WorldWideScience

Sample records for plants potassium transport

  1. Organelle-localized potassium transport systems in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Shin; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-15

    Some intracellular organelles found in eukaryotes such as plants have arisen through the endocytotic engulfment of prokaryotic cells. This accounts for the presence of plant membrane intrinsic proteins that have homologs in prokaryotic cells. Other organelles, such as those of the endomembrane system, are thought to have evolved through infolding of the plasma membrane. Acquisition of intracellular components (organelles) in the cells supplied additional functions for survival in various natural environments. The organelles are surrounded by biological membranes, which contain membrane-embedded K(+) transport systems allowing K(+) to move across the membrane. K(+) transport systems in plant organelles act coordinately with the plasma membrane intrinsic K(+) transport systems to maintain cytosolic K(+) concentrations. Since it is sometimes difficult to perform direct studies of organellar membrane proteins in plant cells, heterologous expression in yeast and Escherichia coli has been used to elucidate the function of plant vacuole K(+) channels and other membrane transporters. The vacuole is the largest organelle in plant cells; it has an important task in the K(+) homeostasis of the cytoplasm. The initial electrophysiological measurements of K(+) transport have categorized three classes of plant vacuolar cation channels, and since then molecular cloning approaches have led to the isolation of genes for a number of K(+) transport systems. Plants contain chloroplasts, derived from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria. A novel K(+) transport system has been isolated from cyanobacteria, which may add to our understanding of K(+) flux across the thylakoid membrane and the inner membrane of the chloroplast. This chapter will provide an overview of recent findings regarding plant organellar K(+) transport proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Ionic channels in plants: potassium transport Canais iônicos em plantas: o transporte de potássio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Costa de Oliveira

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of potassium channels on the plasma membrane has helped to elucidate important mechanisms in animal and plant physiology. Plant growth and development associated mechanisms, such as germination, leaf movements, stomatal action, ion uptake in roots, phloem transport and nutrient storage are linked to potassium transport. Studies describing potassium transport regulation by abscisic acid (ABA, Ca++, light and other factors are presented here. Also the types of channels that regulate potassium uptake and efflux in the cell, and the interaction of these channels with external signals, are discussed.A descoberta de canais iônicos presentes na membrana plasmática tem ajudado a elucidar importantes mecanismos fisiológicos em animais e plantas. Mecanismos associados ao crescimento e desenvolvimento das plantas, tais como germinação, movimento foliar, abertura e fechamento de estômatos, absorção de íons pelas raízes e armazenamento de nutrientes estão ligados ao transporte de potássio. Estudos descrevendo a regulação do transporte deste nutriente por ácido abscísico (ABA, Ca++, luz e outros fatores são apresentados. Os tipos de canais que regulam a saída e entrada de potássio na célula, e as interações destes com os sinais externos, são discutidos.

  3. Potassium nutrition of ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster: overexpression of the Hebeloma cylindrosporum HcTrk1 transporter affects the translocation of both K(+) and phosphorus in the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Delteil, Amandine; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Becquer, Adeline; Plassard, Claude; Sentenac, Hervé; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Mycorrhizal associations are known to improve the hydro-mineral nutrition of their host plants. However, the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for plant potassium nutrition has so far been poorly studied. We therefore investigated the impact of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum on the potassium nutrition of Pinus pinaster and examined the involvement of the fungal potassium transporter HcTrk1. HcTrk1 transcripts and proteins were localized in ectomycorrhizas using in situ hybridization and EGFP translational fusion constructs. Importantly, an overexpression strategy was performed on a H. cylindrosporum endogenous gene in order to dissect the role of this transporter. The potassium nutrition of mycorrhizal pine plants was significantly improved under potassium-limiting conditions. Fungal strains overexpressing HcTrk1 reduced the translocation of potassium and phosphorus from the roots to the shoots of inoculated plants in mycorrhizal experiments. Furthermore, expression of HcTrk1 and the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 were reciprocally linked to the external inorganic phosphate and potassium availability. The development of these approaches provides a deeper insight into the role of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on host plant K(+) nutrition and in particular, the K(+) transporter HcTrk1. The work augments our knowledge of the link between potassium and phosphorus nutrition via the mycorrhizal pathway. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  5. Plant Transporter Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) play a critical role for numerous biological processes, by controlling the movements of ions and molecules in and out of cells. In plants, transporters thus function as gatekeepers between the plant and its surrounding environment and between organs......, tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Since plants are highly compartmentalized organisms with complex transportation infrastructures, they consequently have many transporters. However, the vast majority of predicted transporters have not yet been experimentally verified to have transport...... activity. This project contains a review of the implemented methods, which have led to plant transporter identification, and present our progress on creating a high-throughput functional genomics transporter identification platform....

  6. Potassium transport across guinea pig distal colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechkemmer, G.; Halm, D.R.; Frizzell, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Active absorption and secretion of K was studied by measuring bidirectional 42 K fluxes across short-circuited guinea pig distal colon. Tissues were pretreated with mucosal (m) and serosal (s) indomethacin (1 μM) and amiloride (0.1 mM, m) to suppress spontaneous, electrogenic Cl secretion and Na absorption. Under these conditions, the short-circuit current (I/sub sc/) was 0.4 μeq/cm 2 h while electroneutral K absorption was 2.8 μeq/cm 2 h. Epinephrine (5 μM, s) stimulated electrogenic K secretion, reducing net K absorption to 1.3 μeq/cm 2 h. Bumetanide (0.1 mM, s) abolished this K secretion and restored K absorption to control values, suggesting mechanistic similarities between K and Cl secretion. K absorption was inhibited 40% by the gastric H/K ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole (0.1 mM, m), and was abolished by ouabain (0.1 mM, m). Neutral K absorption does not appear to be mediated by an apical membrane Na/K pump since: the effect of mucosal ouabain on K absorption does not require the presence of mucosal or serosal Na, unidirectional Na fluxes are not influenced by mucosal ouabain, and K absorption is not affected when Na absorption is abolished by amiloride. Net K transport is determined by the balance between electroneutral K absorption and electrogenic K secretion. The ouabain sensitivity of K absorption suggests that colonic H/K ATPase differs from its gastric counterpart

  7. Effect of osmolarity on potassium transport in isolated cerebral microvessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Potassium transport in microvessels isolated from rat brain by a technique involving density gradient centrifugation was studied in HEPES buffer solutions of varying osmolarity from 200 to 420 mosmols, containing different concentration of sodium chloride, choline chloride, or sodium nitrate. The flux of 86 Rb into and out of the endothelial cells was estimated. Potassium influx was very sensitive to the osmolarity of the medium. Ouabain-insensitive K-component was reduced in hypotonic medium and was increased in medium made hypertonic with sodium chloride or mannitol. Choline chloride replacement caused a large reduction in K influx. Potassium influx was significant decrease when nitrate is substituted for chloride ion in isotonic and hypertonic media, whereas a slight decrease was found in hypotonic medium. The decrease of K influx in the ion-replacement medium is due to a decrement of the ouabain-insensitive component. Potassium efflux was unchanged in hypotonic medium but was somewhat reduced in hypertonic medium. The marked effect of medium osmolarity of K fluxes suggests that these fluxes may be responsible for the volume regulatory K movements. The possible mechanism of changes of K flux under anisotonic media is also discussed

  8. Effect of potassium and phosphorus on the transport of radiocesium by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Dupre de Boulois, Herve; Declerck, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    Potassium, a chemical analogue of cesium, and phosphorus, an essential macronutrient transported by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), have been suggested to influence the transport of radiocesium by AMF. However, no study investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of both elements on the importance of this transport. Here, the arbuscular mycorrhizal-plant (AM-P) in vitro culture system associating Medicago truncatula plantlets with Glomus intraradices was used to evaluate this effect. Using three concentrations of K (0, 1, 10 mM) and two concentrations of P (30 and 3000 μM) added to a compartment only accessible to the AMF, we demonstrated that K and P individually and in combination significantly influenced radiocesium transport by AMF. Whilst increased concentration of K decreased the amount of radiocesium transported, the opposite was observed for P. Although the exact mechanisms involved need to be assessed, both elements were identified as important factors influencing the transport of radiocesium by AMF.

  9. Effect of potassium and phosphorus on the transport of radiocesium by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Dupre de Boulois, Herve [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Declerck, Stephane, E-mail: stephan.declerck@uclouvain.b [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Potassium, a chemical analogue of cesium, and phosphorus, an essential macronutrient transported by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), have been suggested to influence the transport of radiocesium by AMF. However, no study investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of both elements on the importance of this transport. Here, the arbuscular mycorrhizal-plant (AM-P) in vitro culture system associating Medicago truncatula plantlets with Glomus intraradices was used to evaluate this effect. Using three concentrations of K (0, 1, 10 mM) and two concentrations of P (30 and 3000 muM) added to a compartment only accessible to the AMF, we demonstrated that K and P individually and in combination significantly influenced radiocesium transport by AMF. Whilst increased concentration of K decreased the amount of radiocesium transported, the opposite was observed for P. Although the exact mechanisms involved need to be assessed, both elements were identified as important factors influencing the transport of radiocesium by AMF.

  10. The Critical Role of Potassium in Plant Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural production continues to be constrained by a number of biotic and abiotic factors that can reduce crop yield quantity and quality. Potassium (K is an essential nutrient that affects most of the biochemical and physiological processes that influence plant growth and metabolism. It also contributes to the survival of plants exposed to various biotic and abiotic stresses. The following review focuses on the emerging role of K in defending against a number of biotic and abiotic stresses, including diseases, pests, drought, salinity, cold and frost and waterlogging. The availability of K and its effects on plant growth, anatomy, morphology and plant metabolism are discussed. The physiological and molecular mechanisms of K function in plant stress resistance are reviewed. This article also evaluates the potential for improving plant stress resistance by modifying K fertilizer inputs and highlights the future needs for research about the role of K in agriculture.

  11. Tomato yield and potassium concentrations in soil and in plant petioles as affected by potassium fertirrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FONTES PAULO CEZAR REZENDE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Santa Clara was grown on a silt clay soil with 46 mg dm-3 Mehlich 1 extractable K, to evaluate the effects of trickle-applied K rates on fruit yield and to establish K critical concentrations in soil and in plant petioles. Six potassium rates (0, 48, 119, 189, 259 and 400 kg ha-1 K were applied in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Soil and plant K critical levels were determined at two plant growth stages (at the beginning of the second and fourth cluster flowering. Total, marketable and weighted yields increased with K rates, reaching their maximum of 86.4, 73.4, and 54.9 ton ha-1 at 198, 194, and 125 kg ha-1 K , respectively. At the first soil sampling date K critical concentrations in the soil associated with K rates for maximum marketable and weighted yields were 92 and 68 mg dm-3, respectively. Potassium critical concentrations in the dry matter of the petioles sampled by the beginning of the second and fourth cluster flowering time, associated with maximum weighted yield, were 10.30 and 7.30 dag kg-1, respectively.

  12. Studies of cesium permeability of potassium transporter from Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Inaba, Jiro; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Hazama, Akihiro

    2007-01-01

    Cs-137 is an important radionuclide for safety assessment of nuclear facilities, and its transfer via plants is an important route from the environment to humans. Studies of Cs uptake mechanisms by plants are essential for understanding 137 Cs movement in soil-to-plant systems and in plants. Since uptake of Cs is considered to be mediated by K transport protein, we investigated Cs + permeability of two Arabidopsis K + transporters, AKT2 and AtHKT1, by using Xenopus oocytes expression systems and two-electrode voltage-clamp technique under various pH conditions. The data showed AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not transport Cs + at external pH in the 5.5-7.5 range. These results indicated that AKT2 and AtHKT1 did not contribute to Cs + influx into cells under physiological conditions in plants. (author)

  13. Transport and homeostasis of potassium and phosphate: limiting factors for sustainable crop production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Mingda; Tang, Ren-Jie; Tang, Yumei; Tian, Wang; Hou, Congong; Zhao, Fugeng; Lan, Wenzhi; Luan, Sheng

    2017-06-01

    Potassium (K) and phosphate (Pi) are both macronutrients essential for plant growth and crop production, but the unrenewable resources of phosphorus rock and potash have become limiting factors for food security. One critical measure to help solve this problem is to improve nutrient use efficiency (NUE) in plants by understanding and engineering genetic networks for ion uptake, translocation, and storage. Plants have evolved multiple systems to adapt to various nutrient conditions for growth and production. Within the NUE networks, transport proteins and their regulators are the primary players for maintaining nutrient homeostasis and could be utilized to engineer high NUE traits in crop plants. A large number of publications have detailed K+ and Pi transport proteins in plants over the past three decades. Meanwhile, the discovery and validation of their regulatory mechanisms are fast-track topics for research. Here, we provide an overview of K+ and Pi transport proteins and their regulatory mechanisms, which participate in the uptake, translocation, storage, and recycling of these nutrients in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Microinjection study on potassium transport of rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto

    1978-01-01

    Wister rate were divided into the following four groups. (A) control group (B) high-potassium diet group (C) low-potassium diet group (D) nephron population reduction (N.P.R.) group. Microinjection of the artificial solutions containing both 86 Rb and 3 H-inulin were performed into the proximal and distal convoluted tubules as well as cortical peritubular capillaries in rats undergoing mannitol diuresis. Excretory patterns of these substances were analyzed in successive urine samples. 3 H-inulin is entirely recovered in the urine of the experimental kidney following the injection into the proximal and distal tubules. 86 Rb is an adequate tracer for potassium and is absorbed into the potassium pool from either proximal tubular injections or peritubular capillaries. 86 Rb excreted with a time course similar to that of 3 H-inulin is termed as 'direct recovery' and that excreted more slowly, 'delayed recovery'. The 86 Rb recoveries which were obtained after proximal injections were independent of the injection site and averaged 9%. Secretion of 86 Rb into the urine was stimulate during enhanced K secretion and decreased during reduced K secretion along the distal nephron. Distal tubular injections gave 100% direct recovery in control, high-K diet, and N.P.R. rats. It was apparent that the 86 Rb recovery was significantly reduced, although not delayed, in animals deprived of dietary potassium for several weeks. At the collecting duct, the extensive net potassium reabsorption is observed in potassium depleted rats, whereas K absorption might be reduced or even secretion is seemingly taking place in potassium loading rats. In conclution, distal convolution and collecting duct play the major role in the regulation of urinary potassium excretion. (auth.)

  15. The Trk Potassium Transporter Is Required for RsmB-Mediated Activation of Virulence in the Phytopathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Rita S; Xavier, Karina B

    2016-01-15

    Pectobacterium wasabiae (previously known as Erwinia carotovora) is an important plant pathogen that regulates the production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes through an N-acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system and through the GacS/GacA two-component system (also known as ExpS/ExpA). At high cell density, activation of GacS/GacA induces the expression of RsmB, a noncoding RNA that is essential for the activation of virulence in this bacterium. A genetic screen to identify regulators of RsmB revealed that mutants defective in components of a putative Trk potassium transporter (trkH and trkA) had decreased rsmB expression. Further analysis of these mutants showed that changes in potassium concentration influenced rsmB expression and consequent tissue damage in potato tubers and that this regulation required an intact Trk system. Regulation of rsmB expression by potassium via the Trk system occurred even in the absence of the GacS/GacA system, demonstrating that these systems act independently and are both required for full activation of RsmB and for the downstream induction of virulence in potato infection assays. Overall, our results identified potassium as an essential environmental factor regulating the Rsm system, and the consequent induction of virulence, in the plant pathogen P. wasabiae. Crop losses from bacterial diseases caused by pectolytic bacteria are a major problem in agriculture. By studying the regulatory pathways involved in controlling the expression of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in Pectobacterium wasabiae, we showed that the Trk potassium transport system plays an important role in the regulation of these pathways. The data presented further identify potassium as an important environmental factor in the regulation of virulence in this plant pathogen. We showed that a reduction in virulence can be achieved by increasing the extracellular concentration of potassium. Therefore, this work highlights how elucidation of the

  16. Trk2 Potassium Transport System in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Potassium Homeostasis, Biofilm Formation, and Stress Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binepal, Gursonika; Gill, Kamal; Crowley, Paula; Cordova, Martha; Brady, L. Jeannine; Senadheera, Dilani B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potassium (K+) is the most abundant cation in the fluids of dental biofilm. The biochemical and biophysical functions of K+ and a variety of K+ transport systems have been studied for most pathogenic bacteria but not for oral pathogens. In this study, we establish the modes of K+ acquisition in Streptococcus mutans and the importance of K+ homeostasis for its virulence attributes. The S. mutans genome harbors four putative K+ transport systems that included two Trk-like transporters (designated Trk1 and Trk2), one glutamate/K+ cotransporter (GlnQHMP), and a channel-like K+ transport system (Kch). Mutants lacking Trk2 had significantly impaired growth, acidogenicity, aciduricity, and biofilm formation. [K+] less than 5 mM eliminated biofilm formation in S. mutans. The functionality of the Trk2 system was confirmed by complementing an Escherichia coli TK2420 mutant strain, which resulted in significant K+ accumulation, improved growth, and survival under stress. Taken together, these results suggest that Trk2 is the main facet of the K+-dependent cellular response of S. mutans to environment stresses. IMPORTANCE Biofilm formation and stress tolerance are important virulence properties of caries-causing Streptococcus mutans. To limit these properties of this bacterium, it is imperative to understand its survival mechanisms. Potassium is the most abundant cation in dental plaque, the natural environment of S. mutans. K+ is known to function in stress tolerance, and bacteria have specialized mechanisms for its uptake. However, there are no reports to identify or characterize specific K+ transporters in S. mutans. We identified the most important system for K+ homeostasis and its role in the biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and growth. We also show the requirement of environmental K+ for the activity of biofilm-forming enzymes, which explains why such high levels of K+ would favor biofilm formation. PMID:26811321

  17. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  18. Alcohol and the calcium-dependent potassium transport of human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, R.A.; Caldwell, K.K.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro exposure of human red blood cells to ethanol (100 and 400 mM) was found to increase the initial rate of calcium-dependent potassium efflux through the red cell membrane. This effect of ethanol was apparently not due to an elevation of the intracellular free calcium but rather to a direct action of the drug on the transport process as, (1) intracellular calcium concentrations were tightly buffered with EGTA, (2) ethanol did not alter the efflux of 45 Ca from the cells, and (3) dantrolene, which has been proposed to counteract the effect of ethanol on intracellular calcium levels in the erythrocyte, did not inhibit the stimulatory action of ethanol. The efflux of potassium from erythrocytes obtained from chronic alcoholics was not different from that of erythrocytes from non-alcoholic individuals. The relationship of these findings to neuronal potassium transport is discussed

  19. Using heterologous expression systems to characterize potassium and sodium transport activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alonso; Benito, Begoña; Cagnac, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The expression of plant transporters in simple well-characterized cell systems is an irreplaceable technique for gaining insights into the kinetic and energetic features of plant transporters. Among all the available expression systems, yeast cells offer the highest simplicity and have the capacity to mimic the in vivo properties of plant transporters. Here, we describe the use of yeast mutants to express K(+) and Na(+) plant transporters and discuss some experimental problems that can produce misleading results.

  20. Effect of potassium fertilizers on 137Cs transfer from sandy soddy-podzolic soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, N.V.; Sanzharova, N.I.; Shishulina, M.V.; Moiseenko, F.V.; Vorob'eva, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to study the behavior of potassium in sandy soddy podzolic soil and its influence on the availability of 137 Cs to plants of winter rye and lupine when applying various doses of potassium fertilizers (PF) and turf-manure compost (TMC). A many-years stationary experiment was established in the Bryansk region in 1986-1988 on soddy podzolic soil contaminated by the accident at the Chernobyl Power Station. The influence of fertilizer was studied in 4-field crop rotation in an experimental plot: seeded fallow (lupine, bird's-foot) – winter rye – potato – spring grains. Potassium and mineral fertilizers were applied. It was shown that the application of potassium fertilizers (from 0 to 180 kg/ha) increased the content of exchangeable potassium in the soil by 1.7-2-7 times and its mobility by 2.5-4.0 times which resulted in a decrease of 137Cs transfer to plants by 5.8-14 times. The inverse proportional relationship was found between the potassium mobility and the content of its mobile form and the accumulation coefficient of 137Cs by lupine and wheat rye plants. A linear relationship was reveled between the accumulation coefficient of 137Cs and the content of exchangeable radionuclide

  1. Inhibitors of plant hormone transport

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klíma, Petr; Laňková, Martina; Zažímalová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 253, č. 6 (2016), s. 1391-1404 ISSN 0033-183X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD15088 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : polar auxin transport * acid-binding protein * gnom arf-gef * equilibrative nucleoside transporter * efflux carrier polarity * plasma-membrane-protein * cultured tobacco cells * arabidopsis-thaliana * gravitropic response * brefeldin-a * Plant hormones * Transport * Inhibitors * Auxin * Cytokinins * Strigolactones * Abscisic acid * Cell biology Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.870, year: 2016

  2. Identification and Characterization of Novel Plant Adenylate Cyclases – The Arabidopsis Thaliana Potassium Uptake Permeases

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Younis, Inas M.

    2018-05-01

    Adenylyl Cyclases (ACs) catalyze the formation of the key universal second messenger adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5’- triphosphate. Cyclic AMP participates in several signal transduction pathways and is present in bacteria and higher and lower eukaryotes including higher plants. Previous studies in plants have shown a role for cAMP in signal transduction during e.g. the cell cycle, elongation of the pollen tube and stimulation of protein kinase activity. More recently cAMP has been shown to play a role in stress responses. Interestingly, cAMP has also been shown to regulate ion transport in plant cells. Here we used a similar strategy that led to the discovery of the first guanylyl cyclase in plants that was based on the alignment of conserved and functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated nucleotide cyclases from lower and higher eukaryotes, to identify a novel candidate ACs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana K+ Uptake 5 and 7). ATKUP5 and 7 are homologous to K+ uptake permeases (KUPs) from bacteria and high-affinity K+ transporters (HAKs) from fungi. The AC activity was investigated by recombinantly expressing the ATKUP5 and 7 AC domain in vitro and by complementation of an E. coli AC mutant (cyaA). Furthermore, ATKUP5 was tested for its ability to functionally complement a yeast mutant deficient in Trk1 and Trk2 high affinity potassium uptake transporters. Site-mutagenesis in the AC domain was used to test the effect of both functions in each other. Furthermore, ATKUP5 was characterized electrophysiologically in HEK-293 cells to characterize the nature of this transporter. The localization of the ATKUP5 in Arabidopsis was examined using a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion with the ATKUP5 to determine whether ATKUP5 is expressed at the plasma or tonoplast membrane. Arabiodpsis thaliana of the wild type, overexpressing ATKUP5 and atkup5 mutant lines were used to examine phenotypic differences.

  3. Cesium and potassium uptake by plants from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, G.; Leising, C.; Krestel, R.; Wirth, E.

    1990-11-01

    The aim of the investigation was the reliable estimation of the Cs-137 root uptake by agricultural crops using the 'observed ratio model' (OR model) for the determination of transfer factors: Cs (plant)/K (plant) = OR x Cs (soil)/K (soil). For model validation representative soil (arable land, grass land, organic substrates from forests and peat) and plant samples from Bavaria were taken. These 4 parameters varied within a sufficiently wide range. In addition some samples from forest sites were taken. Soil and plant samples were taken at the same locations within 1 m 2 . (orig./HP) [de

  4. Corrosion of a hot potassium carbonate CO/sub 2/ removal plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    After ten years of successful operation, a hot potassium carbonate CO/sub 2/ removal plant experienced severe corrosion to the 2'' (50 mm) thick carbon steel absorber process vessel over a fourteen month period. This corrosive attack resulted in complete penetration on three separate occasions. Although the cause of this corrosion is still uncertain, it appears to be the result of decreasing strength of the vanadium pentoxide inhibitor, due to increasing concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the feed gas. After extensive research, Chevron believes that stainless steel metallurgy or replacement of the hot potassium carbonate process are the only reliable long-term solutions

  5. Effect of potassium supply on drought resistance in sorghum: plant growth and macronutrient content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgharipour, M.R.; Heidari, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the main limiting natural resource is widely considered to be water. Therefore, research into crop management practices that enhance drought resistance and plant growth when water supply is limited has become increasingly essential. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of potassium (K) nutritional status on the drought resistance of grain sorghum during 2009. Drought stress by reducing the yield components, especially the number of panicle per plant and one-hundred grain weight reduced grain yield and greatest yield (3499 kg ha/sup -1/) obtained at full irrigation. Potassium sulfate increased grain and biological yield by 28% and 22%, respectively compared to control through improving growth conditions. Drought stress increased the N content, while reduced water availability decreased the K and Na in plant. No K fertilized plants had the lowest leaf K and N and highest Na concentrations. Chlorophyll content increased significantly with increase in K supply and increased frequency of irrigation. Interaction effect of drought stress and potassium sulfate on all studied traits except chlorophyll content was significant and optimum soil K levels protects plants from drought. These observations indicate that adequate K nutrition can improve drought resistance of sorghum. (author)

  6. Possible phthalates transport into plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alžbeta Jarošová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils can be contaminated by high concentrations of phthalic acid esters (PAE resulting from industrial and intensive agricultural activities. A plant receives water and substances (including pollutants from soil by means of rootage. Water solution received by the roots is distributed in particular by means of xylem. Reception by means of floem is not very considerable. Pollutants (including phthalates can be absorbed by roots either by diffusion by means of soil gas phase or soil liquid phase. Another possible way of pollutant entering into the plant is diffusion from atmosphere. Way of substance entering into the plant is decided by so called Henry constant as well as octanol-water partition coefficient. In case of phthalates, big differences between di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP reception and dioctyl phthalate reception were detected. For example, DBP can enter into the plant by means of gas as well as liquid phase while dioctyl phthalate only by gas phase.This publication summarizes fundamental knowledge on possible phthalates transport into plants.

  7. Potassium-transporting proteins in skeletal muscle: cellular location and fiber-type differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Juel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Potassium (K+) displacement in skeletal muscle may be an important factor in the development of muscle fatigue during intense exercise. It has been shown in vitro that an increase in the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]e) to values higher than approx. 10 mm significantly reduce force developm......Potassium (K+) displacement in skeletal muscle may be an important factor in the development of muscle fatigue during intense exercise. It has been shown in vitro that an increase in the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]e) to values higher than approx. 10 mm significantly reduce force......, but is suggested primarily to participate in K+ release to the interstitium. Because there is restricted diffusion of K+ to the interstitium, K+ released to the T-tubules during AP propagation will be removed primarily by reuptake mediated by transport proteins located in the T-tubule membrane. The most important...

  8. The effect of diamide on potassium transport and cellular morphology in mouse L-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szekely, J.G.; Sargent, M.D.; Copps, T.P.; Lobreau, A.U.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of diamide (diazenedicarboxylic acid bis (N,N'-dimethylamide)) on the transport of potassium in mouse L-cells have been investigated using 86 Rb + as a tracer. Active, ouabain-sensitive uptake is reduced after 0.4 to 0.6 mol/L diamide treatment. The size of reduction depends on the temperature and the presence of glucose in the medium. These results suggest that the elimination of reduced glutathione by diamide is the major factor controlling the level of K + transport in treated L-cells. In addition to decreasing active transport, diamide produces dramatic changes in cellular ultrastructure, probably through altered Na + /K + balance and its action on tubulin. Clear organelle-free regions appear surrounded by vacuoles and swollen mitkchondria regions. The clear areas of cytoplasm eventually pinch off from the cell

  9. Potassium transport of Salmonella is important for type III secretion and pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yehao; Ho, Katharina Kim; Su, Jing; Gong, Hao; Chang, Alexander C.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular cations are essential for the physiology of all living organisms including bacteria. Cations such as potassium ion (K+), sodium ion (Na+) and proton (H+) are involved in nearly all aspects of bacterial growth and survival. K+ is the most abundant cation and its homeostasis in Escherichia coli and Salmonella is regulated by three major K+ transporters: high affinity transporter Kdp and low affinity transporters Kup and Trk. Previous studies have demonstrated the roles of cations and cation transport in the physiology of Escherichia coli; their roles in the virulence and physiology of pathogenic bacteria are not well characterized. We have previously reported that the Salmonella K+ transporter Trk is important for the secretion of effector proteins of the type III secretion system (TTSS) of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Here we further explore the role of Salmonella cation transport in virulence in vitro and pathogenesis in animal models. Impairment of K+ transport through deletion of K+ transporters or exposure to the chemical modulators of cation transport, gramicidin and valinomycin, results in a severe defect in the TTSS of SPI-1, and this defect in the TTSS was not due to a failure to regulate intrabacterial pH or ATP. Our results also show that K+ transporters are critical to the pathogenesis of Salmonella in mice and chicks and are involved in multiple growth and virulence characteristics in vitro, including protein secretion, motility and invasion of epithelial cells. These results suggest that cation transport of the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella, especially K+ transport, contributes to its virulence in addition to previously characterized roles in maintaining homeostasis of bacteria. PMID:23728623

  10. The uniqueness of the plant mitochondrial potassium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Pastore

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-inhibited Plant Mitochondrial K+ Channel (PmitoKATPwas discovered about fifteen years ago in Durum WheatMitochondria (DWM. PmitoKATP catalyses the electrophoreticK+ uniport through the inner mitochondrial membrane;moreover, the co-operation between PmitoKATP and K+/H+antiporter allows such a great operation of a K+ cycle tocollapse mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ and ΔpH, thusimpairing protonmotive force (Δp. A possible physiological roleof such ΔΨ control is the restriction of harmful reactive oxygenspecies (ROS production under environmental/oxidative stressconditions. Interestingly, DWM lacking Δp were found to benevertheless fully coupled and able to regularly accomplish ATPsynthesis; this unexpected behaviour makes necessary to recastin some way the classical chemiosmotic model. In the whole,PmitoKATP may oppose to large scale ROS production bylowering ΔΨ under environmental/oxidative stress, but, whenstress is moderate, this occurs without impairing ATP synthesisin a crucial moment for cell and mitochondrial bioenergetics.[BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 391-397

  11. Reduction of Cs-137 levels in plants and fungi after potassium fertilization in a Swedish forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, I.

    1998-01-01

    The uptake of 137 Cs in plants in forest ecosystems are much higher than in agricultural ecosystems. One reason could be that the concentrations of mineral nutrients usually are at much lower levels in forest soils compared to soil from arable land. On the other hand there are often rather weak correlation between the concentrations of exchangeable potassium in forest soils and the levels of 137 Cs in, e. g., dwarf-shrubs. The variations of the potassium levels are rather small in forest soils. This deficit can be offset by fertilization with potassium. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of potassium fertilization on the uptake of 137 Cs in a rather nutrient poor forest ecosystem - a rocky area with a rather shallow soil layer with high organic content. The potassium was spread in May 1992 by using normal agricultural equipment in efforts to get to 200 kg of potassium chloride per hectare. Three plots about 200 m 2 each were selected on the fertilized area and used for sampling of blueberry, lingonberry and heather. One sampling was performed before the spreading and then at least once a year up to 1997. During the mushroom season, the fruit bodies of the commonest species of fungi were collected within the 3 plots. A closely located rocky area was selected as the control area. The 137 Cs levels in blueberry and lingonberry only showed a minor decrease during the 1992 vegetation period. In contrast, heather showed a marked decrease of about 50 % already the first year. In mushrooms (Lactarius rufus and Rozites caperatus) the decrease was even more pronounced. In 1997, 5 vegetation periods after the fertilization, the Cs-137 levels in blueberry, lingonberry and heather were 633, 926 and 3,22 Bq/kg, respectively, amounting to 23%, 53%, and 24% of the control levels (2767, 1741 and 13,2 Bq/kg, respectively). Even fruit bodies of the fungi showed 137 Cs levels around 30 to 50 % of that in the control area. Thus, potassium fertilization appears

  12. EFFECT OF SILICON, NITROGEN AND POTASSIUM IN THE INCIDENCE OF TOMATO PIN WORM IN INDUSTRIAL TOMATO PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Cristina dos Santos2*

    2013-12-01

    of two stems per plant. It was observed a decrease in the number of pinworm leaf mines with an increase in silicon and potassium doses and an increase in the number of mines with an increase on nitrogen doses.

  13. Potassium-modulated physiological performance of mango plants infected by Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaias Severino Cacique

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mango wilt, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata, is an important disease affecting mango production. In view of the beneficial effects of potassium (K in other profitable crops and the lack of information about the effect of macronutrients on mango wilt development, the present study aimed to evaluate how mango plants supplied with K respond physiologically when infected by C. fimbriata. Mango plants (» 3 years old from cultivar Ubá were grown in plastic pots containing 58 mg of K·dm−3 (original K level based on the chemical analysis of the substrate or in plastic pots with substrate amended with a solution of 0.5 M potassium chloride (KCl to achieve the rate of 240 mg K·dm−3. Disease symptoms were more pronounced in inoculated plants grown at the lower K level. Substantial declines in stomatal conductance, in line with decreases in the internal-to-ambient CO2 concentration ratio and the absence of detectable changes in the chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, suggest that the decrease in the net carbon assimilation rate is due, at least initially, to stomatal limitations. High concentrations of K and manganese were found in the stem tissues of inoculated plants and supplied with the highest K rate, most likely due to the involvement of these tissues in the local development of defense mechanisms. The results of this study suggest that the supply of K favored the physiological performance of mango plants and their resistance against C. fimbriata infection.

  14. Impact of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium on Brown Planthopper and Tolerance of Its Host Rice Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mamunur Rashid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål, appeared as a devastating pest of rice in Asia. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of three nutrients, nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and potassium (K, on BPH and its host rice plants. Biochemical constituents of BPH and rice plants with varying nutrient levels at different growth stages, and changes in relative water content (RWC of rice plants were determined in the laboratory. Feeding of BPH and the tolerance of rice plants to BPH with different nutrient levels were determined in the nethouse. Concentrations of N and P were found much higher in the BPH body than in its host rice plants, and this elemental mismatch is an inherent constraint on meeting nutritional requirements of BPH. Nitrogen was found as a more limiting element for BPH than other nutrients in rice plants. Application of N fertilizers to the rice plants increased the N concentrations both in rice plants and BPH while application of P and K fertilizers increased their concentrations in plant tissues only but not in BPH. Nitrogen application also increased the level of soluble proteins and decreased silicon content in rice plants, which resulted in increased feeding of BPH with sharp reduction of RWC in rice plants ultimately caused susceptible to the pest. P fertilization increased the concentration of P in rice plant tissues but not changed N, K, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents, which indicated little importance of P to the feeding of BPH and tolerance of plant against BPH. K fertilization increased K content but reduced N, Si, free sugar and soluble protein contents in the plant tissues which resulted in the minimum reduction of RWC in rice plants after BPH feeding, thereby contributed to higher tolerance of rice plants to brown planthopper.

  15. Boron transport in plants: co-ordinated regulation of transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Background The essentiality of boron (B) for plant growth was established >85 years ago. In the last decade, it has been revealed that one of the physiological roles of B is cross-linking the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in primary cell walls. Borate cross-linking of pectic networks serves both for physical strength of cell walls and for cell adhesion. On the other hand, high concentrations of B are toxic to plant growth. To avoid deficiency and toxicity problems, it is important for plants to maintain their tissue B concentrations within an optimum range by regulating transport processes. Boron transport was long believed to be a passive, unregulated process, but the identification of B transporters has suggested that plants sense and respond to the B conditions and regulate transporters to maintain B homeostasis. Scope Transporters responsible for efficient B uptake by roots, xylem loading and B distribution among leaves have been described. These transporters are required under B limitation for efficient acquisition and utilization of B. Transporters important for tolerating high B levels in the environment have also been identified, and these transporters export B from roots back to the soil. Two types of transporters are involved in these processes: NIPs (nodulin-26-like intrinsic proteins), boric acid channels, and BORs, B exporters. It is demonstrated that the expression of genes encoding these transporters is finely regulated in response to B availability in the environment to ensure tissue B homeostasis. Furthermore, plants tolerant to stress produced by low B or high B in the environment can be generated through altered expression of these transporters. Conclusions The identification of the first B transporter led to the discovery that B transport was a process mediated not only by passive diffusion but also by transporters whose activity was regulated in response to B conditions. Now it is evident that plants sense internal and external B

  16. Potassium fertilization for pineapple: effects on soil chemical properties and plant nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Junqueira Teixeira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was carried out on an Ultisol located at the city of Agudos (22º30'S; 49º03'W, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in order to determine the effects of rates and sources of potassium fertilizer on nutritional status of 'Smooth Cayenne' pineapple and on some soil chemical properties. The experiment was a complete factorial design with four rates (0, 175, 350, and 700 kg ha-1 of K2O and three combinations of K sources (100% KCl, 100% K2SO4 and 40% K2SO4 + 60% KCl. Soil samples were taken from the depths 0-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm at planting and 14 months after. Nutritional status of pineapple plants was assessed by means of tissue analysis. Soil K availability increased with application of K fertilizer, regardless of K sources. Soil chlorine and Cl concentration in pineapple leaves increased with application of KCl or K2SO4+KCl. Plant uptake of potassium was shaped by soil K availability and by the application rates of K fertilizer, independently of K sources.

  17. Radioactivation method for simultaneous determination of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in plants and fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srapeniants, R.A.; Saveliev, I.B.; Kovtun, J.L.; Sidorov, A.V.; Tsagolov, K.S.; Miroshnikova, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    A radioactivation method for the simultaneous determination of the nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in plants and fertilizers is described. Samples to be analyzed and standard samples are exposed to neutron irradiation, and the spectra of gamma radiation induced in the samples are recorded. The samples laid aside for a period of time determined by the half-life of interfering isotopes, and the spectra of the samples and standards are recorded again. The first and second spectra are superposed and shifted relative to each other along the energy axis, and the content of the elements being analyzed is determined by comparing the spectra of the samples and standards

  18. Characterization of cesium uptake mediated by a potassium transport system of bacteria in a soil conditioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pengyao; Idota, Yoko; Yano, Kentaro; Negishi, Masayuki; Kawabata, Hideaki; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Takuo; Morimoto, Kaori; Tsuji, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We found that bacteria in a commercial soil conditioner sold in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, exhibited concentrative and saturable cesium ion (Cs + ) uptake in the natural range of pH and temperature. The concentration of intracellular Cs + could be condensed at least a few times higher compared with the outside medium of the cells. This uptake appeared to be mediated by a K + transport system, since Cs + uptake was dose-dependently inhibited by potassium ion (K + ). Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis indicated that the Cs + uptake involved a single saturable process. The maximum uptake amount (J max ) was the same in the presence and absence of K + , suggesting that Cs + and K + uptakes were competitive with respect to each other. These bacteria might be useful for bioremediation of cesium-contaminated soil. (author)

  19. Plant water relations I: uptake and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants, like all living things, are mostly water. Water is the matrix of life, and its availability determines the distribution and productivity of plants on earth. Vascular plants evolved structures that enable them to transport water long distances with little input of energy, but the hollow trach...

  20. Soil and plant response to used potassium silicate drilling fluid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Linjun; Anne Naeth, M

    2015-10-01

    Use of drilling waste generated from the oil and gas industry for land reclamation has potential to be a practical and economical means to improve soil fertility and to decrease landfills. A four month greenhouse experiment with common barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) on three different textured soils was conducted to determine soil and plant response to incorporated or sprayed potassium silicate drilling fluid (PSDF). Two PSDF types (used once, used twice) were applied at six rates (10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120m(3)ha(-1)) as twelve PSDF amendments plus a control (non PSDF). Effects of PSDF amendment on plant properties were significant, and varied through physiological growth stages. Barley emergence and below ground biomass were greater with used once than used twice PSDF at the same application rate in clay loam soil. Used twice PSDF at highest rates significantly increased barley above ground biomass relative to the control in loam and sand soil. All PSDF treatments significantly increased available potassium relative to the control in all three soils. Soil electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio increased with PSDF addition, but not to levels detrimental to barley. Soil quality rated fair to poor with PSDF amendments in clay loam, and reduced plant performance at the highest rate, suggesting a threshold beyond which conditions are compromised with PSDF utilization. PSDF application method did not significantly affect plant and soil responses. This initial greenhouse research demonstrates that PSDF has potential as a soil amendment for reclamation, with consideration of soil properties and plant species tolerances to determine PSDF types and rates to be used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Potassium co-transport and antiport during the uptake of sucrose and glutamic acid from the xylem vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, A.J.E. van; Erven, A.J. van

    Perfusion experiments with excised internodes of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv Moneymaker) showed that the uptake of glutamic acid and sucrose from the xylem vessels is accompanied with coupled proton co-transport and potassium antiport at low pH (<5.5). At high pH (5.5) both proton and

  2. On mobility of cesium-137, sodium, potassium in various types of soils and prediction of cesium-137 cumulation in agricultural plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkinazi, Eh.I.

    1990-01-01

    Mobility of cesium-137, sodium and potassium in the natural environment in podzolic gray and chernozem medium-loamy, sward podzolic sandy soils and chernozem has been studied. Durability of fixation of cesium-137 increases in a number of soils and increase of the level of metabolic potassium. Coefficient of transition of level of metabolic cesium-137 by potassium and sodium, and of sodium by potassium. The mentioned above coefficients can be used for the prediction of cesium-137 cumulation in plants

  3. Internal transport control in pot plant production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.

    1999-01-01

    Drawing up internal transport schedules in pot plant production is a very complex task. Scheduling internal transport at the operational level and providing control on a day-to-day or even hour-to-hour basis in particular requires a new approach. A hierarchical planning approach based on

  4. Nitrogen, potassium and plant growth retardant effects on oil content and quality of cotton seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkassas, A. R.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this field experiment was to investigate the effect of nitrogen, potassium and a plant growth retardant (PGR on seed yield and protein and oil content of an Egyptian cotton cultivar (Gossypium barbadense Giza 86. Treatments consisted of: soil application of N (95 and 143 kg N ha-1 in the form ammonium nitrate, foliar application of potassium (0, 319, 638 or 957 g K ha-1 as potassium sulfate and foliar application of mepiquat chloride (MC (0 and 48 + 24 g active ingredient ha-1 on seed, protein and oil yields and oil properties of Egyptian cotton cultivar “Giza 86” (Gossypium barbadense. After applying the higher N-rate, foliar application of potassium and plant growth retardant MC significantly increased seed yield and the content of seed protein and oil, seed oil refractive index, unsaponifiable matter and total unsaturated fatty acids (oleic and linoleic. In contrast, oil acid and saponification value as well as total saturated fatty acids were decreased by foliar application of potassium and MC. The seed oil content was decreased with soil application of N.El objetivo de los experimentos de campo fue investigar el efecto del nitrogeno, potasio y retardantes del crecimiento de plantas sobre el contenido en proteínas y aceite de una semilla de algodón cultivada en Egipto (Gossypium barbadense Giza 86. Los tratamientos consistieron en la aplicación en suelo de N (95 and 143 kg N ha-1 en forma de nitrato amónico, aplicación foliar de K (0, 319, 638 or 957 g K ha-1 como sulfato potásico y aplicación foliar de cloruro de m mepiquat (MC (0 and 48 + 24 g de ingrediente activo ha-1 sobre un cultivar de algodón «Giza 86» (Gossypium barbadense. La aplicación de la cantidad más elevada de N, unida a la aplicación de potasio y del retardador MC, aumentó significativamente el rendimiento en semilla, así como el contenido en proteinas y en aceite. Respecto al aceite, aumentó el índice de refracción, la fracci

  5. Radioactivation method for simultaneous determination of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in plants and fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtun, J.L.; Miroshnikova, N.N.; Saveliev, I.B.; Sidorov, A.V.; Srapeniants, R.A.; Tsagolov, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    According to the invention, the radioactivation method for simultaneous determination of the nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium content in plants and fertilizers consists in exposing samples to be analyzed and standard samples to neutron irradiation and recording the spectra of the gamma radiation induced in said samples, whereupon the samples are laid aside for a period of time determined by the half-life of the interfering isotope. This is followed by again recording the spectra of the samples being analyzed and of the standard samples and superposing the first and second spectra of the samples being analyzed and of the standard samples. These spectra are then shifted relative to each other along the energy axis, and the contents of the elements being analyzed are determined by thus comparing the spectra of the samples being analyzed and of the standard samples

  6. Sap flow and sugar transport in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Green plants are Earth’s primary solar energy collectors. They harvest the energy of the Sun by converting light energy into chemical energy stored in the bonds of sugar molecules. A multitude of carefully orchestrated transport processes are needed to move water and minerals from the soil to sites...... of photosynthesis and to distribute energy-rich sugars throughout the plant body to support metabolism and growth. The long-distance transport happens in the plants’ vascular system, where water and solutes are moved along the entire length of the plant. In this review, the current understanding of the mechanism...... and the quantitative description of these flows are discussed, connecting theory and experiments as far as possible. The article begins with an overview of low-Reynolds-number transport processes, followed by an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of vascular transport in the phloem and xylem. Next, sugar...

  7. Modelling activity transport behavior in PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, Jim; McGurk, John; Dickinson, Shirley; Burrows, Robert; Hinds, Kelvin; Hussey, Dennis; Deshon, Jeff; Barrios Figueras, Joan Pau; Maldonado Sanchez, Santiago; Fernandez Lillo, Enrique; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    The activation and transport of corrosion products around a PWR circuit is a major concern to PWR plant operators as these may give rise to high personnel doses. The understanding of what controls dose rates on ex-core surfaces and shutdown releases has improved over the years but still several questions remain unanswered. For example the relative importance of particle and soluble deposition in the core to activity levels in the plant is not clear. Wide plant to plant and cycle to cycle variations are noted with no apparent explanations why such variations are observed. Over the past few years this group have been developing models to simulate corrosion product transport around a PWR circuit. These models form the basis for the latest version of the BOA code and simulate the movement of Fe and Ni around the primary circuit. Part of this development is to include the activation and subsequent transport of radioactive species around the circuit and this paper describes some initial modelling work in this area. A simple model of activation, release and deposition is described and then applied to explain the plant behaviour at Sizewell B and Vandellos II. This model accounts for activation in the core, soluble and particulate activity movement around the circuit and for activity capture ex-core on both the inner and outer oxides. The model gives a reasonable comparison with plant observations and highlights what controls activity transport in these plants and importantly what factors can be ignored. (authors)

  8. Contribution of non-exchangeable potassium forms and its accumulation in corn plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesquieu da S. Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The state of Paraíba, Brazil, has soils from well- to poorly-developed, in which potassium (K is found in different levels, forms and, consequently, with varying availability to plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of non-exchangeable K forms to corn plants in 12 soils from Paraíba state, along four successive cycles. The experimental design was completely randomized block with three replicates and the 24 treatments consisted of the combination between two K levels (0 and 100 mg dm-3 and 12 soils. Before and after each cycle, subsamples of 0.2 dm3 were collected in each pot for the determination of non-exchangeable K (Kne, exchangeable K (Ke and soluble K (Ks. For each cycle, dry matter production, dry matter K content and plant K content (absorbed K were determined. In the studied soils, the amounts of absorbed K after successive cycles were higher than the amounts of exchangeable K released, which shows the contribution of non-exchangeable K forms to corn nutrition.

  9. Regulation of renal Na+-K-ATPase in the rat: role of increased potassium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujais, S.K.; Chekal, M.A.; Hayslett, J.P.; Katz, A.I.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the alterations in collecting tubule Na + -K + -ATPase activity produced by sustained increments in dietary potassium in the rat and to evaluate the role of aldosterone in their generation. In adrenal-intact animals, feeding a high-potassium diet or administration of a high physiological dose of aldosterone, which simulates the delivery rate of this hormone during potassium loading, caused marked increments in Na + -K + -ATPase activity in the cortical collecting tubule (CCT) but had no effect on the enzyme in the inner stripe of the medullary collecting tubule (MCT). A significant increase in enzyme activity was also observed after smaller dietary potassium increments and after 4 days of dietary potassium load. In adrenalectomized rats provided with physiological replacement doses of corticosterone and aldosterone, Na + -K + -ATPase activity in both CCT and MCT was similar to that of adrenal-intact controls but remained unchanged after 7 days on the potassium-enriched (10-fold) diet. In contrast, adrenalectomized animals receiving the high physiological dose of aldosterone displayed an increase in Na + -K + -ATPase activity of CCT comparable with that of adrenal-intact animals, whereas the enzyme activity in the MCT was unaffected. In conclusion, 1) following chronic potassium loading Na + -K + -ATPase activity increases significantly in the CCT with no change in its activity in the inner stripe of the MCT; 2) this increase in enzyme activity occurs in a time-dependent fashion and in proportion to the potassium load; and 3) the stimulation of Na + -K + -ATPase activity in adrenal-replaced rats is facilitated by augmented levels of aldosterone, such as those actually observed in adrenal-intact rats subjected to chronic potassium loading

  10. Regulation of renal Na -K-ATPase in the rat: role of increased potassium transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujais, S.K.; Chekal, M.A.; Hayslett, J.P.; Katz, A.I.

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the alterations in collecting tubule Na -K -ATPase activity produced by sustained increments in dietary potassium in the rat and to evaluate the role of aldosterone in their generation. In adrenal-intact animals, feeding a high-potassium diet or administration of a high physiological dose of aldosterone, which simulates the delivery rate of this hormone during potassium loading, caused marked increments in Na -K -ATPase activity in the cortical collecting tubule (CCT) but had no effect on the enzyme in the inner stripe of the medullary collecting tubule (MCT). A significant increase in enzyme activity was also observed after smaller dietary potassium increments and after 4 days of dietary potassium load. In adrenalectomized rats provided with physiological replacement doses of corticosterone and aldosterone, Na -K -ATPase activity in both CCT and MCT was similar to that of adrenal-intact controls but remained unchanged after 7 days on the potassium-enriched (10-fold) diet. In contrast, adrenalectomized animals receiving the high physiological dose of aldosterone displayed an increase in Na -K -ATPase activity of CCT comparable with that of adrenal-intact animals, whereas the enzyme activity in the MCT was unaffected. In conclusion, 1) following chronic potassium loading Na -K -ATPase activity increases significantly in the CCT with no change in its activity in the inner stripe of the MCT; 2) this increase in enzyme activity occurs in a time-dependent fashion and in proportion to the potassium load; and 3) the stimulation of Na -K -ATPase activity in adrenal-replaced rats is facilitated by augmented levels of aldosterone, such as those actually observed in adrenal-intact rats subjected to chronic potassium loading.

  11. Potassium consumption by rice plant from different sources under salt stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, B.U.; Ali, A.; Mahmood, I.A.; Arshadullah, M.

    2010-01-01

    The study on usage of K+ by two rice cultivars (Cv. Shaheen and KS-282) from KNO/sub 3/, KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (5 mM each), with 60 mM NaCI under hydroponics conditions, showed that fresh mass of shoot (FMS), fresh mass of root (FMR), root/ shoot ratio of fresh and dry mass, relative water contents (RWC) and relative growth rate (RGR) were affected significantly (P=0.01) inconsistent relating to K+ sources under salt stress. The intake of K+ was the highest with application of KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ than KNO) and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ application. The transport of K+ was the highest with KH/sub 2/PO. than KNO) and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ application in Shaheen, whereas in var. KS-282 with K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. transport of K+ was higher than the other two sources. The utilisation of K+ was higher with KNO) than KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ and K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ application in Shaheen, whereas in KS-282, K+ utilisation with KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/. was higher than the other two sources. It was inferred that K+ consumption in shoot and root system of rice was dependent physio-genetically on potassium sources. (author)

  12. Plant nutrient transporter regulation in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen; Bechmann, I.E.

    2002-01-01

    of nutrition. Their down-regulation in mycorrhizal roots, therefore, would be predicted as a result of symbiotic function. A variety of studies on Pi- Zn- and ammonium- or nitrate-transporter genes from two plant species indirectly support this model. For example, one study showed that the expression...... of the high-affinity Pi-transporter MtPT2 within mycorrhizal roots of Medicago truncatula was inversely correlated with the concentration of P within the shoots, which suggested that P supply from the fungus influenced this gene's expression. However, there is some evidence that these plant nutrient...

  13. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness: results from an evaluation of Michigan's potassium iodide distribution program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Laura R; Stanbury, Martha; Manente, Susan

    2012-10-01

    In 2009, the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) made potassium iodide (KI), a nonprescription radio-protective drug, available by mailing vouchers redeemable at local pharmacies for KI tablets, at no cost to residents living within 10 miles of Michigan's 3 nuclear power plants (NPPs). MDCH conducted an evaluation of this program to determine Michigan's KI coverage and to assess general emergency preparedness among residents living near the NPPs. KI coverage was estimated based on redeemed voucher counts and the 2010 Census. Telephone surveys were administered to a random sample (N = 153) of residents living near Michigan's NPPs to evaluate general emergency preparedness, reasons for voucher use or nonuse, and KI knowledge. Only 5.3% of eligible residences redeemed KI vouchers. Most surveyed residents (76.5%) were aware of living near an NPP, yet 42.5% reported doing "nothing" to plan for an emergency. Almost half of surveyed voucher users did not know when to take KI or which body part KI protects. Among voucher nonusers, 48.0% were either unaware of the program or did not remember receiving a voucher. Additional efforts are needed to ensure that all residents are aware of the availability of KI and that recipients of the drug understand when and why it should be taken. Minimal emergency planning among residents living near Michigan's NPPs emphasizes the need for increased emergency preparedness and awareness. Findings are particularly salient given the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant emergency in Japan.

  14. Potassium in the Grape (Vitis vinifera L. Berry: Transport and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzy Y. Rogiers

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available K+ is the most abundant cation in the grape berry. Here we focus on the most recent information in the long distance transport and partitioning of K+ within the grapevine and postulate on the potential role of K+ in berry sugar accumulation, berry water relations, cellular growth, disease resistance, abiotic stress tolerance and mitigating senescence. By integrating information from several different plant systems we have been able to generate new hypotheses on the integral functions of this predominant cation and to improve our understanding of how these functions contribute to grape berry growth and ripening. Valuable contributions to the study of K+ in membrane stabilization, turgor maintenance and phloem transport have allowed us to propose a mechanistic model for the role of this cation in grape berry development.

  15. Potassium solubilizing bacteria-assisted phytoextraction of radiocesium on pechay plants grown in cesium contaminated Fukushima Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rallos, R.V.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the efficiency of metal uptake by plants is important to achieve successful phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils. The presence of potassium solubilizing bacteria (KSB) increases the solubilization of K-containing minerals thereby enhancing the availability of potassium (K+) and other cations including radicesium (137Cs+) for plant uptake. In this study, five KSB isolates were obtained from soybean rhizosphere in Fukushima radiocesium contaminated soils. Based on biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the bacteria were identified as Bacillus megaterium, Pseudomonas putida, P. frederiksbergensis, Burkholderia sabiae, and P. mandelii. The KSB isolates were evaluated for plant growth promotion, potassium (K) uptake and radiocesium phytoextraction of pechay in three different cesium-contaminated Fukushima soils. Inoculation with KSB showed beneficial effects on plant growth and increased the phytoextraction of radiocesium, with much greater magnitude in roots than in shoots. The results indicated that KSB inoculation may be essential in managing radiocesium-contaminated soils and manipulating the transfer from soils to plants.(author)

  16. Plant uptake and transport of 241Am

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Mueller, R.T. Sr.; soufi, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    We conducted several experiments with 241 Am to obtain a more complete understanding of how this transuranium element is absorbed and transported in plants. In a plant species (Tamarix pentandra Pall.) that has salt glands in the leaves excreting NaCl and other ions, 241 Am was not pumped through these glands. Cyanide, which forms complexes with any metals, when applied to a calcareous soil, greatly increased the transport of 241 Am into stems and leaves of bush bean plants. Radioactive cyanide ( 14 C) was also transported to leaves and stems. When radish was grown in both calcareous and noncalcareous soils, 241 Am appeared to be fixed on the peel so firmly that it was resistant to removal by HNO 3 washing. The chelating agent DTPA induced increased transport of 241 Am to leaves and into the fleshy roots of the radish. Data for Golden Cross hybrid corn grown in solution culture showed at least seven times as much 241 Am transport to the xylem exudatields are corrected by recovery of added tracers

  17. Plant essential oils and potassium metabisulfite as repellents for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, Justin M.; Wright, Derek; Buitenhuis, Rose; Hallett, Rebecca H.

