WorldWideScience

Sample records for plants safety guide

  1. Guide for Science Laboratory Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, John J.

    General and specific safety procedures and recommendations for secondary school science laboratories are provided in this guide. Areas of concern include: (1) chemicals (storage, disposal, toxicity, unstable and incompatible chemicals); (2) microorganisms; (3) plants; (4) animals; (5) electricity; (6) lasers; (7) rockets; (8) eye safety and…

  2. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  3. Seismic Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

    1983-09-01

    This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

  4. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  5. Good Practices Guide for Bicycle Safety Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this guide is to serve as an informational resource for educators and other interested professionals in planning and developing bicycle safety education programs. The guide examines 15 existing bicycle safety education programs in the United States and one from Canada. (Author)

  6. Highway Traffic Safety Manpower Functions Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    The purpose of the project, "Revision and Update of Traffic Safety Manpower Training Program Development Guide," was to develop the HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY MANPOWER FUNCTIONS GUIDE. This document provides an organizational schema illustrating the functions essential to be performed and the interrelationship of these functions to carry out…

  7. Occupational Safety and Health Guide (OSH Guide) (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal agencies in assessing their compliance with the standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and it may be used in...combination with an agency-specific manual. The OSH Guide is based on Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1910, Occupational Safety and Health...Standards, and Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Mafters, is also included.

  8. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  9. B Plant interim safety basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S.E.

    1996-09-01

    This interim safety basis (ISB-008) replaces the B Plant Safety Analysis Report, WHC-SD-WM-SAR-013, Rev. 2 (WHC 1993a). ISB-008 uses existing accident analyses, modified existing accident analyses, and new accident analyses to prove that B Plant remains within the safety envelope for transition, deactivation, standby, and shutdown activities. The analyses in ISB-008 are in accordance with the most current requirements for analytical approach, risk determination, and configuration management. This document and supporting accident analyses replace previous design-basis documents.

  10. Process and plant safety

    CERN Document Server

    Hauptmanns, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Accidents in technical installations are random events. Hence they cannot be totally avoided. Only the probability of their occurrence may be reduced and their consequences be mitigated. The book proceeds from hazards caused by materials and process conditions to indicating technical and organizational measures for achieving the objectives of reduction and mitigation. Qualitative methods for identifying weaknesses of design and increasing safety as well as models for assessing accident consequences are presented. The quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of safety measures is explained. The treatment of uncertainties plays a role there. They stem from the random character of the accident and from lacks of knowledge on some of the phenomena to be addressed. The reader is acquainted with the simulation of accidents, safety and risk analyses and learns how to judge the potential and limitations of mathematical modelling. Risk analysis is applied amongst others to “functional safety” and the determinat...

  11. Robots and plant safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, P.

    1996-02-01

    The application of robots in the harsh environments in which TELEMAN equipment will have to operate has large benefits, but also some drawbacks. The main benefit is the ability gained to perform tasks where people cannot go, while there is a possibility of inflicting damage to the equipment handled by the robot, and the plant when mobile robots are involved. The paper describes the types of possible damage and the precautions to be taken in order to reduce the frequency of the damaging events. A literature study for the topic only gave some insight into examples, but no means for a systematic treatment of the topic. (au) 16 refs.

  12. Department of Energy Construction Safety Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    DOE has adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926 ``Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,`` and related parts of 29 CFR 1910, ``Occupational Safety and Health Standards.`` This nonmandatory reference guide is based on these OSHA regulations and, where appropriate, incorporates additional standards, codes, directives, and work practices that are recognized and accepted by DOE and the construction industry. It covers excavation, scaffolding, electricity, fire, signs/barricades, cranes/hoists/conveyors, hand and power tools, concrete/masonry, stairways/ladders, welding/cutting, motor vehicles/mechanical equipment, demolition, materials, blasting, steel erection, etc.

  13. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  14. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  15. For safety in procurement, follow the guide!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    At one time or another, whether as part of a project or for an activity or service, you may find that you have to write a technical specification before placing an order for equipment or machinery. In all cases, when specifying what you need, you must make sure that aspects linked to safety and, in some cases, radiation protection and the protection of the environment, are taken into account in your invitation to tender/price enquiry.   In order to help you with this, the HSE Unit has just published Safety Guideline GS 0-0-1: “27 Key Questions to Ensure that Safety Aspects are Integrated into Invitations to Tender". This guide, available on EDMS under document number 1334815, has been drawn up after the verification of safety aspects of over 300 invitations to tender recently issued by CERN. It collates the most commonly received comments and remarks concerning safety in a question-and-answer format, so you will find plenty of explanations and points to include in your doc...

  16. Component- and plant safety. Bauteil- und Anlagensicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnert, R. (Fachhochschule Koeln (Germany). Fachbereich Anlagen- und Verfahrenstechnik)

    1992-01-01

    Since reliable plants depend on reliable components, the work of engineers entrusted with their planning or maintenance would be unthinkable today without a sufficiently founded safety-engineering knowledge. This book gives a profound introduction to component and plant safety and discusses important licensing aspects. It mainly addresses students of mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, supply and environmental engineering and experienced industrial-planning experts who have some elementary background knowledge of mathematics, mechanics, material science and plant construction. (orig.).

  17. Empirical trials of plant field guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, W D; Cable, S; Marshall, C A M

    2014-06-01

    We designed 3 image-based field guides to tropical forest plant species in Ghana, Grenada, and Cameroon and tested them with 1095 local residents and 20 botanists in the United Kingdom. We compared users' identification accuracy with different image formats, including drawings, specimen photos, living plant photos, and paintings. We compared users' accuracy with the guides to their accuracy with only their prior knowledge of the flora. We asked respondents to score each format for usability, beauty, and how much they would pay for it. Prior knowledge of plant names was generally low (<22%). With a few exceptions, identification accuracy did not differ significantly among image formats. In Cameroon, users identifying sterile Cola species achieved 46-56% accuracy across formats; identification was most accurate with living plant photos. Botanists in the United Kingdom accurately identified 82-93% of the same Cameroonian species; identification was most accurate with specimens. In Grenada, users accurately identified 74-82% of plants; drawings yielded significantly less accurate identifications than paintings and photos of living plants. In Ghana, users accurately identified 85% of plants. Digital color photos of living plants ranked high for beauty, usability, and what users would pay. Black and white drawings ranked low. Our results show the potential and limitations of the use of field guides and nonspecialists to identify plants, for example, in conservation applications. We recommend authors of plant field guides use the cheapest or easiest illustration format because image type had limited bearing on accuracy; match the type of illustration to the most likely use of the guide for slight improvements in accuracy; avoid black and white formats unless the audience is experienced at interpreting illustrations or keeping costs low is imperative; discourage false-positive identifications, which were common; and encourage users to ask an expert or use a herbarium for

  18. Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

  19. Safety in nuclear power plants in India

    OpenAIRE

    Deolalikar R

    2008-01-01

    Safety in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in India is a very important topic and it is necessary to dissipate correct information to all the readers and the public at large. In this article, I have briefly described how the safety in our NPPs is maintained. Safety is accorded overriding priority in all the activities. NPPs in India are not only safe but are also well regulated, have proper radiological protection of workers and the public, regular surveillance, dosimetry, approved standard operat...

  20. Agricultural Mechanics Unit for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Volume 15, Number 4. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhardt, Richard E.; Hunter, Bill

    This instructor's guide is intended for use in teaching the agricultural mechanics unit of a plant science core curriculum. Covered in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: arc welding (following safety procedures, controlling distortion, selecting and caring for electrodes, identifying the material to be welded, and welding…

  1. Safety, Health, and Environmental Auditing A Practical Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Simon Watson

    2010-01-01

    A practical guide to environmental, safety, and occupational health audits. It allows organizations and business to avoid expensive external auditors and retain the knowledge and learning 'in-house'. It allows any competent manager or safety/environmental officer to undertake in-house audits in a competent and reproducible fashion.

  2. Occupational Safety and Health Guide (OSH Guide) (CD-ROM). Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guide is intended for use by Federal agencies in assessing their compliance with the standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration... Occupational Safety and Health Standards, and Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal...Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters, as modified to address relevant requirements of Part 1904, is also included.

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  4. Safety Assessment - Swedish Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, B. [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    After the reactor accident at Three Mile Island, the Swedish nuclear power plants were equipped with filtered venting of the containment. Several types of accidents can be identified where the filtered venting has no effect on the radioactive release. The probability for such accidents is hopefully very small. It is not possible however to estimate the probability accurately. Experiences gained in the last years, which have been documented in official reports from the Nuclear Power Inspectorate indicate that the probability for core melt accidents in Swedish reactors can be significantly larger than estimated earlier. A probability up to one in a thousand operating years can not be excluded. There are so far no indications that aging of the plants has contributed to an increased accident risk. Maintaining the safety level with aging nuclear power plants can however be expected to be increasingly difficult. It is concluded that the 12 Swedish plants remain a major threat for severe radioactive pollution of the Swedish environment despite measures taken since 1980 to improve their safety. Closing of the nuclear power plants is the only possibility to eliminate this threat. It is recommended that until this is done, quantitative safety goals, same for all Swedish plants, shall be defined and strictly enforced. It is also recommended that utilities distributing misleading information about nuclear power risks shall have their operating license withdrawn. 37 refs.

  5. Safety assessment of plant food supplements (PFS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Serra-Majem, L.; Coppens, P.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    Botanicals and botanical preparations, including plant food supplements (PFS), are widely used in Western diets. The growing use of PFS is accompanied by an increasing concern because the safety of these PFS is not generally assessed before they enter the market. Regulatory bodies have become more a

  6. Safety in nuclear power plants in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deolalikar R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety in nuclear power plants (NPPs in India is a very important topic and it is necessary to dissipate correct information to all the readers and the public at large. In this article, I have briefly described how the safety in our NPPs is maintained. Safety is accorded overriding priority in all the activities. NPPs in India are not only safe but are also well regulated, have proper radiological protection of workers and the public, regular surveillance, dosimetry, approved standard operating and maintenance procedures, a well-defined waste management methodology, proper well documented and periodically rehearsed emergency preparedness and disaster management plans. The NPPs have occupational health policies covering periodic medical examinations, dosimetry and bioassay and are backed-up by fully equipped Personnel Decontamination Centers manned by doctors qualified in Occupational and Industrial Health. All the operating plants are ISO 14001 and IS 18001 certified plants. The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited today has 17 operating plants and five plants under construction, and our scientists and engineers are fully geared to take up many more in order to meet the national requirements.

  7. Safety in nuclear power plants in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deolalikar, R

    2008-12-01

    Safety in nuclear power plants (NPPs) in India is a very important topic and it is necessary to dissipate correct information to all the readers and the public at large. In this article, I have briefly described how the safety in our NPPs is maintained. Safety is accorded overriding priority in all the activities. NPPs in India are not only safe but are also well regulated, have proper radiological protection of workers and the public, regular surveillance, dosimetry, approved standard operating and maintenance procedures, a well-defined waste management methodology, proper well documented and periodically rehearsed emergency preparedness and disaster management plans. The NPPs have occupational health policies covering periodic medical examinations, dosimetry and bioassay and are backed-up by fully equipped Personnel Decontamination Centers manned by doctors qualified in Occupational and Industrial Health. All the operating plants are ISO 14001 and IS 18001 certified plants. The Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited today has 17 operating plants and five plants under construction, and our scientists and engineers are fully geared to take up many more in order to meet the national requirements.

  8. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Fusion contains 13 informative papers that were initially presented at the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety held in Vienna, Austria, 10-13 July 2006. Following recommendation from the International Fusion Research Council, the IAEA organizes Technical Meetings on Fusion Safety with the aim to bring together experts to discuss the ongoing work, share new ideas and outline general guidance and recommendations on different issues related to safety and environmental (S&E) aspects of fusion research and power facilities. Previous meetings in this series were held in Vienna, Austria (1980), Ispra, Italy (1983), Culham, UK (1986), Jackson Hole, USA (1989), Toronto, Canada (1993), Naka, Japan (1996) and Cannes, France (2000). The recognized progress in fusion research and technology over the last quarter of a century has boosted the awareness of the potential of fusion to be a practically inexhaustible and clean source of energy. The decision to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents a landmark in the path to fusion power engineering. Ongoing activities to license ITER in France look for an adequate balance between technological and scientific deliverables and complying with safety requirements. Actually, this is the first instance of licensing a representative fusion machine, and it will very likely shape the way in which a more common basis for establishing safety standards and policies for licensing future fusion power plants will be developed. Now that ITER licensing activities are underway, it is becoming clear that the international fusion community should strengthen its efforts in the area of designing the next generations of fusion power plants—demonstrational and commercial. Therefore, the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Safety focused on the safety aspects of power facilities. Some ITER-related safety issues were reported and discussed owing to their potential

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The following provides a summary of the specific issues addressed in this FY-95 Annual Update as they relate to the CH TRU safety bases: Executive Summary; Site Characteristics; Principal Design and Safety Criteria; Facility Design and Operation; Hazards and Accident Analysis; Derivation of Technical Safety Requirements; Radiological and Hazardous Material Protection; Institutional Programs; Quality Assurance; and Decontamination and Decommissioning. The System Design Descriptions`` (SDDS) for the WIPP were reviewed and incorporated into Chapter 3, Principal Design and Safety Criteria and Chapter 4, Facility Design and Operation. This provides the most currently available final engineering design information on waste emplacement operations throughout the disposal phase up to the point of permanent closure. Also, the criteria which define the TRU waste to be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility were summarized in Chapter 3 based on the WAC for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.`` This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents the safety analyses that develop and evaluate the adequacy of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact-Handled Transuranic Wastes (WIPP CH TRU) safety bases necessary to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment from the hazards posed by WIPP waste handling and emplacement operations during the disposal phase and hazards associated with the decommissioning and decontamination phase. The analyses of the hazards associated with the long-term (10,000 year) disposal of TRU and TRU mixed waste, and demonstration of compliance with the requirements of 40 CFR 191, Subpart B and 40 CFR 268.6 will be addressed in detail in the WIPP Final Certification Application scheduled for submittal in October 1996 (40 CFR 191) and the No-Migration Variance Petition (40 CFR 268.6) scheduled for submittal in June 1996. Section 5.4, Long-Term Waste Isolation Assessment summarizes the current status of the assessment.

  10. Grasses and Grasslike Plants of Utah, A Field Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This guide is meant to serve as a help in identifying many of the grasses and grass-like plants common to the rangelands, forests, and farmlands of Utah. It is not an exhaustive guide to the plants contained herein, nor is it a comprehensive summary of all the grasses and grass-like plants in Utah.

  11. 77 FR 50722 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants... regulatory guide (DG), DG-1208, ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems... entitled ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear...

  12. Safety and security aspects in design of digital safety I and C in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yongjian [University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, Magdeburg (Germany). Inst. of Electrical Engineering; Waedt, Karl [Areva GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). PEAS-G

    2016-05-15

    The paper describes a safety objective oriented systematic design approach of digital (computerized) safety I and C in modern nuclear power plants which considers the plant safety requirements as well as cybersecurity needs. The defence in depth philosophy is applied by using different defence lines in the I and C architecture and protection zones in the plant IT environment.

  13. Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1995-01-06

    The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

  14. Product Safety, It's No Accident. A Consumer Product Safety Monthly Planning Guide for Community Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    A consumer product safety monthly planning guide for community organizations is provided. The material is organized into suggested monthly topics with seasonal emphasis. Each section highlights selected information about how to identify potential hazards associated with categories of products. Each section also includes recommendaitons of ways to…

  15. Strategic Thinking and Measures for Plant Quarantine and Food Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guibin; WANG; Jinghan; YANG; Yongmei; LI; Daiju; CUN; Rui; MA; Guiping; FAN

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of plant quarantine to the food safety in China through cases where plant quarantine helps to effectively intercept harmful organisms for food safety and promote export and import trading.It also presents the existing problems in plant quarantine work and appropriate measures.

  16. 77 FR 50720 - Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... COMMISSION Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants... regulatory guide (DG), DG-1207, ``Test Documentation for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems of... revision endorses, with clarifications, the enhanced consensus practices for test documentation...

  17. Field Guide to Plant Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Caren; Bowman, John L; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-10-06

    For the past several decades, advances in plant development, physiology, cell biology, and genetics have relied heavily on the model (or reference) plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis resembles other plants, including crop plants, in many but by no means all respects. Study of Arabidopsis alone provides little information on the evolutionary history of plants, evolutionary differences between species, plants that survive in different environments, or plants that access nutrients and photosynthesize differently. Empowered by the availability of large-scale sequencing and new technologies for investigating gene function, many new plant models are being proposed and studied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety assessment of a nuclear power plant building subjected to an aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thai, Duc-Kien; Kim, Seung-Eock, E-mail: sekim@sejong.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Numerical analysis of a nuclear auxiliary building under aircraft crash is conducted. • The analysis result of impact force is verified using the Riera function. • The safety assessment is performed with regard to different impact scenarios. • Discussions and conclusions on safety of the nuclear building are presented. - Abstract: This paper presents a safety assessment of a nuclear building subjected to an aircraft crash using numerical analysis. For impact simulation, the reinforced concrete (RC) Primary Auxiliary Building (PAB) of the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) is fully modeled and an aircraft model of a Boeing 767-400 is used. The Riera function is used to verify the analysis result of impact force–time history. The IRIS test is used to verify the structural behavior of the RC wall under impact loading. The safety assessment of the building is performed with regard to different impact scenarios. The safety of the nuclear building under aircraft crash, including (1) global structural safety, (2) local structural safety, and (3) vibration safety are evaluated and discussed. The results show that the global and local structural safety of the PAB is ensured in all impact scenarios. However, the vibration safety of the building is not ensured. In accordance, the regulatory guide of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC), shutdown of the nuclear power plant is required.

  19. Safety and Nonsafety Communications and Interactions in International Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL; Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL

    2007-08-01

    Current industry and NRC guidance documents such as IEEE 7-4.3.2, Reg. Guide 1.152, and IEEE 603 do not sufficiently define a level of detail for evaluating interdivisional communications independence. The NRC seeks to establish criteria for safety systems communications that can be uniformly applied in evaluation of a variety of safety system designs. This report focuses strictly on communication issues related to data sent between safety systems and between safety and nonsafety systems. Further, the report does not provide design guidance for communication systems nor present detailed failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) results for existing designs. This letter report describes communications between safety and nonsafety systems in nuclear power plants outside the United States. A limited study of international nuclear power plants was conducted to ascertain important communication implementations that might have bearing on systems proposed for licensing in the United States. This report provides that following information: 1.communications types and structures used in a representative set of international nuclear power reactors, and 2.communications issues derived from standards and other source documents relevant to safety and nonsafety communications. Topics that are discussed include the following: communication among redundant safety divisions, communications between safety divisions and nonsafety systems, control of safety equipment from a nonsafety workstation, and connection of nonsafety programming, maintenance, and test equipment to redundant safety divisions during operation. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  20. Safety Education. A Guide To Help Prevent Accidents Associated with the Home, Student Transportation, Disasters, Pedestrians, Passengers, Fires, Consumerism, Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This teacher's guide presents 10 instructional units for one portion of the Texas-approved course in driver and safety education. The units cover the following topics: what is safety?; accident causation and prevention; home safety; student transportation safety; disasters; pedestrian safety; passenger safety; fire safety; consumer safety; and…

  1. Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSabatino, A; Biswas, D; DeMicco, M; Fisher, L E; Hafner, R; Haslam, J; Mok, G; Patel, C; Russell, E

    2007-04-12

    This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE Order 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his or her review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. This PRG is generally organized at the section level in a format similar to that recommended in Regulatory Guide 7.9 (RG 7.9). One notable exception is the addition of Section 9 (Quality Assurance), which is not included as a separate chapter in RG 7.9. Within each section, this PRG addresses the technical and regulatory bases for the review, the manner in which the review is accomplished, and findings that are generally applicable for a package that meets the approval standards. This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for DOE review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE O 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. The primary objectives of this PRG are to: (1) Summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval; (2) Describe the technical review procedures by which DOE determines that these requirements have been satisfied; (3) Establish and maintain the quality and uniformity of reviews; (4) Define the base from which to evaluate proposed changes in scope

  2. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs (improving or maintaining level of safety with simpler systems or in a more cost-effective manner).

  3. Pilot plants for polymers: Safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordeiro, C.F.; Zvanut, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Air Products and Chemicals is a major manufacturer of polyvinyl alcohol, vinyl acetate-ethylene emulsions and suspension PVC. Polyvinyl alcohol is a water soluble polymer and its primary end-uses are as a textile sizing agent and in adhesives. The emulsion products are used primarily in adhesives, paper, paints, and non-wovens. In order to support these business areas and to expand into new product lines, Air Products operates several polymer pilot plants. The safe operation of these pilot plants mandates careful attention to both design and operating procedures. Often, more care is needed in operating a polymer pilot plant than in other pilot plants or manufacturing facilities.

  4. Woody plants and woody plant management: ecology, safety, environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    2001-01-01

    Wise and effective woody plant management is an increasing necessity for many land uses and conservation practices, especially on forests and rangelands where native or exotic plants are affecting productivity, access, or critical habitat. Tools and approaches for managing woody plants have been under concerted development for the past 50 years, integrating mechanical...

  5. Food and feed safety aspects of cisgenic crop plant varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.W.; Kok, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of the discussions that identified food and feed safety aspects of cisgenic plant varieties in comparison to conventional varieties on the one hand and transgenic plant varieties on the other hand. It was concluded that on the basis of the general characteristics of

  6. Comparative safety assessment of plant-derived foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, E J; Keijer, J; Kleter, G A; Kuiper, H A

    2008-02-01

    The second generation of genetically modified (GM) plants that are moving towards the market are characterized by modifications that may be more complex and traits that more often are to the benefit of the consumer. These developments will have implications for the safety assessment of the resulting plant products. In part of the cases the same crop plant can, however, also be obtained by 'conventional' breeding strategies. The breeder will decide on a case-by-case basis what will be the best strategy to reach the set target and whether genetic modification will form part of this strategy. This article discusses important aspects of the safety assessment of complex products derived from newly bred plant varieties obtained by different breeding strategies. On the basis of this overview, we conclude that the current process of the safety evaluation of GM versus conventionally bred plants is not well balanced. GM varieties are elaborately assessed, yet at the same time other crop plants resulting from conventional breeding strategies may warrant further food safety assessment for the benefit of the consumer. We propose to develop a general screening frame for all newly developed plant varieties to select varieties that cannot, on the basis of scientific criteria, be considered as safe as plant varieties that are already on the market.

  7. Evolution of the future plants operation for a better safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papin, B.; Malvache, P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a coordinated research project of the french CEA, addressing to the evolutions in plant operation apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvement in the operational safety. This program has been scheduled for the 1992-1996 period, with a global 40 men/year effort. The present status of the two main parts of the project is presented: ESCRIME (program aiming at defining the optimal share of tasks between humans and computers in plant operation), IMAGIN (research in the domain of plant information management, in order to ensure the global coherence of the image of the plant, used by the different actors in plant operation). (authors). 3 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. • The concepts of Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. • Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) and Objective Provision Tree (OPT) were performed and updated. • This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. - Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate safety issues using Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM) proposed by Generation IV Forum Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO). In ongoing nuclear energy research such as Generation IV fission power plant (GEN-IV), new methodology based on Technology-Neutral Framework (TNF) has been applied for safety assessment. In this methodology, design and regulatory requirements for safety of nuclear power plants are considered simultaneously. The design based on regulatory requirements can save resource, time, and manpower while maintaining high level safety. ISAM is one of the options to apply TNF in K-DEMO. We have performed safety studies for K-DEMO using Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) and Objective Provision Tree (OPT) which are constitutive part of ISAM. Considering the design phase of K-DEMO, the current study focused on PIRT and OPT for K-DEMO. Results have been reviewed and updated by Korean fusion advisory group after considering the views of specialists from domestic universities, industries, and national institutes in South Korea.

  9. Safety critical systems handbook a straightforward guide to functional safety : IEC 61508 (2010 edition) and related standards

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David J

    2010-01-01

    Electrical, electronic and programmable electronic systems increasingly carry out safety functions to guard workers and the public against injury or death and the environment against pollution. The international functional safety standard IEC 61508 was revised in 2010, and this is the first comprehensive guide available to the revised standard. As functional safety is applicable to many industries, this book will have a wide readership beyond the chemical and process sector, including oil and gas, power generation, nuclear, aircraft, and automotive industries, plus project, instrumentation, design, and control engineers. * The only comprehensive guide to IEC 61508, updated to cover the 2010 amendments, that will ensure engineers are compliant with the latest process safety systems design and operation standards* Helps readers understand the process required to apply safety critical systems standards* Real-world approach helps users to interpret the standard, with case studies and best practice design examples...

  10. A study on safety assessment methodology for a vitrification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. C.; Lee, G. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Kim, G. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In this study, the technical and regulatory status of radioactive waste vitrification technologies in foreign and domestic plants is investigated and analyzed, and then significant factors are suggested which must be contained in the final technical guideline or standard for the safety assessment of vitrification plants. Also, the methods to estimate the stability of vitrified waste forms are suggested with property analysis of them. The contents and scope of the study are summarized as follows : survey of the status on radioactive waste vitrification technologies in foreign and domestic plants, survey of the characterization methodology for radioactive waste form, analysis of stability for vitrified waste forms, survey and analysis of technical standards and regulations concerned with them in foreign and domestic plants, suggestion of significant factors for the safety assessment of vitrification plants, submission of regulated technical standard on radioactive waste vitrification plats.

  11. Work practices, fatigue, and nuclear power plant safety performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K; Olson, J; Morisseau, D

    1994-06-01

    This paper focuses on work practices that may contribute to fatigue-induced performance decrements in the commercial nuclear power industry. Specifically, the amount of overtime worked by operations, technical, and maintenance personnel and the 12-h operator shift schedule are studied. Although overtime for all three job categories was fairly high at a number of plants, the analyses detected a clear statistical relationship only between operations overtime and plant safety performance. The results for the 12-h operator shift schedule were ambiguous. Although the 12-h operator shift schedule was correlated with operator error, it was not significantly related to the other five safety indicators. This research suggests that at least one of the existing work practices--the amount of operator overtime worked at some plants--represents a safety concern in this industry; however, further research is required before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  12. [Safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöting, A; Schauzu, M

    2010-06-01

    The placing of genetically modified plants and derived food on the market falls under Regulation (EC) No. 1829/2003. According to this regulation, applicants need to perform a safety assessment according to the Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. This article gives an overview of the underlying legislation as well as the strategy and scientific criteria for the safety assessment, which should generally be based on the concept of substantial equivalence and carried out in relation to an unmodified conventional counterpart. Besides the intended genetic modification, potential unintended changes also have to be assessed with regard to potential adverse effects for the consumer. All genetically modified plants and derived food products, which have been evaluated by EFSA so far, were considered to be as safe as products derived from the respective conventional plants.

  13. Mathematical Safety Assessment Approaches for Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong-Xiao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to use system analysis methods to identify the hazards in the industrialized process, working environment, and production management for complex industrial processes, such as thermal power plants, is one of the challenges in the systems engineering. A mathematical system safety assessment model is proposed for thermal power plants in this paper by integrating fuzzy analytical hierarchy process, set pair analysis, and system functionality analysis. In the basis of those, the key factors influencing the thermal power plant safety are analyzed. The influence factors are determined based on fuzzy analytical hierarchy process. The connection degree among the factors is obtained by set pair analysis. The system safety preponderant function is constructed through system functionality analysis for inherence properties and nonlinear influence. The decision analysis system is developed by using active server page technology, web resource integration, and cross-platform capabilities for applications to the industrialized process. The availability of proposed safety assessment approach is verified by using an actual thermal power plant, which has improved the enforceability and predictability in enterprise safety assessment.

  14. Periodic safety review of French nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirrier, D.; Debes, M. [Electricite de France, Paris (France)

    1997-12-01

    The safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is checked through different types of safety evaluations, for example, a continuous process, with followup of operational feedback and over-all evaluation every year by each NPP; specific examination, with the study of generic problems when they occur; and a 10-yr outage inspection. In France, the license does not explicitly require periodic safety reviews (PSRs), but an article has been added to the Decree of December 11, 1963 concerning nuclear installations that states, {open_quotes}The Ministers may jointly request the operating utility at any time to proceed to a review of nuclear safety,{close_quotes} which supports requests for PSRs from the safety authority.

  15. IR-360 nuclear power plant safety functions and component classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefpour, F., E-mail: fyousefpour@snira.co [Management of Nuclear Power Plant Construction Company (MASNA) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, F.; Soltani, H. [Management of Nuclear Power Plant Construction Company (MASNA) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The IR-360 nuclear power plant as a 2-loop PWR of 360 MWe power generation capacity is under design in MASNA Company. For design of the IR-360 structures, systems and components (SSCs), the codes and standards and their design requirements must be determined. It is a prerequisite to classify the IR-360 safety functions and safety grade of structures, systems and components correctly for selecting and adopting the suitable design codes and standards. This paper refers to the IAEA nuclear safety codes and standards as well as USNRC standard system to determine the IR-360 safety functions and to formulate the principles of the IR-360 component classification in accordance with the safety philosophy and feature of the IR-360. By implementation of defined classification procedures for the IR-360 SSCs, the appropriate design codes and standards are specified. The requirements of specific codes and standards are used in design process of IR-360 SSCs by design engineers of MASNA Company. In this paper, individual determination of the IR-360 safety functions and definition of the classification procedures and roles are presented. Implementation of this work which is described with example ensures the safety and reliability of the IR-360 nuclear power plant.

  16. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. Methods The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Results Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. Discussion This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety. PMID:26406893

  17. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety.

  18. A proposal of safety indicators aggregation to assess the safety management effectiveness of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Jose Antonio B.; Saldanha, Pedro L.C. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao-Geral de Reatores e Ciclo Combustivel], e-mail: jantonio@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: saldanha@cnen.gov.br; Melo, Paulo F.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: frutuoso@con.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    Safety management has changed with the evolution of management methods, named Quality Systems, moving from Quality Control, where the focus was the product, passing through Quality Assurance, which takes care of the whole manufacturing process and reaching the Total Quality Management, where policies and goals are established. Nowadays, there is a trend towards Management Systems, which integrate all different aspects related to the management of an organization (safety, environment, security, quality, costs and, etc), but it is necessary to have features to establish and assure that safety overrides the remaining aspects. The most usual way to reach this goal is to establish a policy where safety is a priority, but its implementation and the assessment of its effectiveness are no so simple. Nuclear power plants usually have over a hundred safety indicators in many processes dedicated to prevent and detect problems, although a lot of them do not evaluate these indicators in an integrated manner or point out degradation trends of organizational aspects, which can affect the plant safety. This work develops an aggregation of proactive and reactive safety indicators in order to evaluate the effectiveness of nuclear power plant safety management and to detect, at early stages, signs of process degradation or activities used to establish, maintain and assure safety conditions. The aggregation integrates indicators of the usual processes and is based on the manner the management activities have been developed in the last decades, that is: Planning, Doing, Checking and Acting - known as PDCA cycle - plus a fifth element related to the capability of those who perform safety activities. The proposed aggregation is in accordance to Brazilian standards and international recommendations and constitutes a friendly link between the top management level and the daily aspects of the organization. (author)

  19. Hydrogen energy demonstration plant in Patagonia: Description and safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprea, Jose Luis [CNEA (Argentine Atomic Energy Commission), AAH, IRAM, Comahue University, CC 805, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen safety issues and especially hydrogen hazard's address are key points to remove any safety-related barrier in the implementation process of hydrogen energy systems. Demonstrative systems based on hydrogen technologies represent a clear contribution to the task of showing the feasibility of the new technologies and their beneficial capabilities among the public. In this paper, the safety features of the first hydrogen energy demonstrative plant conceived in Latin America are analyzed. The facilities, located in the village of Pico Truncado, Patagonia, Argentina, serve to gain day-to-day experience in the production, storage, distribution, conversion and use of hydrogen in several applications. The plant uses electrolysis to generate pure hydrogen from renewable primary sources, taking advantage of the installed wind power capacity that is continually growing in the region. The installations were designed to accomplish with two primary objectives: total safety assurance and minimization of human errors. Some details of the plant, including a general layout, are presented here, in addition with design criteria, hydrogen hazards, structural precautions, gas monitoring system, existing regulations and safety requirements. (author)

  20. South Ukraine NPP: Safety improvements through Plant Computer upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenman, O. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States); Chernyshov, M. A. [Westron, LLC, 1 Acad. Proskura St., Kharkiv 61070 (Ukraine); Denning, R. S. [Battelle, 505 King Ave, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Kolesov, S. A. [NAEK Energoatom, 3 Vetrov Str., Kiev, 01032 (Ukraine); Balakan, H. H.; Bilyk, B. I.; Kuznetsov, V. I. [PO South Ukraine NPP, NAEK Energoatom, Mylolayv Region, 55000 (Ukraine); Trosman, G. [US Dept. of Energy, International Nuclear Safety Program, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes some results of the Plant Computer upgrade at the Units 2 and 3 of South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). A Plant Computer, which is also called the Computer Information System (CIS), is one of the key safety-related systems at VVER-1000 nuclear plants. The main function of the CIS is information support for the plant operators during normal and emergency operational modes. Before this upgrade, South Ukraine NPP operated out-of-date and obsolete systems. This upgrade project wax founded by the U.S. DOE in the framework of the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP). The most efficient way to improve the quality and reliability of information provided to the plant operator is to upgrade the Human-System Interface (HSI), which is the Upper Level (UL) CIS. The upgrade of the CIS data-acquisition system (DAS), which is the Lower Level (LL) CIS, would have less effect on the unit safety. Generally speaking, the lifetime of the LL CIS is much higher than one of the UL CIS. Unlike Plant Computers at the Western-designed plants, the functionality of the WER-1000 CISs includes a control function (Centralized Protection Testing) and a number of the plant equipment monitoring functions, for example, Protection and Interlock Monitoring and Turbo-Generator Temperature Monitoring. The new system is consistent with a historical migration of the format by which information is presented to the operator away from the traditional graphic displays, for example, Piping and Instrument Diagrams (P and ID's), toward Integral Data displays. The cognitive approach to information presentation is currently limited by some licensing issues, but is adapted to a greater degree with each new system. The paper provides some lessons learned on the management of the international team. (authors)

  1. Nuclear power plant safety related pump issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper summarizes of a number of pump issues raised since the Third NRC/ASME Symposium on Valve and Pump Testing in 1994. General issues discussed include revision of NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, issuance of NRC Information Notice 95-08 on ultrasonic flow meter uncertainties, relief requests for tests that are determined by the licensee to be impractical, and items in the ASME OM-1995 Code, Subsection ISTB, for pumps. The paper also discusses current pump vibration issues encountered in relief requests and plant inspections - which include smooth running pumps, absolute vibration limits, and vertical centrifugal pump vibration measurement requirements. Two pump scope issues involving boiling water reactor waterlog and reactor core isolation cooling pumps are also discussed. Where appropriate, NRC guidance is discussed.

  2. Comparative safety assessment of plant-derived foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, E.J.; Keijer, J.; Kleter, G.A.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The second generation of genetically modified (GM) plants that are moving towards the market are characterized by modifications that may be more complex and traits that more often are to the benefit of the consumer. These developments will have implications for the safety assessment of the resulting

  3. Oakland County Science Safety Series: Reference Guide for Physics and Physical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, Larry; And Others

    This reference guide is designed to organize and suggest acceptable practices and procedures for dealing with safety in the area of science instruction. It is intended for use as a reference for teachers, administrators and other school staff for planning science activities and to assist in making safety decisions in a situational context. This…

  4. Plant Science. Instructor Guide [and] Student Reference. Volume 24, Numbers 3 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, John Kevin

    This document consists of two separately published guides for a course on plant science: an instructor's guide and a student's reference manual. Each part consists of eight lessons and cover the following topics: (1) importance of plants; (2) classification of plants; (3) plant growth factors; (4) weeds, diseases, insects; (5) germination; (6)…

  5. Forklift safety a practical guide to preventing powered industrial truck incidents and injuries

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, George

    1999-01-01

    Written for the more than 1.5 million powered industrial truck operators and supervisors in general industry, as well as those in the construction and marine industries, this Second Edition provides an updated guide to training operators in safety and complying with OSHA's 1999 forklift standard. This edition of Forklift Safety includes a new chapter devoted to the new OSHA 1910.178 standard and new information regarding dock safety, narrow aisle trucks, off-dock incidents, tip-over safety, pallet safety, and carbon monoxide.

  6. Style, content and format guide for writing safety analysis documents. Volume 1, Safety analysis reports for DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of Volume 1 of this 4-volume style guide is to furnish guidelines on writing and publishing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for DOE nuclear facilities at Sandia National Laboratories. The scope of Volume 1 encompasses not only the general guidelines for writing and publishing, but also the prescribed topics/appendices contents along with examples from typical SARs for DOE nuclear facilities.

  7. HFE safety reviews of advanced nuclear power plant control rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, John

    1994-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACR's) will utilize human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role and means of interacting with the system. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of HSI's to ensure that they are designed to good HFE principles and support performance and reliability in order to protect public health and safety. However, the only available NRC guidance was developed more than ten years ago, and does not adequately address the human performance issues and technology changes associated with ACR's. Accordingly, a new approach to ACR safety reviews was developed based upon the concept of 'convergent validity'. This approach to ACR safety reviews is described.

  8. Construction safety in DOE. Part 1, Students guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handwerk, E C

    1993-08-01

    This report is the first part of a compilation of safety standards for construction activities on DOE facilities. This report covers the following areas: general safety and health provisions; occupational health and environmental control/haz mat; personal protective equipment; fire protection and prevention; signs, signals, and barricades; materials handling, storage, use, and disposal; hand and power tools; welding and cutting; electrical; and scaffolding.

  9. Development of safety assessment of nuclear power plants using indicators; Ydinvoimalaitosten turvallisuuden arvioinnin kehittaeminen tunnuslukujen avulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiippana, P.

    1997-11-01

    The study is based on an indicator system which is under development at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). The goal of this study was to define and develop both PSA-based indicators and indicators from failure statistics. As PSA-based indicators the possibility was studied to define and express the risk importance of exemptions from the Technical Specifications, failures, preventive maintenance and other disconnections of devices covered by the Technical Specifications, operating events covered by Guide YVL 1.5 and plant modifications. In this piece of research the applicability of plant specific living PSA-models used for calculation of indicators was examined. The research included both Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants in Finland. 47 refs.

  10. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  11. Health and safety at work: a guide for district nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2010-02-01

    Sickness absence across the NHS costs a billion pounds a year with accidents at work accounting for a significant proportion of that absence. Over half the major injuries in the health service are caused by avoidable slips and falls. Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 the NHS as an employer and district nurses as employees have a duty to manage health and safety effectively and to ensure that others are not put at risk by work-related activities. Breaching a requirement of health and safety law is a criminal offence so it is essential that district nurses are able to fulfil their duty and so avoid prosecution.

  12. Oil shale plant siting methodology: A guide to permits and approvals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordin, J.S.; Hill, S.; Barker, F.; Renk, R.; Dean, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report is a guide to the permits and approvals required to develop an oil shale resource. The permitting requirements of the federal government, six states (Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio), and selected county or local governments are reviewed. The permits and approvals are organized into nine categories: (1) mineral leases and rights-of-way, (2) acquisition of a water supply, (3) environmental impact statement, (4) environmental quality (air quality, water quality, waste disposal, and wildlife values), (5) historical and cultural protection, (6) land use and socioeconomics, (7) prospecting and mining, (8) safety and health, and (9) transportation and communication. This report also contains examples of the permitting process required for the startup of two hypothetical oil shale plants. The first example is for a hypothetical 50,000 barrel-per-day oil shale plant located near Rio Blanco, Colorado. This plant uses conventional open pit mining and surface (Lurgi) processing of the shale. The permitting costs for this plant, including baseline data acquisition and monitoring, exceed $2 million. The second example, a 5,000 barrel-per-day demonstration plant in eastern Montgomery County, Kentucky, is based on open pit mining and surface (Hytort) processing of the shale. Permitting costs for the demonstration plant, including an environmental impact statement, could approach $500,000. Several potential impediments to the development of an oil shale resource are identified and discussed. 33 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Consumer's Guide to Food Safety: Severe Storms and Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... considerable. OTHER Casseroles — pasta, rice based Refreeze Discard Flour, cornmeal, nuts Refreeze Refreeze Breakfast items — waffles, pancakes, bagels Refreeze Refreeze Frozen meal, entree, specialty items (pizza, sausage and biscuit, meat pie, convenience foods) Refreeze Discard Got Food Safety ...

  14. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  15. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Blake P.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides the results of a Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) conducted November 14 to 18 and November 28 to December 9, 1988. This appraisal covered the effectiveness and improvements in the RFP safety program across the site, evaluating progress to date against standards of accepted practice. The appraisal included coverage of the timeliness and effectiveness of actions taken in response to the recommendations/concerns in three previous Technical Safety Appraisals (TSAs) of RFP Bldg. 707 conducted in July 1986, Bldgs. 771/774 conducted in October/November 1986, and Bldgs. 776/777 conducted in January/February 1988. Results of this appraisal are given in Section IV for each of 14 technical safety areas at RFP. These results include a discussion, conclusions and any new safety concerns for each technical safety area. Appendix A contains a description of the system for categorizing concerns, and the concerns are tabulated in Appendix B. Appendix C reports on the evaluation of the contractor's actions and the current status of each of the 230 recommendations and concerns contained in the three previous TSA reports.

  16. Design data and safety features of commerical nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1976-06-01

    Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for 34 nuclear power units in 17 power stations in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each plant, consisting of thermal-hydraulic and nuclear factors, containment features, emergency-core-cooling systems, site features, circulating water system data, and miscellaneous factors. An aerial perspective is also presented for each plant. This volume covers Light Water Reactors (LWRs) with dockets 50-508 through 50-549, four HTGRs--50-171, 50-267, 50-450/451, 50-463/464, the Atlantic Floating Station 50-477/478, and the Clinch River Breeder 50-537.

  17. Considerations on Safety Evaluation of Safety grade Smart Transmitter in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Tae; Jeong, Choong heui [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Non-safety grade smart transmitters have been used for I and C systems of NPPs(Nuclear Power Plants). Smart transmitter is a microprocessor-based device including software and provides capability for digital signals to be communicated on top of the 4-20 mA analog signals. Recently, smart transmitters have been used for safety grade I and C systems as well as non-safety grade I and C system for SKN 3 and 4. Due to potential benefits of smart transmitter, it is anticipated smart transmitters will be widely used safety-related applications at NPPs. For those reasons, smart transmitter's technology and characteristics need to be investigated. Smart transmitters have been used for safety grade as well as non-safety grade I and C system since SKN 3 and 4. Due to potential benefits of smart transmitter, it is anticipated smart transmitters will be widely used safety-related applications at NPPs. For those reasons, smart transmitter's technology and characteristics need to be investigated. To get useful information about that, we surveyed EPRI qualification report, NRC event report, and SKN 3 and 4's review.

  18. Efficacy And Safety Of IVUS-Guided Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovic Marija

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of IVUS-guided PCI has yet to become a routine approach in invasive cardiology due to the relatively high cost of the procedure, equivocal positive results in important studies and the steep learning curve. As an additional diagnostic tool, IVUS seems to be irreplaceable in stent apposition research, edge dissections and the determination of plaque composition.

  19. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  20. Plants and parts of plants used in food supplements: an approach to their safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Carratù

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy most herbal products are sold as food supplements and are subject only to food law. A list of about 1200 plants authorised for use in food supplements has been compiled by the Italian ministry of Health. In order to review and possibly improve the ministry's list an ad hoc working group of Istituto Superiore di Sanità was requested to provide a technical and scientific opinion on plant safety. The listed plants were evaluated on the basis of their use in food, therapeutic activity, human toxicity and in no-alimentary fields. Toxicity was also assessed and plant limitations to use in food supplements were defined.

  1. Latest developments on safety analysis methodologies at the Juzbado plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurron-Cifuentes, Oscar; Ortiz-Trujillo, Diego; Blanco-Fernandez, Luis A. [ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas S. A., Juzbado Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant, Ctra. Salamanca-Ledesma, km. 26, 37015 Juzbado, Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Over the last few years the Juzbado Plant has developed and implemented several analysis methodologies to cope with specific issues regarding safety management. This paper describes the three most outstanding of them, so as to say, the Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) project, the adaptation of the MARSSIM methodology for characterization surveys of radioactive contamination spots, and the programme for the Systematic Review of the Operational Conditions of the Safety Systems (SROCSS). Several reasons motivated the decision to implement such methodologies, such as Regulator requirements, operational experience and of course, the strong commitment of ENUSA to maintain the highest standards of nuclear industry on all the safety relevant activities. In this context, since 2004 ENUSA is undertaking the ISA project, which consists on a systematic examination of plant's processes, equipment, structures and personnel activities to ensure that all relevant hazards that could result in unacceptable consequences have been adequately evaluated and the appropriate protective measures have been identified. On the other hand and within the framework of a current programme to ensure the absence of radioactive contamination spots on unintended areas, the MARSSIM methodology is being applied as a tool to conduct the radiation surveys and investigation of potentially contaminated areas. Finally, the SROCSS programme was initiated earlier this year 2009 to assess the actual operating conditions of all the systems with safety relevance, aiming to identify either potential non-conformities or areas for improvement in order to ensure their high performance after years of operation. The following paragraphs describe the key points related to these three methodologies as well as an outline of the results obtained so far. (authors)

  2. Construction safety in DOE. Part 2, Students guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handwerk, E.C.

    1993-08-01

    This report is the second part of a compilation of safety standards for construction activities on DOE facilities. This report covers the following areas: floor and wall openings; cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators, and conveyors; motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, and marine operations; excavations; concrete and masonry construction; steel erection; underground construction, caisson, cofferdams, and compressed air; demolition; blasting and the use of explosives; power transmission and distribution; rollover protective structures, overhead protection; and ladders.

  3. Guide for the Development of Safety Assessment Report (SAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    smoke grenade and associated launchers. c. Describe operating environments and specific skills for safe operation, maintenance, or disposal. 2 4. Describe...as a result of the design or use of the system. AttaOh OTSG Health Hazard Assesment (AR 40-10). 5. Conclusions and -ecommendations. a. State whethvr...FOR THE j XM52 SMOKE GENERATOR MAY 1984 CONCURRED BY; CONCURRED BY: D-2 SUBJECT: Safety Assessment Report for XM52 Smoke Generator 1.0 INTRODUCTION

  4. Construction safety in DOE. Part 2, Students guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handwerk, E.C.

    1993-08-01

    This report is the second part of a compilation of safety standards for construction activities on DOE facilities. This report covers the following areas: floor and wall openings; cranes, derricks, hoists, elevators, and conveyors; motor vehicles, mechanized equipment, and marine operations; excavations; concrete and masonry construction; steel erection; underground construction, caisson, cofferdams, and compressed air; demolition; blasting and the use of explosives; power transmission and distribution; rollover protective structures, overhead protection; and ladders.

