu (40 and 50 ppm in leaves and remained unaffected in the grain and straw.

  5. 5'-NUCLEOTIDASES OF NAJA NAJA KARACHIENSIS SNAKE VENOM: THEIR DETERMINATION, TOXICITIES AND REMEDIAL APPROACH BY NATURAL INHIBITORS (MEDICINAL PLANTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Asd, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Iqbal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khawaja, Naeem Raza; Muneer, Saiqa; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Khan, Muhammad Saqib; Murtaza, Ghulam; Hussain, Izhar

    2016-01-01

    Present study was carried out regarding enzymatic assay for 5'-nucleotidase enzymes present in snake venom Naja naja karachiensis and to evaluate twenty eight medicinal plants as their antidotes. Elevated enzymatic activities i.e., 119, 183, 262 and 335 U/mL were observed in 10, 20, 30 and 40 µg of crude venom, respectively, in dose dependent manner. Among various plant extracts only two (Bauhinia vaiiegate L. and Citms linion (L.) Burm. f.) were found 94% effective at 160 µg to neutralize 112 U/mL activities (p 0.5) while reference standard was proved 93.2% useful at 80 pg to halt 111 U/mL activities. Cedrus deodara G. Don, Enicostemna hyssopifolium (Willd.) Verdoom, Terminalia arjuma Wight & Am. and Zingiber officinalis Rosc. (at 160 µg) were found ≥90% effective (0.5 ≥ p ≥ 0.1) while Citrulus colocynthis, Fogonia cretica L., Rhazya stticta Dcne and Stenolobiun stans (L.) D. Don (at 320 µg) were proved 90% effective (0.05 ≥ p ≥ 0.02). The remaining plant extracts were observed abortive (p ≥ 0.001) in neutralization of 5'-nucleotidases enzymatic actions. This study emphasizes further characterization of active plant extracts to further explore the antivenom influences of these herbal remedies against deleterious effects produced by 5'-nucleotidase enzymes after snake bite envenomation.

  6. Differential Larval Toxicity and Oviposition Altering Activity of Some Indigenous Plant Extracts against Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Yadav

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are well known as vectors of several disease causing pathogens. The extensive use of synthetic insecticides in the mosquito control strategies resulted to the development of pesticide resistance and fostered environmental deterioration. Hence in recent years plants become alternative source of mosquito control agents. The present study assessed the larvicidal and oviposition altering activity of six different plants species-Alstonia scholaris, Callistemon viminalis, Hyptis suaveolens, Malvastrum coromandelianum, Prosopis juliflora, Vernonia cinerea against Aedes albopictus mosquito in laboratory.Leaf extracts of all the six plants species in five different solvents of various polarities were used in the range of 20-400ppm for larval bioassay and 50,100 and 200ppm for cage bioassay (for the study of oviposition behavior against Ae. albopictus. The larval mortality data were recorded after 24 h and subjected to Probit analysis to determine the lethal concentrations (LC50, while OAI (Oviposition activity index was calculated for oviposition altering activity of the plant extracts.Vernonia cinerea extract in acetone and C. viminalis extract in isopropanol were highly effective against Aedes albopictus larvae with LC50 value 64.57, 71.34ppm respectively. Acetone extract of P. juliflora found to be strong oviposition-deterrent which inhibited >2 fold egg laying (OAI-0.466 at 100ppm.Vernonia cinerea and C. viminallis leaf extracts have the potential to be used as larvicide and P. juliflora as an oviposition-deterrent for the control of Ae. albopictus mosquito.

  7. Investigation of Natural Plant Aegle marmelos Essential Oil Bioactivity on Development and Toxicity of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwan Bhaskar Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The uncontrolled use of synthetic chemicals is a great hazard for the environment and consumers. Methodology: In the present study, essential oil from leaves of Aegle marmelos was isolated by hydro-distillation and tested their insecticidal activity against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst. Results: The results showed that the essential oil of A. marmelos have fumigant toxicity, oviposition and developmental inhibitory activity against T. castaneum. The percentage mortality increased with increasing exposure time and concentration. The median lethal concentration (LC50 of A. marmelos essential oil at 48 h was 14.172 and 17.752 FL against larvae and adults of T. castaneum, respectively. The essential oil significantly reduced oviposition (F3,20 = 304.734 in adults and also reduced pupation (F3,20 = 137.442 and adult emergence (F3,20 = 225.619 in larvae when fumigated with sub-lethal concentration. The percent grains infection was reduced 83.66% at 60% of sub-lethal concentration of 24 h LC50. Fumigation of insect with sub-lethal concentration of A. marmelos essential oil inhibited AChE activity. Reduction in AChE activity was 81.48 and 54.32% of the control, after 24 h of fumigation with sub-lethal concentration. Conclusion: In conclusion, this essential oil probably induces toxicity in insect by inhibiting AChE activity.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Bacillus cereus, and Candida parapsilosis from a multicontaminated soil alleviate metal toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcón, Rosario; Perálvarez, María del Carmen; Roldán, Antonio; Barea, José-Miguel

    2010-05-01

    We investigated if the limited development of Trifolium repens growing in a heavy metal (HM) multicontaminated soil was increased by selected native microorganisms, bacteria (Bacillus cereus (Bc)), yeast (Candida parapsilosis (Cp)), or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), used either as single or dual inoculants. These microbial inoculants were assayed to ascertain whether the selection of HM-tolerant microorganisms can benefit plant growth and nutrient uptake and depress HM acquisition. The inoculated microorganisms, particularly in dual associations, increased plant biomass by 148% (Bc), 162%, (Cp), and 204% (AMF), concomitantly producing the highest symbiotic (AMF colonisation and nodulation) rates. The lack of AMF colonisation and nodulation in plants growing in this natural, polluted soil was compensated by adapted microbial inoculants. The metal bioaccumulation abilities of the inoculated microorganisms and particularly the microbial effect on decreasing metal concentrations in shoot biomass seem to be involved in such effects. Regarding microbial HM tolerance, the activities of antioxidant enzymes known to play an important role in cell protection by alleviating cellular oxidative damage, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase, were here considered as an index of microbial metal tolerance. Enzymatic mechanisms slightly changed in the HM-adapted B. cereus or C. parapsilosis in the presence of metals. Antioxidants seem to be directly involved in the adaptative microbial response and survival in HM-polluted sites. Microbial inoculations showed a bioremediation potential and helped plants to develop in the multicontaminated soil. Thus, they could be used as a biotechnological tool to improve plant development in HM-contaminated environments.

  9. Antimicrobial activity, toxicity and anti-inflammatory potential of methanolic extracts of four ethnomedicinal plant species from Punjab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Rabia; Ayub, Hafsa; Nawaz, Sajid; Islam, Zia Ul; Yasmin, Tayyaba; Bano, Asghari; Wakeel, Abdul; Zia, Saqib; Roberts, Thomas H

    2017-06-08

    The plant species Aristolochia indica (AI), Melilotus indicus (MI), Tribulus terrestris (TT) and Cuscuta pedicellata (CP) are widely used in folk medicine in the villages around Chowk Azam, South Punjab, Pakistan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity, phytochemical composition, and the antibacterial, antifungal, cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory potential of the four medicinal plants listed above. For CP stem, this study represents (to the best of our knowledge) the first time phytochemicals have been identified and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential determined. Phytochemicals were analyzed through chemical tests, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and spectrophotometric methods. Antioxidant activities (DPPH and H2O2) were also determined through spectrophotometric methods. Extracts were evaluated for antibacterial potential via the agar well diffusion method against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia and Acinetobacter baumannii. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the microdilution method. Antifungal activities were tested using the agar tube dilution method against three species: Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae. The cytotoxic potential of the plant extracts was checked using the brine shrimp assay. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the selected plant extracts was evaluated using albumin denaturation, membrane stabilization and proteinase inhibitory assays. Of all the methanolic extracts tested, those from CP (stem) and TTF (T. terrestris fruit) had the highest phenolic, flavonoid and flavonol contents (497±4 mg GAE/g, 385±8 mg QE/g and 139±4 mg QE/g; 426±5 mg GAE/g, 371±8 mg QE/g and 138±6 mg QE/g, respectively) and also exhibited strong antioxidant potential in scavenging DPPH and hydrogen peroxide (IC50 values; 20±1 and 18±0.7 μg/mL; 92±2 and 26±2 μg/mL, respectively). CP, TTF

  10. Are combined AOPs effective for toxicity reduction in receiving marine environment? Suitability of battery of bioassays for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent as an ecotoxicological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Garduño, B; Rueda-Márquez, J J; Manzano, M A; Garrido-Pérez, C; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2016-03-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment of three different wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents D1, D2 and D3 was performed before and after tertiary treatment using combination of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). A multibarrier treatment (MBT) consisting of microfiltration (MF), hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) was applied for all effluents. Sparus aurata, Paracentrotus lividus, Isochrysis galbana and Vibrio fischeri, representing different trophic levels, constituted the battery of bioassays. Different acute toxicity effects were observed in each WWTP effluents tested. The percentage of sea urchin larval development and mortality fish larvae were the most sensitive endpoints. Significant reduction (p WWTP effluents for the marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons toxicity and sorption behaviour of biochars prepared by pyrolysis of paper mill effluent treatment plant sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parmila; Saroha, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) toxicity and sorption behaviour of biochars prepared from pyrolysis of paper mill effluent treatment plant (ETP) sludge in temperature range 200-700 °C was studied. The sorption behaviour was found to depend on the degree of carbonization where the fractions of carbonized and uncarbonized organic content in the biochar act as an adsorption media and partition media, respectively. The sorption and partition fractions were quantified by isotherm separation method and isotherm parameters were correlated with biochar properties (aromaticity, polarity, surface area, pore volume and ash content). The risk assessment for the 16 priority EPA PAHs present in the biochar matrix was performed and it was found that the concentrations of the PAHs in the biochar were within the permissible limits prescribed by US EPA (except BC400 and BC500 for high molecular weight PAHs).

  12. Plant bioassays to assess toxicity of textile sludge compost Bioensaios vegetais na avaliação da toxidade do composto de lodo têxtil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Sérgio Ferreira Araújo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Composting of industrial wastes is increasing because of recycling requirements set on organic wastes. The evaluation of toxicity of these wastes by biological testing is therefore extremely important for screening the suitability of waste for land application. The toxicity of a textile sludge compost was investigated using seed germination and plant growth bioassays using soybean and wheat. Compost samples were mixed with water (seed germination bioassay or nutrient solution (plant growth bioassay at concentrations of 0, 19, 38, 76 and 152 g L-1. No negative effects were observed after five days of compost water-extract in relation to soybean and wheat seed germination. After fifteen days, under a hydroponics system, plant growth had harmful effects of the compost at concentrations above 38 g L-1. Textile sludge compost presented great phytotoxicity under hydroponics condition and the soybean and wheat were sensitive for evaluation of organic wastes in plant growth bioassays.A compostagem de resíduos industriais tem aumentado devido à pressão para reciclar os resíduos orgânicos. A avaliação da toxicidade destes resíduos por testes biológicos é extremamente importante para selecionar resíduos apropriados para aplicação no solo. A toxicidade do composto de lodo têxtil foi investigada utilizando bioensaios de germinação de sementes e crescimento vegetal em soja e trigo. Amostra do composto foi misturada com água (bioensaio de germinação de sementes ou solução nutritiva (bioensaio de crescimento de plantas em concentrações de 0, 19, 38, 76 e 152 g L-1. Não foram observados efeitos negativos, após cinco dias, do extrato aquoso do composto para a germinação de sementes da soja e do trigo. Após quinze dias em sistema hidropônico, houve efeitos deletérios do composto em concentrações acima de 38 g L-1. O composto de lodo têxtil mostrou maior fitotoxicidade em condições hidropônicas e a soja e o trigo são esp

  13. Bisphenol A exposure and healing effects of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. plant extract (APE) in bisphenol A-induced reproductive toxicity in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Balal; Amina; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Ruwei; Qadir, Abdul; Ali, Muhammad Ubaid; Kanwal, Qudsia; Munir, Bushra; Asmatullah; Abbas, Zaigham

    2016-06-01

    The current study presents the bisphenol A exposure and the ameliorative effects of Adiantum capillus-veneris on testicular toxicity induced by bisphenol A. Adult male albino rats were divided into five groups of five animals each: A (control), B (vehicle control), C (toxic), D (protective), and E (ameliorative) were served distilled water, olive oil, bisphenol A (BPA) at 100 mg/kg body weight, A. capillus-veneris plant extract at 25 mg/kg body weight, and BPA + A. capillus-veneris, respectively. All of the doses were administered orally for 15 days, and the rats were then sacrificed. Blood samples for the testosterone assay and both testes were collected for histological examination. The body weight, paired testes weight, relative tissue weight index, Johnsen scoring of tubules, and level of serum testosterone decreased in BPA-treated rats. Similarly, histological examination of the testes in BPA-treated animals revealed a lower number of Leydig cells, an irregular basement membrane, sloughing of germinal layers, vacuolization, a lower number of spermatocytes, and debris in the lumen. However, co-administration of A. capillus-veneris with BPA increased the total antioxidative capacity (330.82 ± 22.46 μmol/mg protein) of the testes and restored the serum testosterone level (1.70 ng/ml); histological features showed restoration in the stages of spermatogenesis. Conclusively, A. capillus-veneris plant extract overcomes the estrogenic effects of BPA on the reproductive system of rats and protects rats' testes against BPA-induced injury/damage via an antioxidative mechanism that appears to be conciliated.

  14. Analysis of the methodology to determine anaerobic toxicity: evaluation of main compounds present in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urra, J; Poirrier, P; Segovia, J; Lesty, Y; Chamy, R

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the concentration of biomass on the level of inhibition and anaerobic degradation kinetics in batch systems was studied with toxic compounds that can generate destabilization in the operation of sludge anaerobic digesters. The compounds were grouped in four families; long chain fatty acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzene sulphonates and organic acids. For the organic acids, there is no effect due to the biomass concentration variation, therefore it is a competitive inhibition; but that doesn't happen with the remaining compounds, where there is a dependence on the complexity of their structure, becoming a non-competitive inhibition. In addition, it was observed that the degradation kinetics is affected, whether diminishing the methane production (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, linear alkylbenzene sulphonates, organics acids) or increasing the initial latency time (long chain fatty acids) without this becoming an obstacle to obtain the maximum methane productions for the latter ones.