    2016-01-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is a globally invasive pest of soft-skinned fruit. Females oviposit into ripening fruit and larvae cause direct destruction of tissues. As many plant essential oils are permitted food additives, they may provide a safe means of protecting fruit from D. suzukii infestation in both conventional and organic production systems. Twelve oils and potassium metabisulfite (KMS) were screened in the laboratory as repellents for D. suzukii flies. Most essential oils deterred D. suzukii flies from cotton wicks containing attractive raspberry juice. Peppermint oil was particularly effective, preventing almost all flies from contacting treated wicks and remaining 100% repellent for 6 d post-application. Thyme oil was unique because it caused high male mortality and reduced the number of responding flies compared to other oils. KMS was not found to be repellent to D. suzukii, but may have fumigant properties, particularly at high concentrations. Peppermint oil appears to be the best candidate for field testing to determine the effectiveness and feasibility of using essential oils as part of a push-pull management strategy against D. suzukii. This is the first time that essential oils have been evaluated and proven effective in preventing fruit-infesting flies from contacting attractive stimuli. PMID:26893197

  18. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  19. Electrical Transport Ability of Nanostructured Potassium-Doped Titanium Oxide Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Yoon; Matsuno, Ryosuke; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takai, Madoka

    2011-02-01

    Potassium-doped nanostructured titanium oxide films were fabricated using a wet corrosion process with various KOH solutions. The doped condition of potassium in TiO2 was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Nanotubular were synthesized at a dopant concentration of 0.27%, these structures disappeared. To investigate the electrical properties of K-doped TiO2, pseudo metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) samples were fabricated. The samples exhibited a distinct electrical behavior and p-type characteristics. The electrical behavior was governed by the volume of the dopant when the dopant concentration was 0.18%.

  20. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    Due to the sessile nature of plants, it is crucial for their survival and growth that they can handle a constantly changing, and thus stressful, ambient environment by modifying their structure and metabolism. The central metabolism of plants is characterized by many alternative options...... for metabolic pathways, which allow a wide range of adjustments of metabolic processes in response to environmental variations. Many of the metabolic pathways in plants involve the processing of redox compounds and the use of adenylates. They converge at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) where...... redox compounds from carbon degradation are used for powering ATP synthesis. The standard ETC contains three sites of energy conservation in complexes I, III, and IV, which are in common with most other eukaryotes. However, the complexity of the plant metabolic system is mirrored in the ETC. In addition...

  1. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  2. Measuring calcium, potassium, and nitrate in plant nutrient solutions using ion-selective electrodes in hydroponic greenhouse of some vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardar, Gökay; Altıkatoğlu, Melda; Ortaç, Deniz; Cemek, Mustafa; Işıldak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Generally, the life cycle of plants depends on the uptake of essential nutrients in a balanced manner and on toxic elements being under a certain concentration. Lack of control of nutrient levels in nutrient solution can result in reduced plant growth and undesired conditions such as blossom-end rot. In this study, sensitivity and selectivity tests for various polyvinylchloride (PVC)-based ion-selective membranes were conducted to identify those suitable for measuring typical concentration ranges of macronutrients, that is, NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+), in hydroponic solutions. The sensitivity and selectivity of PVC-membrane-based ion-selective sensors prepared with tetradodecylammoniumnitrate for NO(3-), valinomycin for K(+), and Ca ionophore IV for Ca(2+) were found to be satisfactory for measuring NO(3-), K(+), and Ca(2+) ions in nutrient solutions over typical ranges of hydroponic concentrations. Potassium, calcium, and nitrate levels that were utilized by cucumber and tomato seedlings in the greenhouse were different. The findings show that tomato plants consumed less amounts of nitrate than cucumber plants over the first 2 months of their growth. We also found that the potassium intake was higher than other nutritional elements tested for all plants. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Transport properties of a potassium-doped single-wall carbon nanotube rope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R. S.; Kim, H. J.; Fischer, J. E.; Lefebvre, J.; Radosavljevic, M.; Hone, J.; Johnson, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Four-probe resistance vs temperature and gate voltage are reported for an individual single-wall carbon nanotube rope before and after doping in situ with potassium. All the features in R(T) from unoriented bulk material, before and after doping, are qualitatively reproduced by the rope data. The 5.3 K conductance of the pristine rope decreases with positive gate voltage, while G vs V g becomes featureless after K doping. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. etermination of Nitrate, Potassium, and Calcium using Ion-Selective Sensors in Soilless Plant Growth Media of Some Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda ALTIKATOĞLU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since it is important to transfer the minerals desired by plants for a long time in a controlled manner, simple and economical new micro and macro scale agricultural production systems are needed. In this study, the nutrients in the plant nutrient solutionwere kept at the required level according to the needs of the plant, using computer controlled potentiometric micro-sized chemical sensor systems. Polyvinylchloride (PVC -based ion-selective sensors have been used to sensitively and selectively measure the concentration of macro nutrient NO3−, K+, and Ca2+ions in the hydroponic solution. It has been found that the nitrate, potassium and calcium ion levels required for the green pepper and eggplants grown in the greenhouse are different. The results showed that in the first two months of growth, the pepper consumed nitrate in a lesser amount than the eggplant. In addition, it was determined that the amount of potassium consumed by plants was higher than that of other nutrients.

  5. Universality of phloem transport in seed plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Liesche, Johannes; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    predictions. The compiled data allowed calculating stem sieve element conductivity and predicting phloem sap flow velocity. The central finding of this work is that all vascular plants seem to have evolved efficient osmotic pumping units, despite their huge disparity in size and morphology. This contribution......Since Münch in the 1920s proposed that sugar transport in the phloem vascular system is driven by osmotic pressure gradients, his hypothesis has been strongly supported by evidence from herbaceous angiosperms. Experimental constraints made it difficult to test this proposal in large trees, where...

  6. Polar transport in plants mediated by membrane transporters: focus on mechanisms of polar auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    Directional cell-to-cell transport of functional molecules, called polar transport, enables plants to sense and respond to developmental and environmental signals. Transporters that localize to plasma membranes (PMs) in a polar manner are key components of these systems. PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, which are the most studied polar-localized PM proteins, are implicated in the polar transport of auxin that in turn regulates plant development and tropic growth. In this review, the regulatory mechanisms underlying polar localization of PINs, control of auxin efflux activity, and PIN abundance at PMs are considered. Up to date information on polar-localized nutrient transporters that regulate directional nutrient movement from soil into the root vasculature is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of potassium in several plants and study of potassium transfer to different beverages, including tequila, by measurement of 40K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete, J.M.; Muller, G.; Cabrera, L.; Martinez, T.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of 40 K was used for determination of potassium concentrations in leaves of agave and maguey cactus leaves, and coffee beans of various origins. The procedure was also used to study potassium transfer to tequila (alcoholic drink made of agave cactus), and the cactus and coffee infusions using 40 K as a natural radioactive tracer. Counting of 40 K in Marinelli containers with the aid of a low background NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system for 12-24 hours was employed. The method appeared to be simple and suitable for determination of potassium concentrations in large samples, which eliminates homogeneity problems. (author)

  8. Gas Transport and Exchange through Wetland Plant Aerenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Aerenchyma, the large airspaces in aquatic plants, is a rapid gas transport pathway between atmosphere and soil in wetlands. Oxygen transport aerates belowground tissue and oxidizes rhizosphere soil, an important process in wetland biogeochemistry. Most plant O2 transport occurs by diffusion...

  9. Involvement of Potassium Transport Systems in the Response of Synechocystis PCC 6803 Cyanobacteria to External pH Change, High-Intensity Light Stress and Heavy Metal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Segalla, Anna; Sato, Yuki; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Szabo, Ildiko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    The unicellular photosynthetic cyanobacterium, able to survive in varying environments, is the only prokaryote that directly converts solar energy and CO2 into organic material and is thus relevant for primary production in many ecosystems. To maintain the intracellular and intrathylakoid ion homeostasis upon different environmental challenges, the concentration of potassium as a major intracellular cation has to be optimized by various K(+)uptake-mediated transport systems. We reveal here the specific and concerted physiological function of three K(+)transporters of the plasma and thylakoid membranes, namely of SynK (K(+)channel), KtrB (Ktr/Trk/HKT) and KdpA (Kdp) in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, under specific stress conditions. The behavior of the wild type, single, double and triple mutants was compared, revealing that only Synk contributes to heavy metal-induced stress, while only Ktr/Kdp is involved in osmotic and salt stress adaptation. With regards to pH shifts in the external medium, the Kdp/Ktr uptake systems play an important role in the adaptation to acidic pH. Ktr, by affecting the CO2 concentration mechanism via its action on the bicarbonate transporter SbtA, might also be responsible for the observed effects concerning high-light stress and calcification. In the case of illumination with high-intensity light, a synergistic action of Kdr/Ktp and SynK is required in order to avoid oxidative stress and ensure cell viability. In summary, this study dissects, using growth tests, measurement of photosynthetic activity and analysis of ultrastructure, the physiological role of three K(+)transporters in adaptation of the cyanobacteria to various environmental changes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Plant ABC transporters enable many unique aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Jae-Ung; Song, Won-Yong; Hong, Daewoong

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial plants have two to four times more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes than other organisms, including their ancestral microalgae. Recent studies found that plants harboring mutations in these transporters exhibit dramatic phenotypes, many of which are related to developmental...... to propose that diverse ABC transporters enabled many unique and essential aspects of a terrestrial plant's lifestyle, by transporting various compounds across specific membranes of the plant....

  11. High brightness potassium ion gun for the HIF neutralized transport experiment (NTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.

    2003-01-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. To focus a high intensity beam to a small spot requires a high brightness beam. In the NTX experiment, a potassium ion beam of up to 400 keV and 80 mA is generated in a Pierce type diode. At the diode exit, an aperture with variable size provides the capability to vary the beam perveance and to significantly reduce the beam emittance. We shall report on the gun characterization including current density profile, phase space distributions and the control of electrons generated by the beam scraping at the aperture. Comparison with particle simulations using the EGUN code will be presented

  12. Temperature effect in potassium and nitrate ions in soil transport Efeito da temperatura no transporte dos íons potássio e nitrato no solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano D. M. A. Gonçalves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available When doing researches on solute dynamics in porous medium, the knowledge of medium characteristics and percolating liquids, as well as of external factors is very important. An important external factor is temperature and, in this sense, our purpose was determining potassium and nitrate transport parameters for different values of temperature, in miscible displacement experiments. Evaluated parameters were retardation factor (R, diffusion/dispersion coefficient (D and dispersivity, at ambient temperature (25 up to 28 ºC, 40 ºC and 50 ºC. Salts used were potassium nitrate and potassium chlorate, prepared in a solution made up of 5 ppm nitrate and 2.000 ppm potassium, with Red-Yellow Latosol porous medium. Temperature exhibited a positive influence upon porous medium solution and upon dispersion coefficient.No estudo da dinâmica de solutos num meio poroso, é de suma importância o conhecimento das propriedades do meio e dos líquidos percolantes, bem como de fatores externos. Um fator externo relevante é a temperatura e, nesse sentido, teve-se como objetivo determinar os parâmetros de transporte dos íons potássio e nitrato para diferentes valores de temperatura em experimentos de deslocamento miscível. Os parâmetros avaliados foram o fator de retardamento (R, o coeficiente de difusão/dispersão (D e a dispersividade (λ , e as temperaturas utilizadas foram a ambiente (25 a 28 ºC, 40 ºC e 50 ºC. Os sais utilizados foram nitrato de potássio e cloreto de potássio, preparados em solução composta de 50 ppm de nitrato e 2.000 ppm de potássio, sendo o meio poroso um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo, textura média. A temperatura apresentou influência positiva na velocidade da solução no meio poroso e no coeficiente de dispersão.

  13. Potassium as an intrinsic uncoupler of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe

    The plant plasma membrane proton pump (H(+)-ATPase) is stimulated by potassium, but it has remained unclear whether potassium is actually transported by the pump or whether it serves other roles. We now show that K(+) is bound to the proton pump at a site involving Asp(617) in the cytoplasmic...

  14. Estimation of internal dose due to potassium-40 in dietary items over one decade around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, B.S.; Rajan, P.S.; Vijayakumar, B.; Thomas, G.; Balamurugan, M.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    The radioactivity measurement of food crops and dietary items were carried out as a part of base line data collection around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant from 2004 to 2013. The major natural radionuclide present in all dietary items is Potassium-40. Natural potassium comprises of three isotopes, 39 K (93.26%), 40 K (0.0117 %), and 41 K (6.73 %). 40 K radioactive has a radioactive half life of 1.248 x 10 9 y. In ∼89% transitions, it emits a β-particle with a maximum energy of 1.33 MeV and in 11% of transitions; it emits a gamma photon of 1.461 MeV. Being ubiquitous, 40 K gives radiation dose to all human beings. It is an important radionuclide in terms of the dose associated with naturally occurring radionuclides. The objective of this work is to investigate the natural radioactivity level of 40 K in some selected major food crops which are locally grown and evaluate the annual ingestion dose to the members of the public around Kudankulam

  15. Potassium and calcium application ameliorates growth and oxidative homeostasis in salt-stressed indian mustard (brassica juncea) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, P. Y.; Ahmad, A.; Hemant, M.; Ganie, A. H.; Iqbal, M.; Aref, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) on growth and antioxidant defence system of salt-stressed Indian mustard plants was studied. Twenty-day-old Indian mustard plants grown hydroponically in Hoagland growth medium were randomly divided into five groups. To served as control and did not receive any additional K or Ca (except that present in Hoagland solution), T1 received 150 mM NaCl, T2 was given an additional doze of 6 mM K, T3 was given 5.6 mM Ca as additional doze, while as T4 received a combination of 150 mM NaCl + 6 mM K + 5.6 mM Ca. The response of the plants was studied ten days after treatment. Salt stress inhibited growth parameters including biomass, chlorophyll content, protein content and NR activity. Membrane damage was induced by the salt treatment with a concurrent increase in antioxidant defence system and proline content. Individual application of K and Ca mitigated the negative influence of the stress with the maximum alleviating potential exhibited by the combined application of these nutrients. Results obtained on real time expression of genes encoding enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, APX, CAT and GR), NR and proline supported our findings with biochemical assays. We conclude from the study that maintaining high K and Ca levels may serve as an effective means for regulating the growth and productivity of Indian mustard plants under saline conditions. (author)

  16. Induction of Defense-Related Physiological and Antioxidant Enzyme Response against Powdery Mildew Disease in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) Plant by Using Chitosan and Potassium Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mona H; El-Mohamedy, Riad S R

    2017-12-01

    Foliar sprays of three plant resistance inducers, including chitosan (CH), potassium sorbate (PS) (C 6 H 7 kO 2 ), and potassium bicarbonates (PB) (KHCO 3 ), were used for resistance inducing against Erysiphe cichoracearum DC (powdery mildew) infecting okra plants. Experiments under green house and field conditions showed that, the powdery mildew disease severity was significantly reduced with all tested treatments of CH, PS, and PB in comparison with untreated control. CH at 0.5% and 0.75% (w/v) plus PS at 1.0% and 2.0% and/or PB at 2.0% or 3.0% recorded as the most effective treatments. Moreover, the highest values of vegetative studies and yield were observed with such treatments. CH and potassium salts treatments reflected many compounds of defense singles which leading to the activation power defense system in okra plant. The highest records of reduction in powdery mildew were accompanied with increasing in total phenolic, protein content and increased the activity of polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase, chitinase, and β-1,3-glucanase in okra plants. Meanwhile, single treatments of CH, PS, and PB at high concentration (0.75%, 2.0%, and/or 3.0%) caused considerable effects. Therefore, application of CH and potassium salts as natural and chemical inducers by foliar methods can be used to control of powdery mildew disease at early stages of growth and led to a maximum fruit yield in okra plants.

  17. Potassium influx and efflux of 2,4-D and MCPA-treated rice plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zsoldos, F.; Haunold, E.

    1976-10-01

    A study was made of the effects of the herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA on the ion uptake, leakage and growth of rice seedlings. The isotopically-labelled solution contained different concentrations of 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) or MCPA (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid). It was established that in the presence of 10 -4 M 2,4-D or MCPA the potassium ion uptake was effectively inhibited, while the K-ion leakage from the roots occurred only at 10 -3 M treatment. The growth of the rice seedlings was markedly retarded even at lower (10 -6 M) concentrations, and the roots and shoots tolerated the herbidie-treatment to different extents. At 10 -8 M herbicide concentration, the effects exhibited were not injurious, but rather favourable. Reduction in root length by herbicides was not in accordance with dry matter production. (author)

  18. Evolutionary relationships and functional diversity of plant sulfate transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eTakahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate is an essential nutrient cycled in nature. Ion transporters that specifically facilitate the transport of sulfate across the membranes are found ubiquitously in living organisms. The phylogenetic analysis of known sulfate transporters and their homologous proteins from eukaryotic organisms indicate two evolutionarily distinct groups of sulfate transport systems. One major group named Tribe 1 represents yeast and fungal SUL, plant SULTR and animal SLC26 families. The evolutionary origin of SULTR family members in land plants and green algae is suggested to be common with yeast and fungal sulfate transporters (SUL and animal anion exchangers (SLC26. The lineage of plant SULTR family is expanded into four subfamilies (SULTR1 to SULTR4 in land plant species. By contrast, the putative SULTR homologues from Chlorophyte green algae are in two separate lineages; one with the subfamily of plant tonoplast-localized sulfate transporters (SULTR4, and the other diverged before the appearance of lineages for SUL, SULTR and SLC26. There also was a group of yet undefined members of putative sulfate transporters in yeast and fungi divergent from these major lineages in Tribe 1. The other distinct group is Tribe 2, primarily composed of animal sodium-dependent sulfate/carboxylate transporters (SLC13 and plant tonoplast-localized dicarboxylate transporters (TDT. The putative sulfur-sensing protein (SAC1 and SAC1-like transporters (SLT of Chlorophyte green algae, bryophyte and lycophyte show low degrees of sequence similarities with SLC13 and TDT. However, the phylogenetic relationship between SAC1/SLT and the other two families, SLC13 and TDT in Tribe 2, is not clearly supported. In addition, the SAC1/SLT family is completely absent in the angiosperm species analyzed. The present study suggests distinct evolutionary trajectories of sulfate transport systems for land plants and green algae.

  19. Evolutionary relationships and functional diversity of plant sulfate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideki; Buchner, Peter; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate is an essential nutrient cycled in nature. Ion transporters that specifically facilitate the transport of sulfate across the membranes are found ubiquitously in living organisms. The phylogenetic analysis of known sulfate transporters and their homologous proteins from eukaryotic organisms indicate two evolutionarily distinct groups of sulfate transport systems. One major group named Tribe 1 represents yeast and fungal SUL, plant SULTR, and animal SLC26 families. The evolutionary origin of SULTR family members in land plants and green algae is suggested to be common with yeast and fungal SUL and animal anion exchangers (SLC26). The lineage of plant SULTR family is expanded into four subfamilies (SULTR1-SULTR4) in land plant species. By contrast, the putative SULTR homologs from Chlorophyte green algae are in two separate lineages; one with the subfamily of plant tonoplast-localized sulfate transporters (SULTR4), and the other diverged before the appearance of lineages for SUL, SULTR, and SLC26. There also was a group of yet undefined members of putative sulfate transporters in yeast and fungi divergent from these major lineages in Tribe 1. The other distinct group is Tribe 2, primarily composed of animal sodium-dependent sulfate/carboxylate transporters (SLC13) and plant tonoplast-localized dicarboxylate transporters (TDT). The putative sulfur-sensing protein (SAC1) and SAC1-like transporters (SLT) of Chlorophyte green algae, bryophyte, and lycophyte show low degrees of sequence similarities with SLC13 and TDT. However, the phylogenetic relationship between SAC1/SLT and the other two families, SLC13 and TDT in Tribe 2, is not clearly supported. In addition, the SAC1/SLT family is absent in the angiosperm species analyzed. The present study suggests distinct evolutionary trajectories of sulfate transport systems for land plants and green algae.

  20. Sugar Transporters in Plants: New Insights and Discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Benjamin T; Leach, Kristen A; Tran, Thu M; Mertz, Rachel A; Braun, David M

    2017-09-01

    Carbohydrate partitioning is the process of carbon assimilation and distribution from source tissues, such as leaves, to sink tissues, such as stems, roots and seeds. Sucrose, the primary carbohydrate transported long distance in many plant species, is loaded into the phloem and unloaded into distal sink tissues. However, many factors, both genetic and environmental, influence sucrose metabolism and transport. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of sugar transporters and sucrose metabolic enzymes is key to improving agriculture. In this review, we highlight recent findings that (i) address the path of phloem loading of sucrose in rice and maize leaves; (ii) discuss the phloem unloading pathways in stems and roots and the sugar transporters putatively involved; (iii) describe how heat and drought stress impact carbohydrate partitioning and phloem transport; (iv) shed light on how plant pathogens hijack sugar transporters to obtain carbohydrates for pathogen survival, and how the plant employs sugar transporters to defend against pathogens; and (v) discuss novel roles for sugar transporters in plant biology. These exciting discoveries and insights provide valuable knowledge that will ultimately help mitigate the impending societal challenges due to global climate change and a growing population by improving crop yield and enhancing renewable energy production. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Plant adaptation to fluctuating environment and biomass production are strongly dependent on guard cell potassium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaudy, Anne; Vavasseur, Alain; Hosy, Eric; Dreyer, Ingo; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Simonneau, Thierry; Sentenac, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    At least four genes encoding plasma membrane inward K+ channels (Kin channels) are expressed in Arabidopsis guard cells. A double mutant plant was engineered by disruption of a major Kin channel gene and expression of a dominant negative channel construct. Using the patch-clamp technique revealed that this mutant was totally deprived of guard cell Kin channel (GCKin) activity, providing a model to investigate the roles of this activity in the plant. GCKin activity was found to be an essential effector of stomatal opening triggered by membrane hyperpolarization and thereby of blue light-induced stomatal opening at dawn. It improved stomatal reactivity to external or internal signals (light, CO2 availability, and evaporative demand). It protected stomatal function against detrimental effects of Na+ when plants were grown in the presence of physiological concentrations of this cation, probably by enabling guard cells to selectively and rapidly take up K+ instead of Na+ during stomatal opening, thereby preventing deleterious effects of Na+ on stomatal closure. It was also shown to be a key component of the mechanisms that underlie the circadian rhythm of stomatal opening, which is known to gate stomatal responses to extracellular and intracellular signals. Finally, in a meteorological scenario with higher light intensity during the first hours of the photophase, GCKin activity was found to allow a strong increase (35%) in plant biomass production. Thus, a large diversity of approaches indicates that GCKin activity plays pleiotropic roles that crucially contribute to plant adaptation to fluctuating and stressing natural environments. PMID:18367672

  2. Radiocesium contamination behavior and its effect on potassium absorption in tropical or subtropical plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Cep 24210-340 (Brazil); Anjos, R.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Cep 24210-340 (Brazil)]. E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.br; Mosquera, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Cep 24210-340 (Brazil); Macario, K. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Cep 24210-340 (Brazil); Veiga, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Cep 24210-340 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The accumulation and long-term decline of radiocesium contamination in tropical plant species was studied through measurements of gamma-ray spectra from pomegranate (Punica granatum) and chili pepper (Capsicum fructescens) trees. The plants were originally grown at a {sup 137}Cs contaminated site (where a radiological accident occurred in the city of Goiania, Brazil, in 1987), and transplanted to uncontaminated soil, so that the main source of contamination of the new leaves and fruits would be the fraction of the available radiocesium in the body of the plants. Measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 4}K concentrations along the roots, main trunk, twigs, leaves and fruits before and after the transplant process of both plant species indicated a direct competition between Cs and K ions, suggesting that these elements could have a common accumulation mechanism. Cesium transfer factors from soil to pomegranate, green and red chili pepper fruits were evaluated as 0.4 {+-} 0.1, 0.06 {+-} 0.01 and 0.05 {+-} 0.01, respectively. Biological half-life values due to {sup 137}Cs translocation from the tree reservoir (BHL{sub T}) were calculated as 0.30 years for pomegranate, 0.12 years and 0.07 years for red and green peppers, respectively.

  3. Radiocesium contamination behavior and its effect on potassium absorption in tropical or subtropical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, C.; Anjos, R.M.; Mosquera, B.; Macario, K.; Veiga, R.

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation and long-term decline of radiocesium contamination in tropical plant species was studied through measurements of gamma-ray spectra from pomegranate (Punica granatum) and chili pepper (Capsicum fructescens) trees. The plants were originally grown at a 137 Cs contaminated site (where a radiological accident occurred in the city of Goiania, Brazil, in 1987), and transplanted to uncontaminated soil, so that the main source of contamination of the new leaves and fruits would be the fraction of the available radiocesium in the body of the plants. Measurements of 137 Cs and 4 K concentrations along the roots, main trunk, twigs, leaves and fruits before and after the transplant process of both plant species indicated a direct competition between Cs and K ions, suggesting that these elements could have a common accumulation mechanism. Cesium transfer factors from soil to pomegranate, green and red chili pepper fruits were evaluated as 0.4 ± 0.1, 0.06 ± 0.01 and 0.05 ± 0.01, respectively. Biological half-life values due to 137 Cs translocation from the tree reservoir (BHL T ) were calculated as 0.30 years for pomegranate, 0.12 years and 0.07 years for red and green peppers, respectively

  4. Nutrient Release, Plant Nutrition, and Potassium Leaching from Polymer-Coated Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Bley

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The increase in food consumption and limitations in food production areas requires improved fertilizer efficiency. Slow- or controlled-release fertilizers are an alternative for synchronizing nutrient availability with the plant demands, reducing losses to the environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of polymer-coated KCl compared with conventional KCl. The products were incubated in soil under controlled conditions to evaluate the time required for nutrient release. A greenhouse experiment was performed with corn plants in pots with loamy sand- or clay-textured soil types to evaluate plant nutrition and losses due to leaching. The K application rates were 0, 18, 36, and 54 mg dm-3. The pots were irrigated, and the percolated liquid was collected. The plants were harvested 30 days after sowing to quantify dry matter (DM and its K content. In the incubation study, the K release from the coated fertilizer was found to be 42 % over 154 days. The data were fit to a linear function from which a period of 315 days was estimated as required for the release of 75 % of the nutrient. Meanwhile, conventional KCl releases 85 % of the K nutrient in the first 48h. In the cultivation of plants in pots, the coating reduced K losses due to leaching in the loamy sand soil; however, only the application rate of 54 mg dm-3 promoted DM production equivalent to conventional KCl. It is possible that the need for K in the early stages of corn development was not met by a coated KCl.

  5. Effect of potassium application in drought-stressed tobacco (Nicotiana rustica L. plants: Comparison of root with foliar application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bahrami-Rad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of potassium (K application through leaves (LA or roots (RA was studied in tobacco plants grown under K deficiency and drought stress conditions. Application of K was effective in improving the shoot growth only under drought conditions, whereas root biomass and length responded under both watering regimes. Under drought conditions, photosynthesis and transpiration activities increased upon K application leading to a reduced water use efficiency. Both RA and LA increased the leaf water potential, relative water content and turgor under both well-watered and drought conditions; RA was more effective than LA in the recovery of leaf turgor. Analyses of water relation parameters in different aged leaves showed lower susceptibility of the middle-aged leaves to both K deficiency and drought stresses than the upper and lower leaves; this phenomenon was accompanied by a more conservative control of water loss in the middle-aged leaves. In contrast, proline was accumulated in the young leaves, and K application increased it further. Although various organic osmolytes were accumulated under the combinative effect of K deficiency and drought stress, they did not exceed the amounts found in the control (well-watered +K plants and were merely a result of the concentration effect. Collectively, our results revealed that the majority of leaf biochemical responses to drought stress are developmentally regulated processes. In addition, the alleviating effect of both RA and LA despite higher water loss indicated that an improved stomatal function upon K application allowed carbohydrates synthesis, thus, enhancing plant growth under water stress.

  6. Sucrose assimilation and the role of sucrose transporters in plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 7 (25), pp. ... Review. Sucrose assimilation and the role of sucrose transporters in plant wound response. Omodele ... Key words: Sucrose transporters, Plasma membrane, carbohydrate, sieve element, source-sink. ... pathogens (Paul et al., 2000) and results in a severe.

  7. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  8. Induction of Barley Silicon Transporter HvLsi1 and HvLsi2, increased silicon concentration in the shoot and regulated Starch and ABA Homeostasis under Osmotic stress and Concomitant Potassium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed A. Hosseini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the major stress factors reducing cereal production worldwide. There is ample evidence that the mineral nutrient status of plants plays a critical role in increasing plant tolerance to different biotic and abiotic stresses. In this regard, the important role of various nutrients e.g., potassium (K or silicon (Si in the mitigation of different stress factors, such as drought, heat or frost has been well documented. Si application has been reported to ameliorate plant nutrient deficiency. Here, we used K and Si either solely or in combination to investigate whether an additive positive effect on barley growth can be achieved under osmotic stress and which mechanisms contribute to a better tolerance to osmotic stress. To achieve this goal, barley plants were subjected to polyethylene glycol (PEG-induced osmotic stress under low or high K supply and two Si regimes. The results showed that barley silicon transporters HvLsi1 and HvLsi2 regulate the accumulation of Si in the shoot only when plant suffered from K deficiency. Si, in turn, increased the starch level under both osmotic stress and K deficiency and modulated the glycolytic and TCA pathways. Hormone profiling revealed that the beneficial effect of Si is most likely mediated also by ABA homeostasis and active cytokinin isopentenyl adenine (iP. We conclude that Si may effectively improve stress tolerance under K deficient condition in particular when additional stress like osmotic stress interferes.

  9. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saa, Sebastian; Olivos-Del Rio, Andres; Castro, Sebastian; Brown, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1) and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2). This experiment utilized 2-years-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 × 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 μg g(-1) of K vs. 5 μg g(-1)) and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2). Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants.

  10. Foliar application of microbial and plant based biostimulants increases growth and potassium uptake in almond (Prunus dulcis [Mill.] D. A. Webb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eSaa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biostimulants has become a common practice in agriculture. However, there is little peer-reviewed research on this topic. In this study we tested, under controlled and replicated conditions, the effect of one biostimulant derived from seaweed extraction (Bio-1 and another biostimulant derived from microbial fermentation (Bio-2. This experiment utilized two-year-old almond plants over two growing seasons in a randomized complete design with a full 2 x 4 factorial structure with two soil potassium treatments (125 µg g-1 of K vs 5 µg g-1 and four foliar treatments (No spray, Foliar-K, Bio-1, Bio-2. Rubidium was utilized as a surrogate for short-term potassium uptake and plant growth, nutrient concentration, and final plant biomass were evaluated. There was a substantial positive effect of both biostimulant treatments on total shoot leaf area, and significant increases in shoot length and biomass under adequate soil potassium supply with a positive effect of Bio-1 only under low K supply. Rubidium uptake was increased by Bio-1 application an effect that was greater under the low soil K treatment. Though significant beneficial effects of the biostimulants used on plant growth were observed, it is not possible to determine the mode of action of these materials. The results presented here illustrate the promise and complexity of research involving biostimulants.

  11. Accumulation and localization of sodium and potassium ions in maize plants on saline soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kabuzenko

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work is studying the accumulation and distribution of Na+ and K+ in maize hybrids of different salt tolerance under conditions of the chloride salinity. The new corn hybrid Veselka MV (salt-tolerant and Odessa 375 MB (not salt-tolerant were studied. The plants grown in salt-free chernozem soil are control. In the experiment, sodium chloride was dissolved in the irrigation water to form the salinity of test soils up to concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0% of ovendry weight. Soil moisture in the pots was maintained at 60% of the full field water capacity, the air temperature was +25…+27 °C, and the light – 10 klux. Plant samples were dried in the oven under 70 °C. Then, the average sample of 10 specimens was thoroughly levigated in the porcelain pounder  and dispersed in distilled water at 100 °C. The ions were extracted, and the extracts were centrifuged for 20 min at 3000 rpm. The ions content in the cell sap was analysed. Plant samples (1 g were incubated 10 min in chloroform, dried carefully with filter paper, and then the cell sap was squeezed. 1 ml of clear top layer of the cell sap was dissolved in 10 ml of distilled water. Ions content was determined by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer ("Karl Zeiss", Germany. Salt-tolerant maize hybrid Veselka MW (14 days age is characterized by an increased content of Na+ in the root tissues in comparison with the above-ground parts. In Odessa 375 MB hybrid this regularity is less pronounced. With the increase of sodium chloride concentration in the soil the content of Na+ in the aerial parts of plants rises. That may be connected with the reduced role of a root barrier. The salt-tolerant hybrid has a higher content of Na+ in the roots as compared to the above-ground parts. The content of K+ was higher in the above-ground parts, which is more pronounced in the salt-tolerant hybrid Veselka MB. The decrease of K+ in cell sap of the root under saline conditions was

  12. Use of on-ground gamma-ray spectrometry to measure plant-available potassium and other topsoil attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, M.T.F.; Harper, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of potassium (K) deficiency is increasing in crops, pastures, and forestry in south-western Australia. Although soil K can be measured using soil sampling and analysis, γ-ray spectrometry offers a potentially cheaper and spatially more precise alternative. This could be particularly useful in precision agriculture, where inputs are applied according to need rather than by general prescription. In a study of topsoils near Jerramungup, Western Australia, strong relationships (r 2 = 0.9) were found between on-ground counts of γ-rays derived from 40 K (γ-K) and both total K and plant-available K. The success of γ-ray spectrometry in predicting available K relied on a strong relationship (r 2 0.9) between total K and available K which may not hold in all areas. Although the relationship between γ-K and available K held over the range of 36-1012 mg/kg, crop response to K fertilisers is only expected when the available K content is 2 = 0.9) were also found between γ-K and a range of other soil attributes, including clay, silt, and organic carbon content. These relationships depended on the locally strong relationship between total K and these soil attributes. Since such relationships do not hold everywhere, the utility of γ-ray spectrometry will likewise be limited. Site-specific calibrations are required if γ-ray spectrometry is to be used for soil property mapping. Copyright (1999) CSIRO Publishing

  13. Gas Transport and Exchange through Wetland Plant Aerenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorrell, Brian Keith; Brix, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Aerenchyma, the large airspaces in aquatic plants, is a rapid gas transport pathway between atmosphere and soil in wetlands. Oxygen transport aerates belowground tissue and oxidizes rhizosphere soil, an important process in wetland biogeochemistry. Most plant O2 transport occurs by diffusion......, and the major challenge for its accurate measurement is avoiding disturbing small-scale gradients in O2 concentration and demand in the pathway. Small O2 sensors with rapid response times and high spatial resolution are the most popular methods for quantifying O2 transport and rhizosphere oxidation...... such as stirring of solutions. In some species, pressurized gas flows develop in shoots and rhizomes, and their contribution to gas fluxes can be assessed with pressure transducers and flow meters. Other gases produced in wetlands (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O) are also transported in aerenchyma. Their fluxes...

  14. Determination of total ribonucleotide pool in plant materials by high-pH anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography following extraction with potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riondet, Christophe; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard

    2005-06-10

    A new, improved method that only requires a potassium hydroxide extraction procedure is presented for the analysis of a full nucleotide pool in plant materials. Quantification was performed by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with UV detection after a potassium hydroxide extraction, and allowed the quantification of 13 linear ribonucleotides in a single run. The method has been validated by comparison of six extraction methods and also by measurement of the intracellular nucleotide levels of three plant species (cell cultures and leaves). The evolution of the nucleotide pool of Nicotiana tabacum cell culture during growth has also been measured, and showed an increase in the pool until the fifth day, where the growth rate reaches a maximum, after which a decrease was observed.

  15. Epigenetic suppression of potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 expression in inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-R; Cheng, J-K; Wu, C-H; Chen, K-H; Liu, C-K

    2017-02-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to the stimulus-evoked pain hypersensitivity that may be experienced after peripheral inflammation. Persistent pathological stimuli in many pain conditions affect the expression of certain genes through epigenetic alternations. The main purpose of our study was to investigate the role of epigenetic modification on potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2) gene expression in the persistence of inflammatory pain. Persistent inflammatory pain was induced through the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left hind paw of rats. Acetyl-histone H3 and H4 level was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation in the spinal dorsal horn. Pain behaviour and inhibitory synaptic function of spinal cord were determined before and after CFA injection. KCC2 expression was determined by real time RT-PCR and Western blot. Intrathecal KCC2 siRNA (2 μg per 10 μL per rat) or HDAC inhibitor (10 μg per 10 μL per rat) was injected once daily for 3 days before CFA injection. Persistent inflammatory pain epigenetically suppressed KCC2 expression through histone deacetylase (HDAC)-mediated histone hypoacetylation, resulting in decreased inhibitory signalling efficacy. KCC2 knock-down caused by intrathecal administration of KCC2 siRNA in naïve rats reduced KCC2 expression in the spinal cord, leading to sensitized pain behaviours and impaired inhibitory synaptic transmission in their spinal cords. Moreover, intrathecal HDAC inhibitor injection in CFA rats increased KCC2 expression, partially restoring the spinal inhibitory synaptic transmission and relieving the sensitized pain behaviour. These findings suggest that the transcription of spinal KCC2 is regulated by histone acetylation epigenetically following CFA. Persistent pain suppresses KCC2 expression through HDAC-mediated histone hypoacetylation and consequently impairs the inhibitory function of inhibitory interneurons. Drugs such as HDAC inhibitors that suppress the influences of

  16. Transportation of part supply improvement in agricultural machinery assembly plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saysaman, Anusit; Chutima, Parames

    2018-02-01

    This research focused on the problem caused by the transportation of part supply in agricultural machinery assembly plant in Thailand, which is one of the processes that are critical to the whole production process. If poorly managed, it will affect transportation of part supply, the emergence of sink cost, quality problems, and the ability to respond to the needs of the customers in time. Since the competition in the agricultural machinery market is more intense, the efficiency of part transportation process has to be improved. In this study, the process of transporting parts of the plant was studied and it was found that the efficiency of the process of transporting parts from the sub assembly line to its main assembly line was 83%. The approach to the performance improvement is done by using the Lean tool to limit wastes based on the ECRS principle and applying pull production system by changing the transportation method to operate as milkrun for transportation of parts to synchronize with the part demands of the main assembly line. After the transportation of parts from sub-assembly line to the main assembly line was improved, the efficiency raised to 98% and transportation process cost was saved to 540,000 Baht per year.

  17. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  18. Uptake and transport of chromium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; D'souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of chromium, an important soil and water pollutant, by five different plant species was examined in nutrient culture experiments using chromium-51 as a tracer. The concentration in aerial tissues of both trivalent and hexavalent forms of chromium was the greatest in peas followed by beans, tomato and the cereals over identical uptake periods. The uptake of 51 Cr 3+ was, in general, greater than 51 CrO 4 2- . Studies with bean plants indicated that shoot uptake of both forms of chromium decreased with increasing pH and salt concentration of the external solution. Concentrations of 10 -4 M and 10 -5 M DNP inhibited 51 Cr uptake by bean shoots. (author)

  19. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The transport of natural radionuclides from soil to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Conkic, Lj.; Slivka, J.; Krmar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The transport and accumulation processes of Ra-226, U-238, Th-232 and K-40 from soil to plants have been studied. Plant samples with consumable parts grown below surface have been bred in natural conditions on soil with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity (barren soil of the uranium mine Gabrovnica-Kalna). An intensive transport of heavy natural radionuclides from soil to the roots was established. The transfer factors for U-238 and Ra-226 have been much bigger than for Th-232. The most intensive uptake was registered for beet root. (author)

  1. 29 CFR 788.11 - “Transporting [such] products to the mill, processing plant, railroad, or other transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âTransporting [such] products to the mill, processing plant... EMPLOYED § 788.11 “Transporting [such] products to the mill, processing plant, railroad, or other transportation terminal.” The transportation or movement of logs or other forestry products to a “mill processing...

  2. Investigating water transport through the xylem network in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Koo; Park, Joonghyuk; Hwang, Ildoo

    2014-04-01

    Our understanding of physical and physiological mechanisms depends on the development of advanced technologies and tools to prove or re-evaluate established theories, and test new hypotheses. Water flow in land plants is a fascinating phenomenon, a vital component of the water cycle, and essential for life on Earth. The cohesion-tension theory (CTT), formulated more than a century ago and based on the physical properties of water, laid the foundation for our understanding of water transport in vascular plants. Numerous experimental tools have since been developed to evaluate various aspects of the CTT, such as the existence of negative hydrostatic pressure. This review focuses on the evolution of the experimental methods used to study water transport in plants, and summarizes the different ways to investigate the diversity of the xylem network structure and sap flow dynamics in various species. As water transport is documented at different scales, from the level of single conduits to entire plants, it is critical that new results be subjected to systematic cross-validation and that findings based on different organs be integrated at the whole-plant level. We also discuss the functional trade-offs between optimizing hydraulic efficiency and maintaining the safety of the entire transport system. Furthermore, we evaluate future directions in sap flow research and highlight the importance of integrating the combined effects of various levels of hydraulic regulation.

  3. Transport phenomena of nanoparticles in plants and animals/humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Moulick, Amitava; Heger, Zbynek; Kopel, Pavel; Zítka, Ondřej; Adam, Vojtech; Lukatkin, Alexander S; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Kizek, Rene

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a plethora nanoparticles with major biota such as plants and animals/humans has been the subject of various multidisciplinary studies with special emphasis on toxicity aspects. However, reports are meager on the transport phenomena of nanoparticles in the plant-animal/human system. Since plants and animals/humans are closely linked via food chain, discussion is imperative on the main processes and mechanisms underlying the transport phenomena of nanoparticles in the plant-animal/human system, which is the main objective of this paper. Based on the literature appraised herein, it is recommended to perform an exhaustive exploration of so far least explored aspects such as reproducibility, predictability, and compliance risks of nanoparticles, and insights into underlying mechanisms in context with their transport phenomenon in the plant-animal/human system. The outcomes of the suggested studies can provide important clues for fetching significant benefits of rapidly expanding nanotechnology to the plant-animal/human health-improvements and protection as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim eVolkov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarises current data concerning Na+ and K+ concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows to choose specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between nonselective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is

  5. The inhibitory effects of potassium chloride versus potassium silicate application on 137Cs uptake by rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Shigeto; Yoshioka, Kunio; Ota, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Sato, Makoto; Satou, Mutsuto

    2016-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company on 11 March 2011, potassium fertilizer was applied to agricultural fields in the southern Tohoku and northern Kanto regions of Japan to reduce the uptake of radiocesium by crops. In this study, we examined the effects of two types of potassium fertilizers, potassium chloride (a readily available potassium fertilizer) and potassium silicate (a slow-release potassium fertilizer), as well as a split application of potassium, on the accumulation of 137 Cs by rice plants in two pot experiments. The 137 Cs concentrations in the brown rice and in the above-ground plants were significantly lower after potassium chloride application than after potassium silicate application. The potassium ion (K + ) concentrations in soil solutions sampled 9 and 21 d after transplanting were significantly higher for the potassium chloride application than for the potassium silicate application. The K + concentrations in soil solutions observed in the application of potassium silicate were similar to those in the treatment when no potassium was applied. This finding indicates that the application of potassium silicate did not sufficiently increase the available K + for rice plants in the soil, which led to a greater uptake of 137 Cs after the potassium silicate application than after the application of potassium chloride. The 137 Cs concentration in brown rice was higher in the split application of potassium fertilizer with the second application at the full heading stage than that without split application and the split application with the second application before heading. - Highlights: • Potassium application reduced 137 Cs uptake by rice grown in pot experiments. • Readily available K fertilizer more effectively decreased brown rice 137 Cs concentration. • Potassium should be applied before heading to reduce brown rice 137 Cs concentration.

  6. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  7. Size effects on the transport coefficient of liquid lithium, sodium and potassium using a soft sphere potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebayo, G.A.; Anusionwu, B.C.

    2004-08-01

    The dependence of the self diffusion coefficient of atoms in liquid Lithium, Sodium and Potassium, interacting through a soft sphere potential, on the number of atoms have been investigated using Molecular Dynamics Simulation at various temperatures. Our calculations predict non-linear relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the number of particles at high densities and medium or low temperatures. The radial distribution function obtained agrees well with experiment. (author)

  8. Uses of the potassium permanganate to eliminate copper cyanide from waste water resulting from a lixiviation plant in a gold mine (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho, J. P.; Fernandez, B.; Ayala, J.; Garcia, M. P.; Lavandeira, A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of cyanide in the hydrometallurgical and chemical industries has led to the emergence of a major environmental problem due to its high toxicity. Te wastewater generated at these plants is hazardous to the environment and therefore must be managed properly. For this purpose, they undergo detoxification processes after lodes from the plant are accumulated in waste-resistant containment ponds that mast be waterproof to prevent environmental disasters from leakages or massive flood. This work shows the results obtained in laboratory tests carried out with plant waters and demonstrates the efficacy of potassium permanganate as an oxidant of cyanide wastewater from a gold hydrometallurgical plant. In the process the destruction of the copper cyanide complexes is solution is achieved and copper metal ions are eliminated through precipitation mostly as hydroxide. (Author) 28 refs.

  9. Classroom Techniques to Illustrate Water Transport in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakrim, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The transport of water in plants is among the most difficult and challenging concepts to explain to students. It is even more difficult for students enrolled in an introductory general biology course. An easy approach is needed to demonstrate this complex concept. I describe visual and pedagogical examples that can be performed quickly and easily…

  10. Uptake and transport of positron-emitting tracer in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Shimazu, Masamitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; and others

    1997-03-01

    The transport of a positron-emitting isotope introduced into a plant was dynamically followed by a special observation apparatus called `Positron-Emitting Tracer Imaging System`. In the system, annihilation {gamma}-rays from the positron emitter are detected with two planer detectors (5 x 6 cm square). The water containing ca. 5 MBq/ml of {sup 18}F was fed to the cut stem of soybean for 2 min and then the images of tracer activity were recorded for 30 - 50 min. When the midrib of a leaf near the petiole was cut just before measurement, the activity in the injured leaf was decreased but detected even at the apex. This result suggests that the damaged leaf recovered the uptake of water through the lamina. Maximum tracer activities in leaves of unirradiated plant were observed within 10 min, whereas those of irradiated plant at 100 Gy were observed after over 25 min. The final activity of irradiated plant after 30 min was lower than that of unirradiated plant. In case of beans, there was a difference in the absorption behavior of the {sup 18}F-labeled water between unirradiated and irradiated samples. These results show that the system is effective to observe the uptake and transportation of water containing positron emitting tracer for the study of damage and recovery functions of plants. (author)

  11. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin X. Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM. It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots – apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs, which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic. Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle. The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  12. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangmin X; Ranathunge, Kosala; Lee, Seulbi; Lee, Yejin; Lee, Deogbae; Sung, Jwakyung

    2018-01-01

    The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM). It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots - apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs), which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic). Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle). The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  13. Long-term effects of single potassium fertilization on 137Cs levels in plants and fungi in a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, K.; Vinichuk, M.; Nikolova, I.; Johanson, K.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the long-term effects of a single application of potassium (K) fertilizer (100 kg K ha -1 ) in 1992 on 137 Cs uptake in a forest ecosystem in central Sweden. 137 Cs activity concentrations were determined in three low-growing perennial shrubs, heather (Calluna vulgaris), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), and in four wild fungal species (Cortinarius semisanguineus, Lactarius rufus, Rozites caperata and Suillus variegatus). Uptake of 137 Cs by plants and fungi growing on K-fertilized plots 17 years after application of the K fertilizer was significantly lower than in corresponding species growing in a non-fertilized control area. The 137 Cs activity concentration was 21-58% lower in fungal sporocarps and 40-61% lower in plants in the K-fertilized area compared with the control. Over the study period, this decrease in 137 Cs activity concentration was more consistent in plants than in fungi, although the effect was statistically significant and strongly pronounced in all species. The effect of K fertilization in reducing 137 Cs activity concentration in fungi and plants decreased over time but was still significant in 2009, 17 years after fertilization. This suggests that application of K fertilizer to forests is an appropriate and effective long-term measure to decrease radiocaesium accumulation in plants and fungi. - Research highlights: → Effects of potassium fertilizer on 137 Cs uptake by plants and fungi are investigated. → 137 Cs activity concentrations in forest plants decreased even within the first year. → The most significant reduction occurred over the first 7-8 years. → The reduction in fungi was less pronounced, but still statistically significant.

  14. Removal of uranium and priority pollutant metals from Fernald Environmental Management Project wastewater utilizing potassium ferrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampshire, Lyle H.; Potts, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    A side-by-side treatment comparison between calcium hydroxide and TRU/Clear '4', a potassium ferrate based wastewater treatment chemical, was performed in a process wastewater and stormwater treatment facility. Results from the full-scale plant testing demonstrated that potassium ferrate could achieve the same treatment levels as calcium hydroxide while generating 55% less sludge than the calcium hydroxide treatment. The testing also showed that utilization of potassium ferrate would minimize the volume of sludge generated and assist in the reduction of total waste management costs associated with storage, monitoring, transportation, and final disposition of generated sludge. (author)

  15. Potassium distribution in sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work the distribution of potassium in sugarcane has been studied during its growth in two different conditions. In the first one the sugarcane soil was prepared with natural fertilizers, using sugarcane bagasse and, in another plantation the soil was prepared with commercial fertilizer NPK with a proportion of 10-10-10. For the measurement of potassium concentration in each part of the plant, gamma ray spectrometry techniques have been used to measure gamma-rays emitted from the radioisotope 40 K present in the sugarcane samples. The concentration of potassium in roots, stems and leaves were measured periodically. The results for sugarcane cultivated in soil with natural fertilizer show a higher concentration of potassium at the beginning of plant development and over time there is an oscillatory behavior in this concentration in each part of the plant, reaching a lower concentration in the adult plant. The results for the plant grown in soil with NPK fertilizer, indicate that the potassium concentration is higher in the stem at the beginning of cultivation and remained practically constant over time in various parts of the plant, with higher values in the leaves and stem than at the root. On the other hand, the results obtained using fertilizer NPK shows a lower potassium concentration, since the fertilizer provoked a much higher growth rate. (author)

  16. Chloroplast Iron Transport Proteins - Function and Impact on Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Millán, Ana F; Duy, Daniela; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated about three billion years ago by endosymbiosis of an ancestor of today's cyanobacteria with a mitochondria-containing host cell. During evolution chloroplasts of higher plants established as the site for photosynthesis and thus became the basis for all life dependent on oxygen and carbohydrate supply. To fulfill this task, plastid organelles are loaded with the transition metals iron, copper, and manganese, which due to their redox properties are essential for photosynthetic electron transport. In consequence, chloroplasts for example represent the iron-richest system in plant cells. However, improvement of oxygenic photosynthesis in turn required adaptation of metal transport and homeostasis since metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative damage. This is most acute in chloroplasts, where radicals and transition metals are side by side and ROS-production is a usual feature of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, on the one hand when bound by proteins, chloroplast-intrinsic metals are a prerequisite for photoautotrophic life, but on the other hand become toxic when present in their highly reactive, radical generating, free ionic forms. In consequence, transport, storage and cofactor-assembly of metal ions in plastids have to be tightly controlled and are crucial throughout plant growth and development. In the recent years, proteins for iron transport have been isolated from chloroplast envelope membranes. Here, we discuss their putative functions and impact on cellular metal homeostasis as well as photosynthetic performance and plant metabolism. We further consider the potential of proteomic analyses to identify new players in the field.

  17. Ionizing radiation action of transport systems of Na+ and K+ of neutronal membranes. Potassium ions reaccumulation with brain slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoretsky, A.I.; Shainskaya, A.M.; Ananyeva, T.V.; Kulikova, I.A.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on the Na,K pump of the surviving brain cortex slices was investigated. It was shown that IR leads to marked disturbances in the Na,K pump activity and causes essential phasic changes in potassium ion reaccumulation by brain slices in different time after exposure. The possibility of modelling the radiation effect with the help of phospholipase A2 and decylenic acid was shown. The mechanisms of the functional disturbance of Na-K pump of nerve cells after irradiation are under discussion. (author)

  18. Heavy Metals in Crop Plants: Transport and Redistribution Processes on the Whole Plant Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper, zinc, manganese, iron, nickel and molybdenum are essential micronutrients for plants. However, when present in excess they may damage the plant or decrease the quality of harvested plant products. Some other heavy metals such as cadmium, lead or mercury are not needed by plants and represent pollutants. The uptake into the roots, the loading into the xylem, the acropetal transport to the shoot with the transpiration stream and the further redistribution in the phloem are crucial for the distribution in aerial plant parts. This review is focused on long-distance transport of heavy metals via xylem and phloem and on interactions between the two transport systems. Phloem transport is the basis for the redistribution within the shoot and for the accumulation in fruits and seeds. Solutes may be transferred from the xylem to the phloem (e.g., in the small bundles in stems of cereals, in minor leaf veins. Nickel is highly phloem-mobile and directed to expanding plant parts. Zinc and to a lesser degree also cadmium are also mobile in the phloem and accumulate in meristems (root tips, shoot apex, axillary buds. Iron and manganese are characterized by poor phloem mobility and are retained in older leaves.

  19. The inhibitory effects of potassium chloride versus potassium silicate application on (137)Cs uptake by rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Shigeto; Yoshioka, Kunio; Ota, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Sato, Makoto; Satou, Mutsuto

    2016-03-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant owned by the Tokyo Electric Power Company on 11 March 2011, potassium fertilizer was applied to agricultural fields in the southern Tohoku and northern Kanto regions of Japan to reduce the uptake of radiocesium by crops. In this study, we examined the effects of two types of potassium fertilizers, potassium chloride (a readily available potassium fertilizer) and potassium silicate (a slow-release potassium fertilizer), as well as a split application of potassium, on the accumulation of (137)Cs by rice plants in two pot experiments. The (137)Cs concentrations in the brown rice and in the above-ground plants were significantly lower after potassium chloride application than after potassium silicate application. The potassium ion (K(+)) concentrations in soil solutions sampled 9 and 21 d after transplanting were significantly higher for the potassium chloride application than for the potassium silicate application. The K(+) concentrations in soil solutions observed in the application of potassium silicate were similar to those in the treatment when no potassium was applied. This finding indicates that the application of potassium silicate did not sufficiently increase the available K(+) for rice plants in the soil, which led to a greater uptake of (137)Cs after the potassium silicate application than after the application of potassium chloride. The (137)Cs concentration in brown rice was higher in the split application of potassium fertilizer with the second application at the full heading stage than that without split application and the split application with the second application before heading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Grass Plants Bind, Retain, Uptake, and Transport Infectious Prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pritzkow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves. These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease.