  5. Safety and Radiation Protection at Swedish Nuclear Power Plants 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    The safety level of the plants is maintained at an acceptable level. SKI has in its regulatory supervision not found any known deficiencies in the barriers which could result in release of radioactive substances in excess of the permitted levels. SKI considers that improvements have been implemented during the year in the management, control and following up of safety work at the plants. In some cases, SKI has imposed requirements that improvements be made. Extensive measures are under way at the nuclear power plants to comply with the safety requirements in SKI's regulations, SKIFS 2004:2 concerning the design and construction of nuclear power reactors, and the stricter requirements regarding physical protection. Concurrently preparations are underway at eight of the ten units for thermal power increases. At the Forsmark plant considerable efforts have been during the year to correct the deficiencies in the safety culture and quality assurance system that became apparent in 2006. A programme to improve the execution of activities has been established in accordance with SKI's decision. SKI considers that the plant has developed in a positive direction but that there are further possibilities for improvement with regard to internal control. This is amongst other things concerns the areas internal auditing, independent safety review function, and working methods. SKI has had special supervision of the plant since 28 September, 2006. At the Oskarshamn plant work has been carried out to improve the organisation and routines in several areas. The plant has established routines which provide the basis to ensure that decisions are taken in a stringent manner. The quality assurance system has a clearer structure and there is a better defined division of work. Some measures remain to be dealt with in 2008. The Ringhals plant has also worked with attitudes to routines and internal control. SKI considers that the measures have good prerequisites to provide a

  6. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Safety Class and Safety Significant Commercial Grade Items (CGI) Critical Characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS, R.J.

    2000-04-24

    This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for use in the Plutonium Finishing Plant as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics of any one item.

  7. Fuzzy-logic-based safety verification framework for nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Achint; Gabbar, Hossam A

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a practical implementation of a safety verification framework for nuclear power plants (NPPs) based on fuzzy logic where hazard scenarios are identified in view of safety and control limits in different plant process values. Risk is estimated quantitatively and compared with safety limits in real time so that safety verification can be achieved. Fuzzy logic is used to define safety rules that map hazard condition with required safety protection in view of risk estimate. Case studies are analyzed from NPP to realize the proposed real-time safety verification framework. An automated system is developed to demonstrate the safety limit for different hazard scenarios.

  8. Plant natural variability may affect safety assessment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rita; Oliveira, Margarida

    2010-12-01

    Before market introduction, genetic engineered (GE) food products, like any other novel food product, are subjected to extensive assessment of their potential effects on human health. In recent years, a number of profiling technologies have been explored aiming to increase the probability of detecting any unpredictable unintended effect and, consequently improving the efficiency of GE food safety assessment. These techniques still present limitations associated with the interpretation of the observed differences with respect to their biological relevance and toxicological significance. In order to address this issue, in this study, we have performed 2D-gel electrophoresis of five different ears of five different MON810 maize plants and of other five of the non-transgenic near-isogenic line. We have also performed 2D-gel electrophoresis of the pool of the five protein extractions of MON810 and control lines. We have notice that, in this example, the exclusive use of data from 2D-electrophoresed pooled samples, to compare these two lines, would be insufficient for an adequate safety evaluation. We conclude that, when using "omics" technologies, it is extremely important to eliminate all potential differences due to factors not related to the ones under study, and to understand the role of natural plant-to-plant variability in the encountered differences.

  9. A Guide to Instruction in the Shooting Sports-Rifles; Air Rifles; Shotguns; Pistols; Hunter Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, Roy K.; And Others

    Prepared for instruction in the use of rifles, air guns, shotguns, pistols, and hunter safety, this guide supplements other materials which are available from the National Rifle Association of America, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, industry, and other sources. The…

  10. Hazard screening application guide. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-06-01

    The basic purpose of hazard screening is to group precesses, facilities, and proposed modifications according to the magnitude of their hazards so as to determine the need for and extent of follow on safety analysis. A hazard is defined as a material, energy source, or operation that has the potential to cause injury or illness in human beings. The purpose of this document is to give guidance and provide standard methods for performing hazard screening. Hazard screening is applied to new and existing facilities and processes as well as to proposed modifications to existing facilities and processes. The hazard screening process evaluates an identified hazards in terms of the effects on people, both on-site and off-site. The process uses bounding analyses with no credit given for mitigation of an accident with the exception of certain containers meeting DOT specifications. The process is restricted to human safety issues only. Environmental effects are addressed by the environmental program. Interfaces with environmental organizations will be established in order to share information.

  11. Ultrasound-guided Thrombin Injection: An Alternative Treatment for Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Better Efficiency and Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghai YAO; Hongliang CONG; Shangqin WU; Shan SUN; Qike DONG; Dongmei CHEN; Peng LI

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and safety of ultrasound-guided thrombin injection on femoral pseudoaneurysm (FPA) as compared to ultrasound-guided local oppression. Eleven cases of FPA were enrolled and 7 cases received ultrasound-guide thrombin injection (injection group), and the remaining 4 cases were treated with local oppression (oppression group). Efficiency and safety were analyzed by ultrasound and subsequent follow-up. The results showed that 1 case relapsed in oppression group while no relapse occurred in thrombin injection group. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection is better for treatment of FPA in terms of effectiveness and safety.

  12. Fruit and Vegetable Production Unit for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Instructor's Guide. Volume 16, Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; Mullinix, Mark K.

    This curriculum guide, part of a plant science core curriculum, consists of materials for use in teaching a unit on fruit and vegetable production. Provided in the first part of the guide are a list of objectives, a bibliography, and a competency profile. The remainder of the guide consists of 11 lessons dealing with the following topics: planning…

  13. Development of a dynamical systems model of plant programmatic performance on nuclear power plant safety risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Stephen M. [Sensortex, Inc., 515 Schoolhouse Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348 (United States)]. E-mail: smhess@sensortex.com; Albano, Alfonso M. [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Gaertner, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to model nuclear power plant accident sequences has provided a significant contribution to understanding the potential initiating events, equipment failures and operator errors that can lead to core damage accidents. Application of the lessons learned from these analyses has resulted in significant improvements in plant operation and safety. However, this approach has not been nearly as successful in addressing the impact of plant processes and management effectiveness on the risks of plant operation. The research described in this paper presents an alternative approach to addressing this issue. In this paper we propose a dynamical systems model that describes the interaction of important plant processes on nuclear safety risk. We discuss development of the mathematical model including the identification and interpretation of significant inter-process interactions. Next, we review the techniques applicable to analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems that are utilized in the characterization of the model. This is followed by a preliminary analysis of the model that demonstrates that its dynamical evolution displays features that have been observed at commercially operating plants. From this analysis, several significant insights are presented with respect to the effective control of nuclear safety risk. As an important example, analysis of the model dynamics indicates that significant benefits in effectively managing risk are obtained by integrating the plant operation and work management processes such that decisions are made utilizing a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach. We note that although the model was developed specifically to be applicable to nuclear power plants, many of the insights and conclusions obtained are likely applicable to other process industries.

  14. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  15. 78 FR 25488 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' DG-1235 is proposed Revision 1 of RG... Stations in order to demonstrate their ability to perform their intended safety functions under...

  16. Havsnaes Wind Farm. A guide on Health and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wettin, Martina [Goovinn, Goeteborg (Sweden); Jiven, Anna [Nordisk Vindkraft, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    This guide has been developed by Nordisk Vindkraft in co-operation with Energimyndigheten (the Swedish Energy Agency). The main purpose is to raise the attention to work environment matters when developing, constructing and operating large-scale wind farms in the northern parts of Sweden. The Swedish wind industry is relatively young. Work Environment Management and legal awareness has been identified by the Swedish Government as one crucial factor for ensuring sound and rapid development of the industry. Havsnaes is to date the largest onshore wind farm in Sweden. Whilst developing this project, Nordisk Vindkraft has gained extensive experience and developed a profound understanding of the prerequisites for the Swedish large-scale wind industry. The wind farm's size, complexity and geographical location near Stroemsund in Jaemtland qualify the project as an excellent pilot study. Preventing accidents and ill-health largely depends on your knowledge, competence and the resources you are able and willing to spend. The key for success is a pro-active approach. During the Havsnaes project, Nordisk Vindkraft has spent considerable amount of time and effort on the management of Work Environment. We hope our gained experience will be beneficial for our industry as a whole.

  17. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have to be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry. Good

  18. 78 FR 67206 - Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Qualification Tests for Safety-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear...-Related Actuators in Nuclear Power Plants.'' This RG is being revised to provide applicants and licensees with the most current information on testing safety-related actuators in nuclear power plants. This...

  19. 76 FR 35861 - Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant AGENCY: Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. ACTION... Treatment and Immobilization Plant located at the Hanford site in the state of Washington. DATES: Comments... Safety Culture at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. Sec....

  20. It's No Accident: A Consumer Product Safety Education Curriculum Resource Guide for Teachers of Grades 3 through 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    This guide for teachers contains product safety information appropriate for young children and suggests learning activities for third through sixth graders. Activities encourage children to examine their home environments for safety hazards and to share this information with family and friends. Unit 1 introduces five basic safety concepts upon…

  1. Safety and Radiation Protection at Swedish Nuclear Power Plants 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-15

    In 2005, no severe events occurred which challenged the safety at the Swedish nuclear power plants. However, some events have been given a special focus. The 'Gudrun' storm, which occurred in January 2005, affected the operation of the reactors at Ringhals and Barsebaeck 2. At Ringhals, the switchyards were affected by salt deposits and, at Barsebaeck, the 400kV grid was subjected to interruptions. The long-term trend is that the total number of fuel defects in Swedish reactors is decreasing. The damage that occurs nowadays has mainly been caused by small objects entering the fuel via the coolant and fretting holes in the cladding. To reduce the number of defects of this type, fuel with filters is successively being introduced to prevent debris from entering the fuel assemblies and cyclone filters in the facility which cleans the coolant. Since the mid-nineties, the pressurised water reactors, Ringhals 2, 3 and 4, have had problems with fuel rod bowing in excess of the safety analysis calculations. Ringhals AB (RAB) has adopted measures to rectify the bowing. Follow-up work shows that the fuel rod bowing is decreasing. The followup in 2005 of damaged tubes in the Ringhals 4 steam generators indicates a continued slow damage propagation. Tubes with defects of such a limited extent that there are adequate margins to rupture and loosening have been kept in operation. Damaged tubes with insufficient margins have plugged. During the year, previously observed minor leakage from the reactor containment in Ringhals 2 was investigated in greater detail and repaired. The investigations showed extensive corrosion attack caused by deficiencies in connection with containment construction. The ageing of electrical cables and other equipment in the I-C systems has been examined by SKI. Regulatory supervision has so far shown that these issues are largely handled in a satisfactory manner by the licensees but that certain supplementary investigations and other measures

  2. The SAFER guides: empowering organizations to improve the safety and effectiveness of electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to improve quality and safety of healthcare. However, EHR users have experienced safety concerns from EHR design and usability features that are not optimally adapted for the complex work flow of real-world practice. Few strategies exist to address unintended consequences from implementation of EHRs and other health information technologies. We propose that organizations equipped with EHRs should consider the strategy of "proactive risk assessment" of their EHR-enabled healthcare system to identify and address EHR-related safety concerns. In this paper, we describe the conceptual underpinning of an EHR-related self-assessment strategy to provide institutions a foundation upon which they could build their safety efforts. With support from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), we used a rigorous, iterative process to develop a set of 9 self-assessment tools to optimize the safety and safe use of EHRs. These tools, referred to as the Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, could be used to self-assess safety and effectiveness of EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and create solutions and culture change to mitigate risks. A variety of audiences could conduct these assessments, including frontline clinicians or care teams in different practices, or clinical, quality, or administrative leaders within larger institutions. The guides use a multifaceted systems-based approach to assess risk and empower organizations to work with internal or external stakeholders (eg, EHR developers) on optimizing EHR functionality and using EHRs to drive improvements in the quality and safety of healthcare.

  3. In-plant safety/relief valve discharge load test, Monticello Plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzek, E.A. (comp.)

    1977-08-01

    This document reports the results of the test program of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharge load phenomena through a ramshead discharge device, and the effects upon the Mark I primary containment torus structure of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives were to provide a data base for verifying/improving bubble pressure, water reflood and piping load analytical models, and to measure the structural response of the torus, SRV piping, supports and acceleration of the basement and pedestal.

  4. Evaluation of overhead guide sign sheeting materials to increase visibility and safety for drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Mohammed Said; Rys, Malgorzata J; Rys, Andrew; Du, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Overhead guide sign visibility must increase to improve driver safety on roadways. Two methods increase overhead guide sign visibility: sign illumination and use of retroreflective sheeting materials. This paper compares three types of retroreflective sheeting: Engineering Grade (type I), Diamond Grade (type XI), and High Intensity (type IV). A field experiment was conducted at night using licensed drivers to determine the optimum retroreflective sheeting material that increases sign visibility and legibility. Results showed that, of the three types of retroreflective sheeting, Diamond Grade (type XI) sheeting requires minimum illuminance to be visible, followed by High Intensity (type IV) sheeting. Cost analysis, including labor, maintenance, and material cost components of the three retroreflective sheeting materials, showed that High Intensity (type IV) could increase sign visibility and legibility at night for Departments of Transportation with limited budgets, consequently increasing driver safety on roadways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 1 - guideword applicability and method description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    Layout planning plays a key role in the inherent safety performance of process plants since this design feature controls the possibility of accidental chain-events and the magnitude of possible consequences. A lack of suitable methods to promote the effective implementation of inherent safety in layout design calls for the development of new techniques and methods. In the present paper, a safety assessment approach suitable for layout design in the critical early phase is proposed. The concept of inherent safety is implemented within this safety assessment; the approach is based on an integrated assessment of inherent safety guideword applicability within the constraints typically present in layout design. Application of these guidewords is evaluated along with unit hazards and control devices to quantitatively map the safety performance of different layout options. Moreover, the economic aspects related to safety and inherent safety are evaluated by the method. Specific sub-indices are developed within the integrated safety assessment system to analyze and quantify the hazard related to domino effects. The proposed approach is quick in application, auditable and shares a common framework applicable in other phases of the design lifecycle (e.g. process design). The present work is divided in two parts: Part 1 (current paper) presents the application of inherent safety guidelines in layout design and the index method for safety assessment; Part 2 (accompanying paper) describes the domino hazard sub-index and demonstrates the proposed approach with a case study, thus evidencing the introduction of inherent safety features in layout design.

  6. Technical basis for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hassan, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tanaka, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of studies sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. The studies were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The studies address the following: (1) adequacy of the present test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred (i.e., Regulatory Guide-endorsed) standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging for equipment to be located in a benign environment; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach for addressing the impact of smoke in digital equipment qualification programs. Significant findings from the studies form the technical basis for a recommended approach to the environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants.

  7. An integrated design methodology for the safety and security of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, S. Y.; Chang, S. H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    After Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, safety of nuclear power plant was issued. In Fukushima accident, one of main reason is location of emergency diesel power generators stop which locate under the sea water level when tsunami occurred. In view of security, emergency diesel generator location under reactor building design is good because for example to escape air strike but is not good for safety for example Fukushima accident. Sometimes safety and security design looks conflicting but nuclear safety and nuclear security share the goal of protecting but nuclear safety and nuclear power plants operate at acceptable risk levels. The purpose of this paper is to introduce safety and security integrated design for nuclear power plant in special emergency diesel generator and control room with simple probabilistic safety assessment analysis.

  8. 76 FR 2726 - Withdrawal of Regulatory Guide 1.154

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Regulatory Guide 1.154, ``Format and Content of Plant-Specific Pressurized Thermal Shock Safety Analysis... Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.154, ``Format and Content of Plant-Specific Pressurized Thermal Shock Safety Analysis... format and content acceptable to the NRC staff for plant-specific pressurized thermal shock (PTS)...

  9. Steam generator tube degradation at the Doel 4 plant influence on plant operation and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheveneels, G. [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-02-01

    The steam generator tubes of Doel 4 are affected by a multitude of corrosion phenomena. Some of them have been very difficult to manage because of their extremely fast evolution, non linear evolution behavior or difficult detectability and/or measurability. The exceptional corrosion behavior of the steam generator tubes has had its drawbacks on plant operation and safety. Extensive inspection and repair campaigns have been necessary and have largely increased outage times and radiation exposure to personnel. Although considerable effort was invested by the utility to control corrosion problems, non anticipated phenomena and/or evolution have jeopardized plant safety. The extensive plugging and repairs performed on the steam generators have necessitated continual review of the design basis safety studies and the adaptation of the protection system setpoints. The large asymmetric plugging has further complicated these reviews. During the years many preventive and recently also defence measures have been implemented by the utility to manage corrosion and to decrease the probability and consequences of single or multiple tube rupture. The present state of the Doel 4 steam generators remains troublesome and further examinations are performed to evaluate if continued operation until June `96, when the steam generators will be replaced, is justified.

  10. Views on safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants; Syn paa saekerhetskultur vid svenska och finska kaernkraftverk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammar, L. [ES-konsulent, (Sweden); Wahlstroem, B.; Kettunen, J. [VTT Automation (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    The report presents the results of interviews about safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants. The aim is to promote the safety work and increase the debate about safety in nuclear power plants, by showing that the safety culture is an important safety factor. The interviews point out different threats, which may become real. It is therefor necessary that the safety aspects get support from of the society and the power plant owners. (EHS)

  11. 77 FR 15399 - Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is announcing the availability of the model safety evaluation (SE) for plant..., Revision 1, is available in ADAMS under Accession No. ML111650552; the model application is available...

  12. 77 FR 27814 - Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force... availability. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is announcing the availability of the model safety evaluation (SE) for plant-specific adoption of Technical Specifications (TSs) Task Force...

  13. 33 CFR 165.115 - Safety and Security Zones; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant, Plymouth, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 165.115 Section 165.115 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.115 Safety and Security Zones; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant,...

  14. Safety Culture Assessment in Petrochemical Industry: A Comparative Study of Two Algerian Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assia Boughaba

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The comparison between the two petrochemical plants of the group Sonatrach confirms these results in which Company A, the managers of which are English and Norwegian, distinguishes itself by the maturity of their safety culture has significantly higher evaluations than the company B, who is constituted of Algerian staff, in terms of safety management practices and safety performance.

  15. Preliminary report: in-plant safety/relief valve discharge load test, Monticello Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.C. (comp.)

    1976-12-01

    This preliminary report covers the results of the test program of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharge load phenomena and the effects upon the Mark I primary containment torus structure of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the test were to provide a data base for verifying/improving analytical models and to measure the structural response of the torus to SRV discharges. Objectives, instrumentation, and test plan are described. Results of continuing data evaluation will be included in the final report scheduled for publication later in 1977.

  16. Determining safety criteria for reinforced concrete structures of power plants taking the example of a nuclear power plant with RBMK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolayev Valery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows how safety criteria of nuclear power plants with reactor RBMK can be defined based on analytical, numerical and mixed calculation methods using data about strength characteristics of materials with the course of time.

  17. User's guide to the steel plant simulation model. [GASP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.G.; Moodie, C.L.

    1976-08-01

    This is a guide to using the modified GASP IV steel plant simulation originally developed by Mackulak. It is a complex model and hopefully this guide will facilitate understanding and using the simulation. A descriptive overview of the model and presentation of the program code is the basis of this guide. Also source deck structure and input data deck set-up will be presented. It is hoped that this guide will provide a satisfactory starting point for those interested in using this model.

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Fiducial Marker Implantation for CyberKnife Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Hong, Seong; Sook; Kim, Jung Hoon; Park, Hyun Jeong; Chang, Yun Woo; Chang, A Ram [Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Seok Beom [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the safety and technical success rate of an ultrasound-guided fiducial marker implantation in preparation for CyberKnife radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 270 percutaneous ultrasound-guided fiducial marker implantations in 77 patients, which were performed from June 2008 through March 2011. Of 270 implantations, 104 were implanted in metastatic lymph nodes, 96 were in the liver, 39 were in the pancreas, and 31 were in the prostate. During and after the implantation, major and minor procedure-related complications were documented. We defined technical success as the implantation enabling adequate treatment planning and CT simulation. The major and minor complication rates were 1% and 21%, respectively. One patient who had an implantation in the liver suffered severe abdominal pain, biloma, and pleural effusion, which were considered as major complication. Abdominal pain was the most common complication in 11 patients (14%). Among nine patients who had markers inserted in the prostate, one had transient hematuria for less than 24 hours, and the other experienced transient voiding difficulty. Of the 270 implantations, 261 were successful (97%). The reasons for unsuccessful implantations included migration of fiducial markers (five implantations, 2%) and failure to discriminate the fiducial markers (three implantations, 1%). Among the unsuccessful implantation cases, six patients required additional procedures (8%). The symptomatic complications following ultrasound-guided percutaneous implantation of fiducial markers are relatively low. However, careful consideration of the relatively higher rate of migration and discrimination failure is needed when performing ultrasound-guided percutaneous implantations of fiducial markers.

  19. An integrated safety for business analysis of process plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, J.E.A.; Gort, J.; Kamperveen, J.P.; Zwanikken, S.L.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study a safety assessment technique is described, in which the contributions of a number of technical and organisational aspects of safety can be compared and quantified. Results can be used for input in recommendations regarding investment decisions, and for development of safety performanc

  20. Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Diane G O

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous pathogens pose a substantial threat to global food security. One central question in plant pathology is how pathogens cause infection and manage to evade or suppress plant immunity to promote disease. With many technological advances over the past decade, including DNA sequencing technology, an array of new tools has become embedded within the toolbox of next-generation plant pathologists. By employing a multidisciplinary approach plant pathologists can fully leverage these technical advances to answer key questions in plant pathology, aimed at achieving global food security. This review discusses the impact of: cell biology and genetics on progressing our understanding of infection structure formation on the leaf surface; biochemical and molecular analysis to study how pathogens subdue plant immunity and manipulate plant processes through effectors; genomics and DNA sequencing technologies on all areas of plant pathology; and new forms of collaboration on accelerating exploitation of big data. As we embark on the next phase in plant pathology, the integration of systems biology promises to provide a holistic perspective of plant–pathogen interactions from big data and only once we fully appreciate these complexities can we design truly sustainable solutions to preserve our resources.

  1. Analysis and insights from a dynamical model of nuclear plant safety risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Stephen M. [Electric Power Research Institute, 30 Bethel Road, Glen Mills, PA 19342 (United States)]. E-mail: shess@epri.com; Albano, Alfonso M. [School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, 90 Stamford Road, Singapore 178903 (Singapore); Gaertner, John P. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we expand upon previously reported results of a dynamical systems model for the impact of plant processes and programmatic performance on nuclear plant safety risk. We utilize both analytical techniques and numerical simulations typical of the analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems to obtain insights important for effective risk management. This includes use of bifurcation diagrams to show that period doubling bifurcations and regions of chaotic dynamics can occur. We also investigate the impact of risk mitigating functions (equipment reliability and loss prevention) on plant safety risk and demonstrate that these functions are capable of improving risk to levels that are better than those that are represented in a traditional risk assessment. Next, we analyze the system response to the presence of external noise and obtain some conclusions with respect to the allocation of resources to ensure that safety is maintained at optimal levels. In particular, we demonstrate that the model supports the importance of management and regulator attention to plants that have demonstrated poor performance by providing an external stimulus to obtain desired improvements. Equally important, the model suggests that excessive intervention, by either plant management or regulatory authorities, can have a deleterious impact on safety for plants that are operating with very effective programs and processes. Finally, we propose a modification to the model that accounts for the impact of plant risk culture on process performance and plant safety risk. We then use numerical simulations to demonstrate the important safety benefits of a strong risk culture.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Treating Small Solid Pancreatic Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Seo, Dong Wan; Dhir, Vinay; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2016-01-01

    The strategy for treating small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms--such as neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN)--is surgical resection. However, pancreatic resection of these lesions still causes significant morbidity. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided ethanol ablation to treat small solid pancreatic neoplasms. A total of 8 patients with small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms and co-morbidities who refused surgery were included. We identified 2 cases of nonfunctioning NET, 3 cases of insulinomas, 1 case of gastrinoma, and 2 cases of SPN. EUS-guided ethanol ablation was performed, and treatment outcomes were assessed with clinical symptom, hormone assay, and imaging study. The mean tumor diameter was 15  mm (range, 7-29  mm), and the median volume of injected ethanol was 2.8  mL (range, 1.2-10.5  mL). There was 1 severe acute pancreatitis after EUS-guided ethanol ablation with 20-gauge CPN needle. During follow-up (median 16.5 months), 6 patients achieved treatment success; however, 2 patients (1 nonfunctioning NET and 1 SPN) still had persistent tumors. The patient with persistent SPN underwent surgical resection and the histopathological results showed peripancreatic infiltration with perineural invasion. Among 6 patients who achieved initial treatment success, 1 patient experienced tumor recurrence within 15 months and underwent repeated EUS-guided ethanol ablation. In conclusion, EUS-guided ethanol ablation therapy is a promising option for patients with small solid pancreatic neoplasm. Multiple sessions or surgical interventions may be required if there is a recurrent or persistent mass, and procedure-related adverse events must be carefully monitored.

  3. 1996-97 Buying Guide - Power Plant Products and Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This buyers guide for the electric power industry contains a product index and directory, a services index and directory, and a company listing (gives the company name and address, and where possible the telephone and fax number and e-mailing addresses).

  4. Ultrasonography-guided Transthoracic Cutting Biopsy of Pulmonary Lesion: Diagnostic Benefits and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mei Ah; Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ohm, Joon Young [Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To assess the safety and usefulness of ultrasonography-guided transthoracic cutting biopsy for lung lesions. Eighty-eight patients (66 men, 22 women, mean age 59 years) with lung lesions underwent an ultrasonography(USG)-guided transthoracic cutting biopsy. The final diagnosis was based on the findings of surgery and clinical and radiological follow-ups. The histopathologic results and diagnostic accuracy of cutting biopsy were determined. Also, the complication rate was statistically evaluated according to the mass size, number of biopsies, and the presence or absence of pleural effusion. Biopsy specimens were successfully obtained in all patients. 79 of 88 lesions (89.8%) were established by histopathology. The final diagnosis was malignant in 58 and benign in 28. The remaining 2 patients were lost to follow-up. Diagnostic sensitivity for malignant lesions was 89.6% (52/58) and that for benign lesions was 96.4% (27/28). Procedure-related complications occurred in 9 patients (10.2%) including pneumothorax (n = 2) and hemoptysis (n = 7). And there was no significant difference according to mass size, number of biopsies, or presence of pleural effusion. USG-guided transthoracic cutting biopsy is a useful and safe method for technically-feasible lung lesions

  5. Forum for fire protection and safety in power plants[Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The conference contains 16 presentations on topics in the fields of fire protection and safety in plants in Western Norway, reorganization and reconstruction of power systems and plants in Norway, various aspects of risk and vulnerability analysis, technological aspects of plant management and construction and problems and risks with particularly transformers. Some views on challenges of the fire departments and the new Norwegian regulations for electrical power supply systems are included. One presentation deals with challenges for Icelandic power production plants.

  6. A cross-cultural study of organizational factors on safety: Japanese vs. Taiwanese oil refinery plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang Hwa; Lee, Chun-Chia; Wu, Muh-Cherng; Takano, Kenichi

    2008-01-01

    This study attempts to identify idiosyncrasies of organizational factors on safety and their influence mechanisms in Taiwan and Japan. Data were collected from employees of Taiwanese and Japanese oil refinery plants. Results show that organizational factors on safety differ in the two countries. Organizational characteristics in Taiwanese plants are highlighted as: higher level of management commitment to safety, harmonious interpersonal relationship, more emphasis on safety activities, higher devotion to supervision, and higher safety self-efficacy, as well as high quality of safety performance. Organizational characteristics in Japanese plants are highlighted as: higher level of employee empowerment and attitude towards continuous improvement, more emphasis on systematic safety management approach, efficient reporting system and teamwork, and high quality of safety performance. The casual relationships between organizational factors and workers' safety performance were investigated using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results indicate that the influence mechanisms of organizational factors in Taiwan and Japan are different. These findings provide insights into areas of safety improvement in emerging countries and developed countries respectively.

  7. Analysis of safety information for nuclear power plants and development of source term estimation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Hee [Atomic Creative Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    Current CARE(Computerized Advisory System for Radiological Emergency) in KINS(Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) has no STES(Source Term Estimation System) which links between SIDS(Safety Information Display System) and FADAS(Following Accident Dose Assessment System). So in this study, STES is under development. STES system is the system that estimates the source term based on the safety information provided by SIDS. Estimated source term is given to FADAS as an input for estimation of environmental effect of radiation. Through this first year project STES for the Kori 3,4 and Younggwang 1,2 has been developed. Since there is no CARE for Wolsong(PHWR) plants yet, CARE for Wolsong is under construction. The safety parameters are selected and the safety information display screens and the alarm logic for plant status change are developed for Wolsong Unit 2 based on the design documents for CANDU plants.

  8. Packaging review guide for reviewing safety analysis reports for packagings: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lloyd, W.R.; Mount, M.E.; Nelson, T.A.; Schwartz, M.W.; Witte, M.C.

    1988-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established procedures for obtaining certification of packagings used by DOE and its contractors for the transport of radioactive materials. The principal purpose of this document is to assure the quality and uniformity of PCS reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The Packaging Review Guide (PRG) also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-understood positions as the same safety issues arise in future cases. An applicant submitting a SARP does not have to follow the solutions or approaches presented. It is also a purpose of the PRG to make information about DOE certification policy and procedures widely available to DOE field offices, DOE contractors, federal agencies, and interested members of the public. 77 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Technology development of maintenance optimization and reliability analysis for safety features in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Choi, Seong Soo; Lee, Dong Gue; Kim, Young Il

    1999-12-01

    The reliability data management system (RDMS) for safety systems of PHWR type plants has been developed and utilized in the reliability analysis of the special safety systems of Wolsong Unit 1,2 with plant overhaul period lengthened. The RDMS is developed for the periodic efficient reliability analysis of the safety systems of Wolsong Unit 1,2. In addition, this system provides the function of analyzing the effects on safety system unavailability if the test period of a test procedure changes as well as the function of optimizing the test periods of safety-related test procedures. The RDMS can be utilized in handling the requests of the regulatory institute actively with regard to the reliability validation of safety systems. (author)

  10. Safety of 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in patients on aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Vasudeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To prospectively assess safety outcome of TRUS guided prostate biopsy in patients taking low dose aspirin. Materials and methods: Consecutive patients, who were planned for 12 core TRUS guided prostate biopsy and satisfied eligibility criteria, were included in the study and divided into two Groups: Group A: patients on aspirin during biopsy, Group B: patients not on aspirin during biopsy, including patients in whom aspirin was stopped prior to the biopsy. Parameters included for statistical analysis were: age, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA, prostate volume, hemoglobin (Hb %, number of hematuria episodes, number of patient reporting hematuria, hematuria requiring intervention, number of patient reporting hematospermia and number of patient reporting rectal bleeding. Results: Of 681 eligible patients, Group A and B had 191 and 490 patients respectively. The mean age, prostate volume, serum PSA and pre-biopsy hemoglobin were similar in both Groups with no significant differences noted between them. None of the post-biopsy complications, including number of hematuria episodes (p=0.83, number of patients reporting hematuria (p=0.55, number of patients reporting hematospermia (p=0.36 and number of patients reporting rectal bleeding (p=0.65, were significantly different between Groups A and B respectively. None of the hemorrhagic complication in either group required intervention and were self limiting. Conclusion: Continuing low dose aspirin during TRUS guided prostate biopsy neither alters the minor bleeding episodes nor causes major bleeding complication. So, discontinuation of low dose aspirin prior to TRUS guided prostate biopsy is not required.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in cavitary pulmonary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping, E-mail: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Hai-Yan, E-mail: mycherishgirl@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jin, E-mail: yari_zj@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Yong, E-mail: fengyong119@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: motozl163@163.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: CT-guided transthoracic biopsy is a well-established method in the cytologic or histologic diagnosis of pulmonary lesions. The knowledge of its diagnostic performance and complications for cavitary pulmonary lesions is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in cavitary pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: 102 consecutive patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions received CT-guided FNAB with use of an 18-gauge (n = 35) or 20-gauge (n = 67) Chiba for histology diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of FNAB were calculated as compared with the final diagnosis. Complications associated with FNAB were observed. The diagnostic accuracy and complications were compared between patients with different lesion sizes and different cavity wall thickness. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNAB were 96.3%, 98.0%, and 96.1%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnosis accuracy in different lesion size (<2 cm vs ≥2 cm), or different cavity wall thickness (<5 mm vs ≥5 mm) were not different (P > 0.05; 0.235). More nondiagnostic sample was found in wall thickness <5 mm lesions (P = 0.017). Associated complications included pneumothorax in 9 (8.8%) patients and alveolar hemorrhage in 14 patients (13.7%) and hemoptysis in 1 patient (1%). No different rate of complications was found with regard to lesion size, wall thickness, length of the needle path and needle size (P > 0.05). Conclusion: CT-guided FNAB can be effectively ad safely used for patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions.

  12. Correct safety requirements during the life cycle of heating plants; Korrekta saekerhetskrav under vaermeanlaeggningars livscykel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegehall, Jan; Hedberg, Johan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    The safety of old steam boilers or hot water generators is in principle based on electromechanical components which are generally easy to understand. The use of safety-PLC is a new and flexible way to design a safe system. A programmable system offers more degrees of freedom and consequently new problems may arise. As a result, new standards which use the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) concept for the level of safety have been elaborated. The goal is to define a way of working to handle requirements on safety in control systems of heat and power plants. SIL-requirements are relatively new within the domain and there is a need for guidance to be able to follow the requirements. The target of this report is the people who work with safety questions during new construction, reconstruction, or modification of furnace plants. In the work, the Pressure Equipment Directive, 97/23/EC, as well as standards which use the SIL concept have been studied. Additionally, standards for water-tube boilers have been studied. The focus has been on the safety systems (safety functions) which are used in water-tube boilers for heat and power plants; other systems, which are parts of these boilers, have not been considered. Guidance has been given for the aforementioned standards as well as safety requirements specification and risk analysis. An old hot water generator and a relatively new steam boiler have been used as case studies. The design principles and safety functions of the furnaces have been described. During the risk analysis important hazards were identified. A method for performing a risk analysis has been described and the appropriate content of a safety requirements specification has been defined. If a heat or power plant is constructed, modified, or reconstructed, a safety life cycle shall be followed. The purpose of the safety life cycle is to plan, describe, document, perform, check, test, and validate that everything is correctly done. The components of the safety

  13. Correct safety requirements during the life cycle of heating plants; Korrekta saekerhetskrav under vaermeanlaeggningars livscykel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegehall, Jan; Hedberg, Johan [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-10-15

    The safety of old steam boilers or hot water generators is in principle based on electromechanical components which are generally easy to understand. The use of safety-PLC is a new and flexible way to design a safe system. A programmable system offers more degrees of freedom and consequently new problems may arise. As a result, new standards which use the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) concept for the level of safety have been elaborated. The goal is to define a way of working to handle requirements on safety in control systems of heat and power plants. SIL-requirements are relatively new within the domain and there is a need for guidance to be able to follow the requirements. The target of this report is the people who work with safety questions during new construction, reconstruction, or modification of furnace plants. In the work, the Pressure Equipment Directive, 97/23/EC, as well as standards which use the SIL concept have been studied. Additionally, standards for water-tube boilers have been studied. The focus has been on the safety systems (safety functions) which are used in water-tube boilers for heat and power plants; other systems, which are parts of these boilers, have not been considered. Guidance has been given for the aforementioned standards as well as safety requirements specification and risk analysis. An old hot water generator and a relatively new steam boiler have been used as case studies. The design principles and safety functions of the furnaces have been described. During the risk analysis important hazards were identified. A method for performing a risk analysis has been described and the appropriate content of a safety requirements specification has been defined. If a heat or power plant is constructed, modified, or reconstructed, a safety life cycle shall be followed. The purpose of the safety life cycle is to plan, describe, document, perform, check, test, and validate that everything is correctly done. The components of the safety

  14. Hazards and hazard combinations relevant for the safety of nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kurt; Brinkman, Hans; Raimond, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    exclusive (e.g., extremely high air temperature and surface ice). Our dataset further provides information on hazard combinations which are more likely to occur than just by random coincidence. 577 correlations between individual hazards are identified by expert opinion and shown in a cross-correlation chart. Combinations discriminate between: (1) causally connected hazards (cause-effect relation) where one hazard (e.g., costal erosion) may be caused by another hazard (e.g., storm surge); or where one hazard (e.g., high wind) is a prerequisite for a correlated hazard (e.g., storm surge). The identified causal links are not commutative. (2) Associated hazards ("contemporary" events) which are probable to occur at the same time due to a common root cause (e.g., a cold front of a meteorological low pressure area which leads to a drop of air pressure, high wind, thunderstorm, lightning, heavy rain and hail). The root cause may not necessarily be regarded as a hazard by itself. The hazard list and the hazard correlation chart may serve as a starting point for the hazard analysis process for nuclear installations in Level 1 PSA as outlined by IAEA (2010), the definition of design basis for nuclear reactors, and the assessment of design extension conditions as required by WENRA-RHWG (2014). It may further be helpful for the identification of hazard combinations and hazard cascades which threaten other critical infrastructure. References: Decker, K. & Brinkman, H., 2017. List of external hazards to be considered in extended PSA. Report No. ASAMPSA_E/WP21/D21.2/2017-41 - IRSN/ PSN-RES/SAG/2017-00011 IAEA, 2010. Development and Application of Level 1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment for Nuclear Power Plants. Safety Guide No. SSG-3, Vienna. http://www-pub.iaea.org/books/ WENRA-RHWG, 2014. WENRA Safety Reference Levels for Existing Reactors. Update in Relation to Lessons Learned from TEPCO Fukushima Dai-Ichi Accident. http://www.wenra.org/publications/

  15. 77 FR 58421 - Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... COMMISSION Model Safety Evaluation for Plant-Specific Adoption of Technical Specifications Task Force...-415- 4737, or by email to pdr.resource@nrc.gov . TSTF-522, Revision 0, includes a model application and is available in ADAMS under Accession No. ML100890316. The model safety evaluation (SE) of...

  16. Food Safety and Plant Health in Ghana - Analysis of the Sanitary and Phytosanitary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maden, van der E.C.L.J.; Tay, J.G.; Koomen, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ghana is a signatory of the WTO agreement on Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) measures. This international agreement sets out a framework for food safety as well as plant health. While food safety is important for both national as well as international trade, phytosanitary compliance can especially

  17. The application of transcriptomics in the comparative safety assessment of (GMO-derived) plant products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    National and international organizations have discussed current approaches to the safety assessment of complex (plant) food products in general and the safety assessment of GMO-derived food products in particular. One of the recommendations of different expert meetings was that the new analytical te

  18. Potentially hazardous plants of Puerto Rico: preliminary guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, F.F.; Medina, F.R.

    1975-08-01

    General information is presented about the kinds of native and imported plants in Puerto Rico (weeds, grasses, vines, cactuses, shrubs, trees and parts thereof) that should be avoided, or not ingested. Small amounts of eaten wild plant materials are usually not likely to be hazardous although large amounts may be dangerous; the striking exception is mushrooms. While a number of Puerto Rican plants are lethal to cattle, only a few are known to cause death to man as, for example, the fruit of the Deadly Manchineel, Hippomane mancinella and the seed of the Rosary Pea, Abrus precatorius. Tourists especially should avoid tasting any green or yellowish apples growing on a medium-sized tree. The Hippomane fruit resembles the Crabapple of temperate zones. It is now unlawful to use the Rosary Pea in the local handicraft industry. An item of special interest is the delicious fruit of Mamey often offered for sale at roadside, the outer coating of which is poisonous. All of the light brown outer covering, including especially all of the inner whitish tunic, must be carefully removed from the golden yellow fruit before eating, or else illness may result. Relatively few of the plants presented here will produce major physical problems if only contacted or chewed, but ingestion of some plant parts produces severe toxic symptoms.

  19. Uncertainty Quantification for Safety Verification Applications in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boafo, Emmanuel

    There is an increasing interest in computational reactor safety analysis to systematically replace the conservative calculations by best estimate calculations augmented by quantitative uncertainty analysis methods. This has been necessitated by recent regulatory requirements that have permitted the use of such methods in reactor safety analysis. Stochastic uncertainty quantification methods have shown great promise, as they are better suited to capture the complexities in real engineering problems. This study proposes a framework for performing uncertainty quantification based on the stochastic approach, which can be applied to enhance safety analysis. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  1. Guide to verification and validation of the SCALE-4 criticality safety software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, M.B.; Jordan, W.C.

    1996-12-01

    Whenever a decision is made to newly install the SCALE nuclear criticality safety software on a computer system, the user should run a set of verification and validation (V&V) test cases to demonstrate that the software is properly installed and functioning correctly. This report is intended to serve as a guide for this V&V in that it specifies test cases to run and gives expected results. The report describes the V&V that has been performed for the nuclear criticality safety software in a version of SCALE-4. The verification problems specified by the code developers have been run, and the results compare favorably with those in the SCALE 4.2 baseline. The results reported in this document are from the SCALE 4.2P version which was run on an IBM RS/6000 workstation. These results verify that the SCALE-4 nuclear criticality safety software has been correctly installed and is functioning properly. A validation has been performed for KENO V.a utilizing the CSAS25 criticality sequence and the SCALE 27-group cross-section library for {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu fissile, systems in a broad range of geometries and fissile fuel forms. The experimental models used for the validation were taken from three previous validations of KENO V.a. A statistical analysis of the calculated results was used to determine the average calculational bias and a subcritical k{sub eff} criteria for each class of systems validated. Included the statistical analysis is a means of estimating the margin of subcriticality in k{sub eff}. This validation demonstrates that KENO V.a and the 27-group library may be used for nuclear criticality safety computations provided the system being analyzed falls within the range of the experiments used in the validation.

  2. TerrPlant Version 1.2.2 User's Guide for Pesticide Exposure to Terrestrial Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tier 1 model for screening-level assessments of pesticides. TerrPlant provides screening-level estimates of exposure to terrestrial plants from single pesticide applications. It does not consider exposures to plants from multiple pesticide applications.

  3. Nuclear power plants and safety; Elektrownie jadrowe i bezpieczenstwo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celinski, Z. [Politechnika Warszawska, Warsaw (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The brief scope on the state of nuclear energetics worldwide as well as development perspectives have been presented. The safety problems, economic competitiveness and public acceptance have been shown and discussed. 55 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  4. An index guiding temporal planting policies for wind erosion reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.X.; Zheng, D.W.; Stigter, C.J.; He, W.Q.; Tuo, D.B.; Zhao, P.

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation cover has spatial as well as temporal characteristics, but the latter are often neglected. Temporal cover characteristics were explored to recommend planting policies for returning arable land into land better protected from serious wind erosion during late autumn, winter, and particularl

  5. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-01-01

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health -- changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and othe...

  6. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-03-01

    This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

  7. Licensee responsibility for nuclear power plant safety; Verantwortung der Genehmigungsinhaber fuer die Sicherheit der Kernkraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Horst

    2010-02-15

    Simple sentences easy to grasp are desirable in regulations and bans. However, in a legal system, their meaning must be unambiguous. Article 6, Paragraph 1 of the EURATOM Directive on a community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear facilities of June 2009 states that 'responsibility for the nuclear safety of a nuclear facility is incumbent primarily on the licensee.' The draft 'Safety Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants, Revision D, April 2009' of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) (A Module 1, 'Safety Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants: Basic Safety Criteria' / '0 Principles' Paragraph 2) reads: 'Responsibility for ensuring safety rests with the licensee. He shall give priority to compliance with the safety goal over the achievement of other operational objectives.' In addition, the existing rules and regulations, whose rank is equivalent to that of international regulations, assign priority to the safety goal to be pursued by the licensee over all other objectives of the company. The operator's responsibility for nuclear safety can be required and achieved only on the basis of permits granted, which must meet legal requirements. The operator's proximity to plant operation is the reason for his 'primary responsibility.' Consequently, verbatim incorporation of Article 6, Paragraph 1 of the EURATOM Directive would only be a superscript added to existing obligations of the operator - inclusive of a safety culture designed as an incentive to further 'the spirit of safety-related actions' - without any new legal contents and consequences. In the reasons of the regulation, this would have to be clarified in addition to the cryptic wording of 'responsibility.. primarily,' at the same time expressing that operators and authorities work together in a spirit of openness and trust. (orig.)

  8. Improved Management of Part Safety Classification System for Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Young; Park, Youn Won; Park, Heung Gyu; Park, Hyo Chan [BEES Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As, in recent years, many quality assurance (QA) related incidents, such as falsely-certified parts and forged documentation, etc., were reported in association with the supply of structures, systems, components and parts to nuclear power plants, a need for a better management of safety classification system was addressed so that it would be based more on the level of parts . Presently, the Korean nuclear power plants do not develop and apply relevant procedures for safety classifications, but rather the safety classes of parts are determined solely based on the experience of equipment designers. So proposed in this paper is a better management plan for safety equipment classification system with an aim to strengthen the quality management for parts. The plan was developed through the analysis of newly introduced technical criteria to be applied to parts of nuclear power plant.

  9. Refractive improvements and safety with topography-guided corneal crosslinking for keratoconus: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Maria; Schiller, Maria; Fredriksson, Anneli; Behndig, Anders

    2017-07-01

    To assess the refractive improvements and the corneal endothelial safety of an individualised topography-guided regimen for corneal crosslinking in progressive keratoconus. An open-label prospective randomised clinical trial was performed at the Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Thirty-seven patients (50 eyes) with progressive keratoconus planned for corneal crosslinking were included. The patients were randomised to topography-guided crosslinking (photorefractive intrastromal crosslinking (PiXL); n=25) or uniform 9 mm crosslinking (corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL); n=25). Visual acuity, refraction, keratometry (K1, K2 and Kmax) and corneal endothelial morphometry were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The PiXL treatment involved an asymmetrical treatment zone centred on the area of maximum corneal steepness with treatment energies ranging from 7.2 to 15.0 J/cm(2); the CXL treatment was a uniform 9 mm 5.4 J/cm(2) pulsed crosslinking. The main outcome measures were changes in refractive errors and corneal endothelial cell density. The spherical refractive errors decreased (pkeratoconus with decreased spherical refractive errors and improved visual acuity, without damage to the corneal endothelium. NCT02514200, Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Living PSA program: LIPSAS development for safety management of an LMFBR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizawa, Kiyoto [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nakai, Ryodai [O-arai Engineering Center, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    During construction and subsequent operation of a nuclear power plant, many changes occur in components, systems and operating procedures, which continuously modify the configuration of the power plant. A living PSA program can assess and manage safety-related operations and plant changes by adequately reproducing plant models and structured databases corresponding to the changes in system configuration. A living PSA system, LIPSAS, has been developed for the Japanese prototype liquid metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor (LMFBR), Monju, which is in the preoperation functional test stage. In order to utilize the LIPSAS as a risk management tool, equations for the schematic time history of the plant risk level and the relative risk criteria have been developed. Experience with LIPSAS shows that this program is a prospective tool to support decisions that affect plant safety, although a continuing and significant resource commitment of the operations staff at the site is still required. (author).