  15. Derivation of Draft Ecological Soil Screening Levels for TNT and RDX Utilizing Terrestrial Plant and Soil Invertebrate Toxicity Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    studies were conducted using the following plant species:  Dicotyledonous symbiotic species alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)  Monocotyledonous...catalog no. 550, lot packed and tested 2000. Supplier: Williams Dam Seeds Ltd. 14  Nitrogen-fixing bacteria for alfalfa  Studies by BRI...used southern states alfalfa-clover nitrogen- fixing bacteria ; catalog no. 111-08000, lot no.3092002. Supplier: Southern States Cooperative, Inc

  16. Evaluation of peroxidase as a biochemical indicator of toxic chemical exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, T.D.; Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the utility of peroxidase (POD) activity as a biochemical indicator of contaminant exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle. The plants were exposed to anthracene, sulfometuron methyl (Oust??), Cd2+, Cr6+, Cu2+, Mn2+, and Se4+ in concentration factors of 10. POD was extracted and measured by spectrophotometric assay. There was a significant increase in POD activity after a 5-d exposure to each of the chemicals at 1 mg/L. The optimum pH for POD activity after exposure to the chemicals was 5.5 to 6.0. The increase in POD was found to be dose dependent for each of the chemicals. The lowest concentration of chemical to induce a significant POD increase was 0.01 mg/L for anthracene, Oust, Cd, Cr, and Cu; 0.1 mg/L for Se; and 1.0 mg/L for Mn.Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the utility of peroxidase (POD) activity as a biochemical indicator of contaminant exposure in the aquatic plant Hydrilla verticillata, Royle. The plants were exposed to anthracene, sulfometuron methyl (Oust), Cd2+, Cr6+, Cu2+, Mn2+, and Se4+ in concentration factors of 10. POD was extracted and measured by spectrophotometric assay. There was a significant increase in POD activity after a 5-d exposure to each of the chemicals at 1 mg/L. The optimum pH for POD activity after exposure to the chemicals was 5.5 to 6.0. The increase in POD was found to be dose dependent for each of the chemicals. The lowest concentration of chemical to induce a significant POD increase was 0.01 mg/L for anthracene, Oust, Cd, Cr, and Cu: 0.1 mg/L for Se; and 1.0 mg/L for Mn.

  17. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Paola; Iavazzo, Pietro; Albanese, Stefano; Agrelli, Diana; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria

    2014-12-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred.

  18. Evaluation of buffers toxicity in tobacco cells: Homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid) is a suitable buffer for plant cells studies at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgo, Lucélia

    2017-06-01

    Low pH is an important environmental stressor of plant root cells. Understanding the mechanisms of stress and tolerance to acidity is critical; however, there is no widely accepted pH buffer for studies of plant cells at low pH. Such a buffer might also benefit studies of Al toxicity, in which buffering at low pH is also important. The challenge is to find a buffer with minimal cellular effects. We examined the cytotoxicity and possible metabolic disturbances of four buffers that have adequate pKa values and potential use for studies in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. These were homopipes (homopiperazine-1,4-bis (2-ethanesulfonic acid); pKa1 4.4), 3,3-dimethylglutaric acid (pKa1 3.73), β-alanine (pKa1 3.70) and potassium biphthalate (pKa1 2.95; pKa2 5.41). First, tobacco BY-2 cells were grown in a rich medium containing 10 mM of each buffer or MES (2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid) as a control, with the pH initially adjusted to 5.7. β-alanine was clearly toxic and dimethylgluturate and biphthalate were found to be cytostatic, in which no culture growth occurred but cell viability was either unaffected or decreased only after 5 days. Only homopipes allowed normal culture growth and cell viability. Homopipes (10 mM) was then tested in cell cultures with an initial pH of 4.3 ± 0.17 in minimal medium to examine whether its undissociated species (H2A) displayed any cellular effects and no cytotoxic effects were observed. It is possible to conclude that among tested buffers, homopipes is the most suitable for studies at low pH, and may be especially useful for aluminum toxicity experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, Paola, E-mail: paola.adamo@unina.it [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Iavazzo, Pietro [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Albanese, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell' Ambiente e delle Risorse, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Napoli (Italy); Agrelli, Diana [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, dell' Ambiente e delle Risorse, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred. - Highlights: • Soil pollution in an intensively farmed area of

  20. Vapor-phase toxicity of butylbenzyl phthalate to three plant species: white mustard, chinese cabbage, and white clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, J W; Staples, C A; Brown, D; Enste-Diefenbach, R

    2008-08-01

    During the manufacture of products containing butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), low emissions to the air may occur. Due to potential exposure of terrestrial communities to BBP vapors, phytotoxicity tests were conducted using Chinese cabbage, white mustard, and white clover. No significant effects on shoot growth were observed at the higher BBP vapor-phase concentration tested, which measured 5.7 microg/m(3). The overall practicality of vapor-phase testing of chemicals with very low vapor pressures is reviewed. These study results suggest that environmental risk from exposure to BBP vapor is negligible for plants.

  1. Manganese nanoparticles: impact on non-nodulated plant as a potent enhancer in nitrogen metabolism and toxicity study both in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Saheli; Patra, Prasun; Mitra, Shouvik; Dey, Kushal Kumar; Jain, Sneha; Sarkar, Samapd; Roy, Shuvrodeb; Palit, Pratip; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-09-03

    Mung bean plants were grown under controlled conditions and supplemented with macro- and micronutrients. The objective of this study was to determine the response of manganese nanoparticles (MnNP) in nitrate uptake, assimilation, and metabolism compared with the commercially used manganese salt, manganese sulfate (MS). MnNP was modulated to affect the assimilatory process by enhancing the net flux of nitrogen assimilation through NR-NiR and GS-GOGAT pathways. This study was associated with toxicological investigation on in vitro and in vivo systems to promote MnNP as nanofertilizer and can be used as an alternative to MS. MnNP did not impart any toxicity to the mice brain mitochondria except in the partial inhibition of complex II-III activity in ETC. Therefore, mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity, which were noted by excess usage of elemental manganese, were prevented. This is the first attempt to highlight the nitrogen uptake, assimilation, and metabolism in a plant system using a nanoparticle to promote a biosafe nanomicronutrient-based crop management.

  2. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants expressing a β-1,3-glucanase from sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) show reduced callose deposition and increased tolerance to aluminium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Shi, Wu Liang; You, Jiang Feng; Bian, Ming Di; Qin, Xiao Mei; Yu, Hui; Liu, Qing; Ryan, Peter R; Yang, Zhen Ming

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-one cultivars of sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) were screened for aluminium (Al) tolerance by measuring relative root growth (RRG). Two contrasting cultivars, ROMA (Al tolerant) and POTCHETSTRM (Al sensitive), were selected to study shorter term responses to Al stress. POTCHETSTRM had higher callose synthase activity, lower β-1,3-glucanase activity and more callose deposition in the root apices during Al treatment compared with ROMA. We monitored the expression of 12 genes involved in callose synthesis and degradation and found that one of these, SbGlu1 (Sb03g045630.1), which encodes a β-1,3-glucanase enzyme, best explained the contrasting deposition of callose in ROMA and POTCHETSTRM during Al treatment. Full-length cDNAs of SbGlu1 was prepared from ROMA and POTCHETSTRM and expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Independent transgenic lines displayed significantly greater Al tolerance than wild-type plants and vector-only controls. This phenotype was associated with greater total β-1,3-glucanase activity, less Al accumulation and reduced callose deposition in the roots. These results suggest that callose production is not just an early indicator of Al stress in plants but likely to be part of the toxicity pathway that leads to the inhibition of root growth.

  3. Poor sequestration of toxic host plant cardenolides and their rapid loss in the milkweed butterfly Danaus chrysippus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Danainae: Danaini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebs, Dietrich; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2017-06-01

    Butterflies of the genus Danaus are known to sequester toxic cardenolides from milkweed host plants (Apocynaceae). In particular, Danaus plexippus efficiently sequesters and stores these compounds, whereas D. chrysippus, is considered to poorly sequester cardenolides. To estimate its sequestration capability compared with that of D. plexippus, larvae of both species were jointly reared on Asclepias curassavica and the major cardenolides of the host plant, calotropin and calactin, were analyzed in adults sampled at different time intervals after eclosion. Both cardenolides were detected in body and wings of D. plexippus. Whereas the calotropin-concentration remained constant over a period of 24 days, that of calactin steadily decreased. In the body, but not in the wings of D. chrysippus, calactin only was detected in low amounts, which was then almost completely lost during the following 8 days after eclosion, suggesting that in contrast to D. plexippus, cardenolides seem to be less important for that butterfly's defence against predators. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of potentially inorganic toxic substances in sewage from treatment plants of the metropolitan region of Campinas by SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana; Broleze, Silvana Turolla, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEC/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente

    2013-07-01

    The increased production of sludge is a consequence of the growth of the volume of treated sewage and of the number of Sewage Treatment Plants (STP) in Brazil and, it has demanded the search of alternatives for its final disposal. Amongst the some alternatives of disposal, the agricultural use is viable, a time that the sewage is rich in organic substances, macro and micronutrients necessary to the soil fertility. However, the illegal industrial releases at public sewage may contain the presence of elements that cause harm to human health and the environment as Pb, Hg, Cd, Cr and Se. This work evaluated the potentially inorganic toxic substances in the sewage, previously dried, of the STP Camanducaia in Jaguariuna city; Village Flora in Sumare city; Praia Azul and Carioba in Americana city; Samambaia, Anhumas, Picarrao and Barao Geraldo in Campinas city, SP, employing the Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF). The sewage of Treatment Plants of the Metropolitan Region of Campinas take care of CONAMA 375/06 legislation. However, so that it can be commercialized as fertilizing or conditioning of soils, it must take care of to Normative Instruction 27/06, needing to reduce the contents of Ni and Cr. One of the alternatives would be a bigger supervising in the generating sources, in order to improve the quality of the tributary of the stations, being adjusted the sewage to the Brazilian legislations. (author)

  5. The toxic effects of heavy metal stress on the growth of aquatic plant%重金属水污染对植物生长影响的方式及研究方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金朝

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the contamination of heavy metals is becoming more and more serious in our country, which has obviously put great toxic effects on aquatic ecosystem and human health. Hence, studies on the toxic mecha- nism of aquatic plants of heavy metal stress are on the increase. According to my studies, the paper introduces the definitions of heavy metal and heavy metal water pollution, summarizes the research contents of the toxic effects of heavy metal stress on the growth of aquatic plants and their relevant methods in recent years, explains the general patterns of the toxic effects, and reviews the toxic mechanism of aquatic plants of heavy metal stress.%我国重金属水污染日趋严重,已明显危害到水生态和人类健康,有关重金属水污染对植物毒害机理的研究越来越多.本文结合笔者的研究工作,介绍了重金属与重金属水污染的概念,总结了近年来有关重金属水污染对植物毒害影响的研究内容及相应研究方法,归纳了重金属水污染对植物毒害的一般规律与可能机理.

  6. Availability of nutrients and toxic heavy metals in marigold plants=Disponibilidade de nutrientes e metais pesados tóxicos em plantas de calêndula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Nacke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Availability of nutrients and toxic heavy metals in marigold plants. This study was performed aiming to assess the availability of nutrients and toxic heavy metals present in marigold plants (Calendula officinalis treated with different fertilizers. The treatments were arranged in factorial scheme (2 x 2 x 3 in a completely randomized experimental design (CRD, with two textures of soil (sandy and clayey, two forms of fertilization (organic and chemical and three fertilization levels (without fertilization, recommended dose, and twice the recommended dose totaling 12 treatments, with four replications. The results showed that the clayey soil promoted the availability of N P, K, Mg, Cu, Zn and Fe; on the other hand, the sandy soil favored the availability of Ca, Mn, Pb and Cr. The organic fertilization provided higher levels of P and Fe, while the leaf tissue of marigold plants chemically fertilized presented higher concentrations of K and Mn.Realizou-se este trabalho com o objetivo de avaliar a disponibilidade de nutrientes e de metais pesados tóxicos presentes em plantas de calêndula (Calendula officinalis após diferentes tipos de adubação. Os tratamentos foram arranjados em esquema fatorial (2 x 2 x 3 dispostos em delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado (DIC, sendo duas texturas de solo, (argilosa e arenosa, duas formas de adubação (química e orgânica e três doses de adubação (sem adubação, dose recomendada e o dobro da dose recomendada, totalizando 12 tratamentos com quatro repetições. Os resultados demonstraram que os solos argilosos favoreceram a disponibilidade de N P, K, Mg, Cu, Zn e Fe; os solos de textura arenosa favoreceram a disponibilidade de Ca, Mn, Pb e Cr. A adubação orgânica disponibilizou maiores teores de P e Fe, enquanto o tecido foliar de plantas de calêndula adubadas com adubação química apresentaram concentrações maiores de K e Mn.

  7. Distribution of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in tailings, soils, and plants around Gol-E-Gohar iron mine, a case study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Naghmeh; Keshavarzi, Behnam; Moore, Farid; Sorooshian, Armin; Ahmadi, Mohamad Reza

    2017-06-15

    This study investigated the concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) including Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn in 102 soils (in the Near and Far areas of the mine), 7 tailings, and 60 plant samples (shoots and roots of Artemisia sieberi and Zygophylum species) collected at the Gol-E-Gohar iron ore mine in Iran. The elemental concentrations in tailings and soil samples (in Near and Far areas) varied between 7.4 and 35.8 mg kg(-1) for As (with a mean of 25.39 mg kg(-1) for tailings), 7.9 and 261.5 mg kg(-1) (mean 189.83 mg kg(-1) for tailings) for Co, 17.7 and 885.03 mg kg(-1) (mean 472.77 mg kg(-1) for tailings) for Cu, 12,500 and 400,000 mg kg(-1) (mean 120,642.86 mg kg(-1) for tailings) for Fe, and 28.1 and 278.1 mg kg(-1) (mean 150.29 mg kg(-1) for tailings) for Ni. A number of physicochemical parameters and pollution index for soils were determined around the mine. Sequential extractions of tailings and soil samples indicated that Fe, Cr, and Co were the least mobile and that Mn, Zn, Cu, and As were potentially available for plants uptake. Similar to soil, the concentration of Al, As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Zn in plant samples decreased with the distance from the mining/processing areas. Data on plants showed that metal concentrations in shoots usually exceeded those in roots and varied significantly between the two investigated species (Artemisia sieberi > Zygophylum). All the reported results suggest that the soil and plants near the iron ore mine are contaminated with PTEs and that they can be potentially dispersed in the environment via aerosol transport and deposition.