  1. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake, and transport infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-05-26

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)) to plants. Small quantities of PrP(Sc) contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrP(Sc) for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PHYSIOLOGY OF ION TRANSPORT ACROSS THE TONOPLAST OF HIGHER PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Pantoja, Omar

    1996-06-01

    The vacuole of plant cells plays an important role in the homeostasis of the cell. It is involved in the regulation of cytoplasmic pH, sequestration of toxic ions and xenobiotics, regulation of cell turgor, storage of amino acids, sugars and CO2 in the form of malate, and possibly as a source for elevating cytoplasmic calcium. All these activities are driven by two primary active transport mechanisms present in the vacuolar membrane (tonoplast). These two mechanisms employ high-energy metabolites to pump protons into the vacuole, establishing a proton electrochemical potential that mediates the transport of a diverse range of solutes. Within the past few years, great advances at the molecular and functional levels have been made on the characterization and identification of these mechanisms. The aim of this review is to summarize these studies in the context of the physiology of the plant cell.

  3. Transportable nuclear power plant TEC-M with two reactor plants of improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Sazonov, A.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Gromov, B.F.; Zelensky, V.N.; Komkova, O.I.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tolstopyatov, V.P.; Toshinsky, G.I.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid metals are the best to meet the requirements of inherently safety nuclear power plants among the coolants used. A great experience has been gained in lead coolant power plant development and operation as applied to transportable power set-ups. Low chemical activity of this coolant with respect to air-water interaction is a determining factor for this coolant. The transportable nuclear power plant is described. It is intended to generate electric power for populated areas placed a long distance from the main electric power supply sources where it is difficult or not economical to deliver the conventional types of fuel. There are several remote areas in Siberia, Kamchatka in need of this type of power plant

  4. Analysis of solute transport in plants using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partelova, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the first part of the work, geometrically and radiochemically characterized standards (phantoms) imitating the plant tissues and allowing the exact quantification of visualised radioindicator in plant tissues were designed and prepared within the study of visual and analytical characteristics of used positron emission tomograph (microPET system) commercially developed for animal objects at visualization of thin objects. Individual experiments carried out by exposure of excised leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) in solutions of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter 18 F (2-[ 18 F]FDG) containing 10-, 100-, or 1000-times higher concentrations of D-glucose (c glu ) in comparison with the original 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution showed that the significant changes in visualisation of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution as well as in chemical portion of 2-[ 18 F]FDG within the leaf blade were observed as result of increased c glu . In the experiments with the whole plants of tobacco or radish exposed in 2-[ 18 F]FDG solution through the root system, only minimal translocation of 18 F radioactivity into the above-ground parts of plants, also in the case of increased c glu , was observed, which suggest the role of root system as a selective barrier of 2-[ 18 F]FDG transport from roots to the above-ground parts. On the basis of mentioned knowledge and analytical approaches (application of prepared phantoms), the dynamic study of 2-[ 18 F]FDG uptake and transport within the excised leaf of tobacco or whole radish plant was carried out. The description of these processes was realized through the 3D PET images and through the quantification of 2-[ 18 F]FDG distribution within the chosen regions of interest from the point of view of accumulated 18 F radioactivity (in Bq) or amount of D-glucose (in μg) as well. Application of methods of multivariate analysis allows to found the similarities between studied objects mainly from the point

  5. The heart and potassium: a banana republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ehsan; Spiers, Christine; Khan, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The importance of potassium in maintaining stable cardiac function is a clinically understood phenomenon. Physiologically the importance of potassium in cardiac function is described by the large number of different kinds of potassium ions channels found in the heart compared to channels and membrane transport mechanisms for other ions such as sodium and calcium. Potassium is important in physiological homeostatic control of cardiac function, but is also of relevance to the diseased state, as potassium-related effects may stabilize or destabilize cardiac function. This article aims to provide a detailed understanding of potassium-mediated cardiac function. This will help the clinical practitioner evaluate how modulation of potassium ion channels by disease and pharmacological manipulation affect the cardiac patient, thus aiding in decision making when faced with clinical problems related to potassium.

  6. Potassium test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperkalemia ) may be due to: Addison disease (rare) Blood transfusion Certain medicines Crushed tissue injury Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis ... released. This may cause a falsely high result. Alternative Names Hypokalemia test; K+ Images Blood test References Mount DB. Disorders of potassium balance. ...

  7. Potassium Iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain other liquids including low-fat white or chocolate milk, flat soda, orange juice, raspberry syrup, or ... Potassium iodide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: swollen glands metallic taste in the ...

  8. Cytopathological evidence for transport of phytoplasma in infected plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic phytoplasmas were observed in sieve tubes, companion cells and in phloem parenchyma of Tagetes patula L., Helichrysum bracteatum Willd. and Gladiolus sp. L. plants with morphological changes typical for phytoplasma infection. In the pores of the sieve plate phytoplasma cells were seen which suggests that the vertical transport of this pathogen goes in the sieve tubes of infected plants throughout the sieve tube pores. The contact of the sieve tube with the neighbouring cells goes through the plasmodesmata, but no changes of the plasmodesmata were observed in the phloem of infected plants. The size and structure of unchanged plasmodesmata does not allow passing through such big structures like phytoplasma. Instead close contact between phytoplasma cells and vertical sieve tube walls takes place. Damages to the cell wall were observed forming cavities in which the phytoplasma cells were present. The damages of parenchyma and companion cells walls also were seen. In cells where the damages of the walls were observed phytoplasmas were present. The phytoplasma cells were sporadically seen also in the intercellular spaces of parenchyma. These data suggest that horizontal transport depends on damages to the infected plant cell walls caused by the phytoplasma itself.

  9. Low Potassium (Hypokalemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Low potassium (hypokalemia) By Mayo Clinic Staff Low potassium (hypokalemia) refers to a lower than normal potassium level ... 2 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A very low potassium level (less than 2.5 mmol/L) ...

  10. Long-distance transport of natrium in bean plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marschner, H.; Ossenberg-Neuhaus, H.

    1976-01-01

    After Na + -application to a certain zone of the root or after application to the tip or to the base of a primary leaf or along the stem of bean plants, the long-distance transport of Na + was studied. The age of the plants was 8 d when root application took place, 10 d at the time of leaf application. After application to the root zone, the long-distance transport of Na + in the direction of the shoot was strongly prevented, and the transport in the direction of the root point could be neglected. Presence of K + in the ambient nutritive solution led to a strong increase of Na + efflux from the roots. Within 48 hrs., 30-40% of the Na + applied to a primary leaf were transported towards the roots. The Na + efflux to the ambient nutritive solution came from the basal regions; it was mostly more than 10% of the amount recepted through the leaf and was only slightly increased by the presence of K + in the external solution. In the case of Na + application through the hypokotyl, this Na + -efflux from the roots was even more than 25% within 12 hrs. Both with leaf and with stem application, only 1% of the Na + taken up was transported in the direction of the shoot point. The separation of the hypocotyl tissue in the bark and in the central cylinder showed the extremely high Na + storage capacity of the central cylinder. The transfer of Na + from the central cylinder into the bark seems to be fast in the hypocotyl, while the escape of Na + from the phloem of the bark into the central cylinder is rather limited. Long-distance transport of Na + in the phloem of the bark is highly basispetal and of high efficiency. Low Na + -contents in bean leaves are thus due to several regulation mechanisms: K + -stimulated Na + -efflux in the root, restricted long-distance transport in the xylemadue to high storage capacity of the xylemparenchyma, Na + influx pumps at the phloem in stem and leaf and strictly basipetal phloem-retransport of Na + in the root and efflux into the surrounding

  11. THE TONOPLAST TRANSPORT SYSTEMS OF PLANT VACUOLES AND THEIR POTENTIAL APPLICATION IN BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Isayenkov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The pivotal role of plant vacuoles in plant survival was discussed in the review. Particularly, the providing of cellular turgor, accumulation of inorganic osmolytes and nutrients are the primary tasks of these cellular organelles. The main mechanisms of tonoplast transport systems were described. The known transport pathways of minerals, heavy metals, vitamins and other organic compounds were classified and outlined. The main systems of membrane vacuolar transport were reviewed. The outline of the physiological functions and features of vacuolar membrane transport proteins were performed. The physiological role of transport of minerals, nutrients and other compounds into vacuoles were discussed. This article reviews the main types of plant vacuoles and their functional role in plant cell. Current state and progress in vacuolar transport research was outlined. The examples of application for rinciples and mechanisms of vacuolar membrane transport in plant biotechnology were iven. The perspectives and approaches in plant and food biotechnology concerning transport and physiology of vacuoles are discussed.

  12. Translocation kinetics of 14C-photosynthate in hybrid rice grown at different potassium levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dean; Shen Yuwei; Xie Xuemin; Rao Lihua; Lu Qing

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of translocation of 14 C-assimilate in hybrid rice plant was studied with 14 CO 2 fed to functional leaf at the tillering and filling stages. The result indicated that the relationship between percentage (V) of photosynthate exporting out of the source leaf or that of assimilate into sink, expanding young leaf or filling panicle, respectively,and time(t)after introducing 14 CO 2 into the leaf was extremely coincided with the regression equation : v = V (t + k)/K m + (t + k). At the tillering stage, fully extended top leaf could export 66% ∼ 79% of its photosynthate assimilated at different potassium levels, and both export potential and rate of 14 C-photosynthate in the fed leaf decreased under the low potassium (1 ppm K supplied), but the rate obviously increased in the superfluous potassium (80 ppm K supplied) in spite of slightly low exporting capacity. Main sink, the expanding young leaf on the top of stem could obtain 28% ∼ 59% of 14 C-assimilate at various potassium levels. Both the importation potential and rate were lowered with low potassium application while hastened by super-supplied potassium at the same development stage. At the filling stage, source, flag leaf, was able to export 83% ∼ 97% of its photosynthate and low potassium (5 ppm) application not only delayed the time of 14 C-photosynthate exportation but also diminished the export rate, whereas the rate was accelerated by superfluous potassium. Low potassium resulted in decrease both in the capacity and in the rate of assimilate importing into grain, nevertheless, high potassium caused decrease of percentage assimilate importing into grain and the increase of improving rate. Therefore, it was strategically considered that neither deficient nor superfluous potassium application was beneficial for assimilate transportation

  13. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  14. Transportable Hydrogen Research Plant Based on Renewable Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel Fernandez; Carlos Madina; Asier Gil de Muro; Jose Angel Alzolab; Iker Marino; Javier Garcia-Tejedor; Juan Carlos Mugica; Inaki Azkkrate; Jose Angel Alzola

    2006-01-01

    Efficiency and cost are nowadays the most important barriers for the penetration of systems based on hydrogen and renewable energies. According to this background, TECNALIA Corporation has started in 2004 the HIDROTEC project: 'Hydrogen Technologies for Renewable Energy Applications'. The ultimate aim of this project is the implementation of a multipurpose demonstration and research plant in order to explore diverse options for sustainable energetic solutions based on hydrogen. The plant is conceived as an independent system that can be easily transported and assembled. Research and demonstration activities can thus be carried out at very different locations, including commercial renewable facilities. Modularity and scalability have also been taken into account for an optimised exploitation. (authors)

  15. Absorption, transport, and chemical fate of plutonium in soybean plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Wildung, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Absorption of plutonium (Pu) by soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) is limited by Pu solubility in soils. Changes in Pu concentration in different tissues with time to senescence indicate Pu is freely transported through the xylem during growth but not subject to remobilization on flowering. Studies in which the DTPA complex of 238 Pu was supplied to the plant suggest a change in chemical form following root absorption. Of the Pu in roots, stems, and leaves at senescence, 28, 54, and 67%, respectively, were soluble. The Pu in the solluble fraction was primarily associated with components of >10000 equivalent molecular weight in leaves and roots, whereas stems exhibited an equal distribution between components in the >10000 and <500 molecular weight fractions. Plutonium associated with mature seeds is concentrated in the seed hull (85%) and cotyledons (14%). The Pu associated with the cotyledon was primarily in the insoluble residues and soluble soy whey

  16. Analysis Of Provided Service Quality In Flowers And Living Plants Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliaková, Adela

    2015-06-01

    This paper analyses quality of the living flowers and plants transportation. A part of this paper compares the demands for a particular transport mode and a practical demonstration of these transport modes within a specific transport mode. The paper presents a survey of quality of services provided by individual transport modes.

  17. Quantum dot transport in soil, plants, and insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Salim, Najeh [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Barraclough, Emma; Burgess, Elisabeth [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Clothier, Brent, E-mail: brent.clothier@plantandfood.co.nz [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Deurer, Markus; Green, Steve [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Malone, Louise [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Weir, Graham [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand)

    2011-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials requires information not only on their toxicity to non-target organisms, but also on their potential exposure pathways. Here we report on the transport and fate of quantum dots (QDs) in the total environment: from soils, through their uptake into plants, to their passage through insects following ingestion. Our QDs are nanoparticles with an average particle size of 6.5 nm. Breakthrough curves obtained with CdTe/mercaptopropionic acid QDs applied to columns of top soil from a New Zealand organic apple orchard, a Hastings silt loam, showed there to be preferential flow through the soil's macropores. Yet the effluent recovery of QDs was just 60%, even after several pore volumes, indicating that about 40% of the influent QDs were filtered and retained by the soil column via some unknown exchange/adsorption/sequestration mechanism. Glycine-, mercaptosuccinic acid-, cysteine-, and amine-conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs were visibly transported to a limited extent in the vasculature of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), onion (Allium cepa) and chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.) plants when cut stems were placed in aqueous QD solutions. However, they were not seen to be taken up at all by rooted whole plants of ryegrass, onion, or Arabidopsis thaliana placed in these solutions. Leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae fed with these QDs for two or four days, showed fluorescence along the entire gut, in their frass (larval feces), and, at a lower intensity, in their haemolymph. Fluorescent QDs were also observed and elevated cadmium levels detected inside the bodies of adult moths that had been fed QDs as larvae. These results suggest that exposure scenarios for QDs in the total environment could be quite complex and variable in each environmental domain. - Research highlights: {yields} Quantum dots are transported rapidly through soil but half were retained. {yields} Intact roots of plants did not take up quantum dots. Excised plants

  18. The Trk Potassium Transporter Is Required for RsmB-Mediated Activation of Virulence in the Phytopathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae

    OpenAIRE

    Valente, Rita S.; Xavier, Karina B.

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium wasabiae (previously known as Erwinia carotovora) is an important plant pathogen that regulates the production of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes through an N-acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system and through the GacS/GacA two-component system (also known as ExpS/ExpA). At high cell density, activation of GacS/GacA induces the expression of RsmB, a noncoding RNA that is essential for the activation of virulence in this bacterium. A genetic screen to identify reg...

  19. Dry matter yield, carbon isotope discrimination and nitrogen uptake in silicon and/ or potassium fed chickpea and barley plants grown under water and non-water stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurd Ali, F.; Al-Chammaa, M.; Mouasess, A.

    2012-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of silicon (Si) and/or potassium (K) on dry matter yield, nitrogen uptake and carbon isotope discrimination Δ 13 C in water stressed (FC1) and well watered (FC2) chickpea plants using 15 N and 13 C isotopes. Three fertilizer rates of Si (Si 5 0, Si 1 00 and Si 2 00) and one fertilizer rate of K were used. The results showed that: In chickpeas, it was found, for most of the growth parameters, that Si either alone or in combination with K was more effective to alleviate water stress than K alone. Increasing soil water level from FC1 to FC2 often had a positive impact on values of most studied parameters. The Si 1 00K + (FC1) and Si 5 0K + (FC2) treatments gave high enough amounts of N 2 -fixation, higher dry matter production and greater nitrogen yield. The percent increments of total N 2 -fixed in the above mentioned treatments were 51 and 47% over their controls, respectively. On the other hand, increasing leaves dry matter in response to the solely added Si (Si 5 0K - and Si 1 00K - ) is associated with lower Δ 13 C under both watering regimes. This may indicate that Si fertilization had a beneficial effect on water use efficiency (WUE). Hence, Δ 13 C could be an adequate indicator of WUE in response to the exogenous supply of silicon to chickpea plants. Our results highlight that Si is not only involved in amelioration of growth and in maintaining of water status but it can be considered as an important element for the symbiotic performance of chickpea plants. It can be concluded that synergistic effect of silicon and potassium fertilization with adequate irrigation improves growth and nitrogen fixation in chickpea plants.In barley plants, solely added K or in combination with adequate rate of Si (Si 1 00) were more effective in alleviating water stress and producing higher yield in barley plants than solely added Si. However, the latter nutrient was found to be more effective than the former in producing

  20. Advances in methods for identification and characterization of plant transporter function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo; Xu, Deyang; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2017-01-01

    Transport proteins are crucial for cellular function at all levels. Numerous importers and exporters facilitate transport of a diverse array of metabolites and ions intra- and intercellularly. Identification of transporter function is essential for understanding biological processes at both......-based approaches. In this review, we highlight examples that illustrate how new technology and tools have advanced identification and characterization of plant transporter functions....

  1. Cardiovascular action of insulin in health and disease: focus in endothelial L-arginine transport and cardiac voltage-dependent potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián eDubó

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of insulin signaling on diabetes mellitus has been related to cardiovascular dysfunction, heart failure and sudden death. In human endothelium, cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1 is related to the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO. Insulin has a vascular effect in endothelial cells through a signaling pathway that involved increases of hCAT-1 expression and L-arginine transport. This mechanism is disrupted in diabetes, a phenomenon potentiated by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contributes to lower availability of NO and endothelial dysfunction. On the other hand, the electrical remodeling in cardiomyocytes is considered a key factor in heart failure progression associated to diabetes mellitus, generating a challenge to understand the specific role of insulin and the pathways involved in cardiac function. Studies on isolated mammalian cardiomyocytes have shown a prolongated action potential in ventricular repolarization phase that produces a long QT interval. The long QT generated is well explained by attenuation in the repolarizing potassium currents in cardiac ventricles. The impaired insulin signaling causes specific changes in these currents, such a decrease amplitude of the transient outward K+ (Ito and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier (IKur currents where, together, a reduction of mRNA and protein expression levels of α-subunits (Ito, fast; Kv 4.2 and IKs; Kv 1.5 or β-subunits (KChIP2 and MiRP of K+ channels involved in these currents in a MAPK mediated pathway process have been described. These results support the hypothesis that the lack of insulin signaling can produce an abnormal repolarization in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the arrhythmogenic potential due to reduced Ito current can contribute to an increase in the incidence of sudden death in heart failure. This review aims to show, based on pathophysiological models, the regulatory function that would have insulin in vascular

  2. Matrix effects for calcium and potassium K-X-rays, in fenugreek plants grown in iron rich soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep, Kanan; Rao, Preeti; Bansal, Himani; Mittal, Raj

    2014-01-01

    The present work comprises the matrix effects study of the plant system (plant and soil) for macronutrients Ca and K with elevated levels of iron in the soil. The earlier derived matrix effect terms from fundamental relations of intensities of analyte and substrate elements with basic atomic and experimental setup parameters had led to iterative determination of enhanced elements rather than avoiding their enhancement. The relations also facilitated the evaluations of absorption for close Z interfering constituents (like Ca and K) in samples of a lot of particular category with interpolation of matrix terms with elemental amounts. The process has already been employed successfully for potato, radish, rice and maize plants. On similar lines, the observed prominent change in interpolation parameters for the plants in the present experiment serves as a tool to check the toxicity/contamination of the growing medium. - Highlights: • Matrix effects for Ca and K in Fenugreek plant and its soil with elevated iron level. • Fenugreek plants grown in iron rich soil and treated with K/Ca fertilizers. • The matrix terms correlated to analyte and enhancer element amounts. • Interpolation of matrix terms with elemental amounts points to Fe toxicity of soil

  3. Application of sheep manure and potassium fertilizer to contaminated soil and its effect on zinc, cadmium and lead accumulation by alfalfa plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouheir Elouear

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Jebel Ressas mining area (Southern of Tunisia, the dispersion of particles that contain Pb, Zn and Cd results in the contamination of the surrounding agricultural soils. These soils have high concentrations of Pb (970 mg kg−1, Zn (9641 mg kg−1 and Cd (53 mg kg−1. This glasshouse study examined the effect of application of fertilizers, i.e., organic fertilizer as local sheep manure and inorganic fertilizer as potassium chloride (KCl, on the growth, uptake and translocation of Cd, Pb, and Zn of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. grown on a contaminated soil. Obtained results showed that alfalfa could tolerate high Cd, Pb, and Zn concentrations in soil and had very good growth performance. Regarding to biomass generation it was observed, in every case, that plant growth is not affected in the treated soil compared with blanks sown in an untreated control soil; improvement ranged from 80% for the KCl to 97% for sheep manure. Application of sheep manure increased electrical conductivity and reduced DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in the soils. But KCl fertilizer favored their accumulation in plants. So, KCl could be a useful amendment for phytoextraction of metals by accumulator species, while sheep manure can be very useful for phytostabilisation.

  4. Neubauer's plantlet method - an alternative procedure for evaluating the effectiveness of potassium based fertilizers in reducing radiocaesium from soil to plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocanu, N.; Cotarlea, M.; Boldor, O.

    1996-01-01

    Accidental releases of radiocaesium into the environment have necessitated the search for effective soil-based countermeasures to reduce its transfer along food-chains. As field experiments can be impractical and protracted to predict rapidly the effectiveness of chemical treatments of radioactive contaminated soils to reduce soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides, laboratory experiments are a suitable alternative for rapid evaluation of the most appropriate countermeasure to apply under a range of different circumstances in the event of accidental radioactive contamination of agricultural lands. Taking into account these considerations our study focuses on the use of a laboratory experiment based on Neubauer's plantlet method to evaluate the effectiveness of potassic salt 30 % applied on two soil types (alluvial and brown-reddish forest type) contaminated with 137 Cs for reducing uptake of the radionuclide to wheat plants grown-up on these soils. The experimental results evidence diminished values for 137 Cs/K quotient in wheat plantlets grown-up on soils treated with potassic salt 30 %, compared to those registered for wheat plantlets grown-up on untreated soils. The diminished values of 137 Cs/K quotient result from the reduced uptake of 137 Cs to plantlets accompanied by the enhanced uptake of potassium. (author)

  5. The effect of sodium on the mineral balance of plants, using the example of root celery and stalk celery. Part I. The role of sodium and potassium in the process of accumulation and utilization of mineral elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Kruszelnicka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 1977 - 1980, studies were conducted on the effect of sodium used to supplement low (K = 800 mg/5 kg and high (K = 1400 mg/5 kg potassium doses on the content of mineral components, their accumulation in the yield and the percentage of their utilization. The study was carried out on root celery - Apium graveolens L. var. rapaceum (Mill. and stalk celery - Apium graveolens L. var. dulce (Mill.. The results obtained in these experiments point to the following conclusions: it was found that potassium and sodium mutually limit each other's uptake. Sodium was more antagonistic towards the uptake of calcium than was potassium. However, no clearly antagonistic effect of these elements on the uptake of magnesium was determined. The accumulation of potassium and sodium by the experimental plants rose while the percentage of utilization of these elements decreased as their level in the nutrient medium increased. Sodium exerted a more distinct effect on the accumulation and utilization of other mineral elements than did potassium.

  6. Variations in natural abundances of 15N and 13C in potassium fed lentil plants grown under water stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shammaa, M.

    2007-12-01

    The impact of two K-fertilizer treatments [K0 (0) and K1 (150 kg K 2 O/ha)] on dry matter production and N 2 fixation (Ndfa) by Lentil (Lens culinaris.) was evaluated in a pot experiment. The plants were also subjected to three soil moisture regimes starting from bud flower initiation stage to pod formation (low, 45-50%; moderate, 55-60% and high 75-80% of field capacity, abbreviated as FC1, FC2 and FC3, respectively). The 15 N natural abundance technique (%δ 1 5 N) was employed to evaluate N 2 fixation using barley as a reference crop. Moreover, the carbon isotope discrimination (%Δ 13 C) was determined to assess factors responsible for crop performance variability in the different treatments. Water restriction occurring during the post-flowering period considerably affects growth and N 2 -fixation. However, K-fertilizer enhanced plant performance by overcoming water shortage influences. The δ 15 N values in lentils ranged from +0.67 to +1.36% depending on soil moisture and K-fertilizer treatments; whereas, those of N 2 fixation and the reference plant were -0.45 and +2.94%, respectively. Consequently, Ndfa% ranged from 45 and 65%. Water stress reduced Δ 13 C values in the FC1K0 And FC1K1 treatments. However, K fertilizer enhanced the whole plants Δ 13 C along with dry matter yield and N 2 fixation. The water stressed plants amended with K (FC1K1) seemed to be the best treatment because of its highest pod yield, high N balance and N 2 -fixation with low consumption of irrigation water. This illustrates the ecological and economical importance of K-fertilizer in alleviating water stress occurring during the post-flowering period of lentil.(Authors)

  7. Variations in natural abundances of 15N and 13C in potassium fed lentil plants grown under water stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shammaa, M.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of two K-fertilizer treatments [K0 (0) and K1 (150 kg K 2 O/ha)] on dry matter production and N 2 fixation (Ndfa) by Lentil (Lens culinaris.) was evaluated in a pot experiment. The plants were also subjected to three soil moisture regimes starting from bud flower initiation stage to pod formation (low, 45-50%. Moderate, 55-60% and high 75-80% of field capacity, abbreviated as FC1, FC2 and FC3, respectively). The 15 N natural abundance technique (%δ 15 N) was employed to evaluate N 2 fixation using barley as a reference crop. Moreover, the carbon isotope discrimination (%Δ 13 C) was determined to assess factors responsible for crop performance variability in the different treatments. Water restriction occurring during the post-flowering period considerably affects growth and N 2 -fixation. However, K-fertilizer enhanced plant performance by overcoming water shortage influences. The delta 15 N values in lentils ranged from +0.67 to +1.36% depending on soil moisture and K-fertilizer treatments. Whereas, those of N 2 fixation and the reference plant were -0.45 and +2.94%, respectively. Consequently, Ndfa% ranged from 45 and 65%. Water stress reduced Δ 13 C values in the FC1K0 And FC1K1 treatments. However, K fertilizer enhanced the whole plants Δ 13 C along with dry matter yield and N 2 fixation. The water stressed plants amended with K (FC1K1) seemed to be the best treatment because of its highest pod yield, high N balance and N 2 -fixation with low consumption of irrigation water. This illustrates the ecological and economical importance of K-fertilizer in alleviating water stress occurring during the post-flowering period of lentil.(Authors)

  8. On the theory of gaseous transport to plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, D. H.

    Solutions of the convection-diffusion equations are developed to show the relationship between bulk transport parameters affecting gaseous transfer to plant canopies and local rates of transfer within the canopy. Foliage density is considered to be uniform and the drag coefficient of elements is specified by cd = γu- n with u as the local wind-speed and γ and n constants. Under conditions of high surface resistance, the bulk deposition velocity at the top of the canopy vg( h) approaches a limit defined by v g(h) = v̂gL p(1-ψ v̂gL p/u ∗) , where v̂g is the local deposition rate, Lp the effective foliage area, u ∗ the friction velocity and ψ a structure coefficient. From this, a criterion is proposed for defining the conditions in which the local resistances may be added in parallel. Comparisons with the external model for the bulk transport resistance rp = ra + rb + rc (where r p = 1/v g(h) and ra is a diffusive resistance between the apparent momentum sink and height h) shows that the bulk surface resistance r c = r̂s/L p( r̂s being a local surface resistance due to internal properties of the surface) and r b = overliner̂p-r a, appearing as an excess aerodynamic component; overliner̂p refers to the depth-averaged value of r̂p—the resistance to transfer through the laminar sublayer enveloping individual canopy elements. In conditions of zero surface resistance the bulk transport rate rp, o can be specified by r p,o/r a = E( r̂p/r̂∗) hq with E and q as constants, the term r̂p/r̂∗ referring to the resistances to mass and momentum transfer to canopy elements. A general expression is formulated for the sublayer Stanton number B -1  r bu ∗ at the extremes of high and zero surface resistance. In conditions of low surface resistance, it is shown that the terms rb + rc cannot be conveniently separated into equivalent aerodynamic and surface components as at the limit of high surface resistance. This conclusion is a departure from previous

  9. Alleviation of rapid, futile ammonium cycling at the plasma membrane by potassium reveals K+-sensitive and -insensitive components of NH4+ transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerba, Mark W; Britto, Dev T; Balkos, Konstantine D; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2008-01-01

    Futile plasma membrane cycling of ammonium (NH4+) is characteristic of low-affinity NH4+ transport, and has been proposed to be a critical factor in NH4+ toxicity. Using unidirectional flux analysis with the positron-emitting tracer 13N in intact seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), it is shown that rapid, futile NH4+ cycling is alleviated by elevated K+ supply, and that low-affinity NH4+ transport is mediated by a K+-sensitive component, and by a second component that is independent of K+. At low external [K+] (0.1 mM), NH4+ influx (at an external [NH4+] of 10 mM) of 92 micromol g(-1) h(-1) was observed, with an efflux:influx ratio of 0.75, indicative of rapid, futile NH4+ cycling. Elevating K+ supply into the low-affinity K+ transport range (1.5-40 mM) reduced both influx and efflux of NH4+ by as much as 75%, and substantially reduced the efflux:influx ratio. The reduction of NH4+ fluxes was achieved rapidly upon exposure to elevated K+, within 1 min for influx and within 5 min for efflux. The channel inhibitor La3+ decreased high-capacity NH4+ influx only at low K+ concentrations, suggesting that the K+-sensitive component of NH4+ influx may be mediated by non-selective cation channels. Using respiratory measurements and current models of ion flux energetics, the energy cost of concomitant NH4+ and K+ transport at the root plasma membrane, and its consequences for plant growth are discussed. The study presents the first demonstration of the parallel operation of K+-sensitive and -insensitive NH4+ flux mechanisms in plants.

  10. Investigation of the transportation requirements for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, R.E.; Davis, D.K.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents a general investigation of the transport requirements associated with the construction and operation of conceptual fusion reactors. Projections of amounts of construction and operating materials requiring transportation are presented for several proposed designs. The material to be shipped is described along with the shipping containers that might be used, the transport modes and the expected impact of transporting these materials. Transportation of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials will be required. Most of these materials are routinely shipped by the transportation industry. Transportation requirements of a representative fusion reactor are also compared with Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) requirements

  11. Nitrogen and potassium concentrations in the nutrients solution for melon plants growing in coconut fiber without drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratieri, Luiz Augusto; Cecílio Filho, Arthur Bernardes; Barbosa, José Carlos; Pavani, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the effects of N and K concentrations for melon plants, an experiment was carried out from July 1, 2011 to January 3, 2012 in Muzambinho city, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The "Bonus no. 2" was cultivated at the spacing of 1.1 × 0.4. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replications in a 4 × 4 factorial scheme with four N concentrations (8, 12, 16, and 20 mmol L(-1)) and four K concentrations (4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol L(-1)). The experimental plot constituted of eight plants. It was observed that the leaf levels of N and K, of N-NO₃ and of K, and the electrical conductivity (CE) of the substrate increased with the increment of N and K in the nutrients' solution. Substratum pH, in general, was reduced with increments in N concentration and increased with increasing K concentrations in the nutrients' solution. Leaf area increased with increments in N concentration in the nutrients solution. Fertigation with solutions stronger in N (20 mmol L(-1)) and K (10 mmol L(-1)) resulted in higher masses for the first (968 g) and the second (951 g) fruits and crop yield (4,425 gm(-2)).

  12. Nitrogen and Potassium Concentrations in the Nutrients Solution for Melon Plants Growing in Coconut Fiber without Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Gratieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of evaluating the effects of N and K concentrations for melon plants, an experiment was carried out from July 1, 2011 to January 3, 2012 in Muzambinho city, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The “Bonus no. 2” was cultivated at the spacing of 1.1 × 0.4. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replications in a 4 × 4 factorial scheme with four N concentrations (8, 12, 16, and 20 mmol L−1 and four K concentrations (4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol L−1. The experimental plot constituted of eight plants. It was observed that the leaf levels of N and K, of N-NO3 and of K, and the electrical conductivity (CE of the substrate increased with the increment of N and K in the nutrients' solution. Substratum pH, in general, was reduced with increments in N concentration and increased with increasing K concentrations in the nutrients' solution. Leaf area increased with increments in N concentration in the nutrients solution. Fertigation with solutions stronger in N (20 mmol L−1 and K (10 mmol L−1 resulted in higher masses for the first (968 g and the second (951 g fruits and crop yield (4,425 gm−2.

  13. Investigation of plant hormone level changes in shoot tips of longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) treated with potassium chlorate by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susawaengsup, Chanthana; Rayanakorn, Mongkon; Wongpornchai, Sugunya; Wangkarn, Sunanta

    2011-08-15

    The endogenous levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellins (GAs), abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinins (CKs) and their changes were investigated in shoot tips of ten longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) trees for off-season flowering until 60 days after potassium chlorate treatment in comparison with those of ten control (untreated) longan trees. These analytes were extracted and interfering matrices removed with a single mixed-mode solid phase extraction under optimum conditions. The recoveries at three levels of concentration were in the range of 72-112%. The endogenous plant hormones were separated and quantified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Detection limits based on the signal-to-noise ratio ranged from 10 ng mL(-1) for gibberellin A4 (GA4) to 200 ng mL(-1) for IAA. Within the first week after potassium chlorate treatment, dry weight (DW) amounts in the treated longan shoot tips of four gibberellins, namely: gibberellin A1(GA1), gibberellic acid (GA3), gibberellin A19 (GA19) and gibberellin A20 (GA20), were found to increase to approximately 25, 50, 20 and 60 ng g(-1) respectively, all of which were significantly higher than those of the controls. In contrast, gibberellin A8 (GA8) obtained from the treated longan was found to decrease to approximately 20 ng g(-1)DW while that of the control increased to around 80 ng g(-1)DW. Certain CKs which play a role in leaf bud induction, particularly isopentenyl adenine (iP), isopentenyl adenosine (iPR) and dihydrozeatin riboside (DHZR), were found to be present in amounts of approximately 20, 50 and 60 ng g(-1)DW in the shoot tips of the control longan. The analytical results obtained from the two-month off-season longan flowering period indicate that high GA1, GA3, GA19 and GA20 levels in the longan shoot tips contribute to flower bud induction while high levels of CKs, IAA and ABA in the control longan contribute more to the vegetative development. Copyright © 2011

  14. Release of cadmium from clays and plant uptake of cadium from soil as affected by potassium and calcium amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghiri, F.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of percent K and/or Ca saturations on the release of Cd from Cd-treated H-clays (kaolinite and illite) and on the Cd availability to plants from Cd-treated Canfield silt loam soil were determined. The concentration of Cd in the dialyzates from both kaolinite and illite clays increased as the percent of Ca or K saturation of the clays in the suspension decreased. The release of Cd from both clays was greater in the presence of Ca than K. In a separate experiment, the concentration of Cd in soybean shoots (Glycine max L. Merr.) ''Corsoy'' decreased with increasing percent Ca or K saturation of the soil. The results indicated that Cd uptake by soybeam shoots could be impaired to a great extent by K application

  15. Optimization of the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) method for simultaneous assay of potassium and plant-available phosphorus in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulin; Mason, Sean; McNeill, Ann; McLaughlin, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    Potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) are two important macronutrients for crops, and are usually applied to soils as granular fertilizer before seeding. Therefore, accurate soil tests prior to planting to predict crop response to fertilizers are important in optimizing crop yields. Traditional methods used for testing both available K and P in soils, which are based on chemical extraction procedures, are to be soil-type dependent, and the predictive relationships across a broad range of soils are generally poor. The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique, based on diffusion theory, is extensively used to measure the diffusive supply of trace elements, metals and some nutrients in soils and water. When DGT is used to assess plant-available P in soils, a good relationship is found between crop response to P fertilizer and concentrations of P in soil measured by DGT, and therefore the DGT method provides a more precise recommendation of P fertilizer requirements. Adaptation of the DGT method to measure plant-available K in soils has already been attempted [1], but limitations were reported due to the non-uniform size of the resin gel, decreased K binding rate of the gel at long deployment times and a limited ability to measure a wide range of K concentrations. To eliminate these problems, a new resin gel has been developed by combining Amberlite and ferrihydrite. This mixed Amberlite and ferrihydrite (MAF) gel has improved properties in terms of handling and even distribution of Amberlite in the gel. The elution efficiencies of the MAF gel for K and P were 90% and 96%, respectively. The diffusion coefficient of K through the diffusive gel was 1.30 × 10(-5)cm(2)s(-1) at 22 ± 1°C and was stable through time. Since ferrihydrite is already used in DGT P testing, the ability of the MAF gel to assess available P simultaneously was also assessed. The MAF gel performed the same as the traditional ferrihydrite gel for available P assessment in a wide variety of

  16. HKT transporters mediate salt stress resistance in plants: from structure and function to the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Shin; Horie, Tomoaki; Hauser, Felix; Deinlein, Ulrich; Schroeder, Julian I; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Plant cells are sensitive to salinity stress and do not require sodium as an essential element for their growth and development. Saline soils reduce crop yields and limit available land. Research shows that HKT transporters provide a potent mechanism for mediating salt tolerance in plants. Knowledge of the molecular ion transport and regulation mechanisms and the control of HKT gene expression are crucial for understanding the mechanisms by which HKT transporters enhance crop performance under salinity stress. This review focuses on HKT transporters in monocot plants and in Arabidopsis as a dicot plant, as a guide to efforts toward improving salt tolerance of plants for increasing the production of crops and bioenergy feedstocks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Storage, handling and internal transport of radioactive materials (fuel elements excepted) in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The rule applies to storage and handling as well as to transport within the plant and to the exchange of - solid radioactive wastes, - liquid radioactive wastes, except for those covered by the rule KTA 3603, - radioactive components and parts which are planned to be mounted and dismounted until shutdown of the plant, - radioactive-contaminated tools and appliances, - radioactive preparations. The rule is to be applied within the fenced-in sites of stationary nuclear power plants with LWR or HTR including their transport load halls, as fas as these are situated so as to be approachable from the nuclear power station by local transport systems. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Kinetics of caesium and potassium absorption by roots of three grass pastures and competitive effects of potassium on caesium uptake in Cynodon sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Valverde, L. Rubio; Garcia-Sanchez, M. J.; Fernandez, J. A.; Velasco, R. H.

    2008-08-01

    Caesium uptake by plant roots has been normally associated with the uptake of potassium as the potassium transport systems present in plants have also the capacity to transport caesium. Three grass species (Eragrostis curvula, Cynodon sp and Distichlis spicata) growing in seminatural grassland of central Argentina were selected to study their capability to incorporate Cs+ (and K+) using electrophysiological techniques. Although the 137Cs soil inventory ranged between 328-730 Bq m-2 in this region, no 137Cs activity was detected in these plants. However, all the species, submitted previously to K+ starvation, showed the uptake of both Cs+ and K+ when micromolar concentrations of these cations were present in the medium. The uptake showed saturation kinetics for both cations that could be fitted to the Michelis-Menten model. KM values were smaller for K+ than for Cs+, indicating a higher affinity for the first cation. The presence of increasing K+ concentrations in the assay medium inhibited Cs+ uptake in Cynodon sp., as expected if both cations are transported by the same transport systems. This effect is due to the competition of both ions for the union sites of the high affinity potassium transporters. In field situation, where soil concentration of Cs+ is smaller than K+ concentration, is then expectable that caesium activity in plants is not detectable. Nevertheless, the studied plants would have the capacity to incorporate caesium if its availability in soil solution increases. In addition, studies of Cs/K interaction can help us to understand the variability in transfer factors.

  19. Kinetics of caesium and potassium absorption by roots of three grass pastures and competitive effects of potassium on caesium uptake in Cynodon sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Velasco, R. H.; Valverde, L. Rubio; Garcia-Sanchez, M. J.; Fernandez, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Caesium uptake by plant roots has been normally associated with the uptake of potassium as the potassium transport systems present in plants have also the capacity to transport caesium. Three grass species (Eragrostis curvula, Cynodon sp and Distichlis spicata) growing in seminatural grassland of central Argentina were selected to study their capability to incorporate Cs + (and K + ) using electrophysiological techniques. Although the 137 Cs soil inventory ranged between 328-730 Bq m -2 in this region, no 137 Cs activity was detected in these plants. However, all the species, submitted previously to K + starvation, showed the uptake of both Cs + and K + when micromolar concentrations of these cations were present in the medium. The uptake showed saturation kinetics for both cations that could be fitted to the Michelis-Menten model. K M values were smaller for K + than for Cs + , indicating a higher affinity for the first cation. The presence of increasing K + concentrations in the assay medium inhibited Cs + uptake in Cynodon sp., as expected if both cations are transported by the same transport systems. This effect is due to the competition of both ions for the union sites of the high affinity potassium transporters. In field situation, where soil concentration of Cs + is smaller than K + concentration, is then expectable that caesium activity in plants is not detectable. Nevertheless, the studied plants would have the capacity to incorporate caesium if its availability in soil solution increases. In addition, studies of Cs/K interaction can help us to understand the variability in transfer factors

  20. Penicillin V Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillin V potassium is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia and other ... heart valves and other symptoms) from coming back. Penicillin V potassium is in a class of medications ...

  1. Potassium maldistribution revisited

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:This study investigated maldistribution of concentrated 15% potassium chloride after injection into .... and latter experiments referred to for example as “Control 1” ..... be further investigated as a reliable, simple method of potassium.

  2. Leaching of potassium in a lysimeter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    Leaching of potassium was studied in the lysimeter plant in Seibersdorf/Austria (Pannonian climate). Averaged over three years, gravitational water amounted to 15.7% of the sum of precipitation (mean 485 mm) and irrigation (mean 138 mm). Differences between the four soils with respect to drainage were explained by the specific percentage of the soil skeleton. The average yearly potassium leaching ranged from 3.64 kg K/ha·yr (Dystric-Cambisol) to 22.7 kg K/ha·yr (drained Gleysol). Correlation between gravitational water volume and potassium leaching were only significant for one out of four soil types. No correlation was observed between extractable potassium in the soil profiles and potassium leaching. (author)

  3. Modeling of radiocesium transport kinetics in system water-aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svadlenkova, M.

    1988-01-01

    Compartment models were used to describe the kinetics of the transport of radionuclides in the system water-biomass of aquatic plants. Briefly described are linear models and models with time variable parameters. The model was tested using data from a locality in the environs of the Bohunice nuclear power plant. Cladophora glomerata algae were the monitored plants, 137 Cs the monitored radionuclide. The models may be used when aquatic plants serve as bioindicators of the radioactive contamination of surface waters, for monitoring the transport of radionuclides in food chains. (M.D.). 10 refs

  4. An Expanding Role For Purine Uptake Permease (PUP -like Transporters In Plant Secondary Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Jelesko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available For the past decade, our understanding of the plant purine uptake permease (PUP transporter family of was primarily oriented on purine nucleobase substrates and their tissue-specific expression patterns in Arabidopsis. However, a tobacco PUP-like homolog demonstrating nicotine uptake permease (NUP activity was recently shown to affect both nicotine metabolism and root cell growth. These new findings expand the physiological role for PUP-like transporters to include plant secondary metabolism. Molecular evolution analyses of PUP-like transporters indicate they are distinct group within an ancient super family of drug and metabolite transporters (DMTs. The PUP-like family originated during terrestrial plant evolution sometime between the bryophytes and the lycophytes. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that the PUP-like transporters were likely were derived from a pre-existing nucleotide sugar transporter family within the DMT super family. Within the lycophyte Selaginella, there are three paralogous groups of PUP-like transporters. One of the three PUP-like paralogous groups showed an extensive pattern of gene duplication and diversification within the angiosperm lineage, whereas the other two more ancestral PUP-like paralogous groups did not. Biochemical characterization of four closely-related PUP-like paralogs together with model-based phylogenetic analyses indicate both subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization during the molecular evolution of angiosperm PUP-like transporters. These findings suggest that members of the PUP-like family of DMT transporters are likely involved in diverse primary and secondary plant metabolic pathways.

  5. KV7 potassium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stott, Jennifer B; Jepps, Thomas Andrew; Greenwood, Iain A

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are key regulators of smooth muscle tone, with increases in activity resulting in hyperpolarisation of the cell membrane, which acts to oppose vasoconstriction. Several potassium channels exist within smooth muscle, but the KV7 family of voltage-gated potassium channels have been...

  6. Coupling of Groundwater Transport and Plant Uptake Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    in environmental systems at different scale. Feedback mechanisms between plants and hydrological systems can play an important role, however having received little attention to date. Here, a new model concept for dynamic plant uptake models applying analytical matrix solutions is presented, which can be coupled...

  7. Analysis and selection of a system for hydraulic transport of slags in the Mironovskii power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirgorodskii, V.G.; Mova, M.E.; Korenev, V.E.; Grechikhin, Yu.A. (Donetskii Politekhnicheskii Institut (USSR))

    1991-01-01

    Discusses systems for hydraulic transport of ashes and slags from combustion of black coal (with an ash content of 40.5%) in the Mironovskii power plant. Three systems are comparatively evaluated: hydraulic transport under influence of gravity, hydraulic transport with a system of dredging pumps, or an airlift pump system. Design of each system, its operation and types of pumps or airlift systems are discussed. The evaluation concentrates on the hydraulic transport system with 1 to 3 airlift pumps each with a capacity ranging from 110 to 890 m{sup 3}/h. Optimum design of the airlift hydraulic system for slag and ash transport is described.

  8. Potassium fluorotitanate preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, Patricia; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    In order to determine the best conditions for potassium fluotitanate preparation as intermediate step in the electrolytic production of metalic titanium, the effects of a number of experimental variables have been studied. This method is a process of sintering titanium dioxide with potassium fluosilicate and potassium chloride, followed by leaching with boiling water and further crystallization by cooling the solution. An overall yield of 90% has been attained under the following conditions: working temperature: 750 deg C; heating time for sintering: 3 hours; molar ratio: titanium dioxide: potassium fluosilicate: potassium chloride: 1 : 2 : 0.4; number of leachings: 6. (Author) [es

  9. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures......Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport...... accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development....

  10. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development.

  11. System-wide organization of actin cytoskeleton determines organelle transport in hypocotyl plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jacqueline; Ivakov, Alexander; Somssich, Marc; Persson, Staffan; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an essential intracellular filamentous structure that underpins cellular transport and cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. However, the system-level properties of actin-based cellular trafficking remain tenuous, largely due to the inability to quantify key features of the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we developed an automated image-based, network-driven framework to accurately segment and quantify actin cytoskeletal structures and Golgi transport. We show that the actin cytoskeleton in both growing and elongated hypocotyl cells has structural properties facilitating efficient transport. Our findings suggest that the erratic movement of Golgi is a stable cellular phenomenon that might optimize distribution efficiency of cell material. Moreover, we demonstrate that Golgi transport in hypocotyl cells can be accurately predicted from the actin network topology alone. Thus, our framework provides quantitative evidence for system-wide coordination of cellular transport in plant cells and can be readily applied to investigate cytoskeletal organization and transport in other organisms. PMID:28655850

  12. Co-regulation of water and K(+) transport in sunflower plants during water stress recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch, Manuel; Benlloch-González, María

    2016-06-01

    16-day-old sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to deficit irrigation for 12 days. Following this period, plants were rehydrated for 2 days to study plant responses to post-stress recovery. The moderate water stress treatment applied reduced growth in all plant organs and the accumulation of K(+) in the shoot. After the rehydration period, the stem recovered its growth and reached a similar length to the control, an effect which was not observed in either root or leaves. Moreover, plant rehydration after water stress favored the accumulation of K(+) in the apical zone of the stem and expanding leaves. In the roots of plants under water stress, watering to field capacity, once the plants were de- topped, rapidly favored K(+) and water transport in the excised roots. This quick and short-lived response was not observed in roots of plants recovered from water stress for 2 days. These results suggest that the recovery of plant growth after water stress is related to coordinated water and K(+) transport from the root to the apical zone of the ​​stem and expanding leaves. This stimulation of K(+) transport in the root and its accumulation in the cells of the growing zones of the ​​stem must be one of the first responses induced in the plant during water stress recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Sodium and potassium concentrations in floral nectars in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sodium and potassium concentrations have been measured in nectar from a variety of flowering plants visited by honey bees (Apis mellifera capensis). In 18 plant species the mean sodium concentration was 9,8 ± 1,4 mmol (± S.E.), and the mean potassium concentration was 18,7 ± 4,3 mmol. These results are compared ...

  14. The multiplicity of dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain of plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Geisler, Daniela A; Møller, Ian Max

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport chain in mitochondria of different organisms contains a mixture of common and specialised components. The specialised enzymes form branches to the universal electron path, especially at the level of ubiquinone, and allow the chain to adjust to different cellular and metabolic...... and their consequences for the understanding of electron transport and redundancy of electron paths...... requirements. In plants, specialised components have been known for a long time. However, recently, the known number of plant respiratory chain dehydrogenases has increased, including both components specific to plants and those with mammalian counterparts. This review will highlight the novel branches...

  15. Regulations for safe transport of spent fuels from nuclear power plants in CMEA member countries. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizka, B.

    1978-11-01

    The regulations for safe transport of spent fuel from nuclear power plants in the CMEA member countries consist of general provisions, technical requirements for spent fuel transport, transport conditions, procedures for submitting reports on transport, regulations for transport and protection of radioactive material to be transported, procedures for customs clearance, technical and organizational measures for the prevention of hypothetical accidents and the elimination of their consequences. The bodies responsible for spent fuel transport in the CMEA member countries are listed. (J.B.)

  16. Physiological Roles of Plant Post-Golgi Transport Pathways in Membrane Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    Membrane trafficking is the fundamental system through which proteins are sorted to their correct destinations in eukaryotic cells. Key regulators of this system include RAB GTPases and soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). Interestingly, the numbers of RAB GTPases and SNAREs involved in post-Golgi transport pathways in plant cells are larger than those in animal and yeast cells, suggesting that plants have evolved unique and complex post-Golgi transport pathways. The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is an important organelle that acts as a sorting station in the post-Golgi transport pathways of plant cells. The TGN also functions as the early endosome, which is the first compartment to receive endocytosed proteins. Several endocytosed proteins on the plasma membrane (PM) are initially targeted to the TGN/EE, then recycled back to the PM or transported to the vacuole for degradation. The recycling and degradation of the PM localized proteins is essential for the development and environmental responses in plant. The present review describes the post-Golgi transport pathways that show unique physiological functions in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Silicon in vascular plants: uptake, transport and its influence on mineral stress under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontigo, Sofía; Ribera, Alejandra; Gianfreda, Liliana; de la Luz Mora, María; Nikolic, Miroslav; Cartes, Paula

    2015-07-01

    So far, considerable advances have been achieved in understanding the mechanisms of Si uptake and transport in vascular plants. This review presents a comprehensive update about this issue, but also provides the new insights into the role of Si against mineral stresses that occur in acid soils. Such information could be helpful to understand both the differential Si uptake ability as well as the benefits of this mineral element on plants grown under acidic conditions. Silicon (Si) has been widely recognized as a beneficial element for many plant species, especially under stress conditions. In the last few years, great efforts have been made to elucidate the mechanisms involved in uptake and transport of Si by vascular plants and recently, different Si transporters have been identified. Several researches indicate that Si can alleviate various mineral stresses in plants growing under acidic conditions, including aluminium (Al) and manganese (Mn) toxicities as well as phosphorus (P) deficiency all of which are highly detrimental to crop production. This review presents recent findings concerning the influence of uptake and transport of Si on mineral stress under acidic conditions because a knowledge of this interaction provides the basis for understanding the role of Si in mitigating mineral stress in acid soils. Currently, only four Si transporters have been identified and there is little information concerning the response of Si transporters under stress conditions. More investigations are therefore needed to establish whether there is a relationship between Si transporters and the benefits of Si to plants subjected to mineral stress. Evidence presented suggests that Si supply and its subsequent accumulation in plant tissues could be exploited as a strategy to improve crop productivity on acid soils.

  18. Ion and metabolite transport in the chloroplast of algae: lessons from land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Justine; Heydarizadeh, Parisa; Schoefs, Benoît; Spetea, Cornelia

    2018-06-01

    Chloroplasts are endosymbiotic organelles and play crucial roles in energy supply and metabolism of eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms (algae and land plants). They harbor channels and transporters in the envelope and thylakoid membranes, mediating the exchange of ions and metabolites with the cytosol and the chloroplast stroma and between the different chloroplast subcompartments. In secondarily evolved algae, three or four envelope membranes surround the chloroplast, making more complex the exchange of ions and metabolites. Despite the importance of transport proteins for the optimal functioning of the chloroplast in algae, and that many land plant homologues have been predicted, experimental evidence and molecular characterization are missing in most cases. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge about ion and metabolite transport in the chloroplast from algae. The main aspects reviewed are localization and activity of the transport proteins from algae and/or of homologues from other organisms including land plants. Most chloroplast transporters were identified in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, reside in the envelope and participate in carbon acquisition and metabolism. Only a few identified algal transporters are located in the thylakoid membrane and play role in ion transport. The presence of genes for putative transporters in green algae, red algae, diatoms, glaucophytes and cryptophytes is discussed, and roles in the chloroplast are suggested. A deep knowledge in this field is required because algae represent a potential source of biomass and valuable metabolites for industry, medicine and agriculture.

  19. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Gurbir S; Iravani, Majid; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2013-09-08

    The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here we present a mesocosm experiment comparing eight plant species for their effects on internal transport and overall emissions of methane under contrasting hydrological conditions. To quantify how much methane was transported internally through plants (the chimney effect), we blocked diffusion from the soil surface with an agar seal. We found that graminoids caused higher methane emissions than forbs, although the emissions from mesocosms with different species were either lower than or comparable to those from control mesocosms with no plant (i.e. bare soil). Species with a relatively greater root volume and a larger biomass exhibited a larger chimney effect, though overall methane emissions were negatively related to plant biomass. Emissions were also reduced by lowering the water table. We conclude that plant species (and functional groups) vary in the degree to which they transport methane to the atmosphere. However, a plant with a high capacity to transport methane does not necessarily emit more methane, as it may also cause more rhizosphere oxidation of methane. A shift in plant species composition from graminoids to forbs and/or from low to high productive species may lead to reduction of methane emissions.

  20. Sucrose assimilation and the role of sucrose transporters in plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant cells are commonly exposed to a variety of injuries such as mechanical and herbivore ... changes in gene repression that contribute to cell defense and repairs. ... tissues or cells can only be met by an increased utilization of exogenously ...