  11. Japan`s international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Akira [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  12. Safety requirements to the operation of hydropower plants; Sicherheit beim Betrieb von Wasserkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Reinhard [Berufsgenossenschaft Energie Textil Elektro Medienerzeugnisse (BG ETEM), Koeln (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Employers have to take into account various safety and health requirements relating to the design, construction, operation and maintenance of hydropower plants. Especially the diversity of the hydropower plant components requires the consideration of different safety and health aspects. In 2011 the ''Fachausschuss Elektrotechnik'' (expert committee electro-technics) of the institution for statutory accident insurance and prevention presented a new ''BG-Information'' dealing with ''Safe methods operating hydropower plants''. The following article gives an introduction into the conception and the essential requirements of this new BG-Information. (orig.)

  13. Safety culture in nuclear power plants. Proceedings; Sicherheitskultur im Kernkraftwerk. Seminarbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    As a consequence of the INSAG-4 report on `safety culture`, published by the IAEA in 1991, the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants (KSA) decided to hold a one-day seminar as a first step in this field. The KSA is an advisory body of the Federal Government and the Federal Department of Transport and Energy (EVED). It comments on applications for licenses, observes the operation of nuclear power plants, assists with the preparation of regulations, monitors the progress of research in the field of nuclear safety, and makes proposals for research tasks. The objective of this seminar was to familiarise the participants with the principles of `safety culture`, with the experiences made in Switzerland and abroad with existing concepts, as well as to eliminate existing prejudices. The main points dealt with at this seminar were: - safety culture from the point of view of operators, - safety culture from the point of view of the authorities, - safety culture: collaboration between power plants, the authorities and research organisations, - trends and developments in the field of safety culture. Invitations to attend this seminar were extended to the management boards of companies operating Swiss nuclear power plants, and to representatives of the Swiss authorities responsible for the safety of nuclear power plants. All these organisations were represented by a large number of executive and specialist staff. We would like to express our sincerest thanks to the Head of the Federal Department of Transport and Energy for his kind patronage of this seminar. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  14. Atomic Information Technology Safety and Economy of Nuclear Power Plants

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Information Technology revaluates current conceptions of the information technology aspects of the nuclear industry. Economic and safety research in the nuclear energy sector are explored, considering statistical methods which incorporate Monte-Carlo simulations for practical applications. Divided into three sections, Atomic Information Technology covers: • Atomic economics and management, • Atomic safety and reliability, and • Atomic safeguarding and security. Either as a standalone volume or as a companion to conventional nuclear safety and reliability books, Atomic Information Technology acts as a concise and thorough reference on statistical assessment technology in the nuclear industry. Students and industry professionals alike will find this a key tool in expanding and updating their understanding of this industry and the applications of information technology within it.

  15. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  16. Rare Plants and Animals of the Texas Hill Country: Educator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Parks and Wildlife, Austin.

    Texas Hill Country is a land of fresh water springs, stony hills, and steep canyons and home to many rare plants and animals. Six activities for grades 3-5 and six activities for grades 6-12 are contained in this guide. Elementary activity highlights include using "The Lorax" by Dr. Seuss to stimulate critical thinking about environmental problems…

  17. The Westinghouse AP1000 plant design: a generation III+ reactor with unique proven passive safety technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demetri, K. J.; Leipner, C. I.; Marshall, M. L., E-mail: demetrkj@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The AP1000 plant is an 1100-M We pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications and standardization that simplify construction, operation, maintenance, safety, and cost. The AP1000 plant is based on proven pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology, with an emphasis on safety features that rely solely on natural forces. These passive safety features are combined with simple, active, defense-in-depth systems used during normal plant operations which also provide the first level of defense against more probable events. This paper focuses on specific safety and licensing topics: the AP1000 plant robustness to be prepared for extreme events that may lead to catastrophic loss of infrastructure, such as the Fukushima Dai-ichi event, and the AP1000 plant compliance with the safety objectives for new plants. The first deployment of the AP1000 plant formally began in July 2007 when Westinghouse Electric Company and its consortium partner, the Shaw Group, signed contracts for four AP1000 units on coastal sites of Sanmen and Haiyang, China. Both sites have the planned ability to accommodate at least six AP1000 units; construction is largely concurrent for all four units. Additionally, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued combined licenses (COLs) to allow Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNC) and South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE and G) to construct and operate AP1000 plants. Within this paper, the various factors that contribute to an unparalleled level of design, construction, delivery, and licensing certainty for any new AP1000 plant projects are described. These include: 1) How the AP1000 plant design development and reviews undertaken in the United States, China and Europe increase licensing certainty. 2) How the AP1000 passive plant robustness against extreme events that result in large loss of infrastructure further contributes to the licensing certainty in a post

  18. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1977. Volume III. Interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, C.R.; Peck, L.J.; Miller, C.E.

    1978-07-01

    This users guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environment and safety research projects for FY 1977. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports.

  19. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education safety guide

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the > fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Safety Standards > Series No. WS-R-2, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, > Including Decommissioning. It covers the roles and responsibilities of > different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive > waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material. It > is intended for organizations generating and handling radioactive > waste or handling such waste on a centralized basis for and the > regulatory body responsible for regulating such activities.  > Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the > environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety > considerations; 5. Predisposal management of radioactive waste; 6. > Acceptance of radioactive waste in disposal facilities; 7. Record > keeping and reporting; 8. Management systems; Appendix I: Fault > schedule for safety assessment and environmental impact assessment; > Ap...

  20. The effects of safety-seeking behavior and guided threat reappraisal on fear reduction during exposure: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Tracy; Telch, Michael J

    2002-03-01

    We examined the effects of safety-seeking behavior and guided threat focus and reappraisal on fear reduction during exposure. Participants (N=46) displaying marked claustrophobic fear were randomized to one of three 30-min exposure conditions: (a) guided threat focus and reappraisal; (b) safety-behavior utilization; or (c) exposure only control. Tripartite outcome assessments during a behavioral approach test, along with measures of suffocation and restriction fears were obtained at pre- and post-treatment, and at a 2-week follow-up. Treatment process measures were collected throughout treatment and consisted of indices of fear activation; within and between-trial fear habituation; and suffocation and entrapment expectancies. Measures of safety behavior utilization and attentional focus were also collected to assess the integrity of the experimental manipulations. Consistent with prediction, those encouraged to utilize safety-behaviors during exposure showed significantly more fear at post-treatment and follow-up relative to those encouraged to focus and reevaluate their core threat(s) during exposure. Moreover, growth curve analyses of treatment process data analyses revealed that safety-behavior utilization exerted a detrimental effect on between-trial habituation; whereas guided threat reappraisal enhanced between-trial habituation.

  1. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

    1991-07-01

    The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  2. Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Angelini, Tana; Masanet, Eric

    2010-07-27

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy consumption are available, and this Energy Guide discusses energy-efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be applied over a broad spectrum of companies. Strategies in the guide address hot water and steam, compressed air, pumps, motors, fans, lighting, refrigeration, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. This guide includes descriptions of expected energy and cost savings, based on real-world applications, typical payback periods, and references to more detailed information. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers achieve cost-effective energy reductions while maintaining product quality. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  3. Guiding plant virus particles to integrin-displaying cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovlid, Marisa L.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Laufer, Burkhardt; Lau, Jolene L.; Kuzelka, Jane; Wang, Qian; Hyypiä, Timo; Nemerow, Glen R.; Kessler, Horst; Manchester, Marianne; Finn, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are structurally regular, highly stable, tunable nanomaterials that can be conveniently produced in high yields. Unmodified VNPs from plants and bacteria generally do not show tissue specificity or high selectivity in binding to or entry into mammalian cells. They are, however, malleable by both genetic and chemical means, making them useful scaffolds for the display of large numbers of cell- and tissue-targeting ligands, imaging moieties, and/or therapeutic agents in a well-defined manner. Capitalizing on this attribute, we modified the genetic sequence of the Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) coat protein to display an RGD oligopeptide sequence derived from human adenovirus type 2 (HAdV-2). Concurrently, wild-type CPMV was modified via NHS acylation and Cu(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry to attach an integrin-binding cyclic RGD peptide. Both types of particles showed strong and selective affinity for several different cancer cell lines that express RGD-binding integrin receptors.Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are structurally regular, highly stable, tunable nanomaterials that can be conveniently produced in high yields. Unmodified VNPs from plants and bacteria generally do not show tissue specificity or high selectivity in binding to or entry into mammalian cells. They are, however, malleable by both genetic and chemical means, making them useful scaffolds for the display of large numbers of cell- and tissue-targeting ligands, imaging moieties, and/or therapeutic agents in a well-defined manner. Capitalizing on this attribute, we modified the genetic sequence of the Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) coat protein to display an RGD oligopeptide sequence derived from human adenovirus type 2 (HAdV-2). Concurrently, wild-type CPMV was modified via NHS acylation and Cu(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) chemistry to attach an integrin-binding cyclic RGD peptide. Both types of particles showed strong and selective affinity

  4. A guided tour: Pollen tube orientation in flowering plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAUTER Margret

    2009-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants requires that two sperm cells are delivered to the embryo sac where double fertilization of an egg cell and of a central cell results in the formation of a diploid embryo and of the triploid nutritional endosperm tissue. The immobile male gametes are delivered to the immobile female gametophyte by a single cell, the pollen tube. The pollen tube must be able to germinate on a genetically appropriate stigma and it must be directed through the transmitting tract of the style from where it must target an ovule. Moreover, the pollen tube must enter the ovule at a defined opening, the micropyle, grow toward one of the two synergids and release the two sperm cells upon contact. This complex process requires recognition events with chemically based or physically supported cell-cell communication as well as directional cues for the growing pollen tube. A number of molecules and mechanisms have been implicated in pollen tube guidance which are summarized in this review.

  5. Safety features in nuclear power plants to eliminate the need of emergency planning in public domain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Vijayan; M T Kamble; A K Nayak; K K Vaze; R K Sinha

    2013-10-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, the safety features of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are being re-examined worldwide including India to demonstrate capabilities to cope with severe accidents. In order to restore public confidence and support for nuclear power, it is felt necessary to design future NPPs with near zero impact outside the plant boundary and thus enabling elimination of emergency planning in public domain. Authors have identified a set of safety features which are needed to be incorporated in advanced reactors to achieve this goal. These features enabling prevention, termination, mitigation and containment of radioactivity for beyond design basis accidents arising from extreme natural events are essential for achieving the goal of elimination of emergency planning in public domain. Inherent safety characteristics, passive and engineered safety features to achieve these functions are discussed in this paper. Present trends and future developments in this direction are also described briefly.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner C. Albrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10, France (n = 3 and the United States (n = 1. Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%. 1,520 (86.4% patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%. Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2% was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001, outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001 and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001 and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP

  7. A Study on Methodologies for Assessing Safety Critical Network's Risk Impact on Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, T. J.; Park, S. K.; Seo, S. J. [Soongsil Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The objectives of this project is to establish methodologies for assessing safety-critical network's risk impact on nuclear power plant by developing reliability analysis models for the safety-critical network. It is essential to develop reliability analysis models for safety-critical network, and it is very important to adapt the model to the current methodologies for assessing risk impact on nuclear power plants. Major outputs of the first year study are preliminary models for assessing reliability of safety-critical communication networks and those of the second year study are methodologies for assessing safety-critical network's risk impact on nuclear power plant.

  8. The application of transcriptomics in the comparative safety assessment of (GMO-derived) plant products

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    National and international organizations have discussed current approaches to the safety assessment of complex (plant) food products in general and the safety assessment of GMO-derived food products in particular. One of the recommendations of different expert meetings was that the new analytical techniques, in particular the ‘omics’ approaches, need to be explored for their potential to improve the analysis and thereby the toxicological and nutritional assessment of complex (GMO-derived) pla...

  9. Regulatory and safety aspects of ageing in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufer, B. [OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France). Nuclear Safety Div.

    2002-08-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is a semi-autonomous body within the OECD established in 1958 with the mandate to promote co-operation among the governments of its participating countries in furthering the development of nuclear power as a safe, environmentally acceptable and economicy energy source. While all of groups have detailed programmes involving important aspects, this paper will focus specifically on the work of Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) and the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI). (orig.)

  10. A development of the Human Factors Assessment Guide for the Study of Erroneous Human Behaviors in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yeon Ju; Lee, Yong Hee; Jang, Tong Il; Kim, Sa Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this paper is to describe a human factors assessment guide for the study of the erroneous characteristic of operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs). We think there are still remaining the human factors issues such as an uneasy emotion, fatigue and stress, varying mental workload situation by digital environment, and various new type of unsafe response to digital interface for better decisions, although introducing an advanced main control room. These human factors issues may not be resolved through the current human reliability assessment which evaluates the total probability of a human error occurring throughout the completion of a specific task. This paper provides an assessment guide for the human factors issues a set of experimental methodology, and presents an assessment case of measurement and analysis especially from neuro physiology approach. It would be the most objective psycho-physiological research technique on human performance for a qualitative analysis considering the safety aspects. This paper can be trial to experimental assessment of erroneous behaviors and their influencing factors, and it can be used as an index for recognition and a method to apply human factors engineering V and V, which is required as a mandatory element of human factor engineering program plan for a NPP design.

  11. Guidelines for nuclear-power-plant safety-issue-prioritization information development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Bickford, W.E.; Konzek, G.J.; Strenge, D.L.; Smith, R.I.; Weakley, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a methodology, with examples, to calculate - to an approximation serviceable for prioritization purposes - the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues. This report is an applications guide to issue-specific calculations. A description of the approach, mathematical models, worksheets and step-by-step examples are provided. Analysis using this method is intended to provide comparable results for many issues at a cost of two staff-weeks per issue. Results will be used by the NRC to support decisions related to issue priorities in allocation of resources to complete safety issue resolutions.

  12. Safety assessment of animal- and plant-derived amino acids as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Christina; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of animal- and plant-derived amino acid mixtures, which function as skin and hair conditioning agents. The safety of α-amino acids as direct food additives has been well established, based on extensive research through acute and chronic dietary exposures and the Panel previously has reviewed the safety of individual α-amino acids in cosmetics. The Panel focused its review on dermal irritation and sensitization data relevant to the use of these ingredients in topical cosmetics. The Panel concluded that these 21 ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as used in cosmetics.

  13. The Experience-Based Safety Training System Using Vr Technology for Chemical Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Nakai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In chemical plants, safety measures are needed in order to minimize the impact of severe accidents and natural disasters. At the same time, carrying out the education and training to workers the corresponding operation in non-stationary situation is essential. However, reproducing the non-stationary conditions to actual equipment or mock-up cannot be performed because it is dangerous. By using the virtual reality (VR technology, we can build up a virtual chemical plant with lower cost compared to real plant. The operator can experience the fire and explosion accidents in the virtual space. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an experienced-based safety training system for implementing the education and training by using the non-stationary situation in the computer. This proposed system is linked with the dynamic plant simulator. A trainee can learn the correct operation through the simulated experience to prevent an accident. The safety awareness of workers will improve by experiential learning. The proposed system is useful for safety education in chemical plant.

  14. Long term safety of fluoroscopically guided selective salpingography and tubal catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, S; Afnan, M; Coomarasamy, A; Ola, B; Hammadieh, N; Temperton, D H; McHugo, J M; Sharif, K

    2002-02-01

    The irradiation of the ovaries of reproductive age women during fluoroscopically guided selective salpingography and tubal catheterization has raised concern about the safety of the procedure. In addition to the risk of cancer induction, which exists with the irradiation of all tissues, with the gonads, the induction of hereditary disorders is possible. The objective of this study was to estimate these risks and present them in a clinically meaningful way. Retrospective analysis was undertaken of 366 consecutive cases of selective salpingography and tubal catheterization performed at the Birmingham Women's Hospital, UK. The radiation doses of different types of procedure were compared with the background annual radiation dose. The risks of cancer and genetic disorders induction were calculated using conversion coefficients published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The radiation dose women were exposed to during selective salpingography and tubal catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance was a fraction of the background annual radiation dose. The excess lifetime risks of cancer and hereditary disorders were in the order of four to 13 and two to six per million procedures respectively. The long term risks of selective salpingography and tubal catheterization under fluoroscopic guidance are low.

  15. 76 FR 46330 - NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1934, Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG); Second Draft... for public comment a document entitled, NUREG-1934 (EPRI 1023259), ``Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling... pdr.resource@nrc.gov . NUREG-1934 (EPRI 1023259), ``Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling...

  16. [Health & safety in a steel plant: technical and managerial action].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusato, M

    2012-01-01

    The report presents the experience in a steel company to improve the management of issues relating to health and safety of workers. The first part of the work focuses on the description of the interventions made by the company in recent years, which can be divided into technical interventions on production facilities, training and information, organizational activities and specific projects in collaboration with the health service. The second part presents the certification project according to OHSAS 18001, with particular focus on the efforts for a lean management of the documentation required by the management systems and for the automation of internal processes. The last part finally describes in detail the manner in which it was decided to address some issues that significantly affect the factory doctor: the recording and analysis of accidents and medications, management of hazardous substances and personal protective equipment.

  17. Plant safety in France 2000 until 2010; Anlagensicherheitspolitik in Frankreich 2000 bis 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, Agnes; Affeltranger, Bastien; Descourriere, Sandrine; Oger, Florence; Duval, Christophe; Gaucher, Rodolphe [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2013-03-15

    The study on the safety of industrial plants on France covers the following issues: The explosion in the operational area of AZF (plant Grande Paroisse) and the consequences; classified installations; the players of accident risks in France; realization of the accident prevention policy in France from 2000 to 2010; prevention of natural risks and consideration of these risks on the level of classified installations (NATECH accidents) in France from 2000 to 2010; further specific topics; actual activities and developments.

  18. Interrelationships of food safety and plant pathology: the life cycle of human pathogens on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Jeri D; Schroeder, Brenda K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial food-borne pathogens use plants as vectors between animal hosts, all the while following the life cycle script of plant-associated bacteria. Similar to phytobacteria, Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and cross-domain pathogens have a foothold in agricultural production areas. The commonality of environmental contamination translates to contact with plants. Because of the chronic absence of kill steps against human pathogens for fresh produce, arrival on plants leads to persistence and the risk of human illness. Significant research progress is revealing mechanisms used by human pathogens to colonize plants and important biological interactions between and among bacteria in planta. These findings articulate the difficulty of eliminating or reducing the pathogen from plants. The plant itself may be an untapped key to clean produce. This review highlights the life of human pathogens outside an animal host, focusing on the role of plants, and illustrates areas that are ripe for future investigation.

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant safety document ICPP hazardous chemical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwood, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a hazardous chemical evaluation performed for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). ICPP tracks chemicals on a computerized database, Haz Track, that contains roughly 2000 individual chemicals. The database contains information about each chemical, such as its form (solid, liquid, or gas); quantity, either in weight or volume; and its location. The Haz Track database was used as the primary starting point for the chemical evaluation presented in this report. The chemical data and results presented here are not intended to provide limits, but to provide a starting point for nonradiological hazards analysis.

  20. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented. (JSR)

  1. Status of safety issues at licensed power plants: TMI Action Plan requirements; unresolved safety issues; generic safety issues; other multiplant action issues. Supplement 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    As part of ongoing US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts to ensure the quality and accountability of safety issue information, the NRC established a program for publishing an annual report on the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of safety issues in major NRC requirements areas. This information was initially compiled and reported in three NUREG-series volumes. Volume 1, published in March 1991, addressed the status of Three Mile Island (TMI) Action Plan Requirements. Volume 2, published in May 1991, addressed the status of unresolved safety issues (USIs). Volume 3, published in June 1991, addressed the implementation and verification status of generic safety issues (GSIs). The first annual supplement, which combined these volumes into a single report and presented updated information as of September 30, 1991, was published in December 1991. The second annual supplement, which provided updated information as of September 30, 1992, was published in December 1992. Supplement 2 also provided the status of licensee implementation and NRC verification of other multiplant action (MPA) issues not related to TMI Action Plan requirements, USIs, or GSIs. This third annual NUREG report, Supplement 3, presents updated information as of September 30, 1993. This report gives a comprehensive description of the implementation and verification status of TMI Action Plan requirements, safety issues designated as USIs, GSIs, and other MPAs that have been resolved and involve implementation of an action or actions by licensees. This report makes the information available to other interested parties, including the public. Additionally, this report serves as a follow-on to NUREG-0933, ``A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues,`` which tracks safety issues until requirements are approved for imposition at licensed plants or until the NRC issues a request for action by licensees.

  2. Pinellas Plant: Child Care/Partnership School safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    The Albuquerque Operations Office through the Pinellas Plant Area Office is involved in a joint venture to establish a Partnership School and a Day Care Facility at the Plant. The venture is unique in that it is based on a partnership with the local county school system. The county school system will provide the teachers, supplies and classroom furnishings for the operation of the school for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, first and second grade during regular school hours. The Government will provide the facility and its normal operating and maintenance costs. A Day Care Facility will also be available for children from infancy through the second grade for outside school hours. The day care will be operated as a non-profit corporation. Fees paid by parents with children in the day care center will cove the cost of staff, food, supplies and liability insurance. Again, the government will provide the facility and its normal operating and maintenance costs. Between 75 and 90 children are expected in the first year of operation. The Partnership School will consist of one class each for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and first grade. Second grade will be added in 1990. The total estimated number of children for both the Child Care and Partnership School should not exceed 200 children. Expected benefits include reduced absenteeism, tardiness and turnover and thus increased productivity. The program will be an asset in recruiting and retaining the best workforce. Other benefits include improved education for the children.

  3. Power plant instrumentation and control handbook a guide to thermal power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Swapan

    2014-01-01

    The book discusses instrumentation and control in modern fossil fuel power plants, with an emphasis on selecting the most appropriate systems subject to constraints engineers have for their projects. It provides all the plant process and design details, including specification sheets and standards currently followed in the plant. Among the unique features of the book are the inclusion of control loop strategies and BMS/FSSS step by step logic, coverage of analytical instruments and technologies for pollution and energy savings, and coverage of the trends toward filed bus systems and integratio

  4. Improved technical specifications and related improvements to safety in commercial Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.R.; Demitrack, T.; Schiele, R.; Jones, J.C. [EXCEL Services Corporation, 11921 Rockville Pike, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)]. e-mail: donaldh@excelservices.com

    2004-07-01

    Many of the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (US) have been converting a portion of the plant operating license known as the Technical Specifications (TS) in accordance with a document published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The TS prescribe commercial nuclear power plant operating requirements. There are several types of nuclear power plants in the US, based on the technology of different vendors, and there is an NRC document that supports each of the five different vendor designs. The NRC documents are known as the Improved Standard Technical Specifications (ISTS) and are contained in a separate document (NUREG series) for each one of the designs. EXCEL Services Corporation (hereinafter EXCEL) has played a major role in the development of the ISTS and in the development, licensing, and implementation of the plant specific Improved Technical Specifications (ITS) (which is based on the ISTS) for the commercial nuclear power plants in the US that have elected to make this conversion. There are currently 103 operating commercial nuclear power plants in the US and 68 of them have successfully completed the conversion to the ITS and are now operating in accordance with their plant specific ITS. The ISTS is focused mainly on safety by ensuring the commercial nuclear reactors can safely shut down and mitigate the consequences of any postulated transient and accident. It accomplishes this function by including requirements directly associated with safety in a document structured systematically and taking into account some key human factors and technical initiatives. This paper discusses the ISTS including its format, content, and detail, the history of the ISTS, the ITS development, licensing, and implementation process, the safety improvements resulting from a plant conversion to ITS, and the importance of the ITS Project to the industry. (Author)

  5. Safety culture assessment in petrochemical industry: a comparative study of two algerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughaba, Assia; Hassane, Chabane; Roukia, Ouddai

    2014-06-01

    To elucidate the relationship between safety culture maturity and safety performance of a particular company. To identify the factors that contribute to a safety culture, a survey questionnaire was created based mainly on the studies of Fernández-Muñiz et al. The survey was randomly distributed to 1000 employees of two oil companies and realized a rate of valid answer of 51%. Minitab 16 software was used and diverse tests, including the descriptive statistical analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, mean analysis, and correlation, were used for the analysis of data. Ten factors were extracted using the analysis of factor to represent safety culture and safety performance. The results of this study showed that the managers' commitment, training, incentives, communication, and employee involvement are the priority domains on which it is necessary to stress the effort of improvement, where they had all the descriptive average values lower than 3.0 at the level of Company B. Furthermore, the results also showed that the safety culture influences the safety performance of the company. Therefore, Company A with a good safety culture (the descriptive average values more than 4.0), is more successful than Company B in terms of accident rates. The comparison between the two petrochemical plants of the group Sonatrach confirms these results in which Company A, the managers of which are English and Norwegian, distinguishes itself by the maturity of their safety culture has significantly higher evaluations than the company B, who is constituted of Algerian staff, in terms of safety management practices and safety performance.

  6. Technical safety appraisal: Buildings 776/777 Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, H C

    1988-03-01

    Buildings 776/777 at the Rocky Flats Plant are major components of the production complex at the plant site. They have been in operation since 1957. The operations taking place in the buildings are nuclear weapons production support, processing of weapons assemblies returned from Pantex, waste processing, research and development in support of production, special projects, and those generated by support groups, such as maintenance. The appraisal team identified nine deficiencies that it believed required prompt attention. DOE management for EH, the program office (Defense Programs), and the field office analyzed the information provided by the appraisal team and instituted compensatory measures for closer monitoring of contractor activities by knowledgeable DOE staff and staff from other sites. Concurrently, the contractor was requested to address both short-term and long-term remedial measures to correct the identified issues as well as the underlying problems. The contractor has provided his action plan, which is included. This plan was under evaluation by EH and the DOE program office at the time this report was prepared. In addressing the major areas of concern identified above, a well as the specific deficiencies identified by the appraisal team, the contractor and the field office are cautioned to search for the root causes for the problems and to direct corrective actions to those root causes rather than solely to the symptoms to assure the sustainability of the improvements being made. The results of prior TSAs led DOE to conclude that previous corrective actions were not sufficient in that a large number of the individual findings are recurrent. Pending completion of remedial actions over the next few months, enhanced DOE oversight of the contractor is warranted.

  7. Efficacy and safety of plant stanols and sterols in the control of blood cholesterol levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katan, M.B.; Grundy, S.M.; Jones, P.J.H.; Law, M.R.; Miettinen, T.; Paoletti, R.

    2003-01-01

    Foods with plant stanol or sterol esters lower serum cholesterol levels. We summarize the deliberations of 32 experts on the efficacy and safety of sterols and stanols. A meta-analysis of 41 trials showed that intake of 2 g/d of stanols or sterols reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by 10%; higher

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  9. Artificial neural network model for prediction of safety performance indicators goals in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, Kelling C.; Nunes, Wallace W. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Aplicacoes Computacionais; Machado, Marcelo D., E-mail: dornemd@eletronuclear.gov.b [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Combustivel Nuclear - GCN.T

    2011-07-01

    Safety performance indicators have been developed to provide a quantitative indication of the performance and safety in various industry sectors. These indexes can provide assess to aspects ranging from production, design, and human performance up to management issues in accordance with policy, objectives and goals of the company. The use of safety performance indicators in nuclear power plants around the world is a reality. However, it is necessary to periodically set goal values. Such goals are targets relating to each of the indicators to be achieved by the plant over a predetermined period of operation. The current process of defining these goals is carried out by experts in a subjective way, based on actual data from the plant, and comparison with global indices. Artificial neural networks are computational techniques that present a mathematical model inspired by the neural structure of intelligent organisms that acquire knowledge through experience. This paper proposes an artificial neural network model aimed at predicting values of goals to be used in the evaluation of safety performance indicators for nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Safety of long-term consumption of plant sterol esters-enriched spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.F.J.; Brink, E.J.; Meijer, G.W.; Princen, H.M.G.; Ntanios, F.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate both efficacy and safety in humans of long-term consumption of spreads containing plant sterol esters. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled parallel trial. Subjects: Hundred and eighty-five healthy volunteers (35-64y). Intervention: Volunteers daily consumed 20g

  11. Artificial neural network model for prediction of safety performance indicators goals in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, Kelling C.; Nunes, Wallace W. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Aplicacoes Computacionais; Machado, Marcelo D., E-mail: dornemd@eletronuclear.gov.b [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Combustivel Nuclear - GCN.T

    2011-07-01

    Safety performance indicators have been developed to provide a quantitative indication of the performance and safety in various industry sectors. These indexes can provide assess to aspects ranging from production, design, and human performance up to management issues in accordance with policy, objectives and goals of the company. The use of safety performance indicators in nuclear power plants around the world is a reality. However, it is necessary to periodically set goal values. Such goals are targets relating to each of the indicators to be achieved by the plant over a predetermined period of operation. The current process of defining these goals is carried out by experts in a subjective way, based on actual data from the plant, and comparison with global indices. Artificial neural networks are computational techniques that present a mathematical model inspired by the neural structure of intelligent organisms that acquire knowledge through experience. This paper proposes an artificial neural network model aimed at predicting values of goals to be used in the evaluation of safety performance indicators for nuclear power plants. (author)

  12. ROLE OF PASSIVE SAFETY FEATURES IN PREVENTION AND MITIGATION OF SEVERE PLANT CONDITIONS IN INDIAN ADVANCED HEAVY WATER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIKAS JAIN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pressing demands of economic competitiveness, the need for large-scale deployment, minimizing the need of human intervention, and experience from the past events and incidents at operating reactors have guided the evolution and innovations in reactor technologies. Indian innovative reactor ‘AHWR’ is a pressure-tube type natural circulation based boiling water reactor that is designed to meet such requirements, which essentially reflect the needs of next generation reactors. The reactor employs various passive features to prevent and mitigate accidental conditions, like a slightly negative void reactivity coefficient, passive poison injection to scram the reactor in event of failure of the wired shutdown systems, a large elevated pool of water as a heat sink inside the containment, passive decay heat removal based on natural circulation and passive valves, passive ECC injection, etc. It is designed to meet the fundamental safety requirements of safe shutdown, safe decay heat removal and confinement of activity with no impact in public domain, and hence, no need for emergency planning under all conceivable scenarios. This paper examines the role of the various passive safety systems in prevention and mitigation of severe plant conditions that may arise in event of multiple failures. For the purpose of demonstration of the effectiveness of its passive features, postulated scenarios on the lines of three major severe accidents in the history of nuclear power reactors are considered, namely; the Three Mile Island (TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. Severe plant conditions along the lines of these scenarios are postulated to the extent conceivable in the reactor under consideration and analyzed using best estimate system thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5/Mod3.2. It is found that the various passive systems incorporated enable the reactor to tolerate the postulated accident conditions without causing severe plant conditions and core degradation.

  13. Factors influencing workers to follow food safety management systems in meat plants in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Wilcock, Anne; Aung, May

    2009-06-01

    Small and medium sized food businesses have been slow to adopt food safety management systems (FSMSs) such as good manufacturing practices and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP). This study identifies factors influencing workers in their implementation of food safety practices in small and medium meat processing establishments in Ontario, Canada. A qualitative approach was used to explore in-plant factors that influence the implementation of FSMSs. Thirteen in-depth interviews in five meat plants and two focus group interviews were conducted. These generated 219 pages of verbatim transcripts which were analysed using NVivo 7 software. Main themes identified in the data related to production systems, organisational characteristics and employee characteristics. A socio-psychological model based on the theory of planned behaviour is proposed to describe how these themes and underlying sub-themes relate to FSMS implementation. Addressing the various factors that influence production workers is expected to enhance FSMS implementation and increase food safety.

  14. Discussion on software aging management of nuclear power plant safety digital control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huihui; Gu, Pengfei; Tang, Jianzhong; Chen, Weihua; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Managing the aging of digital control systems ensures that nuclear power plant systems are in adequate safety margins during their life cycles. Software is a core component in the execution of control logic and differs between digital and analog control systems. The hardware aging management for the digital control system is similar to that for the analog system, which has matured over decades of study. However, software aging management is still in the exploratory stage. Software aging evaluation is critical given the higher reliability and safety requirements of nuclear power plants. To ensure effective inputs for reliability assessment, this paper provides the required software aging information during the life cycle. Moreover, the software aging management scheme for safety digital control system is proposed on the basis of collected aging information.

  15. Guidelines for confirmatory inplant tests of safety-relief valve discharges for BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.M.

    1981-05-01

    Inplant tests of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharges may be required to confirm generically established specifications for SRV loads and the maximum suppression pool temperature, and to evaluate possible effects of plant-unique parameters. These tests are required in those plants which have features that differ substantially from those previously tested. Guidelines for formulating appropriate test matrices, establishing test procedures, selecting necessary instrumentation, and reporting the test results are provided in this report. Guidelines to determine if inplant tests are required on the basis of the plant unique parameters are also included in the report.

  16. Vulnerability, safety and response of nuclear power plants to the hydroclimatic hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    János Katona, Tamás; Vilimi, András

    2016-04-01

    The Great Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami, and the severe accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant 2011 alerted the nuclear industry to danger of extreme rare natural hazards. The subsequent "stress tests" performed by the nuclear industry in Europe and all over the world identifies the nuclear power plant (NPP) vulnerabilities and define the measures for increasing the plant safety. According to the international practice of nuclear safety regulations, the cumulative core damage frequency for NPPs has to be 10-5/a, and the cumulative frequency of early large release has to be 10-6/a. In case of operating plants these annual probabilities can be little higher, but the licensees are obliged to implement all reasonable practicable measures for increasing the plant safety. For achieving the required level of safety, design basis of NPPs for natural hazards has to be defined at the 10-4/a ⎯10-5/a levels of annual exceedance probability. Tornado hazard is some kind of exception, e.g., the design basis annual probability for tornado in the US is equal to 10-7/a. Design of the NPPs shall provide for an adequate margin to protect items ultimately necessary to prevent large or early radioactive releases in the event of levels of natural hazards exceeding those to be considered for design. The plant safety has to be reviewed for accounting the changes of the environmental conditions and natural hazards in case of necessity, but as minimum every ten years in the frame of periodic safety reviews. Long-term forecast of environmental conditions and hazards has to be accounted for in the design basis of the new plants. Changes in hydroclimatic variables, e.g., storms, tornadoes, river floods, flash floods, extreme temperatures, droughts affect the operability and efficiency as well as the safety the NPPs. Low flow rates and high water temperature in the rivers may force to operate at reduced power level or shutdown the plant (Cernavoda NPP, Romania, August 2009). The

  17. Safety Management Characteristics Reflected in Interviews at Swedish Nuclear Power Plants: A System Perspective Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salo, Ilkka (Risk Analysis, Social and Decision Research Unit, Dept. of Psychology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2005-12-15

    The present study investigated safety management characteristics reflected in interviews with participants from two Swedish nuclear power plants. A document analysis regarding the plants' organization, safety policies, and safety culture work was carried out as well. The participants (n=9) were all nuclear power professionals, and the majority managers at different levels with at least 10 years of nuclear power experience. The interview comprised themes relevant for organizational safety and safety management, such as: organizational structures and organizational change, threats to safety, information feedback and knowledge transfer, safety analysis, safety policy, and accident and incident analysis and reporting. The results were in part modeled to important themes derived from a general system theoretical framework suggested by Svenson and developed by Svenson and Salo in relation to studies of 'non-nuclear' safety organizations. A primer to important features of the system theoretical framework is presented in the introductory chapter. The results from the interviews generated interesting descriptions about nuclear safety management in relation to the above themes. Regarding organizational restructuring, mainly centralizations of resources, several examples of reasons for the restructuring and related benefits for this centralization of resources were identified. A number of important reminders that ought to be considered in relation to reorganization were also identified. Regarding threats to the own organization a number of such was interpreted from the interviews. Among them are risks related to generation and competence change-over and risks related to outsourcing of activities. A thorough picture of information management and practical implications related to this was revealed in the interviews. Related to information feedback is the issue of organizational safety indicators and safety indicators in general. The interview answers indicated

  18. 78 FR 47011 - Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants..., ``Software Unit Testing for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' This... software elements if those systems include software. This RG is one of six RG revisions addressing...

  19. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: an organizational overview. Volume 1. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. A model is introduced for the purposes of organizing the literature review and showing key relationships among identified organizational factors and nuclear power plant safety. Volume I of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety.

  20. Systematic review on safety and drug interaction of herbal therapy in hyperlipidemia: a guide for internist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi-Boroujeni, Hamid; Rouhi-Boroujeni, Hojjat; Gharipour, Mojgan; Mohammadizadeh, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Saeed; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-09-14

    Because of reporting high side effects related to biosynthetic drugs, recent attention has been paid to the use of herbs instead of chemical drugs to balance serum lipids. The present systematic review aimed to evaluate the safety of herbal medicines and also to assess drug interaction in herbal therapy in treating hyperlipidemia. The international research databases including MEDLINE; Google scholar, Web of Science SciVerse Scopus (SCOPUS); EBSCO Academic Search; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); and a Chinese database (China Network Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]) were searched from their respective inceptions up to September 2014 with the search terms of "hyperlipidemia", "herbal medicine", "medicine traditional", "extract plant", "Traditional Medicine" and "Chinese Herbal Medicine" without narrowing or limiting search elements. A total of 85 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) studies were finally assessed on human subjects. A notable number of herbal drugs that are commonly used as an anti-hyperlipidemia agent may be interacted with a variety of biosynthetic drugs. In this regard, the most common reported herb-drug reactions were related to anticoagulants, antidepressants, anti-epileptic, anti-inflammatory, and/or even antihypertension and anti-lipidemic drugs. Also, a considerable number of anti-lipidemic drugs of plants origin may be accompanied with metabolic disturbances and serious complications within pregnancy and breast feeding. The main fundamental principles for administration of these drugs include physicians' complete awareness of the effects and interactions of these drugs, educating people not taking these drugs arbitrarily, and closely monitoring the verification and distribution of the drugs in the society.

  1. Agricultural Mechanics and Basic Plant Science. Agricultural Mechanics and Basic Animal Science. An Administrative Guide for Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This basic instructional guide for the first two years of instruction in agricultural education is one in a series of such guides. It is useful in developing and selecting instructional material and implementing competency-based education for two courses: agricultural science and basic plant science and agricultural science and basic animal…

  2. Safety of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients affected by Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Dell'Atti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Crohn’s disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is usually considered a contraindication to transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSBx. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of TRUSBx in a small cohort of patients with CD. Methods: We queried our institutional database clinical data of patients with a diagnosis of CD undergoing TRUSBx, and a retrospective prospective study of 5 patients was planned. All patients enrolled were in the remission phase of CD and asymptomatic. They received the same antibiotic prophylaxis and a povidone-iodine aqueous solution enema before the procedure. A standardized reproducible technique was used with using a ultrasound machine equipped with a 5-9 MHz multifrequency convex probe “end-fire”. The patients were treated under local anaesthesia, and a 14-core biopsy scheme was performed in each patient as first intention. After the procedure each patient was given a verbal numeric pain scale to evaluate tolerability of TRUSBx. Results: TRUSBx was successfully completed in all patients. The number of biopsy cores was 14 (12-16. Of the 5 biopsy procedures performed 40% revealed prostatic carcinoma (PCa with a Gleason score 6 (3+3. No patients required catheterization or admission to the hospital for adverse events after the procedure. The most frequent adverse event was hematospermia (60%, while hematuria was present in 20% of patients and a minimal rectal bleeding in 20% of the patients. No patients reported severe or unbearable pain (score ≥ 8. Conclusions: This study suggests that CD may not be an absolute contraindication to TRUSBx for prostate cancer detection, but still requires a careful patients selection.

  3. Development of a Nuclear Plant Analyzer for Education and Operation Guide of the CANDU Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Su Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, S. K.; Kim, H. D.; Cho, U. Y.; Lim, J. C.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. J.; Park, J. W.; Yeom, C. S.; Suh, J. S.; Park, K. S.; Jung, J. B.; Lee, K. M.; Ahn, H. J.; Lee, I. K. [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    Operator training through the utilization of the NPA can improve efficiently the operator`s capability to cope with plant abnormal behaviors and enhance the safety and operability of nuclear power plants (NPP). Recent trend toward the computing automation and integrated design approach in NPP design analysis recognizes importance of the utilization of NPA technology. Major efforts are made into the expansion of functional capability of the CANDU plant simulation/analysis program obtained through the previous CANDU engineering R and D activities at IAE and into the development of configuration design technology for visualization through graphic display network. Through the simulation tests on the predictive capability of the plant simulation/analysis program and the examination of behavior of the plant operation parameters in typical operational and upset transients, the validation and improvement of the models for the major plant systems have been made. The reactor kinetics model has been improved for 3-D neutronic transient problems. Reactor burnup calculation and on-power fuelling capability have been modelled for the CANDU in-core fuel management practice. Furthermore, the graphic display of simulation results and control panels is user-interactively visualized, and the establishment of basic distributed computing network system through server/client concept with multimedia technique are tried for real time simulation and computational efficiency. The present simulation program has a limitation on the analysis for fast transient problems because of the lack of the explicit two-phase flow model, however, a CANDU NPA which has been developed as the mid-term part of our long term goal constructing `Simulation Based CANDU Design and Analysis System` is anticipated to be used as an assistant tool for nuclear system engineers and plant operators, and as a basic tool for the development of an advanced integrated engineering analyzer. 29 refs., 9 tabs., 110 figs

  4. Application of Safety Instrumented System (SIS) approach in older nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasimi, Elnara; Gabbar, Hossam A., E-mail: hossam.gabbar@uoit.ca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Study Safety Instrumented System (SIS) design for older nuclear power plant. • Apply SIS on Reheater Drains (RD) system. • Apply IEC 61508/61511 to design safety system. • Evaluate risk reduction based on proposed SIS design. - Abstract: In order to remain economically effective and financially profitable, the modern industries have to take their safety culture to a higher level and consider production losses in addition to simple accident prevention techniques. Ideally, compliance with safety requirements start during early design stages, but in some older facilities provisions for Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) may not have been originally included. In this paper, a case study of a Reheater Drains (RD) system is used to illustrate such an example. Frequent failures of tank level controller lead to transients where the operation of shutting down RD pumps requires operators to manually isolate the quenching water and to close the main steam admission valves. Water in this system is at saturation temperature for the reheater steam side pressure, and any manual operation of the system is highly undesirable due to hazards of working with wet steam at approximately 758 kPa(g) pressure, preheated to 237 °C. Additionally, losses of inventory are highly undesirable as well and challenge other systems in the plant. In this paper, it is suggested that RD system can benefit from installation of an independent SIS system in order to address current challenges. This idea is being explored using IEC 61508 framework for “Functional safety of electrical/electronic/programmable electronic safety-related systems” to provide assurance that the SIS will offer the necessary risk reduction required to achieve required safety for the equipment.

  5. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  6. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  7. Using quality and safety education for nurses to guide clinical teaching on a new dedicated education unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKown, Terri; McKeon, Leslie; McKown, Leslie; Webb, Sherry

    2011-12-01

    Gaps exist in health professional education versus the demands of current practice. Leveraging front-line nurses to teach students exemplary practice in a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) may narrow this gap. The DEU is an innovative model for experiential learning, capitalizing on the expertise of staff nurses as clinical teachers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a new academic-practice DEU in facilitating quality and safety competency achievement among students. Six clinical teachers received education in clinical teaching and use of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies to guide acquisition of essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes for continuous health care improvement. Twelve students assigned to the six teachers completed daily logs for the 10-week practicum. Findings suggest that DEU students achieved QSEN competencies through clinical teacher mentoring in interdisciplinary collaboration, using electronic information for best practice and patient teaching, patient/family decision making, quality improvement, and resolution of safety issues.

  8. Different sets of reliability data and success criteria in a probabilistic safety assessment for a plant producing nitroglycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmanns, Ulrich

    2009-03-15

    The lack of plant-specific reliability data for probabilistic safety assessments usually makes it necessary to use generic reliability data. Justifiably different assessments of plant behaviour (success criteria) lead to different models of plant systems. Both affect the numerical results of a probabilistic safety assessment. It is shown how these results change, if different sets of reliability data and different choices of success criteria for the safety system are employed. Differences in results may influence decisions taken on their basis and become especially important if compliance with a safety goal has to be proved, e.g. a safety integrity level. For the purpose of demonstration an accident sequence from a probabilistic safety assessment of a plant producing nitroglycol is used. The analysis relies on plant-specific reliability data so that it provides a good yardstick for comparing it with results obtained using generic data. The superiority of plant-specific data, which should of course be acquired, cannot be doubted. Nevertheless, plant safety can be improved even if generic data are used. However, the assignment to a safety integrity level may be affected by differences in both data and success criteria.

  9. Reliability study: digital engineered safety feature actuation system of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarno [National Nuclear Energy Agency, Batan (Indonesia); Kang, H. G.; Jang, S. C.; Eom, H. S.; Ha, J. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    The usage of digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) in a nuclear power plant becomes more extensive, including safety related systems. The PSA application of these new designs are very important in order to evaluate their reliability. In particular, Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPPs), typically Ulchin 5 and 6 (UCN 5 and 6) reactor units, adopted the digital safety-critical systems such as Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered Safety Feature Actuation System (DESFAS). In this research, we developed fault tree models for assessing the unavailability of the DESFAS functions. We also performed an analysis of the quantification results. The unavailability results of different DESFAS functions showed that their values are comprised from 5.461E-5 to 3.14E-4. The system unavailability of DESFAS AFAS-1 is estimated as 5.461E-5, which is about 27% less than that of analog system if we consider the difference of human failure probability estimation between both analyses. The results of this study could be utilized in risk-effect analysis of KSNPP. We expect that the safety analysis result will contribute to design feedback.

  10. Core safety of Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs) under extreme conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J B Joshi; A K Nayak; M Singhal; D Mukhopadhaya

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear power is currently the fourth largest source of electricity production in India after thermal, hydro and renewable sources of electricity. Currently, India has 20 nuclear reactors in operation and seven other reactors are under construction. Most of these reactors are indigenously designed and built Heavy Water Reactors. In addition, a 300 MWe Advanced Heavy Water Reactor has already been designed and in the process of deployment in near future for demonstration of power production from Thorium apart from enhanced safety features by passive means. India has ambitious plans to enhance the share of electricity production from nuclear. The recent Fukushima accident has raised concerns of safety of Nuclear Power Plants worldwide. The Fukushima accident was caused by extreme events, i.e., large earthquake followed by gigantic Tsunami which are not expected to hit India’s coast considering the geography of India and historical records. Nevertheless, systematic investigations have been conducted by nuclear scientists in India to evaluate the safety of the current Nuclear Power Plants in case of occurrence of such extreme events in any nuclear site. This paper gives a brief outline of the safety features of Indian Heavy Water Reactors for prevention and mitigation of such extreme events. The probabilistic safety analysis revealed that the risk from Indian Heavy Water Reactors are negligibly small.

  11. Safety of 1000 CT-guided steroid injections with air used to localize the epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A; Pochert, S; Romano, C; Brook, A; Miller, T

    2011-10-01

    Historically, ESIs were performed without any imaging guidance, resulting in erroneous placement in up to 30% of injections. Fluoroscopic imaging is now used to guide most procedures. Recently, several reports have described the use of CT to guide ESIs instead of fluoroscopy. CT provides the ability to use air as contrast to localize the epidural space. This retrospective review will discuss findings in 1000 CT-guided ESIs with air localization.