  8. Toxicity and sub-lethal effect of endemic plants from family Anacardiaceae on oviposition behavior of Aedes albopictus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan; Fatma; Zuharah; Chan; Jia; Ling; Nurfazlina; Zulkifly; Nik; Fadzly

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the lethal concentration, oviposition deterrence and ovicidal activity of acetone extracts of Melanochyla fasciculiflora(M. fasciculiflora) leaf and Gluta renghas(G. renghas) leaf against Aedes albopictus(Ae. albopictus). Methods: To determine the lethal concentration of Anacardiaceae, ten test concentrations of the extracts ranging from 200 to 650 mg/L were selected for larvicidal bioassays and 25 early fourth instar larvae were exposed to the extracts for 24 h. The sub-lethal concentrations used for oviposition deterrence was the value of LC25, LC50 and LC75 from above study which is 235 mg/L, 470 mg/L and 705 mg/L for M. fasciculiflora extract and 187.5 mg/L, 375 mg/L and 562.5 mg/L for G. renghas extract, respectively. Twenty gravid Ae. albopictus were allowed to oviposit in different treated concentrations. For oviciding procedure, a total of 300 eggs of Ae. albopictus were soaked in solution with each treated concentration as mentioned above for 24 h. After 24 h, eggs were sieved and soaked in seasoned water, and hatching rates were calculated. For comparison, only seasoned water was used in control experiment.Results: G. renghas demonstrated lower LC50 value of 372.80 mg/L compared to M. fasciculiflora(467.90 mg/L). The activity index of negative oviposition revealed the deterrent effect and thus, caused a remarkable negative response resulting in oviposition of fewer eggs compared with control(without plant extract). The acetone extract of M. fasciculiflora was more effective than G. renghas extract in displaying oviposition deterrence potential since the latter did not possess the deterring effect within the concentration range tested. However, both plant extracts exhibited excellent oviciding effect as 92.33% of eggs failed to be hatched when treated with 705.0 mg/L of M. fasciculiflora and 86.67% with 562.5 mg/L of G. renghas. The oviposition deterrence and percentage of egg mortality were directly proportional to the

  9. Plantas tóxicas para ruminantes e eqüídeos no Norte Piauiense Toxic plants for ruminants and equidae in Northern Piauí

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo W.S. Mello

    2010-01-01

    causa de sinais digestivos e mortes em caprinos. Novos experimentos devem ser feitos para comprovar a toxicidade de outras plantas mencionadas nas entrevistas.The objective of this study was to survey toxic plants for ruminants and equidae in northern Piauí. Seventy one persons were interviewed, including farmers, veterinary practitioners, agronomists, and agrarian technicians from 16 municipalities, performing at least four interviews in each municipality. The most common plant mentioned as a cause of poisoning was Ipomoea asarifolia, which is a well known cause of tremogenic disease in ruminants. Stryphnodendron coriaceum which causes digestive signs was referred as a common cause of death, and is probably the plant that causes most cattle deaths in the region. Enterolobium contortisiliquum was also mentioned as a frequent cause of digestive signs, abortion and photosensitization in cattle. Outbreaks of nephrosis caused by Thiloa glaucocarpa are frequent at the beginning of the raining season. Poisoning by the cyanogenic plants Manihot spp. e Piptadenia macrocarpa are a cause of peracute deaths. Other plants mentioned as toxic were Buchenavia tomentosa, Caesalpinia sp., Brunfelsia sp., Luetzelburgia sp., Hybantus ipecaconha, Phisalys angulata, and Spondias luta. Farmers report that goats are poisoned by the ingestion of the pods of Luetzelburgia sp., which causes digestive signs and death. The ingestion of the fruits of Buchenavia tomentosa is associated with digestive signs and and abortion in ruminants. Brunfelsia sp. is mentioned as a cause of nervous signs at the start of the raining season and donkeys are apparently more affected. The consumption of the fruits of Spondias luta are associated with diarrhea in goats. Recent unpublished experiments demonstrated the toxicity of Brunfelsia sp. as a cause of nervous signs and of Luetzelburgia sp. as a cause of digestive signs in goats. Experiments with other plants are necessary to confirm their toxicity.

  10. Induction and transfer of resistance to poisoning by Amorimia pubiflora in sheep whith non-toxic dosis of the plant and ruminal content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciel Becker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Amorimiapubiflora (Malpighiaceae, which contains sodium monofluoroacetate (MFA is the main cause of "sudden death" in cattle in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso. This research investigated the induction of resistance to the poisoning in sheep by the continuous administration of non-toxic doses of the plant and also the possibility to transfer this resistance to other sheep by the transfaunation of ruminal fluid. For this a group of four sheep (G1 received daily doses of 0.5g kg-1 for 20 days and after an interval of 15 days were challenged with three daily doses of 1g kg-1 for 3 days. Also the transfer of resistance to A. pubiflora poisoning was evaluated by transfaunation of rumen fluid (100ml for 10 days from G1 sheep to five sheep (G2, followed by challenge with the dose of 1g kg-1 for 3 days (G2D2 and after a three-day interval they received a single dose of 3g kg-1 (G2D3. The degree of resistance was evaluated by monitoring the onset of clinical signs, heart rate, and outcome of the poisoning compared with the control groups, which were challenged with three daily doses of 1g kg1 (G3 and with a single dose of 3g kg-1 (G4. Clinical parameters evaluated in Groups G1 and G2 were significantly less pronounced than those observed in G3 and G4 (control (P<0.05. Sheep in G4 (control died after receiving a single dose of 3g kg-1, while those in G2 (transfaunated survived. These findings demonstrated that consumption of non-toxic doses of A. pubiflora induced resistance in sheep and that this resistance can be transferred by transfaunation. New experiments are needed to determine the most efficient ways to induce resistance and to use this technique in the field to prevent the poisoning.

  11. Are fire, soil fertility and toxicity, water availability, plant functional diversity, and litter decomposition related in a Neotropical savanna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Gustavo Henrique; Batalha, Marco Antônio; Silva, Igor Aurélio; Cianciaruso, Marcus Vinicius; Petchey, Owen L

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how biodiversity and ecosystem functioning respond to changes in the environment is fundamental to the maintenance of ecosystem function. In realistic scenarios, the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning path may account for only a small share of all factors determining ecosystem function. Here, we investigated the strength to which variations in environmental characteristics in a Neotropical savanna affected functional diversity and decomposition. We sought an integrative approach, testing a number of pairwise hypotheses about how the environment, biodiversity, and functioning were linked. We used structural equation modelling to connect fire frequency, soil fertility, exchangeable Al, water availability, functional diversity of woody plants, tree density, tree height, and litter decomposition rates in a causal chain. We found significant effects of soil nutrients, water availability, and Al on functional diversity and litter decomposition. Fire did not have a significant direct effect on functional diversity or litter decomposition. However, fire was connected to both variables through soil fertility. Functional diversity did not influence rates of litter decomposition. The mediated effects that emerged from pairwise interactions are encouraging not only for predicting the functional consequences of changes in environmental variables and biodiversity, but also to caution against predictions based on only environmental or only biodiversity change.

  12. Application of the threshold approach for acute fish toxicity testing to plant protection products: a proposed framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creton, Stuart; Clook, Mark; Wheeler, James R

    2014-02-01

    In order to minimise animal testing, this paper explores the feasibility of the "threshold approach" that has been recently developed by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Essentially the approach uses a limit test at a single threshold concentration determined by the results of Daphnia and algae tests. If no mortality is observed in the limit test the fish acute value can be expressed as greater than the threshold value. However, if mortality is observed a full concentration-response test is triggered. In order to assess the applicability of the approach to plant protection products (PPP), a database of 185 products (fish, Daphnia and algae endpoints) was constructed and the threshold approach retrospectively applied. However, this analysis did not take into account the use of the data in the regulatory process. To assess whether the "threshold approach" could be used for PPPs the UK National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) held a workshop in December 2010. This meeting brought together representatives from a number of European regulators and researchers as well as industry to discuss the applicability of the approach. The outcome of this discussion is presented in the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increased Suicide Risk among Workers following Toxic Metal Exposure at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant From 1952 to 2003: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LW Figgs

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a problem worldwide and occupation is an important risk factor. In the last decade, 55 200 deaths in the US were attributed to occupational risk factors. Objective: To determine if toxic metal exposure was associated with suicide risk among Paducah gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP workers. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM was used to determine metal exposure likelihood. Uranium exposure was also assessed by urinalysis. All suicide/self-injury International Classification for Disease (ICD codes were used to identify suicides. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, odds ratios (OR, and hazard ratios (HR were used to estimate suicide risk. Results: PGDP suicide victims typically were younger white men. Within exposure likelihood categories, several suicide SMRs were typically elevated for several metals. Only beryllium exposure likelihood was associated with an increased HR. Uranium urine concentration was associated with an elevated suicide risk after stratification by urinalysis frequency. Conclusion: Suicide risk is associated with uranium exposure.

  14. Boron toxicity in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaratnam, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    Potted oil palms were treated with fertilizer of borate-46 at several concentrations and the plants were observed for boron toxicity effects. Toxicity symptoms were apparent at high rates but not at rates equivalent to typical Malaysian soils.

  15. Toxicity assessment of boron (B) by Lemna minor L. and Lemna gibba L. and their possible use as model plants for ecological risk assessment of aquatic ecosystems with boron pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Nurcan; Türker, Onur Can; Böcük, Harun

    2016-08-01

    As many of the metalloid-based pollutants, the boron (B) toxicity issues have aroused more and more global attentions, especially concerning drinking water sources which flow through boron-rich areas. Therefore, feasible and innovative approaches are required in order to assess B toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the toxic effects of B on Lemna minor L. and Lemna gibba L. were investigated using various endpoints including number of fronds, growth rates, dry biomass and antioxidants enzymatic activities. Lemna species were exposed to B concentrations of 2 (control), 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 mg L(-1) for a test period of 7 days. The results demonstrated that plant growth was significantly reduced when the B concentration reached 16 mg L(-1). Furthermore, our results also concluded that among the antioxidative enzymes, SOD, APX and GPX can serve as important biomarkers for B-rich environment. The present results suggested that L. minor and L. gibba are very useful model plants for phytoremediation of low-B contaminated wastewater and they are also suitable options for B biomonitoring due to high phototoxic sensitivity against B. In this respect, the scientific insight of the present study is to fill the gaps in the research about the use of L. minor and L. gibba in ecotoxicological research associated with B toxicity.

  16. Diffusive gradients in thin films, Rhizon soil moisture samplers, and indicator plants to predict the bioavailabilities of potentially toxic elements in contaminated technosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, Bashar; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Joussein, Emmanuel; Soubrand, Marilyne; Gauthier, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    The phytoavailabilities and potential remobilization of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Zn, Pb, Cd, As, and Sb were assessed in contaminated technosols from former mining and smelting sites. The PTE concentrations in soil pore water (SPW) and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT)-measured concentration (C DGT) methods were used to assess the bioavailabilities of PTE and their remobilization in this study. Together with classical Chelex-100 DGT probes to measure Zn, Cd, and Pb, novel ferrihydrite-backed DGT were used for As and Sb measurements alongside with Rhizon soil moisture sampler method for SPW sampling. To assess the phytoavailabilities of PTE, a germination test with dwarf beans as a plant indicator was used for this purpose. Dwarf bean primary leaves showed high Zn concentrations in contrast to Pb and Cd which showed low phytoavailabilities. Despite As and Sb are present in high concentrations in the mine tailings, their phytoavailabilities indicate very low bioavailabilities. The amounts of Zn, Pb, Cd, As, and Sb extracted with DGT devices correlated well with the total dissolved PTE concentrations in the SPW. The highest R values were observed for Zn, followed by Cd and Pb, indicating the ability of the soil to sustain SPW concentrations, which decreased in that order. Good correlations were also observed between each of dissolved PTE concentrations in SPW, DGT-measured PTE concentrations (C DGT), and the accumulation of PTE in dwarf bean primary leaves. It could be concluded that the use of Rhizon soil moisture samplers and DGT methods may be considered to be a good methods to predict the PTE bioavailabilities in contaminated technosols.

  17. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  18. Boron Toxicity in Plants and Phytoremediation of Boron-laden Soils%过量硼对植物的毒害及高硼土壤植物修复研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春光; 何小娇

    2012-01-01

    硼作为一种植物必需元素,在土壤中过量存在会对植物产生毒害,硼对植物的毒害作用以及利用植物修复高硼土壤已经日益受到关注.目前,硼对不同类型植物的毒害特点,植物的耐受机制还不十分清楚.特别是对于硼污染的植物修复,其研究还处于起步阶段.本文分别从植物的表观症状、生理生化和基因水平等层次,综述了过量硼对植物的毒害,并从高耐受性、超富集能力植物筛选,以及转基因技术应用等角度回顾了硼污染的植物修复研究进展.在此基础上,提出了当前相关研究存在的主要问题,并对未来的研究进行了展望.%Boron is an essential element for plants, however, excessive boron in soil may exert toxic effects to plants. Recently, boron toxicity in plants as well as the phytoremediation of boron-laden soils has attracted much attention by both scientific and regulatory communities. But, boron toxicity in different plant species and the mechanisms of plant tolerance to boron are still unclear, and little information is available on phytoremediation of boron-laden soils. In this paper, boron toxicity in plants was reviewed from the perspectives of visible symptoms, physiological characteristics, and genetic variations. Besides, the application of phytoremediation to boron-contaminated soils was also illustrated, including the selection of high tolerance and/or hyperaccumulating plants, as well as the application of transgenic technologies. Finally, the main problems of current studies and the suggestions for future work were proposed.

  19. Modelling soil and soil to plant transfer processes of radionuclides and toxic chemicals at long time scales for performance assessment of Radwaste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Achim; Miquel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Performance assessments for surface nuclear waste disposal facilities require simulation of transfer processes from the waste canisters to a reference group living near-by. Such simulations need to be extended over several hundred to hundred thousand years, depending on waste type, restraining possibilities to represent short term system complexity and variability. Related modelling can be simplified as long as processes are represented conservatively with assessment endpoints estimated larger compared to more realistic modelling approaches. The indicators are doses for radionuclides (RN) and risk factors for toxic chemicals (TC, i.e. heavy metals, nitrate). We discuss a new simulation tool (SCM-Andra-multilayer-model, SAMM) that, among others, allows to model situations where RN/TC move through a soil profile characterised by temporal undersaturation and root growth (soil-plant subsystem of the biosphere model compared to the adjacent saturated geosphere). SAMM describes all relevant transfer and reaction processes (advection, diffusion, root transport, radioactive decay, chemical reactions incl. sorption - desorption) using well known differential equations solved numerically within MATLAB with scenario description and parameterisation defined in Excel sheets. With this conservative approach in mind, we apply global parameters for which the solid-solution (Kd) or soil-to-plant (TF) distribution coefficients are the most relevant. Empirical data are available for homogeneous situations, such as one compartment pot experiments, but rare for entire soil profiles. Similarly soil hydrology, in particular upward and downward advective fluxes are modelled using an empirical approach solely based on key soil hydrological parameters (precipitation, evapotranspiration, irrigation, water table level) and the soil porosity. Variability of soil hydrology in space and time, likely to change drastically even on hourly bases (i.e. intense precipitation event) or within a single

  20. Tungsten toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  1. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Indarchand R. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science, Nipat Niranjan Nagar, Caves Road, Aurangabad 431004, Maharashtra (India); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84321 (United States); Rai, Mahendra, E-mail: mahendrarai@sgbau.ac.in [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Laboratório de Química Biológica, Instituto de Química, UNICAMP, Cidade Universitária “Zefferino Vaz” Barão Geraldo, CEP 13083-970, Caixa Postal 6150, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  2. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the detection and quantitation of monofluoroacetate in plants toxic to livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatiza...

  3. Screening of native plants and algae growing on fly-ash affected areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India for accumulation of toxic heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, S; Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Dixit, B; Kumar, A; Tripathi, R D

    2008-10-30

    The present investigation was carried out to screen native plants growing in fly-ash (FA) contaminated areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India with a view to using them for the eco-restoration of the area. A total number of 17 plants (9 aquatic, 6 terrestrial and 2 algal species) were collected and screened for heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, B, Si, Al, Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) accumulation. Differential accumulation of various heavy metals by different species of plants was observed. Hydrilla verticillata was found to be the most efficient metal accumulator among 9 aquatic plants, Eclipta alba among 6 terrestrial plants and Phormedium papyraceum between 2 algal species. In general, the maximum levels of most metals were found in terrestrial plants while the lowest in algal species. However, translocation of the metals from root to shoot was found to be higher in aquatic plants than terrestrial ones. These results suggest that various aquatic, terrestrial and algal species of plants may be used in a synergistic way to remediate and restore the FA contaminated areas.