  1. Carbon dioxide and water transport through plant aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Michael; Osborn, Hannah L; Evans, John R

    2017-06-01

    Aquaporins are channel proteins that function to increase the permeability of biological membranes. In plants, aquaporins are encoded by multigene families that have undergone substantial diversification in land plants. The plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) subfamily of aquaporins is of particular interest given their potential to improve plant water relations and photosynthesis. Flowering plants have between 7 and 28 PIP genes. Their expression varies with tissue and cell type, through development and in response to a variety of factors, contributing to the dynamic and tissue specific control of permeability. There are a growing number of PIPs shown to act as water channels, but those altering membrane permeability to CO 2 are more limited. The structural basis for selective substrate specificities has not yet been resolved, although a few key amino acid positions have been identified. Several regions important for dimerization, gating and trafficking are also known. PIP aquaporins assemble as tetramers and their properties depend on the monomeric composition. PIPs control water flux into and out of veins and stomatal guard cells and also increase membrane permeability to CO 2 in mesophyll and stomatal guard cells. The latter increases the effectiveness of Rubisco and can potentially influence transpiration efficiency. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Radon transport from uranium mill tailings via plant transpiration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Radon exhalation by vegetation planted on bare or soil-covered uranium mill wastes was studied based on an assumption that radon transport from soil to atmosphere via plants takes place in the transpiration stream. Results show that radon exhalation by plants is inversely related to water transpired, primarily a dilution effect. Radon released appeared directly related to leaf area, suggesting that radon is carried into the plant by mass flow in water; however, once within the plant, radon very likely diffuses through the entire leaf cuticle, while water vapor diffuses primarily through open stomates. Application of a computerized model for water transpiration to radon exhalation is not immediately useful until the role of water in radon transport is defined throughout the continuum from rooting medium to the atmosphere. Until then, a simple calculation based on leaf area index and Ra-226 concentration in the rooting medium can provide an estimate of radon release from revegetated wastes containing radium

  3. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis to Life at Extreme Potassium Limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hertel, Dietrich; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Link, Hannes; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-07-05

    Potassium is the most abundant metal ion in every living cell. This ion is essential due to its requirement for the activity of the ribosome and many enzymes but also because of its role in buffering the negative charge of nucleic acids. As the external concentrations of potassium are usually low, efficient uptake and intracellular enrichment of the ion is necessary. The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis possesses three transporters for potassium, KtrAB, KtrCD, and the recently discovered KimA. In the absence of the high-affinity transporters KtrAB and KimA, the bacteria were unable to grow at low potassium concentrations. However, we observed the appearance of suppressor mutants that were able to overcome the potassium limitation. All these suppressor mutations affected amino acid metabolism, particularly arginine biosynthesis. In the mutants, the intracellular levels of ornithine, citrulline, and arginine were strongly increased, suggesting that these amino acids can partially substitute for potassium. This was confirmed by the observation that the supplementation with positively charged amino acids allows growth of B. subtilis even at the extreme potassium limitation that the bacteria experience if no potassium is added to the medium. In addition, a second class of suppressor mutations allowed growth at extreme potassium limitation. These mutations result in increased expression of KtrAB, the potassium transporter with the highest affinity and therefore allow the acquisition and accumulation of the smallest amounts of potassium ions from the environment. IMPORTANCE Potassium is essential for every living cell as it is required for the activity for many enzymes and for maintaining the intracellular pH by buffering the negative charge of the nucleic acids. We have studied the adaptation of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis to life at low potassium concentrations. If the major high-affinity transporters are missing, the bacteria are unable to grow

  4. Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs

  5. Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs.

  6. Beyond cellular detoxification: a plethora of physiological roles for MDR transporter homologs in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Estelle; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Higher plants possess a multitude of Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) transporter homologs that group into three distinct and ubiquitous families—the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily, the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS), and the Multidrug And Toxic compound Extrusion (MATE) family. As in other organisms, such as fungi, mammals, and bacteria, MDR transporters make a primary contribution to cellular detoxification processes in plants, mainly through the extrusion of toxic compounds from the cell or their sequestration in the central vacuole. This review aims at summarizing the currently available information on the in vivo roles of MDR transporters in plant systems. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that the biological functions of ABC, MFS, and MATE carriers are not restricted to xenobiotic and metal detoxification. Importantly, the activity of plant MDR transporters also mediates biotic stress resistance and is instrumental in numerous physiological processes essential for optimal plant growth and development, including the regulation of ion homeostasis and polar transport of the phytohormone auxin. PMID:24910617

  7. Prediction of arsenic and antimony transporter major intrinsic proteins from the genomes of crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Ahmed, Jahed; Alum, Md Asraful; Hasan, Md Mahbub; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), commonly known as aquaporins, transport water and non-polar small solutes. Comparing the 3D models and the primary selectivity-related motifs (two Asn-Pro-Ala (NPA) regions, the aromatic/arginine (ar/R) selectivity filter, and Froger's positions (FPs)) of all plant MIPs that have been experimentally proven to transport arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb), some substrate-specific signature sequences (SSSS) or specificity determining sites (SDPs) have been predicted. These SSSS or SDPs were determined in 543 MIPs found in the genomes of 12 crop plants; the As and Sb transporters were predicted to be distributed in noduline-26 like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), and every plant had one or several As and Sb transporter NIPs. Phylogenetic grouping of the NIP subfamily based on the ar/R selectivity filter and FPs were linked to As and Sb transport. We further determined the group-wise substrate selectivity profiles of the NIPs in the 12 crop plants. In addition to two NPA regions, the ar/R filter, and FPs, certain amino acids especially in the pore line, loop D, and termini contribute to the functional distinctiveness of the NIP groups. Expression analysis of transcripts in different organs indicated that most of the As and Sb transporter NIPs were expressed in roots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Suberized transport barriers in Arabidopsis, barley and rice roots: From the model plant to crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreszies, Tino; Schreiber, Lukas; Ranathunge, Kosala

    2018-02-07

    Water is the most important prerequisite for life and plays a major role during uptake and transport of nutrients. Roots are the plant organs that take up the major part of water, from the surrounding soil. Water uptake is related to the root system architecture, root growth, age and species dependent complex developmental changes in the anatomical structures. The latter is mainly attributed to the deposition of suberized barriers in certain layers of cell walls, such as endo- and exodermis. With respect to water permeability, changes in the suberization of roots are most relevant. Water transport or hydraulic conductivity of roots (Lp r ) can be described by the composite transport model and is known to be very variable between plant species and growth conditions and root developmental states. In this review, we summarize how anatomical structures and apoplastic barriers of roots can diversely affect water transport, comparing the model plant Arabidopsis with crop plants, such as barley and rice. Results comparing the suberin amounts and water transport properties indicate that the common assumption that suberin amount negatively correlates with water and solute transport through roots may not always be true. The composition, microstructure and localization of suberin may also have a great impact on the formation of efficient barriers to water and solutes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  9. Handling of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, N.; Komurka, M.

    1983-03-01

    As a result for the Fast Breeder Development extensive experience is available worldwide with respect to Sodium technology. Due to the extension of the research program to topping cycles with Potassium as the working medium, test facilities with Potassium have been designed and operated in the Institute of Reactor Safety. The different chemical properties of Sodium and Potassium give rise in new safety concepts and operating procedures. The handling problems of Potassium are described in the light of theoretical properties and own experiences. Selected literature on main safety and operating problems complete this report. (Author) [de

  10. Transport and Use of Bicarbonate in Plants: Current Knowledge and Challenges Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Poschenrieder

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Bicarbonate plays a fundamental role in the cell pH status in all organisms. In autotrophs, HCO3− may further contribute to carbon concentration mechanisms (CCM. This is especially relevant in the CO2-poor habitats of cyanobacteria, aquatic microalgae, and macrophytes. Photosynthesis of terrestrial plants can also benefit from CCM as evidenced by the evolution of C4 and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM. The presence of HCO3− in all organisms leads to more questions regarding the mechanisms of uptake and membrane transport in these different biological systems. This review aims to provide an overview of the transport and metabolic processes related to HCO3− in microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, and terrestrial plants. HCO3− transport in cyanobacteria and human cells is much better documented and is included for comparison. We further comment on the metabolic roles of HCO3− in plants by focusing on the diversity and functions of carbonic anhydrases and PEP carboxylases as well as on the signaling role of CO2/HCO3− in stomatal guard cells. Plant responses to excess soil HCO3− is briefly addressed. In conclusion, there are still considerable gaps in our knowledge of HCO3− uptake and transport in plants that hamper the development of breeding strategies for both more efficient CCM and better HCO3− tolerance in crop plants.

  11. Transport and Use of Bicarbonate in Plants: Current Knowledge and Challenges Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Fernández, José Antonio; Rubio, Lourdes; Pérez, Laura; Terés, Joana; Barceló, Juan

    2018-05-03

    Bicarbonate plays a fundamental role in the cell pH status in all organisms. In autotrophs, HCO₃ − may further contribute to carbon concentration mechanisms (CCM). This is especially relevant in the CO₂-poor habitats of cyanobacteria, aquatic microalgae, and macrophytes. Photosynthesis of terrestrial plants can also benefit from CCM as evidenced by the evolution of C₄ and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM). The presence of HCO₃ − in all organisms leads to more questions regarding the mechanisms of uptake and membrane transport in these different biological systems. This review aims to provide an overview of the transport and metabolic processes related to HCO₃ − in microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, and terrestrial plants. HCO₃ − transport in cyanobacteria and human cells is much better documented and is included for comparison. We further comment on the metabolic roles of HCO₃ − in plants by focusing on the diversity and functions of carbonic anhydrases and PEP carboxylases as well as on the signaling role of CO₂/HCO₃ − in stomatal guard cells. Plant responses to excess soil HCO₃ − is briefly addressed. In conclusion, there are still considerable gaps in our knowledge of HCO₃ − uptake and transport in plants that hamper the development of breeding strategies for both more efficient CCM and better HCO₃ − tolerance in crop plants.

  12. Ebullition, Plant-Mediated Transport, and Subsurface Horizontal Water Flow Dominate Methane Transport in an Arctic Sphagnum Bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R. A.; McCalley, C. K.; Logan, T. A.; Chanton, J.; Crill, P. M.; Rich, V. I.; Saleska, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas methane from wetlands is of prime concern in the prediction of climate change - especially emission associated with thawing permafrost, which may drive a positive feedback loop of emission and warming. In addition to the biochemistry of methane production and consumption, wetland methane emission depends critically on the transport mechanisms by which methane moves through and out of the ecosystem. We therefore developed a model of methane biochemistry and transport for a sphagnum bog representing an intermediate permafrost thaw stage in Stordalen Mire, Sweden. In order to simultaneously reproduce measured profiles of both the concentrations and isotopic compositions of both methane and carbon dioxide in the peat pore water (Fig. 1) - as well as the surface methane emission - it was necessary for the model to include ebullition, plant-mediated transport via aerenchyma, and subsurface horizontal water flow. Diffusion of gas through the pore water was relatively unimportant. As a result, 90% of the produced methane escaped the wetland rather than being consumed by methanotrophic organisms in the near-surface pore water. Our model provides a comprehensive picture of methane emission from this bog site by quantifying the vertical profiles of: acetoclastic methanogenesis, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, methane oxidation, aerobic respiration, ebullition, plant-mediated transport, subsurface horizontal water flow, and diffusion.

  13. Observations of market pigs following transport to a packing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, K B; Harper, M T; Raines, C R

    2010-06-01

    A field study was conducted to record observations of 41,744 market-weight pigs upon arrival at a commercial abattoir to evaluate the relationships between various independent factors and open-mouth breathing, skin discoloration, lameness, unloading time, and mortality during transport. Observations were recorded from 242 trailer loads on 46 separate days over a period of 14 mo. Travel time (or=2.5 h), wait time before unloading (or=20 min), loading pressure (space or >or=260 kg of BW/m(2) trailer floor space), ambient temperature while unloading (or=17 degrees C), and trailer type [potbelly (PB); straight-deck with conventional unloading doors (SDC); or straight-deck with wide unloading doors (SDW)] were recorded for each load. Open-mouth breathing was more prevalent in pigs when transported on PB trailers compared with that of SDC or SDW trailers (P or=17 degrees C, P or=17 degrees C. Lameness was more prevalent (P travel times at greater loading pressure compared with shorter travel times at decreased loading pressure. Unloading time for PB trailers was longer (P 0.10) relationships between mortality and any independent variable tested. Wait time before unloading was not associated (P > 0.10) with any of the dependent variables included in the statistical model. In conclusion, warmer ambient temperatures (>or=17 degrees C) and the use of PB trailers are associated with an increased incidence of open-mouth breathing and skin discoloration, and longer unloading times after the transport of market pigs.

  14. Inhibiting Cadmium Transport Process in Root Cells of Plants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Yan-ling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium(Cd is the most common element found in the heavy-metal contaminated soils in China. Roots of rice and vegetables can concentrate Cd from acid soils, and then transport Cd to above-ground parts. Cd in edible part of plants directly influences the food safety. Cellwall, plasma membrane and organells of root cells in plant can discriminate Cd from other elements. A lot of Cd can be fixed in root cells by precipitation, complexation, compartmentation, and so on, to inhibit its transport from roots to shoot and guarantee the physiological activities in above-ground parts carrying out normally. This paper summarized recent advance on inhibiting Cd transport process in subcellular fractions of root cells of plants, which is in advantage of exploring excellent germplasms and gene resources in the future.

  15. Navigating the plant cell: intracellular transport logistics in the green kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitmann, Anja; Nebenführ, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Intracellular transport in plant cells occurs on microtubular and actin arrays. Cytoplasmic streaming, the rapid motion of plant cell organelles, is mostly driven by an actin-myosin mechanism, whereas specialized functions, such as the transport of large cargo or the assembly of a new cell wall during cell division, are performed by the microtubules. Different modes of transport are used, fast and slow, to either haul cargo over long distances or ascertain high-precision targeting, respectively. Various forms of the actin-specific motor protein myosin XI exist in plant cells and might be involved in different cellular functions. © 2015 Geitmann and Nebenführ. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  17. Monitoring and diagnostic system of fission product transport and release in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, H.; Kondo, S.; Togo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A monitoring and diagnostic system (MADS) of fission product (FP) transport and release in nuclear power plants (NPPs) is proposed and the conceptual design for MADS is studied. A MADS can be described in the most general way as a computer-based information processing system which takes in plant data, processes it and displays the results to the NPP's operating crew. A major concern for MADS is, however, not to evaluate general plant dynamics, but to monitor the distribution of whole radioactive materials such as FP, and to diagnose the plant state in the view of FP transport during the NPP's lifetime. Several functions demanded of MADS are: (a) during normal operation, to certify the fuel integrity and the effectiveness of the purification systems, (b) in an unusual event, to identify the event and to monitor the amount of FP release with accuracy, and (c) in case of a rare occurrence, to estimate the maximum potential release

  18. Sampling and transport of paraffin waste form from CWDS of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Kim, C. R.; Park, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sampling and transport of paraffin waste form from concentrated waste drying system (CWDS) of domestic nuclear power plant were performed to collect the leaching characteristic data for the disposal of radioactive waste. Transport was performed according to the national regulations and the internal rules of the nuclear power plant. The sample of paraffin waste form was classified as L type package according to the regulation and radiation exposure of operator was measured in the range of 6 to 12 mrem that was less than the estimated amount

  19. Cost of transporting irradiated fuels and maintenance costs of a chemical treatment plant for irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Y.

    1964-01-01

    Numerous studies have been made of the cost of a fuel cycle, but many of them are based on a priori studies and are therefore to be treated with reserve. Thus, in the part dealing with the treatment of irradiated fuels, some important factors in the cost have only rarely been given on the basis of practical experience: the cost of transporting the fuels themselves and the plant maintenance costs. Investigations relating to transport costs are generally based on calculations made from somewhat arbitrary data. The studies carried out in France on the transport of irradiated uranium between the EDF reactors at Chinon and the retreatment plant at La Hague of the irradiated uranium from research reactors to foreign retreatment plants, are reported; they show that by a suitable choice of transport containers and details of expedition it has been possible to reduce the costs very considerably. This has been achieved either by combining rail and road transport or by increasing the writ capacities of the transport containers: an example is given of a container for swimming-pool pile elements which can transport a complete pile core at one time, thus substantially reducing the cost. Studies concerning the maintenance costs of retreatment plants are rarer still, although in direct maintenance plants these figures represent an appreciable fraction of the total treatment cost. An attempt has been made, on the basis of operational experience of a plant, to obtain some idea of these costs. Only maintenance proper has been considered, excluding subsidiary operations such as the final decontamination of apparatus, the burial of contaminated material and radioprotection operations Maintenance has been divided into three sections: mechanical maintenance, maintenance of electrical equipment and maintenance of control and adjustment apparatus. In each of these sections the distinction has been made between manpower and the material side. In order to allow comparisons to be made with

  20. Potassium and Your CKD Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vegetable in your diet, leach them before using. Leaching is a process by which some potassium can be pulled out ... out of my favorite high-potassium vegetables? The process of leaching will help pull potassium out of some high- ...

  1. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li 2 O granule throughput of 2.8 m 3 /s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber

  2. Transport, acceptance, storage and handling of the itens of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The norm aiming to establish the requirements applied to workers or organizations which participate of the activities of transport, acceptance, storage and handling of important itens for safety of nuclear power plants, is presented. The established requirements treat of protection and control necessary to assure that the quality of important itens for safety be it preserved from the end of fabrication until their incorporation to nuclear power plant. (M.C.K.) [pt

  3. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bhullar, Gurbir S; Iravani, Majid; Edwards, Peter J; Olde Venterink, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here...

  4. Possible evidence for transport of an iron cyanide complex by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiotakis, M.; Ebbs, S.D.

    2004-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), and wild cane (Sorghum bicolor L.), were exposed to 15 N-labeled ferrocyanide to determine whether these plant species can transport this iron cyanide complex. Plants were treated with ferrocyanide in a nutrient solution that simulated iron cyanide contaminated groundwater and soil solutions. This nutrient solution has been shown to maintain ferrocyanide speciation with minimal dissociation to free cyanide. Following treatment, all three plants showed dramatic enrichments in roots (δ 15 N%o=1000-1500) and shoots (δ 15 N%o=500). Barley and oat showed enrichment primarily in roots while wild cane showed a near equal enrichment in root and shoot tissues. Nitrogen-deficient barley plants treated with ferrocyanide showed a significantly greater 15 N enrichment as compared to nitrogen-sufficient plants. While the results are suggestive of ferrocyanide transport by these plant species, additional study will be required to verify these results. - Results suggest ferrocyanide transport by barley, oat and wild cane

  5. Possible evidence for transport of an iron cyanide complex by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samiotakis, M.; Ebbs, S.D

    2004-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), and wild cane (Sorghum bicolor L.), were exposed to {sup 15}N-labeled ferrocyanide to determine whether these plant species can transport this iron cyanide complex. Plants were treated with ferrocyanide in a nutrient solution that simulated iron cyanide contaminated groundwater and soil solutions. This nutrient solution has been shown to maintain ferrocyanide speciation with minimal dissociation to free cyanide. Following treatment, all three plants showed dramatic enrichments in roots ({delta} {sup 15}N%o=1000-1500) and shoots ({delta} {sup 15}N%o=500). Barley and oat showed enrichment primarily in roots while wild cane showed a near equal enrichment in root and shoot tissues. Nitrogen-deficient barley plants treated with ferrocyanide showed a significantly greater {sup 15}N enrichment as compared to nitrogen-sufficient plants. While the results are suggestive of ferrocyanide transport by these plant species, additional study will be required to verify these results. - Results suggest ferrocyanide transport by barley, oat and wild cane.

  6. Microfluidics of sugar transport in plant leaves and in biomimetic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rademaker, Hanna

    The physical mechanisms underlying vital plant functions constitute a research field with many important, unsolved problems. Some of these research topics gaining attention in recent years are concerned with the fluid transport in plants. Plants photosynthesize sugars in their leaves for energy...... into the veins. We studied the physics of two basic mechanisms for sugar loading: the polymer trap and passive loading. The polymer trap is an active mechanism, which is characterized by an elevated concentration of sugars inside the veins compared to the rest of the leaf. This is achieved with the help...

  7. Applications of isotopes in plants for the study of absorption and transportation of mineral elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jooste, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of radioisotopes is illustrated by various experiments in plant nutrition. Firstly, the foliar uptake of Zn in fruit trees is discussed. Secondly, the foliar uptake of Fe is compared to the root absorption of a bean plant. Thirdly, there is a comparison of the absorption of the Cl-ion by the roots, leaves and flowers of the petunia. Na-absorption by the non-salt resistant bean plant as well as transportation rate in the bast and xylem are discussed shortly

  8. Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

    2006-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

  9. Transport of calcium in stolones of potato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.; Marschner, H.

    1974-01-01

    In hydroculture tests with potato plants, the 45 Ca displacement into the stolons depending on the growth rate and the degree of supply of Ca of the tuber as well as on the relative air humidity in the region of stolons and tubers was investigated. 45 Ca was either applied via the roots or via the stolon surface. With the 45 Ca supply via the root, only a small 45 Ca displacement into the stolon or tuber takes place if the stolon tip or the tubers were additionally supplied exagenously with Ca (CaSO 4 solution) or if the relative humidity of the air in the region of the stolons or tubers was high. At high relative air humidity around the tubers, there was no 'sink' effect of the tuber on the 45 Ca displacement in the stolon even if the Ca supply of the tuber was bad. 45 Ca applied via the stolon surface at high relative air humidity in the stolon region was practically exclusively displaced to the direction of the sprout. At low air humidity in the region of the stolen and tuber, on the other hand, the 45 Ca was well displaced into the stolon in the direction of the sprout or tuber after application via the root as well as via the stolon. (GSE/LH) [de

  10. Uptake and transport of positron-emitting tracer (18F) in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Shimazu, Masamitsu

    1997-01-01

    The transport of a positron-emitting isotope introduced into a plant was dynamically followed by a special observation apparatus called Positron-Emitting Tracer Imaging System' to observe the damage and recovery functions of plants in vivo. In the system, annihilation γ-rays from the positron emitter are detected with two planar detectors (5 x 6 cm 2 ). The water containing ca. 5 MBq/ml of 18 F was fed to the cut stem of soybean for 2 min and then the images of tracer activity were recorded for 30-50 min. When the midrib of a leaf near the petiole was cut just before measurement, the activity in the injured leaf was decreased but detected even at the apex. This result suggests that the damaged leaf recovered the uptake of water through the lamina. Maximum tracer activities in leaves of unirradiated plant were observed within 10 min, whereas those of irradiated plant at 100 Gy were observed after over 25 min. The final activity of irradiated plant after 30 min was lower than that of unirradiated plant. In case of beans, there was a difference in the absorption behavior of the 18 F-labeled water between unirradiated and irradiated samples. These results show that the system is effective to observe the uptake and transportation of water containing positron emitting tracer for the study of damage and recovery functions of plants. (Author)

  11. Some Sensitivity Studies of Chemical Transport Simulated in Models of the Soil-Plant-Litter System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begovich, C.L.

    2002-10-28

    Fifteen parameters in a set of five coupled models describing carbon, water, and chemical dynamics in the soil-plant-litter system were varied in a sensitivity analysis of model response. Results are presented for chemical distribution in the components of soil, plants, and litter along with selected responses of biomass, internal chemical transport (xylem and phloem pathways), and chemical uptake. Response and sensitivity coefficients are presented for up to 102 model outputs in an appendix. Two soil properties (chemical distribution coefficient and chemical solubility) and three plant properties (leaf chemical permeability, cuticle thickness, and root chemical conductivity) had the greatest influence on chemical transport in the soil-plant-litter system under the conditions examined. Pollutant gas uptake (SO{sub 2}) increased with change in plant properties that increased plant growth. Heavy metal dynamics in litter responded to plant properties (phloem resistance, respiration characteristics) which induced changes in the chemical cycling to the litter system. Some of the SO{sub 2} and heavy metal responses were not expected but became apparent through the modeling analysis.

  12. Plasmodesmos: transporte simplástico de herbicidas na planta Plasmodesmata: symplastic transport of herbicides within the plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Concenço

    2007-01-01

    "group". Cells of the same domain behave as functional units, and substances are able to move between them at rates above the observed for trans-membrane movement. Plasmodesmata participate in long distance movement, both by association with phloem and interchange among neighboring domains. When the plant is under stress and xylem and phloem flux is slower, plasmodesmata could be more participative in long distance transport of systemic herbicide molecules. It remains to be fully understood whether there is a relationship among molecules of some herbicide groups and proteins embedded in the inner surface of plasmodesmata, to determine if some groups are able to manipulate the size of exclusion limit, independent of molecule size, as well as to verify if similarities between native compounds and herbicidal molecules result in higher rates of symplastic uptake. The deserving importance is not given to the role plasmodesmata plays in systemic herbicidal transport within the plant. However, the progress achieved with works related to marked products and plant physiology research intensification will eventually elucidate some not so clear aspects involving herbicide uptake by xylem and phloem, and their association with apoplast and symplastic domains.

  13. Lipid Raft-Based Membrane Compartmentation of a Plant Transport Protein Expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grossmann, Q.; Opekarová, Miroslava; Nováková, L.; Stolz, J.; Tanner, W.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2006), s. 945-953 ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saccharomyces cerevisiae * plant transport protein * hup1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.707, year: 2006

  14. Technical evaluation of the G.E. Transportable Modular AZTECH Plant topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henscheid, J.W.; Stalker, A.E.

    1985-12-01

    This report summarizes EG and G Idaho's review of the General Electric Company's topical report on their Transportable Modular AZTECH Plant. The review evaluated compliance with pertinent codes, standards and regulations. The initial review was discussed with G.E. and all outstanding issues resolved before this final evaluation was made

  15. Uptake, transport and persistence of 14C yeast mannans in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.G.; Kluge, S.

    1988-01-01

    Low-molecular branched-chain 14 C-mannan from Candida tropicalis and high-molecular linear 14 C-mannan from Rhodotorula rubra are not taken up by intact plants. Mechanical injury of plants is a prerequisite for the uptake and transport of polysaccharides in plant tissues. Mannans injected through the epidermis into the parenchyma of tobacco leaves remain mostly confined to the place of injection or to the respective intercostal field. The presence of dimethyl sulfoxide in the solution stimulates the uptake of mannans through intact roots of tobacco, thorn apple and potato plants. Mannans injected in the intercellular space of the parenchyma tissue of tobacco leaves maintain their polymeric structure for at least five days, which almost corresponds with the duration of their antiviral activity in the plants. These results suggest the antiphytoviral activity in fact to be due to the mannans or to principles stimulated by them rather than to their catabolites. (author)

  16. Proapoptotic Role of Potassium Ions in Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglin Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively promote the infiltration of potassium ions. The significance of these channels for tumor biology has become obvious. However, the effects of potassium ions on the tumor or normal cells have seldom been studied. To address this problem, we studied the biological effects of L02 and HepG2 cells with ectogenous potassium ions. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate were analyzed. Our results indicated that potassium ions inhibited proliferation of L02 and HepG2 cells and promoted their apoptosis. Potassium ions induced apoptosis through regulating Bcl-2 family members and depolarized the mitochondrial membrane, especially for HepG2 cell. These biological effects were associated with channel protein HERG. By facilitating expression of channel protein HERG, potassium ions may prevent it from being shunted to procancerous pathways by inducing apoptosis. These results demonstrated that potassium ions may be a key regulator of liver cell function. Thus, our findings suggest that potassium ions could inhibit tumorigenesis through inducing apoptosis of hepatoma cells by upregulating potassium ions transport channel proteins HERG and VDAC1.

  17. Transport of radioactive droplet moisture from a source in a nuclear power plant spray pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a change in the microclimate in the region surrounding a nuclear power plant resulting from the emission of vapor form a cooling tower, evaporation of water from the water surface of a cooling pond or a spray pond, in the latter case direct radioactive contamination of the underlying surface around the nuclear power plant can also occur due to discharge of process water (radioactive) into the pond and its transport in the air over a certain distance in the form of droplet moisture. A typical example may be the situation at the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant in 1986 when accidental discharge of process water into the cooling pond occurred. Below we present a solution for the problem of transport of droplet moisture taking into account its evaporation, which may be used to estimate the scale of radioactive contamination of the locality

  18. Study of transport processes in soils and plants by microautoradiographic and radioabsorption methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varro, T.; Gelencser, Judit; Somogyi, G.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration profiles of lead and boron in carrot root and potato tuber were determined at various diffusion times by microradiographic method. The transport process of nutrients, leaf-manures and plant-protecting agents in plants was investigated by radioabsorption method. The influence of the pH of soils and complex-forming agents on the effective diffusion coefficients of nutritives was studied by radioabsorption technique. In soils, the effective diffusion coefficient of the nutrients was found to change in the region of 10 -16 -10 -10 m 2 s -1 . The data of the measurements give valuable information about the transport processes in plants and soils. (author) 9 refs., 4 figs

  19. Stress regulated members of the plant organic cation transporter family are localized to the vacuolar membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis six genes group into the gene family of the organic cation transporters (OCTs. In animals the members of the OCT-family are mostly characterized as polyspecific transporters involved in the homeostasis of solutes, the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters and the transport of choline and carnitine. In plants little is known about function, localisation and regulation of this gene family. Only one protein has been characterized as a carnitine transporter at the plasma membrane so far. Findings We localized the five uncharacterized members of the Arabidopsis OCT family, designated OCT2-OCT6, via GFP fusions and protoplast transformation to the tonoplast. Expression analysis with RNA Gel Blots showed a distinct, organ-specific expression pattern of the individual genes. With reporter gene fusion of four members we analyzed the tissue specific distribution of OCT2, 3, 4, and 6. In experiments with salt, drought and cold stress, we could show that AtOCT4, 5 and 6 are up-regulated during drought stress, AtOCT3 and 5 during cold stress and AtOCT 5 and 6 during salt stress treatments. Conclusion Localisation of the proteins at the tonoplast and regulation of the gene expression under stress conditions suggests a specific role for the transporters in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  20. Development of a unified transport approach for the assessment of power-plant impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, E.J.; Barton, J.M.; Bledsoe, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress during the first 18 months in implementation of the Unified Transport Approach (UTA) is summarized in this report, which covers the period through December 1976. The goal of this project is to develop mathematical models for fast-transient, one-and two-dimensional transport of thermal, radiological, chemical, and biological properties in rivers, estuaries, lakes, and coastal regions for assessing the impact of power-plant operations. Development and validation of these models are illustrated in applications at several sites where data is available. The models include submodels for sediment transport, exchange of a soluble isotope with sediment, and zone-matching models to connect near-field problems of reentrainment and recirculation with far-field convective transport. Several types of automated data preparation have been introduced, and the codes have been designed to allow input of specified plant operating conditions for given durations. The UTA provides a common basis for calculating the transport of intensive quantities that depend on basic flow properties, which can be obtained from a common set of data for geometry, bathymetry, and meteorology that must be prepared only once. The formulation and calculation are based on a stable set of algorithms that have been tested and proven valid. The user can then focus on understanding and interpreting thermal, chemical, or radiological transport results with confidence that the basic calculations are direct, efficient, and meaningful. Recent work in each of the three areas is described

  1. Regulation of Inducible Potassium Transporter KdpFABC by the KdpD/KdpE Two-Component System in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin He

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kdp-ATPase is an inducible high affinity potassium uptake system that is widely distributed in bacteria, and is generally regulated by the KdpD/KdpE two-component system (TCS. In this study, conducted on Mycobacterium smegmatis, the kdpFABC (encoding Kdp-ATPase expression was found to be affected by low concentration of K+, high concentrations of Na+, and/or NH4+ of the medium. The KdpE was found to be a transcriptional regulator that bound to a specific 22-bp sequence in the promoter region of kdpFABC operon to positively regulate kdpFABC expression. The KdpE binding motif was highly conserved in the promoters of kdpFABC among the mycobacterial species. 5′-RACE data indicated a transcriptional start site (TSS of the kdpFABC operon within the coding sequence of MSMEG_5391, which comprised a 120-bp long 5′-UTR and an open reading frame of the 87-bp kdpF gene. The kdpE deletion resulted in altered growth rate under normal and low K+ conditions. Furthermore, under K+ limiting conditions, a single transcript (kdpFABCDE spanning kdpFABC and kdpDE operons was observed. This study provided the first insight into the regulation of kdpFABC operon by the KdpD/KdpE TCS in M. smegmatis.

  2. Potassium Blood Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Potassium, Serum; 426–27 p. Lab ...

  3. High potassium level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... level is very high, or if you have danger signs, such as changes in an ECG . Emergency ... Seifter JL. Potassium disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Low potassium level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treat and prevent low level of potassium. These foods include: Avocados Baked potato Bananas Bran Carrots Cooked lean beef Milk Oranges Peanut butter Peas and beans Salmon Seaweed Spinach Tomatoes Wheat germ

  5. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm(4+) > Spd(3+) > Put(2+). On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K(+)-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H(+) pumps and Ca(2+) pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca(2+) influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment.

  6. Cell-specific expression of plant nutrient transporter genes in orchid mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochi, Valeria; Falla, Nicole; Girlanda, Mariangela; Perotto, Silvia; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2017-10-01

    Orchid mycorrhizal protocorms and roots are heterogeneous structures composed of different plant cell-types, where cells colonized by intracellular fungal coils (the pelotons) are close to non-colonized plant cells. Moreover, the fungal coils undergo rapid turnover inside the colonized cells, so that plant cells containing coils at different developmental stages can be observed in the same tissue section. Here, we have investigated by laser microdissection (LMD) the localization of specific plant gene transcripts in different cell-type populations collected from mycorrhizal protocorms and roots of the Mediterranean orchid Serapias vomeracea colonized by Tulasnella calospora. RNAs extracted from the different cell-type populations have been used to study plant gene expression, focusing on genes potentially involved in N uptake and transport and previously identified as up-regulated in symbiotic protocorms. Results clearly showed that some plant N transporters are differentially expressed in cells containing fungal coils at different developmental stages, as well as in non-colonized cells, and allowed the identification of new functional markers associated to coil-containing cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Closing plant stomata requires a homolog of an aluminum-activated malate transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Mori, Izumi C; Furuichi, Takuya; Munemasa, Shintaro; Toyooka, Kiminori; Matsuoka, Ken; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2010-03-01

    Plant stomata limit both carbon dioxide uptake and water loss; hence, stomatal aperture is carefully set as the environment fluctuates. Aperture area is known to be regulated in part by ion transport, but few of the transporters have been characterized. Here we report that AtALMT12 (At4g17970), a homolog of the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) of wheat, is expressed in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in AtALMT12 impair stomatal closure induced by ABA, calcium and darkness, but do not abolish either the rapidly activated or the slowly activated anion currents previously identified as being important for stomatal closure. Expressed in Xenopus oocytes, AtALMT12 facilitates chloride and nitrate currents, but not those of organic solutes. Therefore, we conclude that AtALMT12 is a novel class of anion transporter involved in stomatal closure.

  8. Uses of the potassium permanganate to eliminate copper cyanide from waste water resulting from a lixiviation plant in a gold mine (II): Pilot plant experiences; Aplicacion del permanganato potasico para la eliminacion de cianuros de cobre en aguas residuales de la planta de lixiviacion en una mina de oro (II): Ensayos en planta piloto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho, J. P.; Fernandez, B.; Ayala, J.; Gracia, M. P.; Lavandeira, A.

    2011-07-01

    The search for a detoxification treatment of the wastewater generated during industrial processes, has been a constant for all companies in general and for gold mining in particular, whose wastewater generally contains high concentrations of cyanide compounds with high toxicity. In the previous research work, developed in the laboratory, the efficacy of potassium permanganate as an oxidizing agent for cyanidic wastewater, from a gold hydrometallurgical plant, has been demonstrated, achieving the destruction of copper cyanide complexes present in solution and the subsequent metal removal by precipitation as hydroxide. This paper presents the conclusions obtained after the implementation of the process developed in the laboratory, at pilot-plant scale. (Author) 30 refs.

  9. Cloning, localization and expression analysis of vacuolar sugar transporters in the CAM plant Ananas comosus (pineapple).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Edna; Taybi, Tahar; Courbot, Mikaël; Mugford, Sam T; Smith, J Andrew C; Borland, Anne M

    2008-01-01

    In photosynthetic tissues of the CAM plant pineapple (Ananas comosus), storage of soluble sugars in the central vacuole during the daytime and their remobilization at night is required to provide carbon skeletons for nocturnal CO(2) fixation. However, soluble sugars produced photosynthetically must also be exported to support growth processes in heterotrophic tissues. To begin to address how vacuolar sugar storage and assimilate partitioning are regulated in A. comosus, degenerate PCR and cDNA library screening were used to clone three candidate sugar transporters from the leaves of this species. Subcellular localization of the three transporters was investigated via expression of YFP-fusion proteins in tobacco epidermal cells and their co-localization with subcellular markers by confocal microscopy. Using this strategy, a putative hexose transporter (AcMST1) and a putative inositol transporter (AcINT1) were identified that both localized to the tonoplast, whereas a putative sucrose transporter (AcSUT1) was found to localize to prevacuolar compartments. A cDNA (AcMST2) with high similarity to a recently characterized tonoplast hexose transporter in Arabidopsis was also identified from an A. comosus fruit EST database. Analyses of transcript abundance indicated that AcMST1 was more highly expressed in fruits compared to leaves of A. comosus, whilst transcripts of AcINT1, AcSUT1, and AcMST2 were more abundant in leaves. Transcript abundance of AcINT1, the putative inositol transporter, showed day-night changes comparable to those of other CAM-related transcripts described in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The results are discussed in terms of the role of vacuolar sugar transporters in regulating carbon flow during the diel cycle in CAM plants.

  10. CHX14 is a plasma membrane K-efflux transporter that regulates K+ redistribution in "Arabidopsis thaliana"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium (K(+)) is essential for plant growth and development, yet the molecular identity of many K(+) transporters remains elusive. Here we characterized cation/H(+) exchanger (CHX) 14 as a plasma membrane K(+) transporter. "CHX14" expression was induced by elevated K(+) and histochemical analysis...

  11. Economic optimization of the energy transport component of a large distributed solar power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A solar thermal power plant with a field of collectors, each locally heating some transport fluid, requires a pipe network system for eventual delivery of energy power generation equipment. For a given collector distribution and pipe network geometry, a technique is herein developed which manipulates basic cost information and physical data in order to design an energy transport system consistent with minimized cost constrained by a calculated technical performance. For a given transport fluid and collector conditions, the method determines the network pipe diameter and pipe thickness distribution and also insulation thickness distribution associated with minimum system cost; these relative distributions are unique. Transport losses, including pump work and heat leak, are calculated operating expenses and impact the total system cost. The minimum cost system is readily selected. The technique is demonstrated on six candidate transport fluids to emphasize which parameters dominate the system cost and to provide basic decision data. Three different power plant output sizes are evaluated in each case to determine severity of diseconomy of scale.

  12. Transportable nuclear power plant T3C-M with two reactor plants of improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Gromov, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    Development and cultivating of districts in Siberia, North, Far East, Kamchatka and other remote or almost inaccessible district of the country depends to a large degree on their providing with power. The specific character of these districts imposes in turn a wide variety of special requirements upon the power sources. In particular, it is essential to provide the following; maximum manufacture availability of the whole equipment at the minimum volume of construction and installation work on operation site, high safety, longterm service life, ecologically, minimum scope of work on equipment in-service maintenance and inspection, etc. Taking into account the well-known difficulties connected with the delivery of conventional energy carriers to the above-mentioned districts and the situation with the alternative power sources, the application of the low-power nuclear plants (NPP) for these purposes looks definitely promising. Among the probable trends in creating the NPPs of this type as very promising is considered the possibility to apply the two-circuit reactor plant of the vessel type with the liquid lead as a primary coolant and free air as a secondary coolant and working medium in the open gas-turbine cycle. The nuclear plant T3C-M of improved safety with two of this type reactor plants with total electric power of 8 MW is developed by CDB of Machine Building with participation of several enterprises of St. Petersburg under the scientific leadership and is intended for generation of electric power and up to 4 Gcal/h of heat for populated areas and installations placed at long distance from the main electric power supply sources where it is difficult or non-efficient economically to deliver the conventional kinds of fuel. The main principles being laid as a basis when developing the proposed NPP will allow one to create mobile power sources which possess a high degree of safety and inherent self-protection

  13. Reducing Tri halomethanes in the Aigues de Terrassa Potable Water Treatment Plant Using Potassium Permanganate; Reduccion de trihalometanos en la ETAP de Aigues de Terrassa. Tratamiento con permanganato potasico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brull Fontsere, M.; Garcia Espejo, B.; Mellado Ruiz, J.

    2003-07-01

    Mina Publica de Aguas de Terrassa has changed the treatment in its potable water treatment plant which receivers water captured from the river Llobregat. This was prompted by the need to reduce the concentration of trihalomethanes (THM) in drinking water as provided for in Directive 98/83/EC, incorporated into Spanish law by means of Royal Decree 140/2003/. The company has moved the disinfecting stage to the end of the potabilising treatment process while simultaneously introducing the addition of potassium permanganate as apreoxidant. Given that the water in question in highly saline and also contains bromides, various compounds are generated among which bromoform is the most prominent followed, in decreasing rder of quantity, by dibromochloroethena and chloroform. However, the concentrations are much smallerthan those found prior to these changes so it can be concluded that have improved the supply and comply with current legislation. (Author)

  14. Structure and evolution of the plant cation diffusion facilitator family of ion transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanis Michael J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF family are integral membrane divalent cation transporters that transport metal ions out of the cytoplasm either into the extracellular space or into internal compartments such as the vacuole. The spectrum of cations known to be transported by proteins of the CDF family include Zn, Fe, Co, Cd, and Mn. Members of this family have been identified in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and archaea, and in sequenced plant genomes. CDF families range in size from nine members in Selaginella moellendorffii to 19 members in Populus trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the CDF family has expanded within plants, but a definitive plant CDF family phylogeny has not been constructed. Results Representative CDF members were annotated from diverse genomes across the Viridiplantae and Rhodophyta lineages and used to identify phylogenetic relationships within the CDF family. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CDF amino acid sequence data supports organizing land plant CDF family sequences into 7 groups. The origin of the 7 groups predates the emergence of land plants. Among these, 5 of the 7 groups are likely to have originated at the base of the tree of life, and 2 of 7 groups appear to be derived from a duplication event prior to or coincident with land plant evolution. Within land plants, local expansion continues within select groups, while several groups are strictly maintained as one gene copy per genome. Conclusions Defining the CDF gene family phylogeny contributes to our understanding of this family in several ways. First, when embarking upon functional studies of the members, defining primary groups improves the predictive power of functional assignment of orthologous/paralogous genes and aids in hypothesis generation. Second, defining groups will allow a group-specific sequence motif to be generated that will help define future CDF family sequences and aid in functional motif

  15. Integration of two RAB5 groups during endosomal transport in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebine, Kazuo; Choi, Seung-won; Ichinose, Sakura; Uemura, Tomohiro; Nakano, Akihiko

    2018-01-01

    RAB5 is a key regulator of endosomal functions in eukaryotic cells. Plants possess two different RAB5 groups, canonical and plant-unique types, which act via unknown counteracting mechanisms. Here, we identified an effector molecule of the plant-unique RAB5 in Arabidopsis thaliana, ARA6, which we designated PLANT-UNIQUE RAB5 EFFECTOR 2 (PUF2). Preferential colocalization with canonical RAB5 on endosomes and genetic interaction analysis indicated that PUF2 coordinates vacuolar transport with canonical RAB5, although PUF2 was identified as an effector of ARA6. Competitive binding of PUF2 with GTP-bound ARA6 and GDP-bound canonical RAB5, together interacting with the shared activating factor VPS9a, showed that ARA6 negatively regulates canonical RAB5-mediated vacuolar transport by titrating PUF2 and VPS9a. These results suggest a unique and unprecedented function for a RAB effector involving the integration of two RAB groups to orchestrate endosomal trafficking in plant cells. PMID:29749929

  16. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in

  17. The heat transport system and plant design for the HYLIFE-2 fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    HYLIFE is the name given to a family of self-healing liquid-wall reactor concepts for inertial confinement fusion. This HYLIFE-II concept employs the molten salt, Flibe, for the liquid jets instead of liquid lithium used in the original HYLIFE-I study. A preliminary conceptual design study of the heat transport system and the balance of plant of the HYLIFE-II fusion power plant is described in this paper with special emphasis on a scoping study to determine the best intermediate heat exchanger geometry and flow conditions for minimum cost of electricity. 11 refs., 8 figs

  18. TRANSITION METAL TRANSPORT IN PLANTS AND ASSOCIATED ENDOSYMBIONTS: ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI AND RHIZOBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Guerrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transition metals such as iron, copper, zinc, or molybdenum, are essential nutrients for plants. These elements are involved in almost every biological process, including photosynthesis, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress, or symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, plants often grow in soils with limiting metallic oligonutrient bioavailability. Consequently, to ensure the proper metal levels, plants have developed a complex metal uptake and distribution system, that not only involves the plant itself, but also its associated microorganisms. These microorganisms can simply increase metal solubility in soils and making them more accessible to the host plant, as well as induce the plant metal deficiency response, or deliver directly transition elements to cortical cells. Other, instead of providing metals can act as metal sinks, such as endosymbiotic rhizobia in legume nodules that requires relatively large amounts to carry out nitrogen fixation. In this review, we propose to do an overview of metal transport mechanisms in the plant-microbe system, emphasizing the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endosymbiotic rhizobia.

  19. Transport of lead in secondary systems of PWR plants: laboratory and plant investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, D.; Rocher, A.; Nordmann, F.

    1992-01-01

    Both in France and abroad, abnormally high lead concentrations have been found in the deposits on certain steam generator tubes subject to combined inter and transgranular corrosion on the secondary side. Many potential sources of lead have been identified in PWR steam-water system, mainly at the turbine level. Tests on a loop (ORION) have shown that lead (as Pb or PbO) can transport from the condenser to the steam generator and that the contaminant mainly concentrates in flow restricted areas of steam generators

  20. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2001-01-01

    Waste Processors Management Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a cooperative agreement with the USDOE to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US that produces ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP will emphasize on reclaiming and gasifying low-cost coal waste and/or its mixture as the primary feedstocks. The project consists of three phases. Phase I objectives include conceptual development, technical assessment, feasibility design and economic evaluation of a Greenfield commercial co-production plant and a site specific demonstration EECP to be located adjacent to the existing WMPI Gilberton Power Station. There is very little foreseen design differences between the Greenfield commercial coproduction plant versus the EECP plant other than: The greenfield commercial plant will be a stand alone FT/power co-production plant, potentially larger in capacity to take full advantage of economy of scale, and to be located in either western Pennsylvania, West Virginia or Ohio, using bituminous coal waste (gob) and Pennsylvania No.8 coal or other comparable coal as the feedstock; The EECP plant, on the other hand, will be a nominal 5000 bpd plant, fully integrated into the Gilbertson Power Company's Cogeneration Plant to take advantage of the existing infrastructure to reduce cost and minimize project risk. The Gilberton EECP plant will be designed to use eastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal waste and/or its mixture as feedstock

  1. Allowable shipment frequencies for the transport of toxic gases near nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.E.; Heath, D.C.

    1982-10-01

    One part of the safety analysis of offsite hazards for a nuclear power plant is consideration of accidents which could release toxic gases or vapors and thus jeopardize plant safety through incapacitation of the control room operators. The purpose of this work is to provide generic, bounding estimates of the maximum allowable shipping frequencies for the transport of a chemical near the plant, such that the regulatory criteria for the protection of the operators are met. A probabilistic methodology was developed and then applied to the truck and rail transport of an example chemical, chlorine. The current regulatory criteria are discussed in detail. For this study, a maximum allowable probability of occurrence of operator incapacitation of 10 - 5 per year was used in the example calculation for each mode of transport. Comprehensive tables of conditional probabilities are presented. Maximum allowable ahipping frequencies are then derived. These frequencies could be used as part of a generic, bounding criterion for the screening of toxic hazards safety analyses. Unless a transport survey assures shipping frequencies within 8 km of the plant on the order of or lower than 4/week for rail or 35/week for truck, the contol room should be isolatable and the shipping frequency then determines the degree of isolation needed. The need for isolation implies the need for toxic chemical detection at the air intake.For a self-detection case in which the smell threshold is significantly lower than the incapacitation threshold and the control room is isolatable, the corresponding trequencies are 11/week for rail or 115/week for truck. Self-contained breathing equipment is assumed to be used after 5 minutes

  2. Microorganisms transported by ants induce changes in floral nectar composition of an ant-pollinated plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between plants and ants abound in nature and have significant consequences for ecosystem functioning. Recently, it has been suggested that nectar-foraging ants transport microorganisms to flowers; more specifically, they transport yeasts, which can potentially consume sugars and alter nectar composition. Therefore, ants could indirectly change nectar sugar profile, an important floral feature involved in the plant-pollinator mutualism. But this novel role for ants has never been tested. We here investigate the effects of nectarivorous ants and their associated yeasts on the floral nectar sugar composition of an ant-pollinated plant. Differences in the nectar sugar composition of ant-excluded and ant-visited flowers were examined in 278 samples by using high-performance liquid-chromatography. The importance of the genetic identity and density of ant-transported basidiomycetous and ascomycetous yeasts on the variation of nectar traits was also evaluated. Ant visitation had significant effects on nectar sugar composition. The nectar of ant-visited flowers contained significantly more fructose, more glucose, and less sucrose than the nectar of ant-excluded flowers, but these effects were context dependent. Nectar changes were correlated with the density of yeast cells in nectar. The magnitude of the effects of ant-transported ascomycetes was much higher than that of basiodiomycetes. Ants and their associated yeasts induce changes in nectar sugar traits, reducing the chemical control of the plant over this important floral trait. The potential relevance of this new role for ants as indirect nectar modifiers is a rich topic for future research into the ecology of ant-flower interactions.

  3. Produção de pepino de plantas enxertadas cultivadas em soluções nutritivas com diferentes teores de potássio Growth and yield of grafted cucumber plants cultivated in hydroponic solution with different potassium levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Costa

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido em estufa tipo arco de 50 m² na Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas da UNESP em Botucatu. Plantas de pepino (Cucumis sativus L. não enxertadas e enxertadas em abóbora (Cucurbita sp. foram cultivadas em sistema hidropônico para estudar o efeito de níveis de potássio (45; 90; 180 e 360 mg.L-1 de K na altura da planta e produção de número de frutos/m². A condução das plantas foi em vasos de 28 L de capacidade contendo 20% vermiculita + 80% casca de arroz + solução nutritiva fornecida a partir de galões individuais contendo 20 litros de solução. O delineamento experimental foi blocos casualizados, com oito tratamentos (fatorial 4 x 2 e três repetições. Não houve efeito da enxertia e das doses de K sobre a altura da planta, porém, os níveis de potássio independente da enxertia alteraram o início da floração. A enxertia potencializou a produção aumentando em 39% o número de frutos/m² quando fornecido na solução nutritiva 45 mg.L-1 de K e 144% com 360 mg.L-1 de K. O menor teor de potássio, 45 mg.L-1, foi suficiente para atingir alta produção.The trial was carried out at Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas in Botucatu, Brazil. Cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. grafted on squash (Cucumis sp. were cultivated in hydroponic solution to study the effect of three potassium levels (45; 90; 180 and 360 mg.L-1 K on growth and yield of grafted and non grafted cucumber plants. There was no effect of plant height, but grafting and potassium level altered flowering outset. Grafted plants fertilized with 45 mg.L_1 K produced 39% more fruits than non grafted ones, and produced 144% more fruits when fertilized with 360 mg.L-1 K. The lowest K level studied (45 mg.L_1 K was enough to obtain high yield.

  4. Proposal for guidelines for the physical protection of nuclear materials, plants and transports in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The guidelines are based on recommendations in the IAEA's ''Physical Protection of Nuclear Material,'' INFCIRC/225/rev.1. In accordance with practice in other countries, the guidelines give more detailed requirements for the protection of reactor plants than those given in the IAEA's present recommendations, which put more emphasis on the protection of nuclear materials. The measures to be taken for nuclear plants, or nuclear transports, are proposed made to fit the potential risk that the more closely defined actions imply. It is suggested that the more detailed rules for the scope of the protection of plants or materials should be laid down by the National Agency on the basis of recommendations made by the Inspectorate of Nuclear Installations, which in turn are based on the safety documentation of the plant/material owners. It is further proposed that the National Agency, again on a recommendation from the Inspectorate, should lay down more detailed guidelines for the reporting of changes in stocks or transports of nuclear materials. (author)

  5. Fontes de potássio no crescimento in vitro de plantas de orquídea Cattleya loddigesii Potassium sources of Cattleya loddigesii plants in vitro growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Alves de Figueiredo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Plantas de Cattleya loddigesii com 1,0-1,5cm de comprimento, oriundas de sementes germinadas in vitro, foram inoculadas nos tratamentos, os quais consistiram da adição de diferentes concentrações de cloreto e sulfato de potássio (ambos a 0, 125, 250, 375 e 500mg L-1 ao meio Knudson C, em todas as combinações possíveis, acrescido de 2g L-1 de carvão ativado e 150g L-1 de polpa de banana "Nanica". O meio teve seu pH ajustado para 5,8±0,1 e foi solidificado com 5g L-1 de ágar antes da autoclavagem a 121°C por 20 minutos. Após a inoculação, as culturas foram mantidas por 90 dias em sala de crescimento com irradiância em torno de 35µmol m-2 s-1, temperatura de 25±1°C e fotoperíodo de 16 horas. A combinação de 500mg L-1 de KCl com 500mg L-1 de K2SO4 promoveu maior crescimento in vitro em plantas de Cattleya loddigesii, exceto no comprimento de raízes, que se apresentou melhor com 500mg L-1 de KCl na ausência de K2SO4.Cattleya loddigesii preceding seedlings (with 1.0-1.5cm of in vitro germinated seeds were used as explants. The treatments consisted of the addition of different potassium chloride concentrations (0; 125; 250; 375 e 500mg L-1 and potassium sulphate (0; 125; 250; 375 e 500mg L-1, in the Knudson C medium, in all possible combinations, an addition of 2g L-1 activated coal, 150g L-1 and banana 'Nanica' pulp. The medium had the pH set to 5.8±0.1 and was solidified with agar 5g L-1 before the sterilization at 121°C for 20 minutes. After the inoculation, the cultures were maintained in the growth room with irradiancy around 35µmol m-2 s-1 in, 25±1°C temperature and 16-hour photoperiod for 90 days. The combination of KCl 500mg L-1 with K2SO4 500mg L-1 promotes good in vitro growth in Cattleya loddigesii seedlings, except length of roots who if comported better with KCl500 mg L-1 in absence of K2SO4.