  12. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  13. RNA-guided genome editing in plants using a CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kabin; Yang, Yinong

    2013-11-01

    Precise and straightforward methods to edit the plant genome are much needed for functional genomics and crop improvement. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using bacterial Type II cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease (Cas) is emerging as an efficient tool for genome editing in microbial and animal systems. Here, we report the genome editing and targeted gene mutation in plants via the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Three guide RNAs (gRNAs) with a 20-22-nt seed region were designed to pair with distinct rice genomic sites which are followed by the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). The engineered gRNAs were shown to direct the Cas9 nuclease for precise cleavage at the desired sites and introduce mutation (insertion or deletion) by error-prone non-homologous end joining DNA repairing. By analyzing the RNA-guided genome-editing events, the mutation efficiency at these target sites was estimated to be 3-8%. In addition, the off-target effect of an engineered gRNA-Cas9 was found on an imperfectly paired genomic site, but it had lower genome-editing efficiency than the perfectly matched site. Further analysis suggests that mismatch position between gRNA seed and target DNA is an important determinant of the gRNA-Cas9 targeting specificity, and specific gRNAs could be designed to target more than 90% of rice genes. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas system can be exploited as a powerful tool for gene targeting and precise genome editing in plants.

  14. User's guide for PRISIM (Plant Risk Status Information Management System) Arkansas Nuclear One--Unit 1: Volume 2, Program for regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.J.; Guthrie, V.H.; Kirchner, J.R.; Kirkman, J.Q.; Paula, H.M.; Ellison, B.C.; Dycus, F.M.; Farquharson, J.A.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1988-03-01

    This user's guide is a two-volume document designed to teach NRC inspectors and NRC regulators how to access probabilistic risk assessment information from the two Plant Risk Status Information Management System (PRISIM) programs developed for Arkansas Nuclear One--Unit One (ANA-1). This document, Volume 2, describes how the PRA information available in Version 2.0 of PRISIM is useful as an evaluation tool for regulatory activities. Using PRISIM is useful as an evaluation tool for regulatory activities. Using PRISIM, regulators can both access PRA information and modify the information to assess the impact these changes may have on plant safety. Each volume is a stand-alone document.

  15. Treatment guided by rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in Tanzanian children: safety and alternative bacterial diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sykes Alma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO guidelines for the treatment of young children with suspected malaria have recently changed from presumptive treatment to anti-malarial treatment guided by a blood slide or malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT. However, there is limited evidence of the safety of this policy in routine outpatient settings in Africa. Methods Children 3-59 months of age with a non-severe febrile illness and no obvious cause were enrolled over a period of one year in a malaria endemic area of Tanzania. Treatment was determined by the results of a clinical examination and RDT result, and blood culture and serum lactate were also collected. RDT-negative children were followed up over 14 days. Results Over the course of one year, 965 children were enrolled; 158 (16.4% were RDT-positive and treated with artemether-lumefantrine and 807 (83.4% were RDT-negative and treated with non-anti-malarial medicines. Compared with RDT-positives, RDT-negative children were on average younger with a lower axillary temperature and more likely to have a history of cough or difficulty in breathing. Six (0.6% children became RDT-positive after enrolment, all of whom were PCR-negative for Plasmodium falciparum DNA at enrolment. In addition, 12 (1.2% children were admitted to hospital, one with possible malaria, none of whom died. A bacterial pathogen was identified in 9/965 (0.9% children, eight of whom were RDT-negative and one was RDT-positive, but slide-negative. Excluding three children with Salmonella typhi, all of the children with bacteraemia were ≤12 months of age. Compared to double-read research slide results RDTs had a sensitivity of 97.8% (95%CI 96.9-98.7 and specificity of 96.3% (95%CI 96.3-98.4. Conclusions Use of RDTs to direct the use of anti-malarial drugs in young children did not result in any missed diagnoses of malaria although new infections soon after a consultation with a negative RDT result may undermine confidence in results. Invasive

  16. How to create economic incentives in occupational safety and health: A practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsler, D.; Heyer, A.; Kuhl, K.; Eeckelaert, L.; Chatzigiannoglou, C.; Maier, A.; Cuervo, M.; Elsler, D.; Frusteri, L.; Charalambous, A.; Molinaro, R.; Steiger, O.; Brummer, E.; Penttila, M.; Petrisic, N.; Vanadzins, I.; Benedetti, F.; Karadeniz, O.; Treutlein, D.; Tompa, E.; Kohstall, T.; Nicot, A.M.; Tynkkynen, M.; Kruger, H.; Wittig, K.; Stadnik, M.; Jones, C.; Epegui, H.; Lunde-Jensen, P.; Ottati, M.; Pecillo-Pacek, M.; Greef, M.de; Mierlo, M. van; Maya Rubio, M.I.; Kahr, J.; Sapir, M.

    2011-01-01

    This Guide on Economic Incentives Schemes is intended to serve as a practical and user-friendly guide to help incentive providers to create or optimise their own economic incentive schemes. Incentives schemes should not only reward past results of good OSH management (such as low accident numbers),

  17. How to create economic incentives in occupational safety and health: A practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsler, D.; Heyer, A.; Kuhl, K.; Eeckelaert, L.; Chatzigiannoglou, C.; Maier, A.; Cuervo, M.; Elsler, D.; Frusteri, L.; Charalambous, A.; Molinaro, R.; Steiger, O.; Brummer, E.; Penttila, M.; Petrisic, N.; Vanadzins, I.; Benedetti, F.; Karadeniz, O.; Treutlein, D.; Tompa, E.; Kohstall, T.; Nicot, A.M.; Tynkkynen, M.; Kruger, H.; Wittig, K.; Stadnik, M.; Jones, C.; Epegui, H.; Lunde-Jensen, P.; Ottati, M.; Pecillo-Pacek, M.; Greef, M.de; Mierlo, M. van; Maya Rubio, M.I.; Kahr, J.; Sapir, M.

    2011-01-01

    This Guide on Economic Incentives Schemes is intended to serve as a practical and user-friendly guide to help incentive providers to create or optimise their own economic incentive schemes. Incentives schemes should not only reward past results of good OSH management (such as low accident numbers),

  18. 10 CFR 50.49 - Environmental qualification of electric equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... important to safety for nuclear power plants. 50.49 Section 50.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... nuclear power plants. (a) Each holder of or an applicant for an operating license issued under this part... nuclear power plant for which the certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) or § 52.110(a)(1) of...

  19. Dinosaurs and Power Plants. Energy from the Past for the Future. Teacher's Lesson Plan and Activity Guide; Teacher's Guide Supplement of Reproducible Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Fossil Energy.

    This teacher's guide and its accompanying supplement were prepared for use with the U.S. Department of Energy's Dinosaurs and Power Plants, a publication designed for students in grades 5-8 about the history, detection, extraction, transportation, use, environmental problem/solutions, and future of fossil energy. The study of energy science shows…

  20. A probabilistic safety analysis of UF{sub 6} handling at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.J.; Lewis, S.R.; Summitt, R.L. [Safety and Reliability Optimization Services (SAROS), Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A probabilistic safety study of UF{sub 6} handling activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant has recently been completed. The analysis provides a unique perspective on the safety of UF{sub 6} handling activities. The estimated release frequencies provide an understanding of current risks, and the examination of individual contributors yields a ranking of important plant features and operations. Aside from the probabilistic results, however, there is an even more important benefit derived from a systematic modeling of all operations. The integrated approach employed in the analysis allows the interrelationships among the equipment and the required operations to be explored in depth. This paper summarizes the methods used in the study and provides an overview of some of the technical insights that were obtained. Specific areas of possible improvement in operations are described.

  1. Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well.

  2. Organizational analysis and safety for utilities with nuclear power plants: perspectives for organizational assessment. Volume 2. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, R.N.; Olson, J.; Sommers, P.E.; McLaughlin, S.D.; Jackson, M.S.; Nadel, M.V.; Scott, W.G.; Connor, P.E.; Kerwin, N.; Kennedy, J.K. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    This two-volume report presents the results of initial research on the feasibility of applying organizational factors in nuclear power plant (NPP) safety assessment. Volume 1 of this report contains an overview of the literature, a discussion of available safety indicators, and a series of recommendations for more systematically incorporating organizational analysis into investigations of nuclear power plant safety. The six chapters of this volume discuss the major elements in our general approach to safety in the nuclear industry. The chapters include information on organizational design and safety; organizational governance; utility environment and safety related outcomes; assessments by selected federal agencies; review of data sources in the nuclear power industry; and existing safety indicators.

  3. Safety system status monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  4. Implementation of external hazards in Probabilistic Safety Assessment for nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manorma; Klug, Joakim; Raimond, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    The paper will focus on the discussion on implementation of external hazards in the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methods for the extreme external hazards mainly focused on Seismic, Flooding, Meteorological Hazards (e.g. Storm, Extreme temperature, snow pack), Biological infestation, Lightening hazards, Accidental Aircraft crash and man- made hazards including natural external fire and external explosion. This will include discussion on identification of some good practices on the implementation of external hazards in Level 1 PSA, with a perspective of development of extended PSA and introduction of relevant modelling for external hazards in an existing Level 1 PSA. This paper is associated to the European project ASAMPSAE (www.asampsa.eu) which gathers more than 30 organizations (industry, research, safety control) from Europe, US and Japan and which aims at identifying some meaningful practices to extend the scope and the quality of the existing probabilistic safety analysis developed for nuclear power plants.

  5. Safety evaluation for packaging for onsite transfer of B Plant organic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-10-07

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes the use of a 17,500-L (4,623-gal) tank manufactured by Brenner Tank, Incorporated, to transport up to 16,221 L (4,285 gal) of radioactive organic liquid waste. The waste will be transported from the organic loading pad to a storage pad. Both pads are within the B Plant complex, but approximately 4 mi apart.

  6. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Jenkins, C.E.; Rhoads, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Safety and cost information were developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing plant with characteristics similar to the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. The main process building, spent fuel receiving and storage station, liquid radioactive waste storage tank system, and a conceptual high-level waste-solidification facility were postulated to be decommissioned. The plant was conceptually decommissioned to three decommissioning states or modes; layaway, protective storage, and dismantlement. Assuming favorable work performance, the elapsed time required to perform the decommissioning work in each mode following plant shutdown was estimated to be 2.4 years for layaway, 2.7 years for protective storage, and 5.2 years for dismantlement. In addition to these times, approximately 2 years of planning and preparation are required before plant shutdown. Costs, in constant 1975 dollars, for decommissioning were estimated to be $18 million for layaway, $19 million for protective storage and $58 million for dismantlement. Maintenance and surveillance costs were estimated to be $680,000 per year after layaway and $140,000 per year after protective storage. The combination mode of protective storage followed by dismantlement deferred for 10, 30, and 100 years was estimated to cost $64 million, $67 million and $77 million, respectively, in nondiscounted total 1975 dollars. Present values of these costs give reduced costs as dismantlement is deferred. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year radiation dose commitment to the members of the public from airborne releases from normal decommissioning activities were estimated to be less than 11 man-rem.

  7. Impact of mechanical- and maintenance-induced failures of main reactor coolant pump seals on plant safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarm, M A; Boccio, J L; Mitra, S

    1985-12-01

    This document presents an investigation of the safety impact resulting from mechanical- and maintenance-induced reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal failures in nuclear power plants. A data survey of the pump seal failures for existing nuclear power plants in the US from several available sources was performed. The annual frequency of pump seal failures in a nuclear power plant was estimated based on the concept of hazard rate and dependency evaluation. The conditional probability of various sizes of leak rates given seal failures was then evaluated. The safety impact of RCP seal failures, in terms of contribution to plant core-melt frequency, was also evaluated for three nuclear power plants. For leak rates below the normal makeup capacity and the impact of plant safety were discussed qualitatively, whereas for leak rates beyond the normal make up capacity, formal PRA methodologies were applied. 22 refs., 17 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Consumer Product Safety: What's It All About? Teacher's Guide. No. 8-T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    Designed as a flexible resource, this material may be used independently or in conjunction with existing safety, health, consumer education, economics, or social studies units. To facilitate the incorporation of product safety information into the curriculum, the suggested activities section lists major concepts to be developed and indicates…

  9. Peculiar Evolutionary History of miR390-Guided TAS3-Like Genes in Land Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Krasnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based approach was used as a phylogenetic profiling tool to probe genomic DNA samples from representatives of evolutionary distant moss taxa, namely, classes Bryopsida, Tetraphidopsida, Polytrichopsida, Andreaeopsida, and Sphagnopsida. We found relatives of all Physcomitrella patens miR390 and TAS3-like loci in these plant taxa excluding Sphagnopsida. Importantly, cloning and sequencing of Marchantia polymorpha genomic DNA showed miR390 and TAS3-like sequences which were also found among genomic reads of M. polymorpha at NCBI database. Our data suggest that the ancient plant miR390-dependent TAS molecular machinery firstly evolved to target AP2-like mRNAs in Marchantiophyta and only then both ARF- and AP2-specific mRNAs in mosses. The presented analysis shows that moss TAS3 families may undergone losses of tasiAP2 sites during evolution toward ferns and seed plants. These data confirm that miR390-guided genes coding for ARF- and AP2-specific ta-siRNAs have been gradually changed during land plant evolution.

  10. Zebrafish bioassay-guided natural product discovery: isolation of angiogenesis inhibitors from East African medicinal plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Crawford

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS. Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products.

  11. Zebrafish Bioassay-Guided Natural Product Discovery: Isolation of Angiogenesis Inhibitors from East African Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alexander D.; Liekens, Sandra; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R.; Maes, Jan; Munck, Sebastian; Busson, Roger; Rozenski, Jef; Esguerra, Camila V.; de Witte, Peter A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS). Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products. PMID:21379387

  12. Complying with Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations: a guide for compounding pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Bill; Nain, John

    2013-01-01

    In the compounding pharmacy, compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations is essential to protect employees and customers from exposure to hazardous substances and a dangerous environment, to avert heavy fines and penalties levied for noncompliance, and to fulfill the moral obligation of pharmacists to do no harm. Without adequate vigilance, compounders are vulnerable to lapses in adherence to Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements, the results of which can be dire in a climate of increased scrutiny about the safety and integrity of pharmaceutical compounding. Proactively addressing necessary compliance with essential safety regulations can only benefit compounders and their staff and clients, and guidance from an expert in Occupational Safety and Health Administration requirements can be a key factor in accomplishing that goal.

  13. Olfactory cues from plants infected by powdery mildew guide foraging by a mycophagous ladybird beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Jun; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    Powdery mildews (Erysiphales) are economically important plant pathogens that attack many agricultural crops. Conventional management strategies involving fungicide application face challenges, including the evolution of resistance and concerns over impacts on non-target organisms, that call for investigation of more sustainable alternatives. Mycophagous ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) feed on powdery mildew and have considerable potential as biological control agents; however, the foraging ecology and behavior of these beetles is not well understood. Here we document the olfactory cues presented by squash plants (Cucurbita moschata) infected by powdery mildew (Podosphaera sp.) and the behavioral responses of twenty-spotted ladybird beetles (Psyllobora vigintimaculata) to these cues. Volatile analyses through gas chromatography revealed a number of volatile compounds characteristic of infected plants, including 3-octanol and its analogues 1-octen-3-ol and 3-octanone. These compounds are typical "moldy" odorants previously reported in volatiles collected from other fungi. In addition, infected plants exhibited elevated emissions of several compounds also observed in collections from healthy leaves, including linalool and benzyl alcohol, which are reported to have anti-fungal properties. In Y-tube choice assays, P. vigintimaculata beetles displayed a significant preference for the odors of infected plants compared to those of healthy plants. Moreover, beetles exhibited strong attraction to one individual compound, 1-octen-3-ol, which was the most abundant of the characteristic fungal compounds identified. These results enhance our understanding of the olfactory cues that guide foraging by mycophagous insects and may facilitate the development of integrated disease-management strategies informed by an understanding of underlying ecological mechanisms.

  14. Olfactory cues from plants infected by powdery mildew guide foraging by a mycophagous ladybird beetle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tabata

    Full Text Available Powdery mildews (Erysiphales are economically important plant pathogens that attack many agricultural crops. Conventional management strategies involving fungicide application face challenges, including the evolution of resistance and concerns over impacts on non-target organisms, that call for investigation of more sustainable alternatives. Mycophagous ladybird beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae feed on powdery mildew and have considerable potential as biological control agents; however, the foraging ecology and behavior of these beetles is not well understood. Here we document the olfactory cues presented by squash plants (Cucurbita moschata infected by powdery mildew (Podosphaera sp. and the behavioral responses of twenty-spotted ladybird beetles (Psyllobora vigintimaculata to these cues. Volatile analyses through gas chromatography revealed a number of volatile compounds characteristic of infected plants, including 3-octanol and its analogues 1-octen-3-ol and 3-octanone. These compounds are typical "moldy" odorants previously reported in volatiles collected from other fungi. In addition, infected plants exhibited elevated emissions of several compounds also observed in collections from healthy leaves, including linalool and benzyl alcohol, which are reported to have anti-fungal properties. In Y-tube choice assays, P. vigintimaculata beetles displayed a significant preference for the odors of infected plants compared to those of healthy plants. Moreover, beetles exhibited strong attraction to one individual compound, 1-octen-3-ol, which was the most abundant of the characteristic fungal compounds identified. These results enhance our understanding of the olfactory cues that guide foraging by mycophagous insects and may facilitate the development of integrated disease-management strategies informed by an understanding of underlying ecological mechanisms.

  15. Aging of turbine drives for safety-related pumps in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study was performed to examine the relationship between time-dependent degradation and current industry practices in the areas of maintenance, surveillance, and operation of steam turbine drives for safety-related pumps. These pumps are located in the Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) system for pressurized-water reactor plants and in the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling and High-Pressure Coolant Injection systems for boiling-water reactor plants. This research has been conducted by examination of failure data in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, review of Licensee Event Reports, discussion of problems with operating plant personnel, and personal observation. The reported failure data were reviewed to determine the cause of the event and the method of discovery. Based on the research results, attempts have been made to determine the predictability of failures and possible preventive measures that may be implemented. Findings in a recent study of AFW systems indicate that the turbine drive is the single largest contributor to AFW system degradation. However, examination of the data shows that the turbine itself is a reliable piece of equipment with a good service record. Most of the problems documented are the result of problems with the turbine controls and the mechanical overspeed trip mechanism; these apparently stem from three major causes which are discussed in the text. Recent improvements in maintenance practices and procedures, combined with a stabilization of the design, have led to improved performance resulting in a reliable safety-related component. However, these improvements have not been universally implemented.

  16. Safety and efficacy of AVE gfx stent implantation via 6 Fr guiding catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemeneij, F; Laarman, G J; Odekerken, D; Slagboom, T; van der Wieken, R

    1999-08-01

    This prospective study was designed to determine the feasibility of AVE gfx premounted stent systems in combination with 6 Fr guides. Between 1 April and 12 August 1997, 230 patients underwent AVE gfx coronary stent implantation via 6 Fr guides. The radial approach was used in 146 patients (63.5%). In 230 procedures (293 lesions), 237 guiding catheters were used. A total of 331 AVE gfx stents were implanted, 1.4 per patient. Backup, opacification, and friction were considered good in 85.8%, 96.4%, and 76.7%, respectively. Slight and severe friction was felt during combined use of long (> or = 18 mm), large-sized (3.5 mm) stents and small-sized guiding catheters (inner diameter, 0.061-0.062"). The presence of a second protecting guidewire impaired passage of the AVE gfx stent, also in large 6 Fr guides (ID 0.064"). Of 331, 320 (96.7%) stents were successfully deployed at the initial attempt. Ten stents (3%) had to be retrieved. Six of these were successfully placed at a second attempt and three slipped off the balloon, all successfully retrieved from the patient's circulation. At 1 month, 217 patients (94.4%) were free of events. The AVE gfx stent is compatible with 6 Fr guiding catheters. Use of new-generation, large-bore 6 Fr gc (> or = 0.064") is recommended.

  17. Food plant toxicants and safety - Risk assessment and regulation of inherent toxicants in plant foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essers, A.J.A.; Alink, G.M.; Speijers, G.J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The ADI as a tool for risk management and regulation of food additives and pesticide residues is not readily applicable to inherent food plant toxicants: The margin between actual intake and potentially toxic levels is often small; application of the default uncertainty factors used to derive ADI...... values, particularly when extrapolating from animal data, would prohibit the utilisation of the food, which may have an overall beneficial health effect. Levels of inherent toxicants are difficult to control; their complete removal is not always wanted, due to their function for the plant or for human...... health. The health impact of the inherent toxicant is often modified by factors in the food, e.g. the bioavailability from the matrix and interaction with other inherent constituents. Risk-benefit analysis should be made for different consumption scenarios, without the use of uncertainty factors. Crucial...

  18. National nuclear power plant safety research 2007-2010. Proposal for SAFIR2010 framework plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A country utilising nuclear energy is presumed to possess a sufficient infrastructure to cover the education and research in this field, besides the operating organisations of the plants and a regulatory body. The starting point of public nuclear safety research programmes is that they provide the necessary conditions for retaining the knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe and economic use of nuclear power, for development of new know-how and for participation in international cooperation. In fact, the Finnish organisations engaged in research in this sector have been an important resource which the various ministries, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and the power companies have had at their disposal. Ministry of Trade and Industry appointed a group to write the Framework Plan of the new programme. This report contains a proposal for the general outline of the programme, preliminarily entitled as SAFIR2010 (SAfety of Nuclear Power Plants - Finnish National Research Programme). The plan has been made for the period 2007-2010, but it is based on safety challenges identified for a longer time span as well. Olkiluoto 3, the new nuclear power plant unit under construction has also been taken into account in the plan. The safety challenges set by the existing plants and the new plant unit, as well as the ensuing research needs do, however, converge to a great extent. The research programme is strongly based on the Chapter 7a of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act. The construction of the new power plant unit will increase the need for experts in the field in Finland. At the same time, the retirement of the existing experts is continuing. These factors together will call for more education and training, in which active research activities play a key role. This situation also makes long-term safety research face a great challenge. The Framework Plan aims to define the important research needs related to the safety challenges. The research into

  19. Evaluation of a non-targeted "Omic"' approach in the safety assessment of genetically modified plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kok, E. J.; Knuthsen, Pia;

    2006-01-01

    Genetically modified plants must be approved before release in the European Union, and the approval is generally based upon a comparison of various characteristics between the transgenic plant and a conventional counterpart. As a case study, focusing on safety assessment of genetically modified...... plants, we here report the development and characterisation of six independently transformed Arabidopsis thaliana lines modified in the flavonoid biosynthesis. Analyses of integration events and comparative analysis for characterisation of the intended effects were performed by PCR, quantitative Real......, no unintended effects were identified. However, we found that the majority of genes showing differential expression were identified as stress-related genes and that environmental conditions had a large impact on the expression of several genes, proteins, and metabolites. We suggest that the microarray approach...

  20. People detection in nuclear plants by video processing for safety purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Seixas, Jose M.; Silva, Eduardo Antonio B., E-mail: seixas@lps.ufrj.b, E-mail: eduardo@lps.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica; Cota, Raphael E.; Ramos, Bruno L., E-mail: brunolange@poli.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EP/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletronica e de Computacao

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the development of a surveillance system for safety purposes in nuclear plants. The final objective is to track people online in videos, in order to estimate the dose received by personnel, during the execution of working tasks in nuclear plants. The estimation will be based on their tracked positions and on dose rate mapping in a real nuclear plant at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Argonauta nuclear research reactor. Cameras have been installed within Argonauta's room, supplying the data needed. Both video processing and statistical signal processing techniques may be used for detection, segmentation and tracking people in video. This first paper reports people segmentation in video using background subtraction, by two different approaches, namely frame differences, and blind signal separation based on the independent component analysis method. Results are commented, along with perspectives for further work. (author)

  1. SAFETY

    CERN Document Server

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  2. Health-safety and environmental risk assessment of power plants using multi criteria decision making method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozi Ali Seyed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing importance of environmental issues at global and regional levels including pollution of water, air etc. as well as the outcomes such as global warming and climate change has led to being considered environmental aspects as effective factors for power generation. Study ahead, aims at examination of risks resulting from activities of Yazd Combined Cycle Power Plant located in Iran. Method applied in the research is analytical hierarchy process. After identification of factors causing risk, the analytical hierarchy structure of the power plant risks were designed and weight of the criteria and sub-criteria were calculated by intensity probability product using Eigenvector Method and EXPERT CHOICE Software as well. Results indicate that in technological, health-safety, biophysical and socio economic sections of the power plant, factors influenced by the power plant activities like fire and explosion, hearing loss, quantity of groundwater, power generation are among the most important factors causing risk in the power plant. The drop in underground water levels is the most important natural consequence influenced on Yazd Combined Cycle Power Plant.

  3. Monitoring of hot pipes at the power plant Neurath using guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihnacht, Bianca; Klesse, Thomas; Neubeck, Robert; Schubert, Lars

    2013-04-01

    In order to reduce the CO2-emissions and to increase the energy efficiency, the operating temperatures of power plants will be increased up to 720°C. This demands for novel high-performance steels in the piping systems. Higher temperatures lead to a higher risk of damage and have a direct impact on the structure stability and the deposition structure. Adequately trusted results for the prediction of the residual service life of those high strength steels are not available so far. To overcome these problems the implementation of an online monitoring system in addition to periodic testing is needed. RWE operates the lignite power plant Neurath. All test and research activities have to be checked regarding their safety and have to be coordinated with the business operation of the plant. An extra bypass was established for this research and made the investigations independent from the power plant operating. In order to protect the actuators and sensors from the heat radiated from the pipe, waveguides were welded to the bypass. The data was evaluated regarding their dependencies on the environmental influences like temperature and correction algorithms were developed. Furthermore, damages were introduced into the pipe with diameters of 8 mm to 10 mm and successfully detected by the acoustic method.

  4. Characterisation of Liquefaction Effects for Beyond-Design Basis Safety Assessment of Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bán, Zoltán; Győri, Erzsébet; János Katona, Tamás; Tóth, László

    2015-04-01

    -tree procedure. Earlier studies have shown that the potentially liquefiable layer at Paks Nuclear Power Plant is situated in relatively large depth. Therefore the applicability and adequacy of the methods at high overburden pressure is important. In case of existing facilities, the geotechnical data gained before construction aren't sufficient for the comprehensive liquefaction analysis. Performance of new geotechnical survey is limited. Consequently, the availability of the data has to be accounted while selection the analysis methods. Considerations have to be made for dealing with aleatory uncertainty related to the knowledge of the soil conditions. It is shown in the paper, a careful comparison and analysis of the results obtained by different methodologies provides the basis of the selection of practicable methods for the safety analysis of nuclear power plant for beyond design basis liquefaction hazard.

  5. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

  6. 新版IAEA安全导则《核电厂地震危险性评价》的分析与评述%Analysis and Discussions on the New IAEA Safety Guide "Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘华; 吴健

    2006-01-01

    本文分析了国际原子能机构新颁布的安全导则"Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants(NS-G-3.3)"与前版导则相比在内容、方法上的一些显著的变化;同时,结合我国核电厂厂址地震安全性评价的方法和实践,对该新版导则在我国的引进和应用中应该注意的问题,进行了评述.

  7. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  8. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C. E.; Murphy, E. S.; Schneider, K J

    1979-01-01

    Detailed technology, safety and cost information are presented for the conceptual decommissioning of a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Alternate methods of decommissioning are described including immediate dismantlement, safe storage for a period of time followed by dismantlement and entombment. Safety analyses, both occupational and public, and cost evaluations were conducted for each mode.

  9. Safety and nutritional assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed: The role of animal feeding trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haver, van E.; Alink, G.M.; Cockburn, A.; Kuiper, H.A.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report the various elements of the safety and nutritional assessment procedure for genetically modified (GM) plant derived food and feed are discussed, in particular the potential and limitations of animal feeding trials for the safety and nutritional testing of whole GM food and feed. The g

  10. Safety and nutritional assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed: The role of animal feeding trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haver, van E.; Alink, G.M.; Cockburn, A.; Kuiper, H.A.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report the various elements of the safety and nutritional assessment procedure for genetically modified (GM) plant derived food and feed are discussed, in particular the potential and limitations of animal feeding trials for the safety and nutritional testing of whole GM food and feed. The

  11. Safety Assessment of Low-Contaminated Equipment Dismantling at Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidijus Babilas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The decommissioning of nuclear facilities requires adequate planning and demonstration that dismantling and decontamination activities can be conducted safely. Existing safety standards require that an appropriate safety assessment be performed to support the decommissioning plan for each facility (International Atomic Energy Agency, 2006. This paper presents safety assessment approach used in Lithuania during the development of the first dismantling and decontamination project for Ignalina NPP. The paper will mainly focus on the identification and assessment of the hazards raised due to dismantling and decontamination activities at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant and on the assessment of the nonradiological and radiological consequences of the indicated most dangerous initiating event. The drop of heavy item was indicated as one of most dangerous initiating events for the discussed Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant dismantling and decontamination project. For the analysis of the nonradiological impact the finite element model for the load drop force calculation was developed. The radiological impact was evaluated in those accident cases which would lead to the worst radiological consequences. The assessments results show that structural integrity of the building and supporting columns of building structures will be maintained and radiological consequences are lower than the annual regulatory operator dose limit.

  12. Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Bouldin, Don [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Smith, Stephen Fulton [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  13. Probabilistic safety assessment for optimum nuclear power plant life management (PLiM) theory and application of reliability analysis methods for major power plant components

    CERN Document Server

    Arkadov, G V; Rodionov, A N

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment methods are used to calculate nuclear power plant durability and resource lifetime. Directing preventative maintenance, this title provides a comprehensive review of the theory and application of these methods.$bProbabilistic safety assessment methods are used to calculate nuclear power plant durability and resource lifetime. Successful calculation of the reliability and ageing of components is critical for forecasting safety and directing preventative maintenance, and Probabilistic safety assessment for optimum nuclear power plant life management provides a comprehensive review of the theory and application of these methods. Part one reviews probabilistic methods for predicting the reliability of equipment. Following an introduction to key terminology, concepts and definitions, formal-statistical and various physico-statistical approaches are discussed. Approaches based on the use of defect-free models are considered, along with those using binomial distribution and models bas...

  14. Safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the safety codes A9, A10 AND A11 (ex annexes of SAPOCO/42) entitled respectively "Safety responsibilities in the divisions" "The safety policy committee (SAPOCO) and safety officers' committees" and "Administrative procedure following a serious accident or incident" are available on the web at the following URLs: Code A9: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337016/LAST_RELEASED Code A10: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337019/LAST_RELEASED Code A11: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337026/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. TIS Secretariat

  15. The safety assessment of food ingredients derived from plant cell, tissue and organ cultures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Georgiev, Milen I; Park, So-Young; Dandin, Vijayalaxmi S; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2015-06-01

    Plant cell, tissue and organ cultures (PCTOC) have become an increasingly attractive alternative for the production of various high molecular weight molecules which are used as flavourings, fragrances, colouring agents and food additives. Although PCTOC products are cultivated in vitro in a contamination free environment, the raw material produced from PCTOC may contain many components apart from the target compound. In some cases, PCTOC raw materials may also carry toxins, which may be naturally occurring or accumulated during the culture process. Assessment of the safety of PCTOC products is, therefore, a priority of the biotech industries involved in their production. The safety assessment involves the evaluation of starting material, production process and the end product. Before commercialisation, PCTOC products should be evaluated for their chemical and biological properties, as well as for their toxicity. In this review, measures and general criteria for biosafety evaluation of PCTOC products are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  16. Human Factors engineering criteria and design for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant preliminary safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.A.; Schur, A.; Stitzel, J.C.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides a rationale and systematic methodology for bringing Human Factors into the safety design and operations of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). Human Factors focuses on how people perform work with tools and machine systems in designed settings. When the design of machine systems and settings take into account the capabilities and limitations of the individuals who use them, human performance can be enhanced while protecting against susceptibility to human error. The inclusion of Human Factors in the safety design of the HWVP is an essential ingredient to safe operation of the facility. The HWVP is a new construction, nonreactor nuclear facility designed to process radioactive wastes held in underground storage tanks into glass logs for permanent disposal. Its design and mission offer new opposites for implementing Human Factors while requiring some means for ensuring that the Human Factors assessments are sound, comprehensive, and appropriately directed.

  17. Resolving plant operational issues related to pressurizer safety relief valve piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bain, R.A. [Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Div.; Testa, M.F. [Duquesne Light Co., Shippingport, PA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1995-11-01

    Pressurizer safety and relief valve (PSARV) piping has many technical issues related to the qualification and operation of the system that have been addressed at Beaver Valley Unit 2. The PSARV piping is part of a system that must meet Code requirements while being subjected to very significant fluid transient loadings. Valve components include safety valves, power operated relief valves (PORVs), and motor operated block valves. Fluid slugs upstream of these valves can be steam or can be hot or cold water, resulting in a significant variance in possible slug densities. Problems with design options and hardware installed to decrease slug density such as heat tracing, and the susceptibility of the PORVs to leak are issues that affect plant operation, efficiency and cost effectiveness.

  18. Safety in the Elementary Science Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    This guide gives elementary school teachers suggestions for providing a safe environment for their students and covers general safety concerns in the science classroom. Information is printed in a flip chart format for easy reference. Safety areas covered include: (1) In Case of Accident; (2) Eye Protection; (3) Plants in the Classroom; (4) First…

  19. Feasibility, repeatability, and safety of ultrasound-guided stimulation of the first cervical nerve at the alar foramen in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mespoulhès-Rivière, Céline; Brandenberger, Olivier; Rossignol, Fabrice; Robert, Céline; Perkins, Justin D; Marie, Jean-Paul; Ducharme, Norm

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and assess the feasibility, repeatability, and safety of an ultrasound-guided technique to stimulate the first cervical nerve (FCN) at the level of the alar foramen of the atlas of horses. ANIMALS 4 equine cadavers and 6 clinically normal Standardbreds. PROCEDURES In each cadaver, the FCN pathway was determined by dissection, and any anastomosis between the first and second cervical nerves was identified. Subsequently, each of 6 live horses underwent a bilateral ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen 3 times at 3-week intervals. After each procedure, horses were examined daily for 5 days. RESULTS In each cadaver, the FCN passed through the alar foramen; a communicating branch between the FCN and the accessory nerve and anastomoses between the ventral branches of the FCN and second cervical nerve were identified. The anastomoses were located in the upper third of the FCN pathway between the wing of the atlas and the nerve's entry in the omohyoideus muscle. Successful ultrasound-guided electrical stimulation was confirmed by twitching of the ipsilateral omohyoideus muscle in all 6 live horses; this finding was observed bilaterally during each of the 3 experimental sessions. No complications developed at the site of stimulation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen appears to be a safe and straightforward procedure in horses. The procedure may have potential for use in horses with naturally occurring recurrent laryngeal neuropathy to assess reinnervation after FCN transplantation or nerve-muscle pedicle implantation in the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle.

  20. A quantitative risk assessment tool for the external safety of industrial plants with a dust explosion hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Klein, A.J.J.; Maaijer, M. de; Berg, A.C. van den; Deursen, J.R. van; Versloot, N.H.A.

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment (QRA) tool has been developed by TNO for the external safety of industrial plants with a dust explosion hazard. As a first step an industrial plant is divided into groups of modules, defined by their size, shape, and constructional properties. Then the relevant explosi

  1. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  2. Safety Implementation of Hydrogen Igniters and Recombiners for Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accident Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jianjun; ZHOU Zhiwei; JING Xingqing

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen combustion in a nuclear power plant containment building may threaten the integrity of the containment. Hydrogen recombiners and igniters are two methods to reduce hydrogen levels in containment buildings during severe accidents. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety implementation of hydrogen igniters and recombiners. This paper analyzes the risk of deliberate hydrogen ignition and investigates three mitigation measures using igniters only, hydrogen recombiners only or a combination of recombiners and igniters. The results indicate that steam can effectively control the hydrogen flame acceleration and the deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  3. SAFIR2014. The Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety 2011-2014. Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simola, K. (ed.)

    2013-02-15

    The Finnish Nuclear Power Plant Safety Research Programme 2011-2014, SAFIR2014, is a 4-year publicly funded national technical and scientific research programme on the safety of nuclear power plants. The programme is funded by the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR), as well as other key organisations operating in the area of nuclear energy. The programme provides the necessary conditions for retaining knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe use of nuclear power, for developing new know-how and for participation in international co-operation. The SAFIR2014 Steering Group, responsible of the strategic alignements of the programme, consists of representatives of the Finnish Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum), Fennovoima Oy, Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT), Aalto University (Aalto), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (TTL) and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). The research programme is divided into nine areas: Man, organisation and society, Automation and control room, Fuel research and reactor analysis, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuits, Construction safety, Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), and Development of research infrastructure. A reference group is assigned to each of these areas to respond for the strategic planning and to supervise the projects in its respective field. Research projects are selected annually based on a public call for proposals. Most of the projects are planned for the entire duration of the programme, but there can also be shorter one- or two-year projects. The annual volume of the SAFIR2014 programme in 2011-2012 has been 9,5-9,9 M euro. Main funding organisations were the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR) with over 5 M euro and

  4. Development of Behavioral Indicators of Competences for Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kwangsu; Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Shin, Youmin; Lee, Yong-Hee; Jang, Tong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The term of safety competency in nuclear field was presented in the OECD/NEA workshop held in 1999. A model of the safety culture competencies in nuclear power plants was developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). In general, a competency (competence) is defined as 'cluster of employee's attribute, knowledge, skill, ability or other characteristic that contributes to successful job performance'. We also defined safety culture competency as 'cluster of various internal characteristics (e.g., knowledge, skill, ability, motive, attitude and etc.) of employee that contribute to perform job safely and shape a healthy and strong safety culture.' By this definition, the safety culture competency is the broader construct including job competency. An employee having high level of safety culture competency shows extra discretionary effort to improve safety of peer, team and organization in addition to the individual's successful and safe job accomplishment. The behavioral indicators for each of the competencies are focal points of conversations on progress and are monitored continuously by self-assessment and managers or supervisors' intervention. Deficiencies in any of these indicators can point to coaching, training or other learning opportunities that employees may be required in order to improve. The purpose of this study was to derive a model of safety competencies for improving safety culture of NPPs and develop a set of behavioral indicators of each competency. In addition, the method of measuring behavioral indicators was suggested. For the application of developed safety culture competences and behavioral indicators, the most suitable measuring method for behavioral indicators must be developed. In the case of behavioral observations, behavioral dimensions (frequency, persistence and latency), observation possibility, occurrence basis of behavior (daily job performance, situational dependent) are considered to

  5. Probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants; Phases 2-4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, L.; Knochenhauer, M. (Scandpower AB (Sweden)); Holmberg, J.-E.; Rossi, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-05-15

    Safety goals are defined in different ways in different countries and also used differently. Many countries are presently developing them in connection to the transfer to risk-informed regulation of both operating nuclear power plants (NPP) and new designs. However, it is far from self-evident how probabilistic safety criteria should be defined and used. On one hand, experience indicates that safety goals are valuable tools for the interpretation of results from a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and they tend to enhance the realism of a risk assessment. On the other hand, strict use of probabilistic criteria is usually avoided. A major problem is the large number of different uncertainties in a PSA model, which makes it difficult to demonstrate the compliance with a probabilistic criterion. Further, it has been seen that PSA results can change a lot over time due to scope extensions, revised operating experience data, method development, changes in system requirements, or increases of level of detail, mostly leading to an increase of the frequency of the calculated risk. This can cause a problem of consistency in the judgments. This report presents the results from the second, third and fourth phases of the project (2007-2009), which have dealt with providing guidance related to the resolution of some specific problems, such as the problem of consistency in judgement, comparability of safety goals used in different industries, the relationship between criteria on different levels, and relations between criteria for level 2 and 3 PSA. In parallel, additional context information has been provided. This was achieved by extending the international overview by contributing to and benefiting from a survey on PSA safety criteria which was initiated in 2006 within the OECD/NEA Working Group Risk. The results from the project can be used as a platform for discussions at the utilities on how to define and use quantitative safety goals. The results can also be used by

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS IMPROVING INDUSTRIAL SAFETY OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES IN ASPHALT-CONCRETE PLANT MIXERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ivanova

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. The problem of improvement of industrial safety of technol-ogical processes in mixers of asphalt-concrete plants is considered on the basis of analysis of organic impurities content in incomplete combustion products, and es-timation of efficiency of purification of asphalt-concrete plant emissions in the presence of “wet” flue gas purification system is given.Results and conclusions. It has been found that the efficiency of hydrocarbon fuel burning affects the amount of hydrophobic dust thrown into the atmosphere, and burning of heavy fuel oil is attended by significant incompleteness of fuel combustion, and this is connected with the processes of fuel dispersion and evapo-ration. The optimal measures for efficient combustion and cleaning of hydrophob-ic dust are described.

  7. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H. K.

    1981-10-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  9. Application of Solar Chimney Concept to Solve Potential Safety Issues of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; PARK, Youn Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper two main events and their causes have been investigated and a potential alternative supporting system will be provided. The first event to be addressed is the Station Blackout (SBO) caused by the inherent unreliability of the Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) and Alternative AC (AAC) power sources. Different parameters affect The EDG unreliability; for instance, mechanical, operational, maintenance and surveillance. Those parameters will be analyzed and linked to plant safety and Core Damage Frequency (CDF). Also the AACs, the SBO diesel generators, will be studied and their operational requirements similarity with the EDGs will be discussed. The second event to be addressed is the Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) caused by the degradation of heat exchange effectiveness, that is, the poor heat transfer to the Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS). Different causes to such case were observed; intake lines blockages due to ice and foreign biological matters formation and oil spill near the heat sink causing the oil leakage to the heat exchangers tubes. The later cause, oil spill, has been given a special attention here due its potential effects for different nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world; for example, Finland and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the Finnish case, the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) took already countermeasures for such scenario by introducing alternative heat sink, cooling towers, for the primary used heat sink, sea water, for one of its nuclear power plants. The abundance of the solar irradiation in the UAE region provides a perfect condition for the implementation of solar power applications. Utilizing this unique characteristic of that region may provide promising alternative and diverse options for solving potential safety related issues of their NPPs. The Solar Chimney Power Plant (SCPP) could be employed to serve as a supporting system to provide emergency power, in the case of SBO, and emergency cooling, in the case of

  10. Extreme Heat: A Prevention Guide to Promote Your Personal Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  11. Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) self-assessment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, R.T.; Golden, N.L.; Romero, J.R.; Yesner, S.

    1997-06-01

    This document has been prepared as a guide for conducting self-assessments of ES&H functional programs and organizational (line) implementation of these programs. This guide is intended for use by individuals and/or teams involved in or familiar with ES&H programs and line operations (e.g., the {open_quotes}self{close_quotes}in self-assessment). Essential elements of the self-assessment process are described including: schedule and priorities, scope and approach, assessment criteria (e.g., performance objectives and measures), information gathering and analysis techniques, and documentation of planning efforts and results. The appendices in this guide include: (1) an assessment prioritization process, (2) generic performance objectives for line implementation and for ES&H functional programs, (3) sources for ES&H assessment information, (4) systemic factors (developed for SNL`s root cause analysis program), (5) Lockheed Martin audit questions for management systems, compliance and validation, and specific areas and concerns, (6) DOE facility representatives checklist, and (7) assessment tools and resources developed at SNL and other DOE/Lockheed Martin sites. This document is a product of the efforts associated with the SNL ES&H Oversight Pilot Project conducted from June 1995 to January 1997. This Pilot was part of the overall initiative by DOE to reduce burdensome agency oversight by placing greater reliance on contractor self-assessment.

  12. Field Guide to the Plant Community Types of Voyageurs National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Langendoen, Don; Aaseng, Norman; Hop, Kevin; Lew-Smith, Michael

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the U.S. Geological Survey-National Park Service Vegetation Mapping Program is to classify, describe, and map vegetation for most of the park units within the National Park Service (NPS). The program was created in response to the NPS Natural Resources Inventory and Monitoring Guidelines issued in 1992. Products for each park include digital files of the vegetation map and field data, keys and descriptions to the plant communities, reports, metadata, map accuracy verification summaries, and aerial photographs. Interagency teams work in each park and, following standardized mapping and field sampling protocols, develop products and vegetation classification standards that document the various vegetation types found in a given park. The use of a standard national vegetation classification system and mapping protocol facilitate effective resource stewardship by ensuring compatibility and widespread use of the information throughout the NPS as well as by other Federal and state agencies. These vegetation classifications and maps and associated information support a wide variety of resource assessment, park management, and planning needs, and provide a structure for framing and answering critical scientific questions about plant communities and their relation to environmental processes across the landscape. This field guide is intended to make the classification accessible to park visitors and researchers at Voyageurs National Park, allowing them to identify any stand of natural vegetation and showing how the classification can be used in conjunction with the vegetation map (Hop and others, 2001).

  13. Bioenergy guide. Projecting, operation and economic efficiency of biomass power plants; Leitfaden Bioenergie. Planung, Betrieb und Wirtschaftlichkeit von Bioenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deimling, S. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Kaltschmitt, M; Schneider, B. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This guide gives an survey over planning, operation and economics of biomass conversion plants. Main topics are: production and supply of biomass fuels, combustion properties, licensing, cost and financing. It shows planning and management of projects and the legal background for Germany and the European Union.

  14. Woody plants of Western African forests, A guide to the forest trees, shrubs and lianes from Senegal to Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawthorne, W.D.; Jongkind, C.C.H.

    2006-01-01

    A guide to the identification of all the woody plants (c. 2,250 species in 740 genera) of the forest region of West Africa called 'Upper Guinea', between Togo and Senegal. Upper Guinea is one of the world's most important centres of biodiversity, from the mountain forests of Liberia, Guinea and Sier

  15. A computer based living probabilistic safety assessment (LPSA) method for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubair, Muhammad, E-mail: zubairheu@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Basic Sciences, University of Engineering and Technology, Taxila (Pakistan); Zhijian, Zhang [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University (China); Heo, Gyunyoung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahmed, Iftikhar [College of Mathematics and Statics, Chongqing University, 401331 (China); Aamir, Muhammad [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A computer based LPSA method named, online risk monitor system (ORMS) has been proposed. • The essential features and functions of ORMS have been described. • A case study of emergency diesel generator (EDG) of Daya Bay NPP had carried out. • By using ORMS operational failure rate and demand failure probability of EDG has been calculated. - Abstract: To update PSA (probabilistic safety assessment) model this paper presents a computer based living probabilistic safety assessment (LPSA) method named as online risk monitor system (ORMS). The essential features and functions of ORMS have been described in this research. A case study of emergency diesel generator (EDG) of Daya Bay nuclear power plant (NPP) has been done; operational failure rate and demand failure probability of EDG has been calculated with the help of ORMS. The results of ORMS are well matched with data obtained from Daya Bay NPP. ORMS is capable of automatically update the online risk models and reliability parameters of equipment in time. ORMS can support in decision making process of operator and manager in nuclear power plant.