  4. Toxicity of plant essential oils to different life stages of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, and non-target invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Sparagano, O A E; Port, G; Okello, E; Shiel, R S; Guy, J H

    2010-03-01

    Seven essential oils with potential as acaricides for use against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) (Acari: Dermanyssidae), were selected for study. These products (essential oils of manuka, cade, pennyroyal, thyme, garlic, clove bud and cinnamon bark) were deployed against different life stages of D. gallinae in laboratory tests at the (lethal concentration) LC(50) level for adult mites. For all essential oils tested, toxicity to D. gallinae juveniles was as high as toxicity to adults, if not higher. However, at the LC(50) level determined for adults, some oils were ineffective in preventing hatching of D. gallinae eggs. The essential oils were also tested under laboratory conditions at their LC(90) levels for D. gallinae adults on two model non-target species, the brine shrimp, Artemia salina (L.), and the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (L.). Results showed that not all essential oils were as toxic to A. salina and T. molitor as they were to D. gallinae, suggesting that it may be possible to select certain oils for development as acaricides against D. gallinae that would have minimal impact on non-target organisms. However, the level of toxicity to A. salina and T. molitor was not consistent across the selected essential oils.

  5. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Indarchand R; Anderson, Anne J; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-09

    Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV-vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20--a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  6. OptiPhy, a technical-economic optimisation model for improving the management of plant protection practices in agriculture: a decision-support tool for controlling the toxicity risks related to pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mghirbi, Oussama; LE Grusse, Philippe; Fabre, Jacques; Mandart, Elisabeth; Bord, Jean-Paul

    2017-03-01

    The health, environmental and socio-economic issues related to the massive use of plant protection products are a concern for all the stakeholders involved in the agricultural sector. These stakeholders, including farmers and territorial actors, have expressed a need for decision-support tools for the management of diffuse pollution related to plant protection practices and their impacts. To meet the needs expressed by the public authorities and the territorial actors for such decision-support tools, we have developed a technical-economic model "OptiPhy" for risk mitigation based on indicators of pesticide toxicity risk to applicator health (IRSA) and to the environment (IRTE), under the constraint of suitable economic outcomes. This technical-economic optimisation model is based on linear programming techniques and offers various scenarios to help the different actors in choosing plant protection products, depending on their different levels of constraints and aspirations. The health and environmental risk indicators can be broken down into sub-indicators so that management can be tailored to the context. This model for technical-economic optimisation and management of plant protection practices can analyse scenarios for the reduction of pesticide-related risks by proposing combinations of substitution PPPs, according to criteria of efficiency, economic performance and vulnerability of the natural environment. The results of the scenarios obtained on real ITKs in different cropping systems show that it is possible to reduce the PPP pressure (TFI) and reduce toxicity risks to applicator health (IRSA) and to the environment (IRTE) by up to approximately 50 %.

  7. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies of three plants used in Cameroonian ethnoveterinary medicine: Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) leaves, Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae) seeds or leaves, and Mimosa pudica L. (Fabaceae) leaves in Kabir chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghonjuyi, Ndaleh Wozerou; Tiambo, Christian Keambou; Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Toukala, Jean Paul; Lisita, Frederico; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Kimbi, Helen Kuokuo

    2016-02-03

    Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae), Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae) and Mimosa pudica L. (Fabaceae) are widely used in the Cameroonian ethnoveterinary medicine as a panacea, and specifically for gastrointestinal disorders as well as an anthelmintic and antibacterial. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of the hydroalcoholic extracts of Aloe vera leaves, Carica papaya leaves or seeds, and Mimosa pudica leaves after acute and sub-chronic administration in chicks. For the acute toxicity test a single administration of each of the four hydroalcoholic extracts was given orally at doses ranging from 40 to 5120 mg/kg (n=5/group/sex). In the sub-chronic study, these extracts were given orally as a single administration to chicks at doses of 80, 160, 320 and 640 mg/kg/day for 42 days. The anti-angiogenic properties of these extracts (5-320 µg/mg) were investigated in the chick chorioallantoic membrane in vivo. In the acute toxicity test, none of the four studied hydroalcoholic extracts induced mortality or significant behavioural changes. The sub-acute treatment with the four plant extracts did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. However, the results indicated that Aloe vera leaf extract acute treatment by oral route at doses up to 2560 mg/kg did not produce death in 50% (5/10) of chicks during 24h or 14 days of observation, but 20% (2/10) chicks died. The haematological and biochemical analyses did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups, with the exception of a transient rise in white blood cell counts at high doses (640 mg/kg). Additionally, these extracts did not have the potential for anti-angiogenic effects through the inhibition of neo-angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane in vivo. The results showed that the therapeutic use of the hydroalcoholic extracts of Aloe vera leaves, Carica papaya leaves or seeds and Mimosa pudica leaves had very low

  8. 开发烟草等为植物源灭鼠剂的初步探讨%Primary Study on the Toxicity of Some Poisonous Plants Against Al bino Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美文; 王勇; 郭聪; 胡忠军; 陈安国

    2001-01-01

    目的:从植物中筛选出适合害鼠生物学 特性、作用较慢、能杀灭害鼠的植物,为灭鼠剂的开发探索一条有效的对环境安全的途径。 方法:将植物直接或制成毒饵饲喂试鼠。结果:烟草与夹竹桃对试鼠有一定的毒性。结论:烟草可作为开发植 物性杀鼠剂有希望的植物,但仍需进行大量试验。%Objective:To screen the plants that have chronic toxicity to rodents as well as are safe for untargeted animals and for environment.Methods:A series of experimen ts were carried out in laboratory.Albino mice were feed with pulverized plant s directly or diet which mixed with pulverized plant powder and flour.Several pl ants were screened for next trial according to the mortality.Then, the animals w ere feed with the food that was mixed the extracting plant solutions with normal food.Results:Nicotiana tabacuw and Nerium indicum were poisonous to mice. Conclusions:Th e mortality shows that tobacco has the potential to be used to kill rodents.

  9. Comparative study of the assay of Artemia salina L. and the estimate of the medium lethal dose (LD50 value) in mice, to determine oral acute toxicity of plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logarto Parra, A; Silva Yhebra, R; Guerra Sardiñas, I; Iglesias Buela, L

    2001-09-01

    Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), the brine shrimp larva, is an invertebrate used in the alternative test to determine toxicity of chemical and natural products. In this study the Medium Lethal Concentrations (LC50 value) of 20 plant extracts, Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F. (Aloeaceae), Artemisia absinthium L. (Asteraceae); Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae); Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Ex Nees) Stapf (Poaceae); Datura stramonium L. (Solanaceae); Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (Acanthaceae); Musa x paradisiaca L. (Musaceae); Ocimum basilicum L.; O. gratissimum L.; O. tenuiflorum L. (Lamiaceae); Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. (Myrtaceae); Piper auritum Kunth (Piperaceae); Plantago major L. (Plantaginaceae); Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. (Lamiaceae); Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae); Senna alata (L.) Roxb. (Fabaceae); Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (Verbenaceae); and Thuja occidentalis L. (Cupressaceae), were determined using Artemia salina L. (Artemiidae), with the objective of relating the results to the LD50 values reported in mice (tested at three concentrations: 10, 100, and 1000 microg/mL, for each extract). We found good correlation between the in vivo and the in vitro tests (r = 0.85 p < 0.05), and this method is a useful tool for predicting oral acute toxicity in plant extracts.

  10. Toxicity of 56 substances to trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Trapp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    different chemicals or substrates. Highest toxicity (EC50 metals like copper and cadmium. Also, organotins and free cyanide showed very high toxicity. The toxic effect of chlorophenols on willows was comparable to that on duck weed (Lemna) and green algae, while......Toxicity data of substances to higher plants is needed for the purpose of risk assessment, site evaluation, phytoremediation, and plant protection. However, the results from the most common phytotoxicity tests, like the OECD algae and Lemna test, are not necessarily valid for higher terrestrial...... plants. The willow tree toxicity test uses inhibition of transpiration (aside of growth and water use efficiency) of willow cuttings grown in spiked solutions or soils as end point to quantify toxicity. This overview presents results from 60 studies including 24 new unpublished experiments for 56...

  11. Amyloidosis in Alzheimer’s Disease: The Toxicity of Amyloid Beta (Aβ, Mechanisms of Its Accumulation and Implications of Medicinal Plants for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchalee Prasansuklab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that leads to memory deficits and death. While the number of individuals with AD is rising each year due to the longer life expectancy worldwide, current therapy can only somewhat relieve the symptoms of AD. There is no proven medication to cure or prevent the disease, possibly due to a lack of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Most previous studies have accepted the “amyloid hypothesis,” in which the neuropathogenesis of AD is believed to be triggered by the accumulation of the toxic amyloid beta (Aβ protein in the central nervous system (CNS. Lately, knowledge that may be critical to unraveling the hidden pathogenic pathway of AD has been revealed. This review concentrates on the toxicity of Aβ and the mechanism of accumulation of this toxic protein in the brain of individuals with AD and also summarizes recent advances in the study of these accumulation mechanisms together with the role of herbal medicines that could facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  12. Toxic effects of palpoluck Polygonum hydropepper L. and Bhang Cannabis sativa L. plants extracts against termites Heterotermes indicola (Wasmann and Coptotermes heimi (Wasmann (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Zeb

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A research project was carried out aimed at to study the toxic effects of Palpoluck Polygonum hydropipper L. and Bhang Cannabis sativa L. crude extracts against two species of termites i.e. Heterotermes indicola (Wasmann and Coptotermes heimi (Wasmann at Nuclear institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA Peshawar, Pakistan in April 2002. Results revealed that after ten days of feeding maximum percent mortality in case of Polygonum hydropipper L. leaf and flower extracts was 28.0, 52.0, 28 and 74.7 for H. indicola and Coptotermes heimi respectively, while in control only 10.7 and 12.0% mortality were recorded. Similarly, for the same species of termites the percent mortality in Cannabis sativa L. extracts was 54.7, 64.0, 58.7 and 70.7 for leaf and seed extracts respectively, while in control only 12.0 and 10.7% mortality were observed. In each extract mortality was significantly different from that of control. Toxic effects of both extracts (leaf and flower were more profound against Coptotermes heimi than Heterotermes indicola during these ten days of feeding. Also the seed extracts caused more mortality than the leaves for both species, suggesting the availability of high contents of toxic materials in seed.

  13. Heavy Metal Pumps in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, J.F.

    2000-10-01

    The long term goal of the funded research is to understand how heavy metals are taken up from the soil and translocated throughout the plant. The potential application of this research is to create plants with better heavy metal uptake systems and thereby improve the ability of these plants to help clean up toxic metals from soils. A rate limiting step is using plant for bioremediation is the normally poor capacity of plants to concentrate toxic metals. Our interest in metal ion transport systems includes those for essential mineral nutrients such as molybdenum, copper, iron, manganese, as well as toxic metals such as cerium, mercury, cesium, cadmium, arsenic and selenium. Understanding the pathways by which toxic metals accumulate in plants will enable the engineering of plants to exclude toxic metals and create healthier food sources, or to extract toxic metals from the soil as a strategy to clean up polluted lands and water.

  14. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . The first section of this chapter outlines the complete cause-effect pathway, from emissions of toxic substances to intake by the population up to damages in terms of human health effects. Section 2 outlines the framework for assessing human toxicity in LCIA. Section 3 discusses the contributing substances......This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... – demonstrates the importance to account for both outdoor and indoor exposure, including consumer products. Analysing the variations in intake fraction (the fraction of the emitted or applied chemical that is taken in by the consumer and the general population), effect factor and characterisation factor across...

  15. Toxic myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M

    2014-08-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, because they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features, and possible underlying cellular mechanisms.

  16. Field experiments of Anopheles gambiae attraction to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants in Mali to optimize strategies for malaria vector control in Africa using attractive toxic sugar bait methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bah Sekou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on recent studies in Israel demonstrating that attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB methods can be used to decimate local anopheline and culicine mosquito populations, an important consideration is whether the same methods can be adapted and improved to attract and kill malaria vectors in Africa. The ATSB approach uses fruit or flower scent as an attractant, sugar solution as a feeding stimulant, and an oral toxin. The ATSB solutions are either sprayed on vegetation or suspended in simple bait stations, and the mosquitoes ingesting the toxic solutions are killed. As such, this approach targets sugar-feeding female and male mosquitoes. This study examines the attractiveness of African malaria vectors to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants, key biological elements of the ATSB approach for mosquito control. Methods Three field experiments were conducted at sites in Mali. The attraction of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to 26 different local fruits and seedpods was determined at a site in the semi-arid Bandiagara District of Mali. Wire mesh glue traps with fruits/seedpods suspended on skewers inside were set along a seasonal lagoon. Seven replicates of each fruit/seedpod species were tested, with a water-soaked sponge and a sugar-soaked sponge as controls. The attraction of An. gambiae s.l. to 26 different types of flowering plants was determined at a site near Mopti in Mali. The flowering plants held in a water-filled buried container were tested using the same glue traps, with controls including water only and sugar solution. Six replicates of each selected plant type were tested on transects between rice paddies. Additional studies using CDC light traps were done to determine the relative densities and periodicity of An. gambiae s.l. attraction to branches of the most highly attractive flowering plant, branches without flowers, human odor, and candescent light. Results Of the 26 fruits and seedpods tested, 6 were attractive

  17. Field experiments of Anopheles gambiae attraction to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants in Mali to optimize strategies for malaria vector control in Africa using attractive toxic sugar bait methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter C; Beier, John C; Traore, Sekou F; Toure, Mahamoudou B; Traore, Mohamed M; Bah, Sekou; Doumbia, Seydou; Schlein, Yosef

    2010-09-20

    Based on recent studies in Israel demonstrating that attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) methods can be used to decimate local anopheline and culicine mosquito populations, an important consideration is whether the same methods can be adapted and improved to attract and kill malaria vectors in Africa. The ATSB approach uses fruit or flower scent as an attractant, sugar solution as a feeding stimulant, and an oral toxin. The ATSB solutions are either sprayed on vegetation or suspended in simple bait stations, and the mosquitoes ingesting the toxic solutions are killed. As such, this approach targets sugar-feeding female and male mosquitoes. This study examines the attractiveness of African malaria vectors to local fruits/seedpods and flowering plants, key biological elements of the ATSB approach for mosquito control. Three field experiments were conducted at sites in Mali. The attraction of Anopheles gambiae s.l. to 26 different local fruits and seedpods was determined at a site in the semi-arid Bandiagara District of Mali. Wire mesh glue traps with fruits/seedpods suspended on skewers inside were set along a seasonal lagoon. Seven replicates of each fruit/seedpod species were tested, with a water-soaked sponge and a sugar-soaked sponge as controls. The attraction of An. gambiae s.l. to 26 different types of flowering plants was determined at a site near Mopti in Mali. The flowering plants held in a water-filled buried container were tested using the same glue traps, with controls including water only and sugar solution. Six replicates of each selected plant type were tested on transects between rice paddies. Additional studies using CDC light traps were done to determine the relative densities and periodicity of An. gambiae s.l. attraction to branches of the most highly attractive flowering plant, branches without flowers, human odor, and candescent light. Of the 26 fruits and seedpods tested, 6 were attractive to An. gambiae s.l. females and males, respectively

  18. Toxic synovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Synovitis - toxic; Transient synovitis References Horowitz R. Pediatric orthopedic emergencies. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine: Clinical ... JW III, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap ... Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David ...