  6. Errors in potassium balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, G.B.; Lantigua, R.; Amatruda, J.M.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Six overweight adult subjects given a low calorie diet containing adequate amounts of nitrogen but subnormal amounts of potassium (K) were observed on the Clinical Research Center for periods of 29 to 40 days. Metabolic balance of potassium was measured together with frequent assays of total body K by 40 K counting. Metabolic K balance underestimated body K losses by 11 to 87% (average 43%): the intersubject variability is such as to preclude the use of a single correction value for unmeasured losses in K balance studies

  7. Technology data for energy plants. Individual heating plants and energy transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-15

    The present technology catalogue is published in co-operation between the Danish Energy Agency and Energinet.dk and includes technology descriptions for a number of technologies for individual heat production and energy transport. The primary objective of the technology catalogue is to establish a uniform, commonly accepted and up-to-date basis for the work with energy planning and the development of the energy sector, including future outlooks, scenario analyses and technical/economic analyses. The technology catalogue is thus a valuable tool in connection with energy planning and assessment of climate projects and for evaluating the development opportunities for the energy sector's many technologies, which can be used for the preparation of different support programmes for energy research and development. The publication of the technology catalogue should also be viewed in the light of renewed focus on strategic energy planning in municipalities etc. In that respect, the technology catalogue is considered to be an important tool for the municipalities in their planning efforts. (LN)

  8. Knocking down mitochondrial iron transporter (MIT) reprograms primary and secondary metabolism in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Lehmann, Martin; Casiraghi, Fabio Marco; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Seki, Motoaki; Geigenberger, Peter; Zocchi, Graziano; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and its reduced bioavailability strongly impairs mitochondrial functionality. In this work, the metabolic adjustment in the rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial Fe transporter knockdown mutant (mit-2) was analysed. Biochemical characterization of purified mitochondria from rice roots showed alteration in the respiratory chain of mit-2 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In particular, proteins belonging to the type II alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases accumulated strongly in mit-2 plants, indicating that alternative pathways were activated to keep the respiratory chain working. Additionally, large-scale changes in the transcriptome and metabolome were observed in mit-2 rice plants. In particular, a strong alteration (up-/down-regulation) in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both primary and secondary metabolism was found in mutant plants. This was reflected by changes in the metabolic profiles in both roots and shoots of mit-2 plants. Significant alterations in the levels of amino acids belonging to the aspartic acid-related pathways (aspartic acid, lysine, and threonine in roots, and aspartic acid and ornithine in shoots) were found that are strictly connected to the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, some metabolites (e.g. pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, ornithine, and oligosaccharides of the raffinose family) accumulated only in the shoot of mit-2 plants, indicating possible hypoxic responses. These findings suggest that the induction of local Fe deficiency in the mitochondrial compartment of mit-2 plants differentially affects the transcript as well as the metabolic profiles in root and shoot tissues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  9. Enhanced Boron Tolerance in Plants Mediated by Bidirectional Transport Through Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosa, Kareem A; Kumar, Kundan; Chhikara, Sudesh; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2016-02-23

    High boron (B) concentration is toxic to plants that limit plant productivity. Recent studies have shown the involvement of the members of major intrinsic protein (MIP) family in controlling B transport. Here, we have provided experimental evidences showing the bidirectional transport activity of rice OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6. Boron transport ability of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 were displayed in yeast HD9 mutant strain (∆fps1∆acr3∆ycf1) as a result of increased B sensitivity, influx and accumulation by OsPIP1;3, and rapid efflux activity by OsPIP2;6. RT-PCR analysis showed strong upregulation of OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 transcripts in roots by B toxicity. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 exhibited enhanced tolerance to B toxicity. Furthermore, B concentration was significantly increased after 2 and 3 hours of tracer boron ((10)B) treatment. Interestingly, a rapid efflux of (10)B from the roots of the transgenic plants was observed within 1 h of (10)B treatment. Boron tolerance in OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 lines was inhibited by aquaporin inhibitors, silver nitrate and sodium azide. Our data proved that OsPIP1;3 and OsPIP2;6 are indeed involved in both influx and efflux of boron transport. Manipulation of these PIPs could be highly useful in improving B tolerance in crops grown in high B containing soils.

  10. Climatic and geomorphic drivers of plant organic matter transport in the Arun River, E Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Feakins, Sarah J.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Olen, Stephanie M.; Adhikari, Danda P.; Mainali, Janardan; Sachse, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Fixation of atmospheric CO2 in terrestrial vegetation, and subsequent export and deposition of terrestrial plant organic matter in marine sediments is an important component of the global carbon cycle, yet it is difficult to quantify. This is partly due to the lack of understanding of relevant processes and mechanisms responsible for organic-matter transport throughout a landscape. Here we present a new approach to identify terrestrial plant organic matter source areas, quantify contributions and ascertain the role of ecologic, climatic, and geomorphic controls on plant wax export in the Arun River catchment spanning the world's largest elevation gradient from 205 to 8848 m asl, in eastern Nepal. Our approach takes advantage of the distinct stable hydrogen isotopic composition (expressed as δD values) of plant wax n-alkanes produced along this gradient, transported in river waters and deposited in flood deposits alongside the Arun River and its tributaries. In mainstem-flood deposits, we found that plant wax n-alkanes were mostly derived from the lower elevations constituting only a small fraction (15%) of the catchment. Informed by remote sensing data, we tested four differently weighted isotopic mixing models that quantify sourcing of tributary plant-derived organic matter along the Arun and compare it to our field observations. The weighting parameters included catchment area, net primary productivity (NPP) and annual rainfall amount as well as catchment relief as erosion proxy. When weighted by catchment area the isotopic mixing model could not explain field observations on plant wax δD values along the Arun, which is not surprising because the large arid Tibetan Plateau is not expected to be a major source. Weighting areal contributions by annual rainfall and NPP captured field observations within model prediction errors suggesting that plant productivity may influence source strength. However weighting by a combination of rainfall and catchment relief also

  11. Rapid atmospheric transport and large-scale deposition of recently synthesized plant waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Ladd, S. Nemiah; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary plant wax 2H/1H ratios are important tools for understanding hydroclimate and environmental changes, but large spatial and temporal uncertainties exist about transport mechanisms from ecosystem to sediments. To assess atmospheric pathways, we collected aerosol samples for two years at four locations within a ∼60 km radius in northern Switzerland. We measured n-alkane distributions and 2H/1H ratios in these samples, and from local plants, leaf litter, and soil, as well as surface sediment from six nearby lakes. Increased concentrations and 2H depletion of long odd chain n-alkanes in early summer aerosols indicate that most wax aerosol production occurred shortly after leaf unfolding, when plants synthesize waxes in large quantities. During autumn and winter, aerosols were characterized by degraded n-alkanes lacking chain length preferences diagnostic of recent biosynthesis, and 2H/1H values that were in some cases more than 100‰ higher than growing season values. Despite these seasonal shifts, modeled deposition-weighted average 2H/1H values of long odd chain n-alkanes primarily reflected summer values. This was corroborated by n-alkane 2H/1H values in lake sediments, which were similar to deposition-weighted aerosol values at five of six sites. Atmospheric deposition rates for plant n-alkanes on land were ∼20% of accumulation rates in lakes, suggesting a role for direct deposition to lakes or coastal oceans near similar production sources, and likely a larger role for deposition on land and transport in river systems. This mechanism allows mobilization and transport of large quantities of recently produced waxes as fine-grained material to low energy sedimentation sites over short timescales, even in areas with limited topography. Widespread atmospheric transfer well before leaf senescence also highlights the importance of the isotopic composition of early season source water used to synthesize waxes for the geologic record.

  12. Genes encoding novel lipid transporters and their use to increase oil production in vegetative tissues of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changcheng; Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi; Shanklin, John

    2017-12-26

    The present invention discloses a novel gene encoding a transporter protein trigalactosyldiacylglycerol-5 (TGD5), mutations thereof and their use to enhance TAG production and retention in plant vegetative tissue.

  13. The effect of potassium nutrition on sup 137 Cs uptake in two upland species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H E; Harrison, A F; Poskitt, J M; Roberts, J D; Clint, G [Institute for Terrestrial Ecology, Grange-over-Sands (UK)

    1991-01-01

    Agrostis capillaris (Agrostis) and Calluna vulgaris (Calluna), two species with differing phenologies and widespread presence in upland areas of Britain where high Chernobyl fallout occurred, were grown in pot culture with varying concentrations of potassium in the rooting medium. Tissue content of potassium increased with increasing supply in both species. Roots, excised from these plants, were placed in a solution of {sup 137}Cs-labelled caesium chloride for 15 min to determine uptake potential. There were clear negative relationships between the rate of uptake of {sup 137}Cs by both species and (a) the concentration of potassium supplied and (b) plant issue potassium concentrations. With Agrotis, there was an approximately ten-fold difference in {sup 137}Cs uptake between potassium-deficient and optimum plants; with Calluna, it was approximately eight-fold. These results demonstrate the suppression of {sup 137}Cs uptake into plants by potassium supply. (author).

  14. The occurrence and control of nitric oxide generation by the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Nicole A; Sivanesan, Hampavi; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2017-07-01

    The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is bifurcated such that electrons from ubiquinol are passed to oxygen via the usual cytochrome path or through alternative oxidase (AOX). We previously showed that knockdown of AOX in transgenic tobacco increased leaf concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), implying that an activity capable of generating NO had been effected. Here, we identify the potential source of this NO. Treatment of leaves with antimycin A (AA, Q i -site inhibitor of Complex III) increased NO amount more than treatment with myxothiazol (Myxo, Q o -site inhibitor) despite both being equally effective at inhibiting respiration. Comparison of nitrate-grown wild-type with AOX knockdown and overexpression plants showed a negative correlation between AOX amount and NO amount following AA. Further, Myxo fully negated the ability of AA to increase NO amount. With ammonium-grown plants, neither AA nor Myxo strongly increased NO amount in any plant line. When these leaves were supplied with nitrite alongside the AA or Myxo, then the inhibitor effects across lines mirrored that of nitrate-grown plants. Hence the ETC, likely the Q-cycle of Complex III generates NO from nitrite, and AOX reduces this activity by acting as a non-energy-conserving electron sink upstream of Complex III. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 65 Zn absorption by orange leaves and their transport on the plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaretto, Rodrigo Marcelli; Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Muraoka, Takashi; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio Franco do; Mourao Filho, Francisco de Assis Alves

    2002-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is common in Brazilian citrus orchards. The objective of the experiment was to study the Zn absorption from different sources (ZnSO 4 , ZnCl 2 , Zn-EDTA and Zn-ligno sulfate) by orange leaves and transport of the leaf absorbed Zn to the other parts of the plant. Orange plants were grown in greenhouse and some of their leaves received solution with a Zn concentration of 0.07 %. The fertilizer solutions were labeled with 65 Zn (0,6 KBq g -1 ). After 3, 6, 12, 24 hours and 2, 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 days from Zn application to the leaves, the plants were harvested. The plants that received the Zn solution were separated in different parts. The 65 Zn activity of the samples were determined by monochannel gamma spectrometry. The results showed that the foliar fertilization increased the leaf Zn concentration, the chloride was more efficient Zn source than sulfate, but only a small portion (less than 5 μg in 30 days) of foliar applied 65 Zn was translocated to other plant parts, independent of the Zn source. (author)

  16. The Effect of Potassium on the Controlling of Salt in Evening Primrose (Oenothera macrocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goldani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Salinity has been recognized as one of the major abiotic factors affecting crop yields in arid and semi-arid irrigated areas of the world and efforts for breeding salt-resistant crop plants have been made. Approximately one-third of the world irrigated soils and a large proportion of soils in dry land are saline. Two major effects have been identified as the probable causes of high salt toxicity in crop plant i.e., the ionic effect and the osmotic effect. The ionic effect results in alterations in enzymatic processes, disturbances in accumulation and transport of different ions or a combination of all these factors. As a result, shoot and root growing reduce and uptake of nutrient elements by plants is adversely affected. While excess Na accumulated in plants under salinity stress conditions hinders K uptake; Cl hinders NO3 uptake by plants and destroys ionic balance in plants. Evening primrose is a plant which belongs to Onagraceae. Its seed oil has a special arrangement in Glycerol molecule, so it has been used a lot in medical treatments and also feeding. Researchers showed that using the best techniques and methods in farming can increase the amount of oil in the seeds of this plant. The wrong method of agricultural activities in Iran caused increasing salt in the soil, so growing plants in this situation isn’t possible. For confronting with this phenomenon knowing and choosing kinds of plants that can resist the situation of salt is really a necessary. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replicates was performed with five levels of NaCl salinity on Oenothera macrocarpa (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM and potassium chloride levels (zero and 15.02 mM and three times in the Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 1390. Salt treatment to prevent osmotic shock was applied to four-leaf stage and treated with potassium was gradually

  17. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy of Potassium on Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormode, Daniel; Leroy, Brian; Yankowitz, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the effect of charged impurities on the electronic properties of large single crystal CVD grown graphene using scanning tunneling microscopy. Mono- and multilayer crystals were prepared by transferring graphene from copper onto exfoliated boron nitride flakes on 300 nm SiO2 substrates. The boron nitride provides an ultra flat surface for the graphene. Potassium atoms are controllably deposited on the graphene at low temperature by heating a nearby getter source. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and transport measurements were performed in ultra high vacuum at 4.5 K. Transport measurements demonstrate the shifting of the Dirac point as the samples are doped, while STM measurements demonstrate the size, arrangement and local electronic influence of the potassium atoms.

  18. The Profile of Student Misconceptions on The Human and Plant Transport Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainiyah, M.; Ibrahim, M.; Hidayat, M. T.

    2018-01-01

    This research aims to identify misconceptions on the humans and plants transportation systems. The research was done in the 8th grade in Indonesia. Data were collected to use a three-tier test. This type of research was used survey design. Content analysis was used to analyze the misconception data. The results of this research were the location of misconception of each student is different. The highest misconceptions identified in this research, namely: a) arteries that drain blood to the heart (73.3%); b) veins that drain blood from the heart (70.0%); c) place of oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange occurs in the veins (66.7%); d) blood pressure in veins greater than in capillaries (63.3%); e) absorption of water occurs diffusion and absorption of minerals occurs osmosis (76.7%); f) transport of photosynthesis process occurs by diffusion (66.7%); g) photosynthesis process occurs during the day (63.3%); and h) process of evaporation of water through the leaves are guttation (56.7%). The results of this research show that the level of students misconceptions on the of human and plant transport systems is still high so that it can serve as a reference to improve the learning process and the reduction of student misconceptions.

  19. Testing the Münch hypothesis of long distance phloem transport in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, Michael; Knoblauch, Jan; Mullendore, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem, but this h......Long distance transport in plants occurs in sieve tubes of the phloem. The pressure flow hypothesis introduced by Ernst Münch in 1930 describes a mechanism of osmotically generated pressure differentials that are supposed to drive the movement of sugars and other solutes in the phloem......, but this hypothesis has long faced major challenges. The key issue is whether the conductance of sieve tubes, including sieve plate pores, is sufficient to allow pressure flow. We show that with increasing distance between source and sink, sieve tube conductivity and turgor increases dramatically in Ipomoea nil. Our...... results provide strong support for the Münch hypothesis, while providing new tools for the investigation of one of the least understood plant tissues....

  20. Estimation of geochemical parameters for assessing subsurface transport at the Savannah River Plant: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.; Grant, M.W.; King, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    Geochemical parameter estimates to be used in assessing the subsurface transport of chemicals from Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste sites are presented. Specifically, reference values for soil-solution distribution coefficients, solubility, leach rates, and retardation coefficients are estimated for 31 inorganic chemicals (assuming speciation is governed by reasonable assumptions about controlling variables such as Eh and pH) and 36 organic compounds. Additionally, facilitated transport (the association of chemicals with inorganic and organic ligands or colloids resulting in relatively high mobility) was estimated using field data to derive a fraction of the disposal mass which was assumed to be mobile. Hydrologic parameters such as dispersion coefficient, average moisture content in vadose zone, bulk density, and effective porosity are also presented. The estimates are based on site-specific studies when available, combined with technical literature

  1. Atmospherical experiment in Angra I plant for characterizing the effluent transport threw in the atmospheric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Lobo, M.A. da; Kronemberger, B.M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Available as short communication only. The Environmental Safety Division of the Nuclear Safety and Fuel Department from FURNAS Electric Station S.A. joint with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), achieved a field experiment for characterizing the atmospheric transport and diffusion in the site complex of Angra I Nuclear Power Plant. The complex topography with the thick vegetation and the neighbour building bring problems for the modelling of the effluent transport and the dispersion. The actual meteorological measure system is automatic and compound with four towers. An intensive atmospheric measure with captive balloon is included, and the collected data shows that the site flux is strongly influenced by the topography and insolation. (C.G.C.). 2 figs

  2. Coulomb interaction rules timescales in potassium ion channel tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De March, N.; Prado, S. D.; Brunnet, L. G.

    2018-06-01

    Assuming the selectivity filter of KcsA potassium ion channel may exhibit quantum coherence, we extend a previous model by Vaziri and Plenio (2010 New J. Phys. 12 085001) to take into account Coulomb repulsion between potassium ions. We show that typical ion transit timescales are determined by this interaction, which imposes optimal input/output parameter ranges. Also, as observed in other examples of quantum tunneling in biological systems, the addition of moderate noise helps coherent ion transport.

  3. Phloem-sap-dynamics sensor device for monitoring photosynthates transportation in plant shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yuya; Ono, Akihito; Terao, Kyohei; Suzuki, Takaaki; Takao, Hidekuni; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Ikuo; Shimokawa, Fusao

    2018-06-01

    We propose a microscale phloem-sap-dynamics sensor device to obtain the index of an internal plant condition regarding the transportation of primary photosynthates in phloem, which is an essential indicator of stable crop production under controlled-growth environments. In detail, we integrated a conventional Granier sensor with a thermal-flow sensor and devised an improved sensor device to quantify such index, including the information on velocity and direction of the phloem-sap flow using the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The experimental results showed that although the proposed sensor device was approximately only 1/10 the size of the conventional Granier sensor, it could generate an output nearly equal to that of the conventional sensor. Furthermore, experiments using mimicked plants demonstrated that the proposed device could measure minute flow velocities in the range of 0–200 µm/s, which are generally known as the phloem-sap flow velocity, and simultaneously detect the flow direction.

  4. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus

    2014-01-01

    utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions....... Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air...... that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using...

  5. Soil physics with Python transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere system

    CERN Document Server

    Bittelli, Marco; Tomei, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents numerical methods to solve soil physics problems using computers. It starts with the theory and then shows how to use Python code to solve the problems. Most soil physics books focus on deriving rather than solving the differential equations for mass and energy transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The focus of this book is on solutions. Agricultural and biological scientists usually have a good working knowledge of algebra and calculus, but not of differential equations. Here numerical procedures are used to solve differential equations.

  6. Environmental impact study on a degassing and scaling of cistern trucks for fuel transportation plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Tupia, Elmer

    2014-01-01

    The present Study of Environmental Impact (EIA) it is carried out by the Company Ecoplanet Group from the Peru CORP, to application of Servisya CORP, proprietor of a degassing plant and scaling of trucks cistern for transports of derived liquid fuels of the hydrocarbons, the environment of the location area undestood in the Country of Lima of the district of Villa El Salvador being. El presente estudio de Impacto Ambiental(EIA) es realizado por la empresa Ecoplanet group del Perú S.A. a s...

  7. Cesium transport in Four Mile Creek of the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiser, D.L.

    1979-04-01

    The behavior of a large radioactive cesium release to a Savannah River Plant (SRP) stream was examined using a stable cesium release to Four Mile Creek. Measurements following the release show that most of the cesium released was transported downstream; however, sorption and desorption decreased the maximum concentration and increased the travel time and duration, relative to a dye tracer, at sampling stations downstream. The study was made possible by the development of an analytical technique using ammonium molybdophosphate and neutron activation that permitted the measurement of stable cesium concentrations as low as 0.2 μg/L

  8. Obtaining and testing of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungies inocula for the modification of radionuclides transport into the plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryipka, A.V.; Sorochins'kij, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    Spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungies have been isolaten from the plants collected at the Chernobyl zone. Selection of the plants were done due to their high radionuclides' accumulation ability and AM colonization level as well. These spores were used to start the inocula production for the plant treatment aimed to affect radionuclides transport. Spores identification was done based on their morphological and molecular features. Three different AM inocula with high potential to modify 90 Sr and 137 Cs transport at the phytoremediation experiments were obtained

  9. Identification and expression analysis of MATE genes involved in flavonoid transport in blueberry plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Yushan; Liu, Hongdi; Kang, Limin; Geng, Jinman; Gai, Yuzhuo; Ding, Yunlong; Sun, Haiyue; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins are the most recently identified family of multidrug transporters. In plants, this family is remarkably large compared to the human and bacteria counterpart, highlighting the importance of MATE proteins in this kingdom. Here 33 Unigenes annotated as MATE transporters were found in the blueberry fruit transcriptome, of which eight full-length cDNA sequences were identified and cloned. These proteins are composed of 477-517 residues, with molecular masses ~54 kDa, and theoretical isoelectric points from 5.35 to 8.41. Bioinformatics analysis predicted 10-12 putative transmembrane segments for VcMATEs, and localization to the plasma membrane without an N-terminal signal peptide. All blueberry MATE proteins shared 32.1-84.4% identity, among which VcMATE2, VcMATE3, VcMATE5, VcMATE7, VcMATE8, and VcMATE9 were more similar to the MATE-type flavonoid transporters. Phylogenetic analysis showed VcMATE2, VcMATE3, VcMATE5, VcMATE7, VcMATE8 and VcMATE9 clustered with MATE-type flavonoid transporters, indicating that they might be involved in flavonoid transport. VcMATE1 and VcMATE4 may be involved in the transport of secondary metabolites, the detoxification of xenobiotics, or the export of toxic cations. Real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that the expression profile of the eight VcMATE genes varied spatially and temporally. Analysis of expression and anthocyanin accumulation indicated that there were some correlation between the expression profile and the accumulation of anthocyanins. These results showed VcMATEs might be involved in diverse physiological functions, and anthocyanins across the membranes might be mutually maintained by MATE-type flavonoid transporters and other mechanisms. This study will enrich the MATE-based transport mechanisms of secondary metabolite, and provide a new biotechonology strategy to develop better nutritional blueberry cultivars.

  10. Virus-induced plasma membrane aquaporin PsPIP2;1 silencing inhibits plant water transport of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juanjuan; Ye, Guoliang; Qian, Zhengjiang; Ye, Qing

    2016-12-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are known to facilitate water transport across cell membranes, but the role of a single AQP in regulating plant water transport, particularly in plants other than Arabidopsis remains largely unexplored. In the present study, a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique was employed to suppress the expression of a specific plasma membrane aquaporin PsPIP2;1 of Pea plants (Pisum sativum), and subsequent effects of the gene suppression on root hydraulic conductivity (Lp r ), leaf hydraulic conductivity (K leaf ), root cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp rc ), and leaf cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp lc ) were investigated, using hydroponically grown Pea plants. Compared with control plants, VIGS-PsPIP2;1 plants displayed a significant suppression of PsPIP2;1 in both roots and leaves, while the expression of other four PIP isoforms (PsPIP1;1, PsPIP1;2, PsPIP2;2, and PsPIP2;3) that were simultaneously monitored were not altered. As a consequence, significant declines in water transport of VIGS-PsPIP2;1 plants were observed at both organ and cell levels, i.e., as compared to control plants, Lp r and K leaf were reduced by 29 %, and Lp rc and Lp lc were reduced by 20 and 29 %, respectively. Our results demonstrate that PsPIP2;1 alone contributes substantially to root and leaf water transport in Pea plants, and highlight VIGS a useful tool for investigating the role of a single AQP in regulating plant water transport.

  11. In Silico Analysis of the Regulation of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain in C3 Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alejandro; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven M; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M; Struik, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ). A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO 2 , to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and noncyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol is possible after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate, and this facilitated an increase in nonphotochemical quenching and proton motive force under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO 2 , high light intensity, or combined high CO 2 and high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Application of radioanalytical methods in the quantification of solute transport in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornik, M.

    2016-01-01

    chemical speciation. The last studied issue was PET as a very promising radioanalytical method in terms of the application and analytical capabilities of a commercial microPET system primarily developed for biological objects of the type of laboratory animals, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with positron emitter "1"8F (2-["1"8F]FDG) or radioisotope "6"5ZnCl_2 (with the minority of β"+ decay - 1.5 %) for the quantification of distribution and description of in vivo dynamics of 2-["1"8F]FDG or Zn uptake and transport in the tissues of selected plant species. (author)

  13. Use of stable isotopes for estimating water and nitrogen transport in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygoryuk, I.P.; Petrenko, N.I.; Shvedova, O.Yu.; Tkachev, V.I.; Yaroshenko, O.A.

    1998-01-01

    Peculiarities in the response of various wheat cultivars and maize hybrids to water deficiency were studied in laboratory and vegetation experiments. Their resistance to extemal environmental factors was estimated by changes in nitrogen ( 15 N) and water (HDO) accumulation, transport and distribution in plant organs. The water supply was maintained at 60% FWC (control) and was reduced to 30% FWC (experiment) in the absence of plant watering during different stages or with use of polyethylene glycol. Decrease in water potential of medium from -0.05 (control) to -0.5, -0.9 and -1.6 MPa resulted in inhibition of water absorption, transport and distribution in spring wheat organs. After 24-hour stress, root absorption of water of drought-resistant varieties as compared to non-drought resistant ones was more sensitive, during 5, 10 and 15 min intervals after HDO introduction in nutrition medium. Strong depression of water exchange was observed at weaker stress in non-resistant variety. HDO absorption of the low part of the stem at short exposure resembled that of roots. The 24-hour stress revealed the tendency to sharper inhibition of absorption of labelled water in leaves of resistant variety. At a more durable stress the intensity of leaf water-exchange resistant variety was stabilized, while in the non-resistant variety it was reduced considerably. The intensity of HDO and 15 N exchange under stress conditions depended on the lability of regulator mechanism of water transport. Genotypic specificity of N use by wheat and maize plants depending on water supply and inclusion of 15 N in total and protein N was found. The 15 N content in total N in spring wheat cultivars under optimum water supply and under drought made 3.65 to 6.20 and 1.69 to 3.47, respectively. The 15 N content in protein N under the above conditions was 3.03 to 5.96 and 2.36 to 2.93, respectively. At water stress the main mass of labelled N in plant roots and stems was localized, while its intake into

  14. effect of population density and dose of nitrogen and potassium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... while, nitrogen consumption increased dry weight resulting in increased plant yield (Hatami et al., 2009). Vorob (2000) ... of this study was to investigate the effect of plant density and dose of nitrogen and potassium on Green bean Cv. ..... biogeochem. cycle., 2008, 22(1), 1022-1041. [11] Moniruzzaman M ...

  15. Potassium and calcium nutrition improves potato production in drip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The response of Spunta potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants to different rates of potassium (60 and 120 kg Fed-1 ) in presence or absence of Ca nutrition was studied. The study was performed in sandy-loam soil under a drip-irrigation system during fall seasons of 1996 and 1997 years. Plants fertilised with high rate of K ...

  16. Effects of potassium behaviour in soils on crop absorption | Lin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potassium (K) is one of the three major elements that play important roles in plants, such as maintaining turgor of cells, promoting activation of enzymes, and improving efficiency of photosynthesis. The types of K in soil may affect the plant absorption of K. K in soils includes K minerals, K in layered silicates (clay minerals), ...

  17. O comportamento de pés-mãe de Eucalyptus globulus Labill. sujeitos a diferentes níveis de azoto e potássio Influence of nitrogen and potassium on Eucalyptus globulus Labill. mother plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Ribeiro

    2007-07-01

    crescimento dos pés-mãe de E. globulus e para o sucesso do enraizamento das suas estacas, devendo a fertilização azotada destas plantas ser sujeita a um cuidado trabalho de optimização.In Portugal the traditional propagation of Eucalyptus globulus Labill (E. globulus by seed is being replaced by vegetative propagation by stem cuttings. However, for E. globulus, there is no sufficient information related to the management of mother plant fertilization. So, it is important to study the relationship between the fertilization of the mother plant and the rooting ability of the cuttings. With the aim of evaluating the effect of nitrogen and potassium on E. globulus mother plants, a fertilization experiment was performed during 2 years. 2 clones of E. globulus (clone HD161 and clone CN5 were fertilized, periodically, with 6 different nutrient solutions corresponding to 3 levels of nitrogen (50, 100 and 200 mg N L-1 and 2 levels of potassium (50 and 100 mg K L-1. In 1998, stock plants were subjected to formative pruning. In 1999, biomass, number of cuttings produced by the mother plants and rooting ability of the cuttings were evaluated. With the two levels of potassium applied no significant effects were found. On the contrary, increasing levels of nitrogen applied to the mother plants led to: i an increase of total biomass, ii a higher production of stem cuttings, iii an improvement of the rooting ability of the cuttings. Results showed that nitrogen fertilization and, as consequence, nitrogen reserves, constitute a limiting factor for rooting in E. globulus cuttings. Thus, research on the optimization of nitrogen fertilization of E. globulus mother plants should be performed.

  18. Influence of drainage and nutrient-solution nitrogen and potassium concentrations on the agronomic behavior of bell-pepper plants cultivated in a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamser, Anderson Fernando; Cecilio Filho, Arthur Bernardes; Nowaki, Rodrigo Hiyoshi Dalmazzo; Mendoza-Cortez, Juan Waldir; Urrestarazu, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The interactive effects of N (6, 9, 12 and 15 mmol L-1) and K (3, 5, 7, and 9 mmol L-1) concentrations in nutrient solutions were evaluated on bell pepper grown in a coconut-coir substrate and fertilized without drainage. An additional treatment with drainage was evaluated using N and K concentrations of 12 and 7 mmol L-1, respectively. The hybrid Eppo cultivar of yellow bell pepper was cultivated for 252 days beginning 9 November 2012. Electrical conductivity (EC), the N and K concentrations in the substrate solution, marketable fruit yield, total dry weight and macronutrient concentrations in shoots were periodically evaluated. Fruit production was lower in the system without drainage, regardless of the N and K concentrations, compared to the recommended 10-20% drainage of the volume of nutrient solution applied. Higher K concentrations in the nutrient solution did not affect plant production in the system without drainage for the substrate with an initial K concentration of 331.3 mg L-1. Fruit yield was higher without drainage at a nutrient-solution N concentration of 10.7 mmol L-1. The upper EC limit of the substrate solution in the system without drainage was exceeded 181 days after planting. Either lower nutrient concentrations in the nutrient solution or a drainage system could thus control the EC in the substrate solution.

  19. Critical Issues in the Study of Magnesium Transport Systems and Magnesium Deficiency Symptoms in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko I. Kobayashi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg is the second most abundant cation in living cells. Over 300 enzymes are known to be Mg-dependent, and changes in the Mg concentration significantly affects the membrane potential. As Mg becomes deficient, starch accumulation and chlorosis, bridged by the generation of reactive oxygen species, are commonly found in Mg-deficient young mature leaves. These defects further cause the inhibition of photosynthesis and finally decrease the biomass. Recently, transcriptome analysis has indicated the transcriptinal downregulation of chlorophyll apparatus at the earlier stages of Mg deficiency, and also the potential involvement of complicated networks relating to hormonal signaling and circadian oscillation. However, the processes of the common symptoms as well as the networks between Mg deficiency and signaling are not yet fully understood. Here, for the purpose of defining the missing pieces, several problems are considered and explained by providing an introduction to recent reports on physiological and transcriptional responses to Mg deficiency. In addition, it has long been unclear whether the Mg deficiency response involves the modulation of Mg2+ transport system. In this review, the current status of research on Mg2+ transport and the relating transporters are also summarized. Especially, the rapid progress in physiological characterization of the plant MRS2 gene family as well as the fundamental investigation about the molecular mechanism of the action of bacterial CorA proteins are described.

  20. Intact plant MRI for the study of cell water relations, membrane permeability, cell-to-cell and long distance water transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    2007-01-01

    Water content and hydraulic conductivity, including transport within cells, over membranes, cell-to-cell, and long-distance xylem and phloem transport, are strongly affected by plant water stress. By being able to measure these transport processes non-invasely in the intact plant situation in

  1. Suggestions of radiation protection instruments in ships used for transporting spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants to central stores and further to fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warenmo, G.

    1979-01-01

    Some radiation protection measures are necessary in ships which will be used for transporting spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants to central stores and further to fuel reprocessing plants in order to protect the crew from unnecessarily high radiation doses and to ensure that not allowable values occur. Such measures are discussed in this report as well as suitable radiation protection instruments for such ships. (E.R.)

  2. The Limitation Amount of Available Potassium for Wheat in a Loess Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vafakhah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was determining the most limiting plant growth factor in the wheat root zone dominated by illite in clay fraction and a high specific surface with ample ammonium acetate extractible potassium. A completely randomized block design with 4 replicates was used in Seyed Miran Research Farm (Gorgan during 2009-2010 growing season. Treatments were mineral fertilizers (to achieve different levels of yields, gypsum (1000 Kg/ha calcium, calcium chloride (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca, urea (93 Kg ha-1 N and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined, gypsum (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined, calcium chloride (1000 Kg ha-1 Ca and potassium chloride (105 Kg ha-1 K combined and control. Wheat cultivar (N-80-19 was planted in experimental site at 2009/12/9. The results showed that potassium is the most limiting plant growth factor in the site of the experiment. Electric diffuse double layer is expected to be truncated with a high specific surface soil in this area minimizing the soil solution-diffuse double layer interface for rapid potassium diffusion. The highest yield grain and straw with urea and potassium chloride showed a greater effect on plant and soil potassium concentrations. A greater potassium diffusion rate may be achieved as a result of greater concentration gradients between the exchange sites and soil solution by potassium fertilization and more potassium excess. Ammonium from urea diminished potassium fixation with illite and increased potassium root uptake.

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2001-01-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification, SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP designs emphasize on recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from coal clean operations and will assess blends of the culm and coal or petroleum coke as feedstocks. The project is being carried out in three phases. Phase I involves definition of concept and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II consists of an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III involves updating the original EECP design, based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 BPD coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification, SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP designs emphasize on recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from coal clean operations and will assess blends of the culm and coal or petroleum coke as feedstocks. The project is being carried out in three phases. Phase I involves definition of concept and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II consists of an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III involves updating the original EECP design, based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 BPD coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania.

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-01-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

  6. Potassium toxicity at low serum potassium levels with refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen; Abela, Oliver G; Narisetty, Keerthy; Rhine, David; Abela, George S

    2015-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a life-threatening condition occurring in severely malnourished patients after initiating feeding. Severe hypophosphatemia with reduced adenosine triphosphate production has been implicated, but little data are available regarding electrolyte abnormalities. In this case, we report electrocardiographic changes consistent with hyperkalemia during potassium replacement after a serum level increase from 1.9 to 2.9 mEq/L. This was reversed by lowering serum potassium back to 2.0 mEq/L. In conclusion, the patient with prolonged malnutrition became adapted to low potassium levels and developed potassium toxicity with replacement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional properties and differential mode of regulation of the nitrate transporter from a plant symbiotic ascomycete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Barbara; Viscomi, Arturo R.; Bolchi, Angelo; Martin, Yusé; Siverio, José M.; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen assimilation by plant symbiotic fungi plays a central role in the mutualistic interaction established by these organisms, as well as in nitrogen flux in a variety of soils. In the present study, we report on the functional properties, structural organization and distinctive mode of regulation of TbNrt2 (Tuber borchii NRT2 family transporter), the nitrate transporter of the mycorrhizal ascomycete T. borchii. As revealed by experiments conducted in a nitrate-uptake-defective mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, TbNrt2 is a high-affinity transporter (Km=4.7 μM nitrate) that is bispecific for nitrate and nitrite. It is expressed in free-living mycelia and in mycorrhizae, where it preferentially accumulates in the plasma membrane of root-contacting hyphae. The TbNrt2 mRNA, which is transcribed from a single-copy gene clustered with the nitrate reductase gene in the T. borchii genome, was specifically up-regulated following transfer of mycelia to nitrate- (or nitrite)-containing medium. However, at variance with the strict nitrate-dependent induction commonly observed in other organisms, TbNrt2 was also up-regulated (at both the mRNA and the protein level) following transfer to a nitrogen-free medium. This unusual mode of regulation differs from that of the adjacent nitrate reductase gene, which was expressed at basal levels under nitrogen deprivation conditions and required nitrate for induction. The functional and expression properties, described in the present study, delineate TbNrt2 as a versatile transporter that may be especially suited to cope with the fluctuating (and often low) mineral nitrogen concentrations found in most natural, especially forest, soils. PMID:16201972

  8. Optimum design for effective water transport through a double-layered porous hydrogel inspired by plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeonjeong; Huh, Hyungkyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    Plant leaves are generally known to have optimized morphological structure in response to environmental changes for efficient water usage. However, the advantageous features of plant leaves are not fully utilized in engineering fields yet, since the optimum design in internal structure of plant leaves is unclear. In this study, the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways inside plant leaves was investigated. Water transport through double-layered porous hydrogel models analogous to mesophyll cells was experimentally observed. In addition, computational experiment and theoretical analysis were applied to the model systems to find the optimal design for efficient water transport. As a result, the models with lower porosity or with pores distributed widely in the structure exhibit efficient mass transport. Our theoretical prediction supports that structural features of plant leaves guarantee sufficient water supply as survival strategy. This study may provide a new framework for investigating the biophysical principles governing the morphological optimization of plant leaves and for designing microfluidic devices to enhance mass transport ability. This study was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and funded by the Korean government.

  9. Estimation of gamma dose rate from hulls and shield design for the hull transport cask of Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    In Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP), un-dissolved clad of fuel pins known as hulls are the major sources of high level solid waste. Safe handling, transport and disposal require the estimation of radioactivity as a consequent of gamma dose rate from hulls in fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant in comparison with thermal reactor fuel. Due to long irradiation time and low cooling of spent fuel, the evolution of activation products 51 Cr, 58 Co, 54 Mn and 59 Fe present as impurities in the fuel clad are the major sources of gamma radiation. Gamma dose rate from hull container with hulls from Fuel Sub Assembly (FSA) and Radial Sub Assembly (RSA) of Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP) was estimated in order to design the hull transport cask. Shielding computations were done using point kernel code, IGSHIELD. This paper describes the details of source terms, estimation of dose rate and shielding design of hull transport cask in detail. (author)

  10. 21 CFR 184.1619 - Potassium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solution of potassium hydroxide with excess carbon dioxide to produce potassium carbonate; (3) By treating a solution of potassium hydroxide with carbon dioxide to produce potassium bicarbonate, which is... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium carbonate. 184.1619 Section 184.1619 Food...

  11. Potassium in milk and milk products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombrito, E.Z.; Nuguid, Z.F.S.; Tangonan, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of potassium in imported processed milk was determined by gamma spectral analysis. The results show that the potassium content of diluted infant formula milk is closest to the reported mean concentration of potassium in human milk while other milk types have potassium values similar to the potassium content of cow milk. (Auth.). 2 figs., 5 refs

  12. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Alexander K; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Bryan, Tom W; Hetue, Jackson D; Lake, Katherine A; Ellison, Paul A; Engle, Jonathan W; Barnhart, Todd E; Nickles, Robert J; Williams, Paul H; DeJesus, Onofre T

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [(18)F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modeling of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [(18)F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.

  13. STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

    2010-04-29

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

  14. Cadmium uptake from solution by plants and its transport from roots to shoots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, S.C.; Jones, L.H.P.; Hopper, M.J.

    1976-02-01

    The uptake of cadmium by the roots of plants, and its transport to shoots was examined using solution culture. Uptake by the roots of perennial ryegrass over a period of 4 hours from an aqueous solution containing 0.25 ppm cadmium as CdCl/sub 2/ was (i) enhanced by killing the roots and (ii) depressed when Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ or Zn/sup 2 +/ were added to the solution. The distribution of cadmium between the roots and shoots of 23 species was examined at 4 days after a single, 3-day exposure to a nutrient solution containing 0.01 ppm added Cd. In all except 3 species, i.e. kale, lettuce and watercress, more than 50% of that taken up was retained in the shoot, and in fibrous roots of fodder beet, parsnip, carrot and radish it was greater than in the swollen storage roots. When perennial ryegrass was similarly exposed to solutions containing 0.01, 0.05, and 0.25 ppm added cadmium, uptake, as measured at 3 days after adding cadmium, increased with increasing rates of addition, but the proportion retained in the roots was constant (approximately 88%). There was no further transport from roots to shoots during the next 21 days, with the result that the concentration in the shoots decreased progressively with increasing growth. It is concluded that although the roots of several species can take up large quantities of cadmium from solution there are mechanisms which may restrict the movement of cadmium through plants, and thus to animals. 21 references, 7 tables.

  15. A Nostoc punctiforme Sugar Transporter Necessary to Establish a Cyanobacterium-Plant Symbiosis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L.; Meeks, John C.; Flores, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using 14C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work. PMID:23463784

  16. Transport of Cobalt 60 from the Argentine Nuclear Power Plant in Embalse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Vietri, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this presentation is to point out some relevant issues related to the transport of cobalt 60 for domestic uses and export from the Argentine Nuclear Power Plant located in Embalse (ENPP). It is remarked that in last 22 years, ENPP produced about 2600 PBq (70 MCi) of Co-60, and that Argentina is the third Co-60 producer, after Canada and Russia. It is mentioned that in Argentina there are facilities which manufacture Zircaloy seamless tubes and reactivity control bars containing cobalt 59 to be used in ENPP, the operation of Candu reactor at ENPP including cobalt-related activities, and the manufacture and commercialization of Co-60 sealed sources. The Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority verifies the compliance of nuclear activities with regulatory standards, including those related to the transport of radioactive material. Then, it is described the process for obtaining Co-60 at ENPP with an activity concentration to allow its use in medicine and industry. After that, is considered in detail the type of package used for the transport of Co-60 from ENPP: it is to say, Type B(U) package designs that must be approved by the Competent Authority origin of the design, and they are able to withstand routine, normal and accident conditions of transport, including severe impacts, fires and immersion in water. The overall dimensions of packages are about 1.0 m to 1.5 m diameter by 1.2 m to 1.8 m high, as well as the gross mass could vary from 6500 kg to 9500 kg. Radioactive contents consist of Co-60 sealed sources (called pencils), with an activity range from 8 PBq to 16 PBq. Then, it is considered activities prior to dispatch of Type B(U) packages at ENPP, including the preparation of radioactive contents, packaging and package (labelling and marking) as well as necessary tests and documentation for transport in order to fulfil pertinent requirements of package design operation manual of the package and related standards. Finally, it is pointed

  17. Subsurface fate and transport of cyanide species at a manufactured-gas plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Nakles, D.V.

    1999-01-01

    Cyanide is present at manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites in oxide-box residuals, which were often managed on-site as fill during active operations. Cyanide can leach from these materials, causing groundwater contamination. Speciation, fate, and transport of cyanide in a sand-gravel aquifer underlying an MGP site in the upper Midwest region of the US were studied through characterization, monitoring, and modeling of a plume of cyanide-contaminated groundwater emanating from the site. Results indicate that cyanide in the groundwater is primarily in the form of iron-cyanide complexes (>98%), that these complexes are stable under the conditions of the aquifer, and that they are transported as nonreactive solutes in the sand-gravel aquifer material. Weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, which represents a minute fraction of total cyanide in the site groundwater, may undergo chemical-biological degradation in the sand-gravel aquifer. It seems that dilution may be the only natural attenuation mechanism for iron-cyanide complexes in sand-gravel aquifers at MGP sites

  18. Plasmodesmata without callose and calreticulin in higher plants - open channels for fast symplastic transport?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill N. Demchenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodesmata (PD represent membrane-lined channels that link adjacent plant cells across the cell wall. PD of higher plants contain a central tube of endoplasmic reticulum called desmotubule. Membrane and lumen proteins seem to be able to move through the desmotubule, but most transport processes through PD occur through the cytoplasmic annulus (Brunkard et al., 2013. Calreticulin (CRT, a highly conserved Ca2+-binding protein found in all multi-cellular eukaryotes, predominantly located in the ER, was shown to localize to PD, though not all PD accumulate CRT. In nitrogen fixing actinorhizal root nodules of the Australian tree Casuarina glauca, the primary walls of infected cells containing the microsymbiont become lignified upon infection. TEM analysis of these nodules showed that during the differentiation of infected cells, PD connecting infected cells, and connecting infected and adjacent uninfected cells, were reduced in number as well as diameter (Schubert et al., 2013. In contrast with PD connecting young infected cells, and most PD connecting mature infected and adjacent uninfected cells, PD connecting mature infected cells did not accumulate CRT. Furthermore, as shown here, these PD were not associated with callose, and based on their diameter, they probably had lost their desmotubules. We speculate that either this is a slow path to PD degradation, or that the loss of callose accumulation and presumably also desmotubules leads to the PD becoming open channels and improves metabolite exchange between cells.

  19. Nuclear microprobe study of heavy metal uptake and transport in aquatic plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Zs.; Kocsar, I.; Szikszai, Z.; Lakatos, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In aquatic ecosystems water contamination by trace metals is one of the main types of pollution that may stress the biotic community. Although some metals are needed as micronutrients for autotrophic organisms, they can have toxic effects at higher concentration. Aquatic plants can take up large quantities of nutrients and metals from the environment, they can live under extreme environmental conditions therefore they are being increasingly used in remediation processes to reduce contamination. Besides the usually applied bulk analytical techniques quantitative micro-PIXE investigation of the macro, micro and trace element distribution within the root can lead to a better understanding of the heavy metal up-take, transport and detoxification mechanisms of the plants and thus helps to select the proper species for the remedial activity, or possibly to increase the efficiency of the remediation. In this work we determined the elemental distributions in root cross sections and along the roots of reed (Phragmaties australis), bulrush (Typha angustifolia) and sea club-rush (Bolboschoemus maritimus) using the Debrecen nuclear microprobe. The plants originate from the dried units of the wastewater sedimentation pond system of the tannery of Kunszentmarton. 1500 m 3 waste water containing lime, sodium-salts, ammonium-salts, chromium-salts, sodium, chlorine and magnesium ions, sulphur and organic material was released to the pond system every day till 1988. The chosen species are the dominant species of the area, composing 85-90% of the green plant covering. This heavily contaminated area has been regularly monitored by the colleagues of the Dept. of Applied Ecology of the Univ. of Debrecen since 1998. They focused their work the potentially toxic heavy metal chromium. In order to conserve the samples in the living state, the roots were frozen in liquid nitrogen. 16-20 μm thick cross sections were made with cryo-microtome, and all the

  20. Heterologous expression of the yeast Tpo1p or Pdr5p membrane transporters in Arabidopsis confers plant xenobiotic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Estelle; Niño-González, María; Godinho, Cláudia P; Cabrito, Tânia R; Teixeira, Miguel C; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Duque, Paula

    2017-07-03

    Soil contamination is a major hindrance for plant growth and development. The lack of effective strategies to remove chemicals released into the environment has raised the need to increase plant resilience to soil pollutants. Here, we investigated the ability of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasma-membrane transporters, the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) member Tpo1p and the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) protein Pdr5p, to confer Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic plants expressing either of the yeast transporters were undistinguishable from the wild type under control conditions, but displayed tolerance when challenged with the herbicides 2,4-D and barban. Plants expressing ScTPO1 were also more resistant to the herbicides alachlor and metolachlor as well as to the fungicide mancozeb and the Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Al 3+ and Cd 2+ cations, while ScPDR5-expressing plants exhibited tolerance to cycloheximide. Yeast mutants lacking Tpo1p or Pdr5p showed increased sensitivity to most of the agents tested in plants. Our results demonstrate that the S. cerevisiae Tpo1p and Pdr5p transporters are able to mediate resistance to a broad range of compounds of agricultural interest in yeast as well as in Arabidopsis, underscoring their potential in future biotechnological applications.

  1. Dietary reference values for potassium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derives dietary reference values (DRVs) for potassium. The Panel decides to set DRVs on the basis of the relationships between potassium intake and blood pressure and stroke...

  2. Neural synchronization via potassium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Mosekilde, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Using a relatively simple model we examine how variations of the extracellular potassium concentration can give rise to synchronization of two nearby pacemaker cells. With the volume of the extracellular space and the rate of potassium diffusion as control parameters, the dual nature of this reso...

  3. Can Diuretics Decrease Your Potassium Level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of low potassium? Can diuretics decrease your potassium level? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Yes, ... your urine. This can lead to low potassium levels in your blood (hypokalemia). Signs and symptoms of ...

  4. Root-to-shoot hormonal communication in contrasting rootstocks suggests an important role for the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid in mediating plant growth under low-potassium nutrition in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Martínez-Andújar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Selection and breeding of rootstocks that can tolerate low K supply may increase crop productivity in low fertility soils and reduce fertilizer application. However, the underlying physiological traits are still largely unknown. In this study, 16 contrasting recombinant inbred lines (RILs derived from a cross between domestic and wild tomato species (Solanum lycopersicum x S. pimpinellifolium have been used to analyse traits related to the rootstock-mediated induction of low (L, low shoot fresh weight or high (H, high shoot fresh weight vigour to a commercial F1 hybrid grown under control (6 mM, c and low-K (1mM, k. Based on hormonal and ionomic composition in the root xylem sap and the leaf nutritional status after long-term (7 weeks exposure low-K supply, a model can be proposed to explain the rootstocks effects on shoot performance with the ethylene precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC playing a pivotal negative role. The concentration of this hormone was higher in the low-vigour Lc and Lk rootstocks under both conditions, increased in the sensitive HcLk plants under low-K while it was reduced in the high-vigour Hk ones. Low ACC levels would promote the transport of K vs Na in the vigorous Hk grafted plants. Along with K, Ca and S, micronutrient uptake and transport were also activated in the tolerant Hk combinations under low-K. Additionally, an interconversion of trans-zeatin into trans-zeatin riboside would contribute to decrease ACC in the tolerant LcHk plants. The high vigour induced by the Hk plants can also be explained by an interaction of ACC with other hormones (cytokinins and salicylic, abscisic and jasmonic acids. Therefore, Hk rootstocks convert an elite tomato F1 cultivar into a (micro nutrient-efficient phenotype, improving growth under reduced K fertilization.

  5. Performance analysis of a potassium-steam two stage vapour cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitachi, Kohshi; Saito, Takeshi

    1983-01-01

    It is an important subject to raise the thermal efficiency in thermal power plants. In present thermal power plants which use steam cycle, the plant thermal efficiency has already reached 41 to 42 %, steam temperature being 839 K, and steam pressure being 24.2 MPa. That is, the thermal efficiency in a steam cycle is facing a limit. In this study, analysis was made on the performance of metal vapour/steam two-stage Rankine cycle obtained by combining a metal vapour cycle with a present steam cycle. Three different combinations using high temperature potassium regenerative cycle and low temperature steam regenerative cycle, potassium regenerative cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle, and potassium bleed cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle were systematically analyzed for the overall thermal efficiency, the output ratio and the flow rate ratio, when the inlet temperature of a potassium turbine, the temperature of a potassium condenser, and others were varied. Though the overall thermal efficiency was improved by lowering the condensing temperature of potassium vapour, it is limited by the construction because the specific volume of potassium in low pressure section increases greatly. In the combinatipn of potassium vapour regenerative cycle with steam regenerative cycle, the overall thermal efficiency can be 58.5 %, and also 60.2 % if steam reheat and regenerative cycle is employed. If a cycle to heat steam with the bled vapor out of a potassium vapour cycle is adopted, the overall thermal efficiency of 63.3 % is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Optimising processes of discontinuous loading and continuous transportation through mobile crushing plants; Prozessoptimierung bei diskontinuierlicher Beladung und kontinuierlichem Transport durch mobile Brecheranlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christoph, B.M. [ThyssenKrupp Foerdertechnik GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    With its current development stage, the fully mobile crushing plant has reached the same level of mobility and capability as rope shovel and hydraulic excavators. Hence, this machine becomes an important link between discontinuous loading and continuous transportation in order to optimise surface mine operations which includes the sequences 'loosen', 'load' and 'transport'. Due to the increased availability of the crushing plant, the efficiency of the entire process rises. In addition, due to the central process control by the excavator operator, personnel cost can be saved. Consequently, the targets for increased process efficiency mentioned at the beginning of the presentation are fulfilled as fewer personnel can reach a higher degree of machine utilisation. (orig.)

  7. Potassium iodide stockpiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimm, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    After examination by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other federal agencies of federal policy on the use and distribution of potassium iodide (KI) as a thyroid-blocking agent for use in off-site preparedness around commercial nuclear powerplants, FEMA believes the present shelf life of KI is too short, that the minimum ordering quantities are an obstacle to efficient procurement, and that the packaging format offered by the drug industry does not meet the wishes of state and local government officials. FEMA has asked assistance from the Food and Drug Administration in making it possible for those states wishing to satisfy appropriate requirements to do so at the minimum cost to the public. Given an appropriate packaging and drug form, there appears to be no reason for the federal government to have further involvement in the stockpiling of KI

  8. Potassium-argon technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassignol, Charles; Cornette, Yves; David, Benjamin; Gillot, P.-Y.

    1978-04-01

    The main features of the method of processing rocks and minerals and measuring the extracted argon, for the purpose of potassium-argon dating are described. It differs in several respects from the conventional one, as described, f.i., in Dalrymple and Lanphere's monography. Principally it was established that the continual purification of the gases in the mass spectrometer cell during the measurement, stops the peaks of current drift, and renders them representative of the introduced argon. This allows on the one hand to improve the reliability and accuracy of measurements, on the other hand to get rid of the isotopic dilution method, with 38 A as a spike. Moreover the reliability of the radiogenic argon is improved by taking into account the mislinearness of the M.S. response. All this results in a higher performance of the K/Ar dating method, especially in the recent ages range. The technological side of the problem was only dealt with [fr

  9. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  10. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, James; Carr, Ron; Chebl, Maroun; Coleman, Robert; Costantini, William; Cox, Robert; Dial, William; Jenkins, Robert; McGovern, James; Mueller, Peter

    2006-01-01

    ...., trains, ships, etc.) and maximizing intermodal efficiency. A healthy balance must be achieved between the flow of international commerce and security requirements regardless of transportation mode...

  11. Does short-term potassium fertilization improve recovery from drought stress in laurel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Elisabetta; Inzerillo, Simone; Grisafi, Francesca; Sajeva, Maurizio; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Xylem hydraulic conductance varies in response to changes in sap solute content, and in particular of potassium (K(+)) ion concentration. This phenomenon, known as the 'ionic effect', is enhanced in embolized stems, where it can compensate for cavitation-induced loss of hydraulic conductance. Previous studies have shown that in well-watered laurel plants (Laurus nobilis L.), potassium concentration of the xylem sap and plant hydraulic conductance increased 24 h after fertilization with KCl. The aim of this work was to test whether water-stressed laurel plants, grown under low potassium availability, could recover earlier from stress when irrigated with a KCl solution instead of potassium-free water. Two-year-old potted laurel seedlings were subjected to water stress by suspending irrigation until leaf conductance to water vapour (g(L)) dropped to ∼30% of its initial value and leaf water potential (ψ(L)) reached the turgor loss point (ψ(TLP)). Plants were then irrigated either with water or with 25 mM KCl and monitored for water status, gas exchange and plant hydraulics recovery at 3, 6 and 24 h after irrigation. No significant differences were found between the two experimental groups in terms of ψ(L), g(L), plant transpiration, plant hydraulic conductance or leaf-specific shoot hydraulic conductivity. Analysis of xylem sap potassium concentration showed that there were no significant differences between treatments, and potassium levels were similar to those of potassium-starved but well-watered plants. In conclusion, potassium uptake from the soil solution and/or potassium release to the xylem appeared to be impaired in water-stressed plants, at least up to 24 h after relief from water stress, so that fertilization after the onset of stress did not result in any short-term advantage for recovery from drought. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A novel potassium channel in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Zanetti

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the structure-function relationship of a small number of prokaryotic ion channels characterized so far greatly contributed to our knowledge on basic mechanisms of ion conduction. We identified a new potassium channel (SynK in the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, a photosynthetic model organism. SynK, when expressed in a K(+-uptake-system deficient E. coli strain, was able to recover growth of these organisms. The protein functions as a potassium selective ion channel when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The location of SynK in cyanobacteria in both thylakoid and plasmamembranes was revealed by immunogold electron microscopy and Western blotting of isolated membrane fractions. SynK seems to be conserved during evolution, giving rise to a TPK (two-pore K(+ channel family member which is shown here to be located in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis. Our work characterizes a novel cyanobacterial potassium channel and indicates the molecular nature of the first higher plant thylakoid cation channel, opening the way to functional studies.