  16. Updating Human Factors Engineering Guidelines for Conducting Safety Reviews of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger - NRC

    2011-09-19

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) programs of applicants for nuclear power plant construction permits, operating licenses, standard design certifications, and combined operating licenses. The purpose of these safety reviews is to help ensure that personnel performance and reliability are appropriately supported. Detailed design review procedures and guidance for the evaluations is provided in three key documents: the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), the HFE Program Review Model (NUREG-0711), and the Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines (NUREG-0700). These documents were last revised in 2007, 2004 and 2002, respectively. The NRC is committed to the periodic update and improvement of the guidance to ensure that it remains a state-of-the-art design evaluation tool. To this end, the NRC is updating its guidance to stay current with recent research on human performance, advances in HFE methods and tools, and new technology being employed in plant and control room design. This paper describes the role of HFE guidelines in the safety review process and the content of the key HFE guidelines used. Then we will present the methodology used to develop HFE guidance and update these documents, and describe the current status of the update program.

  17. Investigation of the performance based structural safety factor of elbow pipes in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Reserch Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The piping systems in nuclear power plant are composed of various typed pipes such as straight pipe, elbow, branch and reducer etc. The elbow is connected from straight pipe to another pipes in order to establish the complicated piping system. Elbow is one of very important components considering management of wall thinning degradation. It is however applied by various loads such as system pressure, earthquake, postulated break loading and many transient loads, which provoke simply the internal pressure, bending and torsional stress. In this study, firstly pipes in the secondary system of the nuclear power plant are investigated in view of the ratio of radius to thickness. Next, a large number of finite element analysis considering the all typed dimensions of commercial pipe has been performed to find out the behavior of TES(Twice Elastic Slope) plastic load of elbows, which is based on evaluation of the structural safety factor. Finally performance based structural safety factor was investigated comparing with maximum allowable load by construction code.

  18. [Genetically modified plants and food safety. State of the art and discussion in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauzu, M

    2004-09-01

    Placing genetically modified (GM) plants and derived products on the European Union's (EU) market has been regulated by a Community Directive since 1990. This directive was complemented by a regulation specific for genetically modified and other novel foods in 1997. Specific labelling requirements have been applicable for GM foods since 1998. The law requires a pre-market safety assessment for which criteria have been elaborated and continuously adapted in accordance with the state of the art by national and international bodies and organisations. Consequently, only genetically modified products that have been demonstrated to be as safe as their conventional counterparts can be commercialized. However, the poor acceptance of genetically modified foods has led to a de facto moratorium since 1998. It is based on the lack of a qualified majority of EU member states necessary for authorization to place genetically modified plants and derived foods on the market. New Community Regulations are intended to end this moratorium by providing a harmonized and transparent safety assessment, a centralised authorization procedure, extended labelling provisions and a traceability system for genetically modified organisms (GMO) and derived food and feed.

  19. Technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety systems in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tanaka, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Antonescu, C.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results of research sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. This research was conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). ORNL investigated potential failure modes and vulnerabilities of microprocessor-based technologies to environmental stressors, including electromagnetic/radio-frequency interference, temperature, humidity, and smoke exposure. An experimental digital safety channel (EDSC) was constructed for the tests. SNL performed smoke exposure tests on digital components and circuit boards to determine failure mechanisms and the effect of different packaging techniques on smoke susceptibility. These studies are expected to provide recommendations for environmental qualification of digital safety systems by addressing the following: (1) adequacy of the present preferred test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging in qualification testing for equipment that is to be located in mild environments; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach to address smoke in a qualification program.

  20. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Reviewing methodologically disparate data: a practical guide for the patient safety research field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katrina F; Long, Susannah J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Vincent, Charles A; Kroll, J Simon; Sevdalis, Nick

    2012-02-01

    This article addresses key questions frequently asked by researchers conducting systematic reviews in patient safety. This discipline is relatively young, and asks complex questions about complex aspects of health care delivery and experience, therefore its studies are typically methodologically heterogeneous, non-randomized and complex; but content rich and highly relevant to practice. Systematic reviews are increasingly necessary to drive forward practice and research in this area, but the data do not always lend themselves to 'standard' review methodologies. This accessible 'how-to' article demonstrates that data diversity need not preclude high-quality systematic reviews. It draws together information from published guidelines and experience within our multidisciplinary patient safety research group to provide entry-level advice for the clinician-researcher new to systematic reviewing, to non-biomedical research data or to both. It offers entry-level advice, illustrated with detailed practical examples, on defining a research question, creating a comprehensive search strategy, selecting articles for inclusion, assessing study quality, extracting data, synthesizing data and evaluating the impact of your review. The article concludes with a comment on the vital role of robust systematic reviews in the continuing advancement of the patient safety field. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products-Soil burden and risk to food safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suominen, K., E-mail: kimmo.suominen@evira.fi [Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira, Risk Assessment Research Unit, Mustialankatu 3, 00790 Helsinki (Finland); Verta, M. [Finnish Environmental Institute (SYKE), Mechelininkatu 34a, P.O. Box 140, 00251 Helsinki (Finland); Marttinen, S. [MTT Agrifood Research Finland, 31600 Jokioinen (Finland)

    2014-09-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP + NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP + NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. - Highlights:

  3. A geminivirus-based guide RNA delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas has emerged as potent genome editing technology and has successfully been applied in many organisms, including several plant species. However, delivery of genome editing reagents remains a challenge in plants. Here, we report a virus-based guide RNA (gRNA) delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing (VIGE) that can be used to precisely target genome locations and cause mutations. VIGE is performed by using a modified Cabbage Leaf Curl virus (CaLCuV) vector to expr...

  4. Safety of an intercostal approach for imaging-guided percutaneous drainage of subdiaphragmatic abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Stephen R; Nelson, Rendon C; Bashir, Mustafa R; Jaffe, Tracy A; Kim, Charles Y; Haystead, Clare M

    2014-06-01

    The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that an intercostal approach to imaging-guided percutaneous subdiaphragmatic abscess drainage is as safe as a subcostal approach. A cohort of 258 consecutive patients with one or more subdiaphragmatic abscesses referred for imaging-guided (CT or ultrasound) percutaneous drainage was identified. Demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between patients who underwent drainage catheter placement via an intercostal approach versus those who underwent drainage catheter placement via a subcostal approach. Percutaneous drainage was performed for 441 abscesses in 258 patients in 409 separate procedures (214 via an intercostal approach, 186 by a subcostal approach, and nine by a combined approach). The total number of pleural complications was significantly higher in the intercostal group (56/214 [26.2%]) than the subcostal group (15/186 [8.1%]; p intercostal group than the subcostal group (15/214 [7.0%] vs 0/186 [0%], respectively; p intercostal vs subcostal, 3/214 [1.4%] vs 1/186 [0.5%]; p = 0.63). A few of the complications in the patients who underwent an intercostal-approach drainage were clinically significant. Four of the 15 pneumothoraces required thoracostomy tubes and eight of 38 (21.1%) pleural effusions required thoracentesis, none of which was considered infected. An intercostal approach for imaging-guided percutaneous drainage is associated with a higher risk of pleural complications; however, most of these complications are minor and should not preclude use of the intercostal approach.

  5. CT-guided cutting needle biopsy of lung lesions - Safety and efficacy of an out-patient service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charig, M.J.; Phillips, A.J

    2000-12-01

    AIM: To determine the safety and efficacy of CT-guided cutting needle biopsy of lung lesions as an out-patient procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS:A total of 185 consecutive biopsies were performed under CT guidance on 183 patients between January 1991 and December 1998 using 20-gauge (n= 33), 18-gauge (n= 151) or 14-gauge (n= 1) core biopsy needles. A chest radiograph was taken after observation in the Radiology department for 1 h and asymptomatic patients were discharged. RESULTS: The histology was malignant in 150 biopsies (81.1%) and benign in 23 (12.4%) with 12 false-negative results (6.5%); there were no false-positive results. The sensitivity was 92.6%; specificity 100%; negative predictive value 65.7%; and overall accuracy 93.5%. Pneumothoraces occurred in 48 patients (25.9%); one required aspiration only and four required insertion of an intercostal drain. One patient developed a pneumothorax after discharge. Small haemoptyses occurred in 13 patients without pneumothorax (7.0%), one of whom was admitted. In-patient treatment was required in 10 patients (5.4%). CONCLUSION: Computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions is a safe technique with a diagnostic accuracy and complication rate comparable to reported figures for fine needle aspiration biopsy. It can be safely performed on an out-patient basis. Charig, M.J., Phillips, A.J. (2000)

  6. Computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma: safety, efficacy, and effect on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wieners, Gero; Schwartz, Franziska; Seidensticker, Max; Pech, Maciej; Ruehl, Ricarda; Wust, Peter; Lopez-Hänninen, Enrique; Gademann, Günther; Peters, Nils; Berg, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2010-09-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 83 patients were recruited, presenting with 140 HCC- lesions. Treatment was performed by CT-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints included local tumor control and overall survival (OS). A matched-pair analysis with patients not receiving brachytherapy was performed. Match criteria included the Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score, alpha-fetoprotein, presence, and extent of multifocal disease. For statistical analysis, Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression were performed. Mean and median cumulative TTP for all patients (n = 75) were 17.7 and 10.4 months. Five local recurrences were observed. The OS after inclusion reached median times of 19.4 months (all patients), 46.3 months (CLIP score, 0), 20.6 months (CLIP score, 1) 12.7 months, (CLIP score, 2), and 8.3 months (CLIP score, >or=3). The 1- and 3-year OS were 94% and 65% (CLIP score, 0), 69% and 12% (CLIP score, 1), and 48% and 19% (CLIP score, 2), respectively. Nine complications requiring intervention were encountered in 124 interventions. Matched-pair analysis revealed a significantly longer OS for patients undergoing CT-guided brachytherapy. Based on our results the study treatment could be safely performed. The study treatment had a beneficial effect on OS in patients with advanced HCC, with respect to (and depending on) the CLIP score and compared with OS in a historical control group. A high rate of local control was also observed, regardless of applied dose in a range of 15 to 25 Gy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Anesthetic effect and safety of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade in sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Dong; Yu, Li-Na; Zhao, Da-Qiang; Xie, Liang; Zhou, Hai-Yu; Wang, Sheng

    2016-12-20

    To explore the anesthetic effect and safety of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade in video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. A total of 120 patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for moderate or severe hyperhidrosis were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade (group A, n=60) or general anesthesia with tracheal intubation (group B, n=60). In both groups routine monitoring and radial artery catheterization were used. The patients in group A were given oxygen inhalation via a nasal tube after thoracic paravertebral blockade, and those in group B had intratracheal intubation. Blood gas analyses were conducted 5 min before and 5 min after the operation and the clinical outcomes and complications were recorded in each group. All the patients completed the operations safely and none of the patients with thoracic paravertebral blockade required conversion to general anesthesia. Significant differences were recorded between groups A and B in anesthetic preparation time (6.26∓2.09 vs 46.32∓15.76 min), awakening time (6.26∓2.09 vs 46.32∓15.76 min), and mean hospitalization expense (6355.54∓426.00 vs 8932.25∓725.98 RMB Yuan). Compared with those in group B, the patients in group A showed a significantly lower rate of postoperative throat discomfort (0% vs 100%), a shorter monitoring time (2 h vs 12 h), and faster recovery time for food intake (2 h vs 6 h). The parameters of artery blood gas analysis both before and after the operation were similar between the two groups, but the postoperative variations differed significantly between the two groups in pH value and PaCO2 but not in PaO2. Ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral blockade is safe and effective in video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis and is associated with less complications and better postoperative recovery.

  8. SAFIR2010. The Finnish research programme on nuclear power plant safety 2007-2010. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. (ed.)

    2009-02-15

    Major part of Finnish public research on nuclear power plant safety during the years 2007-2008 has been carried out in the SAFIR2010 programme. The steering group of SAFIR2010 consists of representatives from Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oyj, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy (Fortum), Tekes - the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT). In addition to representatives of these organisations, the Steering Group has permanent experts from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) and Fennovoima Oy (Fennovoima). SAFIR2010 research programme is divided in eight research areas that are Organisation and human, Automation and control room, Fuel and reactor physics, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuit, Construction safety, and Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Research projects of the programme are chosen on the basis of annual call for proposals. The annual volume of the SAFIR2010 programme in 2007-2008 has been 6,3-6,7 M euro and approximately 50 person years. Main funding organisations in 2007-2008 were State Waste Management Fund VYR with 2,7-3,0 M euro and VTT with 2,4-2,5 M euro annually. In 2008 research was carried out in 30 projects. The research in the programme has been carried out primarily by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Other research units responsible for the projects solely or in co-operation with other institutions include Lappeenranta University of Technology, Helsinki University of Technology, Tampere University of Technology, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and Finnish Meteorological Institute. In addition, there have been a few minor subcontractors in some projects. The programme management

  9. SAFIR2010. The Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety 2007-2010. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K.; Suolanen, V. (eds.)

    2011-02-15

    Major part of Finnish public research on nuclear power plant safety during the years 2007-2010 has been carried out in the SAFIR2010 programme. The steering group of SAFIR2010 consisted of representatives from Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oyj, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy (Fortum), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Aalto University School of Science and Technology (Aalto, former Helsinki University of Technology) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT). In addition to representatives of these organisations, the Steering Group had permanent experts from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) and Fennovoima Oy (Fennovoima). SAFIR2010 research programme was divided in eight research areas that were Organisation and human, Automation and control room, Fuel and reactor physics, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuit, Construction safety, and Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). Research projects of the programme were chosen on the basis of annual call for proposals. The annual volume of the SAFIR2010-programme in 2007-2010 has been 6,5-7,1 M euro and approximately 50 person years. Main funding organisations in 2007-2010 have been the State Waste Management Fund VYR with 2,7-3,0 M euro and VTT with 2,4-2,7 M euro annually. In 2010 research was carried out in 33 projects. The research in the programme has been carried out primarily by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Other research units responsible for the projects solely or in co-operation with other institutions include Lappeenranta University of Technology, Aalto University (previously Helsinki University of Technology), Tampere University of Technology, Fortum Power and Heat Oy (previously Fortum Nuclear Services Oy), Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and Finnish

  10. Incident learning and failure-mode-and-effects-analysis guided safety initiatives in radiation medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay eKapur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By combining incident learning and process failure-mode-and-effects-analysis in a structure-process-outcome framework we have created a risk profile for our radiation medicine practice and implemented evidence-based risk mitigation initiatives focused on patient safety. Based on reactive reviews of incidents reported in our departmental incident-reporting system and proactive failure-mode-and-effects-analysis, high safety-risk procedures in our paperless radiation medicine process and latent risk factors were identified. Six initiatives aimed at the mitigation of associated severity, likelihood of occurrence and detectability risks were implemented. These were the standardization of care pathways and toxicity grading, pre-treatment-planning peer review, a policy to thwart delay-rushed processes, an electronic whiteboard to enhance coordination and the use of six-sigma metrics to monitor operational efficiencies. The effectiveness of these initiatives over a three year period was assessed using process and outcome specific metrics within the framework of the department structure. There has been a 47% increase in incident reporting, with no increase in adverse events. Care pathways have been used with greater than 97% clinical compliance rate. The implementation of peer review prior to treatment planning and use of the whiteboard have provided opportunities for proactive detection and correction of errors. There has been a twofold drop in the occurrence of high-risk procedural delays. Patient treatment start delays are routinely enforced on cases that would have historically been rushed. Z-scores for high risk procedures have steadily improved from 1.78 to 2.35. The initiatives resulted in sustained reductions of failure-mode risks as measured by a set of evidence-based metrics over a three year period. These augment or incorporate many of the published recommendations for patient safety in radiation medicine by translating them to clinical

  11. A Guide to the Design of Occupational Safety and Health Training for Immigrant, Latino/a Dairy Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Lauren M.; Rosecrance, John; Stallones, Lorann; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    Industrialized dairy production in the U.S. relies on an immigrant, primarily Latino/a, workforce to meet greater production demands. Given the high rates of injuries and illnesses on U.S. dairies, there is pressing need to develop culturally appropriate training to promote safe practices among immigrant, Latino/a dairy workers. To date, there have been few published research articles or guidelines specific to developing effective occupational safety and health (OSH) training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. Literature relevant to safety training for immigrant workers in agriculture and other high-risk industries (e.g., construction) was examined to identify promising approaches. The aim of this paper is to provide a practical guide for researchers and practitioners involved in the design and implementation of effective OSH training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. The search was restricted to peer-reviewed academic journals and guidelines published between 1980 and 2015 by universities or extension programs, written in English, and related to health and safety training among immigrant, Latino/a workers within agriculture and other high-risk industries. Relevant recommendations regarding effective training transfer were also included from literature in the field of industrial–organizational psychology. A total of 97 articles were identified, of which 65 met the inclusion criteria and made a unique and significant contribution. The review revealed a number of promising strategies for how to effectively tailor health and safety training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry grouped under five main themes: (1) understanding and involving workers; (2) training content and materials; (3) training methods; (4) maximizing worker engagement; and (5) program evaluation. The identification of best practices in the design and implementation of training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers within

  12. A Guide to the Design of Occupational Safety and Health Training for Immigrant, Latino/a Dairy Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Lauren M; Rosecrance, John; Stallones, Lorann; Roman-Muniz, Ivette Noami

    2016-01-01

    Industrialized dairy production in the U.S. relies on an immigrant, primarily Latino/a, workforce to meet greater production demands. Given the high rates of injuries and illnesses on U.S. dairies, there is pressing need to develop culturally appropriate training to promote safe practices among immigrant, Latino/a dairy workers. To date, there have been few published research articles or guidelines specific to developing effective occupational safety and health (OSH) training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. Literature relevant to safety training for immigrant workers in agriculture and other high-risk industries (e.g., construction) was examined to identify promising approaches. The aim of this paper is to provide a practical guide for researchers and practitioners involved in the design and implementation of effective OSH training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry. The search was restricted to peer-reviewed academic journals and guidelines published between 1980 and 2015 by universities or extension programs, written in English, and related to health and safety training among immigrant, Latino/a workers within agriculture and other high-risk industries. Relevant recommendations regarding effective training transfer were also included from literature in the field of industrial-organizational psychology. A total of 97 articles were identified, of which 65 met the inclusion criteria and made a unique and significant contribution. The review revealed a number of promising strategies for how to effectively tailor health and safety training for immigrant, Latino/a workers in the dairy industry grouped under five main themes: (1) understanding and involving workers; (2) training content and materials; (3) training methods; (4) maximizing worker engagement; and (5) program evaluation. The identification of best practices in the design and implementation of training programs for immigrant, Latino/a workers within

  13. Plant safety margin against frost damages has declined in Switzerland over the last four decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitasse, Yann; Schneider, Léonard; Klein, Geoffrey; Rixen, Christian; Rebetez, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Winters and early springs have become warmer over the last decades which has in turn promoted earlier plant development in temperate regions. While temperatures will on average continue to increase in the coming decades due to the rise of greenhouse gases concentration in the atmosphere, there is no consensus about how the occurrence of late spring frosts will change. If the frequency and the severity of late spring frosts remain unchanged in the future or advance less than vegetation onset, vulnerable plant organs (young leaves, flowers or dehardened buds) may be more exposed to frost damage. Here we analyzed long-term series of temperature data during the period 1975-2016 at 50 locations in Switzerland. We used different thresholds of growing degree days (GDD) as a proxy for spring phenology of fruit trees based on long-term series of phenological observations. Finally, we tested whether the time lag between the date when the GDD is reached and the latest occurrence of frost has changed over the study period. Overall we found that the safety margin against potential frost damage to plants has slightly decreased during the study period, irrespective of elevation (from 203 to 2283 m). Our results suggest that the cost for preventing frost damages on fruit trees could increase in the coming decades and the introduction of new varieties of fruit trees adapted to warmer climate should be carefully considered as they generally exhibit earlier spring phenology.

  14. Safety of virus-resistant transgenic plants two decades after their introduction: lessons from realistic field risk assessment studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Marc; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Potential safety issues have been raised with the development and release of virus-resistant transgenic plants. This review focuses on safety assessment with a special emphasis on crops that have been commercialized or extensively tested in the field such as squash, papaya, plum, grape, and sugar beet. We discuss topics commonly perceived to be of concern to the environment and to human health--heteroencapsidation, recombination, synergism, gene flow, impact on nontarget organisms, and food safety in terms of allergenicity. The wealth of field observations and experimental data is critically evaluated to draw inferences on the most relevant issues. We also express inside views on the safety and benefits of virus-resistant transgenic plants, and recommend realistic risk assessment approaches to assist their timely deregulation and release.

  15. Fit, Healthy, and Ready To Learn: A School Health Policy Guide. Part II: Policies To Promote Sun Safety and Prevent Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Katherine

    This publication is a supplementary chapter to "Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide; Part I: General School Health Policies, Physical Activity, Healthy Eating, and Tobacco-Use Prevention." It discusses various aspects of a complete school policy and plan to promote sun safety. The first section "Purpose…

  16. Fit, Healthy, and Ready To Learn: A School Health Policy Guide. Part II: Policies To Promote Sun Safety and Prevent Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Katherine

    This publication is a supplementary chapter to "Fit, Healthy, and Ready to Learn: A School Health Policy Guide; Part I: General School Health Policies, Physical Activity, Healthy Eating, and Tobacco-Use Prevention." It discusses various aspects of a complete school policy and plan to promote sun safety. The first section "Purpose…

  17. Diagnostic Yield and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Fine Needle Aspiration of Central Mediastinal Lung Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vazquez-Sequeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. EUS-FNA is an accurate and safe technique to biopsy mediastinal lymph nodes. However, there are few data pertaining to the role of EUS-FNA to biopsy central lung masses. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic yield and safety of EUS-FNA of indeterminate central mediastinal lung masses. Methods. Design: Retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database; noncomparative. Setting: Tertiary referral center. From 10/2004 to 12/2010, all patients with a lung mass located within proximity to the esophagus were referred for EUS-FNA. Main Outcome Measurement: EUS-FNA diagnostic accuracy and safety. Results. 73 consecutive patients were included. EUS allowed detection in 62 (85% patients with lack of visualization prohibiting FNA in 11 patients. Among sampled lesions, one patient (1/62 = 1.6% had a benign lung mass (hamartoma, while the remaining 61 patients (61/62 = 98.4% had a malignant mass (primary lung cancer: 55/61 = 90%; lung metastasis: 6/61 = 10%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of EUS-FNA were 96.7%, 100%, and 96.7%, respectively. The sensitivity was 80.8% when considering nonvisualized masses. One patient developed a pneumothorax (1/62 = 1.6%. Conclusions. EUS-FNA appears to be an accurate and safe technique for tissue diagnosis of central mediastinal lung masses.

  18. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, H. K.

    1981-10-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0

  19. Nursing Student Experiences Regarding Safe Use of Electronic Health Records: A Pilot Study of the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Karen J; Eden, Lacey; Merrill, Katreena Collette; Hughes, Mckenna

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has linked improper electronic health record configuration and use with adverse patient events. In response to this problem, the US Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology developed the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guides to evaluate electronic health records for optimal use and safety features. During the course of their education, nursing students are exposed to a variety of clinical practice settings and electronic health records. This descriptive study evaluated 108 undergraduate and 51 graduate nursing students' ratings of electronic health record features and safe practices, as well as what they learned from utilizing the computerized provider order entry and clinician communication Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guide checklists. More than 80% of the undergraduate and 70% of the graduate students reported that they experienced user problems with electronic health records in the past. More than 50% of the students felt that electronic health records contribute to adverse patient outcomes. Students reported that many of the features assessed were not fully implemented in their electronic health record. These findings highlight areas where electronic health records can be improved to optimize patient safety. The majority of students reported that utilizing the Safety and Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience guides increased their understanding of electronic health record features.

  20. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  1. Evolution of safety systems in the Juzbado Plant; Evolucion de los sistemas de seguridad en la fabrica de Juzbado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino, M. L.

    2010-07-01

    Safety has always been one of the cornerstones of the operation of the Juzbado Plant since it began operations in 1985. Along these 25 years the systems for monitoring and controlling the impact of the Plants operation have evolved significantly, always trying to maintain the highest standards of the nuclear industry in all the activities with relevance to safety. The drivers of these developments were changes in regulations, the increase of the production capacity of the Plant, the design modifications incorporated in its facilities and of course, the lessons learned during the years of operation. Furthermore, over the last few years the Juzbado Plant has developed and implemented several analysis methodologies to cope with specific issues regarding safety management. The latest is programme for the Systematic Review of the Operational Conditions of the Safety Systems, which was initiated in 2009 to assess the actual operating conditions of all the system with safety relevance, aiming to identify areas for improvement in order to ensure their high-performance after 25 years of operation. Following more significant examples of this evolution are showing. (Author)

  2. On the Seismic Safety of Nuclear Power Plant Sites in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; Park, S.; Yang, J.; Shim, T.; Im, C. B.

    2016-12-01

    The Korean Peninsula is located at the far eastern part of Eurasian Plate, and within the intra-plate region several hundred km away from the nearest plate boundary. The earthquakes around the Korean Peninsula show the typical characteristics of intra-plate earthquakes. So to speak, those are low seismicity, relatively smaller magnitude than that of inter-plate earthquakes, and spatially irregular epicenters. There are 24 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation, 4 NPPs in completion of construction, and 4 NPPs in preparation of construction in South Korea. Even though the seismicity of the Korean Peninsula is known as relatively low, but because there are more than 30 NPPs within not so large territory, thorough the preparedness of NPPs' safety against earthquakes is required. The earthquake preparedness of NPPs in South Korea is composed of 4 stages: site election, design, construction and operation. Since regulatory codes and standards are strictly applied in each stage, the NPPs in South Korea are believed to be safe enough against the maximum potential earthquake ground motion. Through data analysis on geological and seismological characteristics of the region within a radius of 320 km from the site and the detailed geological survey of the area within a radius of 8 km from the site, the design earthquake ground motion of NPPs in South Korea is determined to be 0.2g (in case of newly constructed NPPs is 0.3g) considering the maximum potential earthquake ground motion and some safety margin. The ground motions and surface deformation caused by capable faults are also considered in the seismic design of NPPs. In addition, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety as a regulatory technical expert organization, has been operating independent real time earthquake monitoring network as a part of securing the seismic safety of NPP sites in South Korea since late 1990's. If earthquakes with more than magnitude 3.0 are occurred in the Korean Peninsula or the peak ground

  3. Pantex Plant final safety analysis report, Zone 4 magazines. Staging or interim storage for nuclear weapons and components: Issue D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) contains a detailed description and evaluation of the significant environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) issues associated with the operations of the Pantex Plant modified-Richmond and steel arch construction (SAC) magazines in Zone 4. It provides (1) an overall description of the magazines, the Pantex Plant, and its surroundings; (2) a systematic evaluations of the hazards that could occur as a result of the operations performed in these magazines; (3) descriptions and analyses of the adequacy of the measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards; and (4) analyses of potential accidents and their associated risks.

  4. Operational safety of turbine-generators at Loviisa nuclear power plant; Turbiini-generaattoreiden kaeyttoeturvallisuus Loviisan ydinvoimalaitoksella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virolainen, T.

    1997-06-01

    The goal of the study is to assess the operational safety of the turbine-generators at the Loviisa NPP. The lay-out, operation, control, monitoring and testing of turbine-generators have been studied. Taking these findings into consideration and by using operational data of Loviisa and other power plants, the most significant safety issues of the turbine-generator system have been identified. The frequencies for initiating events and possible consequences have been determined based on plant operational experience and related literature. (58 refs.).

  5. Assessment of Occupational Health and Safety for a Gas Meter Manufacturing Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ece; Iskender, Gulen; Germirli Babuna, Fatos

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the occupational health and safety for a gas meter manufacturing plant. The risk assessment and management study is applied to plastic injection and mounting departments of the factory through quantitative Fine Kinney method and the effect of adopting 5S workplace organization procedure on risk assessment is examined. The risk assessment reveals that there are 17 risks involved; 14 grouped in high risk class (immediate improvement as required action); 2 in significant (measures to be taken as required action) and one in possible risk class (monitoring as required action). Among 14 high risks, 4 can be reduced by 83 % to be grouped under possible class when 5S is applied. One significant risk is observed to be lowered by 78 % and considered as possible risk due to the application of 5S. As a result of either 67 or 50 % reductions in 7 high risks, these risks are converted to be members of significant risk group after 5S implications.

  6. Assessment of effects of fires on safety of nuclear power plants. Paloturvallisuuden arviointi ydinvoimalassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.

    1992-01-01

    Experience and probabilistic safety assessments have shown that fires may present a major hazard in a nuclear plant either as initial events or as a factor aggravating the consequences from accidents initiated otherwise. Numerical modelling of fires can be performed in various ways. The oldest approach is based on experimental models where rough correlations are employed. Depending on the type of application more advanced codes are employed in fire analyses. In zone models each compartment is divided into two horizontal layers, which both are at the same temperature. In system models the building to be analyzed is divided into interconnected nodes. The most complicated fire analysis models are field models, which calculate multidimensional fields of temperatures and other quantities by solving numerically the conservation equations for several variables.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Medicinal Plants or Related Natural Products for Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Souza Nascimento

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the effects of medicinal plants (MPs or related natural products (RNPs on fibromyalgia (FM patients, we evaluate the possible benefits and advantages of MP or RNP for the treatment of FM based on eight randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs involving 475 patients. The methodological quality of all studies included was determined according to JADAD and “Risk of Bias” with the criteria in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.1.0. Evidence suggests significant benefits of MP or RNP in sleep disruption, pain, depression, joint stiffness, anxiety, physical function, and quality of life. Our results demonstrated that MP or RNP had significant effects on improving the symptoms of FM compared to conventional drug or placebo; longer tests are required to determine the duration of the treatment and characterize the long-term safety of using MP, thus suggesting effective alternative therapies in the treatment of pain with minimized side effects.

  8. Citizens guide to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Compliance Certification Application to the EPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted an application to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a certificate showing that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) complies with strict environmental regulations designed to safeguard humans and the environment for at least 10,000 years. Congress gave the EPA authority to regulate the WIPP site for disposal of transuranic waste under the 1992 WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The EPA has one year to review the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) before determining whether the DOE has successfully documented the WIPP`s compliance with federal environmental standards. The application presents the conclusions of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering work specifically dedicated to disposal of transuranic waste at the WIPP. The application thoroughly documents how the natural characteristics of the WIPP site, along with engineered features, comply with the regulations. In the application, the DOE responds fully to the federal standards and to the EPA`s certification criteria. This Citizens` Guide provides an overview of the CCA and its role in moving toward final disposal of transuranic waste.

  9. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G., E-mail: wrcc@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: dhbs@cdtn.br, E-mail: tanius@cdtn.br, E-mail: raphaelmecanica@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T., E-mail: joprocha@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ideir_engenharia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica

    2013-07-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors: How we do it safety and completely

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations.

  11. How to evaluate the risks of work equipment and installations for health and safety? Research and activities of the German Committee for Plant Safety and consequences for regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R

    2012-01-01

    Work equipment and installations with a high risk for health and safety of employees should be paid a special attention. The German Product Safety Act, which is aimed to manufacturers or distributors in order to protect consumers, maintains a conclusive catalogue of these so-called "installations in need of monitoring" fixing the work equipment and installations for which such special inspections can be demanded. This catalogue has remained unchanged for decades and has been transformed nearly unmodified into the Plant Safety Ordinance. Currently, there is a discussion about this catalogue in Germany. A major point of concern is the definition and the significance of "especially" dangerous work equipment and installations. Two recent research projects are dealing with the problem how to define "especially".

  12. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Theresa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP procedures under magnetic resonance (MR guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany. The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N. The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation

  13. KAERI software safety guideline for developing safety-critical software in digital instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Kim, Jang Yeol; Eum, Heung Seop

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organization. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards. Most of them are describing mandatory requirements, what shall be done, for the safety-critical software. The developers of such a software. However, there have been a lot of controversial factors on whether the work practices satisfy the regulatory requirements, and to justify the safety of such a system developed by the work practices, between the licenser and the licensee. We believe it is caused by the reason that there is a gap between the mandatory requirements (What) and the work practices (How). We have developed a guidance to fill such gap, which can be useful for both licenser and licensee to conduct a justification of the safety in the planning phase of developing the software for nuclear reactor protection systems. (author). 67 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. KAERI software safety guideline for developing safety-critical software in digital instrumentation and control system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jang Soo; Kim, Jang Yeol; Eum, Heung Seop

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the safety planning for safety-critical software systems is being recognized as the most important phase in the software life cycle, and being developed new regulatory positions and standards by the regulatory and the standardization organization. The requirements for software important to safety of nuclear reactor are described in such positions and standards. Most of them are describing mandatory requirements, what shall be done, for the safety-critical software. The developers of such a software. However, there have been a lot of controversial factors on whether the work practices satisfy the regulatory requirements, and to justify the safety of such a system developed by the work practices, between the licenser and the licensee. We believe it is caused by the reason that there is a gap between the mandatory requirements (What) and the work practices (How). We have developed a guidance to fill such gap, which can be useful for both licenser and licensee to conduct a justification of the safety in the planning phase of developing the software for nuclear reactor protection systems. (author). 67 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs.

  15. Practical management of chemicals and hazardous wastes: An environmental and safety professional`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhre, W.L.

    1995-08-01

    This book was written to help the environmental and safety student learn about the field and to help the working professional manage hazardous material and waste issues. For example, one issue that will impact virtually all of these people mentioned is the upcoming environmental standardization movement. The International Standards Organization (ISO) is in the process of adding comprehensive environmental and hazardous waste management systems to their future certification requirements. Most industries worldwide will be working hard to achieve this new level of environmental management. This book presents many of the systems needed to receive certification. In order to properly manage hazardous waste, it is important to consider the entire life cycle, including when the waste was a useful chemical or hazardous material. Waste minimization is built upon this concept. Understanding the entire life cycle is also important in terms of liability, since many regulations hold generators responsible from cradle to grave. This book takes the life-cycle concept even further, in order to provide additional insight. The discussion starts with the conception of the chemical and traces its evolution into a waste and even past disposal. At this point the story continues into the afterlife, where responsibility still remains.

  16. Using Expert Panel Data to Guide Youth Agricultural Safety and Health Training Resources in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Mann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Labor (US DOL oversees the Agricultural Hazardous Occupations Orders (AgHOs, which identifies specific tasks that youth are prohibited from performing for hire on American farms and ranches. An educational exemption from this public policy is currently in place that allows youth, 14–15 years old, to complete a certification program prior to engaging in agricultural work involving tractors and machinery. However, limited guidance is provided in the legislation regarding the format or content of the tractor and machinery certification exemption. Four AgHOs (tractor and machinery studies were identified and included in this meta-analysis publication. The research goals of this analysis were to determine basic trends of learning outcomes, and identify educational content to be delivered as a result of these studies. Within each of the four studies, expert panels were used to identify educational learning outcomes. The analysis revealed that 48.0% (n = 184 of all learning outcome items fell within the Tractor-based (Tractor learning outcome category, 29.8% (n = 114 within General Safety and Health (General, and 22.2% (n = 85 of items in the Machinery-based (Machinery category. Ultimately, sound educational methods and understanding of fundamental student competence are essential components for any training program, including youth who complete AgHOs tractor and machinery certification programs.

  17. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants; Phases 2-4. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, L.; Knochenhauer, M. (Scandpower AB (Sweden)); Holmberg, J.-E.; Rossi, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2011-05-15

    Safety goals are defined in different ways in different countries and also used differently. Many countries are presently developing them in connection to the transfer to risk-informed regulation of both operating nuclear power plants (NPP) and new designs. However, it is far from self-evident how probabilistic safety criteria should be defined and used. On one hand, experience indicates that safety goals are valuable tools for the interpretation of results from a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), and they tend to enhance the realism of a risk assessment. On the other hand, strict use of probabilistic criteria is usually avoided. A major problem is the large number of different uncertainties in a PSA model, which makes it difficult to demonstrate the compliance with a probabilistic criterion. Further, it has been seen that PSA results can change a lot over time due to scope extensions, revised operating experience data, method development, changes in system requirements, or increases of level of detail, mostly leading to an increase of the frequency of the calculated risk. This can cause a problem of consistency in the judgments. This report presents the results from the second, third and fourth phases of the project (2007-2009), which have dealt with providing guidance related to the resolution of some specific problems, such as the problem of consistency in judgement, comparability of safety goals used in different industries, the relationship between criteria on different levels, and relations between criteria for level 2 and 3 PSA. In parallel, additional context information has been provided. This was achieved by extending the international overview by contributing to and benefiting from a survey on PSA safety criteria which was initiated in 2006 within the OECD/NEA Working Group Risk. The results from the project can be used as a platform for discussions at the utilities on how to define and use quantitative safety goals. The results can also be used by

  19. Incorporating organizational factors into probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants through canonical probabilistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, S.F. [Dpto. de Inteligencia Artificial, E.T.S.I. Informatica (UNED), Juan del Rosal, 16, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: seve@dia.uned.es; Mosleh, A. [2100A Marie Mount Hall, Materials and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)]. E-mail: mosleh@umd.edu; Izquierdo, J.M. [Area de Modelado y Simulacion, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado, 11, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: jmir@csn.es

    2007-08-15

    The {omega}-factor approach is a method that explicitly incorporates organizational factors into Probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Bayesian networks (BNs) are the underlying formalism used in this approach. They have a structural part formed by a graph whose nodes represent organizational variables, and a parametric part that consists of conditional probabilities, each of them quantifying organizational influences between one variable and its parents in the graph. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, we discuss some important limitations of current procedures in the {omega}-factor approach for either assessing conditional probabilities from experts or estimating them from data. We illustrate the discussion with an example that uses data from Licensee Events Reports of nuclear power plants for the estimation task. Second, we introduce significant improvements in the way BNs for the {omega}-factor approach can be constructed, so that parameter acquisition becomes easier and more intuitive. The improvements are based on the use of noisy-OR gates as model of multicausal interaction between each BN node and its parents.

  20. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products--soil burden and risk to food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, K; Verta, M; Marttinen, S

    2014-09-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP+NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP+NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland.

  1. Pandora - a simulation tool for safety assessments. Technical description and user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstroem, Per-Anders (Facilia AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report documents a flexible simulation tool, Pandora, used in several post closure safety assessments in both Sweden and Finland to assess the radiological dose to man due to releases from radioactive waste repositories. Pandora allows the user to build compartment models to represent the migration and fate of radionuclides in the environment. The tool simplifies the implementation and simulation of radioecological biosphere models in which there exist a large set of radionuclides and input variables. Based on the well-known technical computing software MATLAB and especially its interactive graphical environment Simulink, Pandora receives many benefits. MATLAB/Simulink is a highly flexible tool used for simulations of practically any type of dynamic system; it is widely used, continuously maintained, and often upgraded. By basing the tool on this commercial software package, we gain both the graphical interface provided by Simulink, as well as the ability to access the advanced numerical equation solving routines in MATLAB. Since these numerical methods are well established and quality assured in their MATLAB implementation, the solution methods used in Pandora can be considered to have high level of quality assurance. The structure of Pandora provides clarity in the model format, which means the model itself assists its own documentation, since the model can be understood by inspecting its structure. With the introduction of the external tool Pandas (Pandora assessment tool), version handling and an integrated way of performing the entire calculation chain has been added. Instead of being dependent on other commercial statistical software as @Risk for performing probabilistic assessments, they can now be performed within the tool

  2. The safety of ultrasound guided central venous cannulation in patients with liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Central venous cannulation (CVC is frequently required during the management of patients with liver disease with deranged conventional coagulation parameters (CCP. Since CVC is known to be associated with vascular complications, it is standard practice to transfuse Fresh-Frozen Plasma or platelets to correct CCP. These CCP may not reflect true coagulopathy in liver disease. Additionally CVC when performed under ultrasound guidance (USG-CVC in itself reduces the incidence of complications. Aim: To assess the safety of USG-CVC and to evaluate the incidence of complications among liver disease patients with coagulopathy. Setting and Design: An audit of all USG-CVCs was performed among adult patients with liver disease in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Data was collected for all the adult patients (18-60 years of either gender suffering from liver disease who had required USG-CVC. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis was done to identify possible risk factors for complications. Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.1 ± 11.6 years. Mean international normalized ratio was 2.17 ± 1.16 whereas median platelet count was 149.5 (range, 12-683 × 10 9 /L. No major vascular or non-vascular complications were recorded in our patients. Overall incidence of minor vascular complications was 18.6%, of which 13% had significant ooze, 10.3% had hematoma formation and 4.7% had both hematoma and ooze. Arterial puncture and multiple attempts were independent risk factors for superficial hematoma formation whereas low platelet count and presence of ascites were independent risk factors for significant oozing. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance -CVC in liver disease patients with deranged coagulation is a safe and highly successful modality.

  3. Implementation of Recommendations from the One System Comparative Evaluation of the Hanford Tank Farms and Waste Treatment Plant Safety Bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, Richard L.; Niemi, Belinda J.; Paik, Ingle K.; Buczek, Jeffrey A.; Lietzow, J.; McCoy, F.; Beranek, F.; Gupta, M.

    2013-11-07

    A Comparative Evaluation was conducted for One System Integrated Project Team to compare the safety bases for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (WTP) and Tank Operations Contract (TOC) (i.e., Tank Farms) by an Expert Review Team. The evaluation had an overarching purpose to facilitate effective integration between WTP and TOC safety bases. It was to provide One System management with an objective evaluation of identified differences in safety basis process requirements, guidance, direction, procedures, and products (including safety controls, key safety basis inputs and assumptions, and consequence calculation methodologies) between WTP and TOC. The evaluation identified 25 recommendations (Opportunities for Integration). The resolution of these recommendations resulted in 16 implementation plans. The completion of these implementation plans will help ensure consistent safety bases for WTP and TOC along with consistent safety basis processes. procedures, and analyses. and should increase the likelihood of a successful startup of the WTP. This early integration will result in long-term cost savings and significant operational improvements. In addition, the implementation plans lead to the development of eight new safety analysis methodologies that can be used at other U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) complex sites where URS Corporation is involved.

  4. Documentation of Hanford Site independent review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herborn, D.I.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, and as such is responsible for preparation of the HWVP Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR). The HWVP PSAR was prepared pursuant to the requirements for safety analyses contained in US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 4700.1, Project Management System (DOE 1987); 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities (DOE 1986a); 5481.lB, Safety Analysis and Review System (DOE 1986b) which was superseded by DOE order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, for nuclear facilities effective April 30, 1992 (DOE 1992); and 6430.lA, General Design Criteria (DOE 1989). The WHC procedures that, in large part, implement these DOE requirements are contained in WHC-CM-4-46, Nonreactor Facility Safety Analysis Manual. This manual describes the overall WHC safety analysis process in terms of requirements for safety analyses, responsibilities of the various contributing organizations, and required reviews and approvals.

  5. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 2-Domino Hazard Index and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    The design of layout plans requires adequate assessment tools for the quantification of safety performance. The general focus of the present work is to introduce an inherent safety perspective at different points of the layout design process. In particular, index approaches for safety assessment and decision-making in the early stages of layout design are developed and discussed in this two-part contribution. Part 1 (accompanying paper) of the current work presents an integrated index approach for safety assessment of early plant layout. In the present paper (Part 2), an index for evaluation of the hazard related to the potential of domino effects is developed. The index considers the actual consequences of possible escalation scenarios and scores or ranks the subsequent accident propagation potential. The effects of inherent and passive protection measures are also assessed. The result is a rapid quantification of domino hazard potential that can provide substantial support for choices in the early stages of layout design. Additionally, a case study concerning selection among various layout options is presented and analyzed. The case study demonstrates the use and applicability of the indices developed in both parts of the current work and highlights the value of introducing inherent safety features early in layout design.

  6. Definition and means of maintaining the emergency notification and evacuation system portion of the plutonium finishing plant safety envelope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WHITE, W.F.

    1999-05-20

    The Emergency Evacuation and Notification System provides information to the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Building Emergency Director to assist in determining appropriate emergency response, notifies personnel of the required response, and assists in their response. The report identifies the equipment in the Safety Envelope (SE) for this System and the Administrative, Maintenance, and Surveillance Procedures used to maintain the SE Equipment.

  7. Valve inlet fluid conditions for pressurizer safety and relief valves in combustion engineering-designed plants. Final report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, J.; Chari, D.; Puchir, M.; Weismantel, S.

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assemble documented information for C-E designed plants concerning pressurizer safety and power operated relief valve (PROV) inlet fluid conditions during actuation as calculated by conventional licensing analyses. This information is to be used to assist in the justification of the valve inlet fluid conditions selected for the testing of safety valves and PORVs in the EPRI/PWR Safety/Relief Valve Test Program. Available FSAR/Reload analyses and certain low temperature overpressurization analyses were reviewed to identify the pressurization transients which would actuate the valves, and the corresponding valve inlet fluid conditions. In addition, consideration was given to the Extended High Pressure Liquid Injection event. A general description of each pressurization transient is provided. The specific fluid conditions identified and tabulated for each C-E designed plant for each transient are peak pressurizer pressure, pressure ramp rate at actuation, temperature and fluid state.

  8. Development of Real Time Operating System for Safety Grade PLC (POSAFE-Q) for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Han Seong [ENESYS, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Jae [POSCON, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Joon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Lee, Dong Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    POSAFE-Q is a newly developed programmable logic controller (PLC) in order to apply to digital safety system of nuclear power plants (NPP) according to Nuclear Power Plant safety requirements. POSAFE-Q hardware and software development process, including design, review, verification and validation, and configuration control and quality assurance, satisfies the requirements imposed by 10CFR50, Appendix B. This article introduces a real time operating system pCOS, which is the core of POSAFE-Q. Section 2 describes the structure of pCOS. Section 3 describes a few important features of pCOS, which are necessary to the application for the digital safety system of NPP.0.