  19. ACUTE TOXICITY EFFECT OF THE AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Acute And Toxicity Effect of The Aqueous Extract of Terminalia avicennioides. ACUTE TOXICITY ... that this valuable medicinal resources in plants are largely untapped because of .... Test of significance was done in rows. Same superscripts ...

  20. Boron Toxicity to Plant Under Salinity Stress:A Review%盐胁迫下过量硼对植物毒害效应的研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常璨; 卢文凯; 刘春光

    2014-01-01

    分别从植物生长发育、生理特性以及硼的富集等方面,综述盐胁迫下过量硼对植物的毒害效应,分析盐分如何通过调节植物蒸腾作用、离子吸收以及水通道蛋白活性等机制影响硼的吸收和富集,并展望了相关研究的发展趋势。%In this paper, the effects of salinity stress on boron toxicity to plants were reviewed in respect of plant growth, physiological char-acteristics, and boron uptake and accumulation. The mechanisms involving the regulation of plant transpiration and ion uptake, and the ac-tivity of aquaporins were also discussed. Further studies were proposed on the effects of other soil conditions and the effect of excess boron on salinity stress using molecular technique.

  1. Research Advances in Uptake, Metabolism and Toxicity of Antimony in Plants%植物对锑的吸收和代谢及其毒性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯人伟; 韦朝阳; 涂书新

    2012-01-01

    锑(Sb)是一种有毒致癌元素,一些自然和人为因素己造成我国部分地区土壤、水体及农产品受到严重的锑污染.环境中高含量的锑不仅影响农作物生长、降低其产量,如果通过食物链被人体大量吸收,还会引起严重的健康问题.研究锑在植物体内的富集特征,对于保护环境与人体健康具有重要的现实意义.该文对当前锑在环境中的含量、污染状况、植物对锑的吸收、代谢以及锑对植物的毒害作用等方面的研究现状进行了综述.同时建议今后应加强以下3方面的研究:(1)锑在生物圈迁移与转化特征;(2)植物对锑的吸收、转运和代谢机制及锑的毒害作用机理;(3)锑污染上壤及水体的植物修复技术.%Antimony (Sb) is a toxic carcinogenic element. In some areas of China, soil, water, and agricultural products have been severely polluted by Sb because of particular natural and artificial factors. High levels of Sb in the environment can threaten the health of humans via the food chain. To protect the environment and human health, we must investigate the behavioural characteristics of Sb in plants and the biosphere. Here, we summarize recent progress in research on the mechanisms of absorption, metabolism and toxicity of Sb in plants. Attention must be paid to (1) migration and transformation behaviours in the biosphere; (2) mechanisms of uptake, transport, metabolism and toxicity in plants, especially in crops; and (3) technologies for phytoremediation of contaminated soil and water.

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis plants expressing Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F are not toxic to the assassin bug, Zelus renardii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton and maize delivering insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have been commercialized since 1996. Bt plants are subjected to environmental risk assessments for non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that suppress pest populations. In th...

  3. Polyamine and nitric oxide crosstalk: Antagonistic effects on cadmium toxicity in mung bean plants through upregulating the metal detoxification, antioxidant defense and methylglyoxal detoxification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Alam, Md Mahabub; Rahman, Anisur; Suzuki, Toshisada; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination is a serious agricultural and environmental hazard. The study investigates cross-protection roles of putrescine (Put, 0.2 mM) and nitric oxide (sodium nitroprusside; SNP, 1 mM) in conferring Cd (CdCl2, 1.5 mM) tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L. cv. BARI Mung-2) seedlings. Cadmium stress increased root and shoot Cd content, reduced growth, destroyed chlorophyll (chl), modulated proline (Pro) and reduced leaf relative water content (RWC), increased oxidative damage [lipid peroxidation, H2O2 content, O2(∙-) generation rate, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity], methylglyoxal (MG) toxicity. Put and/or SNP reduced Cd uptake, increasd phytochelatin (PC) content, reduced oxidative damage enhancing non-enzymatic antioxidants (AsA and GSH) and activities of enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX)]. Exogenous Put and/or SNP modulated endogenous polyamines, PAs (putrescine, Put; spermidine, Spd; spermine, Spm), and NO; improved glyoxalase system in detoxifying MG and improved physiology and growth where combined application showed better effects which designates possible crosstalk between NO and PAs to confer Cd-toxicity tolerance.

  4. 广西2007~2011年有毒动植物食物中毒现状分析%Food poisoning due to toxic plant and control measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋玉艳; 唐振柱; 刘展华; 黄立嵘; 姚雪婷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of toxic plant food poisoning events in Guangxi from 2007 to 2011 so as to provide evidences for the prevention and control of food poisoning. Methods The data of toxic plant food poisoning events in Guangxi reported on network system of China sudden public health events were collected and analyzed. Results There were 64 toxic plant food poisoning events in Guangxi from 2007 to 2011, resulting in 805 persons involved and 43 persons died with the average of 12.58 people per case. The peak season occurred mainly in Autumn. Place distribution of food poisoning events were at family (46.88%) and cafeterias (31.25%). There were largest number of food poisoning at the cafeterias (60.37%); however, the highest mortality was at families (88.37%) with the fatality of 31.40%. The main fatal foods were poisonous mushrooms, fake wine, wild honey and improper processing of kidney bean were Conclusion Health education on the knowledge related to the prevention of toxic plant food poisoning be strengthened.%目的 分析广西有毒动植物食物中毒事件流行病学特征,为预防和控制有毒动植物食物中毒的发生提供科学依据.方法 收集广西2007~ 2011年中国突发公共卫生事件报告管理信息系统上报的有毒动植物食物中毒档案资料,建立数据库,归类统计分析.结果 2007~ 2011年广西共发生有毒动植物食物中毒事件64起,中毒人数805人,死亡43人,平均中毒规模为12.58人/起;中毒高发季节为第3季度;中毒场所主要发生在家庭占46.88%,其次是集体食堂占31.25%;中毒人数以集体食堂为最高,占60.37%,而死亡人数以家庭最高,占88.37%,病死率达31.40%.致死人数较多的因素主要为误食毒蘑菇、自制药酒、野生蜂蜜及菜豆加工不当等.结论 加强预防食物中毒宣教工作将有效控制误食有毒动植物中毒死亡事件的发生.

  5. Toxicity of fluoride to aquatic species and evaluation of toxicity modifying factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, Krysta; Elphick, James; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene

    2015-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of fluoride to a variety of freshwater aquatic organisms and to establish whether water quality variables contribute substantively to modifying its toxicity. Water hardness, chloride, and alkalinity were tested as possible toxicity modifying factors for fluoride using acute toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca and Oncorhynchus mykiss. Chloride appeared to be the major toxicity modifying factor for fluoride in these acute toxicity tests. The chronic toxicity of fluoride was evaluated with a variety of species, including 3 fish (Pimephales promelas, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus namaycush), 3 invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia, H. azteca, and Chironomus dilutus), 1 plant (Lemna minor), and 1 alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Hyalella azteca was the most sensitive species overall, and O. mykiss was the most sensitive species of fish. The role of chloride as a toxicity modifying factor was inconsistent between species in the chronic toxicity tests.

  6. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  7. Toxicity and antifeedant activity of essential oils from three aromatic plants grown in Colombia against Euprosterna elaeasa and Acharia fusca (Lepidoptera:Limacodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ricardo Hernández-Lambraño; Karina Caballero-Gallardo; Jesus Olivero-Verbel

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the biological effects of essential oils (EOs) isolated from Cymbopogon nardus, Cymbopogon flexuosus and Cymbopogon martinii grown in Colombia against two Lepidoptera larvae, common pests in the oil palm. Methods:Specimens were captured in the field and the antifeedant activity and dermal contact lethality of EOs were measured against Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa (Lepidoptera:Limacodidae) at various concentrations 0.002-0.600 μL/cm2 and 0.002-8 μL/g, respectively. Results: All EOs exhibited strong antifeedant and toxicity activity toward Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa larvae. Cymbopogon martinii oil was the most active against both pest insect species, although all tested EOs were better than the synthetic repellent IR3535 on both insects. Conclusions:Colombian EOs have potential for integrated pest management programs in the oil palm industry.

  8. Toxicity and antifeedant activity of essential oils from three aromatic plants grown in Colombia against Euprosterna elaeasa and Acharia fusca(Lepidoptera:Limacodidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ricardo; Hernández-Lambrao; Karina; Caballero-Gallardo; Jesus; Olivero-Verbel

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the biological effects of essential oils(EOs) isolated from Cymbopogon iiardus,Cymbopogon Jlexuosus and Cvrnbopogon marlinii grown in Colombia against two Lepidoptera larvae,common pests in the oil palm.Methods:Specimens were captured in the field and the antifeedant activity and dermal contact lethality of EOs were measured against Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa(Lepidoptera:I.imacodidae) at various concentrations 0.002-0.600 μL/cm~3 and 0.002-8 μL/g,respectively.Results:All EOs exhibited strong antifeedant and toxicity activity toward Acharia fusca and Euprosterna elaeasa larvae.Cymbopogon marlinii oil was llie most active againsl both pest insect species,although all tested EOs were better than the synthetic;repellent IR535 on both insects.Conclusions:Colombian EOs have potential for integrated pest management programs in the oil palm industry.

  9. Quantification of potentially toxic elements in sewage and sludge from treatment plants in the cities of Campinas and Jaguariuna using synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luciana Carla Ferreira de; Canteras, Felippe Benavente; Moreira, Silvana, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br, E-mail: felippe.canteras@gmail.com, E-mail: lucarla24@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Saneamento e Ambiente

    2013-07-01

    The rapid urban and industrial development in last decades has brought as one of the consequences, changes in the environment. The lack of planning of city growth is, today, one of the major causes of water pollution including residential, industrial, agricultural, and hospital waste. The metals contamination is a major problem, causing serious changes to the environment, causing harm to human health. The sludge generated at sewage treatment plants, is an important source of nutrients and organic matter, and therefore it can also be reused mainly for agricultural use, since contaminants are removed. The cities of Campinas and Jaguariuna are inserted in the Campinas Metropolitan Region (CMR), one of the most dynamic regions in the Brazilian economy. Therefore, to study the anthropogenic influences of the cities, evaluated the quality of raw and treated effluent and the sludge generated in sewage treatment plants, especially with regard to heavy metals. Measurements of metals were performed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence. For treated effluent data were compared to CONAMA 357 law and Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb showed concentrations in according with the law. To reuse in agriculture the contents were compared to the limits defined by CETESB and some elements had concentrations above to the permitted preventing its reuse. For sludge, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ba and Pb, in the two treatment plants studied, the concentrations were lower than the maximum permissible values established by CONAMA 375 law allowing the sludge application sludge on agricultural land. (author)

  10. Silício como amenizador da fitotoxicidade de zinco em plantas jovens de Eucalyptus urophylla cultivadas em solução nutritiva Silicon as alleviator of zinc toxicity in young Eucalyptus urophylla plants grown in nutrient solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Isabel do Carmo Pinto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Apesar de o zinco (Zn ser micronutriente fundamental para o crescimento e metabolismo das plantas, quando presente em níveis tóxicos no ambiente pode afetar o desenvolvimento vegetal. Entre os vários efeitos benéficos do silício (Si, cita-se sua influência na diminuição ou eliminação dos efeitos adversos de metais pesados no meio. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do Si na amenização da toxidez de Zn sobre o crescimento e nutrição mineral de plantas de Eucalyptus urophylla. As plantas foram cultivadas em vasos contendo 3 L de solução nutritiva de Clark, em esquema fatorial 6 x 2, sendo seis concentrações de Zn (0, 2, 50, 150, 300 e 450 µmol L-1 como ZnSO4 7H2O e duas de Si (0 e 1,78 mmol L-1 de Si como silicato de potássio. Após oito semanas, avaliaram-se alguns parâmetros morfológicos das plantas, produção de matéria seca, teores e utilização de nutrientes. O aumento das concentrações de Zn na solução nutritiva proporcionou maior fitotoxicidade nas raízes em relação à parte aérea. A adição do Si amenizou o efeito negativo do excesso de Zn sobre o crescimento, no entanto pouco influenciou os teores dos nutrientes avaliados nos tecidos, embora tenha proporcionado utilização mais eficiente de P, Ca, Mg e S pelas plantas de Eucalyptus urophylla.Zn is an essential micronutrient for the growth and metabolism of plants, but when present in toxic levels in the environment, it can affect the the development of plants. Among the several beneficial effects of silicon (Si, it presents an effect in the decrease or elimination of the adverse effects of heavy metals in the environment. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of Si in the alleviation of Zn toxicity on the growth and mineral nutrition of Eucalyptus urophylla seedlings cultivated in nutrient solution. Seedlings of Eucalyptus urophylla were grown in pots containing 3L of Clark nutrient solution, in a 6 x 2 factorial design, using

  11. CORRELATION AMONG PHENOLIC, TOXIC METALS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The content of metals, total phenols, flavonoids and antioxidant activities of different plant extracts, used in .... Correlation among phenolic, content of toxic metals and antioxidant activity. Bull. Chem. ..... cosmetic and pharmaceutical products.

  12. Plant Research '75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Research is reported on stomatal regulation of the gas exchanges between plant and environment; inhibitory effects in flower formation; plant growth and development through hormones; hormone action; development and nitrogen fixation in algae; primary cell wall glycoprotein ectensin; enzymic mechanisms and control of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis; molecular studies of membrane studies; sensory transduction in plants; regulation of formation of protein complexes and enzymes in higher plant cell and mechanism of sulfur dioxide toxicity in plants. (PCS)

  13. 锰毒对柱花草苗期生长及铁镁吸收的影响%Effects of Manganese Toxicity on Plant Growth, Acquisition of Iron and Magnesium in Stylosanthes guianensis Seedling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志坚; 严炜; 孙丽莉; 刘国道; 廖红; 田江

    2011-01-01

    采用营养液培养柱花草,研究锰毒对其生长以及叶绿素含量的影响,外源锰对柱花草铁和镁吸收的影响.结果表明:叶片失绿和皱缩是柱花草锰毒害的主要症状.当外源锰浓度为200μmoL/L时,柱花草生长受到明显抑制,叶绿素含量显著降低;随外源锰浓度的增加,植株体内锰和铁含量显著增加,维持较高的铁含量;锰毒虽然显著降低了柱花草根部镁的含量,但对地上部镁含量影响不大,地上部镁离子的平衡仍可以维持.说明柱花草维持较高的地上部铁含量和镁离子平衡是柱花草适应锰毒害的生理机制之一.%Effects of manganese (Mn)toxicity on plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, acquisition of iron (Fe)and magnesium(Mg)in Stylosanthes guianensis (Stylo)seedling were investigated in the nutrient solution experiments. The results showed that the typical symptoms of Mn toxicity in stylo were indicated by leaf chlorosis and crinkle. Plant growth and chlorophyll concentration in leaves were obviously decreased at 200 Umol/L Mn application. With the increase of Mn availability, content of Mn and Fe was significantly increased in both shoots and roots. However, Mg content in roots was decreased, but in shoots was not affected. All the results showed that maintaining Mg homeostasis and relative high level of Fe in shoots might be one of adaptive mechanisms of stylo to Mn toxicity.

