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Sample records for plants dna-binding properties

  1. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  2. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

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    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  3. Conservation of DNA-binding specificity and oligomerisation properties within the p53 family

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    Joerger Andreas C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors activate their target genes by binding to specific response elements. Many transcription factor families evolved from a common ancestor by gene duplication and subsequent divergent evolution. Members of the p53 family, which play key roles in cell-cycle control and development, share conserved DNA binding and oligomerisation domains but exhibit distinct functions. In this study, the molecular basis of the functional divergence of related transcription factors was investigated. Results We characterised the DNA-binding specificity and oligomerisation properties of human p53, p63 and p73, as well as p53 from other organisms using novel biophysical approaches. All p53 family members bound DNA cooperatively as tetramers with high affinity. Despite structural differences in the oligomerisation domain, the dissociation constants of the tetramers was in the low nanomolar range for all family members, indicating that the strength of tetramerisation was evolutionarily conserved. However, small differences in the oligomerisation properties were observed, which may play a regulatory role. Intriguingly, the DNA-binding specificity of p53 family members was highly conserved even for evolutionarily distant species. Additionally, DNA recognition was only weakly affected by CpG methylation. Prediction of p53/p63/p73 binding sites in the genome showed almost complete overlap between the different homologs. Conclusion Diversity of biological function of p53 family members is not reflected in differences in sequence-specific DNA binding. Hence, additional specificity factors must exist, which allowed the acquisition of novel functions during evolution while preserving original roles.

  4. DNA binding property and antitumor evaluation of xanthone with dimethylamine side chain.

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    Shen, Rui; Wang, Weihua; Yang, Gengliang

    2014-05-01

    In this work, a xanthone derivative was obtained by cationic modification of the free hydroxyl group of xanthone with dimethylamine group of high pKa value. The interactions of xanthones with DNA were investigated by spectroscopic methods, electrophoretic migration assay and polymerase chain reaction test. Results indicate that xanthones can intercalate into the DNA base pairs by the hydrophobic plane and the xanthone with dimethylamine side chain may also bind the DNA phosphate framework by the basic amine alkyl chain, thus showing a better DNA binding ability than the xanthone. Furthermore, inhibition on tumor cells (ECA109, SGC7901, GLC-82) proliferation of xanthones were evaluated by MTT method. Analysis results show that the xanthone with dimethylamine side chain exhibits more effective inhibition activity against three cancer cells than the xanthone. The effects on the inhibition of tumor cells in vitro agree with the studies of DNA binding. It means that the amine alkyl chain would play an important role in its antitumor activity and DNA binding property.

  5. Substituent Effects on Cytotoxic Activity, Spectroscopic Property, and DNA Binding Property of Naphthalimide Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Rang; Qian, Feng; Sun, Qian; Ma, Cui-Lan; Rong, Rui-Xue; Cao, Zhi-Ran; Wang, Xiao-Man; Li, Xiao-Liu

    2016-05-01

    A series of novel naphthalimide derivatives NI1-5 containing piperazine moieties (N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine and 1-piperazinepropanol) and piperidine moieties (4-piperidinemethanol, 4-hydroxypiperidine and 4-piperidineethanol) have been synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic activity, spectroscopic property, and DNA binding behaviors. It was found that substituents at the 4-position remarkably influence the various activities of this series of compound. Compounds NI3-5 modified with piperidines exhibited potent cytotoxic activities against Hela, SGC-7901, and A549 cells with the IC50 values from 0.73 μm to 6.80 μm, which are better than NI1-2 functionalized with piperazines. Compounds NI1-2 showed higher binding capacity with Ct-DNA than compounds NI3-5 based on studies of UV-vis, fluorescence and CD spectra. Furthermore, compounds NI3-5, as DNA intercalators, showed fluorescence enhancement upon binding with Ct-DNA. More interestingly, fluorescence imaging studies of compound NI4 with A549 cells showed that the fluorescence predominantly appeared in the cytoplasm. These results provided a potential application of NI3-5 as anticancer therapeutic and cancer cell imaging agents.

  6. SELEX-Seq: A Method to Determine DNA Binding Specificities of Plant Transcription Factors.

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    Smaczniak, Cezary; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is a method that allows isolating specific nucleotide sequences that interact with a DNA binding protein of choice. By using a transcription factor (TF) and a randomized pool of double-stranded DNA, this technique can be used to characterize TF DNA binding specificities and affinities. The method is based on protein-DNA complex immunoprecipitation with protein-specific antibodies and subsequent DNA selection and amplification. Application of massively parallel sequencing (-seq) at each cycle of SELEX allows determining the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or TF complex. The resulting TF DNA binding motifs can be used to predict potential DNA binding sites in genomes and thereby direct target genes of TFs.