  9. The European multicenter trial on the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion (GO-LIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkenmaier Christof

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the implant-related problems with pedicle screw-based spinal instrumentations, other types of fixation have been tried in spinal arthrodesis. One such technique is the direct trans-pedicular, trans-discal screw fixation, pioneered by Grob for spondylolisthesis. The newly developed GO-LIF procedure expands the scope of the Grob technique in several important ways and adds security by means of robotic-assisted navigation. This is the first clinical trial on the GO-LIF procedure and it will assess safety and efficacy. Methods/Design Multicentric prospective study with n = 40 patients to undergo single level instrumented spinal arthrodesis of the lumbar or the lumbosacral spine, based on a diagnosis of: painful disc degeneration, painful erosive osteochondrosis, segmental instability, recurrent disc herniation, spinal canal stenosis or foraminal stenosis. The primary target criteria with regards to safety are: The number, severity and cause of intra- and perioperative complications. The number of significant penetrations of the cortical layer of the vertebral body by the implant as recognized on postoperative CT. The primary target parameters with regards to feasibility are: Performance of the procedure according to the preoperative plan. The planned follow-up is 12 months and the following scores will be evaluated as secondary target parameters with regards to clinical improvement: VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, short form - 12 health questionnaire and the Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaire for patients with spinal claudication. The secondary parameters with regards to construct stability are visible fusion or lack thereof and signs of implant loosening, implant migration or pseudarthrosis on plain and functional radiographs. Discussion This trial will for the first time assess the safety and efficacy of guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion. There is no control group, but the results, the

  10. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  11. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  12. RNA-Guided Cas9-Induced Mutagenesis in Tobacco Followed by Efficient Genetic Fixation in Doubled Haploid Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedel, Sindy; Pencs, Stefanie; Hensel, Götz; Müller, Andrea; Rutten, Twan; Kumlehn, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Customizable endonucleases are providing an effective tool for genome engineering. The resulting primary transgenic individuals (T0) are typically heterozygous and/or chimeric with respect to any mutations induced. To generate genetically fixed mutants, they are conventionally allowed to self-pollinate, a procedure which segregates individuals into mutant heterozygotes/homozygotes and wild types. The chances of recovering homozygous mutants among the progeny depend not only on meiotic segregation but also on the frequency of mutated germline cells in the chimeric mother plant. In Nicotiana species, the heritability of Cas9-induced mutations has not been demonstrated yet. RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease-mediated mutagenesis was targeted to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene harbored by a transgenic tobacco line. Upon retransformation using a GFP-specific guide RNA/Cas9 construct, the T0 plants were allowed to either self-pollinate, or were propagated via regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen which give rise to haploid/doubled haploid plants or from leaf explants that form plants vegetatively. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of the T0 plants. About half of these mutations proved heritable via selfing. Regeneration from in vitro cultured embryogenic pollen allowed for homozygous mutants to be produced more efficiently than via sexual reproduction. Consequently, embryogenic pollen culture provides a convenient method to rapidly generate a variety of genetically fixed mutants following site-directed mutagenesis. The recovery of a mutation not found among sexually produced and analyzed progeny was shown to be achievable through vegetative plant propagation in vitro, which eventually resulted in heritability when the somatic clones were selfed. In addition, some in-frame mutations were associated with functional attenuation of the target gene rather than its full knock-out. The generation of mutants with compromised rather than

  13. Development of reliability-based safety enhancement technology; development of organization concept model in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Ju Youl; Kim, Yoon Ik; Yang, Hui Chang; Lee, Yong Sik; Kim, Se Hyung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The influences of organizational factors on safety of nuclear power plants are mentioned in the early 1970s and noticed after being focused on in the accident report of TMI in 1979. These needs let us implement this research and the purposes of this research are to assess the organizational influences and to develop the organizational conceptual model to establish the basis of identifying the organizational factors, using this model to contribute to enhance safety and economics in nuclear power plants. Eventually research on the organizational influences is expected to have two effects, which are to improve safety through identifying potential causes of accidents and to elevate economics as a new approach to more efficient operation of nuclear power plants. In this study, recent studies were surveyed on the organizational conceptual model, the identification of organizational factors, assessment of organizational influences and evaluation methods of organizational factors and organizational influences among the overseas and domestic researches. In addition specific characteristics of domestic nuclear power plants were tried to identify through plant visit and an evaluation method of organizational influences on component maintenance and human performance were developed and presented. 71 refs., 40 figs., 18 tabs. (Author)

  14. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  15. Volatile chemical cues guide host location and host selection by parasitic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin B. Runyon; Mark C. Mescher; Consuelo M. De Moraes

    2006-01-01

    The importance of plant volatiles in mediating interactions between plant species is much debated. Here, we demonstrate that the parasitic plant Cuscuta pentagona (dodder) uses volatile cues for host location. Cuscuta pentagona seedlings exhibit directed growth toward nearby tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum...

  16. Integrated safety assessment of Indian nuclear power plants for extreme events: Reducing impact on public mind

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kakodkar; Ram Kumar Singh

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear energy professionals need to understand and address the catastrophe syndrome that of late seems to be increasingly at work in public mind in the context of nuclear energy. Classically the nuclear power reactor design and system evolution has been based on the logic of minimization of risk to an acceptable level and its quantification based on a deterministic approach and backed up by a further assessment based on the probabilistic methodology. However, in spite of minimization of risk, the reasons for anxiety and trauma in public mind that still prevails in the context of severe accidents needs to be understood and addressed. Margins between maximum credible accidents factored in the design and the ultimate load withstanding capacities of relevant systems need to be enhanced and guaranteed with a view to minimize release of radioactivity and avoid serious impact in public domain. A more realistic basis for management of an accident in public domain also needs to be quantified for this purpose. Assurance to public on limiting the consequences to a level that does not lead to a trauma is something that we need to be able to credibly demonstrate and confirm. The findings from Chernobyl reports point to significant psychological effects and related health disorders due to large scale emergency relocation of people that could have been possibly reduced by an order of magnitude without significant additional safety detriment. A combination of probabilistic and deterministic approaches should be evolved further to minimize consequences in public domain through enhancing safety margins and adding greater precision to quantitatively predicting accident progression and its management. The paper presents the case studies of the extreme external event such as tsunami and its impact on the coastal nuclear plants in India, the containment integrity assessment under the extreme internal event of over-pressurization and aircraft impact along with hydrogen deflagration

  17. PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived

  18. Mathematical aspects of assessing extreme events for the safety of nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempski, Slawomir; Borysiewicz, Mieczyslaw

    2015-04-01

    In the paper the review of mathematical methodologies applied for assessing low frequencies of rare natural events like earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes or tornadoes, floods (in particular flash floods and surge storms), lightning, solar flares, etc., will be given in the perspective of the safety assessment of nuclear plants. The statistical methods are usually based on the extreme value theory, which deals with the analysis of extreme deviation from the median (or the mean). In this respect application of various mathematical tools can be useful, like: the extreme value theorem of Fisher-Tippett-Gnedenko leading to possible choices of general extreme value distributions, or the Pickands-Balkema-de Haan theorem for tail fitting, or the methods related to large deviation theory. In the paper the most important stochastic distributions relevant for performing rare events statistical analysis will be presented. This concerns, for example, the analysis of the data with the annual extreme values (maxima - "Annual Maxima Series" or minima), or the peak values, exceeding given thresholds at some periods of interest ("Peak Over Threshold"), or the estimation of the size of exceedance. Despite of the fact that there is a lack of sufficient statistical data directly containing rare events, in some cases it is still possible to extract useful information from existing larger data sets. As an example one can consider some data sets available from the web sites for floods, earthquakes or generally natural hazards. Some aspects of such data sets will be also presented taking into account their usefulness for the practical assessment of risk for nuclear power plants coming from extreme weather conditions.

  19. A geminivirus-based guide RNA delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kangquan; Han, Ting; Liu, Guang; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Ying; Yu, Alice Yunzi L; Liu, Yule

    2015-10-09

    CRISPR/Cas has emerged as potent genome editing technology and has successfully been applied in many organisms, including several plant species. However, delivery of genome editing reagents remains a challenge in plants. Here, we report a virus-based guide RNA (gRNA) delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 mediated plant genome editing (VIGE) that can be used to precisely target genome locations and cause mutations. VIGE is performed by using a modified Cabbage Leaf Curl virus (CaLCuV) vector to express gRNAs in stable transgenic plants expressing Cas9. DNA sequencing confirmed VIGE of endogenous NbPDS3 and NbIspH genes in non-inoculated leaves because CaLCuV can infect plants systemically. Moreover, VIGE of NbPDS3 and NbIspH in newly developed leaves caused photo-bleached phenotype. These results demonstrate that geminivirus-based VIGE could be a powerful tool in plant genome editing.

  20. Aseismic safety analysis of a prestressed concrete containment vessel for CPR1000 nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ping; Wang, Qingkang; Kong, Xianjing

    2017-01-01

    The containment vessel of a nuclear power plant is the last barrier to prevent nuclear reactor radiation. Aseismic safety analysis is the key to appropriate containment vessel design. A prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model with a semi-infinite elastic foundation and practical arrangement of tendons has been established to analyze the aseismic ability of the CPR1000 PCCV structure under seismic loads and internal pressure. A method to model the prestressing tendon and its interaction with concrete was proposed and the axial force of the prestressing tendons showed that the simulation was reasonable and accurate. The numerical results show that for the concrete structure, the location of the cylinder wall bottom around the equipment hatch and near the ring beam are critical locations with large principal stress. The concrete cracks occurred at the bottom of the PCCV cylinder wall under the peak earthquake motion of 0.50 g, however the PCCV was still basically in an elastic state. Furthermore, the concrete cracks occurred around the equipment hatch under the design internal pressure of 0.4MPa, but the steel liner was still in the elastic stage and its leak-proof function soundness was verified. The results provide the basis for analysis and design of containment vessels.

  1. Assessment of enriched uranium storage safety issues at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This document is an assessment of the technical safety issues pertaining to the storage of EU at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The purpose of the assessment is to serve as the basis for defining the technical standards for storage of EU at Y-12. A formal assessment of the Y-12 materials acceptance criteria for EU is currently being conducted by a task force cochaired by B. G. Eddy of DOE Oak Ridge Operations and S. 0. Cox of Y-12 Defense Programs. The mission of this technical assessment for storage is obviously dependent on results of the acceptance assessment. Clearly, the two efforts require coordination to avoid inconsistencies. In addition, both these Assessments must be consistent with the Environmental Assessment for EU storage at Y-12.1 Both the Storage Assessment and the Criteria for Acceptance must take cognizance of the fact that a portion of the EU to be submitted for storage in the future is expected to be derived from foreign sources and to include previously irradiated uranium containing significant levels of transuranics, radioactive daughter products, and unstable uranium isotopes that do not occur in the EU stream of the DOE weapons complex. National security considerations may dictate that these materials be accepted despite the fact that they fail to conform to the Acceptance Criteria. This document will attempt to address the complexities inherent in this situation.

  2. Structural Safety Analysis Based on Seismic Service Conditions for Butterfly Valves in a Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Uk Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  3. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  4. A conceptual study on large-capacity safety relief valve (SRV) for future BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Katsumi; Tokunaga, Takashi; Iwanaga, Masakazu; Kurosaki, Toshikazu [Toshiba Corporation, Isogo Nuclear Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual study of Safety Relief Valve (SRV) which has larger flow capacity than that of the conventional one and a new structure. Maintenance work of SRVs is one of the main concerns for next-generation Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) plants whose thermal power is planned to be increased. Because the number of SRVs increases with the thermal power, their maintenance would become critical during periodic inspections. To decrease the maintenance work, reduction of the number by increasing the nominal flow rate per SRV and a new structure suitable for easier treatment have been investigated. From a parameter survey of the initial and maintenance cost, the optimum capacity has been estimated to be between 180 and 200 kg/s. Primarily because the number of SRVs decreases in inversely proportional to the capacity, the total maintenance work decreases. The new structure of SRV, with an internally mounted actuator, decreases the number of the connecting parts and will make the maintenance work easier. A 1/4-scale model of the new SRV has been manufactured and performance tests have been conducted. The test results satisfied the design target, which shows the feasibility of the new structure. (author)

  5. Environment, safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the DOE Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Golden, Colorado. The assessment, which was conducted during the period of May 17 through May 28, 1993, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices (Defense Programs (DP) and Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM)), the DOE Rocky Flats Office (RFO), and the site contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G). Despite the near constant state of flux under which RFP has been required to operate, the Progress Assessment Team has concluded that significant progress has been made in correcting the deficiencies identified in the 1989 Assessment and in responding responsibly to regulations, and DOE directives and guidance that have been issued since that time. The Team concluded that the improvements have been concentrated in the activities associated with plutonium facilities and in regulatory driven programs. Much remains to be done with respect to implementing on a sitewide basis those management systems that anchor an organization`s pursuit of continuous ES&H improvement. Furthermore the Team concluded that the pace of improvement has been constrained by a combination of factors that have limited the site`s ability to manage change in the pursuit of sitewide ES&H excellence.

  6. Plant‐O‐Matic: a dynamic and mobile guide to all plants of the Americas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldsmith, Greogory R.; Holme, Naia Morueta; Sandel, Brody Steven

    2016-01-01

    000 plant species. Plant-O-Matic, a free iOS application, combines the species distribution models with the location services built into a mobile device to provide users with a list of all plant species expected to occur in the 100 × 100 km geographic grid cell corresponding to the user's location...... in identification of species by the user. The application's ability to assemble locally relevant lists of plant species and their attributes on demand for anywhere in the Americas provides a powerful new tool for identifying, exploring, and understanding plant diversity. Mobile applications such as Plant...

  7. Operational safety analysis of the Olkiluoto encapsulation plant and disposal facility; Olkiluodon kapselointi- ja loppusijoituslaitoksen kaeyttoeturvallisuusanalyysi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, J.; Suolanen, V. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    Radiation doses for workers of the facility, for inhabitants in the environment and for terrestrial ecosystem possibly caused by the encapsulation and disposal facilities to be built at Olkiluoto during its operation were considered in the study. The study covers both the normal operation of the plant and some hypothetical incidents and accidents. Release through the ventilation stack is assumed to be filtered both in normal operation and in hypothetical abnormal fault and accident cases. In addition the results for unfiltered releases are also presented. This research is limited to the deterministic analysis. During about 30 operation years of our four nuclear power plant units there have been found 58 broken fuel pins. Roughly estimating there has been one fuel leakage per year in a facility (includes two units). Based on this and adopting a conservative approach, it is estimated that one fuel pin per year could leak in normal operation during encapsulation process. The release magnitude in incidents and accidents is based on the event chains, which lead to loss of fuel pin tightness followed by a discharge of radionuclides into the handling space and to some degree to the atmosphere through the ventilation stack equipped with redundant filters. The most exposed group of inhabitants is conservatively assumed to live at the distance of 200 meters from the encapsulation and disposal plant and it will receive the largest doses in most dispersion conditions. The dose value to a member of the most exposed group was calculated on the basis of the weather data in such a way that greater dose than obtained here is caused only in 0.5 percent of dispersion conditions. The results obtained indicate that during normal operation the doses to workers remain small and the dose to the member of the most exposed group is less than 0.001 mSv per year. In the case of hypothetical fault and accident releases the offsite doses do not exceed either the limit values set by the safety

  8. A Study on the Adverse Effect of AOVs in AFWS Recirculation Paths on Plant Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huong, Ho Thi Thanh [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dae-Wook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Auxiliary feedwater system (AFWS) recirculation flow paths adopted air operated valves (AOVs) which could fail close on loss of instrument air (LOIA) event. So the AOVs and recirculation paths are closed on LOIA event, which could result in Auxiliary feedwater (AFW) pump(s) damage, which contributes greatly to core damage frequency (CDF).. On February 2002, the USNRC issued an inspection finding related to potential common cause failure of AOVs in AFWS recirculation flow paths on loss of instrument air system in Point Beach nuclear power plant (Pt. Beach). The AOVs have been removed from AFWS recirculation paths in the design of Korea standard nuclear power plant (KSNP). So, there is no possibility of above mentioned failure event in KSNP. It would be beneficial to evaluate the significance of adverse effect of AOVs in AFWS recirculation paths to realize the importance of maintaining AFWS recirculation paths always open. In this study, the AFWS modeling of Ulchin unit 3 and 4 was modified to model the AOVs in AFW recirculation flow paths to evaluate the change in CDF, which is caused by the adverse effect of AOV with operation mode of 'fails close' on LOIA event. It is concluded that the existence of AOV with 'fail close' design in AFWS MDP recirculation paths results in CDF increase of 131%, which is significant adverse effect on plant safety.. In this regard, the improved Westinghouse design and KSNP design had removed the AOVs from AFWS MDP recirculation paths. However, a couple of units with old Westinghouse design, Kori 1 and 2, still have AOVs in AFWS MDP recirculation paths and throttle back operation of AFWS is in effect. Although those AOVs adopt 'fail open' design to prevent above mentioned inadvertent closure, considering the big increase in CDF, there still exists considerable risk from the possibility of 'failure to open' during this throttle back operation. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that any

  9. Safety - a Neglected Issue When Introducing Solid Biomass Fuel in Thermal Power Plants? Some Evidence of an Emerging Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess; Astad, John

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines recent evidence from Denmark and abroad with climate change projects that aim to reduce global carbon dioxide emissions by converting coal fired thermal power plants to solid biomass fuel. The paper argues that projects appear to be pursued narrow-mindedly with insufficient...... attention paid to safety and points to evidence of media-shifting-that the 'resolution' of a problem within the environmental domain creates a new problem in the workplace safety domain. The paper argues that biomass pellets qualify as an emerging risk for which proper control strategies have yet...

  10. Radiation safety issues in the water treatment plant - Indoor radon and gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantsikene, A.; Kiisk, M.; Suursoo, S.; Koch, R. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Lumiste, L. [Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    the second stage filters, classifying them as radioactive material. {sup 222}Rn activity generated in the filter columns was compared to {sup 222}Rn activity entering the plant with raw water; the latter was estimated via liquid scintillation technique. The results indicate that {sup 222}Rn inflow is insignificant compared to the {sup 222}Rn generation in the columns. The estimated difference is in six orders of magnitude. Six alpha-track detectors were placed inside the treatment plant (in filter hall and working rooms) for measuring {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn indoor air concentrations. The obtained results are above 200 Bq/m{sup 3}. According to the Estonian Standard EVS 840:2009 'Design of radon-safe buildings', the annual radon concentration in living-, rest- and workrooms should remain below 200 Bq/m{sup 3}. The implemented investigation presented in this paper reveals the importance of monitoring radiation safety of the workers of this water treatment plant. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  11. Ultrasound guided percutaneous microwave ablation of benign thyroid nodules: Safety and imaging follow-up in 222 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Wenwen [Binzhou Medical University, #346 Guan-hai Road, Lai-shan, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Wang, Shurong, E-mail: 7762808@sina.com [Department of Ultrasound, Muping Area People' s Hospital, #629 Nan-hua Street, Mu-ping, Yantai, Shandong 264100 (China); Wang, Bin [Binzhou Medical University, #346 Guan-hai Road, Lai-shan, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Xu, Qingling; Yu, Shoujun; Yonglin, Zhang; Wang, Xiju [Department of Ultrasound, Muping Area People' s Hospital, #629 Nan-hua Street, Mu-ping, Yantai, Shandong 264100 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: Microwave ablation is a minimally invasive technique that has been used to treat benign and malignant tumors of liver, lung and kidney. Towards thyroid nodules, only a few cases are reported so far. The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules with a large sample. Materials and methods: A total of 477 benign thyroid nodules in 222 patients underwent microwave ablation in our department from July 2009 to March 2012. Microwave ablation was carried out using microwave antenna (16G) under local anesthesia. Nodule volume, thyroid function and clinical symptoms were evaluated before treatment and at 1, 3, more than 6 months. The study was ethics committee approved and written informed consents were obtained from all patients. Results: All thyroid nodules significantly decreased in size after microwave ablation. A 6-month follow-up was achieved in 254 of 477 nodules, and the mean decrease in the volume of thyroid nodules was from 2.13 ± 4.42 ml to 0.45 ± 0.90 ml, with a mean percent decrease of 0.65 ± 0.65. A volume-reduction ratio greater than 50% was observed in 82.3% (209/254) of index nodules, and 30.7% (78/254) of index nodules disappeared 6-month after the ablation. The treatment was well tolerated and no major complications were observed except pain and transient voice changes. Conclusions: Microwave ablation seems to be a safe and effective technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. Further prospective randomized studies are needed to define the role of the procedure in the treatment of thyroid nodules.

  12. Integrated Safety Management System Phase I Verification for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) [VOL 1 & 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SETH, S.S.

    2000-01-10

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Policy 450.4, Safety Management System Policy commits to institutionalizing an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex as a means of accomplishing its missions safely. DOE Acquisition Regulation 970.5204-2 requires that contractors manage and perform work in accordance with a documented safety management system.

  13. A field guide to valuable underwater aquatic plants of the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Donald W.

    1986-01-01

    Underwater plants are a valuable part of the Great Lakes ecosystem, providing food and shelter for aquatic animals. Aquatic plants also help stabilize sediments, thereby reducing shoreline erosion. Annual fall die-offs of underwater plants provide food and shelter for overwintering small aquatic animals such as insects, snails, and freshwater shrimp.

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  15. Improved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX Wind Guide Technology at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Mortensen

    2010-12-31

    This project added a new airflow enhancement technology to an existing ACC cooling process at a selected coal power plant. Airflow parameters and efficiency improvement for the main plant cooling process using the applied technology were determined and compared with the capabilities of existing systems. The project required significant planning and pre-test execution in order to reach the required Air Cooled Condenser system configuration for evaluation. A host Power Plant ACC system had to be identified, agreement finalized, and addition of the SPX ACC Wind Guide Technology completed on that site. Design of the modification, along with procurement, fabrication, instrumentation, and installation of the new airflow enhancement technology were executed. Baseline and post-modification cooling system data was collected and evaluated. The improvement of ACC thermal performance after SPX wind guide installation was clear. Testing of the improvement indicates there is a 5% improvement in heat transfer coefficient in high wind conditions and 1% improvement at low wind speed. The benefit increased with increasing wind speed. This project was completed on schedule and within budget.

  16. Safety provisions for UF{sub 6} handling in the design of a new UF{sub 6} conversion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, S.P. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, Preston (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) Fuel Division is currently undertaking the final design and construction of a new UF{sub 6} conversion plant at its production site at Springfields near Preston in the north of England. The Company has gained much experience in the handling of UF{sub 6} during operation of plants on site since 1961. The major hazard occurs during the liquefication cycle and the basis of the maximum credible incident scenario adopted for safety assessment and design purposes is discussed. This paper considers the design features which have been incorporated in the new plant to counter the hazards presented by the presence of UF{sub 6} in gaseous and liquid form and explains current thinking on operational procedures in areas of potential risk such as cylinder filling. The plant emergency response philosophy and systems are described and specific design provisions which have been included to satisfy the UK regulatory bodies are outlined in some detail.

  17. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I. Final report: plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, T. Y.

    1981-05-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. The Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic accelaration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock).

  18. SAFETY FIRST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring safety while peacefully utilizing nuclear energy is a top priority for China A fter a recent earthquake in Japan caused radioactive leaks at a nuclear power plant in Tokyo, the safety of nuclear energy has again aroused public attention.

  19. 食品安全犯罪刑法指导理念的重置%Resetting the Guiding Philosophy of Criminal Law for Food Safety Crime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令仙

    2014-01-01

    Based on the risk criminal law concept ,“Criminal Law Amendment VIII ” has made some revisions for food safety crimes, reducing the conviction threshold , expanding the scope of punishment , increasing the intensity of punishment .But China ’ s food safety has not improved and food safety crime has been at a high rate .This paper illustrated the current situation of food safety crimes, pointed out the deficiencies of the guiding ideology of the risk criminal law and proposed that people ’ s livelihood criminal law should be the guiding ideology of food safety crimes in order to punish the food safety crimes and protect people ’s welfare.%《刑法修正案(八)》基于风险刑法的理念对食品安全犯罪进行了修改,降低入罪的门槛,扩大惩处范围,加大惩罚力度,但我国食品安全形势并未好转,食品安全犯罪的发案率居高,现状堪忧。对当前食品安全犯罪的现状进行阐述,指出风险刑法指导理念的缺陷,提出以民生刑法作为食品安全犯罪的刑事指导理念,以期有效惩治危害食品安全的犯罪,保障民生安全。

  20. Safety Guide-Line and Requirements for Distributed Raman Amplification and its Applications to WDM Transmission Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahito; Tomizawa; Akira; Hirano; Yutaka; Miyamoto

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses optical safety issues in distributed Raman amplification systems. Given the extremely high pump powers, network service operators have critical issues for safety. This paper focuses on both " eye-hazard" and " fire-hazards" .

  1. Safety Guide-Line and Requirements for Distributed Raman Amplification and its Applications to WDM Transmission Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahito Tomizawa; Akira Hirano; Yutaka Miyamoto

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses optical safety issues in distributed Raman amplification systems. Given the extremely high pump powers, network service operators have critical issues for safety. This paper focuses on both “eye-hazard” and “fire-hazards”.

  2. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  3. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  4. Financial Control and Safety. An investigation on how financial and safety aspects are integrated in the decision making at the Swedish nuclear power plants; Ekonomistyrning och saekerhet. En utredning om hur ekonomi- och saekerhetsaspekter integreras vid beslutsfattandet vid kaernkraftverken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaernild, Ola [OV Konsult i Vaesteraas AB, Vaesteraas (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    The alleged inter-relationship between economy and nuclear safety has been investigated. Through interviews and review of instructions and other documents, information on how management at Swedish nuclear power plants integrates financial control and safety management has been compiled. Owners of nuclear power plants have well founded expectations on that the plants are profitable and that the operations are rationalized in order to reduce costs. This could allegedly threaten the nuclear safety. However, it is not to be expected that there are any obvious relationships between expenditures and safety. The quality of the safety management has to be judged in terms of how well safety requirements are met irrespective of the associated costs. The owners have imposed clear financial objectives on the nuclear power plants. At the same time they have also established policies for nuclear safety. The nuclear power plants have systems for operations management, which basically comprise separate parts for operations planning and quality management. Financial control and safety management are included in the operations planning and quality management respectively. The quality management impose restrictions to be adhered to in the operations planning. This means that from a formal point of view, the safety management is superior to the operations planning. There are examples of simple as well as advanced approaches to financial management at the nuclear power plants. In all cases the methods used are reasonably well adapted to the needs. Typical for all plants is the focus on long-term aspects. Investments are for example analysed in a plant life-time perspective. With regard to safety, profitability calculations are not required to the same extent for safety related investments as for other investments. A number of factors, which tend to warrant that safety aspects are given the appropriate attention in the decision making, have been identified. Examples of such factors are

  5. Ethics of Plant Breeding: The IFOAM Basic Principles as a Guide for the Evolution of Organic Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts Van Bueren, E.

    2010-01-01

    The basic values of organic agriculture is laid down in the IFOAM four basic principles: the principle of health, the principle of ecology, the principle of fairness and the principle of care. These principles and the consequences and challenges for the further development of organic plant breeding

  6. Advanced safety engineering for wind power plants; Moderne Sicherheitstechnik fuer Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, Juergen [Bachmann Electronic GmbH, Feldkirch (Austria). Safety und Security

    2010-06-15

    Wind power systems are classified as machines and are subject to the 2006/42/EC directive on machinery. They must meet specifications concerning functional safety. Modern safety solutions including programmable control systems offer a wide range of options. For example, remote monitoring and servicing can be combined with intelligent redundancies in order to ensure and even improve availability. Bachman Electronic offers an integrated safety package for this purpose. (orig.)

  7. Studies of the relationship between employee`s safety consciousness, morale, and supervisor`s leadership in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misumi, Jyuji; Hiraki, Tadao; Sakurai, Yukihiro [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Kyoto (Japan); Yoshida, Michio; Misumi, Emiko; Tokudome, Eiji

    1996-09-01

    This study examined the relationship between employee`s safety consciousness, morale, and supervisor`s leadership using multiple regression analysis. Respondents were 2152 male employees who were working at nuclear power plants (operation division, maintenance division, and joint companies). Main results were as follows. (1) Individual morale variables, such as `work motivation` and `mental hygine`, were correlated with leadership M behavior rather than with P behavior. On the other hand, group morale variables, such as `teamwork` and `meeting quality`, were correlated with both P and M behavior. These results shows P and M leadership affect the employee`s morale. (2) With regard to safety consciousness variables, `communication` and `work place norm` to ensure safety were strongly correlated to leadership both P and M behavior. However, neither `sense of tension to ensure safety` nor `experiencing cold shiver` were related to leadership P or M behavior. It was suggested that practices for accidents prevention in workplace are related to supervisor`s P and M leadership behavior. (3) `Sense of tension` to ensure safety and `experiencing cold shiver` were negatively correlated with `mental hygine`, but positively correlated with `work motivation`. These results suggest that increase of the work motivation might improve employee`s awareness and ability for detecting human errors. (author)

  8. Contribution to the safety assessment of instrumentation and control software for nuclear power plants: Application to SPIN N4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soubies, B.; Henry, J.Y.; Le Meur, M. [and others

    1995-04-01

    1300 MWe pressurised water reactors (PWRs), like the 1400 MWe reactors, operate with microprocessor-based safety systems. This is particularly the case for the Digital Integrated Protection System (SPIN), which trips the reactor in an emergency and sets in action the safeguard functions. The softwares used in these systems must therefore be highly dependable in the execution of their functions. In the case of SPIN, three players are working at different levels to achieve this goal: the protection system manufacturer, Merlin Gerin; the designer of the nuclear steam supply system, Framatome; the operator of the nuclear power plants, Electricite de France (EDF), which is also responsible for the safety of its installations. Regulatory licenses are issued by the French safety authority, the Nuclear Installations Safety Directorate (French abbreviation DSIN), subsequent to a successful examination of the technical provisions adopted by the operator. This examination is carried out by the IPSN and the standing group on nuclear reactors. This communication sets out: the methods used by the manufacturer to develop SPIN software for the 1400 MWe PWRs (N4 series); the approach adopted by the IPSN to evaluate the safety software of the protection system for the N4 series of reactors.

  9. Oncological safety of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic liver resection for colorectal metastases: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langella, Serena; Russolillo, Nadia; D'Eletto, Marco; Forchino, Fabio; Lo Tesoriere, Roberto; Ferrero, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic liver surgery has gained widespread acceptance and nowadays it is suggested even for malignant disease. Although the benefits on short-term outcomes have been proven, data on oncological safety are still lacking. The aim of this study is to assess oncologic results after ultrasound-guided laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) or open liver resection (OLR) for colorectal metastases. 37 consecutive patients undergoing LLR between 01/2004 and 03/2014 were matched at a ratio of 1:1 with 37 OLR. Matching criteria were male sex, number and diameter of liver metastases, segment location, synchronous presentation, site and stage of primary tumor, positive lymph nodes of the primary, and concomitant extrahepatic disease. Demographic characteristics were similar among groups. Parenchymal transection time was longer in the LLR group (68 ± 38.2 SD vs 40 ± 33.7 SD, p = 0.01). Mortality was nil in LLR and OLR. Overall morbidity was significantly lower in LLR (13.5 vs 37.8%, p = 0.02), although severe complications were similar among the two groups. Patients undergoing LLR were discharged earlier (5 ± 2.3 SD vs 8 ± 6.6 SD days, p resection was recorded in four LLR and three OLR (p = 1). Overall recurrences were similar among groups. Eight patients with hepatic or extrahepatic recurrence among LLR underwent surgery vs four of OLR (p = 0.03). After a median follow-up of 35.7 months in LLR and 47.9 months in OLR, 3-year overall survival was 91.8% LLR and 74.8% OLR (p = 0.14). 3-year disease-free survival was 69.1% LLR and 65.9% OLR (p = 0.53). Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative complications [HR 3.42 (95% CI 1.32-8.89)] and multiple metastases [HR 3.84 (95% CI 1.34-10.83)] were independent predictors of worse survival (p = 0.01). Ultrasound-LLR for colorectal hepatic metastases is safe, ensuring oncologic outcomes comparable to OLR.

  10. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Fort Calhoun nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vehec, T.A.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Fort Calhoun was selected as the sixth plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Fort Calhoun plant.

  11. Global SUMO proteome responses guide gene regulation, mRNA biogenesis, and plant stress responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Mazur; H.A. van den Burg

    2012-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance, and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related protein

  12. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffitt, N.E.; Lloyd, R.C.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Garner, L.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-08-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. H. B. Robinson was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the H. B. Robinson plant.

  13. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant.

  14. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Point Beach nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, R C; Moffitt, N E; Gore, B F; Vo, T V; Vehec, T A [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Point Beach was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRS. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Point Beach plant.

  15. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the McGuire nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Lloyd, R.C.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. McGuire was selected as one of a series of plants for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the McGuire plant.

  16. Review of nuclear power plant safety cable aging studies with recommendations for improved approaches and for future work.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Many U. S. nuclear power plants are approaching 40 years of age and there is a desire to extend their life for up to 100 total years. Safety-related cables were originally qualified for nuclear power plant applications based on IEEE Standards that were published in 1974. The qualifications involved procedures to simulate 40 years of life under ambient power plant aging conditions followed by simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Over the past 35 years or so, substantial efforts were devoted to determining whether the aging assumptions allowed by the original IEEE Standards could be improved upon. These studies led to better accelerated aging methods so that more confident 40-year lifetime predictions became available. Since there is now a desire to potentially extend the life of nuclear power plants way beyond the original 40 year life, there is an interest in reviewing and critiquing the current state-of-the-art in simulating cable aging. These are two of the goals of this report where the discussion is concentrated on the progress made over the past 15 years or so and highlights the most thorough and careful published studies. An additional goal of the report is to suggest work that might prove helpful in answering some of the questions and dealing with some of the issues that still remain with respect to simulating the aging and predicting the lifetimes of safety-related cable materials.

  17. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  18. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  19. THE TRANSGENIC PLANTS – ADVANTAGES REGARDING THEIR CULTIVATION AND POTENTIALLY RISKS CONCERNING THE FOOD SAFETY

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades the genetic modifi ed organisms (GMO) have started to “conquer”, little by little our lives. The most widely used are the trangenic plants, because they have bigger productions and they are resistant to different pests. In the beginning, the spread of the transgenic plants was controlled, but today many countries cultivate genetic modifi ed plants without any control. Among these countries Romania is ahead, starting the cultivation of the transgenic plants in 1999, ver...

  20. A decade of plant proteomics and mass spectrometry: translation of technical advancements to food security and safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Pedreschi, Romina; Carpentier, Sebastien; Wang, Tai; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Kohli, Ajay; Ndimba, Bongani Kaiser; Bykova, Natalia V; Rampitsch, Christof; Zolla, Lello; Rafudeen, Mohamed Suhail; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence Veronique; Tsakirpaloglou, Nikolaos; Ndimba, Roya Janeen; Farrant, Jill M; Renaut, Jenny; Job, Dominique; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Rakwal, Randeep

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous progress in plant proteomics driven by mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has been made since 2000 when few proteomics reports were published and plant proteomics was in its infancy. These achievements include the refinement of existing techniques and the search for new techniques to address food security, safety, and health issues. It is projected that in 2050, the world's population will reach 9-12 billion people demanding a food production increase of 34-70% (FAO, 2009) from today's food production. Provision of food in a sustainable and environmentally committed manner for such a demand without threatening natural resources, requires that agricultural production increases significantly and that postharvest handling and food manufacturing systems become more efficient requiring lower energy expenditure, a decrease in postharvest losses, less waste generation and food with longer shelf life. There is also a need to look for alternative protein sources to animal based (i.e., plant based) to be able to fulfill the increase in protein demands by 2050. Thus, plant biology has a critical role to play as a science capable of addressing such challenges. In this review, we discuss proteomics especially MS, as a platform, being utilized in plant biology research for the past 10 years having the potential to expedite the process of understanding plant biology for human benefits. The increasing application of proteomics technologies in food security, analysis, and safety is emphasized in this review. But, we are aware that no unique approach/technology is capable to address the global food issues. Proteomics-generated information/resources must be integrated and correlated with other omics-based approaches, information, and conventional programs to ensure sufficient food and resources for human development now and in the future.

  1. Extraction and use of historical extreme climate databases for nuclear power plants safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Yasser; Bertin, Xavier; Bardet, Lise; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Rebour, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Safety assessments of nuclear power plants (NPPs) related to natural hazards are a matter of major interest to the nuclear community in France and many European countries. Over the past fewer decades, France has experienced many of these events such as heat waves (2003 and 2006), heavy snowstorms (1958, 1990 and 1992), storms which have given rise to heavy rain and severe floods (1992, 1999, 2010), strong straight-line wind and extreme marine surges (1987, 1999 and 2010) much larger than the other local observations (outliers). These outliers had clearly illustrated the potential to underestimate the extreme surges calculated with the current statistical methods. The estimation of extreme surges then requires the use of a statistical analysis approach having a more solid theoretical framework and using more reliable databases for the assessment of hazards to design NPPs to low or extremely low probabilities of failure. These databases can be produced by collecting historical information (HI) about severe climatic events occurred over short and long timescales. As a matter of fact, natural hazards such as heat waves, droughts, floods, severe storms and snowstorms have affected France and many European countries since the dawn of time. These events would have been such horrific experiences that if they really occurred, there would be unmistakable traces of them. They must have left clues. These catastrophic events have been unforgettably engraved in people's minds and many of them have been traced in archives and history textbooks. The oldest events have certainly left clues and traces somewhere in the geological layers of the earth or elsewhere. The construction of the historical databases and developing probabilistic approaches capable of integrating them correctly is highly challenging for the scientific community (Translating these geological clues to historical data to build historical databases that can be used by the statistical models is a different

  2. Electrical safety code manual a plan language guide to national electrical code, OSHA and NFPA 70E

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Kimberley

    2010-01-01

    Safety in any workplace is extremely important. In the case of the electrical industry, safety is critical and the codes and regulations which determine safe practices are both diverse and complicated. Employers, electricians, electrical system designers, inspectors, engineers and architects must comply with safety standards listed in the National Electrical Code, OSHA and NFPA 70E. Unfortunately, the publications which list these safety requirements are written in very technically advanced terms and the average person has an extremely difficult time understanding exactly what they need to

  3. "Plantas con madre": plants that teach and guide in the shamanic initiation process in the East-Central Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, X; Clavo, Z M; Jovel, E M; Pardo-de-Santayana, M

    2011-04-12

    We present and discuss a particular group of plants used by a diversity of healers in the initiation process and apprenticeship of traditional medicine, as practiced by Amazonian societies in East-Central Peru. Often, these plants are locally called plantas con madre (plants with a mother), and are thought to guide initiates in the process of seeking sacred knowledge, learning about plant usage, and understanding traditional medicine practices. We illustrate the diversity of plants used in the apprenticeship and practice of traditional medicine, and nurture the discussion to better understand the terminology used by Indigenous healers to describe plant uses and their practices. The study was conducted between 2003 and 2008 with the participation of 29 curanderos (healers; 23 men, 6 women), 3 apprentices and 4 herbalists. The participants belonged to four ethnic groups: 17 Mestizos, 15 Shipibo-Konibo, 1 Ashaninka, and 1 Matsiguenga; a Spanish apprentice and an Italian herbalist were also included in the study. The field data were collected using semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and the witnessing of numerous healing sessions. Oral informed consent was obtained from each participant. We identified 55 plant species belonging to 26 botanical families, which are used in initiation processes and apprenticeships of traditional medicine. This group of plants is administered under strict conditions during training and healing sessions called dietas (shamanic diets), with the supervision of one or more maestros curanderos (master healers). We observed that during the shamanic diets, maestros curanderos administered plants depending on the teachings or tools he/she was passing on, and were based on a particular sequence during the initiation process: (I) purification and cleansing species; (II) sensitivity and intuition; (III) strengthening; and (IV) protection and defence. Traditional healers continue to be a primary source of health care for the majority

  4. Deep sequencing of plant and animal DNA contained within traditional Chinese medicines reveals legality issues and health safety concerns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Coghlan

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica. Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety

  5. Deep sequencing of plant and animal DNA contained within traditional Chinese medicines reveals legality issues and health safety concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Megan L; Haile, James; Houston, Jayne; Murray, Dáithí C; White, Nicole E; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Bellgard, Matthew I; Bunce, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been practiced for thousands of years, but only within the last few decades has its use become more widespread outside of Asia. Concerns continue to be raised about the efficacy, legality, and safety of many popular complementary alternative medicines, including TCMs. Ingredients of some TCMs are known to include derivatives of endangered, trade-restricted species of plants and animals, and therefore contravene the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) legislation. Chromatographic studies have detected the presence of heavy metals and plant toxins within some TCMs, and there are numerous cases of adverse reactions. It is in the interests of both biodiversity conservation and public safety that techniques are developed to screen medicinals like TCMs. Targeting both the p-loop region of the plastid trnL gene and the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, over 49,000 amplicon sequence reads were generated from 15 TCM samples presented in the form of powders, tablets, capsules, bile flakes, and herbal teas. Here we show that second-generation, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA represents an effective means to genetically audit organic ingredients within complex TCMs. Comparison of DNA sequence data to reference databases revealed the presence of 68 different plant families and included genera, such as Ephedra and Asarum, that are potentially toxic. Similarly, animal families were identified that include genera that are classified as vulnerable, endangered, or critically endangered, including Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) and Saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica). Bovidae, Cervidae, and Bufonidae DNA were also detected in many of the TCM samples and were rarely declared on the product packaging. This study demonstrates that deep sequencing via HTS is an efficient and cost-effective way to audit highly processed TCM products and will assist in monitoring their legality and safety especially when

  6. Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Part 6, appendices A, B, and C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events (including internal flooding, but excluding internal fire). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, reviewed the WE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. In particular, these results are assessed in relation to the design and operational characteristics of the various reactor and containment types, and by comparing the IPEs to probabilistic risk assessment characteristics. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants.

  7. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  8. Guide for prioritizing power plant productivity improvement projects: handbook of availability improvement methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-15

    As part of its program to help improve electrical power plant productivity, the Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a methodology for evaluating productivity improvement projects. This handbook presents a simplified version of this methodology called the Availability Improvement Methodology (AIM), which provides a systematic approach for prioritizing plant improvement projects. Also included in this handbook is a description of data taking requirements necessary to support the AIM methodology, benefit/cost analysis, and root cause analysis for tracing persistent power plant problems. In applying the AIM methodology, utility engineers should be mindful that replacement power costs are frequently greater for forced outages than for planned outages. Equivalent availability includes both. A cost-effective ranking of alternative plant improvement projects must discern between those projects which will reduce forced outages and those which might reduce planned outages. As is the case with any analytical procedure, engineering judgement must be exercised with respect to results of purely mathematical calculations.

  9. The role of IAEA in the seismic assessment and upgrading of existing NPPs. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerpinar, A.; Godoy, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (IAEA). Div. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    1997-03-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in Eastern Europe and in particular WWER type nuclear power plants during the past seven years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on `Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants`. These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  10. Treatment of the safety culture in the Integrated Plant Supervision System (SISC); Tratamiento de la cultura de seguridad en el Sistema Integrado de Supervision de Centrales (SISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrientos Montero, M.; Gil Ontes, B.

    2013-09-01

    Certain of the catastrophes that occurred in the 1980's, among them the Chernobyl accident, underlined the importance of the human factor and led to the development of the concept of the safety culture. Today this is one of the main aspects involved in safety analysis, as applied in the management of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  11. Treatment of the safety culture in the Integrated Plant Supervision System; Tratamiento de la cultura de seguridad en el Sistema Integrado de Supervision de Centrales (SISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrientos Montero, M.; Gil Montes, B.

    2013-06-01

    Certain of the catastrophes that occurred in the 1980's, among them the Chernobyl accident, underlined the importance of the human factor and led to the development of the concept of the safety culture. Today this is one of the main aspects involved in safety analysis, as applied in the management of nuclear power plants. (Author)

  12. Marine Plants of Tanzania. A field guide to the seaweeds and seagrasses of Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    E.C. Oliveira; Österlund, K.; Mtolera, M.S.P.

    2003-01-01

    This is a book about the macroscopic marine plants of Tanzania, namely the seaweeds or benthic macroscopic algae and the seagrasses, that are marine flowering plants. Having flourished in the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, taxonomic studies then became less popular and the emphasis of biological investigations turned to other aspects of biology. However, after realising how important the conservation of biodiversity is, we are now experiencing a new interes...

  13. Intermountain West Military Training Lands Planting Guide: Selecting Seed Mixtures for Actively Used Military Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    heavy use. We also include a third category of generally light use where low-growing vegetation is re- quired, such as roadsides, small-arms ranges, and...materials not commonly used in land restoration, relocation of TE or other at-risk plants, and phytoremediation or phytostabilization of...temperature and drought than north-facing slopes. Another important goal is to select plants that are not susceptible to up- take of metals and

  14. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine: Feasibility of a new institutional protocol for improved patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner Juraj

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image guided spinal injections are successfully used in the management of low back pain and sciatica. The main benefit of CT-guided injections is the safe, fast and precise needle placement, but the radiation exposure remains a serious concern. The purpose of the study was to test a new institutional low-dose protocol for CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine to reduce radiation exposure while increasing accuracy and safety for the patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospective database during a 4-month period (Oct-Dec 2011 at a German University hospital using a newly established low-dose-CT-protocol for periradicular injections in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation and nerve root entrapment. Inclusion criteria were acute or chronic nerve root irritation due to lumbar disc hernia, age over 18, compliance and informed consent. Excluded were patients suffering from severe obesity (BMI > 30, coagulopathy, allergy to injected substances, infection and non-compliant patients. Outcome parameters consisted of the measured dose length product (mGycm2, the amount of scans, age, gender, BMI and the peri-interventional complications. The results were compared to 50 patients, treated in the standard-interventional CT-protocol for spinal injections, performed in June-Oct 2011, who met the above mentioned inclusion criteria. Results A total amount of 100 patients were enrolled in the study. A significant radiation dose reduction (average 85.31% was achieved using the institutional low-dose protocol compared to standard intervention mode in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine. Using the low-dose protocol did not increase the complications rate in the analyzed cohort. Conclusions Low-dose-CT-protocols for lumbar perineural injections significantly reduce the exposure to radiation of non-obese patients without an increase of complications. This increases long-time patient

  15. Safety analysis methodology for Chinshan nuclear power plant spent fuel pool under Fukushima-like accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Hao-Tzu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China). Research Atomic Energy Council; Li, Wan-Yun; Wang, Jong-Rong; Tseng, Yung-Shin; Chen, Hsiung-Chih; Shih, Chunkuan; Chen, Shao-Wen [National Tsing Hua Univ., HsinChu, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2017-03-15

    Chinshan nuclear power plant (NPP), a BWR/4 plant, is the first NPP in Taiwan. After Fukushima NPP disaster occurred, there is more concern for the safety of NPPs in Taiwan. Therefore, in order to estimate the safety of Chinshan NPP spent fuel pool (SFP), by using TRACE, MELCOR, CFD, and FRAPTRAN codes, INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, R.O.C.) performed the safety analysis of Chinshan NPP SFP. There were two main steps in this research. The first step was the establishment of Chinshan NPP SFP models. And the transient analysis under the SFP cooling system failure condition (Fukushima-like accident) was performed. In addition, the sensitive study of the time point for water spray was also performed. The next step was the fuel rod performance analysis by using FRAPTRAN and TRACE's results. Finally, the animation model of Chinshan NPP SFP was presented by using the animation function of SNAP with MELCOR analysis results.

  16. 加强核电厂建造安全管理%Strengthening of Nuclear Power Plant Construction Safety Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞军

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the warning of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and analyzes the major nuclear safety issues in nuclear power development in China, problems in nuclear power plants under construction, and how to strengthen supervision and management in nuclear power construction. It also points out that the development of nuclear power must attach great importance to the safety, and nuclear power plant construction should strictly implement the principle of "safety first and quality first"%介绍了福岛核事故对核安全的警示,分析了我国核电发展当前的主要问题、在建核电厂存在的问题,以及如何加强在建核电厂监督管理。指出了核电发展必须高度重视安全,核电建设要严格贯彻“安全第一,质量第一”的方针。

  17. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabai, A.S.; Fecht, B.A.; Powers, T.B.; Bickford, W.E.; Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Bian, S.H.; Daling, P.M.; Eschbach, E.J.; Allen, C.H.