  14. The facts about sunn hemp toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) is an annual plant widely grown in the tropics. The genus Crotalaria includes some species known to be toxic to animals. Development of seed producing cultivars for the continental USA at Auburn University, AL, has raised the question if its seed and forage are toxic...

  15. Toxicity of 56 substances to trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Lauge Peter Westergaard; Trapp, Stefan

    2017-06-17

    Toxicity data of substances to higher plants is needed for the purpose of risk assessment, site evaluation, phytoremediation, and plant protection. However, the results from the most common phytotoxicity tests, like the OECD algae and Lemna test, are not necessarily valid for higher terrestrial plants. The willow tree toxicity test uses inhibition of transpiration (aside of growth and water use efficiency) of willow cuttings grown in spiked solutions or soils as end point to quantify toxicity. This overview presents results from 60 studies including 24 new unpublished experiments for 56 different chemicals or substrates. Highest toxicity (EC50 algae, while volatile compounds like chlorinated solvents or benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene had less effect on trees than on these aquatic plants, due to volatilization from leaves and test media. In particular low (g/L range) toxicity was observed for tested nanomaterials. Effects of pharmaceuticals (typically weak acids or bases) depended strongly of the solution pH. Like for algae, baseline toxicity was observed for willows, which is related to the water solubility of the compounds, with absolute chemical activity ranging from 0.01 to 0.1, but with several exceptions. We conclude that the willow tree toxicity test is a robust method for relating uptake, accumulation, and metabolism of substances to the toxicity to trees.

  16. 基于物联网技术的石化厂区有毒气体泄漏在线监测系统%Online Monitoring System of Toxic Gas Leak for Petrochemical Plant Based on Internet of Things

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锋; 李凯亮; 曾俊林

    2015-01-01

    According to the production safety problems caused by toxic gas leak,which may occur in the productive process of petrochemical plants,an online monitoring system of toxic gas leak for petrochemical plant was designed ,which was a combination of wireless sensor networks,portable devices,cloud instant storage function,real-time display web pages,online monitoring SMS a-larm,android mobile real-time display and solar charging technology.The functions of real-time,online monitoring and early warning for the toxic gases ( mainly including H2 S,SO2 ,CO,CH4 ) ,temperature,humidity,wind direction,wind speed,PM2.5 and other fac-tors in petrochemical plant were realized,and made the production supervisors grasp the toxic gases’ real-time dynamic information of petrochemical factory,thus removing the factors that lead to dangerous accidents immediately and controlling the risk in the ini-tial stage,so as to realize the safe,sustainable and efficient chemical production.Experiments show that the on-line monitoring sys-tem has good reliability,security and practicability.%针对石化厂在生产过程中可能发生有毒气体泄漏带来的生产安全问题,设计了一套石化厂区有毒气体泄漏在线监测系统,该系统集无线传感器网络、便携式设备、云端即时存储功能、网页实时显示、在线监测短信报警、安卓手机实时显示及太阳能充电等技术于一体,实现对石化厂区中有毒气体(主要包括H2 S、SO2、CO、CH4)、温度、湿度、风向、风速、PM2.5等因子的实时、在线监测和预警,使生产管理人员掌握石化厂区的有毒气体实时动态信息,对可能引发危险事故的因素及时排除,把危险控制在始发阶段,以实现化工生产的安全、持续、高效进行。实验表明:该在线监测系统具有良好可靠性、安全性和实用性。

  17. Antiplasmodial activity and toxicity of crude extracts from alternatives parts of plants widely used for the treatment of malaria in Burkina Faso: contribution for their preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansané, Adama; Sanon, Souleymane; Ouattara, Lamoussa P; Traoré, Abdoulaye; Hutter, Sébastien; Ollivier, Evelyne; Azas, Nadine; Traore, Alfred S; Guissou, Innocent P; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Nebié, Issa

    2010-01-01

    In order to prevent the destruction of the ecology and to sustain the flora mainly for medicinal plants, we investigated on alternative parts taken from four plants already known to display antiplasmodial activities and largely used by traditional healers in sub-Saharan Africa. The evaluated parts are bark of trunk for Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides and leaves for Sarcocephalus latifolius instead of roots, and leaves for Combretum molle and Anogeissus leiocarpus instead of stem bark. The antiplasmodial activity of extracts of these plants was evaluated in vitro using the multi-resistant strain (W2) of Plasmodium falciparum. Antiproliferative activity was also assessed, using K562S human monocyte cell lines, along with calculation of the selectivity index (SI) of each extract. The highest in vitro antiplasmodial activity was found in the alkaloid extract of trunk bark from Z. zanthoxyloides and from the MeOH extract of A. leiocarpus leaves (IC(50) = 1.2 microg/mL and 4.9 microg/mL, respectively) with good selectivity index. Moderate activity was found in the MeOH extract (IC(50) = 5.7 microg/mL) and MeOH/H2O extract (IC(50) = 7.9 microg/mL) of C. molle leaves. Moderate activity was also found in the MeOH/H20 extract (IC(50) = 5.2 microg/mL) and the decoction (IC(50) = 8.2 microg/mL) from leaves of A. leiocarpus. No good activity was found with extracts from roots of S. latifolius. All extracts tested displayed low levels of cytotoxicity against K562S cells. The data generated clearly show that the trunk bark for Z. zanthoxyloides and the leaves for A. leiocarpus and C. molle could be used for the treatment of malaria instead of roots and stem bark.

  18. Thermal Stress and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at subthermoneutral te...

  19. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  20. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  1. Molecular docking and ADME-toxicity studies of potential compounds of medicinal plants grown in Indonesia as an anti-rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaluddin, Rizki; Muhtadi, Wildan Khairi; Chabib, Lutfi; Ikawati, Zullies; Martien, Ronny; Ismail, Hilda

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with recurrent bone destruction around the joints that could lead to permanent joint damage. DMARDs (Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatoid Drugs) and NSAIDs (Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) are the RA therapies with many side effects on long term use. Based on the ethnomedicine, there are many plants that could be found in Indonesia that contain the potential compounds as alternative RA therapies. The aim of this study is to assess the potential of compounds of various medicinal plants against multiple proteins that play an important role on RA through the molecular docking study and pharmacokinetic prediction. Hesperidin, EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate), and mangiferin showed higher activity compared to the other compounds against TACE (TNF-α converting enzyme) which play an important role in the inhibition of TNF-α. Inhibition on it could suppress macrophage cell and T-cell activity by suppressing the regulation of cytokine secretion against inflammation. Furthermore, hesperidin, EGCG, and mangiferin did not show effects on CYP450 (cytochrome P450). Modification of drug delivery system must be done to increase the bioavailability of the compounds. It can be concluded that hesperidin, EGCG, and mangiferin are potential to be developed as an RA therapy with a modification of drug delivery system. This study suggest the encapsulation method using liposome as the drug carrier, which is suitable with the charactheristic of hesperidine, EGCG, and mangiferin.

  2. Chemical composition, acute toxicity, and antinociceptive activity of the essential oil of a plant breeding cultivar of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Antônio Medeiros; Onofre, Alexandre Sherlley; Lira, Amintas Figueiredo; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Marchioro, Murilo; Estevam, Charles dos Santos; de Araujo, Brancilene Santos

    2011-05-01

    Ocimum basilicum L. is an aromatic herb used in Brazil to treat illnesses such as respiratory and rheumatic problems, vomiting, and pain. In the present study, the chemical composition, acute toxicity, and antinociceptive effects of the essential oil (EO) of the cultivar "Maria Bonita" obtained from O. basilicum L. PI 197442 genotype were evaluated in Swiss mice (20-35 g each). Lethal dose to cause 50 % death (LD50) was calculated from a dose-response curve (100-5000 mg/kg body wt.; n = 6) as 532 mg/kg body wt. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test (0.6 % i. p.), EO (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body wt., n = 8, s. c.) was effective in reducing the abdominal contractions at all doses (48-78 %). In the hot-plate test, EO significantly increased the latency at 50 mg/kg body wt. at all times (37-52 %, n = 8, s. c.). However, the effects of morphine and EO at 50 mg/kg were reverted in the presence of naloxone, an opioid antagonist. In the formalin test, EO significantly reduced paw licking time in the first and second phases of pain at 200 mg/kg body wt. (38 and 75 %, respectively, n = 8, s. c.). The results suggested that the peripheral and central antinociceptive effects of EO are related to the inhibition of the biosynthesis of pain mediators, such as prostaglandins and prostacyclins, and its ability to interact with opioid receptors.

  3. Toxic influence of silver and uranium salts on activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants and synthetic activated sludge associates modeled on its pure cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyupa, Dmitry V; Kalenov, Sergei V; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Khokhlachev, Nikolay S; Baurina, Marina M; Kuznetsov, Alexander Ye

    2015-01-01

    Toxic impact of silver and uranium salts on activated sludge of wastewater treatment facilities has been studied. Some dominating cultures (an active nitrogen fixer Agrobacterium tumifaciens (A.t) and micromyces such as Fusarium nivale, Fusarium oxysporum, and Penicillium glabrum) have been isolated and identified as a result of selection of the activated sludge microorganisms being steadiest under stressful conditions. For these cultures, the lethal doses of silver amounted 1, 600, 50, and 300 µg/l and the lethal doses of uranium were 120, 1,500, 1,000, and 1,000 mg/l, respectively. A.tumifaciens is shown to be more sensitive to heavy metals than micromyces. Synthetic granular activated sludge was formed on the basis of three cultures of the isolated micromyces steadiest against stress. Its granules were much more resistant to silver than the whole native activated sludge was. The concentration of silver causing 50 % inhibition of synthetic granular activated sludge growth reached 160-170 μg/l as far as for the native activated sludge it came only to 100-110 μg/l.

  4. Screening approach by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the blood quantification of thirty-four toxic principles of plant origin. Application to forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Jérémy; Guitton, Jérôme; Romeuf, Ludovic; Bévalot, Fabien; Boyer, Baptiste; Fanton, Laurent; Gaillard, Yvan

    2015-01-15

    Plant poisonings have left their mark on history and still cause many deaths, whether intentional or accidental. The means to show toxicological evidence of such poisonings should be implemented with great care. This article presents a technique for measuring thirty-nine toxic principles of plant origin in the blood, covering a large amount of toxins from local or exotic plants: α-lobeline, α-solanine, aconitine, ajmaline, atropine, brucine, cephalomannine, colchicine, convallatoxin, cymarine, cytisine, digitoxin, digoxin, emetine, gelsemine, ibogaine, jervine, kavain, lanatoside C, lupanine, mitragynine, neriifolin, oleandrin, ouabain, paclitaxel, physostigmine, pilocarpine, podophyllotoxin, proscillaridin A, reserpine, retrorsine, ricinine, scopolamine, senecionine, sparteine, strophanthidin, strychnine, veratridine and yohimbine. Analysis was carried out using an original ultra-high performance liquid chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection. Extraction was a standard solid phase extraction performed on Oasis(®) HLB cartridge. Thirty-four of the thirty-nine compounds were put through a validation procedure. The assay was linear in the calibration curve range from 0.5 or 5 μg/L to 1000 μg/L according to the compounds. The method is sensitive (LOD from 0.1 to 1.6 μg/L). The within-day precision of the assay was less than 22.5% at the LLOQ, and the between-day precision was less than 21.5% for 10 μg/L for all the compounds included. The assay accuracy was in the range of 87.4 to 119.8% for the LLOQ. The extraction recovery and matrix effect ranged from 30 to 106% and from -30 to 14%, respectively. It has proven useful and effective in several difficult forensic cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Toxicity of monkshood. Review.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingolfsdottir, K; Olafsson, K

    1997-03-01

    Monkshood, Aconitum napellus L. (Ranunculaceae), is considered one of the most poisonous plants growing in Europe. Monkshood and other Aconitum species are still used in Oriental and homeopathic medicine as analgesics, febrifuges and hypotensives. The neurotoxin aconitine is the principal alkaloid in most subspecies of monkshood. A review is presented, which includes historical aspects of monkshood as a poisonous and medicinal plant, the mode of action of aconitine, symptoms of toxicity, treatment and reports of recent poisoning incidents. In addition, results of quantitative HPLC examination of hypogeous and epigeous organs from a population of A. napellus ssp. vulgare cultivated in Iceland are discussed. The fact that children in Iceland have commonly been known to eat the sweet tasting nectaries in monkshood prompted an investigation of the alkaloidal content of these organs specifically. The low aconitine content found in the nectaries as well as in whole flowers accords with the absence of reported toxicity arising from the handling of flowers and consumption of nectaries from A. napellus in this country.

  6. Toxic compounds in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Nazmul; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Islam, Md Asiful; Gan, Siew Hua

    2014-07-01

    There is a wealth of information about the nutritional and medicinal properties of honey. However, honey may contain compounds that may lead to toxicity. A compound not naturally present in honey, named 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), may be formed during the heating or preservation processes of honey. HMF has gained much interest, as it is commonly detected in honey samples, especially samples that have been stored for a long time. HMF is a compound that may be mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic. It has also been reported that honey can be contaminated with heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium. Honey produced from the nectar of Rhododendron ponticum contains alkaloids that can be poisonous to humans, while honey collected from Andromeda flowers contains grayanotoxins, which can cause paralysis of limbs in humans and eventually leads to death. In addition, Melicope ternata and Coriaria arborea from New Zealand produce toxic honey that can be fatal. There are reports that honey is not safe to be consumed when it is collected from Datura plants (from Mexico and Hungary), belladonna flowers and Hyoscamus niger plants (from Hungary), Serjania lethalis (from Brazil), Gelsemium sempervirens (from the American Southwest), Kalmia latifolia, Tripetalia paniculata and Ledum palustre. Although the symptoms of poisoning due to honey consumption may differ depending on the source of toxins, most common symptoms generally include dizziness, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, headache, palpitations or even death. It has been suggested that honey should not be considered a completely safe food.

  7. Comparative analysis of plant and macroinvertebrate communities and toxic metal concentrations at an abandoned surface mine in Grant County, West Virginia. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The document reports on the sampling of vegetation, utilizing list-count quadrats along predetermined transects within 3 major areas of Allison Engineering surface mine. Quadrats, 1/4 x m, were utilized to sample the herbaceous and ground strata. Vegetation was assessed according to percent cover, using 5 classes of cover to maintain objectivity. Sampling of vegetation within the Southern Section corresponded with sample sites. Sampling of vegetation within Middle Section was conducted to add to the data regarding vegetation influencing the Southern Section and the Northern Section Sampling of vegetation of Northern Section deviated from that of other sections (sampling not as random). Vegetative data from sections were analyzed by standard methods for cover (dominance) and frequency. A floristic list of the vascular plants surveyed/collected within sections categorized (pteridophytes, angiosperms-monocots, and angiosperms-dicots).