  13. Beznau nuclear power plant: comments of the Federal Department of Transport, Communications and Energy on the reproaches of Greenpeace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Answer of the chairman of the EVED (Federal Department of Transport, Communications and Energy) to the open letter in which Greenpeace Switzerland made massive accusations against the nuclear power plant Beznau and the HSK (Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate). All the charges are rebutted in this answer

  14. Transport processes of the legume symbiosome membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C Clarke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosome membrane (SM is a physical barrier between the host plant and nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis, and represents a regulated interface for the movement of solutes between the symbionts that is under plant control. The primary nutrient exchange across the SM is the transport of a carbon energy source from plant to bacteroid in exchange for fixed nitrogen. At a biochemical level two channels have been implicated in movement of fixed nitrogen across the SM and a uniporter that transports monovalent dicarboxylate ions has been characterized that would transport fixed carbon. The aquaporin NOD26 may provide a channel for ammonia, but the genes encoding the other transporters have not been identified. Transport of several other solutes, including calcium and potassium, have been demonstrated in isolated symbiosomes, and genes encoding transport systems for the movement of iron, nitrate, sulfate and zinc in nodules have been identified. However, definitively matching transport activities with these genes has proved difficult and many further transport processes are expected on the SM to facilitate the movement of nutrients between the symbionts. Recently, work detailing the SM proteome in soybean has been completed, contributing significantly to the database of known SM proteins. This represents a valuable resource for the identification of transporter protein candidates, some of which may correspond to transport processes previously described, or to novel transport systems in the symbiosis. Putative transporters identified from the proteome include homologues of transporters of sulfate, calcium, peptides and various metal ions. Here we review current knowledge of transport processes of the SM and discuss the requirements for additional transport routes of other nutrients exchanged in the symbiosis, with a focus on transport systems identified through the soybean SM proteome.

  15. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  16. Sugars en route to the roots. Transport, metabolism and storage within plant roots and towards microorganisms of the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennion, Nils; Durand, Mickael; Vriet, Cécile; Doidy, Joan; Maurousset, Laurence; Lemoine, Rémi; Pourtau, Nathalie

    2018-04-28

    In plants, root is a typical sink organ that relies exclusively on the import of sugar from the aerial parts. Sucrose is delivered by the phloem to the most distant root tips and, en route to the tip, is used by the different root tissues for metabolism and storage. Besides, a certain portion of this carbon is exuded in the rhizosphere, supplied to beneficial microorganisms and diverted by parasitic microbes. The transport of sugars towards these numerous sinks either occurs symplastically through cell connections (plasmodesmata) or is apoplastically mediated through membrane transporters (MST, SUT/SUC and SWEET) that control monosaccharide and sucrose fluxes. Here, we review recent progresses on carbon partitioning within and outside roots, discussing membrane transporters involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic factors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Uses of the potassium permanganate to eliminate copper cyanide from waste water resulting from a lixiviation plant in a gold mine (I); Aplicacion del permanganato potasico para la eliminacion de cianuros de cobre en aguas residuales de la planta de lixiviacion en una mina de oro (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho, J. P.; Fernandez, B.; Ayala, J.; Garcia, M. P.; Lavandeira, A.

    2009-07-01

    The use of cyanide in the hydrometallurgical and chemical industries has led to the emergence of a major environmental problem due to its high toxicity. Te wastewater generated at these plants is hazardous to the environment and therefore must be managed properly. For this purpose, they undergo detoxification processes after lodes from the plant are accumulated in waste-resistant containment ponds that mast be waterproof to prevent environmental disasters from leakages or massive flood. This work shows the results obtained in laboratory tests carried out with plant waters and demonstrates the efficacy of potassium permanganate as an oxidant of cyanide wastewater from a gold hydrometallurgical plant. In the process the destruction of the copper cyanide complexes is solution is achieved and copper metal ions are eliminated through precipitation mostly as hydroxide. (Author) 28 refs.

  18. The multidrug transporter ABCG2 (BCRP) is inhibited by plant-derived cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M L; Lau, D T T; Allen, J D; Arnold, J C

    2007-11-01

    Cannabinoids are used therapeutically for the palliation of the adverse side effects associated with cancer chemotherapy. However, cannabinoids also inhibit both the activity and expression of the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein in vitro. Here we address the interaction of cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD) and delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with the related multidrug transporter, ABCG2. Cannabinoid inhibition of Abcg2/ABCG2 was assessed using flow cytometric analysis of substrate accumulation and ATPase activity assays. The cytotoxicity and chemosensitization by cannabinoids was determined with cell viability assays. Expression of cannabinoid and vanilloid receptors was assessed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and cannabinoid modulation of ABCG2 expression was examined using immunoblotting. CBN, CBD and THC increased the intracellular accumulation of the Abcg2/ABCG2 substrate, mitoxantrone, in an over-expressing cell line. The THC metabolite, (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-delta 9-THC was much less potent. The plant cannabinoids inhibited both basal and substrate stimulated ATPase activity of human ABCG2. Cannabinoid cytotoxicity occurred in the absence of known cannabinoid cell surface receptors, and only at concentrations higher than those required for Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibition. Sub-toxic concentrations of the cannabinoids resensitized the overexpressing cell line to the cytotoxic effect of Abcg2/ABCG2 substrates, mitoxantrone and topotecan. This occurred in the absence of any effect on ABCG2 expression. Cannabinoids are novel Abcg2/ABCG2 inhibitors, reversing the Abcg2-mediated multidrug-resistant phenotype in vitro. This finding may have implications for the co-administration of cannabinoids with pharmaceuticals that are ABCG2 substrates.

  19. Trypanosome Letm1 protein is essential for mitochondrial potassium homeostasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hashimi, Hassan; McDonald, Lindsay M.; Stříbrná, Eva; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 288, č. 37 (2013), s. 26914-26925 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bioenergetics * Letm1 * Mitochondria * Potassium Transport * Translation * Trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.600, year: 2013

  20. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K channels...... and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K channels may be of importance....

  1. Potassium channels in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Potassium channels are the most widely distributed class of ion channels. These channels are transmembrane proteins known to play important roles in both normal and pathophysiological functions in all cell types. Various potassium channels are recognised as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, brain/spinal cord ischaemia and sepsis. In addition to their importance as therapeutic targets, certain potassium channels are known for their beneficial roles in anaesthesia, cardioprotection and neuroprotection. Some types of potassium channels present in the plasma membrane of various cells have been found in the inner mitochondrial membrane as well. Potassium channels have been proposed to regulate mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration, matrix volume and Ca(+) ion homeostasis. It has been proposed that mitochondrial potassium channels mediate ischaemic preconditioning in various tissues. However, the specificity of a pharmacological agents and the mechanisms underlying their effects on ischaemic preconditioning remain controversial. The following potassium channels from various tissues have been identified in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated (mitoK(ATP)) channel, large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoBK(Ca)) channel, intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-regulated (mitoIK(Ca)) channel, voltage-gated (mitoKv1.3 type) channel, and twin-pore domain (mitoTASK-3) channel. It has been shown that increased potassium flux into brain mitochondria induced by either the mitoK(ATP) channel or mitoBK(Ca) channel affects the beneficial effects on neuronal cell survival under pathological conditions. Recently, differential distribution of mitoBK(Ca) channels has been observed in neuronal mitochondria. These findings may suggest a neuroprotective role for the mitoBK(Ca) channel in specific brain structures. This minireview summarises current data on brain mitochondrial potassium channels and the efforts to identify

  2. Tracing cohesive sediment transportation at river mouths around Tokyo, Japan by Cesium originated from Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    koibuchi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment transport at river mouths, which consists of suspended-load and bed-load, has not been fully understood, since bed-load transport of cohesive sand is difficult to observe. Especially, the impact of sediment transport on the total amount of fine-grained cohesive sediment has not been elucidated. Cesium-134 and cesium-137 were spread from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) after the earthquake of March 11 of 2011, and attached to the fine-grained sand on the land. The contaminated sand flowed into the river mouths through the rivers possibly due to the complex physical processes in estuarine areas. To evaluate the fine-grained sediment transport around Tokyo and Tokyo Bay, field observations were carried out utilizing radionuclide originated from FDNPP as an effective tracer. The cohesive sediment transport at three different river mouths around Tokyo was successfully quantified. The cohesive sediment transport deposited in the estuary was found to be greatly dependent on the land use, geometry, river discharge and salinity. In addition,the transport driven by the rainfall was minute, and its behavior was quite different from suspended solids. Although further field observations of radionuclide are necessary, it is clear that fine-grained sediment in the bay from rivers already settled on the river mouth by aggregation. The settled sand will not move even in rainfall events. Consequently, the transport of radionuclide to the Pacific Ocean may not occur.; Cesium distribution around Tokyo Bay ; Cesium Concentration in Edogawa river

  3. Oral potassium supplementation in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Gatenby, Piers A

    2008-08-01

    Hospital inpatients are frequently hypokalaemic. Low plasma potassium levels may cause life threatening complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias. Potassium supplementation may be administered parenterally or enterally. Oral potassium supplements have been associated with oesophageal ulceration, strictures and gastritis. An alternative to potassium salt tablets or solution is dietary modification with potassium rich food stuffs, which has been proven to be a safe and effective method for potassium supplementation. The potassium content of one medium banana is equivalent to a 12 mmol potassium salt tablet. Potassium supplementation by dietary modification has been shown to be equally efficacious to oral potassium salt supplementation and is preferred by the majority of patients. Subsequently, it is our practice to replace potassium using dietary modification, particularly in surgical patients having undergone oesophagogastrectomy or in those with peptic ulcer disease.

  4. Evaluating Status Change of Soil Potassium from Path Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenming; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine critical environmental parameters of soil K availability and to quantify those contributors by using a proposed path model. In this study, plot experiments were designed into different treatments, and soil samples were collected and further analyzed in laboratory to investigate soil properties influence on soil potassium forms (water soluble K, exchangeable K, non-exchangeable K). Furthermore, path analysis based on proposed path model was carried out to evaluate the relationship between potassium forms and soil properties. Research findings were achieved as followings. Firstly, key direct factors were soil S, ratio of sodium-potassium (Na/K), the chemical index of alteration (CIA), Soil Organic Matter in soil solution (SOM), Na and total nitrogen in soil solution (TN), and key indirect factors were Carbonate (CO3), Mg, pH, Na, S, and SOM. Secondly, path model can effectively determine direction and quantities of potassium status changes between Exchangeable potassium (eK), Non-exchangeable potassium (neK) and water-soluble potassium (wsK) under influences of specific environmental parameters. In reversible equilibrium state of , K balance state was inclined to be moved into β and χ directions in treatments of potassium shortage. However in reversible equilibrium of , K balance state was inclined to be moved into θ and λ directions in treatments of water shortage. Results showed that the proposed path model was able to quantitatively disclose moving direction of K status and quantify its equilibrium threshold. It provided a theoretical and practical basis for scientific and effective fertilization in agricultural plants growth. PMID:24204659

  5. Evaluating status change of soil potassium from path model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming He

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine critical environmental parameters of soil K availability and to quantify those contributors by using a proposed path model. In this study, plot experiments were designed into different treatments, and soil samples were collected and further analyzed in laboratory to investigate soil properties influence on soil potassium forms (water soluble K, exchangeable K, non-exchangeable K. Furthermore, path analysis based on proposed path model was carried out to evaluate the relationship between potassium forms and soil properties. Research findings were achieved as followings. Firstly, key direct factors were soil S, ratio of sodium-potassium (Na/K, the chemical index of alteration (CIA, Soil Organic Matter in soil solution (SOM, Na and total nitrogen in soil solution (TN, and key indirect factors were Carbonate (CO3, Mg, pH, Na, S, and SOM. Secondly, path model can effectively determine direction and quantities of potassium status changes between Exchangeable potassium (eK, Non-exchangeable potassium (neK and water-soluble potassium (wsK under influences of specific environmental parameters. In reversible equilibrium state of [Formula: see text], K balance state was inclined to be moved into β and χ directions in treatments of potassium shortage. However in reversible equilibrium of [Formula: see text], K balance state was inclined to be moved into θ and λ directions in treatments of water shortage. Results showed that the proposed path model was able to quantitatively disclose moving direction of K status and quantify its equilibrium threshold. It provided a theoretical and practical basis for scientific and effective fertilization in agricultural plants growth.

  6. Stranded Fuel, Orphan Sites, Dead Plants: Transportation Planning Considerations After the BRC Report - 13393

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Alex W. [The Thrower Group LLC, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The author explores transportation, packaging and storage questions related to a primary recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future; i.e., that fuel from shutdown plants be removed to consolidated storage as soon as possible to enable final decommissioning and beneficial re-use of those sites. The paper discusses the recommendations of the BRC, the implications and challenges that implementing those recommendations present, and provides recommended solutions for beginning the multi-year planning, coordination, material acquisition, and communications processes that will be needed to move fuel from shutdown plants when a destination site becomes available. Removal of used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites (which are serving no other purpose other than storing SNF and GTCC, at considerable expense) was a central recommendation of the BRC, for a number of reasons. This recommendation was one of the most widely acclaimed that the Commission put forward. However, there are significant challenges (such as availability of fuel canister overpacks, lack of infrastructure, handling constraints and others) that will need to be addressed, apart from the critically important identification of a suitable and workable storage destination site. Resolving these logistical challenges will need to begin even before a destination site is identified, given the long lead-times required for planning and procurement. Based on information available today, it is possible to make informed predictions about what will be needed to modify existing contractual arrangements with utilities, address equipment and infrastructure needs, and begin working with states, tribes and local governments to start initial preparation needs. If DOE, working with industry and other experienced parties, can begin planning and acquisition activities in the near term, overall schedule risk can be reduced and potential cost avoidance achieved. The most immediate benefit will

  7. Stranded Fuel, Orphan Sites, Dead Plants: Transportation Planning Considerations After the BRC Report - 13393

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, Alex W.

    2013-01-01

    The author explores transportation, packaging and storage questions related to a primary recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future; i.e., that fuel from shutdown plants be removed to consolidated storage as soon as possible to enable final decommissioning and beneficial re-use of those sites. The paper discusses the recommendations of the BRC, the implications and challenges that implementing those recommendations present, and provides recommended solutions for beginning the multi-year planning, coordination, material acquisition, and communications processes that will be needed to move fuel from shutdown plants when a destination site becomes available. Removal of used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites (which are serving no other purpose other than storing SNF and GTCC, at considerable expense) was a central recommendation of the BRC, for a number of reasons. This recommendation was one of the most widely acclaimed that the Commission put forward. However, there are significant challenges (such as availability of fuel canister overpacks, lack of infrastructure, handling constraints and others) that will need to be addressed, apart from the critically important identification of a suitable and workable storage destination site. Resolving these logistical challenges will need to begin even before a destination site is identified, given the long lead-times required for planning and procurement. Based on information available today, it is possible to make informed predictions about what will be needed to modify existing contractual arrangements with utilities, address equipment and infrastructure needs, and begin working with states, tribes and local governments to start initial preparation needs. If DOE, working with industry and other experienced parties, can begin planning and acquisition activities in the near term, overall schedule risk can be reduced and potential cost avoidance achieved. The most immediate benefit will

  8. Potassium homeostasis during exercise in domestic species: the role of the sodium-potassium pump in skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Maria E.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, Jens Christian Skou was awarded the Nobel prize in Chemistry for his discovery and elegant description, some 40 years earlier, of the sodium-potassium (Na+,K+) pump in crab nerve fibres [37]. It is now widely accepted that this cation transport system is essential for cell function, and

  9. Influence of Potassium on Sapric Peat under Different Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajuddin, Syafik Akmal Mohd; Rahman, Junita Abdul; Rahim, Nor Haakmal Abd; Saphira Radin Mohamed, Radin Maya; Saeed Abduh Algheethi, Adel Ali, Dr

    2018-04-01

    Potassium is mainly present in soil in the natural form known as the K-bearing mineral. Potassium is also available in fertilizer as a supplement to plants and can be categorized as macronutrient. The application of potassium improves the texture and structure of the soil beside to improves plant growth. The main objective of this study was to determine the concentration of potassium in sapric peat under different conditions. Physical model was used as a mechanism for the analysis of the experimental data using a soil column as an equipment to produce water leaching. In this investigation, there were four outlets in the soil column which were prepared from the top of the column to the bottom with the purpose of identifying the concentration of potassium for each soil level. The water leaching of each outlet was tested using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results obtained showed that the highest concentrations of potassium for flush condition at outlet 4 was 13.58 ppm. Similarly, sapric under rainwater condition recorded the highest value of 13.32 and 12.34 ppm respectively at outlet 4 for wet and dry condition. However, the difference in Sapric, rainwater and fertilizer category showed that the highest value for the wet condition was achieved at outlet 2 with 13.99 ppm while highest value of 14.82 ppm was obtained for the dry condition at the outlet 3. It was concluded that the outlets in the soil column gave a detailed analysis of the concentration of potassium in the soil which was influenced by the environmental conditions.

  10. Soil salinity and yield of mango fertigated with potassium sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. Carneiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Irrigated fruit crops have an important role in the economic and social aspects in the region of the Sub-middle São Francisco River Valley. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate soil salinity and the productive aspects of the mango crop, cv. Tommy Atkins, fertigated with doses of potassium chloride (KCl and potassium sulfate (K2SO4 during two crop cycles (from January to March 2014 and from January to March 2015. The experiment was carried out in a strip-split-plot design and five potassium doses (50, 75, 100, 125 and 150% of the recommended dose as plots and two potassium sources (KCl and K2SO4 as subplots, with four replicates. Soil electrical conductivity (EC, exchangeable sodium (Na+ and potassium (K+ contents and pH were evaluated. In addition, the number of commercial fruits and yield were determined. The fertilization with KCl resulted in higher soil EC compared with K2SO4 fertigation. Soil Na+ and K+ contents increased with increasing doses of fertilizers. K2SO4 was more efficient for the production per plant and yield than KCl. Thus, under the conditions of this study, the K2SO4 dose of 174.24 g plant-1 (24.89 kg ha-1 or 96.8% of recommendation, spacing of 10 x 7 m was recommended for a yield of 23.1 t ha-1 of mango fruits, cv. Tommy Atkins.

  11. Using radar wind profilers and RASS data to calculate power plant plume rise and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ping, Y.J.; Gaynor, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    As the number of 915-MHz radar wind profilers and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS) increases, their number of uses also increases. These systems have demonstrated particular utility in air quality studies and, more specifically, in complex terrain. One data set from the radar profilers that has not, to date, been utilized to any large extent is represented by the temperature profiles derived from the RASS. Normally, these profiles represent a 5-min average every hour with a height resolution of about 60 m, a minimum range of about 100 m, and a maximum range of about 1.5 km, although this varies substantially with meterological conditions. Such profiles have several potential applications. Among them are determinations of mixing height and stability. In this work, we use the stability, along with the hour-averaged wind profiles, to estimate plume rise heights at a power plant site in Laughlin, Nevada, about 200 km south of Lake Mead. The profiles are first stratified according to season and synoptic categories so that the calculated plume rise heights could be separated by background transport conditions. The data were taken during Project Measurement of Haze and Visual Effects (MOHAVE), which took place in 1992. This project is briefly discussed in the next section, along with the instrumentation and data used in this study

  12. Using radar wind profilers and RASS data to calculate power plant plume rise and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Y.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Gaynor, J.E. [NOAA/ERL Wave Propagation Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    As the number of 915-MHz radar wind profilers and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS) increases, their number of uses also increases. These systems have demonstrated particular utility in air quality studies and, more specifically, in complex terrain. One data set from the radar profilers that has not, to date, been utilized to any large extent is represented by the temperature profiles derived from the RASS. Normally, these profiles represent a 5-min average every hour with a height resolution of about 60 m, a minimum range of about 100 m, and a maximum range of about 1.5 km, although this varies substantially with meterological conditions. Such profiles have several potential applications. Among them are determinations of mixing height and stability. In this work, we use the stability, along with the hour-averaged wind profiles, to estimate plume rise heights at a power plant site in Laughlin, Nevada, about 200 km south of Lake Mead. The profiles are first stratified according to season and synoptic categories so that the calculated plume rise heights could be separated by background transport conditions. The data were taken during Project Measurement of Haze and Visual Effects (MOHAVE), which took place in 1992. This project is briefly discussed in the next section, along with the instrumentation and data used in this study.

  13. Ca2+ transport in plant cells and mechanisms of transformation of phytochrome-induced photosignals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotovski, Igor D.

    1995-01-01

    The recent data on the influence of phytochrome on the efficiency of Ca2+ translocation across the membranes of oat protoplasts are given. Ca2+ uptake in the protoplasts was shown to be influenced by the red light (R) illumination. This effect was reverted by the following far-red light (FR) illumination. To elucidate the sensitivity to phytochrome-controlling action the screening between the mechanisms of Ca2+ transport across the plasma membranes of oat protoplasts, Na+/Ca2+ and Ca2+/H+ exchangers, Ca2+-pump and Ca2+-channel was done. It was established that phytochrome modulated the activity of Na+/Ca2+-exchanger and Ca2+-pump. The light-mediated oscillations of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration in the oat protoplasts were demonstrated using fluorescence probe quin2 loaded into the cells and laser monitoring of fluorescence signal. The evidences were obtained that the oscillations were not the result of the elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration and had no connection with Ca2+ pool of mitochondria. The possibility of the relation between the Ca2+ oscillations and phosphoinositide metabolism in plant cell membranes is analyzed. The mechanisms of transformation of primary phytochrome signal into biological effects were discussed.

  14. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, D. W; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  15. Effect of gibberellic acid and potassium nitrate on seed germination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae are rare resurrection plants, endemic and relict species from Balkan Peninsula. The effect of gibberellic acid (GA3) and potassium nitrate (KNO3) were conducted to determine the seed germination response for these two species. An experiment was conducted with four ...

  16. Potassium-phosphorus relationships in cotton (gossypium hirsutum L.) as affected by potassium nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdum, M.I.; Ashraf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Field studies were undertaken to determine the interrelationship between potassium (K+) concentration in various organs of plant and phosphorus (P) content as influenced by K-nutrition in cotton. The experiment was conducted on Miani soil series silt loam and classified as Calcaric Cambisols, fine silty, mixed Hyperthermic Fluventic Haplocambids. The treatments consisted .of (a) four cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars (CI.M-448, CIM-IIOO, Karishma, S-12); and (b) four potassium fertilizer doses (0, 62.5, 125.0, 250.0 kg K ha-l). The design of experiment was split plot (main: cultivars, sub-plot: K-doses). The plant samples were collected at five stages of growth, i.e., first flower bud., first flower, peak flowering, first boll split and maturity. The various parts of plants were analyzed for phosphorus and potassium concentration at various stages of growth. Phosphorus concentration in leaves, stems, burs, seed and lint decreased with concurrent increase in K-doses. Crop maintained 0.22% phosphorus concentration in leaf tissues at first flower bud and dropped to 0.11% at maturity. Cultivars differed greatly amongst themselves in terms of maintaining P content in their different parts. Averaged across K-doses, cv. CIM-448 maintained the highest P content in all parts than other cultivars. There was a negative and significant correlation co-efficient between K and P concentration in various parts of the plant. The study demonstrated antagonistic interaction between K+ and P in cotton plant under irrigated conditions. (author)

  17. Functional expression and characterization of plant ABC transporters in Xenopus laevis oocytes for transport engineering purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Deyang; Veres, Dorottya; Belew, Zeinu Mussa

    2016-01-01

    the question whether the oocytes system is suitable to express and characterize ABC transporters. Thus we have selected AtABCG25, previously characterized in insect cells as the exporter of commercially valuable abscisic acid—as case study for optimizing of characterization in Xenopus oocytes. The tools...

  18. Measuring and modeling of a three-dimensional tracer transport in a planted soil column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, N.; Javaux, M.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Huber, K.; Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.

    2013-12-01

    Water flow from soil to root is driven by the plant transpiration and an important component of the hydrological cycle. The model R-SWMS combines three-dimensional (3D) water flow and solute transport in soil with a detailed description of root structure in three dimensions [1,2]. This model offers the possibility to calculate root water and solute uptake and flow within the roots, which enables explicit studies with respect to the distribution of water and solutes around the roots as well as local processes at the root-soil interface. In this study, we compared measured data from a tracer experiment using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with simulations in order to assess the distribution and magnitude of the water uptake of a young lupine plant. An aqueous solution of the Gadolinium-complex (Gd-DTPA2-) was chosen as a tracer, as it behaves conservatively and is ideally suited for MRI. Water flow in the soil towards the roots can thus be visualized by following the change in tracer concentrations over time. The data were obtained by MRI, providing high resolution 3D images of the tracer distribution and root architecture structures by using a spin echo pulse sequence, which is strongly T1- weighted to be tracer sensitive [3], and T2 -weighted for root imaging [4]. This experimental setup was simulated using the 3D high-resolution numerical model R-SWMS. The comparison between MRI data and the simulations showed extensive effects of root architecture parameters on solute spreading. Although the results of our study showed the strength of combining non-invasive measurements and 3D modeling of solute and water flow in soil-root systems, where the derivation of plant hydraulic parameters such as axial and radial root conductivities is possible, current limitations were found with respect to MRI measurements and process description. [1] Javaux, M., T. Schröder, J. Vanderborght, and H. Vereecken (2008), Use of a Three-Dimensional Detailed Modeling Approach for

  19. Transport of Cd and Zn to seeds of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) during specific stages of plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Renuka P; Ebbs, Stephen D

    2008-01-01

    The accumulation of excess Cd in the seeds of cereal and other crops compromises their commercial value and presents a potential risk to human health. Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.] is a moderate accumulator of heavy metals such as Cd and Zn, and the seeds are consumed throughout the world, particularly in the Indian subcontinent. The study here examined the transport of Cd into Indian mustard plants and to seeds as a function of external Cd and the stage of the life cycle (vegetative growth, flowering and seed set) to identify critical developmental windows where transport from roots to seeds was the greatest. Plants were also treated simultaneously with Zn to determine if Zn fertilization mitigated the transport of Cd to seeds. Plants treated with Cd during the seed set accumulated the highest concentrations of Cd, exceeding 8 mg kg(-1) dry weight in some instances. Cadmium accumulated during vegetative growth was not highly redistributed to seeds. No effects of Zn were observed with regard to Cd redistribution to seeds. This may be because of the relatively small Zn : Cd ratios tested. However, the results suggest that if Zn fertilization is to be used to reduce the Cd accumulation in seeds of this species, that plants should be treated during the seed set stage. As the seeds of Indian mustard consistently accumulated Cd to concentrations that exceed acceptable limits for food crops, additional study of Cd redistribution in this species is warranted.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide (KOH, CAS Reg... pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from the...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hydroxide or potassium carbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant...

  3. Transportation infrastructure between nuclear power plant gates and nearest line-haul networks: Plan and procedure for data development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saricks, C.L.; Singh, M.K.; Stammer, R.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    This study is concerned with the segments of the transportation system that include possible routings over public roads and private (or public) rail links, and waterway access (within 25 miles) from the gates of typical reactor sites to proximate links of what can be termed the national through-route system. These routings are by no means uniform throughout the United States. Local roads and rail links near reactor sites may be subject to a wide variety of jurisdictions for maintenance, repair, and inspection; may or may not (at present) qualify for federal assistance under the Federal-Aid Highway and related funding programs; may or may not meet accepted construction standards for facilities expected to bear heavy loads; and, perhaps most importantly for the spent-fuel transportation program, may be subject to occasional and currently unavoidable disruptions that could seriously impair shipment schedules. The overall objectives of the study are to describe a framework for identifying the characteristics of the near-site transportation networks of all existing nuclear power plants that could give rise to important shipment scheduling and programming constraints. These characteristics cover both transportation infrastructure and existing structural and environmental limitation, and define a scope and schedule for constructing a data base for the transportation networks surrounding all nuclear power plants. 6 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants; Transport radionuklida i doze u okolini nekih termoelektrana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Telenta, B [Savezni hidrometeoroloski zavod, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sokcic-Kostic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1994-07-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  5. Potassium supplements for oral diarrhoea regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, M L; Levine, M M; Black, R E; Hughes, T P; Rust, J; Tome, F C

    1980-10-18

    A study is proposed for supplementing potassium loss from diarrhea in rehydration therapies with fresh fruit and other naturally potassium-rich foods. Bananas contain .1 mol of potassium per gm. Freshly squeezed lemon or orange juices were tested for potassium and sodium content and found to have very low potassium concentration. Therefore, the banana was chosen for an upcoming study that will determine if infants and children suffering from diarrhea can ingest the amounts of the fruit necessary to elevate the potassium level sufficiently. Bananas as the potassium source are thought to be well-accepted in developing areas.

  6. OsPIN5b modulates rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and yield by changing auxin homeostasis, transport and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guangwen; Coneva, Viktoriya; Casaretto, José A; Ying, Shan; Mahmood, Kashif; Liu, Fang; Nambara, Eiji; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2015-09-01

    Plant architecture attributes such as tillering, plant height and panicle size are important agronomic traits that determine rice (Oryza sativa) productivity. Here, we report that altered auxin content, transport and distribution affect these traits, and hence rice yield. Overexpression of the auxin efflux carrier-like gene OsPIN5b causes pleiotropic effects, mainly reducing plant height, leaf and tiller number, shoot and root biomass, seed-setting rate, panicle length and yield parameters. Conversely, reduced expression of OsPIN5b results in higher tiller number, more vigorous root system, longer panicles and increased yield. We show that OsPIN5b is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) -localized protein that participates in auxin homeostasis, transport and distribution in vivo. This work describes an example of an auxin-related gene where modulating its expression can simultaneously improve plant architecture and yield potential in rice, and reveals an important effect of hormonal signaling on these traits. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... acid with potassium hydroxide or potassium carbonate. It occurs as transparent crystals or a white... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium citrate. 184.1625 Section 184.1625 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1625 Potassium citrate. (a) Potassium citrate (C6H5K3O7·H2O, CAS...

  8. Legal and Institutional Issues of Transportable Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    jointly the international and national actions required for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. A transportable nuclear power plant (TNPP) is a factory manufactured, transportable and relocatable nuclear power plant which, when fuelled, is capable of producing final energy products such as electricity and heat. Introducing a TNPP may require fewer financial and human resources from the host State. However, the deployment of such reactors will face new legal issues in the international context which need to be resolved to enable the deployment of such reactors in countries other than the country of origin. The objective of this report is to study the legal and institutional issues for the deployment of TNPPs, to reveal challenges that might be faced in their deployment, and to outline pathways for resolution of the identified issues and challenges in the short and long terms. It is addressed to senior legal, regulatory and technical officers in Member States planning to embark on a nuclear power programme or to expand an existing one by considering the introduction of a TNPP

  9. Comprehensive cooling water study annual report. Volume IV: radionuclide and heavy metal transport, Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladden, J.B.; Lower, M.W.; Mackey, H.E.; Specht, W.L.; Wilde, E.W.

    1985-07-01

    The principal sources of tritium, radiocesium, and radiocobalt in the environment at the Savannah River Plant have been reactor area effluent discharges to onsite streams. Radioactive releases began in 1955, with the period of major reactor releases occurring between 1955 and 1968. Since the early 1970s, releases, except for tritium releases, have been substantially reduced. Radioisotope liquid releases resulted specifically from leaching of reactor fuel elements with cladding failures which exposed the underlying fuel to water. The direct sources of these releases were heat exchanger cooling water, spent fuel storage and disassembly basin effluents, and process water from each of the reactor areas. Offsite radiochemical monitoring of water and sediment at upriver and downriver water treatment facilities indicates that SRP contributions of gamma-emitting radionuclide levels present at these facilities are minute. Tritium in water attributable to SRP operations is routinely detected at the downriver facilities; however, total alpha and nonvolatile beta concentrations attributable to SRP liquid releases are not detected at the downriver facilities. The historic material balance calculated for onsite releases of tritium transported to the Savannah River exhibits a high accounting of tritium released. Other radionuclides released to onsite streams have primarily remained in onsite floodplains. Radionuclide releases associated with reactor operations are derived primarily from disassembly basin water releases in the reactor areas and historically have been the major source of radioactivity released to onsite streams. The movement and interaction of these releases have been governed by cooling water discharges. Liquid releases continue to meet DOE concentration guides for the various radioisotopes in onsite streams and in the Savannah River

  10. Metallic substrate materials for thin film oxygen transport membranes for application in a fossil power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Y.; Baumann, S.; Sebold, D.; Meulenberg, W.A.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF) - IEF-1 Materials Synthesis and Processing

    2010-07-01

    La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}CO{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF58428) and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CO{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF5582) exhibit high oxygen permeability due to their high ionic and electronic conductivity. For this reason they are under discussion for application in oxygen transport membranes (OTMs) in zero-emission power plants using oxyfuel technology. A thin film membrane which can increase the oxygen flux is beneficial and a structural substrate is required. Two types of Ni-base alloys were studied as substrate material candidates with a number of advantages, such as high strength, high temperature stability, easy joining and similar thermal expansion coefficient to the selected perovskite materials. Chemical compositions and thermal expansion coefficients of Ni-base alloys were measured in this study. LSCF58428 and BSCF5582 layers were screen printed on Ni-based alloys and co-fired at high temperature in air. The microstructure and element analysis of samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and EDX). A Ni-base alloy, MCrAlY, with a high Al content was the most suitable substrate material, and showed better chemical compatibility with perovskite materials at high temperature than Hastelloy X, which is a chromia-forming Ni-base alloy. A reaction occurred between Sr in the perovskite and the alumina surface layers on MCr-AlY. However, the reaction zone did not increase in thickness during medium-term annealing at 800 C in air. Hence, it is expected that this reaction will not prevent the application of MCr-AlY as a substrate material. (orig.)

  11. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide

  12. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Jones, Laura M; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2011-03-07

    Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide at synapses that

  13. Transport and detoxification of cadmium, copper and zinc in the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi caerulescens

    OpenAIRE

    Leitenmaier, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    SummaryIn this thesis, various aspects on heavy metal accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Thlaspi caerulescens have been investigated. T. caerulescens belongs to the family of Brassicaceae and hyperaccumulates zinc. Its ecotype Ganges, originating from Southern France, additionally takes up cadmium actively. It is known from previous studies that hyperaccumulators have highly overexpressed metal transporters and that most of them store the metal in the vacuole of large epidermal cells....

  14. Tonoplast- and plasma membrane-localized aquaporin-family transporters in blue hydrangea sepals of aluminum hyperaccumulating plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Negishi

    Full Text Available Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla is tolerant of acidic soils in which toxicity generally arises from the presence of the soluble aluminum (Al ion. When hydrangea is cultivated in acidic soil, its resulting blue sepal color is caused by the Al complex formation of anthocyanin. The concentration of vacuolar Al in blue sepal cells can reach levels in excess of approximately 15 mM, suggesting the existence of an Al-transport and/or storage system. However, until now, no Al transporter has been identified in Al hyperaccumulating plants, animals or microorganisms. To identify the transporter being responsible for Al hyperaccumulation, we prepared a cDNA library from blue sepals according to the sepal maturation stage, and then selected candidate genes using a microarray analysis and an in silico study. Here, we identified the vacuolar and plasma membrane-localized Al transporters genes vacuolar Al transporter (VALT and plasma membrane Al transporter 1 (PALT1, respectively, which are both members of the aquaporin family. The localization of each protein was confirmed by the transient co-expression of the genes. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting results indicated that VALT and PALT1 are highly expressed in sepal tissue. The overexpression of VALT and PALT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred Al-tolerance and Al-sensitivity, respectively.

  15. Laser microdissection reveals that transcripts for five plant and one fungal phosphate transporter genes are contemporaneously present in arbusculated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Lanfranco, Luisa; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-09-01

    The establishment of a symbiotic interaction between plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi requires both partners to undergo significant morphological and physiological modifications which eventually lead to reciprocal beneficial effects. Extensive changes in gene expression profiles recently have been described in transcriptomic studies that have analyzed the whole mycorrhizal root. However, because root colonization by AM fungi involves different cell types, a cell-specific gene expression pattern is likely to occur. We have applied the laser microdissection (LMD) technology to investigate expression profiles of both plant and fungal genes in Lycopersicon esculentum roots colonized by Glomus mosseae. A protocol to harvest arbuscule-containing cells from paraffin sections of mycorrhizal roots has been developed using a Leica AS LMD system. RNA of satisfactory quantity and quality has been extracted for molecular analysis. Transcripts for plant phosphate transporters (LePTs), selected as molecular markers for a functional symbiosis, have been detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays and associated to distinct cell types, leading to novel insights into the distribution of LePT mRNAs. In fact, the transcripts of the five phosphate transporters (PTs) have been detected contemporaneously in the same arbusculated cell population, unlike from the neighboring noncolonized cells. In addition, fungal H(+)ATPase (GmHA5) and phosphate transporter (GmosPT) mRNAs were found exclusively in arbusculated cells. The discovery that five plant and one fungal PT genes are consistently expressed inside the arbusculated cells provides a new scenario for plant-fungus nutrient exchanges.

  16. Influence of ingredients of motor transport exhausts on the seed productivity of adornment flowering plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. P. Pryimak

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Basic descriptions of the seminal productivity for some ornamental flowering plants under influence of cars’ emissions are presented. Decreasing of the seminal productivity, germinating capacity of seeds and mass of thousand seeds was found. Recommendations on plants using for planting of the cities environment polluted by vehicles emissions are proposed.

  17. 48 CFR 945.505-11 - Records of transportation and installation costs of plant equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and installation costs of plant equipment. 945.505-11 Section 945.505-11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Management of Government... plant equipment. The requirements of FAR 45.505-11 apply to plant equipment having a unit cost of $1,000...

  18. Numerical modeling of variably saturated flow and transport, 881 Hillside at Rocky Flats Plant, Jefferson County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedors, R.W.; Warner, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    This study characterizes the unconfined groundwater flow and chemical transport in a thin veneer of colluvial and alluvial Quaternary sediments on the 881 Hillslope at Rocky Flats Plant, Jefferson County, Colorado. Colluvial deposits with a varying thickness of 1.5 to 6.7 meters mantle a 255 meter steeply dipping hillslope. Saturated and the similar material types. A two-dimensional finite element code for variably saturated conditions is used to obtain steady state flow conditions from which water contents and Darcy velocities are used for transient contaminant transport modeling. The migration of an absorptive solute is modeled over a twenty year period using the transport portion of the two-dimensional finite element code. Different potential scenarios for the source area are compared with actual well sample data. The solutes considered for this study are Trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolved in the water phase

  19. The Arabidopsis guard cell outward potassium channel GORK is regulated by CPK33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Ronzier, Elsa; Sanchez, Frédéric; Prado, Karine; Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Lanciano, Sophie; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lacombe, Benoît; Xiong, Tou Cheu

    2017-07-01

    A complex signaling network involving voltage-gated potassium channels from the Shaker family contributes to the regulation of stomatal aperture. Several kinases and phosphatases have been shown to be crucial for ABA-dependent regulation of the ion transporters. To date, the Ca 2+ -dependent regulation of Shaker channels by Ca 2+ -dependent protein kinases (CPKs) is still elusive. A functional screen in Xenopus oocytes was launched to identify such CPKs able to regulate the three main guard cell Shaker channels KAT1, KAT2, and GORK. Seven guard cell CPKs were tested and multiple CPK/Shaker couples were identified. Further work on CPK33 indicates that GORK activity is enhanced by CPK33 and unaffected by a nonfunctional CPK33 (CPK33-K102M). Furthermore, Ca 2+ -induced stomatal closure is impaired in two cpk33 mutant plants. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Potassium recycling pathways in the human cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, P C; Cunningham, C D; Schulte, B A

    2001-07-01

    Potential pathways for recycling potassium (K+) used in the maintenance of inner ear electrochemical gradients have been elucidated in animal models. However, little is known about K+ transport in the human cochlea. This study was designed to characterize putative K+ recycling pathways in the human ear and to determine whether observations from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. A prospective laboratory study using an immunohistochemical approach to analyze the distribution of key ion transport mediators in the human cochlea. Human temporal bones were fixed in situ within 1 to 6 hours of death and subsequently harvested at autopsy. Decalcification was accomplished with the aid of microwaving. Immunohistochemical staining was then performed to define the presence and cell type-specific distribution of Na,K-ATPase, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the inner ear. Staining patterns visualized in the human cochlea closely paralleled those seen in other species. Anti-Na,K-ATPase stained strongly the basolateral plasma membrane of strial marginal cells and nerve endings underlying hair cells. This antibody also localized Na,K-ATPase to type II, type IV, and type V fibrocytes in the spiral ligament and in limbal fibrocytes. NKCC was present in the basolateral membrane of strial marginal cells as well as in type II, type V, and limbal fibrocytes. Immunoreactive carbonic anhydrase was present in type I and type III fibrocytes and in epithelial cells lining Reissner's membrane and the spiral prominence. The distribution of several major ion transport proteins in the human cochlea is similar but not identical to that described in various rodent models. These results support the presence of a complex system for recycling and regulating K+ homeostasis in the human cochlea, similar to that described in other mammalian species.

  1. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Faculty ii INDUSTRY TRAVEL Domestic Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Transportation Policy), Washington, DC Department of...developed between the railroad and trucking industries. Railroads: Today’s seven Class I freight railroad systems move 42% of the nation’s intercity ...has been successfully employed in London to reduce congestion and observed by this industry study during its travels . It is currently being

  2. Crystal structure of the potassium-importing KdpFABC membrane complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ching-Shin; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Stokes, David L.

    2017-06-21

    Cellular potassium import systems play a fundamental role in osmoregulation, pH homeostasis and membrane potential in all domains of life. In bacteria, the kdp operon encodes a four-subunit potassium pump that maintains intracellular homeostasis, cell shape and turgor under conditions in which potassium is limiting1. This membrane complex, called KdpFABC, has one channel-like subunit (KdpA) belonging to the superfamily of potassium transporters and another pump-like subunit (KdpB) belonging to the superfamily of P-type ATPases. Although there is considerable structural and functional information about members of both superfamilies, the mechanism by which uphill potassium transport through KdpA is coupled with ATP hydrolysis by KdpB remains poorly understood. Here we report the 2.9 Å X-ray structure of the complete Escherichia coli KdpFABC complex with a potassium ion within the selectivity filter of KdpA and a water molecule at a canonical cation site in the transmembrane domain of KdpB. The structure also reveals two structural elements that appear to mediate the coupling between these two subunits. Specifically, a protein-embedded tunnel runs between these potassium and water sites and a helix controlling the cytoplasmic gate of KdpA is linked to the phosphorylation domain of KdpB. On the basis of these observations, we propose a mechanism that repurposes protein channel architecture for active transport across biomembranes.

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of NpABCG5/NpPDR5, a plant pleiotropic drug resistance transporter expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Frédéric; Pierman, Baptiste; Bertin, Aurélie; Lévy, Daniel; Boutry, Marc

    2017-05-04

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters belong to the ABCG subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and are involved in the transport of various molecules across plasma membranes. During evolution, PDR genes appeared independently in fungi and in plants from a duplication of a half-size ABC gene. The enzymatic properties of purified PDR transporters from yeast have been characterized. This is not the case for any plant PDR transporter, or, incidentally, for any purified plant ABC transporter. Yet, plant PDR transporters play important roles in plant physiology such as hormone signaling or resistance to pathogens or herbivores. Here, we describe the expression, purification, enzymatic characterization and 2D analysis by electron microscopy of NpABCG5/NpPDR5 from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia , which has been shown to be involved in the plant defense against herbivores. We constitutively expressed NpABCG5/NpPDR5, provided with a His-tag in a homologous system: suspension cells from Nicotiana tabacum (Bright Yellow 2 line). NpABCG5/NpPDR5 was targeted to the plasma membrane and was solubilized by dodecyl maltoside and purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The ATP-hydrolyzing specific activity (27 nmol min -1  mg -1 ) was stimulated seven-fold in the presence of 0.1% asolectin. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that NpABCG5/NpPDR5 is monomeric and with dimensions shorter than those of known ABC transporters. Enzymatic data (optimal pH and sensitivity to inhibitors) confirmed that plant and fungal PDR transporters have different properties. These data also show that N. tabacum suspension cells are a convenient host for the purification and biochemical characterization of ABC transporters. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Soil, plant, and transport influences on methane in a subalpine forest under high ultraviolet irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated direct methane emission from plant foliage under aerobic conditions, particularly under high ultraviolet (UV irradiance. We examined the potential importance of this phenomenon in a high-elevation conifer forest using micrometeorological techniques. Vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide in forest air were monitored every 2 h for 6 weeks in summer 2007. Day to day variability in above-canopy CH4 was high, with observed values in the range 1790 to 1910 nmol mol−1. High CH4 was correlated with high carbon monoxide and related to wind direction, consistent with pollutant transport from an urban area by a well-studied mountain-plain wind system. Soils were moderately dry during the study. Vertical gradients of CH4 were small but detectable day and night, both near the ground and within the vegetation canopy. Gradients near the ground were consistent with the forest soil being a net CH4 sink. Using scalar similarity with CO2, the magnitude of the summer soil CH4 sink was estimated at ~1.7 mg CH4 m−2 h−1, which is similar to other temperate forest upland soils. The high-elevation forest was naturally exposed to high UV irradiance under clear sky conditions, with observed peak UVB irradiance >2 W m−2. Gradients and means of CO2 within the canopy under daytime conditions showed net uptake of CO2 due to photosynthetic drawdown as expected. No evidence was found for a significant foliar CH4 source in the vegetation canopy, even under high UV conditions. While the possibility of a weak foliar source cannot be excluded given the observed soil sink, overall this subalpine forest was a net sink for atmospheric methane during the growing season.

  5. Bioavailability of flavonoids: a review of their membrane transport and the function of bilitranslocase in animal and plant organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Sabina; Terdoslavich, Michela; Franca, Raffaella; Vanzo, Andreja; Tramer, Federica; Braidot, Enrico; Petrussa, Elisa; Vianello, Angelo

    2009-05-01

    Fruits and vegetables are rich in flavonoids, and ample epidemiological data show that diets rich in fruits and vegetables confer protection against cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases, and cancer. However, flavonoid bioavailability is reportedly very low in mammals and the molecular mechanisms of their action are still poorly known. This review focuses on membrane transport of flavonoids, a critical determinant of their bioavailability. Cellular influx and efflux transporters are reviewed for their involvement in the absorption of flavonoids from the gastro-intestinal tract and their subsequent tissue distribution. A focus on the mammalian bilirubin transporter bilitranslocase (TCDB 2.A.65.1.1) provides further insight into flavonoid bioavailability and its relationship with plasma bilirubin (an endogenous antioxidant). The general function of bilitranslocase as a flavonoid membrane transporter is further demonstrated by the occurrence of a plant homologue in organs (petals, berries) where flavonoid biosynthesis is most active. Bilitranslocase appears associated with sub-cellular membrane compartments and operates as a flavonoid membrane transporter.

  6. The concentration of the coolant 7Li in Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant operating with potassium hydroxide as an alkalizing reagent (possible impact on the occurrence of axial offset anomaly)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.D.; Minkova, K.F.; Ivanova, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of axial offset anomaly (AOA) has occurred in a number of PWRs operating with extended fuel cycles and high boiling duty cores. Up to now AOA has been observed in PWRs operating with lithium hydroxide and the alkalizing reagent used for pH adjustment in boric acid water solutions. Since AOA is connected with the LiBO 2 precipitation in porous corrosion product deposits on the fuel cladding surfaces, we could presume that the replacement of lithium hydroxide with potassium hydroxide will avoid AOA. Nowadays there is a lack of observed AOA in VVER, i.e., a lack of formation of lithium metaborate (LiBO 2 ) deposits on the fuel element surfaces by coolant alkalization with potassium hydroxide. Nevertheless, the concentrations of 7 Li appear in the coolant, as a product of the neutron reaction with boron: 10 B (n,α) → 7 Li (n, α). As a consequence the possibility it is not excluded of LiBO 2 formation in VVERs with potassium hydroxide water chemistry. The aim of this study is to inform the reader about the development of the concentration of the coolant lithium concentration during the fuel cycles of VVERs and to discuss the possibility of LiBO 2 formation under VVER operation conditions. (orig.)

  7. In silico analysis of the regulation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in C3 plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales Sierra, A.; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven Michiel; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M.; Struik, Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and non-cyclic alternative electron transport),

  8. Relative quantitative RT-PCR to study the expression of plant nutrient transporters in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    had high reproducibility and reflected trends in gene expression as observed by Northern blotting. Using this technique, it was demonstrated that both the high-affinity phosphate transporter MtPt2 and a putative nitrate transporter from Medicago truncatula were down-regulated in roots when colonized...

  9. Fusarium oxysporum volatiles enhance plant growth via affecting auxin transport and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios eBitas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption.

  10. Extrarenal potassium adaptation: role of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachley, J.D.; Crider, B.P.; Johnson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Following the ingestion of a high-potassium-content diet for only a few days, the plasma potassium of rats rises only modestly in response to a previously lethal dose of potassium salts. This acquired tolerance, termed potassium adaptation, is principally the result of increased capacity to excrete potassium into the urine. However, a substantial portion of the acute potassium dose is not immediately excreted and is apparently translocated into cells. Previous studies have failed to show an increase in the content of potassium of a variety of tissues from such animals. Using 86 Rb as a potassium analogue, we have shown that the skeletal muscle of potassium-adapted rats takes up significantly greater amounts of potassium in vivo in response to an acute challenge than does that of control animals. Furthermore, the same animals exhibit greater efflux of 86 Rb following the termination of the acute infusion. We have also shown that the Na+-K+-ATPase activity and ouabain-binding capacity of skeletal muscle microsomes are increased by the process of potassium adaptation. We conclude that skeletal muscle is an important participant in potassium adaptation and acts to temporarily buffer acute increases in the extracellular concentration of potassium

  11. Plant ion channels: gene families, physiology, and functional genomics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, John M; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-01-01

    Distinct potassium, anion, and calcium channels in the plasma membrane and vacuolar membrane of plant cells have been identified and characterized by patch clamping. Primarily owing to advances in Arabidopsis genetics and genomics, and yeast functional complementation, many of the corresponding genes have been identified. Recent advances in our understanding of ion channel genes that mediate signal transduction and ion transport are discussed here. Some plant ion channels, for example, ALMT and SLAC anion channel subunits, are unique. The majority of plant ion channel families exhibit homology to animal genes; such families include both hyperpolarization- and depolarization-activated Shaker-type potassium channels, CLC chloride transporters/channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, and ionotropic glutamate receptor homologs. These plant ion channels offer unique opportunities to analyze the structural mechanisms and functions of ion channels. Here we review gene families of selected plant ion channel classes and discuss unique structure-function aspects and their physiological roles in plant cell signaling and transport.

  12. Potassium availability in soils - forms and spatial distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afari-Sefa, Victor; Kwakye, Peter K.; Nyamiah, Mercy; Okae-Anti, Daniel; Imoro, A. Ziblim

    2004-10-01

    Potassium forms the third most important plant nutrient limiting plant growth and consequently reducing crop yields. This study was conducted on soil potassium availability, distribution and relationship with other soil properties. Seventeen top soil samples (0-15 cm) were collected from four agro-ecological zones of the Central and Western Regions of Ghana. Water soluble, exchangeable and non-exchangeable forms of K were determined. The exchangeable K was extracted with 1 N-bar NH 4 OAc, 0.1 N-bar HNO 3 , 0.01 M-bar CaCl 2 , Bray No. 1 and 1 N-bar boiling HNO 3 . The non-exchangeable K was extracted with 1 N-bar boiling HNO 3 . Potassium was determined using flame photometer. The results showed that potassium is available in the soil in different forms and amounts. Soils from the forest-savanna transition and coastal savanna zones had relatively higher soil solution K concentration than soils from the moist rainforest and semi-deciduous forest zones. Also, soils of the semi-deciduous forest and forest savanna transition as well as the coastal savanna zones contained 2-3 times exchangeable K of the soils of the moist rainforest. The results also showed that the pH, texture as well as the land use affected K availability in the soils. (author)

  13. A novel high-affinity sucrose transporter is required for virulence of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Wahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic fungi cause massive yield losses and affect both quality and safety of food and feed produced from infected plants. The main objective of plant pathogenic fungi is to get access to the organic carbon sources of their carbon-autotrophic hosts. However, the chemical nature of the carbon source(s and the mode of uptake are largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporter (Srt1 from the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and its characterization as a fungal virulence factor. Srt1 has an unusually high substrate affinity, is absolutely sucrose specific, and allows the direct utilization of sucrose at the plant/fungal interface without extracellular hydrolysis and, thus, without the production of extracellular monosaccharides known to elicit plant immune responses. srt1 is expressed exclusively during infection, and its deletion strongly reduces fungal virulence. This emphasizes the central role of this protein both for efficient carbon supply and for avoidance of apoplastic signals potentially recognized by the host.

  14. A fugacity approach for modeling the transport of airborne organic chemicals in an air/plant/soil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L.D.; McKone, T.E.

    1991-05-01

    An important issue facing both public and private agencies is the identification and quantification of exposures by indirect pathways to toxic chemicals released to the atmosphere. With recent public concerns over pesticides such as malathion and alar in foods, greater attention is being given to the process of chemical uptake by plants. Whether chemicals taken up by plants can accumulate and ultimately enter the human food chain are important questions for determining health risks and safe levels of toxic air-pollutant emissions and pesticide application. A number of plant-toxicokinetic, or ''botanicokinetic,'' models have been developed to give estimates of how chemicals are partitioned and transported within plants. In this paper, we provide a brief review of these models, describing their main features and listing some of their advantages and disadvantages. We then describe and demonstrate a five-compartment air/plant/soil model, which builds on and extends the features included in previous models. We apply this model to the steady-state chemical partitioning of perchloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in grass as test cases. We conclude with a discussion of the advantages and limitations of the model

  15. Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan L. (Editor); Ming, Doug W. (Editor); Henninger, Don (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Technical Memorandum is a compilation of presentations and discussions in the form of minutes from a workshop entitled 'Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media' held at NASA's Johnson Space Center, July 24-25, 2000. This workshop arose from the growing belief within NASA's Advanced Life Support Program that further advances and improvements in plant production systems for microgravity would benefit from additional knowledge of fundamental processes occurring in the root zone. The objective of the workshop was to bring together individuals who had expertise in various areas of fluid physics, soil physics, plant physiology, hardware development, and flight tests to identify, discuss, and prioritize critical issues of water and air flow through porous media in microgravity. Participants of the workshop included representatives from private companies involved in flight hardware development and scientists from universities and NASA Centers with expertise in plant flight tests, plant physiology, fluid physics, and soil physics.