    1986-07-01

    This is the fifth in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 23 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of winter 1986, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, ''A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.''

  18. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, W.B.; Gallucci, R.H.V.; Konzek, G.J.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Fecht, B.A.; Allen, C.H.; Allen, R.D.; Bickford, W.E., Carbaugh, E.H.; Lewis, J.R.

    1983-12-01

    This is the third in a series of reports to document the use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose and cost impacts of implementing resolutions to reactor safety issues (NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews et al. 1983). This report contains results of issue-specific analyses for 31 issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information as of summer 1983, and two staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced, as one consideration in setting priorities for reactor safety issues, in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues.

  19. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... subsection to NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power... incorporate the final approved guidance into the next revision of NUREG 0800. Dated at Rockville,...

  20. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. [Appendices only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Jenkins, C.E.; Rhoads, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Volume 2 comprises six appendices on: facility description; residual radioactivity inventory estimates; description and contamination levels of reference site; derivation of residual contamination levels; decommissioning mode detail; and decommissioning safety assessment details.

  1. Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

    1980-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify the impact of maintenance and testing (M and T) upon the safety of LWR power plants. The study involved data extraction from various sources reporting safety-related and operation-related nuclear power plant experience. Primary sources reviewed, including Licensee Event Reports (LER's) submitted to the NRC, revealed that only ten percent of events reported could be identified as M and T problems. The collected data were collated in a manner that would allow identification of principal types of problems which are associated with the performance of M and T tasks in LWR power plants. Frequencies of occurrence of events and their general endemic nature were analyzed using data clustering and pattern recognition techniques, as well as chi-square analyses for sparse contingency tables. The results of these analyses identified seven major categories of M and T error modes which were related to individual facilities and reactor type. Data review indicated that few M and T problems were directly related to procedural inadequacies, with the majority of events being attributable to human error.

  2. The effects of electric power industry restructuring on the safety of nuclear power plants in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas S.

    Throughout the United States the electric utility industry is restructuring in response to federal legislation mandating deregulation. The electric utility industry has embarked upon an extraordinary experiment by restructuring in response to deregulation that has been advocated on the premise of improving economic efficiency by encouraging competition in as many sectors of the industry as possible. However, unlike the telephone, trucking, and airline industries, the potential effects of electric deregulation reach far beyond simple energy economics. This dissertation presents the potential safety risks involved with the deregulation of the electric power industry in the United States and abroad. The pressures of a competitive environment on utilities with nuclear power plants in their portfolio to lower operation and maintenance costs could squeeze them to resort to some risky cost-cutting measures. These include deferring maintenance, reducing training, downsizing staff, excessive reductions in refueling down time, and increasing the use of on-line maintenance. The results of this study indicate statistically significant differences at the .01 level between the safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants and boiling water reactor nuclear power plants. Boiling water reactors exhibited significantly more problems than did pressurized water reactors.

  3. Safety demonstration tests on pressure rise in ventilation system and blower integrity of a fuel-reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Junichi; Suzuki, Motoe; Tsukamoto, Michio; Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-12-01

    In JAERI, the demonstration test was carried out as a part of safety researches of the fuel-reprocessing plant using a large-scale facility consist of cells, ducts, dumpers, HEPA filters and a blower, when an explosive burning due to a rapid reaction of thermal decomposition for solvent/nitric acid occurs in a cell of the reprocessing plant. In the demonstration test, pressure response propagating through the facility was measured under a blowing of air from a pressurized tank into the cell in the facility to elucidate an influence of pressure rise in the ventilation system. Consequently, effective pressure decrease in the facility was given by a configuration of cells and ducts in the facility. In the test, transient responses of HEPA filters and the blower by the blowing of air were also measured to confirm the integrity. So that, it is confirmed that HEPA filters and the blower under pressure loading were sufficient to maintain the integrity. The content described in this report will contribute to safety assessment of the ventilation system in the event of explosive burning in the reprocessing plant. (author)

  4. Dynamical safety assessment of the nuclear power plant component using the information feedback oriented system dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Jung, Byung Ryul; Kwak, Sang Man [The Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2002-05-01

    A feedback oriented dynamical safety assessment in nuclear power plant is constructed. A commercial software for System Dynamics, Ventana Simulation Environment (Vensim), is used to develop a dynamics model for the Auxiliary Feed Water System (AFWS) of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The 18-month refuel cycle is described for the real situation. The failure rate is higher when the plant is in zero power state like maintenance, test, and refueling, which is not well described in conventional Event/Fault Tree based safety assessment. This also means a human failure rate is high in the standby and shutdown states. Time Step is introduced for the different time weighted frequency of failure cases. The Common Cause Failure is affected by Time Step process. The simulation shows dynamically for the standby-running and shutdown-running of nuclear power plant. The modeling is easily made by a unique graphic designed method and understood by operator or reviewer well. The logical and systems thinking is simulated.

  5. Preliminary safety analysis of a PBMR supplying process heat to a co-located ethylene production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlat, Raluca O., E-mail: rscarlat@nuc.berkeley.edu [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Koutchesfahani, Tawni [University of California, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 201 Gilman Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hong, Rada; Peterson, Per F. [University of California Berkeley, Nuclear Engineering, 4118 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers the safety analysis and licensing approach for co-locating a pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) to provide process heat to an ethylene production unit. The PBMR is an advanced nuclear reactor design that provides 400 MW of thermal energy. Ethylene production is an energy intensive process that utilizes large gas furnaces to provide the heat for the process. Coupling a PBMR with an ethylene production plant would open a new market for nuclear power, and would provide the chemical industry with a cleaner power source, helping to achieve the Clean Air Act standards, and eliminating the 0.5 ton of CO{sub 2} emissions per ton of produced ethylene. Our analysis uses the Chevron Phillips chemical plant in Sweeney, TX as a prototypical site. The plant has four ethylene production trains, with a total power consumption of 2.4 GW, for an ethylene output of 3.7 million tons per year, 4% of the global ethylene production capacity. This paper proposes replacement of the gas furnaces by low-emission PBMR modules, and presents the safety concerns and risk mitigation and management options for this coupled system. Two coupling design options are proposed, and the necessary changes to the design basis events and severe accidents for the PBMR licensing application are discussed. A joint effort between the chemical and the nuclear entities to optimize the coupling design, establish preventive maintenance procedures, and develop emergency response plans for both of the units is recommended.

  6. A survey on reliability and safety analysis techniques of robot systems in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, H.S.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, J.C.; Choi, Y.R.; Moon, S.S

    2000-12-01

    The reliability and safety analysis techniques was surveyed for the purpose of overall quality improvement of reactor inspection system which is under development in our current project. The contents of this report are : 1. Reliability and safety analysis techniques suvey - Reviewed reliability and safety analysis techniques are generally accepted techniques in many industries including nuclear industry. And we selected a few techniques which are suitable for our robot system. They are falut tree analysis, failure mode and effect analysis, reliability block diagram, markov model, combinational method, and simulation method. 2. Survey on the characteristics of robot systems which are distinguished from other systems and which are important to the analysis. 3. Survey on the nuclear environmental factors which affect the reliability and safety analysis of robot system 4. Collection of the case studies of robot reliability and safety analysis which are performed in foreign countries. The analysis results of this survey will be applied to the improvement of reliability and safety of our robot system and also will be used for the formal qualification and certification of our reactor inspection system.

  7. THE TRANSGENIC PLANTS – ADVANTAGES REGARDING THEIR CULTIVATION AND POTENTIALLY RISKS CONCERNING THE FOOD SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana PUSTA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the genetic modifi ed organisms (GMO have started to “conquer”, little by little our lives. The most widely used are the trangenic plants, because they have bigger productions and they are resistant to different pests. In the beginning, the spread of the transgenic plants was controlled, but today many countries cultivate genetic modifi ed plants without any control. Among these countries Romania is ahead, starting the cultivation of the transgenic plants in 1999, very soon after their obtaining. This paper outline the effect of the food consumption obtained from this plants which may determine different effects on human body. Also, because the genetic modifi ed plants have bigger productions than the normal ones and they are more resistant, the farmers are not encouraged to declare that they are using genetic modifi ed seeds. So, in that way, the consumer does not know what kind of food he consumes.

  8. Operational readiness verification, phase 1: A study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, E. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Gauthereau, V. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the findings from the first phase of a study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants. Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) - in Swedish called Driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) - refers to the test and verification activities that are necessary to ensure that plant systems are able to provide their required functions when needed - more concretely that all plant systems are in their correct functional state when the plant is restarted after an outage period. The concrete background for this work is that nine ORV related incidents were reported in Sweden between July 1995 and October 1998. The work reported here comprised a literature survey of research relevant for ORV issues, and an assessment of the present situation at Swedish NPPs with respect to ORV. The literature survey was primarily aimed at research related to NPPs, but also looked at domains where similar problems have occurred, such as maintenance in commercial aviation. The survey looked specifically for organisational and MTO aspects relevant to the present situation in Swedish NPPs. One finding was that ORV should be seen as an integral part of maintenance, rather than as a separate activity. Another, that there is a characteristic distribution of error modes for maintenance and ORV, with many sequence errors and omissions, rather than a set of unique error modes. An international study further showed that there are important differences in how procedures are used, and in the balance between decentralisation and centralisation. Several studies also suggested that ORV could usefully be described as a barrier system in relation to the flow of work, for instance using the following five stages: (1) preventive actions during maintenance/outage, (2) post-test after completion of work, (3) pre-test before start-up, (4) the start-up sequence itself, and (5) preventive actions during power operation - possibly including automatic safety systems. In the field survey

  9. Using dark diversity and plant characteristics to guide conservation and restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Brunbjerg, Ane Kirstine; Clausen, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    more often than others, although this is important knowledge for restoration and conservation actions. 2. We applied the concept to a massive national (Danish) plant diversity data base, containing 236 923 records from 15 160 surveys involving 564 species. This enabled the first geographically...... comprehensive (43 000 km2) assessment of dark diversity, at a spatial resolution relevant for conservation and restoration planning (78 m2) across multiple terrestrial habitats, thereby maximising the practical applications of this concept. The probability for a given plant species to belong to the dark...

  10. A Guide to the PLAZA 3.0 Plant Comparative Genomic Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandepoele, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    PLAZA 3.0 is an online resource for comparative genomics and offers a versatile platform to study gene functions and gene families or to analyze genome organization and evolution in the green plant lineage. Starting from genome sequence information for over 35 plant species, precomputed comparative genomic data sets cover homologous gene families, multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic trees, and genomic colinearity information within and between species. Complementary functional data sets, a Workbench, and interactive visualization tools are available through a user-friendly web interface, making PLAZA an excellent starting point to translate sequence or omics data sets into biological knowledge. PLAZA is available at http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/plaza/ .

  11. Safety; Avertissement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  12. Modification and backfitting at the Barsebaeck Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and 2 in safety related systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Leif [KSU, Nykoeping (Sweden); Nilsson, Ove; Lidh, B. [ES-Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-05-01

    This report is intended for use by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. It has been published to enable comparison of modification and backfitting implemented at Barsebaeck, with those implemented at other plants, both domestic and abroad. The report summarizes the more notable modifications and backfitting carried out on any safety-related equipment, or software, at Barsebaeck, and covers the decade 1984 to 1994. Modifications to hardware, and to some extent to software, are catalogued, but not described in any detail. No general procedures (operational or maintenance) are dealt with. 3 refs.

  13. The waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository: A case study in radioactive waste disposal safety and risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Leif G. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) deep geological defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) repository in the United States was certified on the 13 of May 1998 and opened on the 26 of March 1999. Two sets of safety/performance assessment calculations supporting the certification of the WIPP TRUW repository show that the maximum annual individual committed effective dose will be 32 times lower than the regulatory limit and that the cumulative amount of radionuclide releases will be at least 10 times, more likely at least 20 times, lower than the regulatory limits. Yet, perceptions remain among the public that the WIPP TRUW repository imposes an unacceptable risk.

  14. Safety and nutritional assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed: the role of animal feeding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    In this report the various elements of the safety and nutritional assessment procedure for genetically modified (GM) plant derived food and feed are discussed, in particular the potential and limitations of animal feeding trials for the safety and nutritional testing of whole GM food and feed. The general principles for the risk assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed are followed, as described in the EFSA guidance document of the EFSA Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms. In Section 1 the mandate, scope and general principles for risk assessment of GM plant derived food and feed are discussed. Products under consideration are food and feed derived from GM plants, such as maize, soybeans, oilseed rape and cotton, modified through the introduction of one or more genes coding for agronomic input traits like herbicide tolerance and/or insect resistance. Furthermore GM plant derived food and feed, which have been obtained through extensive genetic modifications targeted at specific alterations of metabolic pathways leading to improved nutritional and/or health characteristics, such as rice containing beta-carotene, soybeans with enhanced oleic acid content, or tomato with increased concentration of flavonoids, are considered. The safety assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed follows a comparative approach, i.e. the food and feed are compared with their non-GM counterparts in order to identify intended and unintended (unexpected) differences which subsequently are assessed with respect to their potential impact on the environment, safety for humans and animals, and nutritional quality. Key elements of the assessment procedure are the molecular, compositional, phenotypic and agronomic analysis in order to identify similarities and differences between the GM plant and its near isogenic counterpart. The safety assessment is focussed on (i) the presence and characteristics of newly expressed proteins and other new constituents and possible

  15. Structural Aging Program to evaluate continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the Structural Aging (SAG) Program which is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into three technical tasks: Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  16. Probabilistic analysis of safety in industrial irradiation plants; Analisis probabilistico de seguridad en plantas industriales de irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderete, F.; Elechosa, C. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250 - Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: falderet@sede.arn.gov.ar

    2006-07-01

    The Argentinean Nuclear Regulatory Authority is carrying out the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of the two industrial irradiation plants existent in the country. The objective of this presentation is to show from the regulatory point of view, the advantages of applying this tool, as well as the appeared difficulties; for it will be made a brief description of the facilities, of the method and of the normative one. Both plants are multipurpose facilities classified as 'industrial irradiator category IV' (panoramic irradiator with source deposited in pool). Basically, the execution of an APS consists of the following stages: 1. Identification of initiating events. 2. Modeling of Accidental Sequences (Event Trees). 3. Analysis of Systems (Fault trees). 4. Quantification of Accidental Sequences. The argentine normative doesn't demand to these facilities the realization of an APS, however the basic standard of Radiological Safety establishes that in the design of this type of facilities in the cases that is justified, should make sure that the annual probability of occurrence of an accidental sequence and the resulting dose in a person gives as result an radiological risk inferior to the risk limit adopted as acceptance criteria. On the other hand the design standard specifies for these irradiators it demands a maximum fault rate of 10{sup -2} for the related components with the systems of radiological safety. In our case, the possible initiating events have been identified that carried out to not wanted situations (about people exposure, radioactive contamination). Then, for each one of the significant initiating events, the corresponding accidental sequences were modeled and the safety systems that intervene in this sequences by means of fault trees were analyzed, for then to determine the fault probabilities of the same ones. At the moment they are completing these fault trees, but the difficulty resides in the impossibility of obtaining real data

  17. Viimsi water treatment plant for Ra removal: NORM residue/waste generation, radiation safety issues, and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiisk, M.; Suursoo, S.; Realo, E.; Jantsikene, A.; Lumiste, L.; Vaeaer, K.; Isakar, K.; Koch, R. [University of Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    In early 2012, the first large-scale water treatment plant, specifically designed to remove Ra-isotopes from groundwater, was commissioned in Viimsi parish, North-Estonia. The plant serves approximately 15 000 consumers with maximum production capacity of 6000 m{sup 3}/d. The chosen water treatment technology is chemical free and is based on co-precipitation and adsorption with Fe(OH){sub 3} and MnO{sub 2} flocks, and adsorption of residual Ra onto zeolite sand. The chosen technology is a complex approach and is designed to reduce high Fe and Mn concentrations as well as dissolved gases along with Ra isotopes. It is proved to be well adapted with hydro-chemical conditions of the groundwater feeding the plant. As the novel technology has been applied for the first time on a large scale, the plant was taken under long-term investigation when commissioned. The latter focuses on three areas: Ra removal efficiency and its dynamics, build-up of radioactive waste, and radiation safety. The average Ra-226 and Ra-228 activity concentrations in raw water feeding the plant are approximately 0.5 Bq/L and 0.6 Bq/L, respectively, resulting in total indicative dose of 0.4 mSv/y. Operating conditions of the plant are restricted by the established indicative value of 0.1 mSv/y for drinking water, i.e. a minimum 75% removal efficiency for Ra is required. Results of the studies show that the plant operates at Ra-removal efficiency of 98% or higher without the need of regeneration or replacement of filtering materials within the first two years. Measurements confirm that ∼90% of Ra accumulates in the solid filter media, 8-9% is washed out by backwash system as liquid effluent and 1-2% is fed on to the consumer distribution network. It has been calculated that at the level of current production capacity (below 3000 m{sup 3}/d) the yearly accumulation rate in the plant is approximately 300 and 400 MBq/y for Ra-226 and Ra-228, respectively. These values strongly exceed the exemption

  18. Feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided nerve block for management of limb injuries by emergency care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Bhoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients require procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA for the treatment of acute traumatic injuries. PSA has complications. Ultrasound (US guided peripheral nerve block is a safe alternative. Aim: Ultrasound guided nerve blocks for management of traumatic limb emergencies in Emergency Department (ED. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in ED. Materials and Methods: Patients above five years requiring analgesia for management of limb emergencies were recruited. Emergency Physicians trained in US guided nerve blocks performed the procedure. Statistical analysis: Effectiveness of pain control, using visual analogue scale was assessed at baseline and at 15 and 60 minutes after the procedure. Paired t test was used for comparison. Results: Fifty US guided nerve blocks were sciatic- 4 (8%, femoral-7 (14%, brachial- 29 (58%, median -6 (12%, and radial 2 (4% nerves. No patients required rescue PSA. Initial median VAS score was 9 (Inter Quartile Range [IQR] 7-10 and at 1 hour was 2(IQR 0-4. Median reduction in VAS score was 7.44 (IQR 8-10(75%, 1-2(25% (P=0.0001. Median procedure time was 9 minutes (IQR 3, 12 minutes and median time to reduction of pain was 5 minutes (IQR 1,15 minutes. No immediate or late complications noticed at 3 months. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks can be safely and effectively performed for upper and lower limb emergencies by emergency physicians with adequate training.

  19. Career and Personal Development for Plant Science Core Curriculum. Instructor's Guide. Vol. 15. No. 1. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; And Others

    Intended as part of the second year of instruction for students of vocational agriculture, this unit for a plant science core curriculum consists of five lessons designed to help students in their careers and personal development. Topics are: reconsidering career plans; finding information on available jobs; getting a job; developing as a…

  20. Managing Your Energy; An Energy Star Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worrell, E.; Angelini, T.; Masanet, E.

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, industry spends over $100 billion annually to power its manufacturing plants. Companies also spend on maintenance, capital outlay, and energy services. Improving energy efficiency is vital to reduce these costs and increase earnings. Many cost-effective opportunities to reduce

  1. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  2. Global SUMO proteome responses guide gene regulation, mRNA biogenesis, and plant stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eMazur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related proteins are SUMO-modified in plants, yeast, and metazoans. Overlapping SUMO targets include heat-shock proteins, transcription regulators, histones, histone-modifying enzymes, proteins involved in DNA damage repair, but also proteins involved in mRNA biogenesis and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Proteomics studies indicate key roles for SUMO in gene repression by controlling histone (deacetylation activity at genomic loci. The responsible heavily sumoylated transcriptional repressor complexes are recruited by EAR (Ethylene-responsive element binding factor [ERF]-associated Amphiphilic Repression-motif containing transcription factors in plants. These transcription factors are not necessarily themselves a SUMO target. Conversely, SUMO acetylation prevents binding of downstream partners by preventing binding of SIMs (SUMO-interaction peptide motifs presents in these partners, while SUMO acetylation has emerged as mechanism to recruit specifically bromodomains; bromodomain are generally linked with gene activation. These findings strengthen the idea of a bidirectional sumo-/acetylation switch in gene regulation. Quantitative proteomics has highlighted that global sumoylation provides a dynamic response to protein damage involving SUMO chain-mediated protein degradation, but also SUMO E3 ligase-dependent transcription of HSP (Heat-shock protein genes. With these insights in SUMO function and novel technical advancements, we can now study SUMO dynamics in responses to (abiotic stress in plants.

  3. Management of the aging of critical safety-related concrete structures in light-water reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Arndt, E.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant safety-related structures for continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued-service determinations. Objectives, accomplishments, and planned activities under each of these tasks are presented. Major program accomplishments include development of a materials property data base for structural materials as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, a review and assessment of inservice inspection techniques for concrete materials and structures has been complete, and work on development of a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future condition assessment of concrete structures is well under way. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Precise plant breeding using new genome editing techniques: opportunities, safety and regulation in the EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Frank; Schiemann, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Several new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs) have been developed during the last decade, and make it possible to precisely perform genome modifications in plants. The major problem, other than technical aspects, is the vagueness of regulation concerning these new techniques. Since the definition of eight NPBTs by a European expert group in 2007, there has been an ongoing debate on whether the resulting plants and their products are covered by GMO legislation. Obviously, cover by GMO legislation would severely hamper the use of NPBT, because genetically modified plants must pass a costly and time-consuming GMO approval procedure in the EU. In this review, we compare some of the NPBTs defined by the EU expert group with classical breeding techniques and conventional transgenic plants. The list of NPBTs may be shortened (or extended) during the international discussion process initiated by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. From the scientific point of view, it may be argued that plants developed by NPBTs are often indistinguishable from classically bred plants and are not expected to possess higher risks for health and the environment. In light of the debate on the future regulation of NPBTs and the accumulated evidence on the biosafety of genetically modified plants that have been commercialized and risk-assessed worldwide, it may be suggested that plants modified by crop genetic improvement technologies, including genetic modification, NPBTs or other future techniques, should be evaluated according to the new trait and the resulting end product rather than the technique used to create the new plant variety.

  5. Verification of Safety Margins of Battery Banks Capacity of Class 1E DC System in a Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukman, Abdulrauf [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zhu, Oon-Pyo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    According to Ref 'Station blackout (SBO) is generally a plant condition with complete loss of all alternating current (AC) power from off-site sources, from the main generator and from standby AC power sources important to safety to the essential and nonessential switchgear buses. Direct current (DC) power supplies and uninterruptible AC power supplies may be available as long as batteries can supply the loads, alternate AC power supplies are available'. The above IAEA document indicated the importance of batteries during SBO. Prior to the Fukushima accident, most batteries might be designed with coping capability of four hours. However, the accident showed the need for the coping capability to be increased to at least eight hours. The purpose of this research is to verify the safety capacity margin of the nuclear qualified battery banks of class 1E DC system and test the response to SBO using the load profile of a Korean design nuclear power plant (NPP). The capacity margins of class 1E batteries of DC power system batteries in a nuclear power plant were determined using the load profile of the plant. It was observed that if appropriate manufacturer Kt data are not available, the accuracy of the battery capacity might not be accurately calculated. The result obtained shows that the batteries have the coping capability of two hours for channel A and B, and eight hours for channel C and D. Also capacity margin as show in figure show a reasonable margin for each batteries of the DC system.

  6. A study for good regulatin of the CANDU's in Korea. Development of safety regulatory requirement for CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se Ki; Shin, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Yu, Y. J.; Lee, Y. J. [Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The objective of project is to derive the policy recommendations to improve the efficiency of CANDU plants regulation. These policy recommendations will eventually contribute to the upgrading of Korean nuclear regulatory system and safety enhancement. During the first phase of this 2 years study, following research activities were done. On-site survey and analysis on CANDU plants regulation. Review on CANDU plants regulating experiences and current constraints. Review and analysis on the new Canadian regulatory approach.

  7. Survey among agricultural workers about interpretation of plant protection product labels and safety data sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Rubbiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to examine the effectiveness of risk communication in agriculture through examination and interpretation of safety data sheets and product labels for agriculture products classified as hazardous. Labels and safety data sheets were shown to the users inviting them to report their own interpretation of hazard, risk and the need of preventive measures. One area sample was identified in a cluster of wine companies, chosen in a range of medium to large sizes throughout the country, where 100 subjects were interviewed by telephone or direct interview. Participants were surveyed through questions relating to demographic information, education and perception of risk.

  8. Review guidelines on software languages for use in nuclear power plant safety systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Graff, S.; Green, W.; Lin, D.; Koch, S.; Tai, A.; Wendelboe, D. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Guidelines for the programming and auditing of software written in high level languages for safety systems are presented. The guidelines are derived from a framework of issues significant to software safety which was gathered from relevant standards and research literature. Language-specific adaptations of these guidelines are provided for the following high level languages: Ada, C/C++, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) Ladder Logic, International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard 1131-3 Sequential Function Charts, Pascal, and PL/M. Appendices to the report include a tabular summary of the guidelines and additional information on selected languages.s

  9. Guidelines for nuclear power plant safety issue prioritization information development. Supplement 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This is the sixth in a series of reports to document the development and use of a methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to calculate, for prioritization purposes, the risk, dose, and cost impacts of implementing potential resolutions to reactor safety issues (see NUREG/CR-2800, Andrews, et al., 1983). This report contains the results of issue-specific analyses for 34 generic issues. Each issue was considered within the constraints of available information at the time the issues were examined and approximately 2 staff-weeks of labor. The results are referenced as one consideration in NUREG-0933, A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues (Emrit, et al., 1983).

  10. Short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer: A multi-center retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Min; Ye, Xin; Yang, Xia; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guang Hui; Wei, Zhigang [Dept. of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated with Shandong University, Jinan (China); Fan, Wei Jun [Imaging and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Kaixian [Dept. of Oncology, Teng Zhou Central People' s Hospital Affiliated with Jining Medical College, Tengzhou (China); Bi, Jing Wang [Dept. of Oncology, Jinan Military General Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Jinan (China)

    2016-11-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. From May 2010 to April 2014, 31 patients with unilateral adrenal metastasis from lung cancer who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous MWA were enrolled. This study was conducted with approval from local Institutional Review Board. Clinical outcomes and complications of MWA were assessed. Their tumors ranged from 1.5 to 5.4 cm in diameter. After a median follow-up period of 11.1 months, primary efficacy rate was 90.3% (28/31). Local tumor progression was detected in 7 (22.6%) of 31 cases. Their median overall survival time was 12 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 44.3%. Median local tumor progression-free survival time was 9 months. Local tumor progression-free survival rate was 77.4%. Of 36 MWA sessions, two (5.6%) had major complications (hypertensive crisis). CT-guided percutaneous MWA may be fairly safe and effective for treating solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer.

  11. Short-Term Outcomes and Safety of Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Solitary Adrenal Metastasis from Lung Cancer: A Multi-Center Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Min; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Kaixian; Bi, Jingwang; Yang, Xia; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guanghui; Wei, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. Materials and Methods From May 2010 to April 2014, 31 patients with unilateral adrenal metastasis from lung cancer who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous MWA were enrolled. This study was conducted with approval from local Institutional Review Board. Clinical outcomes and complications of MWA were assessed. Results Their tumors ranged from 1.5 to 5.4 cm in diameter. After a median follow-up period of 11.1 months, primary efficacy rate was 90.3% (28/31). Local tumor progression was detected in 7 (22.6%) of 31 cases. Their median overall survival time was 12 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 44.3%. Median local tumor progression-free survival time was 9 months. Local tumor progression-free survival rate was 77.4%. Of 36 MWA sessions, two (5.6%) had major complications (hypertensive crisis). Conclusion CT-guided percutaneous MWA may be fairly safe and effective for treating solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. PMID:27833402

  12. Clinical Safety and Immunogenicity of Tumor-Targeted, Plant-Made Id-KLH Conjugate Vaccines for Follicular Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tusé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first evaluation of plant-made conjugate vaccines for targeted treatment of B-cell follicular lymphoma (FL in a Phase I safety and immunogenicity clinical study. Each recombinant personalized immunogen consisted of a tumor-derived, plant-produced idiotypic antibody (Ab hybrid comprising the hypervariable regions of the tumor-associated light and heavy Ab chains, genetically grafted onto a common human IgG1 scaffold. Each immunogen was produced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using twin magnICON vectors expressing the light and heavy chains of the idiotypic Ab. Each purified Ab was chemically linked to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH to form a conjugate vaccine. The vaccines were administered to FL patients over a series of ≥6 subcutaneous injections in conjunction with the adjuvant Leukine (GM-CSF. The 27 patients enrolled in the study had previously received non-anti-CD20 cytoreductive therapy followed by ≥4 months of immune recovery prior to first vaccination. Of 11 patients who became evaluable at study conclusion, 82% (9/11 displayed a vaccine-induced, idiotype-specific cellular and/or humoral immune response. No patients showed serious adverse events (SAE related to vaccination. The fully scalable plant-based manufacturing process yields safe and immunogenic personalized FL vaccines that can be produced within weeks of obtaining patient biopsies.

  13. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VII. Employee occupational exposure and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This is the seventh in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VII is to describe record series pertaining to employee occupational exposure and health at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of occupational exposure monitoring and health practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to occupational exposure monitoring and health policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume 1. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, environmental and workplace monitoring, and waste management. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  14. Development of a communication protocol for a digital safety I and C in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K. I.; Lee, J. K.; Park, J. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This paper presents the development and test results of the SSCP (SMART Safety Communication Protocol) for SMART MMIS. The SSCP supports 10Mbps, and broadcast and deterministic communications. The platform and communication device that use the SSCP were tested using various test items to validate the feasibility of the SSCP.

  15. The accuracy and safety aspects of a novel robotic needle guide manipulator to perform transrectal prostate biopsies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.G.; Ansems, J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Futterer, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To introduce a new in-house developed pneumatically controlled magnetic field compatible manipulator as an aid to perform magnetic resonance (MR)-guided biopsies of the prostate. METHODS: A pneumatic controlled manipulator with five degrees of freedom constructed of plastic to achieve magne

  16. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health related research. Volume 4: Production and materials handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This is the fourth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume 4 is to describe record series pertaining to production and materials handling activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of production and materials handling practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to production and materials handling policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records.

  17. Safety and protection problems in the management of a plant with cyclotron, radiopharmacy laboratory and PET/CT equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, A.; Speranza, A.; Panico, M. [University Federico-2, National Research Council - Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging and Dept. of Bio-morphological and Functional Sciences, Napoli (Italy); Delia, R. [University La Sapienza - sez. Rieti, Faculty of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Casale, M. [University Federico-2, Dept. of Physics - Health Physics School, Napoli (Italy); Salvatore, M. [University Federico-2 and National Research Council - Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Dept. of Bio-morphological and Functional Sciences, Napoli (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The importance of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is spreading and increasing in many clinical diagnostic fields, as well as the oncology, the cardiology, the neurology and so on. A strong input to the diffusion of this imaging technique from the research field to clinical one has been given either by the development of knowledge about PET or the modern technologies, which allow to set up at very suitable prices and in very little volumes, like in an hospital site, complete systems, which consist of: Cyclotron; Radiopharmacy Laboratory; one or more either PET or PET/CT. Such set-up arrangement allows to carry out highly innovative diagnostic examinations with a remarkable achievement of diagnostic quality and large number of daily examinations. In this paper the authors show the achieved know-how with respect to radioprotection for the set-up and running management of two systems such as PET/CT tomography unit, cyclotron and radiopharmacy laboratory, installed one in the Imaging Diagnostic Department of the Hospital of Naples University and used only for medical and research purposes, and the other one in A.C.O.M. (Advanced Center of Oncology in Macerata), used for commercial and research purposes. The following safety problems have been considered: the facility lay-out; the optimisation of the paths either for the operator, or the patients and the radiotracers; the guide lines for the protection and the safety of the patients, operators and general population, in relation to the utilization and the management of either the more common radiotracers (18 F and 11 C) or those in research progress, for example 64 Cu and 124 I; the protocol set up for the image quality control in relation to the patient protection and safety. The above problems have also been considered, taking into account the Italian regulation and the International Recommendations. (authors)

  18. Periodical safety review of the Goesgen-Daeniken nuclear power plant. Summary, results and evaluation; Periodische Sicherheitsueberpruefung fuer das Kernkraftwerk Goesgen-Daeniken. Zusammenfassung, Ergebnisse und Bewertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-15

    The Goesgen nuclear power plant (KKG) received its operational licence on September 9, 1978. The operational start-up of the plant went on into the year 1979, but there was a short interruption because of the accident in the Three Mile Island reactor on March 28, 1979. In May 1985 KKG submitted a request for raising the thermal reactor power from the then 2808 MW to 3002 MW. Based on the examination by the Federal Agency for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (HSK), the Swiss Federal Council granted the licence in two steps: in December 1985 for raising the thermal power to 2900 MW, and, in April 1992, to 3002 MW. The licence for the second step was given under the condition that some more experience was to be gained concerning the fuel rod cladding under higher loading. As part of the yearly re-licensing on restart after fuel assembly reloading, HSK confirmed that the plant status conformed to the legal requirements. In November 1986, HSK asked all Swiss nuclear power plant managers to state their opinions on proposed measures concerning severe accidents. Some of the measures were already in discussion; the Chernobyl accident on April 26, 1986, accelerated their implementation and was also a reason for the introduction of the measures against severe accidents. In this context, KKG carried out a risk study which led to the installation of a filtered pressure release system for the containment. Another consequence of the Chernobyl accident was the introduction of technical Periodical Safety Reviews (PSR) for all operating nuclear power plants. Central points of the PSR are: a) comparison with the continuously improving state-of-the-art of science and technology concerning safety precautions; b) a systematic evaluation of operating experience and plant status; c) the taking into account of probabilistic safety analyses in the overall evaluation of the plant. Within the framework of the examination of the overall plant, HSK also checks how its requirements concerning

  19. Contribution of Plant Breeding Efforts to the Safety of the Cereal-based Food Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zoltán (B)edo; Mariann Rakszegi; László Láng; Peter Shewry

    2006-01-01

    @@ A comprehensive food safety strategy requires the establishment of a farm-to-fork traceability system, which allows each step in the food chain to be followed and identified. This policy requires a multidisciplinary scientific approach including the wide range of technological knowledge necessary to maintain the safety of the whole food chain. With the introduction of the sustainability concept considerable changes have taken place in food production.New priorities have been raised nowadays due to increasing concern for environmental protection and healthy food production. These new priorities, which have led to the agricultural sector developing a more multifunctional character,are based on new social demands in relation to food production, where the essential criteria are to provide nutritious foodstuffs free of dangerous substances and to use environment-friendly technologies which ensure sustainability.

  20. The use of a plastic guide improves the safety and reduces the duration of endotracheal intubation in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewski, Adrian; Pasławski, Robert; Skrzypczak, Piotr; Pasławska, Urszula; Szuba, Andrzej; Nicpoń, Józef

    2014-10-01

    The successful endotracheal intubation of pigs using the standard orotracheal method is challenging and technically difficult, because of the pig's oral anatomy and the presence of excess tissue in the oropharyngeal region. Hence, the operator, who is usually an anesthetist, requires extensive training in order to successfully perform the procedure in pigs. In this report, we describe a safe and quick method of successful endotracheal intubation in the pig using an 80-cm blunt-tipped plastic vascular catheter, when the pig is placed in ventral recumbency. Specifically, the use of this plastic guide wire shortened the duration of the procedure and reduced the risks of the procedure. Since the use of the guide wire also improves the ease of the procedure, its use will also enable inexperienced operators to perform successful first-time endotracheal intubation of pigs without causing injury.

  1. Lessons Learned for Space Safety from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Manami; Miki, Masami; Mitsui, Masami; Kawada, Ysuhiro; Takeuchi, Nobuo

    2013-09-01

    On March 11 2011, Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake hit Japan and caused the devastating damage. The Fukushima Nuclear Power Station (NPS) was also severely damaged.The Japanese NPSs are designed based on the detailed safety requirements and have multiple-folds of hazard controls to the catastrophic hazards as in space system. However, according to the initial information from the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and the Japanese government, the larger-than-expected tsunami and subsequent events lost the all hazard controls to the release of radioactive materials.At the 5th IAASS, Lessons Learned from this disaster was reported [1] mainly based on the "Report of the Japanese Government to the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety" [2] published by Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters in June 2011, three months after the earthquake.Up to 2012 summer, the major investigation boards, including the Japanese Diet, the Japanese Cabinet and TEPCO, published their final reports, in which detailed causes of this accident and several recommendations are assessed from each perspective.In this paper, the authors examine to introduce the lessons learned to be applied to the space safety as findings from these reports.

  2. A safety and regulatory assessment of generic BWR and PWR permanently shutdown nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, R.J.; Davis, R.E.; Grove, E.J.; Azarm, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The long-term availability of less expensive power and the increasing plant modification and maintenance costs have caused some utilities to re-examine the economics of nuclear power. As a result, several utilities have opted to permanently shutdown their plants. Each licensee of these permanently shutdown (PSD) plants has submitted plant-specific exemption requests for those regulations that they believe are no longer applicable to their facility. This report presents a regulatory assessment for generic BWR and PWR plants that have permanently ceased operation in support of NRC rulemaking activities in this area. After the reactor vessel is defueled, the traditional accident sequences that dominate the operating plant risk are no longer applicable. The remaining source of public risk is associated with the accidents that involve the spent fuel. Previous studies have indicated that complete spent fuel pool drainage is an accident of potential concern. Certain combinations of spent fuel storage configurations and decay times, could cause freshly discharged fuel assemblies to self heat to a temperature where the self sustained oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding may cause cladding failure. This study has defined four spent fuel configurations which encompass all of the anticipated spent fuel characteristics and storage modes following permanent shutdown. A representative accident sequence was chosen for each configuration. Consequence analyses were performed using these sequences to estimate onsite and boundary doses, population doses and economic costs. A list of candidate regulations was identified from a screening of 10 CFR Parts 0 to 199. The continued applicability of each regulation was assessed within the context of each spent fuel storage configuration and the results of the consequence analyses.

  3. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  4. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  5. Operational readiness verification, phase 1: A study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, E. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Gauthereau, V. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the findings from the first phase of a study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants. Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) - in Swedish called Driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) - refers to the test and verification activities that are necessary to ensure that plant systems are able to provide their required functions when needed - more concretely that all plant systems are in their correct functional state when the plant is restarted after an outage period. The concrete background for this work is that nine ORV related incidents were reported in Sweden between July 1995 and October 1998. The work reported here comprised a literature survey of research relevant for ORV issues, and an assessment of the present situation at Swedish NPPs with respect to ORV. The literature survey was primarily aimed at research related to NPPs, but also looked at domains where similar problems have occurred, such as maintenance in commercial aviation. The survey looked specifically for organisational and MTO aspects relevant to the present situation in Swedish NPPs. One finding was that ORV should be seen as an integral part of maintenance, rather than as a separate activity. Another, that there is a characteristic distribution of error modes for maintenance and ORV, with many sequence errors and omissions, rather than a set of unique error modes. An international study further showed that there are important differences in how procedures are used, and in the balance between decentralisation and centralisation. Several studies also suggested that ORV could usefully be described as a barrier system in relation to the flow of work, for instance using the following five stages: (1) preventive actions during maintenance/outage, (2) post-test after completion of work, (3) pre-test before start-up, (4) the start-up sequence itself, and (5) preventive actions during power operation - possibly including automatic safety systems. In the field survey

  6. Role of Prognostics in Support of Integrated Risk-based Engineering - A Review in Respect of Nuclear Power Plant Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Pecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present approach of plant surveillance employs, on-line monitoring of process parameters, periodic in-service inspection, condition monitoring, etc. To make these program more effective there is growing application of risk-based / risk-informed approach to plant surveillance. However, risk-based approach in the present form is ���static’ in nature, and based on probabilistic methods. It is expected that to cater to real-time challenges the approach should be dynamic in terms on-line monitoring that employing deterministic and probabilistic methods in an integrated manner. The available literature suggests that extensive efforts are being made to upgrade / modify existing condition based approach to prognostic approach. There is a general appreciation of the fact that the prediction capabilities in surveillance programme in general and conditioning monitoring approach in particular can be improved significantly through prognostic approach. This paper reviews prognostics approach that enabled assessment of remaining life of the components in complex engineering systems with a special reference to nuclear plants where safety forms the major objective function.

  7. Assembly plant simulation to support decision-making n Layout Design considering safety issues. A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aída Sáez Más

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation model that has been created to support decision-making during the layout redesign of an engine and transmission assembly plant in the automotive sector. The plant requires a new layout and supply logistic due to an increase in its complexity and daily production. Discrete event simulation has been used to validate an initial proposal and to propose different what-if scenarios of layout and operations management systems. These scenarios will be evaluated regarding materials flow generated throughout the plants. The main focus of the decision process was focused on safety issues related to the material handling. The simulation model and its description have been done according to the methodology proposed in Sáez Más, García Sabater, Morant Llorca, y Maheut (2016, where the simulation model is focus as a 4-layer architecture (network, logic, database and visual reality. The achieved model is very flexible and modular, and it allows to save modelling time because of the parameterize of different combinations in layout and operations management.

  8. Role of Prognostics in Support of Integrated Risk-based Engineering - A Review in Respect of Nuclear Power Plant Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar V. Varde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present approach of plant surveillance employs, on-line monitoring of process parameters, periodic in-service inspection, condition monitoring, etc. To make these program more effective there is growing application of risk-based / risk-informed approach to plant surveillance. However, risk-based approach in the present form is ‘static’ in nature, and based on probabilistic methods. It is expected that to cater to real-time challenges the approach should be dynamic in terms on-line monitoring that employing deterministic and probabilistic methods in an integrated manner. The available literature suggests that extensive efforts are being made to upgrade / modify existing condition based approach to prognostic approach. There is a general appreciation of the fact that the prediction capabilities in surveillance programm in general and conditioning monitoring approach in particular can be improved significantly through prognostic approach. This paper reviews prognostics approach that enabled assessment of remaining life of the components in complex engineering systems with a special reference to nuclear plants where safety forms the major objective function.

  9. Bioactivity-guided isolation of cytotoxic constituents from three medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullatti, Kirankumar; Pathade, Namrata; Mandavkar, Yuvaraj; Godavarthi, Ashok; Biradi, Mahesh

    2013-05-01

    The ethanol extracts and their fractions of three Indian medicinal plants, Ervatamia coronaria (Jacq.) Stapf, (Apocynaceae), Mimosa pudica L. (Mimosaceae) and Caesalpinia bonduc (L.) Roxb. (Caesalpiniaceae) were tested for their cytotoxic activity in the brine shrimp lethality (BSL) bioassay and in various cancer cell lines. The plants were selected based on their traditional use in the treatment of cancer/tumors. To investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity of Ervatamia coronaria, Mimosa pudica and Caesalpinia bonduc. Ethanolic extracts and their fractions of E. coronaria, M. pudica and C. bonduc were subjected to cytotoxicity studies using BSL bioassay method with concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 µg/ml. The alkaloid fraction of E. coronaria with significant cytotoxicity in BSL bioassay was subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity studies with HT-29, A-549, HepG-2, MCF-7 and L-6 cell lines at concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml and a DNA fragmentation study using the HT-29 cell line. The alkaloid fractions of E. coronaria and M. pudica showed significant cytotoxicity with LC50 values of 65.83 and 85.10 µg/ml in the BSL bioassay, respectively. The purified alkaloid fraction of E. coronaria exhibited highest cytotoxicity in HT-29, A-549 and MCF-7 cell lines with IC50 values of 32.5, 47.5 and 72.5 µg/ml, respectively, and induced DNA fragmentation in the HT-29 cell line at a concentration of 65 µg/ml. The alkaloid fraction of E. coronaria exhibited significant cytotoxicity. Alkaloids such as ervatamine, apparicine and coronaridine that were earlier reported may be responsible for this activity.

  10. Scientific paradigms of structural safety of aged plants-Lessons learned from Russian activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn [Ex-Secretariat of Nuclear Safety Commission (Japan)], E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp; Timofeev, Boris [CRISM Prometey, Shpalernaja 49, St. Petersburg 193015 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    The study of the effects behind the degradation of components and materials is becoming increasingly important for the safe operation of aged plants especially when it comes to life extension. Since the Russian nuclear community began to examine life extension issues nearly 15 years ago, there is much to learn from these pioneering studies. At the Ninth International Conference entitled 'Material Issues in Design, Manufacturing and Operation of Nuclear Power Plants Equipment' held in St. Petersburg, 2006, recent data were introduced regarding the ageing effects of mechanical properties of various kinds of steel and welding joints of Russian NPP components. The meeting was organized by the Central Research Institute of Structural Materials (CRISM) 'Prometey' in cooperation with the IAEA and JRC-EU. In reviewing the recent data presented at the Ninth Conference, the authors believe that the paradigms of structural integrity issues in aged plants are now reasonably well established in (1) fracture mechanics and irradiation hardening of reactor vessels and core internals and (2) thermal ageing and annealing effects. However, the first author, G. Saji, believes that the current approach of low-cycle fatigue is still unable to prevent and predict environmentally assisted cracks such as demonstrated in the IGSCC issues in the down-comer pipes of RBMK plants and various steam generator corrosion issues. This fundamental flaw stems from design codes, which do not incorporate the basic knowledge of electrochemical corrosion mechanisms as represented by the corrosion current.

  11. Safety evaluation of some wild plants in the New Nordic Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mithril, Charlotte; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2012-01-01

    plants the majority of the bioactive components reported were within the range experienced when eating or drinking typical food stuffs. For most compounds the hazards could be evaluated as minor. The only precaution found was for common lambsquarters because of its presumed high level of oxalic acid...

  12. IMPROVEMENT OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY, RELIABILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY OF POWER PLANTS BASED ON ASSOCIATED PETROLEUM GAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Borisovich Shonin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with one of the important ecological problems – utilization of associated petroleum gas (APG at oil fields. An example of APG usage as a fuel for gas turbine power plants is examined. Among possible topologies of power plants the focus is put on the structure based on turbines with combined diesel-gas supplying for increasing in reliability of power generation in case of failures in the system of preparation of APG. In order to ensure correct transition of turbines from gas to diesel supplying it is important to know responds of the system to the interruption of gas supplying. Based on the fundamental principles of thermodynamics and fluid dynamics gas-turbine power plant simulation model has been developed utilizing MATLAB/Simulink environment. Using the model has allowed revealing the influence of load-sharing among the turbines of different types on the transition to an additional source of turbine fuel. Based on simulation results, recommendations have been worked out for the improvement of the reliability of gas turbine power plant.