  8. Wastewater Toxicity Test of Industrial Enterprises in Zhenjiang New District No.2 Wastewater Treatment Plant%镇江市新区第二污水处理厂入网企业废水毒性试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张有仓; 王申; 胡吉仁

    2012-01-01

    镇江市新区第二污水厂进水主要是新区化工园区的混合化工废水,针对生化系统经常遭受异常进水或毒性物质冲击的情况,提出了以耗氧速率(OUR)及COD去除率和硝化速率评价污水可生物降解性的方法,以提高活性污泥系统的处理效率和运行管理水平。研究结果表明,六类化工企业废水的毒性大小顺序为农药类﹥电子类﹥染料类﹥造纸类﹥橡胶类﹥酒精类。%The influent of No.2 Wastewater Treatment Plant in Zhenjiang New District is mainly mixed chemical wastewater.To solve problems such as shocks caused by influent abnormalities and toxic matters,this paper proposed to evaluate the biodegradation capacity of the wastewater by promoting oxygen uptake rate(OUR) of mud,COD removal rates and nitrification rates so as to upgrade the operation management level of activated sludge system.This study indicates that the toxicity sequence of the six chemical industrial effluents was pesticide effluent〉electron effluent〉dyestuff effluent〉papermaking effluent〉rubber effluent〉ethyl alcohol effluent.

  9. An in vivo assay for elucidating the importance of cytochromes P450 for the ability of a wild mammalian herbivore (Neotoma lepida) to consume toxic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopec, Michele M; Malenke, Jael R; Halpert, James R; Denise Dearing, M

    2013-01-01

    An in vivo assay using the cytochrome P450 (P450) suicide inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and 24-h food intake was developed to determine the relative importance of P450s in two populations of Neotoma lepida with respect to biotransformation of plant secondary compounds in the animals' natural diets. The efficacy of ABT as a P450 inhibitor was first validated using hypnotic-state assays with and without pretreatment with ABT. Pretreatment with 100 mg/kg ABT by gavage increased hexobarbital sleep times 3-4-fold in both populations, showing effective inhibition of P450s in woodrats. Next, the Great Basin population was fed a terpene-rich juniper diet, and the Mojave population was fed a phenolic-rich creosote diet, with rabbit chow serving as the control diet in each group. Treatment with ABT inhibited food intake in the Great Basin population fed the juniper diet to a greater extent (35%) than the Great Basin population fed the control diet (19%) or the Mojave population fed the creosote diet (16%). The food intake of the Mojave population fed the control diet was not significantly inhibited by ABT. The findings suggest that the biotransformation of terpenes in juniper relies more heavily on P450s than that of phenolics in creosote. This assay provides an inexpensive and noninvasive method to explore the relative importance of P450s in the biotransformation strategies of wild mammalian herbivores.

  10. Alleviation of heavy metals toxicity by the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and effects on wheat grown in saline sodic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tamoor Ul; Bano, Asghari; Naz, Irum

    2017-06-03

    The aim of the study was to determine tolerance of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in different concentrations of Cu, Cr, Co, Cd, Ni, Mn, and Pb and to evaluate the PGPR-modulated bioavailability of different heavy metals in the rhizosphere soil and wheat tissues, grown in saline sodic soil. Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas moraviensis were isolated from Cenchrus ciliaris L. growing in the Khewra salt range. Seven-day-old cultures of PGPR were applied on wheat as single inoculum, co-inoculation and carrier-based biofertilizer (using maize straw and sugarcane husk as carrier). At 100 ppm of Cr and Cu, the survival rates of rhizobacteria were decreased by 40%. Single inoculation of PGPR decreased 50% of Co, Ni, Cr and Mn concentrations in the rhizosphere soil. Co-inoculation of PGPR and biofertilizer treatment further augmented the decreases by 15% in Co, Ni, Cr and Mn over single inoculation except Pb and Co where decreases were 40% and 77%, respectively. The maximum decrease in biological concentration factor (BCF) was observed for Cd, Co, Cr, and Mn. P. moraviensis inoculation decreases the biological accumulation coefficient (BAC) as well as translocation factor (TF) for Cd, Cr, Cu Mn, and Ni. The PGPR inoculation minimized the deleterious effects of heavy metals, and the addition of carriers further assisted the PGPR.

  11. Contact toxicity of crude extracts from 32 tropical plants against Brontispa longissima%32种热带植物的乙醇提取物对椰心叶甲的触杀活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红芳; 符悦冠

    2014-01-01

    用索氏提取法对所选植物进行粗提物提取,采用浸渍法在室内测定热带地区的32种植物乙醇提取物对椰心叶甲的触杀活性,结果表明:假蒟(根)、假蒟(叶)、假蒟(茎)、白花丹(叶)、海杧果(果)乙醇提取物对椰心叶甲成虫表现出较高的触杀活性,椰心叶甲成虫校正死亡率分别为100%、100%、96.67%、70%、70%;假蒟(根)、铁芒箕(叶)、山香(叶)、山苦楝(叶)和狮子尾(叶)乙醇提取物对椰心叶甲幼虫的触杀活性较高,校正死亡率分别为100%、86.67%、68.97%、56.67%、50%.以上几种杀虫植物值得进一步深入研究,从这些热带植物中提取、分离和纯化高活性的杀虫活性成分,为开发新的椰心叶甲植物源杀虫剂奠定基础.%The Soxhlet extraction method was used to extract the bioactivities from the selected plants and the impregnation method was used to study the contact toxicity of the alcohol extracts of 32 tropical plants against Brontispa longissima in laboratory. The results showed that the alcohol extracts of Piper sarmentosum root, Piper sarmentosum leaf, Piper sarmentosum stem, Plumbago izoylanica leaf, Cerbera manghas fruit showed the higher activity against the adult of Brontispa longissima among the extracts tested. Their percentage mortality were 100%,100%, 96. 67%,70%,70%. The alcohol extracts of Piper sarmentosum root, Dicranopteris dichotoma leaf, Hyptis suaveolens leaf, Evodia glabrifolia leaf, Rhaphidophora hongkongensis leaf on the larvae of Brontispa longissima showed the higher activity among the extracts tested. Their percentages of mortality were 100%, 86. 67%,68. 97%, 56. 67%, 50%. The insecticidal plant above deserves further research on extraction, separation and purification of insecticidal components of high activity from these tropical plants, to lay the foundation for the development of new botanical insecticides of Brontispa longissima.

  12. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  13. Toxic Effects of Cr3+,Cr6+ on the Physiological and Biochemical Characteristics of Tea Plant%Cr3+和Cr6+胁迫对茶树生理生化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐茜; 冯德建; 杨华; 吴永胜; 谭和平

    2009-01-01

    The toxic effects of different concentrations of Cr3+ and Cr6+ on the physiological and biochemical characteristics of tea plant were studied in Hoagland solution culture.The results indicated that: with the increasing of Cr3+,Cr6+ concentrations,the symptoms of tea plant became obviously; the contents of chlorophyll and the ratio of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b reduced obviously,and there were obviously negative effects to net photosynthesis rate,intercellular CO2 concentration,transpiration rate and stoma conductivity.Under the Cr3+ stress,the activities of SOD,POD and CAT increased at first and then decreased,under the Cr6+ stress,the activities of SOD and POD increased at first and then decreased too,but the activity of CAT decreased all the time.At the same time,the contents of MDA and proline (Pro),cytomembrane permeability increased obviously with the increasing of Cr3+,Cr6+ concentrations.Therefore,it highlighted that the Cr3+ and Cr6+ stresses could mangle the cytomembrane system,the structures and functions of the major organelles of tea plant,and the toxic effects of Cr6+ on tea plant was stronger than that of Cr3+.%通过水培试验,研究比较了不同浓度(10~60 mg/L)的Cr3+、Cr6+胁迫对茶树叶片一些生理生化指标的影响.结果表明:随Cr3+、Cr6+胁迫浓度的增加,茶树受害程度加深,中毒症状明显;叶绿素含量以及叶绿素a/b比值极显著降低,并对净光合速率、胞间CO2浓度、蒸腾速率及气孔导度产生显著负面影响.Cr3+胁迫下,SOD、POD、CAT活性随Cr3+浓度增加呈先升高后降低趋势;而Cr6+胁迫下,SOD、POD活性也出现先升后降趋势,但CAT活性则持续下降.丙二醛含量、细胞膜透性和脯氨酸含量也随Cr3+、Cr6+浓度增加显著增加,表明Cr3+、Cr6+胁迫对茶树细胞质膜系统及主要细胞器的结构与功能都具有较强的破坏作用,Cr6+的毒害作用强于Cr3+.

  14. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  15. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) of Belford Roxo industrial plant effluent and its contribution in water quality of downstream of Sarapui River, Iguacu River sub-basin, Baia da Guanabara Basin, RJ, Brazil; Avaliacao e identificacao da toxicidade (Toxity Identification Evaluation - TIE) do efluente liquido do polo industrial de Belford Roxo, RJ, e sua contribuicao na qualidade das aguas do corso inferior do Rio Sarapui, sub-bacia do Rio Iguacu, Bacia da Baia da Guanabara, RJ, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz Eduardo Botelho

    2006-07-01

    The quality of Belford Roxo Industrial Plant effluent and water from Sarapui River were evaluated with Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Danio rerio acute and chronic toxicity tests. In association with the ecotoxicological monitoring, the Toxicity Identification Evaluation procedure were performed and the identification of the toxic compounds was possible. The Chloride ion was identified as the major toxic compound in the effluent with additional effects of Metals, Ammonium and Sulfide. For the Sarapui River, the compounds of Phosphorus and Nitrogen were identified as the major toxic compounds with addictive effects of Metals, Ammonium and Sulfide. Although the environmental impact estimation based on the effluent toxicity suggests a minor impact on the water quality of Sarapui River, this was already sufficiently contaminated to make impracticable the establishment of an aquatic community. The constant discharge of untreated sludge promotes the eutrophication of this water body and makes impossible the equilibrium of this ecosystem. (author)

  16. Toxic Amblyopia (Nutritional Amblyopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finds Additional Content Medical News Toxic Amblyopia (Nutritional Amblyopia) By James Garrity, MD, Whitney and Betty MacMillan ... Neuropathies) Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Optic Neuritis Papilledema Toxic Amblyopia Toxic amblyopia is damage to the optic nerve ...

  17. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  18. Chemical speciation of heavy metals and leaching toxicity analysis of sludge in copper metallurgy plant%铜污泥中重金属形态分布及浸出毒性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖天鹏; 祝星; 祁先进; 王华; 史谊峰; 刘春侠

    2014-01-01

    结合目前有色冶金工业上普遍采用的石灰铁盐法工艺特点,首次采用改进的BCR连续提取法与毒性浸出实验相结合的方法对铜污泥(中和渣与铁砷渣污泥)的重金属形态分布与浸出毒性进行了系统的研究。结果表明:采用改进的BCR方法对铜冶炼污泥重金属元素形态进行提取,形态提取具有较高的回收率;As、Zn、Pb与Cd为中和渣与铁砷渣污泥中主要的重金属元素(质量含量As>Zn>Pb>Cd),其中中和渣含As高达58566 mg/kg (折合5.85%),铁砷渣含As为12582 mg/kg(折合1.26%);两种重金属形态分布差异主要体现在As的形态分布上,铁砷渣污泥中重金属稳定性较好,特别是砷的稳定性较中和渣高;中和渣污泥中,As 主要以弱酸态形式存在(占68.01%),Zn、Pb与Cd主要以残渣态存在;铁砷渣污泥中,As、Zn、Pb与Cd主要以残渣态存在,其中残渣态As占59.21%;浸出毒性结果显示两种污泥中砷的浸出毒性都远远超过国标GB 5085.3-2007规定值,因此铜冶炼厂污泥属于含高砷危险废弃物,而以弱酸态As为主的中和渣污泥浸出毒性较高,而主要以残渣态As存在的铁砷渣污泥浸出毒性较低。%According to the lime-iron salt method commonly used in recent non-ferrous metallurgy industry,the modified sequential extraction procedure proposed by BCR (Community Bureau of Reference of the European Commission,now the Standards,Measuring and Testing Programme) was used and leaching toxicity test was performed to investigate sludge (neutralization sludge and iron-arsenic sludge) in a copper metallurgy plant for the first time. It was found that recovery of heavy metals in the BCR process was high. As,Zn,Pb and Cd were the main heavy metals in those two sludges,following the weight content order of As > Zn > Pb > Cd. The weight contents of neutralization sludge and iron-arsenic sludge were high up to 58 566 mg/kg (5

  19. Attenuation of chromium toxicity by bioremediation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chromium is an important toxic environmental pollutant. Chromium pollution results largely from industrial activities, but other natural and anthropogenic sources also contribute to the problem. Plants that are exposed to environmental contamination by chromium are affected in diverse ways, including a tendency to suffer metabolic stress. The stress imposed by Cr exposure also extends to oxidative metabolic stress in plants that leads to the generation of active toxic oxygen free radicals. Such active free radicals degrade essential biomolecules and distort plant biological membranes. In this chapter, we describe sources of environmental chromium contamination, and provide information about the toxic impact of chromium on plant growth and metabolism. In addition, we address different phytoremediation processes that are being studied for use worldwide, in contaminated regions, to address and mitigate Cr pollution. There has been a long history of attempts to successfully mitigate the toxic effects of chromium-contaminated soil on plants and other organisms. One common approach, the shifting of polluted soil to landfills, is expensive and imposes environmental risks and health hazards of its own. Therefore, alternative eco-friendly bioremediation approaches are much in demand for cleaning chromium-polluted areas. To achieve its cleaning effects, bioremediation utilizes living organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants) that are capable of absorbing and processing chromium residues in ways which amend or eliminate it. Phytoremediation (bioremediation with plants) techniques are increasingly being used to reduce heavy metal contamination and to minimize the hazards of heavy metal toxicity. To achieve this, several processes, viz., rhizofiltration, phytoextraction, phytodetoxification, phytostabilization, and phytovolatilization, have been developed and are showing utility in practice, or promise. Sources of new native hyperaccumulator plants for use at contaminated

  20. Evaluación de la toxicidad aguda de extractos de plantas medicinales por un método alternativo (Evaluation of acute toxicity of extracts of medicinal plants by an alternative testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deodelsy Bermúdez Toledo:

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la toxicidad a dosis única de seis extractos de plantas medicinales: Psidium guajava L. (guayaba, Eucalyptus citriodoraHooker (eucalipto de limón, Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf (caña santa, hierba de limón, Hibiscus elatus Sw. (majagua, Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (tilo, Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour. Spreng (orégano francés mediante un método alternativo e internacionalmente validado y aceptado (procedimiento de dosis fijas en ratasSprague Dawley. El grupo tratado recibió por vía oral una dosis límite de 2000 mg/kg de masa corporal y el control negativocloruro de sodio 0,9%. En las condiciones del ensayo no se produjo mortalidad ni se manifestaron síntomas indicativos de toxicidad en los animales. Los estudios anatomopatológicos macroscópicos nomostraron ninguna alteración en los órganos estudiados. La DL50 de los extractos de estudio se encuentra por encima de 2000mg/kg de masa corporal, calificándose éstos, según el Sistema Global Armonizado, como “No clasificadas” (”No tóxicas”.A single dose toxicity study in six extracts of medicinal plants: Psidium guajava L. (guava, Eucalyptus citriodora Hooker (lemon eucalyptus, Cymbopogon citratus (DC Stapf (lemon grass, Hibiscus elatus Sw. (majagua, Justicia pectoralis Jacq. (linden, lectranthus amboinicus (Lour. Spreng (French oregano was done, using an alternative internationally validated and accepted method (Fix Dose Procedure in Sprague Dawley rats. The treated group received by oral route a dose limit of 2000 mg/kg of corporal mass and the controlnegative chloride of sodium 0.9%. Under the assay conditions didn't produced mortality neither they showed indicative symptoms oftoxicity in the animals. The macroscopic anatomopathology studies didn't show any alteration in the studied organs. The LD50 ofthe study extracts is above 2000 mg/kg of corporal mass, being qualified these, according to the Harmonized Global System,as "Not classified" ("Not toxic".