  7. Exploration of DAPI analogues: Synthesis, antitrypanosomal activity, DNA binding and fluorescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Kumar, Arvind; Say, Martial; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Paul, Ananya; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2017-03-10

    The DAPI structure has been modified by replacing the phenyl group with substituted phenyl or heteroaryl rings. Twelve amidines were synthesized and their DNA binding, fluorescence properties, in vitro and in vivo activities were evaluated. These compounds are shown to bind in the DNA minor groove with high affinity, and exhibit superior in vitro antitrypanosomal activity to that of DAPI. Six new diamidines (5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f and 5j) exhibit superior in vivo activity to that of DAPI and four of these compounds provide 100% animal cure at a low dose of 4 × 5 mg/kg i.p. in T. b. rhodesiense infected mice. Generally, the fluorescence properties of the new analogues are inferior to that of DAPI with the exception of compound 5i which shows a moderate increase in efficacy while compound 5k is comparable to DAPI.

  8. Interaction of a rhizobial DNA-binding protein with the promoter region of a plant leghemoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welters, P.; Metz, B.; Felix, G.; Palme, K. (Max Planck Insitut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany)); Szczyglowski, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Bruijn, F.J. de (Max Planck Institut fur Zuchtungsforschung, Koeln (Germany) Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A nucleotide sequence was identified approximately 650 bp upstream of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin gene Srglb3 start codon, which interacts specifically with a proteinaceous DNA-binding factor found in nodule extracts but not in extracts from leaves or root. The binding site for this factor was delimited using footprinting techniques. The DNA-binding activity of this factor was found to be heat stable, dependent on divalent cations, and derived from the (infecting) Azorhizobium caulinodans bacteria or bacteroids (A. caulinodans bacterial binding factor 1, AcBBF1). A 9- to 10-kD protein was isolated from a free-living culture of A. caulinodans that co-purifies with the DNA-binding activity (A. caulinodans bacterial binding protein 1, AcBBP1) and interacts specifically with its target (S. rostrata bacterial binding site 1, SrBBS1). The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal 27 residues of AcBBP1 was determined and was found to share significant similarity (46% identity; 68% similarity) with a domain of the herpes simplex virus major DNA-binding protein infected cell protein 8(ICP8). An insertion mutation in the SrBBS1 was found to result in a substantial reduction of the expression of a Srglb3-gus reporter gene fusion in nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants, suggesting a role for this element in Srglb3 promoter activity. Based on these results, the authors propose that (a) bacterial transacting factor(s) may play a role in infected cell-specific expression of the symbiotically induced plant lb genes. 70 refs., 11 figs.

  9. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

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    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  10. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

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    Al-Mudaris, Zena A; Majid, Aman S A; Ji, Dan; Al-Mudarris, Ban A; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang; Osman, Hasnah; Jamal Din, Shah Kamal Khan; Abdul Majid, Amin M S

    2013-01-01

    Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R) and (S)-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1), the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1) has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP), but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP), stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS) significantly improved the

  11. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena A Al-Mudaris

    Full Text Available Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R and (S-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1, the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1 has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP, but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP, stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS significantly improved

  12. NMR characterization of the DNA binding properties of a novel Hoechst 33258 analogue peptide building block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Jakob; Behrens, Carsten; Jacobsen, Jens Peter

    2002-01-01

    A novel aryl-bis-benzimidazole amino acid analogue of the DNA-binding compound Hoechst 33258 has recently been designed for incorporation in peptide combinatorial libraries by replacing the N-methylpiperazine group with a carboxyl group and the hydroxy group with an amino-methyl group. The DNA...... preference with the bis-benzimidazole moiety displaced toward the 3'-end from the center of the duplex. Two families of models of the complexes with A(5) and A(3)T(3) were derived with restrained molecular dynamics based on a large set of 70 and 61, respectively, intermolecular ligand NOEs. Both models give...... a picture of a tightly fitting ligand with close van der Waals contacts with the walls of the minor groove and with the two benzimidazole and the amide hydrogens involved in bifurcated cross-strand hydrogen bonds to adenine N3 and thymine O2. The minor groove width of the models correlate well...

  13. Characterization of DNA binding property of the HIV-1 host factor and tumor suppressor protein Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5.