  13. Suitability review of FMEA and reliability analysis for digital plant protection system and digital engineered safety features actuation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I. S.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, B. S.; Hwang, S. W.; Ryu, K. C. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-15

    Of the many items that should be checked out during a review stage of the licensing application for the I and C system of Ulchin 5 and 6 units, this report relates to a suitability review of the reliability analysis of Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS) and Digital Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (DESFAS). In the reliability analysis performed by the system designer, ABB-CE, fault tree analysis was used as the main methods along with Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA). However, the present regulatory technique dose not allow the system reliability analysis and its results to be appropriately evaluated. Hence, this study was carried out focusing on the following four items ; development of general review items by which to check the validity of a reliability analysis, and the subsequent review of suitability of the reliability analysis for Ulchin 5 and 6 DPPS and DESFAS L development of detailed review items by which to check the validity of an FMEA, and the subsequent review of suitability of the FMEA for Ulchin 5 and 6 DPPS and DESFAS ; development of detailed review items by which to check the validity of a fault tree analysis, and the subsequent review of suitability of the fault tree for Ulchin 5 and 6 DPPS and DESFAS ; an integrated review of the safety and reliability of the Ulchin 5 and 6 DPPS and DESFAS based on the results of the various reviews above and also of a reliability comparison between the digital systems and the comparable analog systems, i.e., and analog Plant Protection System (PPS) and and analog Engineered Safety Features Actuation System (ESFAS). According to the review mentioned above, the reliability analysis of Ulchin 5 and 6 DPPS and DESFAS generally satisfies the review requirements. However, some shortcomings of the analysis were identified in our review such that the assumed test periods for several equipment were not properly incorporated in the analysis, and failures of some equipment were not included in the

  14. Design data and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants. Vol. I. Docket No. 50-3 through 50-295

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F. A.

    1973-12-01

    BS>Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for thirty-two commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each plant consisting of Thermal-Hydraulic and Nuclear Factors, Containment Features, Emergency Core Cooling Systems, Site Features, Circulating Water System Data, and Miscellaneous Factors. An aerial perspective is also presented for each plant. Those covered in this volume are Indian Point No. 1, Docket Number 50-3, and all subsequent plants finishing with Zion, Docket Number 50-295. (auth)

  15. Design data and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants. Vol. I. Docket No. 50-3 through 50-295

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F. A.

    1973-12-01

    BS>Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for thirty-two commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each plant consisting of Thermal-Hydraulic and Nuclear Factors, Containment Features, Emergency Core Cooling Systems, Site Features, Circulating Water System Data, and Miscellaneous Factors. An aerial perspective is also presented for each plant. Those covered in this volume are Indian Point No. 1, Docket Number 50-3, and all subsequent plants finishing with Zion, Docket Number 50-295. (auth)

  16. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VI, workplace and environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This is the sixth in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VI is to describe record series pertaining to workplace and environmental monitoring activities at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of workplace and environmental monitoring practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to workplace and environmental monitoring policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of this volume and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume I. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, waste management, and employee health. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire. A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  17. Safety analysis report for packaging, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, model DC-1 package with HEU oxide contents. Change pages for Rev.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-18

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for the Model DC-1 package with highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide contents has been prepared in accordance with governing regulations form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation and orders from the Department of energy. The fundamental safety requirements addressed by these regulations and orders pertain to the containment of radioactive material, radiation shielding, and nuclear subcriticality. This report demonstrates how these requirements are met.

  18. Screening for cardiovascular safety: a structure-activity approach for guiding lead selection of melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kym, Philip R; Souers, Andrew J; Campbell, Thomas J; Lynch, John K; Judd, Andrew S; Iyengar, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Anil; Gao, Ju; Freeman, Jennifer C; Wodka, Dariusz; Mulhern, Mathew; Zhao, Gang; Wagaw, Seble H; Napier, James J; Brodjian, Sevan; Dayton, Brian D; Reilly, Regina M; Segreti, Jason A; Fryer, Ryan M; Preusser, Lee C; Reinhart, Glenn A; Hernandez, Lisa; Marsh, Kennan C; Sham, Hing L; Collins, Christine A; Polakowski, James S

    2006-04-06

    An inactin-anesthetized rat cardiovascular (CV) assay was employed in a screening mode to triage multiple classes of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHr1) antagonists. Lead identification was based on a compound profile producing high drug concentration in both plasma (>40 microM) and brain (>20 microg/g) with optimization activities on multiple classes of MCHr1 antagonists were terminated. After providing evidence that the cardiovascular liabilities were not a function of MCHr1 antagonism, continued screening identified the chromone-substituted aminopiperidine amides as a class of MCHr1 antagonists that demonstrated a safe cardiovascular profile at high drug concentrations in both plasma and brain. The high incidence of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with an array of MCHr1 antagonists of significant chemical diversity, combined with the stringent safety requirements for antiobesity drugs, highlight the importance of incorporating cardiovascular safety assessment early in the lead selection process.

  19. Safety significance of inadvertent operation of motor operated valves in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.; Carbonaro, J.F.; Hall, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    This report addresses concerns about the consequences of valve mispositioning which were brought to the forefront following an event at Davis Besse in 1985 (NRC, 1985a). The concern related to the ability to reposition ``position changeable`` motor operated valves (MOVs) in the event of their inadvertent operation from the control room and was documented in Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Bulletin 85-03 (NRC, 1985b) and Generic Letter (GL) 89-10 (NRC, 1989). The mispositioned MOVs may not be able to be returned to their required position due to high differential pressure (dP) or high flow conditions across the valves. The inability to reposition such valves may have significant safety consequences as in the Davis Besse event. However, full consideration of such mispositioning in safety analyses and in MOV test programs can be labor intensive and expensive. Industry raised concerns that consideration of position changeable valves under GL 89-10 would not decrease the probability of core damage to an extent which would justify licensee costs. As a response, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has conducted separate scoping studies for both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRS) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) using Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques to determine if such valve mispositioning by itself is significant to safety. The approach utilized internal events PRA models to survey the order of magnitude of the risk significance of valve mispositioning by considering the failure of selected position changeable MOVS. The change in core damage frequency (CDF) was determined for each valve considered and the results were presented as a risk increase ratio for each of four assumed MOV failure rates. The risk increase ratios resulting from this failure rate sensitivity study can be used as a basis for a judgement determination of the risk significance of the MOV mispositioning issue for BWRs and PWRS.

  20. Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F; Havrilla, Caroline A; DeFalco, Lesley A; Esque, Todd C; Custer, Nathan A; Wood, Troy E

    2017-03-01

    Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations are critical to understanding the consequences of large-scale manipulation of gene flow and to predicting success of restoration efforts. However, genetic information for species of interest can be difficult and expensive to obtain through traditional common garden experiments. Recent advances in landscape genetics offer marker-based approaches for identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species, but tools are still needed to link these approaches with practical aspects of ecological restoration. Here, we combine spatially explicit landscape genetics models with flexible visualization tools to demonstrate how cost-effective evaluations of adaptive genetic divergence can facilitate implementation of different seed sourcing strategies in ecological restoration. We apply these methods to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers genotyped in two Mojave Desert shrub species of high restoration importance: the long-lived, wind-pollinated gymnosperm Ephedra nevadensis, and the short-lived, insect-pollinated angiosperm Sphaeralcea ambigua. Mean annual temperature was identified as an important driver of adaptive genetic divergence for both species. Ephedra showed stronger adaptive divergence with respect to precipitation variability, while temperature variability and precipitation averages explained a larger fraction of adaptive

  1. Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F.; Havrilla, Caroline A.; DeFalco, Lesley; Esque, Todd; Custer, Nathan; Wood, Troy E.

    2016-01-01

    Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations are critical to understanding the consequences of large-scale manipulation of gene flow and to predicting success of restoration efforts. However, genetic information for species of interest can be difficult and expensive to obtain through traditional common garden experiments. Recent advances in landscape genetics offer marker-based approaches for identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species, but tools are still needed to link these approaches with practical aspects of ecological restoration. Here, we combine spatially-explicit landscape genetics models with flexible visualization tools to demonstrate how cost-effective evaluations of adaptive genetic divergence can facilitate implementation of different seed sourcing strategies in ecological restoration. We apply these methods to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers genotyped in two Mojave Desert shrub species of high restoration importance: the long-lived, wind-pollinated gymnosperm Ephedra nevadensis, and the short-lived, insect-pollinated angiosperm Sphaeralcea ambigua. Mean annual temperature was identified as an important driver of adaptive genetic divergence for both species. Ephedra showed stronger adaptive divergence with respect to precipitation variability, while temperature variability and precipitation averages explained a larger fraction of adaptive

  2. ABWR Nuclear Power Plant : Safety nuclear electricity and low cost; La Central Nuclear ABWR: Electricidad de origen nuclear segura y de costa previsible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, J.; Segarr, J.

    2002-07-01

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) nuclear plant defines the new generation of advanced nuclear plant designs that have achieved higher levels of safety and can satisfy the increasing needs for low cost electricity. Two ABWRs in Japan are now in their fifth cycles of operation. By every measure, these units have proven themselves successful. The construction of two more ABWRs in Taiwan at the Lungmen site is once again proceeding smoothly. Attention is now being focused on europe where the ABWR has been adapted to meet European safety requirements through utility sponsored programs. (Author)

  3. Current issues in developing safety culture while establishing wind energy power plants in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, M.C.M.; Repaka, B.; Gowda, P. [MSRIT Research Centre, Bangalore (India); Chandrashekar, R. [SaIT, Bangalore (India)

    2012-07-01

    Safety is important to every one working in the various organizations. They want to be safe when coming to work, at the time of work and going back to home. The ultimate aim of every worker is to work for the needs/money and or satisfaction where these would get prioritized according to the individuals. People don't want accidents to happen. People don't want to get themselves injured nor their colleagues. People would like and love to work in a company which cares for them and keeps them safe. Having said this then what makes them meet with or see an accident in the wind farm? Yes it is the unsafe act and unsafe condition which causes an accident in the wind farm. The present study put forward the factors /issues that influence people behaviors as part of weakening the safety culture to perform an unsafe act or to ignore and work in an unsafe condition. (Author)

  4. The automatic programming for safety-critical software in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Eom, Heung Seop; Choi, You Rark

    1998-06-01

    We defined the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology by modifying Dr. Harel`s statechart-based on formal methods in order to digitalized the reactor protection system. It is suggested software requirement specification guideline to specify design specification which is basis for requirement specification and automatic programming by the caused by shutdown parameter logic of the steam generator water level for Wolsung 2/3/4 unit SDS no.1 and simulated it by binding the Graphic User Interface (GUI). We generated the K and R C code automatically by utilizing the Statemate MAGNUM Sharpshooter/C code generator. Auto-generated K and R C code is machine independent code and has high productivity, quality and provability. The following are the summaries of major research and development. - Set up the Korean unique safety-critical software development methodology - Developed software requirement specification guidelines - Developed software design specification guidelines - Reactor trip modeling for steam generator waster level Wolsung 2/3/4 SDS no. 1 shutdown parameter logic - Graphic panel binding with GUI. (author). 20 refs., 12 tabs., 15 figs

  5. Probabilistic safety evaluation: Development of procedures with applications on components used in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, P. [Det Norske Veritas AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    A probabilistic procedure has been developed by SAQ Kontroll AB to calculate two different failure probabilities, P{sub F}: Probability of failure, defect size given by NDT/NDE. Probability of failure, defect not detected by NDT/NDE. Based on the procedure, SAQ Kontroll AB has developed a computer program PROPSE (PRObabilistic Program for Safety Evaluation). Within PROPSE, the following features are implemented: Two different algorithms to calculate the probability of failure are included: Simple Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS), with an error estimate on P{sub F}. First-Order Reliability Method (FORM), with sensitivity factors using the most probable point of failure in a standard normal space. Using these factors, it is possible to rank the parameters within an analysis. Estimation of partial safety factors, given an input target failure probability and characteristic values for fracture toughness, yield strength, tensile strength and defect depth. Extensive validation has been carried out, using the probabilistic computer program STAR6 from Nuclear Electric and the deterministic program SACC from SAQ Kontroll AB. The validation showed that the results from PROPSE were correct, and that the algorithms used in STAR6 were not intended to work for a general problem, when the standard deviation is either 'small' or 'large'. Distributions, to be used in a probabilistic analysis, are discussed. Examples on data to be used are also given.

  6. CT fluoroscopy-guided preoperative short hook wire placement for small pulmonary lesions: evaluation of safety and identification of risk factors for pneumothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Susumu [Okayama University Medical School, Departments of Radiology, Okayama (Japan); Miyoshi, Shinichiro [Okayama University Medical School, General Thoracic Surgery, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety of computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided short hook wire placement for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and the risk factors for pneumothorax associated with this procedure. We analyzed 267 short hook wire placements for 267 pulmonary lesions (mean diameter, 9.9 mm). Multiple variables related to the patients, lesions, and procedures were assessed to determine the risk factors for pneumothorax. Complications (219 grade 1 and 4 grade 2 adverse events) occurred in 196 procedures. No grade 3 or above adverse events were observed. Univariate analysis revealed increased vital capacity (odds ratio [OR], 1.518; P = 0.021), lower lobe lesion (OR, 2.343; P = 0.001), solid lesion (OR, 1.845; P = 0.014), prone positioning (OR, 1.793; P = 0.021), transfissural approach (OR, 11.941; P = 0.017), and longer procedure time (OR, 1.036; P = 0.038) were significant predictors of pneumothorax. Multivariate analysis revealed only the transfissural approach (OR, 12.171; P = 0.018) and a longer procedure time (OR, 1.048; P = 0.012) as significant independent predictors. Complications related to CT fluoroscopy-guided preoperative short hook wire placement often occurred, but all complications were minor. A transfissural approach and longer procedure time were significant independent predictors of pneumothorax. (orig.)

  7. Salmonella and produce: survival in the plant environment and implications in food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatica, Marianne K; Schneider, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    There has been a continuous rise in the number of produce-based foodborne outbreaks in the recent decades despite the perception that foodborne diseases were primarily linked to animal-based products. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 95% of Salmonella-based infections originate from foodborne sources, with multiple produce-based salmonellosis outbreaks occurring since 1990. The contamination of produce in both the pre-harvest and post-harvest produce environments is challenging to eliminate since produce is consumed as a raw, fresh commodity. Salmonella spp. contamination is possible through contact with the produce in the field as well as in the processing facility. The field contamination of produce infers the ability of Salmonella spp. to survive on the plant surface. The fitness of Salmonella spp. in the plant habitat is limited as opposed to naturally plant-associated bacteria, but survival is possible. The use of intensive farming practices, globalization of food products, high demand for convenience food products, and increased foodborne disease surveillance also have unknown ramifications in the ascending trends of produce-based outbreaks. A better understanding of the ecology of Salmonella spp. in the plant environment as well as the processing, food handling, and surveillance factors affecting the incidence of foodborne outbreaks will provide a comprehensive view of the etiology and epidemiology of produce-associated foodborne outbreaks. An understanding of the outbreaks and the factors facilitating produce contamination will allow for the development of intervention procedures and strategies to reduce the risk of produce contamination by Salmonella spp.

  8. Assessing and implementing training requirements for staff at plants to meet safety, environment and job needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, L. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    The rationale for and the process to establish a team to develop a framework for a training plan, determine the cost of such a program for all employees of the Power Supply Division of Manitoba Hydro, and to establish guidelines for implementation of the plan are described. The end result of the process is a job profile and skill and knowledge inventory for some 25 job families within the Power Supply Division; a form to establish training needs for all employees for a three year period which will provide the basis for a three-year training plan and budget; an implementation guide and training plan spreadsheet to facilitate the implementation process; and a series of performance indicators. 4 figs.

  9. Safety assessment for electricity generation failure accident of gas cooled nuclear power plant using system dynamics (SD) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The power production failure happens in the loss of coolant of the nuclear power plants (NPPs). The air ingress is a serious accident in gas cooled NPPs. The quantification of the study performed by the system dynamics (SD) method which is processed by the feedback algorithms. The Vensim software package is used for the simulation, which is performed by the Monte-Carlo method. Two kinds of considerations as the economic and safety properties are important in NPPs. The result shows the stability of the operation when the power can be decided. The maximum value of risk is the 11.77 in 43rd and the minimum value is 0.0 in several years. So, the success of the circulation of coolant is simulated by the dynamical values. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo safety profile of the Indian traditional medicinal plant Grewia tiliaefolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicson, Sheeja Malar; Samuthirapandi, Muniasamy; Govindaraju, Archunan; Kasi, Pandima Devi

    2015-10-01

    Grewia tiliaefolia Vahl., is a subtropical tree used in Ayurvedic formulations and also by tribal communities in India for treatment of wounds, urinary infection and skin diseases. Despite of its medicinal use, the plant has not been previously tested for its safety. This study evaluated the toxicological profile of the methanolic extract of G. tiliaefolia leaves (MEGT) through in vitro (cytotoxic, mutagenic, genotoxic) and in vivo (acute and sub-acute) studies. In vitro assays conclude that there is no significant (pcytotoxicity and genotoxicity at the tested concentrations (250-2000 μg/ml) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ames assay in the tested Salmonella typhimurium strains revealed no significant (ptested concentrations and is safe to be used as herbal medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Standard model for the safety analysis report of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; Modelo padrao para relatorio de analise de seguranca de usinas de reprocessamento de combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-02-15

    This norm establishes the Standard Model for the Safety Analysis Report of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants, comprehending the presentation format, the detailing level of the minimum information required by the CNEN for evaluation the requests of Construction License or Operation Authorization, in accordance with the legislation in force. This regulation applies to the following basic reports: Preliminary Safety Analysis Report - PSAR, integrating part of the requirement of Construction License; and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) which is the integrating part of the requirement for Operation Authorization.

  12. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Baking Industry: An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Plant and Energy Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanet, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Therkelsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Worrell, Ernst [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2012-12-28

    The U.S. baking industry—defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the manufacture of commercial bakery products such as breads, rolls, frozen cakes, pies, pastries, and cookies and crackers—consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in food processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. A summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency is also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. baking industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures—as well as on their applicability to different production practices—is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  13. Conceptual design of an integrated information system for safety related analysis of nuclear power plants (IRIS Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, K.; Zehnder, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Galperin, A. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1994-01-01

    This report deals with a conceptual design of an integrated information management system, called PSI-IRIS, as needed to assist the analysts for reactor safety related investigations on Swiss nuclear power plants within the project STARS. Performing complicated engineering analyses of an NPP requires storage and manipulation of a large amount of information, both data and knowledge. This information is characterized by its multi-disciplinary nature, complexity, and diversity. The problems caused by inefficient and lengthy manual operations involving the data flow management within the framework of the safety related analysis of an NPP, can be solved by applying computer aided engineering (CAE) principles. These principles are the basis for the design of the integrated information management system PSI-IRIS presented in this report. The basic idea is to create a computerized environment, which includes both database and functional capabilities. The database of the PSI-IRIS consists of two parts, an NPP generic database (GDB) and a collection of analysis results (CASE{sub L}IB). The GDB includes all technical plant data and information needed to generate input decks for all computer codes utilized within the STARS project. The CASE{sub L}IB storage contains the accumulated knowledge, input decks, and result files of the NPP transient analyses. Considerations and analysis of the data types and the required data manipulation capabilities as well as operational requirements resulted in the choice of an object-oriented database management system (OODBMS) as a development platform for solving the software engineering problems. Several advantages of OODBMS`s over conventional relational database management systems were found of crucial importance, especially providing the necessary flexibility for different data types and the potential for extensibility. (author) 15 figs., tabs., 20 refs.

  14. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Cytotoxic Cycloartane Triterpenoid Glycosides from the Traditionally Used Medicinal Plant Leea indica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau Hsiung Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leea indica is a medicinal plant used traditionally to cure cancer. In this study, the cytotoxic compounds of L. indica were isolated using bioassay-guided approach. Two cycloartane triterpenoid glycosides, mollic acid arabinoside (MAA and mollic acid xyloside (MAX, were firstly isolated from L. indica. They inhibited the growth of Ca Ski cervical cancer cells with IC50 of 19.21 μM (MAA and 33.33 μM (MAX. MRC5 normal cell line was used to calculate selectivity index. MAA and MAX were about 8 and 4 times more cytotoxic to Ca Ski cells compared to MRC5. The cytotoxicity of MAA was characterized by both cytostatic and cytocidal effects. MAA decreased the expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen, increased sub-G1 cells, and arrested cells in S and G2/M phases. This study provides the evidence for the ethnomedicinal use of L. indica and paves the way for future mechanism studies on the anticancer effects of MAA.

  15. Safety assessment and feeding value for pigs, poultry and ruminant animals of pest protected (Bt plants and herbicide tolerant (glyphosate, glufosinate plants: interpretation of experimental results observed worldwide on GM plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Aumaitre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New varieties of plants resistant to pests and/or tolerant to specific herbicides such as maize, soybean, cotton, sugarbeets, canola, have been recently developed by using genetic transformation (GT. These plants contain detectable specificactive recombinant DNA (rDNA and their derived protein. Since they have not been selected for a modification oftheir chemical composition, they can be considered as substantially equivalent to their parents or to commercial varietiesfor their content in nutrients and anti-nutritional factors. However, insect protected maize is less contaminated by mycotoxinsthan its parental counterpart conferring a higher degree of safety to animal feeds. The new feeds, grain and derivatives,and whole plants have been intensively tested in vivo up to 216 days for their safety and their nutritional equivalencefor monogastric farm animals (pig, poultry and ruminants (dairy cows, steers, lambs. The present article is basedon the interpretation and the summary of the scientific results published in original reviewed journals either as full papers(33 or as abstracts (33 available through September 2003. For the duration of the experiments adapted to the species,feed intake, weight gain, milk yield and nutritional equivalence expressed as feed conversion and/or digestibility of nutrientshave never been affected by feeding animals diets containing GT plants. In addition, in all the experimental animals,the body and carcass composition, the composition of milk and animal tissues, as well as the sensory properties of meatare not modified by the use of feeds derived from GT plants. Furthermore, the health of animals, their physiological characteristicsand the survival rate are also not affected.The presence of rDNA and derived proteins can be recognized and quantified in feeds in the case of glyphosate resistant soybeanand canola and in the case of insect protected maize. However, rDNA has never been recovered either in milk, or in

  16. Occupational Health and Safety Issues in Ontario Sawmills and Veneer/Plywood Plants: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave K. Verma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study was conducted within the Ontario sawmill and veneer/plywood manufacturing industry. Information was collected by postal questionnaire and observational walk-through surveys. Industrial hygiene walk-through surveys were conducted at 22 work sites, and measurements for wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol were taken. The aim of the study was to obtain data on the current status regarding health and safety characteristics and an estimate of wood dust, noise, and bioaerosol exposures. The occupational exposure to wood dust and noise are similar to what has been reported in this industry in Canada and elsewhere. Airborne wood dust concentration ranged between 0.001 mg/m3 and 4.87 mg/m3 as total dust and noise exposure ranged between 55 and 117 dB(A. The study indicates the need for a more comprehensive industry-wide study of wood dust, noise, and bioaersols.

  17. Food Safety Practices in the Egg Products Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viator, Catherine L; Cates, Sheryl C; Karns, Shawn A; Muth, Mary K; Noyes, Gary

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a national census survey of egg product plants (n = 57) to obtain information on the technological and food safety practices of the egg products industry and to assess changes in these practices from 2004 to 2014. The questionnaire asked about operational and sanitation practices, microbiological testing practices, food safety training for employees, other food safety issues, and plant characteristics. The findings suggest that improvements were made in the industry's use of food safety technologies and practices between 2004 and 2014. The percentage of plants using advanced pasteurization technology and an integrated, computerized processing system increased by almost 30 percentage points. Over 90% of plants voluntarily use a written hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan to address food safety for at least one production step. Further, 90% of plants have management employees who are trained in a written HACCP plan. Most plants (93%) conduct voluntary microbiological testing. The percentage of plants conducting this testing on egg products before pasteurization has increased by almost 30 percentage points since 2004. The survey findings identify strengths and weaknesses in egg product plants' food safety practices and can be used to guide regulatory policymaking and to conduct required regulatory impact analysis of potential regulations.

  18. [Skin test: guide of post-marketed re-evaluation of clinical safety in traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xu; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    Anaphylaxis is the most common adverse reaction caused by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injection, the most serious of which is type I, so post-marketed safety re-evaluation is necessary. Skin test can be used to screen type I allergy reaction, which is of great significance for TCM injection safe use. Skin test is not only able to find the population sensitization situation of TCM injection, but also is a way of understanding the mechanism of allergy reaction. TCM injection varieties that often occur type I anaphylaxis are applicable to skin test, and study population include healthy volunteers and patients whose disease is listed in the drug specification, intracutaneous test and prick test are the alternative method. The concentration of skin-test solution may influence the positive rate of skin test, penicillin skin-test solution preparation method can be used as the reference in TCM injection. Different doses of TCM injection skin-test solution,glucose injection and normal saline, histamine hydrochloride are comprised in comparison. Given the characteristics of type I allergy reaction,we should be pay close attention to skin test reaction in half an hour, and observation index need be designed based on post-marketed re-evaluation of clinical safety.

  19. The material concept in German light water reactors. Contribution to plant safety economic efficiency and failure provision; Das Werkstoffkonzept in deutschen Leichtwasserreaktoren. Beitrag zur Anlagensicherheit, Wirtschaftlichkeit und Schadensvorsorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilg, Ulf [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg; Koenig, Guenter [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Neckarwestheim; Erve, Manfred [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In the design and construction stage of nuclear power plants relevant decisions may affect the service life of a component, and thus influence safety and availability of the plant. The German ''basic safety concept'' has an important effect on the quality of the BOL (begin of life) status. Materials selection and qualification are of significant importance for the component lifetime and the profitability of the plant. Examples for the implementation of this concept are demonstrated for the steam generator tubing material Incoloy 800, the inside-plated ferritic compound tubes as control rod drive mechanism nozzle through the RPV head of BWR plants that are not susceptible for corrosion enhanced cracking that was observed for Inconel 600 tubing. A fundamental failure analysis of crack formation in Ti stabilized austenitic pipes of BWR plants found since 1993 were definitely identified as intergranular stress corrosion caused by a local sensitization of the welding process induced overheated structured in the heat affected zone. This allowed target-oriented mitigation measures. The safety culture implemented in German nuclear plants in connection with the break preclusion or integrity concept, respectively, including a continuous actualization with respect to the state-of-the art are the technical prerequisites for damage precaution and possible life time extension.

  20. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuel (Supplement 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P M

    1983-09-01

    Analysis of the Savannah River Plant RBOF and RRF included an evaluation of the reliability of process equipment and controls, administrative controls, and engineered safety features. The evaluation also identified potential scenarios and radiological consequences. Risks were calculated in terms of 50-year population dose commitment per year (man-rem/year) to the onsite and offsite population within an 80 Km radius of RBOF and RRF, and to an individual at the plant boundary. The total 50-year onsite and offsite population radiological risks of operating the RBOF and RRF were estimated to be 1.0 man-rem/year. These risks are significantly less than the population dose of 54,000 man/rem/yr for natural background radiation in a 50-mile radius. The 50-year maximum offsite individual risk from operating the facility was estimated to be 2.1 {times} 10{sup 5} rem/yr. These risks are significantly lower than 93 mrem/yr an individual is expected to receive from natural background radiation in this area. The analysis shows. that the RBOF and RRF can be operated without undue risk to onsite personnel or to the general public.

  1. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant H-Canyon operations. Supplement 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beary, M M; Collier, C D; Fairobent, L A; Graham, R F; Mason, C L; McDuffee, W T; Owen, T L; Walker, D H [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1986-02-01

    The H-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the HM process to separate uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and fission products. Irradiated uranium fuels containing {sup 235}U at enrichments from 1.1% to 94% are processed and recovered, along with neptunium and plutonium isotopes. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. This SAR documents an analysis of the H-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the Conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some H-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the H-Carbon can be operated without due risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined an the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological does are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  2. Semi-quantitative study to evaluate the performance of a HACCP-based food safety management system in Japanese milk processing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampers, I.; Toyofuku, H.; Luning, P.A.; Uyttendaele, M.; Jacxsens, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an insight in the performance of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)-based food safety management systems (FSMS) implemented in Japanese milk processing plants. Since 1995, Japan has a comprehensive approval system for food manufacturing establishments by

  3. Preliminary systems-interaction results from the Digraph Matrix Analysis of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant safety-injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Champney, J.M.; Alesso, H.P.

    1983-06-01

    This report provides preliminary results generated by a Digraph Matrix Analysis (DMA) for a Systems Interaction analysis performed on the Safety Injection System of the Tennessee Valley Authority Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. An overview of DMA is provided along with a brief description of the computer codes used in DMA.

  4. Semi-quantitative study to evaluate the performance of a HACCP-based food safety management system in Japanese milk processing plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampers, I.; Toyofuku, H.; Luning, P.A.; Uyttendaele, M.; Jacxsens, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an insight in the performance of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP)-based food safety management systems (FSMS) implemented in Japanese milk processing plants. Since 1995, Japan has a comprehensive approval system for food manufacturing establishments by eva

  5. Preliminary systems-interaction results from the Digraph Matrix Analysis of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant safety-injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Champney, J.M.; Alesso, H.P.

    1983-06-01

    This report provides preliminary results generated by a Digraph Matrix Analysis (DMA) for a Systems Interaction analysis performed on the Safety Injection System of the Tennessee Valley Authority Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant. An overview of DMA is provided along with a brief description of the computer codes used in DMA.

  6. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  7. Clinical efficacy and safety of surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) in the treatment of benign skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Steven K M; Patel, Kunal; Kim, Teddy; Knipprath, Erik; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Cerviño, Laura I; Lawson, Joshua D; Murphy, Kevin T; Sanghvi, Parag; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2017-04-01

    Frameless, surface imaging guided radiosurgery (SIG-RS) is a novel platform for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) wherein patient positioning is monitored in real-time through infra-red camera tracking of facial topography. Here we describe our initial clinical experience with SIG-RS for the treatment of benign neoplasms of the skull base. We identified 48 patients with benign skull base tumors consecutively treated with SIG-RS at a single institution between 2009 and 2011. Patients were diagnosed with meningioma (n = 22), vestibular schwannoma (n = 20), or nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (n = 6). Local control and treatment-related toxicity were retrospectively assessed. Median follow-up was 65 months (range 61-72 months). Prescription doses were 12-13 Gy in a single fraction (n = 18), 8 Gy × 3 fractions (n = 6), and 5 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 24). Actuarial tumor control rate at 5 years was 98%. No grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicity was observed. Grade ≤2 toxicity was associated with symptomatic lesions (p = 0.049) and single fraction treatment (p = 0.005). SIG-RS for benign skull base tumors produces clinical outcomes comparable to conventional frame-based SRS techniques while enhancing patient comfort.

  8. Development of Nuclear Power Plant Safety Evaluation Method for the Automation Algorithm Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Geun; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is commonly believed that replacing human operators to the automated system would guarantee greater efficiency, lower workloads, and fewer human error. Conventional machine learning techniques are considered as not capable to handle complex situations in NPP. Due to these kinds of issues, automation is not actively adopted although human error probability drastically increases during abnormal situations in NPP due to overload of information, high workload, and short time available for diagnosis. Recently, new machine learning techniques, which are known as ‘deep learning’ techniques have been actively applied to many fields, and the deep learning technique-based artificial intelligences (AIs) are showing better performance than conventional AIs. In 2015, deep Q-network (DQN) which is one of the deep learning techniques was developed and applied to train AI that automatically plays various Atari 2800 games, and this AI surpassed the human-level playing in many kind of games. Also in 2016, ‘Alpha-Go’, which was developed by ‘Google Deepmind’ based on deep learning technique to play the game of Go (i.e. Baduk), was defeated Se-dol Lee who is the World Go champion with score of 4:1. By the effort for reducing human error in NPPs, the ultimate goal of this study is the development of automation algorithm which can cover various situations in NPPs. As the first part, quantitative and real-time NPP safety evaluation method is being developed in order to provide the training criteria for automation algorithm. For that, EWS concept of medical field was adopted, and the applicability is investigated in this paper. Practically, the application of full automation (i.e. fully replaces human operators) may requires much more time for the validation and investigation of side-effects after the development of automation algorithm, and so the adoption in the form of full automation will take long time.

  9. European protection principles against external hazards by means of Emergency Power Supply and Control Safety System Building in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallinat, Dipl Ing [Max Aicher Engineering GmbH, Freilassing (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    One of the most important nuclear power plant safety requirements is a redundant and independent power system. This requires such a design of emergency power systems that failure of one will not adversely impact the other. External hazards of natural origin or linked to human activity could potentially affect plant safety. The general objective of the design provisions is to ensure that the safety functions of the systems and components required to return the plant to a safe shutdown state and to prevent and limit radioactive release are not adversely affected. As external hazards are site dependent, Technical Guidelines specify that 'it is not necessary to take all of the hazards in a standardized design; such external hazards as external flooding, drought, ice formation and toxic, corrosive or combustible gases may be dealt with only for a specific plant, on a plant specific basis'. In accordance with the Technical Guidelines, external hazards are taken into consideration at the design stage consistently with internal events or hazards. The basic design principle is to protect against external hazards in accordance with the Technical Guidelines using a 'load case' procedure.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  11. Evaluation of Safety of Arrabidaea chica Verlot (Bignoniaceae), a Plant with Healing Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemelli, Tiago Farret; Prado, Lismare da Silva; Santos, Franciele Souza; de Souza, Ana Paula; Guecheva, Temenouga Nikolova; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Ferraz, Alexandre de Barros Falcão; Corrêa, Dione Silva; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Picada, Jaqueline Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Arrabidaea chica Verlot (Bignoniaceae) has been used as a medicinal herb to treat anemia, hemorrhage, inflammation, intestinal colic, hepatitis, and skin infections in the Brazilian Amazon region. Studies have demonstrated the healing properties of extracts obtained from A. chica leaves, which contain anthocyanins and flavonoids. However, few investigations have assessed the safe use of this plant species. In this study, mutagenic and genotoxic effects of a crude aqueous extract, a butanolic fraction, and aqueous waste from A. chica leaves were evaluated using the Salmonella/microsome assay in TA98, TA97a, TA100, TA102, and TA1535 strains and the alkaline comet assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture with and without metabolic activation. The crude aqueous extract, butanolic fraction, and aqueous waste were not mutagenic in any of the Salmonella typhimurium strains tested, and showed negative responses for genotoxicity in CHO cells. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids such as rutin and luteolin. The lack of mutagenic/genotoxic effects might be due to phytochemical composition with high concentrations of known anti-inflammatory compounds. Thus, the crude aqueous extract, butanolic fraction, and aqueous waste from A. chica leaves do not appear to pose short-term genotoxic risks.

  12. Systems Thinking Safety Analysis: Nuclear Security Assessment of Physical Protection System in Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical assessment has been performed in the aspect of the nuclear power plants (NPPs security. The physical protection system (PPS is constructed by the cyber security evaluation tool (CSET for the nuclear security assessment. The systems thinking algorithm is used for the quantifications by the Vensim software package. There is a period of 60 years which is the life time of NPPs' operation. The maximum possibility happens as 3.59 in the 30th year. The minimum value is done as 1.26 in the 55th year. The difference is about 2.85 times. The results of the case with time delay have shown that the maximum possibility of terror or sabotage incident happens as 447.42 in the 58th year and the minimum value happens as 89.77 in the 51st year. The difference is about 4.98 times. Hence, if the sabotage happens, the worst case is that the intruder can attack the target of the nuclear material in about one and a half hours. The general NPPs are modeled in the study and controlled by the systematic procedures.

  13. Probabilistic seismic safety assessment of a CANDU 6 nuclear power plant including ambient vibration tests: Case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nour, Ali [Hydro Québec, Montréal, Québec H2L4P5 (Canada); École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C3A7 (Canada); Cherfaoui, Abdelhalim; Gocevski, Vladimir [Hydro Québec, Montréal, Québec H2L4P5 (Canada); Léger, Pierre [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C3A7 (Canada)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • In this case study, the seismic PSA methodology adopted for a CANDU 6 is presented. • Ambient vibrations testing to calibrate a 3D FEM and to reduce uncertainties is performed. • Procedure for the development of FRS for the RB considering wave incoherency effect is proposed. • Seismic fragility analysis for the RB is presented. - Abstract: Following the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan there is a worldwide interest in reducing uncertainties in seismic safety assessment of existing nuclear power plant (NPP). Within the scope of a Canadian refurbishment project of a CANDU 6 (NPP) put in service in 1983, structures and equipment must sustain a new seismic demand characterised by the uniform hazard spectrum (UHS) obtained from a site specific study defined for a return period of 1/10,000 years. This UHS exhibits larger spectral ordinates in the high-frequency range than those used in design. To reduce modeling uncertainties as part of a seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), Hydro-Québec developed a procedure using ambient vibrations testing to calibrate a detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the containment and reactor building (RB). This calibrated FE model is then used for generating floor response spectra (FRS) based on ground motion time histories compatible with the UHS. Seismic fragility analyses of the reactor building (RB) and structural components are also performed in the context of a case study. Because the RB is founded on a large circular raft, it is possible to consider the effect of the seismic wave incoherency to filter out the high-frequency content, mainly above 10 Hz, using the incoherency transfer function (ITF) method. This allows reducing significantly the non-necessary conservatism in resulting FRS, an important issue for an existing NPP. The proposed case study, and related methodology using ambient vibration testing, is particularly useful to engineers involved in seismic re-evaluation of

  14. A 3-year hygiene and safety monitoring of a meat processing plant which uses raw materials of global origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Stavros G; Grivokostopoulos, Nikolaos C; Bikouli, Vasiliki C; Doultsos, Dimitrios A; Zilelidou, Evangelia A; Gialitaki, Maria A; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-09-16

    A systematic approach in monitoring the hygiene of a meat processing plant using classical microbiological analyses combined with molecular characterization tools may assist in the safety of the final products. This study aimed: (i) to evaluate the total hygiene level and, (ii) to monitor and characterize the occurrence and spread of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in the environment and the final products of a meat industry that processes meat of global origin. In total, 2541 samples from the processing environment, the raw materials, and the final products were collected from a Greek meat industry in the period 2011-2013. All samples were subjected to enumeration of total viable counts (TVC), Escherichia coli (EC) and total coliforms (TCC) and the detection of Salmonella spp., while 709 of these samples were also analyzed for the presence L. monocytogenes. Pathogen isolates were serotyped and further characterized for their antibiotic resistance and subtyped by PFGE. Raw materials were identified as the primary source of contamination, while improper handling might have also favored the proliferation of the initial microbial load. The occurrence of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes reached 5.5% and 26.9%, respectively. Various (apparent) cross-contamination or persistence trends were deduced based on PFGE analysis results. Salmonella isolates showed wide variation in their innate antibiotic resistance, contrary to L. monocytogenes ones, which were found susceptible to all antibiotics except for cefotaxime. The results emphasize the biodiversity of foodborne pathogens in a meat industry and may be used by meat processors to understand the spread of pathogens in the processing environment, as well as to assist the Food Business Operator (FBO) in establishing effective criteria for selection of raw materials and in improving meat safety and quality. This approach can limit the increase of microbial contamination during the processing steps observed in

  15. Feasibility, efficacy, and safety of radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation guided by monitoring of the initial impedance decrease as a surrogate of catheter contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichlin, Tobias; Lane, Christopher; Nagashima, Koichi; Nof, Eyal; Chopra, Nagesh; Ng, Justin; Barbhaiya, Chirag; Tadros, Tomas; John, Roy M; Stevenson, William G; Michaud, Gregory F

    2015-04-01

    The initial impedance decrease during radiofrequency (RF) ablation is an indirect marker of catheter contact and lesion formation. We aimed to assess feasibility, efficacy, and safety of an ablation approach guided by initial impedance decrease. A total of 25 patients with paroxysmal AF had point-by-point, wide antral pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. RF applications were aborted if a decrease of at least 5 Ω did not occur in the first 10 seconds; otherwise, ablation was continued for at least 20 seconds. Power was 30 Watts and reduced to 15-25 Watts on the posterior wall. A total of 28% of RF applications were terminated because of inadequate impedance decrease. The remaining lesions showed a median decrease of 7.6 Ω (IQR 5.0-10.7) at 10 seconds and median duration of RF lesions was 38 seconds. Note that, 100 PVs were isolated with 49 rings. PVI occurred before anatomic completion of the ablation ring of adequate lesions in 39/49 (80%) and concurrent with ring completion in 7/49 (14%). Additional lesions were required in 3/49 (6%) rings. After PVI, additional lesions were required to eliminate dormant conduction in 2/47 (4%) and pace-capture on the ablation line in 24/49 vein pairs (49%). During short-term follow-up, 3 nonfatal esophageal injuries and 2 late pericardial effusions occurred. During a mean follow-up of 431 ± 87 days, 21/25 patients (84%) remained free of recurrent symptomatic atrial arrhythmias. PVI guided by initial impedance decrease is feasible and results in PVI concurrent with or before completion of the ablation ring in 94% of patients. Single procedure efficacy after one year of follow-up was 84%. Near-term complications suggest that deeper lesions are created, indicating that further reduction of RF-power and duration is warranted. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. "Life without nuclear power": A nuclear plant retirement formulation model and guide based on economics. San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station case: Economic impacts and reliability considerations leading to plant retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Frank

    Traditionally, electric utilities have been slow to change and very bureaucratic in nature. This culture, in and of itself, has now contributed to a high percentage of United States electric utilities operating uneconomical nuclear plants (Crooks, 2014). The economic picture behind owning and operating United States nuclear plants is less than favorable for many reasons including rising fuel, capital and operating costs (EUCG, 2012). This doctoral dissertation is specifically focused on life without nuclear power. The purpose of this dissertation is to create a model and guide that will provide electric utilities who currently operate or will operate uneconomical nuclear plants the opportunity to economically assess whether or not their nuclear plant should be retired. This economic assessment and stakeholder analysis will provide local government, academia and communities the opportunity to understand how Southern California Edison (SCE) embraced system upgrade import and "voltage support" opportunities to replace "base load" generation from San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) versus building new replacement generation facilities. This model and guide will help eliminate the need to build large replacement generation units as demonstrated in the SONGS case analysis. The application of The Nuclear Power Retirement Model and Guide will provide electric utilities with economic assessment parameters and an evaluation assessment progression needed to better evaluate when an uneconomical nuclear plant should be retired. It will provide electric utilities the opportunity to utilize sound policy, planning and development skill sets when making this difficult decision. There are currently 62 nuclear power plants (with 100 nuclear reactors) operating in the United States (EIA, 2014). From this group, 38 are at risk of early retirement based on the work of Cooper (2013). As demonstrated in my model, 35 of the 38 nuclear power plants qualify to move to the economic

  17. Occupational safety and health protection in modern power plant operation. New contents in the apprenticeship of a power plant master craftsman; Arbeitssicherheit und Gesundheitsschutz im modernen Kraftwerksbetrieb. Neue Inhalte der Kraftwerksmeister-Ausbildung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettler, E. [RWE Power AG, Kraftwerke Region Ost, Kraftwerk Westfalen, Hamm (Germany); Bieder, M. [RWE Power AG, Kraftwerke Region West, GuD-Anlage Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Liberalisation on the electricity market and the resulting competition are challenging utilities in particular. This process of change affects occupational safety and health protection in power plant operation as well. Regarding large utilities, today this objective is not in contradiction to corporate targets but integral part of leading culture. (orig.)

  18. Survey on Resource of Medicinal Plants in Guiding County of Guizhou Province%贵州贵定县药用植物资源调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张天伦; 吴家其; 徐文芬; 何顺志

    2012-01-01

    Resource of medicinal plants in Guiding County of Guizhou Province were investigated through field survey, sample collection, data study and species identification. More than 693 species of vascular plants belonging to 151 families and 439 genera were found. Based on the fundamental traditional Chinese medicine theory, treat- ments accepted by folk and drug use from clinical practices, all medicinal plants were divided into 18 classes ac- cording to their medicinal functions. Suggestions were made for sustainable development of twenty new medicinal resources and five protected plants in Guiding County.%通过野外考察、标本采集、资料收集与资料考证及标本鉴定,对贵定县药用植物资源进行了调查研究。发现贵定县有药用维管属植物151科439属693余种,根据中医理论基础,民间及临床用药,按其药用功能划分为18类。贵定县有20种药用新资源,5种保护植物,并对该县的中草药资源可持续发展提出建议。

  19. Comparison of Safety Margin Generation Concepts in Image Guided Radiotherapy to Account for Daily Head and Neck Pose Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Eva Maria; Grimm, Sarah; Debus, Jürgen; Bendl, Rolf; Giske, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors allows a precise conformation of the high-dose region to clinical target volumes (CTVs) while respecting dose limits to organs a risk (OARs). Accurate patient setup reduces translational and rotational deviations between therapy planning and therapy delivery days. However, uncertainties in the shape of the CTV and OARs due to e.g. small pose variations in the highly deformable anatomy of the head and neck region can still compromise the dose conformation. Routinely applied safety margins around the CTV cause higher dose deposition in adjacent healthy tissue and should be kept as small as possible. Materials and Methods In this work we evaluate and compare three approaches for margin generation 1) a clinically used approach with a constant isotropic 3 mm margin, 2) a previously proposed approach adopting a spatial model of the patient and 3) a newly developed approach adopting a biomechanical model of the patient. All approaches are retrospectively evaluated using a large patient cohort of over 500 fraction control CT images with heterogeneous pose changes. Automatic methods for finding landmark positions in the control CT images are combined with a patient specific biomechanical finite element model to evaluate the CTV deformation. Results The applied methods for deformation modeling show that the pose changes cause deformations in the target region with a mean motion magnitude of 1.80 mm. We found that the CTV size can be reduced by both variable margin approaches by 15.6% and 13.3% respectively, while maintaining the CTV coverage. With approach 3 an increase of target coverage was obtained. Conclusion Variable margins increase target coverage, reduce risk to OARs and improve healthy tissue sparing at the same time. PMID:28033416

  20. Lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: efficient education items of radiation safety for general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, K; Endo, K

    2015-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP-1) accident, while as tragic as the tsunami, was a man-made disaster created by the ignorance of the effects of radiation and radioactive materials. Therefore, it is important that all specialists in radiation protection in medicine sympathize with the anxiety of the general public regarding the harmful effects of radiation and advise people accordingly. All questions and answers were collected related to inquiries from the general public that were posted to reliable websites, including those of the government and radiation-related organizations, from March 2011 to November 2012. The questions were summarized and classified by similarity of content. (1) The total number of questions is 372. The content was broadly classified into three categories: inquiries for radiation-related knowledge and about health effects and foods. The questions asked to obtain radiation-related knowledge were the most common, accounting for 38 %. Thirty-six percentage of the questions were related to health effects, and 26 % involved foods, whereas 18 % of the questions were related to children and pregnancy. (2) The change over time was investigated in 290 questions for which the time of inquiry was known. Directly after the earthquake, the questions were primarily from people seeking radiation-related knowledge. Later, questions related to health effects increased. The anxiety experienced by residents following the nuclear accident was caused primarily by insufficient knowledge related to radiation, concerns about health effects and uncertainties about food and water safety. The development of educational materials focusing on such content will be important for risk communication with the general public in countries with nuclear power plants. Physicians and medical physicist should possess the ability to respond to questions such as these and should continue with medical examinations and treatments in a safe and appropriate manner.