  16. Removal ratio of gaseous toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem by indoor plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K J; Kim, H J; Khalekuzzaman, M; Yoo, E H; Jung, H H; Jang, H S

    2016-04-01

    This work was designed to investigate the removal efficiency as well as the ratios of toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem and by direct diffusion from the air into the medium. Indoor plants (Schefflera actinophylla and Ficus benghalensis) were placed in a sealed test chamber. Shoot or root zone were sealed with a Teflon bag, and gaseous toluene and xylene were exposed. Removal efficiency of toluene and total xylene (m, p, o) was 13.3 and 7.0 μg·m(-3)·m(-2) leaf area over a 24-h period in S. actinophylla, and was 13.0 and 7.3 μg·m(-3)·m(-2) leaf area in F. benghalensis. Gaseous toluene and xylene in a chamber were absorbed through leaf and transported via the stem, and finally reached to root zone, and also transported by direct diffusion from the air into the medium. Toluene and xylene transported via the stem was decreased with time after exposure. Xylene transported via the stem was higher than that by direct diffusion from the air into the medium over a 24-h period. The ratios of toluene transported via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium were 46.3 and 53.7% in S. actinophylla, and 46.9 and 53.1% in F. benghalensis, for an average of 47 and 53% for both species. The ratios of m,p-xylene transported over 3 to 9 h via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium was 58.5 and 41.5% in S. actinophylla, and 60.7 and 39.3% in F. benghalensis, for an average of 60 and 40% for both species, whereas the ratios of o-xylene transported via the stem versus direct diffusion from the air into the medium were 61 and 39%. Both S. actinophylla and F. benghalensis removed toluene and xylene from the air. The ratios of toluene and xylene transported from air to root zone via the stem were 47 and 60 %, respectively. This result suggests that root zone is a significant contributor to gaseous toluene and xylene removal, and transported via the stem plays an important role in this process.

  17. The wheat NHX antiporter gene TaNHX2 confers salt tolerance in transgenic alfalfa by increasing the retention capacity of intracellular potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Min; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Liu, Zi-Hui; Li, Hui-Cong; Guo, Xiu-Lin; Li, Guo-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that TaNHX2 transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) accumulated more K(+) and less Na(+) in leaves than did the wild-type plants. To investigate whether the increased K(+) accumulation in transgenic plants is attributed to TaNHX2 gene expression and whether the compartmentalization of Na(+) into vacuoles or the intracellular compartmentalization of potassium is the critical mechanism for TaNHX2-dependent salt tolerance in transgenic alfalfa, aerated hydroponic culture was performed under three different stress conditions: control condition (0.1 mM Na(+) and 6 mM K(+) inside culture solution), K(+)-sufficient salt stress (100 mM NaCl and 6 mM K(+)) and K(+)-insufficient salt stress (100 mM NaCl and 0.1 mM K(+)). The transgenic alfalfa plants had lower K(+) efflux through specific K(+) channels and higher K(+) absorption through high-affinity K(+) transporters than did the wild-type plants. Therefore, the transgenic plants had greater K(+) contents and [K(+)]/[Na(+)] ratios in leaf tissue and cell sap. The intracellular compartmentalization of potassium is critical for TaNHX2-induced salt tolerance in transgenic alfalfa.

  18. Diagnostic study of bovine welfare during transport to a beneficiary plant in the Caribbean region of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pérez –Viloria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A diagnostic animal welfare (AW study was carried out during the terrestrial transport of cattle to a slaughtering plant in the Caribbean region of Colombia. A cross sectional analytical study was carried out on 20 drivers, evaluating demographic variables, attitude towards cattle and the management. Data of 59 trips (588 cattle were analyzed, evaluating the conditions of the vehicles and determining load density, weight heterogeneity, distance traveled, waiting time before landing and the employee at the landing. Parts of vehicles are not used exclusively for transporting cattle and do not fully comply with the provisions of the ICA. Load densities were lower than those recommended, with values of 320.5 kg/m2 (SD=6.3 and 285.2 kg/m2 (SD=83.48 for small and large vehicles, respectively. Distance traveled was 21.6 km, on average. The average total wait and discharge times were 11.1 and 2.8 min, respectively. The distance traveled, the charge density and the discharge time were correlated with the number of hematomas and the pH of the cold carcass. Failures that have a negative effect on the welfare of cattle during transportation and unloading in the dressing plant and on the quality of the carcass were evidenced, together with the lack of training of the drivers in the AW.

  19. Impact of mine dumps on transport the invasive plant species to Upper Silesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotkova, N.; Lokajickova, B.; Mec, J.; Svehlakova, H.; Stalmachova, B.

    2017-10-01

    Human activities significantly change the species composition in the area. The main factor of change was the mining industry, which changed the natural conditions on Upper Silesia. The anthropogenic relief of mine dumps are the main centre of alien plant in an industrial landscape. The poster deals with the state of the invasive plant species by the phyto-sociological surveys on Upper Silesia.

  20. Mechanism and evolution of calcium transport across the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient, thus the influx of Ca(2+) into plant cells is a critical process. In addition, the efflux of Ca(2+) out of a cell is important to prevent toxicity resulting from Ca(2+) excess, and to modulate levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) required for signaling functions. Bioc...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: potassium-aggravated myotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aggravated by eating potassium-rich foods such as bananas and potatoes. Stiffness occurs in skeletal muscles throughout the body. Potassium-aggravated myotonia ranges in severity from mild episodes ...

  2. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline Potassium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    CLASSROOM. 285. RESONANCE | March 2016. Qualitative Carbohydrate Analysis using Alkaline. Potassium Ferricyanide. Keywords. Alkaline potassium ferricyanide, qualitative ... Carbohydrates form a distinct class of organic compounds often .... Laboratory Techniques: A contemporary Approach, W B Saunders Com-.

  3. Status of potassium permanganate - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a brief overview of the Technical Sections completed and being worked on for the New Animal Drug Application (NADA) for potassium permanganate will be presented. Initial Label Claim (Columnaris on catfish/HSB): 1) Human Food Safety - Complete for all fin fish (June 1999). A hazard charac...

  4. Increased serum potassium affects renal outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miao, Y; Dobre, D; Heerspink, H J Lambers

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on serum potassium and the effect of a serum potassium change on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy.......To assess the effect of an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) on serum potassium and the effect of a serum potassium change on renal outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and nephropathy....

  5. High dose potassium-nitrate chemical dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorda de Cancio, E.M.; Munoz, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    This dosimeter is used to control 10 kGY-order doses (1 Mrad). Nitrate suffers a radiolitic reduction phenomena, which is related to the given dose. The method to use potassium nitrate as dosimeter is described, as well as effects of the temperature of irradiation, pH, nitrate concentration and post-irradiation stability. Nitrate powder was irradiated at a Semi-Industrial Plant, at Centro Atomico Ezeiza, and also in a Gammacell-220 irradiator. The dose rates used were 2,60 and 1,80 KGY/hour, and the given doses varied between 1,0 and 150 KGY. The uncertainty was +-3% in all the range. (author) [es

  6. Obtaining of potassium dicyan-argentate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattarova, M.A.; Solojenkin, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    This work is devoted to obtaining of potassium dicyan-argentate. By means of exchange reaction between silver nitrate and potassium cyanide the potassium dicyan-argentate was synthesized. The analysis of obtained samples was carried out by means of titration and potentiometry.

  7. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5622 - Potassium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 582.5622 Section 582.5622 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5622 Potassium chloride. (a) Product. Potassium chloride. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. Determination of Optimum Nitrogen and Potassium Levels for potato Production in Central high lands of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunka Egata

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To determine the required levels of nitrogen and potassium, an experiment was conducted at Holetta Agricultural Research Center and Jeldu sub Center from 2014-2015 using three factors (Jalenie, Gudenie and Belete potato varies; 87, 110, 133kg/ha nitrogen rates and 0, 34.5, 69, 103.5kg/ha potassium in the form of K2O levels and as a completely randomized block design arrangement with three replications. In each location every year the 36 treatments (4 potassium oxide levels x 3 nitrogen levels x 3 varieties were assigned in random combinations to 36 plots of one block in a random case which was replicated in to two additional blocks of different randomizations in order to make total of three replications/blocks. Data were analyzed by SAS software Version 9.2. Potassium rates significantly affected the total yield and marketable yield as compared to the control treatment. Application of potassium at 103.5 kg/ha produced significantly a higher marketable yield than all rates. As compared to Jeldu, the Holetta location produced the maximum highly significant yield and yield component. Interaction of potassium and nitrogen fertilizers affected marketable tuber numbers and plant height significantly. In 2014, Belete produced the highest (27.31 ton/ha marketable yield at an application of 34.5 kg/ha potassium and 110 kg/ha nitrogen while Gudenie produced the highest (30.53 ton/ha marketable yield at an application of 69 kg/ ha potassium and 110 kg/ha nitrogen rates in 2015. It is better to apply 69 kg/ha potassium and 110 kg/ha nitrogen to potato production for reasonable yield at sites similar to experimental locations. It can be concluded that, interaction of nitrogen and potassium rates significantly affected plant height and marketable tuber numbers.

  11. Constraints on water transport posed by xylem embolism: implications for drought and frost resistance in woody plants

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Vilalta, Jordi

    2001-01-01

    Consultable des del TDX Títol obtingut de la portada digitalitzada Introducció L'aigua és un recurs i un factor limitant per la vida de les plantes. El transport d'aigua des de les arrels fins a les fulles té lloc fonamentalment a través del xilema. La capacitat d'aquest teixit per transportar aigua (i.e., la seva conductivitat hidràulica) no és constant sinó que depèn de les condicions en què es produeix el transport. En particular, quan els potencials hídrics es fan molt negatius (seq...

  12. The ALMT Family of Organic Acid Transporters in Plants and Their Involvement in Detoxification and Nutrient Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo; Kochian, Leon; Piñeros, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    About a decade ago, members of a new protein family of anion channels were discovered on the basis of their ability to confer on plants the tolerance toward toxic aluminum ions in the soil. The efflux of Al 3+ -chelating malate anions through these channels is stimulated by external Al 3+ ions. This feature of a few proteins determined the name of the entire protein family as Aluminum-activated Malate Transporters (ALMT). Meanwhile, after several years of research, it is known that the physiological roles of ALMTs go far beyond Al-detoxification. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on this transporter family and assess their involvement in diverse physiological processes.

  13. The ALMT family of organic acid transporters in plants and their involvement in detoxification and nutrient security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available About a decade ago, members of a new protein family of anion channels were discovered on the basis of their ability to confer on plants the tolerance towards toxic aluminum ions in the soil. The efflux of Al3+-chelating malate anions through these channels is stimulated by external Al3+ ions. This feature of a few proteins determined the name of the entire protein family as Aluminum-activated Malate Transporters (ALMT. Meanwhile, after several years of research, it is known that the physiological roles of ALMTs go far beyond Al-detoxification. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on this transporter family and assess their involvement in diverse physiological processes.

  14. Studies and research concerning BNFP. Nuclear transportation studies related to use of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.T.

    1981-11-01

    It will be necessary to transport radioactive material on a routine basis if the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) is to be utilized. This report examines the current and projected status of transport of high-level nuclear material, with particular application directed toward the operation of the BNFP. The current domestic US status is one of comparative inactivity in the movement of utility spent fuel. Pending the successful disposition of fuel cycle options such as either Away-from-Reactor (AFR) storage or reprocessing, spent fuel transport to the BNFP will be dormant through the mid-1980's. If fuel movement is initiated, the primary areas of concern will be the maze of local, state, and federal regulations on routing, the availability of spent fuel casks, and the logistic concerns of fuel loading and unloading capability at the reactor and the BNFP. The report examines the application of overweight truck (OWT) shipments of spent fuel casks patterned on current European practice. Overweight shipments, whether by truck or intermodal movement (rail or barge combined with truck shipment), can have a significant impact on resolving logistics problems. It seems obvious from our studies that OWT casks will be utilized, along with legal weight truck and rail shipment. Water transport was also examined. It appears that this mode will only be used in the event that highway and rail problems are insuperable

  15. Coevolving MAPK and PID phosphosites indicate an ancient environmental control of PIN auxin transporters in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dory, Magdalena; Hatzimasoura, Elizabeth; Kállai, Brigitta M; Nagy, Szilvia K; Jäger, Katalin; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Nádai, Tímea V; Mészáros, Tamás; López-Juez, Enrique; Barnabás, Beáta; Palme, Klaus; Bögre, László; Ditengou, Franck A; Dóczi, Róbert

    2018-01-01

    Plant growth flexibly adapts to environmental conditions, implying cross-talk between environmental signalling and developmental regulation. Here, we show that the PIN auxin efflux carrier family possesses three highly conserved putative mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) sites adjacent to the phosphorylation sites of the well-characterised AGC kinase PINOID, which regulates the polar localisation of PINs and directional auxin transport, thereby underpinning organ growth. The conserved sites of PIN1 are phosphorylated in vitro by two environmentally activated MAPKs, MPK4 and MPK6. In contrast to AGC kinases, MAPK-mediated phosphorylation of PIN1 at adjacent sites leads to a partial loss of the plasma membrane localisation of PIN1. MAPK-mediated modulation of PIN trafficking may participate in environmental adjustment of plant growth. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. The solubility of iron sulfides and their role in mass transport in Girdler-Sulfide heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, P.H.; Wallace, G.; Campbell, A.B.

    1978-04-01

    The solubilities of several iron sulfides, mackinawite FeSsub((1-x)), troilite FeS, pyrrhotite Fesub((1-x))S (monoclinic and hexagonal), and pyrite FeS 2 have been determined in aqueous H 2 S solution at 0.1 MPa and 1.8 MPa H 2 S pressures between 25 deg and 125 deg C. The dependence of solubility on the pH of the medium has also been studied. It is concluded that since mackinawite is the most soluble of the iron sulfides, and has the highest dissolution rate and the steepest decline in solubility with temperature, its prolonged formation during plant operation should be avoided to minimize iron transport from lower to higher temperature areas in Girdler-Sulfide (G.S.) heavy water plants. This can be achieved by a preconditioning of carbon steel surfaces to convert mackinawite to pyrrhotite and pyrite

  17. Impact of potash fertilization on uptake of potassium by rice saplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.N.; Sood, B.S.; Allawadhi, K.L.; Mittal, Raj

    1995-01-01

    Potash fertilization of plants that affects the potassium content of soils and its uptake by plants has been studied. For this rice saplings in pots were grown by planting Basmati seeds. Their growth was monitored by applying different amounts of potash fertilizers and keeping all other environment factors; soil, temperature, light and humidity etc. constant. Total potassium contents in rice saplings were determined using the method based upon XRF technique. The monitoring of growth of saplings of different pots shows that time duration of their freshness and greenishness and average length after fertilization were in increasing order with the amount of potassium fertilizer applied to the saplings. More over, the results of potassium content in different samples reveals that lower value of potash fertilizer has suppressed the potassium content in rice saplings as compared to those of saplings and soil of untreated pot. Potassium content of other saplings treated with 100, 150 and 200 mg of KCl per 200 ml of water were found to be enhanced from about 0.2 to 0.8 mg/g of dried amount with fertilizer contents. This shows that presently applied maximum amount of fertilizer is favourable for plants and visually induces no adverse effects in the saplings. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  18. Efeitos de doses de nitrogênio e potássio e densidade populacional sobre a classificação de bulbos de cebola Effect of onion bulb classification as a result of nitrogen and potassium levels and planting density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André May

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O efeito de doses de nitrogênio e de potássio e da população de plantas foi avaliado na classificação de bulbos de duas cultivares de cebola. Os tratamentos foram arranjados em esquema fatorial 2 x 4 x 4 x 4, correspondentes a, respectivamente, cultivares (Optima e Superex, nitrogênio (0; 50; 100 e 150 kg ha-1 de N, potássio (0; 75; 150 e 225 kg ha-1 de K2O e população de plantas (60; 76; 92 e 108 plantas m-2. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi de blocos casualizados, com quatro repetições. Os fertilizantes utilizados foram nitrato de amônio e cloreto de potássio para o fornecimento de N e K, respectivamente. A aplicação de nitrogênio e de potássio reduziu para aproximadamente zero a porcentagem de bulbos não-comerciais para as duas cultivares. A maior percentagem de bulbos com diâmetro transversal entre 50 e 70 mm foi alcançada com 60 plantas m-2 e com a aplicação de 150 kg ha-1 de N, principalmente para a Superex. As maiores porcentagens de bulbos duplos ocorreram na cultivar Superex, com a aplicação de 150 kg ha-1 de N (17% do total de bulbos produzidos e sob população de 60 plantas m-2 (22% do total de bulbos.The effect of nitrogen and potassium fertilizer doses and planting densities were evaluated in bulb classification of two onion cultivars. The treatments were arranged in factorial 2 x 4 x 4 x 4, respectively correspondent by cultivars (Optima and Superex, nitrogen (0; 50; 150 and 150 kg ha-1 of N, potassium (0; 75; 150 and 225 kg ha-1 of K2O and planting density (60; 76; 92 and 108 plants m-2. The experimental design was of randomized blocks, with four replications The fertilizers ammonium nitrate and potassium chloride were employed to provide N and K, respectively. The nitrogen and potassium application reduced to near to zero the incidence of non-comercial bulbs in both cultivars. The largest percentage of bulbs measuring 50 to 70 mm was reached with 60 plants m-2 and application of 150 kg ha-1 of N

  19. Determination of technical and economic parameters of an ionic transport membrane air separation unit working in a supercritical power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotowicz Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an air separation unit was analyzed. The unit consisted of: an ionic transport membrane contained in a four-end type module, an air compressor, an expander fed by gas that remains after oxygen separation and heat exchangers which heat the air and recirculated flue gas to the membrane operating temperature (850 °C. The air separation unit works in a power plant with electrical power equal to 600 MW. This power plant additionally consists of: an oxy-type pulverized-fuel boiler, a steam turbine unit and a carbon dioxide capture unit. Life steam parameters are 30 MPa/650 °C and reheated steam parameters are 6 MPa/670 °C. The listed units were analyzed. For constant electrical power of the power plant technical parameters of the air separation unit for two oxygen recovery rate (65% and 95% were determined. One of such parameters is ionic membrane surface area. In this paper the formulated equation is presented. The remaining technical parameters of the air separation unit are, among others: heat exchange surface area, power of the air compressor, power of the expander and auxiliary power. Using the listed quantities, the economic parameters, such as costs of air separation unit and of individual components were determined. These quantities allowed to determine investment costs of construction of the air separation unit. In addition, they were compared with investment costs for the entire oxy-type power plant.

  20. The mitochondrial phosphate transporters modulate plant responses to salt stress via affecting ATP and gibberellin metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial phosphate transporter (MPT plays crucial roles in ATP production in plant cells. Three MPT genes have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we report that the mRNA accumulations of AtMPTs were up-regulated by high salinity stress in A. thaliana seedlings. And the transgenic lines overexpressing AtMPTs displayed increased sensitivity to salt stress compared with the wild-type plants during seed germination and seedling establishment stages. ATP content and energy charge was higher in overexpressing plants than those in wild-type A. thaliana under salt stress. Accordingly, the salt-sensitive phenotype of overexpressing plants was recovered after the exogenous application of atractyloside due to the change of ATP content. Interestingly, Genevestigator survey and qRT-PCR analysis indicated a large number of genes, including those related to gibberellin synthesis could be regulated by the energy availability change under stress conditions in A. thaliana. Moreover, the exogenous application of uniconazole to overexpressing lines showed that gibberellin homeostasis was disturbed in the overexpressors. Our studies reveal a possible link between the ATP content mediated by AtMPTs and gibberellin metabolism in responses to high salinity stress in A. thaliana.

  1. Matter accumulation and changes of assimilation product transport and carbohydrate regime in barley plants as induced by infection with Puccinia striiformis West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, J. (Akademie der Landwirtschaftswissenschaften der DDR, Aschersleben. Inst. fuer Phytopathologie)

    1982-01-01

    Accumulation of nuclides (/sup 32/P, /sup 14/C), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ assimilation and /sup 14/C transport were studied in several barley cultivars differing in their resistance to yellow rust. Increased matter accumulation was found in the rust pustules. Mycelium was proved by means of autoradiography. Infection causes changes with regard to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ assimilation, carbohydrate regime and transport of /sup 14/C assimilation products. Certain relationships exist between these changes and plant resistance to yellow rust. During germination the rust uredospores release substances, particularly amino acids, to be transported in the plant.

  2. Real-time monitoring and analysis of nutrient transportation in a living plant using a positron emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Shinpei

    2005-01-01

    We visualized the uptake and transportation of nutrition in a living plant using positron-emitting tracers and mathematical analysis of the data. We have been developing a positron-imaging technique to visualize the uptake and transportation of nutrients in a plant by a positron-emitting tracer-imaging system (PETIS) using positron-emitting nuclide-labeled compounds. The PETIS data is analyzed mathematically to understand the physiological meaning of the physical parameters. In this study, the results on the uptake and transportation of nutrients, which were obtained with the use of a positron-imaging method, are introduced. (author)

  3. Preparation of potassium-reduced tantalum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolosov, V.N.; Miroshnichenko, M.N.; Orlov, V.M.; Prokhorova, T.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of tantalum powders prepared by reduction of molten potassium heptafluorotantalate with liquid potassium are studied in a temperature range of 750 - 850 deg C using potassium chloride as a flux at a ratio of K 2 TaF 7 : KCl = 1, 2, and 3. The use of potassium as a reducing agent facilitates washing of tantalum powders for impurity salt removal, reduces sodium content and leakage currents in the anodes. As compared to sodium process, the potassium reduction results in a high yield of sponge material, a decrease in the specific surface area and yield of tantalum powder suitable for manufacture of capacitor anodes [ru

  4. A cold-induced myo-inositol transporter-like gene confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambe, Mame Abdou Nahr; He, Xueying; Tu, Qinghua; Guo, Zhenfei

    2015-03-01

    A full length cDNA encoding a myo-inositol transporter-like protein, named as MfINT-like, was cloned from Medicago sativa subsp. falcata (herein falcata), a species with greater cold tolerance than alfalfa (M. sativa subsp. sativa). MfINT-like is located on plasma membranes. MfINT-like transcript was induced 2-4 h after exogenous myo-inositol treatment, 24-96 h with cold, and 96 h by salinity. Given that myo-inositol accumulates higher in falcata after 24 h of cold treatment, myo-inositol is proposed to be involved in cold-induced expression of MfINT-like. Higher levels of myo-inositol was observed in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfINT-like than the wild-type but not in the roots of plants grown on myo-inositol containing medium, suggesting that transgenic plants had higher myo-inositol transport activity than the wild-type. Transgenic plants survived better to freezing temperature, and had lower ion leakage and higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm ) after chilling treatment. In addition, greater plant fresh weight was observed in transgenic plants as compared with the wild-type when plants were grown under drought or salinity stress. The results suggest that MfINT-like mediated transport of myo-inositol is associated with plant tolerance to abiotic stresses. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  5. Transport of plutonium, americium, and curium from soils into plants by roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimpl, M.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1979-12-01

    For assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products by ingestion it is necessary to know the soil to plant transfer factors. The literature was entirely investigated, in order to judge the size of the soil to plant transfer factors. In total, 92 publications - from 1948 to 1978 -have been evaluated. As result, transfer factors from 10 -9 to 10 -3 have been found for Plutonium, and from 10 -6 to 1 for Americium. For Curium only few data are available in literature. The considerable variation of the measured transfer factors is based on the dependence of these transfer factors from the ion exchange capacity of soils, from the amount of organic materials, from the pH-value, and from the mode of contamination. There are, in any case, contradictory data, although there has been detected a dependence of the transfer factors from these parameters. Chelating agenst increase the transfer factors to approximately 1300. As well, fertilizers have an influence on the size of the transfer factors - however, the relationships have been scarcely investigated. The distribution of actinides within the individual parts of plants has been investigated. The highest concentrations are in the roots; in the plant parts above ground the concentration of actinides decreases considerably. The most inferior transfer factors were measured for the respective seed or fruits. The soil to plant transfer factors of actinides are more dependend on the age of the plants within one growing period. At the beginning of the period, the transfer factor is considerably higher than at the end of this period. With respect to plants with a growing period of several years, correlations are unknown. (orig.) [de

  6. Impact of reduced atmospheric CO2 and varied potassium supply on carbohydrate and potassium distribution in grapevine and grape berries (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Zelmari A; Walker, Rob R; Deloire, Alain J; Barril, Célia; Clarke, Simon J; Rogiers, Suzy Y

    2017-11-01

    To assess the robustness of the apparent sugar-potassium relationship during ripening of grape berries, a controlled-environment study was conducted on Shiraz vines involving ambient and reduced (by 34%) atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, and standard and increased (by 67%) soil potassium applications from prior to the onset of ripening. The leaf net photoassimilation rate was decreased by 35% in the reduced CO 2 treatment. The reduction in CO 2 delayed the onset of ripening, but at harvest the sugar content of the berry pericarp was similar to that of plants grown in ambient conditions. The potassium content of the berry pericarp in the reduced CO 2 treatment was however higher than for the ambient CO 2 . Berry potassium, sugar and water content were strongly correlated, regardless of treatments, alluding to a ternary link during ripening. Root starch content was lower under reduced CO 2 conditions, and therefore likely acted as a source of carbohydrates during berry ripening. Root carbohydrate reserve replenishment could also have been moderated under reduced CO 2 at the expense of berry ripening. Given that root potassium concentration was less in the vines grown in the low CO 2 atmosphere, these results point toward whole-plant fine-tuning of carbohydrate and potassium partitioning aimed at optimising fruit ripening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Model of iodine transport and reaction kinetics in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.

    1977-05-01

    A model is presented to describe the time-dependent flow and retention of stable iodine isotopes and the decay of 131 I in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The plant consists of 16 units of equipment such as a voloxidizer or graphite burner, fuel dissolver, solvent extractors, storage tanks, vaporizers, primary iodine sorbers, and silver zeolite. The rate of accumulation of bulk and radioactive iodine in these units and in the environment is described using 19 differential equations. Reasonable time-dependence of iodine retention factors (RFs) by the plant were calculated. RFs for a new plant in excess of 10 6 for stable iodine and 129 I decrease to the range of 10 3 to 10 2 as plant operating times exceed 50 to 100 days. The RFs for 131 I also decrease initially, for a period of approximately 10 days, but then increase by several orders of magnitude due to radioactive decay and isotopic exchange. Generally, the RFs for 131 I exceed those for stable iodine by factors of 10 4 or more. 19 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  8. Produção do melão rendilhado em função da concentração de potássio na solução nutritiva e do número de frutos por planta Net melon yield as affected by potassium concentration in nutrient solution and number of fruits per plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caciana C. Costa

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido em hidroponia (NFT, de junho a novembro de 2001, na UNESP, em Jaboticabal. A cultivar Bônus nº 2 foi cultivada sob blocos casualizados, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, com seis repetições. Foram avaliados o número de frutos por planta (2; 3; 4 e fixação livre e a concentração de potássio na solução nutritiva (66; 115,5; 165 e 247,5 mg L-1 de K. Nas colheitas ocorridas entre 105 e 133 dias após o transplantio (DAT, foram obtidos 2,0; 2,5; 2,7 e 2,3 frutos por planta, enquanto que aos 85 DAT, o número de frutos fixados tinha sido, respectivamente, 2; 3; 4 e 6,2 frutos por planta. O incremento da concentração de potássio na solução nutritiva aumentou, inicialmente, o número de frutos fixados, e contribuiu, posteriormente, para a redução do abortamento dos frutos. Também, promoveu aumento no peso médio do segundo fruto. A produção e o peso médio dos frutos não foram influenciados pelo emprego de soluções nutritivas com concentração de potássio acima de 66 mg L-1. Entretanto, o número de frutos por planta afetou a produção e o peso médio dos frutos, promovendo respectivamente, aumento e redução à medida que maior foi o número de frutos por planta.The experiment was carried out using hidroponic solution (NFT from June to November-2001, in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil. The 'Bonus nº 2' was cultivated in randomized blocks design, with split-plot scheme and six replications. Fruit number per plant (2; 3; 4 and free and potassium concentration in the nutrient solution (66; 115.5; 165 e 247.5 mg L-1 were the studied factors. At harvests [105 to 133 days after transplant (DAT], 2.0; 2.5; 2.7 and 2.3 fruits per plant were obtained, whereas at 85 DAT, 2; 3; 4 and 6.2 fruits had been set, respectively. Increasing potassium concentration in the nutrient solution improved initially fruit set and contributed later to reduce the fruit aborting in plants. Also the potassium promoted

  9. Leaching of Major and Minor Elements during the Transport and Storage of Coal Ash Obtained in Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Krgović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In power plant, coal ash obtained by combustion is mixed with river water and transported to the dump. Sequential extraction was used in order to assess pollution caused by leaching of elements during ash transport through the pipeline and in the storage (cassettes. A total of 80 samples of filter ash as well as the ash from active (currently filled and passive (previously filled cassettes were studied. Samples were extracted with distilled water, ammonium acetate, ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid, acidic solution of hydrogen-peroxide, and a hydrochloric acid. Concentrations of the several elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Ba, Ca, Mg, Ni, Pb, and Zn in all extracts were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Pattern recognition method was carried out in order to provide better understanding of the nature of distribution of elements according to their origins. Results indicate possible leaching of As, Ca, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Pb. Among these elements As, Cd, and Pb are toxicologically the most important but they were not present in the first two phases with the exception of As. The leaching could be destructive and cause negative effects on plants, water pollution, and damage to some life forms.

  10. Fast method for the detection of transport process in plant tissues by radiotracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, K.; Joo, P.

    1995-01-01

    The efficiency of nutrients, microelements and plant protective agents and additives applied on foliar and various aeriel parts of plants depends on the adsorption of their spray drops and the penetration of agents into tissues, cells and inner caves. The permeability of the cuticular membrane and the mode of entry of above substances through the cuticle and their mobility in other tissues are poorly understood but have been the subject of intensive research. The traditional methods in biological systems are the automicroradiography and sample taking methods. The radioactive tracer method developed by us is suitable for determining the effective diffusion coefficients characterizing the migration process and concentration distributions off these materials in plants by consumption of minimal amount of β-labelled radioactive isotopes in very short time. (author) 9 refs.; 3 figs

  11. Role of Heavy Metal Pumps in Transport of Zinc from Soil to Seeds of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Irene

    . In Arabidopsis roots, the heavy metal ATPases AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 are localized to the pericycle cells and are important for the export of zinc, in order for zinc to enter the xylem and get to the shoot. I have identified a new novel role for AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 in the developing seed. The Arabidopsis seed consists...... at this location actively export zinc from the mother plant seed coat. Mutant plants that lack AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 accumulate zinc in the seed coat, and consequently have vastly reduced amounts of zinc inside the seed. The finding that AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 are involved in pumping zinc out of the mother plant seed coat...

  12. Genome-Wide Characterization of Major Intrinsic Proteins in Four Grass Plants and Their Non-Aqua Transport Selectivity Profiles with Comparative Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Kalam Azad

    Full Text Available Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs, commonly known as aquaporins, transport not only water in plants but also other substrates of physiological significance and heavy metals. In most of the higher plants, MIPs are divided into five subfamilies (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs. Herein, we identified 68, 42, 38 and 28 full-length MIPs, respectively in the genomes of four monocot grass plants, specifically Panicum virgatum, Setaria italica, Sorghum bicolor and Brachypodium distachyon. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the grass plants had only four MIP subfamilies including PIPs, TIPs, NIPs and SIPs without XIPs. Based on structural analysis of the homology models and comparing the primary selectivity-related motifs [two NPA regions, aromatic/arginine (ar/R selectivity filter and Froger's positions (FPs] of all plant MIPs that have been experimentally proven to transport non-aqua substrates, we predicted the transport profiles of all MIPs in the four grass plants and also in eight other plants. Groups of MIP subfamilies based on ar/R selectivity filter and FPs were linked to the non-aqua transport profiles. We further deciphered the substrate selectivity profiles of the MIPs in the four grass plants and compared them with their counterparts in rice, maize, soybean, poplar, cotton, Arabidopsis thaliana, Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii. In addition to two NPA regions, ar/R filter and FPs, certain residues, especially in loops B and C, contribute to the functional distinctiveness of MIP groups. Expression analysis of transcripts in different organs indicated that non-aqua transport was related to expression of MIPs since most of the unexpressed MIPs were not predicted to facilitate the transport of non-aqua molecules. Among all MIPs in every plant, TIP (BdTIP1;1, SiTIP1;2, SbTIP2;1 and PvTIP1;2 had the overall highest mean expression. Our study generates significant information for understanding the diversity, evolution, non

  13. Polar transport of plant hormone auxin – the role of PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zažímalová, Eva; Křeček, Pavel; Skůpa, Petr; Hoyerová, Klára; Petrášek, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 13 (2007), s. 1621-1637 ISSN 1420-682X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038303; GA AV ČR KJB600380604; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Plant hormone * phytohormone * plant growth regulator Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.239, year: 2007

  14. Osmotically driven pipe flows and their relation to sugar transport in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Rio, Emmanuelle; Hansen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    as well as in many cases in plants) we show that the equations of motion for the sugar concentration and the water velocity can be solved exactly by the method of characteristics, yielding the entire flow and concentration profile along the tube. The concentration front decays exponentially in agreement......) for tubes of length L, radius r, permeability kappa and fluid viscosity eta. The experiments (which are in the small M regime) are in good quantitative agreement with the theory. The applicability of our results to plants is discussed and it is shown that it is probable that the Munch mechanism can account...

  15. Criticality Calculations of Fresh LEU and MOX Assemblies for Transport and Storage at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, S.

    2001-01-11

    Transportation of low-enriched uranium (LEU) and mixed-oxide (MOX) assemblies to and within the VVER-1000-type Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant is investigated. Effective multiplication factors for fresh fuel assemblies on the railroad platform, fresh fuel assemblies in the fuel transportation vehicle, and fresh fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool are calculated. If there is no absorber between the units, the configurations with all MOX assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors than the configurations with all LEU assemblies when the system is dry. When the system is flooded, the configurations with all LEU assemblies result in higher effective multiplication factors. For normal operating conditions, effective multiplication factors for all configurations are below the presumed upper subcritical limit of 0.95. For an accident condition of a fully loaded fuel transportation vehicle that is flooded with low-density water (possibly from a fire suppression system), the presumed upper subcritical limit is exceeded by configurations containing LEU assemblies.

  16. Numerical simulation of a passive scalar transport from thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issakhov, Alibek; Baitureyeva, Aiymzhan

    2017-06-01

    The active development of the industry leads to an increase in the number of factories, plants, thermal power plants, nuclear power plants, thereby increasing the amount of emissions into the atmosphere. Harmful chemicals are deposited on the soil surface, remain in the atmosphere, which leads to a variety of environmental problems which are harmful for human health and the environment, flora and fauna. Considering the above problems, it is very important to control the emissions to keep them at an acceptable level for the environment. In order to do that it is necessary to investigate the spread of harmful emissions. The best way to assess it is the creating numerical simulation of gaseous substances' motion. In the present work the numerical simulation of the spreading of emissions from the thermal power plant chimney is considered. The model takes into account the physical properties of the emitted substances and allows to calculate the distribution of the mass fractions, depending on the wind velocity and composition of emissions. The numerical results were performed using the ANSYS Fluent software package. As a result, the results of numerical simulations and the graphs are given.

  17. Internal transport of alien and native plants by geese and ducks: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Alvarez, Alberto; van Leeuwen, Casper H. A.; Luque, Carlos J.; Hussner, Andreas; Velez-Martin, Alberto; Perez-Vazquez, Andres; Green, Andy J.; Castellanos, Eloy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alien plant species are rapidly spreading in aquatic ecosystems around the world, causing major ecological effects. They are typically introduced by humans, after which natural vectors facilitate their further spread. Migratory waterbirds have long been recognised as important dispersal vectors for

  18. Utilization of respiratory energy in higher plants : requirements for 'maintenance' and transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Quantitative knowledge of both photosynthesis and respiration is required to understand plant growth and resulting crop yield. However, especially the nature of the energy demanding processes that are dependent on dark respiration in full-grown tissues is largely unknown. The main objective

  19. Transport of the radionuclides and doses for some coal fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, D.; Telenta, B.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation exposure of the public in the vicinity of the selected coal fired power plants near from Belgrade has been studied. The contents of natural radionuclides according to experimental data have been used and dose rates from inhalation have been calculated using a two dimensional version of the cloud model. (author)

  20. A Plumber's-Eye View of Xylem Water Transport in Woody Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Pinol, Josep

    2004-01-01

    We present a practical for university-level students aimed at measuring and comparing xylem hydraulic properties of co-existing plant species. After sampling branches of several woody species in the field, their main hydraulic properties were measured using a simple set-up. Hydraulic conductivity ("K[subscript h]") was calculated as the ratio…

  1. Efeito de bicarbonato de potássio sobre a severidade do oídio em plantas de soja Effect of potassium bicarbonate on the severity of powdery mildew in soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Medice

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O oídio da soja, causado por Erysiphe diffusa, é considerado uma doença esporádica podendo ocasionar perdas quando atinge proporções epidêmicas. O trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a eficiência de bicarbonato de potássio (Kaligreen® no controle do oídio da soja. As pulverizações do bicarbonato de potássio nas concentrações de 0; 0,25%, 0,5%, 0,75% e 1,0% e do fungicida (piraclostrobina + epoxiconazole e as avaliações foram semanais. Folhas foram coletadas para análise ultraestrutural através da microscopia eletrônica de varredura. O bicarbonato de potássio controlou a doença em todas as concentrações, mas causou fitotoxicidade a partir de 0,5%. Na analise ultraestrutural pode-se observar que o produto apresentou ação direta sobre o patógeno ocasionando murchamento e redução na germinação dos conídios. O produto apresenta potencial para controlar a doença, porém deve ser adequada a concentração a ser recomenda, bem como a frequência de aplicação para evitar os problemas de fitotoxicidade.The soybean powdery mildew, caused by Erysiphe diffusa, is considered a sporadic disease which can cause losses when it reaches epidemic proportions. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of potassium bicarbonate (Kaligreen® in controlling soybean powdery mildew. Sprays of both potassium bicarbonate at concentrations of 0, 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1.0% and fungicide (pyraclostrobin + epoxiconazole, as well as assessments, were weekly carried out. Leaves were collected for ultrastructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy. Potassium bicarbonate controlled the disease at all concentrations but caused phytotoxicity from 0.5%. In the ultrastructural analysis, the product had a direct action on the pathogen, causing wilting and reduction in conidium germination. The product has the potential to control the disease, but the concentration to be recommended should be adequate, as well as the frequency of application to

  2. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John W. Rich

    2001-03-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

  3. Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The indirect methanol cell fuel concept being actively pursued by the United States Department of Energy and General Motors Corporation is based on electrochemical engine (e.c.e.) an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electric power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen are under active development. This paper describes status of each of these components, and describe a model that predicts the steady state performance of the e.c.e

  4. Emerging Technologies for the Production of Renewable Liquid Transport Fuels from Biomass Sources Enriched in Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwei-Ting Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed predominantly of cellulose, a range of non-cellulosic polysaccharides and lignin. The walls account for a large proportion not only of crop residues such as wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse, but also of residues of the timber industry and specialist grasses and other plants being grown specifically for biofuel production. The polysaccharide components of plant cell walls have long been recognized as an extraordinarily large source of fermentable sugars that might be used for the production of bioethanol and other renewable liquid transport fuels. Estimates place annual plant cellulose production from captured light energy in the order of hundreds of billions of tonnes. Lignin is synthesised in the same order of magnitude and, as a very large polymer of phenylpropanoid residues, lignin is also an abundant, high energy macromolecule. However, one of the major functions of these cell wall constituents in plants is to provide the extreme tensile and compressive strengths that enable plants to resist the forces of gravity and a broad range of other mechanical forces. Over millions of years these wall constituents have evolved under natural selection to generate extremely tough and resilient biomaterials. The rapid degradation of these tough cell wall composites to fermentable sugars is therefore a difficult task and has significantly slowed the development of a viable lignocellulose-based biofuels industry. However, good progress has been made in overcoming this so-called recalcitrance of lignocellulosic feedstocks for the biofuels industry, through modifications to the lignocellulose itself, innovative pre-treatments of the biomass, improved enzymes and the development of superior yeasts and other microorganisms for the fermentation process. Nevertheless, it has been argued that bioethanol might not be the best or only biofuel that can be generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources and that hydrocarbons with

  5. Emerging Technologies for the Production of Renewable Liquid Transport Fuels from Biomass Sources Enriched in Plant Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hwei-Ting; Corbin, Kendall R.; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed predominantly of cellulose, a range of non-cellulosic polysaccharides and lignin. The walls account for a large proportion not only of crop residues such as wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse, but also of residues of the timber industry and specialist grasses and other plants being grown specifically for biofuel production. The polysaccharide components of plant cell walls have long been recognized as an extraordinarily large source of fermentable sugars that might be used for the production of bioethanol and other renewable liquid transport fuels. Estimates place annual plant cellulose production from captured light energy in the order of hundreds of billions of tons. Lignin is synthesized in the same order of magnitude and, as a very large polymer of phenylpropanoid residues, lignin is also an abundant, high energy macromolecule. However, one of the major functions of these cell wall constituents in plants is to provide the extreme tensile and compressive strengths that enable plants to resist the forces of gravity and a broad range of other mechanical forces. Over millions of years these wall constituents have evolved under natural selection to generate extremely tough and resilient biomaterials. The rapid degradation of these tough cell wall composites to fermentable sugars is therefore a difficult task and has significantly slowed the development of a viable lignocellulose-based biofuels industry. However, good progress has been made in overcoming this so-called recalcitrance of lignocellulosic feedstocks for the biofuels industry, through modifications to the lignocellulose itself, innovative pre-treatments of the biomass, improved enzymes and the development of superior yeasts and other microorganisms for the fermentation process. Nevertheless, it has been argued that bioethanol might not be the best or only biofuel that can be generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources and that hydrocarbons with intrinsically higher energy

  6. Effect of soaking of seeds in potassium silicate and uniconazole on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... by low concentration of uniconazole treatment as compared to the control and other treatments. The growth of tomato seedlings was efficiently regulated by uniconazole 50 mg L-1 (12 h soaking) treatment. Key words: Chlorophyll fluorescence, plant growth retardants, plug plants, potassium silicate, seed treatment, silicon, ...

  7. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Stone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+ ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60–100 mEq is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health.

  8. Transport and concentration controls for chloride, strontium, potassium and lead in Uvas Creek, a small cobble-bed stream in Santa Clara County, California, U.S.A. 1. Conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, V.C.; Jackman, A.P.; Zand, S.M.; Zellweger, G.W.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Stream sediments adsorb certain solutes from streams, thereby significantly changing the solute composition; but little is known about the details and rates of these adsorptive processes. To investigate such processes, a 24-hr. injection of a solution containing chloride, strontium, potassium, sodium and lead was made at the head of a 640-m reach of Uvas Creek in west-central Santa Clara County, California. Uvas Creek is a cobble-bed pool-and-riffle stream draining the eastern slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains. By September 12, 1973, after a long dry season, Uvas Creek had a low (0.0215 m3s-1 average) flow which varied diurnally, from 0.018 to 0.025 m3s-1. Because stream discharge varied while the injection rate was constant, the concentration of tracers (injected solutes), after mixing in the stream, varied inversely with discharge. Chloride, a nonreactive solute, served as a tracer of water movement. Analysis of extensive chloride concentration data at five sites below the injection point during and after the injection demonstrated that there was considerable underflow of water through the stream gravels; however, the extent of underflow varied greatly within the study reach. Pre-injection water, displaced by tracer-laden water percolating through the gravels, diluted tracers in the stream channel, giving the mistaken impression of groundwater inflow at some points. Accurate measurement of total discharge in such streams requires prolonged tracer injection unless a reach can be found where underflow is negligible. Strontium and potassium were adsorbed by the bed sediments to a moderate extent and lead was strongly adsorbed. A high proportion of these metals could be removed by adsorption from percolating underflow because of extensive and intimate contact with bed sediments. After channel clearing following injection cutoff, 51% of the added strontium and 96% of the lead remained in the study reach, whereas only 19% of the chloride remained. Packets of sized

  9. Evaluation of the potassium adsorption capacity of a potassium adsorption filter during rapid blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, H; Akatsuka, Y; Muramatsu, C; Isogai, S; Sugiura, Y; Arakawa, S; Murayama, M; Kurahashi, M; Takasuga, H; Oshige, T; Yuba, T; Mizuta, S; Emi, N

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of extracellular potassium in red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) increases during storage, leading to risk of hyperkalemia. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) can eliminate the potassium at normal blood transfusion. This study aimed to investigate the potassium adsorption capacity of a PAF during rapid blood transfusion. We tested several different potassium concentrations under a rapid transfusion condition using a pressure bag. The adsorption rates of the 70-mEq/l model were 76·8%. The PAF showed good potassium adsorption capacity, suggesting that this filter may provide a convenient method to prevent hyperkalemia during rapid blood transfusion. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Influence of pollen transport dynamics on sire profiles and multiple paternity in flowering plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall J Mitchell

    Full Text Available In many flowering plants individual fruits contain a mixture of half- and full- siblings, reflecting pollination by several fathers. To better understand the mechanisms generating multiple paternity within fruits we present a theoretical framework linking pollen carryover with patterns of pollinator movement. This 'sire profile' model predicts that species with more extensive pollen carryover will have a greater number of mates. It also predicts that flowers on large displays, which are often probed consecutively during a single pollinator visitation sequence, will have a lower effective number of mates. We compared these predictions with observed values for bumble bee-pollinated Mimulus ringens, which has restricted carryover, and hummingbird-pollinated Ipomopsis aggregata, which has extensive carryover. The model correctly predicted that the effective number of mates is much higher in the species with more extensive carryover. This work extends our knowledge of plant mating systems by highlighting mechanisms influencing the genetic composition of sibships.

  11. Determination of temperature measurements uncertainties of the heat transport primary system of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerantz, Marcelo E.; Coutsiers, Eduardo E.; Moreno, Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, the systematic errors in temperature measurements in inlet and outlet headers of HTPS coolant channels of Embalse nuclear power plant are evaluated. These uncertainties are necessary for a later evaluation of the channel power maps transferred to the coolant. The power maps calculated in this way are used to compare power distributions using neutronic codes. Therefore, a methodology to correct systematic errors of temperature in outlet feeders and inlet headers is developed in this work. (author)

  12. Transport structures and water reservoir for the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Klacansky, T.

    1986-01-01

    The projects are described which were implemented by Doprastav Bratislava within the preparation of the site for the Mochovce nuclear power plant. This includes a railway siding in a length of 11.2 kilometres which includes a railway bridge, two other bridges and the reconstruction of the Kalna nad Vahom railway terminal. Also reconstructed or newly built were road communications in a total length of 23.3 km. The said project included the construction of a road flyover over the railway track and the construction of five other smaller bridges. In order to provide the utility water supply to the Mochovce nuclear power plant, a large reservoir is being built at Velke Kozmalovce. The reservoir will have a total capacity of 2.6 mill. m 3 of water, of this the effective capacity will be 2.1 mill. m 3 on a flooded area of some 90 ha. Part of the reservoir will be a small hydro-power plant, the reservoir will also be used for irrigation on the fields of the neighbouring farms. (Z.M.)

  13. POTASSIUM FERTILIZATION AND SOIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR COTTON CROPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VITOR MARQUES VIDAL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton has great socio-economic importance due to its use in textile industry, edible oil and biodiesel production and animal feed. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify the best potassium rate and soil management for cotton crops and select among cultivars, the one that better develops in the climatic conditions of the Cerrado biome in the State of Goiás, Brazil. Thus, the effect of five potassium rates (100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 kg ha-1 of K2O and two soil management systems (no-till and conventional tillage on the growth, development and reproduction of four cotton cultivars (BRS-371, BRS-372, BRS-286 and BRS-201 was evaluated. The data on cotton growth and development were subjected to analysis of variance; the data on potassium rates were subjected to regression analysis; and the data on cultivars and soil management to mean test. The correlation between the vegetative and reproductive variables was also assessed. The conventional tillage system provides the best results for the herbaceous cotton, regardless of the others factors evaluated. The cultivar BRS-286 has the best results in the conditions evaluated. The cultivar BRS-371 under no-till system present the highest number of fruiting branches at a potassium rate of 105.5% and highest number of floral buds at a potassium rate of 96.16%. The specific leaf area was positively correlated with the number of bolls per plant at 120 days after emergence of the herbaceous cotton.

  14. Alternative potassium source for the cultivation of ornamental sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Thereza dos Santos Torqueti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Brazil is dependent on importation of fertilizers, especially the potassics. Rocks and minerals that contain nutrients have a potential for use in agriculture as fertilizer, especially those of slow solubilization and that exhibit residual effect. In this context, the objective was to assess the feasibility of glauconite rock as potassium source for the cultivation of ornamental sunflower. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions arranged in an entirely randomized design, in a 4x4 + 4 factorial scheme, with four replicates and one plant per plot. Four glauconite-based fertilizers were used as a potassium source: fine grained glauconite, fine grained organo-mineral glauconite, coarse grained glauconite and coarse grained organo-mineral glauconite, in four doses, as well as an additional treatment with four doses of KCl, the principal conventional source of the nutrient. The height of the flower stalks, the diameter of the stem and floral capitulum, the number of cultivation days and post-harvest durability were evaluated. The application of KCl yielded the production of flower stems with greater height and larger capitulum diameter in relation to the supply of glauconite. Among the glauconite based fertilizers, the fine grained organo-mineral product provided the best flower charateristics. The postharvest commercial durability of the flower stalks was higher in plants that received the glauconite and fine grained organo-mineral glauconite. The fine grained organo-mineral glauconite surpasses all other alternative sources of potassium in relation to the agronomic characteristics evaluated.

  15. Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confusion listlessness tingling, prickling, burning, tight, or pulling sensation of arms, hands, legs, or feet heaviness or weakness of legs cold, pale, gray skin stomach pain unusual stomach bulging ...

  16. Potassium and zinc increase tolerance to salt stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Amin Ullah; Hadi, Fazal; Midrarullah; Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Rahman, Khaista

    2017-07-01

    Potassium and zinc are essential elements in plant growth and metabolism and plays a vital role in salt stress tolerance. To investigate the physiological mechanism of salt stress tolerance, a pot experiment was conducted. Potassium and zinc significantly minimize the oxidative stress and increase root, shoot and spike length in wheat varieties. Fresh and dry biomass were significantly increased by potassium followed by zinc as compared to control C. The photosynthetic pigment and osmolyte regulator (proline, total phenolic, and total carbohydrate) were significantly enhanced by potassium and zinc. Salt stress increases MDA content in wheat varieties while potassium and zinc counteract the adverse effect of salinity and significantly increased membrane stability index. Salt stress decreases the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase) while the exogenous application of potassium and zinc significantly enhanced the activities of these enzymes. A significant positive correlation was found of spike length with proline (R 2  = 0.966 ∗∗∗ ), phenolic (R 2  = 0.741 ∗ ) and chlorophyll (R 2  = 0.853 ∗∗ ). The MDA content showed significant negative correlation (R 2  = 0.983 ∗∗∗ ) with MSI. It is concluded that potassium and zinc reduced toxic effect of salinity while its combine application showed synergetic effect and significantly enhanced salt tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanism of action of anions on the electron transport chain in thylakoid membranes of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Rawal, Pooja; Zsiros, Ottó; Bharti, Sudhakar; Garab, Gyozo; Jajoo, Anjana

    2011-04-01

    With an aim to improve our understanding of the mechanisms behind specific anion effects in biological membranes, we have studied the effects of sodium salts of anions of varying valency in thylakoid membranes. Rates of electron transport of PS II and PS I, 77K fluorescence emission and excitation spectra, cyclic electron flow around PS I and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were measured in thylakoid membranes in order to elucidate a general mechanism of action of inorganic anions on photosynthetic electron transport chain. Re-distribution of absorbed excitation energy has been observed as a signature effect of inorganic anions. In the presence of anions, such as nitrite, sulphate and phosphate, distribution of absorbed excitation energy was found to be more in favor of Photosystem I (PS I). The amount of energy distributed towards PS I depended on the valency of the anion. In this paper, we propose for the first time that energy re-distribution and its valence dependence may not be the effect of anions per se. The entry of negative charge (anion) is accompanied by influx of positive charge (protons) to maintain a balance of charge across the thylakoid membranes. As reflected by the CD spectra, the observed energy re-distribution could be a result of structural rearrangements of the protein complexes of PS II caused by changes in the ionic environment of the thylakoid lumen.

  18. The nucleobase cation symporter 1 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and that of the evolutionarily distant Arabidopsis thaliana display parallel function and establish a plant-specific solute transport profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Jessica R; Hunt, Kevin A; Minton, Janet A; Schultes, Neil P; Mourad, George S

    2013-09-01

    The single cell alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of importing purines as nitrogen sources. An analysis of the annotated C. reinhardtii genome reveals at least three distinct gene families encoding for known nucleobase transporters. In this study the solute transport and binding properties for the lone C. reinhardtii nucleobase cation symporter 1 (CrNCS1) are determined through heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CrNCS1 acts as a transporter of adenine, guanine, uracil and allantoin, sharing similar - but not identical - solute recognition specificity with the evolutionary distant NCS1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. The results suggest that the solute specificity for plant NCS1 occurred early in plant evolution and are distinct from solute transport specificities of single cell fungal NCS1 proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Operating experience with potassium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, N.F.

    1984-04-01

    In an international cooperation R and D work for the realization of potassium topping cycles to increase the conversion efficiency of thermal power stations is going on. Feasibility studies show that the realization of such a process can be achieved under economic considerations with existing materials and today's technology. Nevertheless, it has to be shown that the assumptions with respect to material behaviour and component reliability are based on sound technical premises. Therefore, in continuation of design studies, a hardware programme has been initiated in the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf. First results with respect to component and material behaviour are described. (Author) [de

  20. Improved HYLIFE-II heat transport system and steam power plant: Impact on performance and cost of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Lee, Ying T.