  1. Synergistic effects of a photooxidized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and copper on photosynthesis and plant growth: evidence that in vivo formation of reactive oxygen species is a mechanism of copper toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, T S; Marder, J B; Tripuranthakam, S; Dixon, D G; Greenberg, B M

    2001-06-01

    Heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are often cocontaminants in industrialized environments, yet little is known about either the extent or mechanisms of their cotoxicity. To address this shortfall, the combined effects of an oxygenated PAH, 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone (1,2-dhATQ), and a heavy metal, Cu2+, on photosynthesis and growth of the duckweed (Lemna gibba) were evaluated. Using assays of chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosystem I activity, 1,2-dhATQ inhibited electron transport at the cytochrome b6/f complex. Conversely, Cu2+ alone (at low concentrations) had little effect on photosynthesis. When Cu2+ was combined with 1,2-dhATQ, an increase in transient and steady-state chlorophyll a fluorescence quenching occurred relative to 1,2-dhATQ alone. Treatment of isolated thylakoid membranes with 1,2-dhATQ inhibited whole-chain linear electron transport, measured as O2 consumption using methyl viologen as the electron acceptor. However, Cu2+ plus 1,2-dhATQ resulted in active O2 consumption with or without methyl viologen as an electron acceptor. From these data, we conclude that 1,2-dhATQ renders the plastoquinone pool to a highly reduced state by inhibiting at cytochrome b6/f. Then, Cu2+ is able to mediate the transfer of electrons from reduced plastoquinone to O2, forming reactive oxygen species. At the whole-organism level, when Cu2+ and 1,2-dhATQ were mixed at concentrations that resulted in the above-mentioned impacts on photosynthesis, synergistic inhibition of plant growth was observed. This suggests a catalytic mechanism of toxicity for redox active metals, a process that could be instrumental in explaining their impacts at low concentrations.

  2. [Source identification of toxic wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Yu, Yin; Zhou, Yue-Xi; Chen, Xue-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Miao

    2014-12-01

    Petrochemical wastewaters have toxic impacts on the microorganisms in biotreatment processes, which are prone to cause deterioration of effluent quality of the wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the inhibition effects of activated sludge's oxygen consumption were tested to evaluate the toxicity of production wastewaters in a petrochemical industrial park. The evaluation covered the wastewaters from not only different production units in the park, but also different production nodes in each unit. No direct correlation was observed between the toxicity effects and the organic contents, suggesting that the toxic properties of the effluents could not be predicted by the organic contents. In view of the variation of activated sludge sensitivity among different tests, the toxicity data were standardized according to the concentration-effect relationships of the standard toxic substance 3, 5-dichlorophenol on each day, in order to improve the comparability among the toxicity data. Furthermore, the Quality Emission Load (QEL) of corresponding standard toxic substance was calculated by multiplying the corresponding 3, 5-dichlorophenol concentration and the wastewater flow quantity, to indicate the toxicity emission contribution of each wastewater to the wastewater treatment plant. According to the rank list of the toxicity contribution of wastewater from different units and nodes, the sources of toxic wastewater in the petrochemical industrial park were clearly identified. This study provides effective guidance for source control of wastewater toxicity in the large industrial park.

  3. 田间土壤外源铜镍在小麦中的累积及其毒害研究%Toxicity and Accumulation of Copper and Nickel in Wheat Plants Cropped on Alkaline and Acidic Field Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄锦孙; 韦东普; 郭雪雁; 马义兵

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the toxicity of added copper(Cu) and nickel(Ni) in soils to wheat and metal accumulation in wheat plants.The results showed that the yields of wheat straw and grain were decreased with the increasing concentration of Cu and Ni added to soils.The added Cu concentrations yielding 10% inhibition of wheat yield(EC10) were 499.6 mg·kg-1 for alkaline soils(Dezhou,pH 8.90),and 55.7 mg·kg-1 for acidic soils(Qiyang,pH 5.31).The toxicity of Cu or Ni in acidic soils were significantly higher than that in alkaline soils.With increasing addition of Cu or Ni,the contents of Cu in wheat grains initially increased and then keep at constant level,while the accumulation of Ni in grains linearly increased.The contents of Cu and Ni in Qiyang wheat grains were 6.07-9.26 mg·kg-1 and 0.53-31.78 mg·kg-1,and those of in Dezhou were 5.24-10.52 mg·kg-1 and 0.16-25.33 mg·kg-1.In both field experimental sites,the contents of Cu in wheat grains meet the national standard for food safety.These findings showed that Cu is more relevant to ecological risk assessments than to food safety assessments for wheat grown in soils that have been contaminated with Cu.%通过湖南祁阳和山东德州的田间试验,研究不同水平外源Cu、Ni在酸性和碱性土壤中经过老化之后对小麦的毒害及其在小麦植株内的累积状况.结果表明,小麦籽粒和秸秆的生物量随着土壤中Cu、Ni添加剂量增加而减少.酸性土壤(祁阳,pH 5.31)和碱性土壤(德州,pH 8.90)中外源Cu的对小麦的10%抑制效应含量(EC10)分别为55.7 mg.kg-1和499.6mg.kg-1,外源Cu、Ni在祁阳田间土壤中的毒性显著高于德州田间土壤.随着土壤重金属添加量的增加,Cu在祁阳小麦籽粒中的含量随土壤Cu添加量的增加而增加,后趋于稳定,Ni在德州小麦籽粒中的含量随土壤Ni添加量的增加呈线性增加;德州小麦籽粒中Cu、Ni含量范围分别为6.07~9

  4. Microbially produced phytotoxins and plant disease management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbially produced phytotoxins and plant disease management. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Pathogenic fungi and bacteria often damage their host (plants) tissues by producing toxic metabolites, which induced various symptoms ...

  5. 蜜源植物常用农药对蜜蜂急性毒性及风险评价%The acute toxicity and risk assessment of 25 pesticides used in nectar plant to Apis mellifera L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苍涛; 王彦华; 俞瑞鲜; 吴长兴; 陈丽萍; 吴声敢; 赵学平

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five pesticides, which were commonly used in the period of flowering of 4 main nectar plants in Zhejiang province, were chosen to determine the acute toxicity to bees (Apis mellifera L. ) combining with the field maximum dose. The results showed that; the 48 h LC50 values of 1. 8% EC abamectin to Apis mellifera L. was 0. 0528 (0. 0462 -0. 0603) mg·L-1 , belongs to very high toxic grade; the 48 h LC50 values range of 1% EC em-amectin benzoate, 40% EC methidathion, 10% AS nitenpyram, 40% EC phoxim, 2.5% EC lambda-cyhalothrin, 4. 5% EC beta-cypermethrin, 480 g·L-1 EC chlorpyrifos, 45% EC malathion, 10% WP imidacloprid and 90% TC trichlorfon to Apis mellifera L. were 1. 02 (0. 869 - 1. 14) mg·L-1 to 13. 9 (12. 4 - 15. 5) mg·L-1, belongs to high toxic grade; the 48 h LC50 values range of 15% EC pyridaben, 20% SP acetamiprid and 15% WP ethylicin to Apis mellifera L. were 43. 3(37. 5 -50. 0) mg·L-1 to 163( 127 -210) mg-L ' , belongs to moderate toxic grade; the LC50 values of 5% SC fenpyroximate, 250 g·L-1 EC prochloraz, 25% WP diflubenzuron, 40% EC propargite, 50% WP cyromazine, 50% WG dimethomorph, 75% WG carbendazim, 25% WP buprofezin, 35% SC procymidone, 50% WP iprodione and 75% WP chlorothalonil to Apis mellifera L. were higher than 200 mg·L-1 , belongs to low toxic grade. The results showed that 1.8% EC abamectin, 1% EC emamectin benzoate, 40% EC methidathion, 10% AS nitenpyram, 40% EC phoxim, 2. 5% EC lambda-cyhalothrin, 4. 5% EC beta-cypermethrin, 480 g-L"1 EC chlorpyrifos, 45% EC malathion and 90% TC trichlorfon had very high risk to Apis mellifera L. 10% WP imidaclo-prid, 15% EC pyridaben and 5% SC fenpyroximate had high risk to Apis mellifera L. 20% SP acetamiprid, 15% WP ethylicin, 250 g·L-1 EC prochloraz, 40% EC propargite, 50% WP cyromazine and 50% WG dimethomorph were moderately risk to Apis mellifera L. , while other pesticides were low-risk to Apis mellifera L.%选择浙江省种植面积较大的4种蜜源植

  6. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and acute toxicity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-03

    Jun 3, 2008 ... Susceptibility test, acute toxicity test and phytochemical screening ... man to fight various human and animal diseases has made plants a sine qua ... alternatives in the treatment of infectious diseases since pathogens of have ...

  7. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... causing toxicity to plants as exhibited by reduced seed germination ... hypochlorite for 1 min to prevent fungal attack, and triple-rinsed in distilled ..... Effects of arsenic on seed germination and physiological activities of wheat.

  8. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Advance on pharmacologic actions, toxicity and pharmacokinetics of pyrrolizidine alkaloids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiangguo; Wang, Changhong; Li, Yan; Wang, Zhengtao

    2009-03-01

    Plants containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids were widely used in traditional medicine. Its hepatotoxicity is main toxicity as well known internationally. In order to providing some foundation for the future studies, the advancement on the pharmacologic actions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of pyrrolizidine alkaloids was reviewed.

  10. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  11. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  12. Methylglyoxal alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Duan, Xiang-Qiu; Xia, Yan-Mei; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Zhi-Hao; Min, Xiong

    2017-02-01

    Methylglyoxal alleviates cadmium toxicity in wheat (Triticum aestivum L) by improving plant growth. For a long time, the reactive α, β-carbonyl ketoaldehyde methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO; MG) has been regarded as merely a toxic metabolite in plants, but, now, emerging as a signal molecule in plants. In this study, cadmium (Cd) stress decreased plant height, root length, fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that Cd had toxic effects on the growth of wheat seedlings. The toxic effects of Cd were alleviated by exogenously applied MG in a dosage dependent fashion, and 700 mM MG reached significant differences, but this alleviating effect was eliminated by the treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, MG scavenger), suggesting that MG could mitigate Cd toxicity in wheat. This study reported for the first time that MG could alleviate Cd toxicity in wheat, uncovering a new possible physiological function for MG, and opening a novel line of research in plant stress biology.

  13. Manganese toxicity hardly affects sulfur metabolism in Brassica rapa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, M.I.; Prajapati, D.H.; Parmar, S.; Aghajanzadeh, T.; Hawkesford, M.J.; De Kok, L.J.; De Kok, L.J.; Haneklaus, S.H.; Hawkesford, M.J.; Schnug, E.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant nutrient, though at elevated levels in plant tissues it may become toxic. The physiological basis for phytotoxicity is largely unclear. Exposure of Brassica rapa to elevated levels of Mn2+ in the nutrient solution resulted in decreased biomass production at ≥ 20

  14. Pyridostigmine Synergistic Toxicity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-31

    AND DEET IN THE LABORATORY RAT 1. Executive Sum m ary .............................................................................................. 2 2...TOXICOLOGICAL STUDY 75-48-2665 ACUTE ORAL TOXICITY STUDY OF PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE. PERMETHRIN. AND DEET IN THE LABORATORY RAT 1. REFERENCES: See Appendix A... LABORATORY RAT 1. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine potential toxic interactions when pyridostigmine bromide. permethrin. and DEET are given

  15. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  16. Mechanisms of phosphine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nisa S; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G; Schlipalius, David I; Ebert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH(3)), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH(3) and AsH(3). The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  17. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nisa S.; Bhattacharya, Ishita; Tuck, Andrew G.; Schlipalius, David I.; Ebert, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3), the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N) and arsenic (As), which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity. PMID:21776261

  18. A new approach for simultaneous screening and quantification of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in some potential pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants by using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Li, Na; Choi, Franky Fung-Kei; Qiao, Chun-Feng; Song, Jing-Zheng; Li, Song-Lin; Liu, Xin; Cai, Zong-Wei; Fu, Peter P; Lin, Ge; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2010-11-29

    A rapid, but sensitive and selective method for simultaneous screening and quantification of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) by ultra performance liquid-chromatography (UPLC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQ-MS) is described. This was accomplished by incorporating the precursor ion scan (PIS) acquisition and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) acquisition in the same UPLC-MS/MS run. Notably, the developed PIS approach for detecting two pairs of characteristic product ions at m/z 120/138 or 168/150, allowed specific identification of toxic retronecine and otonecine types PAs. This PIS method is highly sensitive with over 10-fold sensitivity improvement upon previously published LC-MS method. Moreover, this new approach is suitable for high sample throughput and was applied to the screening and quantifying toxic PAs in 22 samples collected from seven Parasenecio species and four Senecio species. In addition, coupling the MRM with PIS approach generated quantitative results equivalent to those obtained by conventional MRM-only approach. This coupled MRM with PIS approach could provide both qualitative and quantitative results without the need of repetitive analyses.

  19. Toxic Shock Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Toxic Shock Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Toxic Shock Syndrome Print ... it, then take some precautions. What Is Toxic Shock Syndrome? If you're a girl who's had ...

  20. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part I: macrophyte toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are contaminants of aquatic ecosystems with numerous sources, both anthropogenic and natural. The toxicity of HAAs to aquatic plants is generally uncharacterized. Laboratory tests were conducted with three macrophytes (Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum) to assess the toxicity of five HAAs. Myriophyllum spp. has been proposed as required test species for pesticide registration in North America, but few studies have been conducted under standard test conditions. The HAAs in the present experiments were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). MCA was the most toxic to Myriophyllum spp. with EC50 values ranging from 8 to 12.4 mg/l depending on the endpoint, followed by DCA (EC50 range 62-722.5 mg/l), TCA (EC50 range 49.5-1702.6 mg/l), CDFA (EC50 range 105.3 to >10,000 mg/l) and with TFA (EC50 range 222.1 to 10,000 mg/l) the least toxic. Generally, L. gibba was less sensitive to HAA toxicity than Myriophyllum spp., with the difference in toxicity between them approximately threefold. The range of toxicity within Myriophyllum spp. was normally less than twofold. Statistically, plant length and node number were the most sensitive endpoints as they had the lowest observed coefficients of variation, but they were not the most sensitive to HAA toxicity. Toxicological sensitivity of endpoints varied depending on the measure of effect chosen and the HAA, with morphological endpoints usually an order of magnitude more sensitive than pigments for all plant species. Overall, mass and root measures tended to be the most sensitive indicators of HAA toxicity. The data from this paper were subsequently used in an ecological risk assessment for HAAs and aquatic plants. The assessment found HAAs to be of low risk to aquatic macrophytes and the results are described in the second manuscript of this series.