    1992-12-01

    The HYLIFE-II conceptual design has evolved and improved continually over the past four years to its present form. This paper describes the latest FY92 versions, Reference Case H1 (nominally 1 GWe net output) and the Enhanced Case HE (nominally 2 GWe net output), which take advantage of improvements in the tritium management system to eliminate the intermediate loop and the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX's). The improvements in the heat transport system and the steam power plant are described and the resulting cost reductions are evaluated. The new estimated cost of electricity (in 1990 dollars) is 6.6 cents/kWh for Reference Case H1 and 4.7 cents/kWh for the Enhanced Case

  1. ROTUNDA3 function in plant development by phosphatase 2A-mediated regulation of auxin transporter recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampelias, Michael; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Aesaert, Stijn; Coussens, Griet; Rolčík, Jakub; Bruno, Leonardo; De Winne, Nancy; Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Van Montagu, Marc; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Friml, Jiří; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2016-03-08

    The shaping of organs in plants depends on the intercellular flow of the phytohormone auxin, of which the directional signaling is determined by the polar subcellular localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins. Phosphorylation dynamics of PIN proteins are affected by the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and the PINOID kinase, which act antagonistically to mediate their apical-basal polar delivery. Here, we identified the ROTUNDA3 (RON3) protein as a regulator of the PP2A phosphatase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The RON3 gene was map-based cloned starting from the ron3-1 leaf mutant and found to be a unique, plant-specific gene coding for a protein with high and dispersed proline content. The ron3-1 and ron3-2 mutant phenotypes [i.e., reduced apical dominance, primary root length, lateral root emergence, and growth; increased ectopic stages II, IV, and V lateral root primordia; decreased auxin maxima in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-treated root apical meristems; hypergravitropic root growth and response; increased IAA levels in shoot apices; and reduced auxin accumulation in root meristems] support a role for RON3 in auxin biology. The affinity-purified PP2A complex with RON3 as bait suggested that RON3 might act in PIN transporter trafficking. Indeed, pharmacological interference with vesicle trafficking processes revealed that single ron3-2 and double ron3-2 rcn1 mutants have altered PIN polarity and endocytosis in specific cells. Our data indicate that RON3 contributes to auxin-mediated development by playing a role in PIN recycling and polarity establishment through regulation of the PP2A complex activity.

  2. Effect of nitrogen and potassium fertilization on radiocesium absorption in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nihei, Naoto; Hirose, Atsushi; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive materials that were released during the nuclear accident contaminated the soil and agricultural products. It has become clear that potassium fertilization is effective for the reduction of radiocesium concentrations in agricultural crops. However, apart from reports about potassium, few reports have examined how nitrogen, which has a large effect on crop growth, contributes to the radiocesium absorption. Focusing on this point, we studied the effect of nitrogen and potassium fertilizer on the radiocesium absorption in soybean seedlings. The concentration of radiocesium in the seed of soybean was higher in nitrogen-fertilized plants than in plants grown without fertilizer. The radiocesium concentration in the aboveground biomass increased as the amount of nitrogen fertilization increased. But the concentrations of radiocesium were higher in potassium-fertilized plants at high-N than in plants without added nitrogen and potassium. Further study is required to clarify the factors that incur an increase in radiocesium concentration in response to nitrogen fertilization. Special care is required to start farming soybean on fallow fields evacuated after the accident or on fields where rice has been grown before, which tend to have higher available nitrogen than the regularly cultivated fields. (author)

  3. Inverse pH regulation of plant and fungal sucrose transporters: a mechanism to regulate competition for sucrose at the host/pathogen interface?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Wippel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant sucrose transporter activities were shown to respond to changes in the extracellular pH and redox status, and oxidizing compounds like glutathione (GSSG or H(2O(2 were reported to effect the subcellular targeting of these proteins. We hypothesized that changes in both parameters might be used to modulate the activities of competing sucrose transporters at a plant/pathogen interface. We, therefore, compared the effects of redox-active compounds and of extracellular pH on the sucrose transporters UmSRT1 and ZmSUT1 known to compete for extracellular sucrose in the Ustilago maydis (corn smut/Zea mays (maize pathosystem. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present functional analyses of the U. maydis sucrose transporter UmSRT1 and of the plant sucrose transporters ZmSUT1 and StSUT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae or in Xenopus laevis oocytes in the presence of different extracellular pH-values and redox systems, and study the possible effects of these treatments on the subcellular targeting. We observed an inverse regulation of host and pathogen sucrose transporters by changes in the apoplastic pH. Under none of the conditions analyzed, we could confirm the reported effects of redox-active compounds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that changes in the extracellular pH but not of the extracellular redox status might be used to oppositely adjust the transport activities of plant and fungal sucrose transporters at the host/pathogen interface.

  4. Integrative response of plant mitochondrial electron transport chain to nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Takushi; Noguchi, Ko

    2011-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability is widely known as a determinant of plant growth and respiration rate. However, less attention has been paid to the effect of the type of N source (nitrate, nitrite or ammonium) on the respiratory system. This review summarizes the latest findings on this topic, with an emphasis on the effect of ammonium and nitric oxide (NO) on the respiratory system, and the physiological role of alternative oxidase (AOX). First, concentrated ammonium has been found to increase plant respiration rate (ammonium-dependent respiratory increase, ARI). We will introduce two hypotheses to explain ARI, futile ammonium cycling and excess reducing equivalents, and verify the validity of each hypothesis. We suggest that these two hypotheses are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Second, gene expression of AOX is suppressed when N is predominately available as nitrate instead of ammonium. We will discuss possible signaling pathways leading to this expression pattern. Third, while AOX expression is induced by NO, AOX activity itself is insensitive to NO. In contrast, activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is sensitive to NO. We outline the NO production pathway, focusing on nitrite-dependent NO production, and discuss the physiological significance of the fact that AOX activity is insensitive to NO. Finally, this review aims to build an integrated scheme of the respiratory response to the type of N source, considering leaves in high light conditions or hypoxic roots.

  5. How membranes shape plant symbioses: signaling and transport in nodulation and arbuscular mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapaume, Laure; Reinhardt, Didier

    2012-01-01

    As sessile organisms that cannot evade adverse environmental conditions, plants have evolved various adaptive strategies to cope with environmental stresses. One of the most successful adaptations is the formation of symbiotic associations with beneficial microbes. In these mutualistic interactions the partners exchange essential nutrients and improve their resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. In arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and in root nodule symbiosis (RNS), AM fungi and rhizobia, respectively, penetrate roots and accommodate within the cells of the plant host. In these endosymbiotic associations, both partners keep their plasma membranes intact and use them to control the bidirectional exchange of signaling molecules and nutrients. Intracellular accommodation requires the exchange of symbiotic signals and the reprogramming of both interacting partners. This involves fundamental changes at the level of gene expression and of the cytoskeleton, as well as of organelles such as plastids, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and the central vacuole. Symbiotic cells are highly compartmentalized and have a complex membrane system specialized for the diverse functions in molecular communication and nutrient exchange. Here, we discuss the roles of the different cellular membrane systems and their symbiosis-related proteins in AM and RNS, and we review recent progress in the analysis of membrane proteins involved in endosymbiosis. PMID:23060892

  6. Plant-mediated CH4 transport and C gas dynamics quantified in-situ in a Phalaris arundinacea-dominant wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Askær; Elberling, Bo; Friborg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    passive. Thus, diurnal variations are less important in contrast to wetland vascular plants facilitating convective gas flow. Despite of plant-dominant CH4 transport, net CH4 fluxes were low (–0.005–0.016 µmol m-2 s-1) and annually less than 1% of the annual C-CO2 assimilation. This is considered a result......±35% of ecosystem CH4 emissions were plant-mediated, but data show no evidence of significant diurnal variations related to convective gas flow regardless of season or plant growth stages. Therefore, despite a high percentage of arenchyma, P. arundinacea-mediated CH4 transport is interpreted to be predominantly...

  7. Experience gathered from the transport of a fuel element prototype of the CNA-II (Atucha-II nuclear power plant) type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastorini, A.; Belinco, C.G.; El Bis, E.D.; Sacchi, M.A.; Mayans, C.O.; Martin Ghiselli, A.; Marcora, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the needs to materialize the transport of a fuel element prototype of the CNA-II (Atucha-II nuclear power plant) type, under special conditions, from the Fabrication Pilot Plant sited at the Constituyentes Atomic Center and the Ezeiza Atomic Center, for its subsequent analysis at the High Pressure Experimental Loop. The special conditions under which the transport has been made responded to the fact that the prototype presents a fragile adjustment between rods and separators, necessary to be preserved. (Author) [es

  8. The effect of foliar feeding of potassium salts and urea in spinach on gas exchange, leaf yield and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Borowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a phytotron, the effectiveness of foliar feeding of different potassium salts, with and without the addition of 0.5% CO(NH22, in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. was investigated. Potassium was applied 3 times in the form of 1% solutions KCl, KNO3, K2SO4 and C6H5K3O7•H2O, compared to water as the control treatment. The obtained results show that foliar feeding of potassium salts in spinach is an efficient method of supplementing the level of K+ in plants during vegetation. Plants fed with KNO3 had the highest content of potassium in leaves, and those fertilized with K2SO4, C6H5K3O7 × H2O and KCl had an only slightly lower potassium content. The application of potassium salts resulted in more intensive gas exchange in leaves (stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, transpiration and, as a consequence of that, increased leaf yield. Potassium nitrate and citrate influenced most effectively the abovementioned processes. The treatment of spinach with potassium salts resulted in an increased content of protein, chlorophyll, carotenoids, nitrates and iron as well as a decreased content of vitamin C and calcium in leaves.

  9. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] horizon free field fluid transport characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.

    1987-12-01

    This report describes the first attempt to measure the free field brine transport characteristics of the host rock. The data, which have been used to estimate the brine permeability, also suggest free field pore pressure values. One borehole was located in a competent predominantly halite bed with the test region positioned approximately nine meters from the rib. A second borehole intersected Marker Bed 139, which is a one meter thick fractured predominantly anhydrite layer. For this second borehole, the test region was positioned approximately 12 meters from the invert/rib intersection. A description of the tests provided in Section 2. Data obtained during these tests are described in Section 3. Analysis of these data and the associated uncertainties inherent in the data interpretation are presented in Section 4. Test results are given in Section 5. Conclusions are provided in Section 6. 13 refs., 65 figs

  10. Potassium adsorption ratios as an indicator for the fate of agricultural potassium in groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffioen, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fertilization of agricultural land in groundwater infiltration areas often causes deterioration of groundwater quality. In addition to nitrogen and phosphorous, potassium deserves attention. The fate of potassium in the subsurface is controlled mainly by cation-exchange. Use of the Potassium

  11. Modeling generator power plant portfolios and pollution taxes in electric power supply chain networks: a transportation network equilibrium transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai Wu; Nagurney, A.; University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Zugang Liu; Stranlund, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Global climate change and fuel security risks have encouraged international and regional adoption of pollution/carbon taxes. A major portion of such policy interventions is directed at the electric power industry with taxes applied according to the type of fuel used by the power generators in their power plants. This paper proposes an electric power supply chain network model that captures the behavior of power generators faced with a portfolio of power plant options and subject to pollution taxes. We demonstrate that this general model can be reformulated as a transportation network equilibrium model with elastic demands and qualitatively analyzed and solved as such. The connections between these two different modeling schemas is done through finite-dimensional variational inequality theory. The numerical examples illustrate how changes in the pollution/carbon taxes affect the equilibrium electric power supply chain network production outputs, the transactions between the various decision-makers the demand market prices, as well as the total amount of carbon emissions generated. (author)

  12. Transporting transuranic waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Risk and cost perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B. M.; Gilette, J. L.; Poch, L. A.; Suermann, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an authorized US Department of Energy (DOE) research and development facility constructed near the city of Carlsbad in southeastern New Mexico. The facility is intended to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste resulting from US defense activities. Under the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA), federal lands surrounding the WIPP facility were withdrawn from all public use and the title of those lands was transferred to the Secretary of Energy. The DOE's TRU waste is stored, and in some cases is still being generated, at 10 large-quantity and 13 small-quantity sites across the US. After applicable certification requirements have been met, the TRU waste at these sites will be sent to the WIPP to initiate the disposal phase of the facility, which according to current planning is projected to last for approximately 35 years

  13. Evapotranspiration: A process driving mass transport and energy exchange in the soil-plant-atmosphere-climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel G.; Oren, Ram; Manzoni, Stefano; Higgins, Chad; Parlange, Marc B.

    2012-09-01

    The role of evapotranspiration (ET) in the global, continental, regional, and local water cycles is reviewed. Elevated atmospheric CO2, air temperature, vapor pressure deficit (D), turbulent transport, radiative transfer, and reduced soil moisture all impact biotic and abiotic processes controlling ET that must be extrapolated to large scales. Suggesting a blueprint to achieve this link is the main compass of this review. Leaf-scale transpiration (fe) as governed by the plant biochemical demand for CO2 is first considered. When this biochemical demand is combined with mass transfer formulations, the problem remains mathematically intractable, requiring additional assumptions. A mathematical "closure" that assumes stomatal aperture is autonomously regulated so as to maximize the leaf carbon gain while minimizing water loss is proposed, which leads to analytical expressions for leaf-scale transpiration. This formulation predicts well the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and increases in D on fe. The case of soil moisture stress is then considered using extensive gas exchange measurements collected in drought studies. Upscaling the fe to the canopy is then discussed at multiple time scales. The impact of limited soil water availability within the rooting zone on the upscaled ET as well as some plant strategies to cope with prolonged soil moisture stress are briefly presented. Moving further up in direction and scale, the soil-plant system is then embedded within the atmospheric boundary layer, where the influence of soil moisture on rainfall is outlined. The review concludes by discussing outstanding challenges and how to tackle them by means of novel theoretical, numerical, and experimental approaches.

  14. Three Candida albicans potassium uptake systems differ in their ability to provide Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1trk2 mutants with necessary potassium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elicharová, Hana; Hušeková, Barbora; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2016), fow039 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/12/1151; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03398S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 606786 - ImResFun Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Candida * potassium uptake * Hak1 transporter * Trk1 transporter * Acu1 ATPase * cation homeostasis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.299, year: 2016

  15. Effects of Cow Manure, Ammonium Sulfate and Potassium Sulfate on Physico-Chemical Indices of Fruit and Leaf of Mazafati Date (Phoenix Dactylifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Aryakia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. is one of the most important fruit species grown in Iran. This plant is mainly grown in the south of the country, where pH of soil is high, resulting in poor nutrient uptake. Furthermore, because of high yield and annual pruning of date palm, large amounts of macro and micronutrients are removed from soil. So, annual fertilizing should be applied for good performance. Research shows that use of manure alone or in combination with mineral fertilizers improves physico-chemical indices of fruits and leaves of palm trees. Regarding to high nutrition dependency of date palm, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of different fertilizers on physico-chemical indices of its leaf and fruit. The main objectives of this study were thus to evaluate the effect of cow manure, ammonium sulfate and potassium sulfate on physico-chemical indices in fruit and leaf of Mazafati date. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in bam zone, Kerman, Iran, in 2011- 2012. The area was located at 28°53′40′′N latitude, 58°37′18′′E longitude and 1050 m above sea level. A factorial experiment in a randomized complete block design was performed during month of March. Factors included ammonium sulfate (0, 500 and 1000 g/tree, potassium sulfate (0, 750 and 1500 g/tree accompanied by cow manure (5 kg/tree. For leaf and fruit analysis, sampling was performed during month of June. Physico-chemical indices including nitrogen, potassium, iron, chlorophyll a, b and total, carotenoid, fruit weight, fruit diameter, fruit length, TSS and TSS/TA were evaluated. Chlorophyll was measured by using the method of Lichtenthaler (1987. Total soluble solid (TSS was measured by using refractometer. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software and the treatment means were separated by Duncan’s multiple range tests. Results and Discussion: Results showed that because of supplying nitrogen, sulfur and potassium and their

  16. AtMRP1 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a glutathione S-conjugate pump: isolation and functional definition of a plant ATP-binding cassette transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y P; Li, Z S; Rea, P A

    1997-07-22

    Because plants produce cytotoxic compounds to which they, themselves, are susceptible and are exposed to exogenous toxins (microbial products, allelochemicals, and agrochemicals), cell survival is contingent on mechanisms for detoxifying these agents. One detoxification mechanism is the glutathione S-transferase-catalyzed glutathionation of the toxin, or an activated derivative, and transport of the conjugate out of the cytosol. We show here that a transporter responsible for the removal of glutathione S-conjugates from the cytosol, a specific Mg2+-ATPase, is encoded by the AtMRP1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. The sequence of AtMRP1 and the transport capabilities of membranes prepared from yeast cells transformed with plasmid-borne AtMRP1 demonstrate that this gene encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates of xenobiotics and endogenous substances, including herbicides and anthocyanins.

  17. Transport and phosphorylation of choline in higher plant cells. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bligny, R.; Foray, M.F.; Roby, C.; Douce, R.

    1989-03-25

    When sycamore cells were suspended in basal medium containing choline, the latter was taken up by the cells very rapidly. A facilitated diffusion system appertained at low concentrations of choline and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. At higher choline concentrations simple diffusion appeared to be the principal mode of uptake. Addition of choline to the perfusate of compressed sycamore cells monitored by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy resulted in a dramatic accumulation of P-choline in the cytoplasmic compartment containing choline kinase and not in the vacuole. The total accumulation of P-choline over a 10-h period exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. During this period, in the absence of Pi in the perfusion medium there was a marked depletion of glucose-6-P, and the cytoplasmic Pi resonance disappeared almost completely. When a threshold of cytoplasmic Pi was attained, the phosphorylation of choline was sustained by the continuous release of Pi from the vacuole although at a much lower rate. However, when 100 microM inorganic phosphate was present in the perfusion medium, externally added Pi was preferentially used to sustain P-choline synthesis. It is clear, therefore, that cytosolic choline kinase associated with a carrier-mediated transport system for choline uptake appeared as effective systems for continuously trapping cytoplasmic Pi including vacuolar Pi entering the cytoplasm.

  18. Mutation of the Arabidopsis NRT1.5 nitrate transporter causes defective root-to-shoot nitrate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Hua; Kuo, Hui-Fen; Canivenc, Geneviève; Lin, Choun-Sea; Lepetit, Marc; Hsu, Po-Kai; Tillard, Pascal; Lin, Huey-Ling; Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsai, Chyn-Bey; Gojon, Alain; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular and regulatory mechanisms of long-distance nitrate transport in higher plants. NRT1.5 is one of the 53 Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1 (Peptide Transporter PTR) genes, of which two members, NRT1.1 (CHL1 for Chlorate resistant 1) and NRT1.2, have been shown to be involved in nitrate uptake. Functional analysis of cRNA-injected Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.5 is a low-affinity, pH-dependent bidirectional nitrate transporter. Subcellular localization in plant protoplasts and in planta promoter-beta-glucuronidase analysis, as well as in situ hybridization, showed that NRT1.5 is located in the plasma membrane and is expressed in root pericycle cells close to the xylem. Knockdown or knockout mutations of NRT1.5 reduced the amount of nitrate transported from the root to the shoot, suggesting that NRT1.5 participates in root xylem loading of nitrate. However, root-to-shoot nitrate transport was not completely eliminated in the NRT1.5 knockout mutant, and reduction of NRT1.5 in the nrt1.1 background did not affect root-to-shoot nitrate transport. These data suggest that, in addition to that involving NRT1.5, another mechanism is responsible for xylem loading of nitrate. Further analyses of the nrt1.5 mutants revealed a regulatory loop between nitrate and potassium at the xylem transport step.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of potassium chloride aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezin, Denis; Driesner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Potassium chloride is a ubiquitous salt in natural fluids, being the second most abundant dissolved salt in many geological aqueous solutions after sodium chloride. It is a simple solute and strong electrolyte easily dissociating in water, however the thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions were never correlated with sufficient accuracy for a wide range of physicochemical conditions. In this communication we propose a set of parameters for a Pitzer-type model which allows calculation of all necessary thermodynamic properties of KCl solution, namely excess Gibbs free energy and derived activity coefficient, apparent molar enthalpy, heat capacity and volume, as well as osmotic coefficient and activity of water in solutions. The system KCl-water is one of the best studied aqueous systems containing electrolytes. Although extensive experimental data were collected for thermodynamic properties of these solutions over the years, the accurate volumetric data became available only recently, thus making possible a complete thermodynamic formulation including a pressure dependence of excess Gibbs free energy and derived properties of the KCl-water liquids. Our proposed model is intended for calculation of major thermodynamic properties of KCl aqueous solutions at temperatures ranging from freezing point of a solution to 623 K, pressures ranging from saturated water vapor up to 150 MPa, and concentrations up to the salt saturation. This parameterized model will be further implemented in geochemical software packages and can facilitate the calculation of aqueous equilibrium for reactive transport codes.

  20. 21 CFR 582.1613 - Potassium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium bicarbonate. 582.1613 Section 582.1613 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1613 Potassium bicarbonate. (a)...

  1. Potassium doped MWCNTs for hydrogen storage enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adabi Qomi, S.; Gashtasebi, M.; Khoshnevisan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Here we have used potassium doped MWCNTs for enhancement of hydrogen storage process. XRD and SEM images have confirmed the doping of potassium. For studying the storage process a hydrogenic battery set up has been used. In the battery the working electrode has been made of the silver foam deposited by the doped MWCNTs electrophoretically.

  2. 75 FR 23298 - Potassium Permanganate From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Permanganate From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on potassium permanganate from China. SUMMARY: The... on potassium permanganate from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  3. 75 FR 51112 - Potassium Permanganate From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Permanganate From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of an expedited five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on potassium permanganate from China... of the antidumping duty order on potassium permanganate from China would be likely to lead to...

  4. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be...

  5. Ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    A portion of the binary phase diagram for the system ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate has been determined from -55/sup 0/C to 185/sup 0/C. Results are presented for the ammonium-nitrate-rich end of the system up to 30 wt% potassium nitrate.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1610 - Potassium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served) (percent) Functional use Confections and...) of this chapter 0.25 Do. All other food categories 0.01 Do. (d) Prior sanctions for potassium... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium alginate. 184.1610 Section 184.1610 Food...

  7. Development of a system for real-time measurements of metabolite transport in plants using short-lived positron-emitting radiotracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Matthew R.

    Over the past 200 years, the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentration has increased by more than 35%, and climate experts predict that CO2 levels may double by the end of this century. Understanding the mechanisms of resource management in plants is fundamental for predicting how plants will respond to the increase in atmospheric CO 2. Plant productivity sustains life on Earth and is a principal component of the planet's system that regulates atmospheric CO2 concentration. As such, one of the central goals of plant science is to understand the regulatory mechanisms of plant growth in a changing environment. Short-lived positron-emitting radiotracer techniques provide time-dependent data that are critical for developing models of metabolite transport and resource distribution in plants and their microenvironments. To better understand the effects of environmental changes on resource transport and allocation in plants, we have developed a system for real-time measurements of rnetabolite transport in plants using short-lived positron-emitting radio-tracers. This thesis project includes the design, construction, and demonstration of the capabilities of this system for performing real-time measurements of metabolite transport in plants. The short-lived radiotracer system described in this dissertation takes advantage of the combined capabilities and close proximity of two research facilities at. Duke University: the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) and the Duke University Phytotron, which are separated by approximately 100 meters. The short-lived positron-emitting radioisotopes are generated using the 10-MV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator located in the main TUNL building, which provides the capability of producing short-lived positron-emitting isotopes such as carbon-11 (11C: 20 minute half-life), nitrogen-13 (13N; 10 minute half-life), fluorine-18 (18F; 110 minute half-life), and oxygen-15 (15O; 2 minute half-life). The radioisotopes may

  8. Chronic potassium depletion increases adrenal progesterone production that is necessary for efficient renal retention of potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabida, Boutaïna; Edwards, Aurélie; Salhi, Amel; Azroyan, Anie; Fodstad, Heidi; Meneton, Pierre; Doucet, Alain; Bloch-Faure, May; Crambert, Gilles

    2011-08-01

    Modern dietary habits are characterized by high-sodium and low-potassium intakes, each of which was correlated with a higher risk for hypertension. In this study, we examined whether long-term variations in the intake of sodium and potassium induce lasting changes in the plasma concentration of circulating steroids by developing a mathematical model of steroidogenesis in mice. One finding of this model was that mice increase their plasma progesterone levels specifically in response to potassium depletion. This prediction was confirmed by measurements in both male mice and men. Further investigation showed that progesterone regulates renal potassium handling both in males and females under potassium restriction, independent of its role in reproduction. The increase in progesterone production by male mice was time dependent and correlated with decreased urinary potassium content. The progesterone-dependent ability to efficiently retain potassium was because of an RU486 (a progesterone receptor antagonist)-sensitive stimulation of the colonic hydrogen, potassium-ATPase (known as the non-gastric or hydrogen, potassium-ATPase type 2) in the kidney. Thus, in males, a specific progesterone concentration profile induced by chronic potassium restriction regulates potassium balance.

  9. Informational system to assist decision making at spent nuclear fuel transportation from VVER-440, VVER-1000 and RBMK-1000 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryndin, A.V.; Kirkin, A.M.; Stroganov, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The developed informational system provides an automated estimations of nuclear and radiation safety parameters during spent nuclear fuel transportation from WWER-440 and WWER-1000 and RBMK-1000 nuclear power plants to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and allows us to determine the optimum cask loading from the dose rates distribution outside of protection point of view [ru

  10. Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, D.E.; Fan, T.W.M.; Higashi, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    'During the funding period of 1996--1997, the authors explored the utility of multi-nuclear, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for a comprehensive analysis of barley root exudates collected under Fe sufficient and deficient conditions. As both structural and quantitative information was obtained directly from crude root exudates using this approach, no tedious sample fractionation was necessary, which will greatly facilitate future chemical characterization of root exudates in general. They found that the phytosiderophore mugineic acids (including 2'-deoxymugineic acid, mugineic acid, and 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid) were readily identified and quantified in crude exudate samples along with a number of amino and organic acids. The amount of mugineic acids excreted was correlated positively with the extent of Fe deficiency with 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid being the most prominent component. The total Fe chelating capacity was also measured using the ferrozine assay and compared with the production of the mugineic acids. They were surprised to find that the mugineic acids may account for a part of the Fe chelating capacity, especially under mild and moderatley Fe deficient conditions. Lactate, alanine, y-aminobutyrate, malate, and glycinebetaine collectively may contribute to a significant fraction of the Fe chelating capacity. In light of the known stimulatory effect of alanine and citrate on metal availability to algae (Campell, 1995), the function of these low molecular weight metabolites as vehicles for Fe or metal uptake in general warrant further investigation. This work is now published in Analytical Biochemistry 251, 57-68 ( 1997). They then proceeded to apply the above approach to investigate the interaction of elevated cadmium (Cd) with Fe deficiency in gramineous plants. They have completed one each series of cadmium (Cd) treatments of barley and wheat seedlings under Fe sufficient

  11. Bayesian inverse modeling of the atmospheric transport and emissions of a controlled tracer release from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Donald D.; Simpson, Matthew; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Baskett, Ronald L.

    2017-01-01

    Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of model inputs that affect the transport and dispersion of a trace gas released from a coastal California nuclear power plant are quantified using ensemble simulations, machine-learning algorithms, and Bayesian inversion. The PDFs are constrained by observations of tracer concentrations and account for uncertainty in meteorology, transport, diffusion, and emissions. Meteorological uncertainty is calculated using an ensemble of simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that samples five categories of model inputs (initialization time, boundary layer physics, land surface model, nudging options, and reanalysis data). The WRF output is used to drive tens of thousands of FLEXPART dispersion simulations that sample a uniform distribution of six emissions inputs. Machine-learning algorithms are trained on the ensemble data and used to quantify the sources of ensemble variability and to infer, via inverse modeling, the values of the 11 model inputs most consistent with tracer measurements. We find a substantial ensemble spread in tracer concentrations (factors of 10 to 10 3 ), most of which is due to changing emissions inputs (about 80 %), though the cumulative effects of meteorological variations are not negligible. The performance of the inverse method is verified using synthetic observations generated from arbitrarily selected simulations. When applied to measurements from a controlled tracer release experiment, the inverse method satisfactorily determines the location, start time, duration and amount. In a 2 km x 2 km area of possible locations, the actual location is determined to within 200 m. The start time is determined to within 5 min out of 2 h, and the duration to within 50 min out of 4 h. Over a range of release amounts of 10 to 1000 kg, the estimated amount exceeds the actual amount of 146 kg by only 32 kg. The inversion also estimates probabilities of different WRF configurations. To best match

  12. Bayesian inverse modeling of the atmospheric transport and emissions of a controlled tracer release from a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Donald D.; Simpson, Matthew; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Baskett, Ronald L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of model inputs that affect the transport and dispersion of a trace gas released from a coastal California nuclear power plant are quantified using ensemble simulations, machine-learning algorithms, and Bayesian inversion. The PDFs are constrained by observations of tracer concentrations and account for uncertainty in meteorology, transport, diffusion, and emissions. Meteorological uncertainty is calculated using an ensemble of simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model that samples five categories of model inputs (initialization time, boundary layer physics, land surface model, nudging options, and reanalysis data). The WRF output is used to drive tens of thousands of FLEXPART dispersion simulations that sample a uniform distribution of six emissions inputs. Machine-learning algorithms are trained on the ensemble data and used to quantify the sources of ensemble variability and to infer, via inverse modeling, the values of the 11 model inputs most consistent with tracer measurements. We find a substantial ensemble spread in tracer concentrations (factors of 10 to 10{sup 3}), most of which is due to changing emissions inputs (about 80 %), though the cumulative effects of meteorological variations are not negligible. The performance of the inverse method is verified using synthetic observations generated from arbitrarily selected simulations. When applied to measurements from a controlled tracer release experiment, the inverse method satisfactorily determines the location, start time, duration and amount. In a 2 km x 2 km area of possible locations, the actual location is determined to within 200 m. The start time is determined to within 5 min out of 2 h, and the duration to within 50 min out of 4 h. Over a range of release amounts of 10 to 1000 kg, the estimated amount exceeds the actual amount of 146 kg by only 32 kg. The inversion also estimates probabilities of different WRF configurations. To best

  13. Summary of atmospheric measurements and transport pathways of radioactive materials released by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuruta, Haruo; Nakajima, Teruyuki [Tokyo Univ., Atmosphere and Ocean Research Inst., Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Takigawa, Masayuki [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FD1NPP) accident, a continual monitoring of atmospheric radionuclides was independently carried out at several stations by different research institutions in the Kanto area south of Fukushima prefecture. No such measurements were made in the Fukushima area. Although the sampling methodology varied from one station to the next, the following results were found by the analysis of these data during March 13-31, 2011. High concentrations of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, and {sup 137}Cs in the atmosphere were observed in the first period (March 15-16, 2011) and the second period (March 20-23, 2011). According to a numerical simulation by an atmospheric transport model, these radionuclides were directly transported to the stations from the FD1NPP. The ratio of {sup 131}I to {sup 137}Cs in the atmosphere was around 10 in the first period and on March 20-21, while the ratio in the periods outside the first period and the March 20-21 was around 100. According to the measurements of gaseous {sup 131}I ({sup 131}I(g)) and particulate {sup 131}I ({sup 131}I(a)) which were performed separately at two stations, at least half of the total {sup 131}I (the sum of {sup 131}I(g) and {sup 131}I(a)) sampled was particulate {sup 131}I in the first and second periods, although {sup 131}I(a) was 20-40% of the total {sup 131}I in the periods outside the first and second periods. (author)

  14. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  15. Selective intake of potassium from K-bearing silicate minerals by sunflower and upland rice inferred from Eu anomaly. Implication for weathering as a direct consequence of plant physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Tasuku; Saito, Sakura; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Sugiyama, Megumi; Ae, Noriharu

    2006-01-01

    Two crops (sunflower and upland rice) cultivated using three K-bearing minerals and KCl by Sugiyama and Ae (2000) were analyzed for rare earth elements (REEs). The two crops had been reported by them to general more available silica in soil (especially in the case of sunflower) and absorbed silica in plants (especially in the case of upland rice) than that available originally in soil. The K-bearing minerals included biotite, muscovite, and K-feldspar. The REE patterns of individual crop specimens exhibited different extents of Eu anomaly; upland rice exhibited more varying extent of Eu anomaly than sunflower. It is inferred that REEs released from the K-bearing minerals had a longer contact with soil in the case of sunflower than in the case of upland rice. By the scrutiny of the extent of the Eu anomaly, it was found that upland rice took in K and REEs from all the K-bearing minerals, including hardly-soluble feldspar. Eu anomaly can be a good proxy of sources of inorganic nutrients in plants as well as of the directness of absorption of the nutrients. When the present results are viewed from a different angle, they endorse that plant-induced weathering is equivalent to physiological action of plants. (author)

  16. Atmospheric transport of radionuclides emitted due to wildfires near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Zibtsev, Sergey; Myroniuk, Viktor; Zhurba, Marina; Hamburger, Thomas; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Paugam, Ronan; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Kireev, Sergey I.

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, two major fires in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) have caused concerns about the secondary radioactive contamination that might have spread over Europe. The total active burned area was estimated to be about 15,000 hectares, of which 9000 hectares burned in April and 6000 hectares in August. The present paper aims to assess, for the first time, the transport and impact of these fires over Europe. For this reason, direct observations of the prevailing deposition levels of 137Cs and 90Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am in the CEZ were processed together with burned area estimates. Based on literature reports, we made the conservative assumption that 20% of the deposited labile radionuclides 137Cs and 90Sr, and 10% of the more refractory 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am, were resuspended by the fires. We estimate that about 10.9 TBq of 137Cs, 1.5 TBq of 90Sr, 7.8 GBq of 238Pu, 6.3 GBq of 239Pu, 9.4 GBq of 240Pu and 29.7 GBq of 241Am were released from both fire events. These releases could be classified as of "Level 3" on the relative INES (International Nuclear Events Scale) scale, which corresponds to a serious incident, in which non-lethal deterministic effects are expected from radiation. To simulate the dispersion of the resuspended radionuclides in the atmosphere and their deposition onto the terrestrial environment, we used a Lagrangian dispersion model. Spring fires redistributed radionuclides over the northern and eastern parts of Europe, while the summer fires also affected Central and Southern Europe. The more labile elements escaped more easily from the CEZ and then reached and deposited in areas far from the source, whereas the larger refractory particles were removed more efficiently from the atmosphere and thus did mainly affect the CEZ and its vicinity. For the spring 2015 fires, we estimate that about 80% of 137Cs and 90Sr and about 69% of 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Am were deposited over areas outside the CEZ. 93% of the labile and 97% of

  17. JOYO MK-III modification work on heat transport system. Working plan and plant control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozaki, K.; Ichige, S.; Ohshima, J.

    2002-07-01

    The MK-III project to improve the irradiation capability of the experimental fast reactor JOYO have been in underway since 1987. The increase of fast neutron flux and the enlargement of that field increase the reactor thermal rate from 100 MWt to 140 MWt. To increase cooling capacity of heat transport system, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), dump heat exchangers (DHXs), piping connecting to IHXs and DHXs, main motors on primary and secondary main circulation pumps were replaced. The replacement of these large components was carried out under following hard conditions. 1) Limitation of work space, 2) Fuel subassembly and molten sodium in the reactor vessel, 3) high radiation circumstances for primary cooling system, 4) treatment of radioactive sodium (radioactive sodium and corrosion product such as 60 Co, 54 Mn). There are little experiences of this kind of work in the world. Therefore the organization, working plan and safety management points were carefully examined and established, based on the previous experience of JOYO operation and maintenance, research and development results of safety treatment of sodium, experience of previous work on sodium facilities. Followings results were obtained and effectiveness was confirmed in the work. (1) Development of most suitable working plan derived from elements and full size mock up experiments, reduction of exposure time by workers training, reduction of radiation dose by installation of temporal radiation shielding were useful to reduce radiation dose. The usage of seal bag was useful to prevent the contamination spreading over. (2) The usage of seal bag, oxygen concentration monitoring in the seal bag, nitrogen concentration monitoring in the cooling system cover gas, low pressure control of cover gas were useful to reduce the inflow of oxygen to cooling system. (3) The bite cutting method for piping in air and press down cutting by roller cutter in the seal bag to prevent inflow of cutting piece, stopper

  18. A self-referencing biosensor for real-time monitoring of physiological ATP transport in plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Diana C; Clark, Greg; Cannon, Ashley E; Roux, Stanley; Chaturvedi, Prachee; McLamore, Eric S

    2015-12-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a self-referencing electrochemical biosensor for the direct measurement of ATP flux into the extracellular matrix by living cells/organisms. The working mechanism of the developed biosensor is based on the activity of glycerol kinase and glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase. A stratified bi-enzyme nanocomposite was created using a protein-templated silica sol gel encapsulation technique on top of graphene-modified platinum electrodes. The biosensor exhibited excellent electrochemical performance with a sensitivity of 2.4±1.8 nA/µM, a response time of 20±13 s and a lower detection limit of 1.3±0.7 nM. The self-referencing biosensor was used to measure exogenous ATP efflux by (i) germinating Ceratopteris spores and (ii) growing Zea mays L. roots. This manuscript demonstrates the first development of a non-invasive ATP micro-biosensor for the direct measurement of eATP transport in living tissues. Before this work, assays of eATP have not been able to record the temporally transient movement of ATP at physiological levels (nM and sub-nM). The method demonstrated here accurately measured [eATP] flux in the immediate vicinity of plant cells. Although these proof of concept experiments focus on plant tissues, the technique developed herein is applicable to any living tissue, where nanomolar concentrations of ATP play a critical role in signaling and development. This tool will be invaluable for conducting hypothesis-driven life science research aimed at understanding the role of ATP in the extracellular environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cooling tower drift studies at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant. [Transport of drift-derived chromium in terrestrial ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, F.G.; Hanna, S.R.; Parr, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer and fate of chromium from cooling tower drift to terrestrial ecosystems were quantified at the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment facility at Paducah, Kentucky. Chromium concentrations in plant materials (fescue grass) decreased with increasing distance from the cooing tower, ranging from 251 +- 19 ppM at 15 meters to 0.52 +- 0.07 ppM at 1500 meters. The site of drift contamination, size characteristics, and elemental content of drift particles were determined using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive x-ray analysis capabilities. Results indicate that elemental content in drift water (mineral residue) may not be equivalent to the content in the recirculating cooling water of the tower. This hypothesis is contrary to basic assumptions in calculating drift emissions. A laboratory study simulating throughfall from 1 to 6 inches of rain suggested that there are more exchange sites associated with litter than live foliage. Leachate from each one inch throughfall simulant removed 3% of the drift mass from litter compared to 7 to 9% from live foliage. Results suggest that differences in retention are related to chemical properties of the drift rather than physical lodging of the particle residue. To determine the potential for movement of drift-derived chromium to surface streams, soil--water samplers (wells) were placed along a distance gradient to Little Bayou Creek. Samples from two depths following rainstorms revealed the absence of vertical or horizontal movement with maximum concentrations of 0.13 ppb at 50 meters from the tower. Preliminary model estimates of drift deposition are compared to depositionmeasurements. Isopleths of the predicted deposition are useful to identify areas of maximum drift transport in the environs of the gaseous diffusion plant.

  20. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: A theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  1. A concise route to branched erythrono-gamma-lactones. Synthesis of the leaf-closing substance potassium (+/-)-(2R,3R)-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutanoate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Robinson, Tony V; Taylor, Dennis K

    2009-01-01

    -94% yield), including the natural plant lactone (+/-)-2-C-d-methylerythrono-1,4-lactone 1. The latter compound was treated with aqueous potassium hydroxide to afford potassium (+/-)-(2R,3R)-2,3,4-trihydroxy-2-methylbutanoate 2, which is a leaf-closing substance of Leucaena leucocephalam....

  2. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary T. Rochelle; A. Frank Seibert; J. Tim Cullinane; Terraun Jones

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Progress has been made in this reporting period on three subtasks. The rigorous Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (electrolyte-NRTL) model has been regressed to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in potassium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions. An analytical method for piperazine has been developed using a gas chromatograph. Funding has been obtained and equipment has been donated to provide for modifications of the existing pilot plant system with stainless steel materials.

  3. VKCDB: Voltage-gated potassium channel database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of voltage-gated potassium channels comprises a functionally diverse group of membrane proteins. They help maintain and regulate the potassium ion-based component of the membrane potential and are thus central to many critical physiological processes. VKCDB (Voltage-gated potassium [K] Channel DataBase is a database of structural and functional data on these channels. It is designed as a resource for research on the molecular basis of voltage-gated potassium channel function. Description Voltage-gated potassium channel sequences were identified by using BLASTP to search GENBANK and SWISSPROT. Annotations for all voltage-gated potassium channels were selectively parsed and integrated into VKCDB. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data for the channels were collected from published journal articles. Transmembrane domain predictions by TMHMM and PHD are included for each VKCDB entry. Multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains of channels of the four Kv families and the KCNQ family are also included. Currently VKCDB contains 346 channel entries. It can be browsed and searched using a set of functionally relevant categories. Protein sequences can also be searched using a local BLAST engine. Conclusions VKCDB is a resource for comparative studies of voltage-gated potassium channels. The methods used to construct VKCDB are general; they can be used to create specialized databases for other protein families. VKCDB is accessible at http://vkcdb.biology.ualberta.ca.

  4. The permeability and loss of potassium in three types of Yunnan soil measured by using 86Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dayong; Bie Zhilong; Wan Zhaoliang

    1997-01-01

    The permeability and loss of potassium in three types of soil (purple, paddy and red soil) used for planting tobacco in Yunnan province were studied by using 86 Rb tracer method. The results showed that for the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil, the potassium loss in soils was in order of purple soil>paddy soil>red soil. The loss of potassium in purple soil and paddy soil increased with sampling time. In the same soil, the loss of potassium was fast with the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil, but it was slow with the treatment of 0.2 gK 2 O/kg soil and 0.3 gK 2 O/kg soil. The potassium residues in soil surface was in order of red soil>paddy soil>purple soil. And the amounts of potassium in soil surface was positively correlated with potassium added. With the increase of soil depth, a slight decrease of potassium residue was found for the treatment of 0.2 gK 2 O/kg soil and 0.3 gK 2 O/kg soil, while a slight increase for the treatment of 0.1 gK 2 O/kg soil

  5. Overexpression of a Grapevine Sucrose Transporter (VvSUC27 in Tobacco Improves Plant Growth Rate in the Presence of Sucrose In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumeng Cai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The import of sugar from source leaves and it further accumulation in grape berries are considerably high during ripening, and this process is mediated via sucrose transporters. In this study, a grape sucrose transporter (SUT gene, VvSUC27, located at the plasma membrane, was transferred to tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum. The transformants were more sensitive to sucrose and showed more rapid development, especially roots, when cultured on MS agar medium containing sucrose, considering that the shoot/root dry weight ratio was only half that of the control. Moreover, all transformed plants exhibited light-colored leaves throughout their development, which indicated chlorosis and an associated reduction in photosynthesis. The total sugar content in the roots and stems of transformants was higher than that in control plants. No significant difference was observed in the leaves between the transformants and control plants. The levels of growth-promoting hormones were increased, and those of stress-mediating hormones were reduced in transgenic tobacco plants. The qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of VvSUC27 was 1,000 times higher than that of the autologous tobacco sucrose transporter, which suggested that the markedly increased growth rate of transformants was because of the heterogeneously expressed gene. The transgenic tobacco plants showed resistance to abiotic stresses. Strikingly, the overexpression of VvSUC27 leaded to the up regulation of most reactive oxygen species scavengers and abscisic acid-related genes that might enable transgenic plants to overcome abiotic stress. Taken together, these results revealed an important role of VvSUC27 in plant growth and response to abiotic stresses, especially in the presence of sucrose in vitro.

  6. Transport of Zn (II by TDDA-Polypropylene Supported Liquid Membranes and Recovery from Waste Discharge Liquor of Galvanizing Plant of Zn (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanif Ur Rehman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The facilitated passage of Zn (II across flat sheet supported liquid membrane saturated with TDDA (tri-n-dodecylamine in xylene membrane phase has been investigated. The effect of acid and metal ion concentration in the feed solution, the carrier concentration in membrane phase, stripping agent concentration in stripping phase, and coions on the extraction of Zn (II was investigated. The stoichiometry of the extracted species, that is, complex, was investigated on slope analysis method and it was found that the complex (LH2·Zn(Cl2 is responsible for transport of Zn (II. A mathematical model was developed for transport of Zn (II, and the predicted results strongly agree with experimental ones. The mechanism of transport was determined by coupled coion transport mechanism with H+ and Cl− coupled ions. The optimized SLM was effectively used for elimination of Zn (II from waste discharge liquor of galvanizing plant of Zn (II.

  7. Rapid ammonia gas transport accounts for futile transmembrane cycling under NH3/NH4+ toxicity in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T; Li, Mingyuan; Becker, Alexander; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2013-12-01

    Futile transmembrane NH3/NH4(+) cycling in plant root cells, characterized by extremely rapid fluxes and high efflux to influx ratios, has been successfully linked to NH3/NH4(+) toxicity. Surprisingly, the fundamental question of which species of the conjugate pair (NH3 or NH4(+)) participates in such fluxes is unresolved. Using flux analyses with the short-lived radioisotope (13)N and electrophysiological, respiratory, and histochemical measurements, we show that futile cycling in roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings is predominately of the gaseous NH3 species, rather than the NH4(+) ion. Influx of (13)NH3/(13)NH4(+), which exceeded 200 µmol g(-1) h(-1), was not commensurate with membrane depolarization or increases in root respiration, suggesting electroneutral NH3 transport. Influx followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for NH3 (but not NH4(+)), as a function of external concentration (Km = 152 µm, Vmax = 205 µmol g(-1) h(-1)). Efflux of (13)NH3/(13)NH4(+) responded with a nearly identical Km. Pharmacological characterization of influx and efflux suggests mediation by aquaporins. Our study fundamentally revises the futile-cycling model by demonstrating that NH3 is the major permeating species across both plasmalemma and tonoplast of root cells under toxicity conditions.

  8. On the fusibility of potassium heptafluorotantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulyanskij, A.I.; Bessonova, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Phase transformations of potassium heptafluorotantalate near the liquidus temperature have been studied. Thermograms and polytherm of the electric condUctivity of potassium heptafluorotantalate, thermogram of the mechanical mixture 0.5 K 2 TaF 7 +0.5 KF and thermogram of K 3 TaF 8 crystallization are plotted. The phase diagram of the K 2 TaF 7 -KF system is presented. In the temperature range 746 to 778 deg, i.e. above K 2 TaF 7 melting point, the melt is shown to remain heterogeneous. A portion of the phase diagram rich in potassium heptafluorotantalate is qualified as an ordinary eutectics

  9. X-ray absorption in atomic potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomilsek, Jana Padeznik; Kodre, Alojz; Arcon, Iztok; Nemanic, Vincenc

    2008-01-01

    A new high-temperature absorption cell for potassium vapor is described. X-ray absorption coefficient of atomic potassium is determined in the energy interval of 600 eV above the K edge where thresholds for simultaneous excitations of 1s and outer electrons, down to [1s2p] excitation, appear. The result represents also the atomic absorption background for XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) structure analysis. The K ionization energy in the potassium vapor is determined and compared with theoretical data and with the value for the metal

  10. Study on the Effect of Calcium and Potassium Spray on Date Bunch Fading Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shekofteh

    2017-09-01

    weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, stone diameter, and bunch fading percentage at 1℅ level. The highest wet fruit weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, stone weight, and stone diameter were attained in the treatment containing combined application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate. Furthermore, the lowest amounts of these traits were obtained in control. The lowest and highest percentage of date bunch fading belonged to the combined treatment of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate, and control, respectively. In general, application of calcium nitrate and potassium sulfate with each other improved fruit traits and reduced bunch fading percentage. Calcium mobility in the plant takes place mainly in the xylem, together with water. Therefore, calcium uptake is directly related to plant transpiration rate. Conditions of high humidity, cold and low transpiration rates may result in calcium deficiency. Salinity might also cause calcium deficiency because it decreases water uptake by the plant. Since calcium mobility in plants is limited, calcium deficiency appears in younger leaves and in fruits, because they have a very low transpiration rate. Therefore, it is necessary to have a constant supply of calcium for continued growth. Calcium deficiency is usually caused by low calcium availability or water stress which results in low transpiration rates. Calcium is an essential plant nutrient with many roles including participation in metabolic processes of other nutrients uptake, promotion of proper plant cell elongation, and improvement of cell wall structure – calcium is an essential part of plant cell wall. It forms calcium pectate compounds which give stability to cell walls and bind cells together. It also helps protecting the plant against heat stress - calcium improves stomata function and participates in induction of heat shock proteins. In addition, it helps protecting the plant against diseases - numerous fungi and bacteria secret enzymes

  11. Relationship of soil potassium forms with maize potassium contents in soils derived from different parent materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Mehmood Butt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of soil potassium (K dynamics is essential for sustainable crop production. Bioavailability of K depends on forms and distribution within the soil profile. The objectives of this research were to determine which soil K forms control the maize (Zea mays K contents and compare the extracting capability of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB with ammonium acetate (NH4OAc method. Nine soils representing three different parent materials, i.e. loess, sandstone and shale were sampled at three surface genetic horizons. Within each parent material, three soils at varying level of development were selected. Besides basic soil parameters, K was fractioned into water soluble K, exchangeable K, non-exchangeable K, and NaTPB-extracted K. The maize was sown in pots having 2 kg soil from each genetic horizon. Crop was harvested at seven weeks and plant was analysed for K contents. Results show that NaTPB-extracted K gave best correlation as compared to NH4OAc method. This conveys that a non-exchangeable K portion that becomes available to plants can be better estimated by NaTPB method than NH4OAc extraction.

  12. Two phloem nitrate transporters, NRT1.11 and NRT1.12, are important for redistributing xylem-borne nitrate to enhance plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Kai; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2013-10-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) nitrate transporters NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 reveals how the interplay between xylem and phloem transport of nitrate ensures optimal nitrate distribution in leaves for plant growth. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are low-affinity nitrate transporters. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis showed higher expression of these two genes in larger expanded leaves. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are plasma membrane transporters expressed in the companion cells of the major vein. In nrt1.11 nrt1.12 double mutants, more root-fed (15)NO3(-) was translocated to mature and larger expanded leaves but less to the youngest tissues, suggesting that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are required for transferring root-derived nitrate into phloem in the major veins of mature and larger expanded leaves for redistributing to the youngest tissues. Distinct from the wild type, nrt1.11 nrt1.12 double mutants show no increase of plant growth at high nitrate supply. These data suggested that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are involved in xylem-to-phloem transfer for redistributing nitrate into developing leaves, and such nitrate redistribution is a critical step for optimal plant growth enhanced by increasing external nitrate.

  13. Desenvolvimento e produção de frutos de bananeira em resposta à adubação nitrogenada e potássica Development and production of fruits of banana plant as a response to nitrogen and potassium fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDILSON CARVALHO BRASIL

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da adubação nitrogenada e potássica no desenvolvimento e produção da bananeira (Musa spp., cultivar Pioneira, em experimento conduzido no Município de Capitão Poço, PA, em Latossolo Amarelo, utilizando-se o delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados. Os tratamentos foram: 0, 80, 160 e 240 g de N/planta/ano e 0, 150, 300 e 450 g de K2O/planta/ano. Como fontes de nutrientes, utilizaram-se uréia e cloreto de potássio. Os resultados de crescimento, até 240 dias do plantio, indicaram que apenas o N influenciou a circunferência do pseudocaule e a altura de planta, verificando-se que o modelo quadrático ajustou-se melhor a todas as variáveis avaliadas. No segundo ciclo de produção, a adição de K promoveu efeito quadrático no peso de cacho, peso de penca por cacho e peso médio de penca, com incrementos de 73, 76 e 39%, respectivamente, em relação à ausência de K. A aplicação de N promoveu aumento linear no peso de cacho e de pencas por cacho, com aumentos máximos de 32 e 30%, respectivamente, em relação a ausência do nutriente. No terceiro ciclo de produção, apenas o K influenciou no peso de cacho, peso de penca por cacho e peso médio de penca, com aumentos de 39, 40 e 26%, respectivamente.The effect of the N and K fertilization on the development and production of the banana plant (Musa spp., cv. Pioneira, was evaluated in an experiment carried out in Capitão Poço county, Pará State, Brazil, in a Yellow Latosol, using a randomized blocks design, in factorial arrangement of 4x4. The treatments were: 0, 80, 160 and 240 g of N per plant per year; 0, 150, 300 and 450 g of K2O per plant per year. Urea and potassium chloride were used as nutrient sources. The results of plant growth showed that there was effect of N on circumference of pseudostem and plant height. The quadratic model was better adjusted to all the variables. The results of production of the second cycle indicated that K increased

  14. Prenatal developmental toxicity study with 7-hydroxymatairesinol potassium acetate (HMRlignan) in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterbeek, A.P.M.; Roberts, A.; Korte, H.; Unkila, M.; Waalkens-Berendsen, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Plant lignan 7-hydromatairesinol, a novel precursor of the mammalian lignan enterolactone was evaluated in a prenatal developmental toxicity study conducted in the Wistar rat. Mated female rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.25, 1, and 4% (w/w) of 7-hydroxymatairesinol in the form of potassium

  15. Effects of foliar potassium fertilization on muskmelon fruit quality and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer preference of many fruits and vegetables such as muskmelon [Cucumis melo L. (Reticulatus Group)] is determined by a few key quality traits such as sugar content, aroma and texture. These quality traits are directly related to adequate potassium (K) content in plant tissues. However, soil-...

  16. EFICIÊNCIA DE ABSORÇÃO E UTILIZAÇÃO DE POTÁSSIO POR PLANTAS DE SOJA EM SOLUÇÃO NUTRITIVA EFFICIENCY OF POTASSIUM UPTAKE AND UTILIZATION BY SOYBEAN PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS VITOR SILVA DO SACRAMENTO

    1998-01-01

    nutrient solutions with either adequate or deficient K levels (0.5 and 1.82 mmol. L-1 and harvested 20, 40 and 60 days after plant emergence (DAPE. The plants were separated in top, median and lower leaves, stems and roots, dried, ground and analyzed for K contents. Regardless of cultivar, in deficient plants K was translocated from the other organs to median leaves, in order to maintain its K contents. This behavior was particularly evident in 'IAC 11' and 'IAC 18'. Well nourished plants showed higher EAB than deficient plants. 'IAC 17' and 'IAC 18' showed higher EAB at either adequate or deficient K levels. 'FT 2' showed highest EUK in deficient solutions at 40 DAPE (immediately before flowering, and the lowest EUK at 60 DAPE. The utilization index was helpful in determining cultivar plasticity to adapt to K deficiency. The highest plasticity was observed for 'FT 2' at 40 DAPE and for 'IAC 18' at 60 DAPE. K-deficient plants were more efficient in EC, yielding more dry matter for K uptake unit.

  17. Effect of potassium on micromorphological and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... study the effect of potassium on yield and internal leaf tissues composition of cotton ... Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were applied at 150 mg N/kg soil and 75 mg ..... Copper enzymes in isolated chloroplasts: Polyphenol.

  18. Crystal structure transformation in potassium acrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai Verneker, V. R.; Vasanthakumari, R.

    1983-10-01

    Potassium acrylate undergoes a reversible phase transformation around 335°K with an activation energy of 133 kcal/mole. Differential scanning calorimetry and high temperature X-ray powder diffraction techniques have been used to probe this phenomenon.

  19. Thanatochemistry: Study of vitreous humor potassium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nilesh Keshav Tumram

    2014-02-18

    Feb 18, 2014 ... particularly vitreous potassium has received most attention. It is known that ... respect to different age and sex at different death intervals. The details regarding the ... Analyser by the Ion selective method. The reagents used ...

  20. Photoconductivity and dielectric studies of potassium pentaborate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single crystal of potassium pentaborate (KB5) has been grown by solution growth ... equipped with the Gunn Oscillator guided with rectangular wave-guide. ... its dielectric behaviour with the change of frequency has also been investigated.