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    Supratik Das

    Full Text Available Integrase Interactor 1 (INI1/hSNF5 is a component of the hSWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The INI1 gene is either deleted or mutated in rhabdoid cancers like ATRT (Atypical terratoid and rhabdoid tumor. INI1 is also a host factor for HIV-1 replication. INI1 binds DNA non-specifically. However, the mechanism of DNA binding and its biological role are unknown. From agarose gel retardation assay (AGRA, Ni-NTA pull-down and atomic force microscopy (AFM studies we show that amino acids 105-183 of INI1 comprise the minimal DNA binding domain (DBD. The INI1 DBD is absent in plants and in yeast SNF5. It is present in Caenorhabditis elegans SNF5, Drosophila melanogaster homologue SNR1 and is a highly conserved domain in vertebrates. The DNA binding property of this domain in SNR1, that is only 58% identical to INI1/hSNF5, is conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies of INI1 DBD and INI1 DBD:DNA complexes at different concentrations show that the DBD exists as a monomer at low protein concentration and two molecules of monomer binds one molecule of DNA. At high protein concentration, it exists as a dimer and binds two DNA molecules. Furthermore, isothermal calorimetry (ITC experiments demonstrate that the DBD monomer binds DNA with a stoichiometry (N of ∼0.5 and Kd  = 0.94 µM whereas the DBD dimer binds two DNA molecules sequentially with K'd1 = 222 µM and K'd2 = 1.16 µM. Monomeric DBD binding to DNA is enthalpy driven (ΔH = -29.9 KJ/mole. Dimeric DBD binding to DNA is sequential with the first binding event driven by positive entropy (ΔH'1 = 115.7 KJ/mole, TΔS'1 = 136.8 KJ/mole and the second binding event driven by negative enthalpy (ΔH'2 = -106.3 KJ/mole, TΔS'2 = -75.7 KJ/mole. Our model for INI1 DBD binding to DNA provides new insights into the mechanism of DNA binding by INI1.

  14. Receptors from glucocorticoid-sensitive lymphoma cells and two clases of insensitive clones: physical and DNA-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K R; Stampfer, M R; Tomkins, G M

    1974-10-01

    Mouse lymphoma tissue culture cells (S49.1A) are normally killed by dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid hormone. Dexamethasone-resistant clones have been selected from this line, some of which retain the ability to specifically bind dexamethasone. Addition of [(3)H]dexamethasone to cultures, followed by cell fractionation, reveals that the nuclear transfer of hormone-receptor complexes in some of these variant clones is deficient (nt(-)), while others show increased nuclear transfer (nt(i)) relative to the parental line. Two independently selected members of each class have been studied here, in an effort to elucidate the molecular determinants involved in the receptor-nucleus interaction in vivo. The labeled receptors in cell-free extracts bind to DNA-cellulose, but only after previous incubation of the extract at 20 degrees , similar to the treatment required for cell-free interaction of receptors with nuclei. More importantly, the apparent DNA-binding affinity of the nt(-) receptors is lower than the wild type, whereas the nt(i) receptors bind DNA with an affinity higher than the parental molecules. The parallelism of nuclear and DNA binding, together with the observations that the receptors from the variants have sedimentation properties different from the wild-type cells, lead us to conclude that (i) these variants may contain altered receptor molecules and (ii) DNA is probably the primary nuclear binding site for steroid receptors in vivo.

  15. DNA binding by the plant-specific NAC transcription factors in crystal and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Lindemose, Søren; Grossmann, J. Günter;

    2012-01-01

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) plant transcription factors regulate essential processes in development, stress responses and nutrient distribution in important crop and model plants (rice, Populus, Arabidopsis), which makes them highly relevant in the context of crop optimization and bioenergy production. Th...

  16. [Expression and purification of FOXO1 DNA binding domain and its DNA properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yinuer; Li, Jun; Chen, Yongheng; Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhuchu

    2017-01-28

    目的:探讨翼螺旋转录因子FOXO1的DNA结合域(FOXO1 DNA binding domain,FOXO1-DBD)的表达、纯化及与DNA的结合特性。方法:采用优化FOXO1-DNA的基因序列和低温诱导的方式实现FOXO1-DBD蛋白的可溶性表达,通过镍亲和层析及阳离子交换层析进行纯化,并经凝胶迁移实验(electrophoretic mobility shift assay,EMSA)验证FOXO1-DBD的DNA结合特性。结果:优化后的FOXO1基因在21 ℃时编码的蛋白大多以可溶性方式表达,通过两步纯化即可获得95%以上纯度的FOXO1-DBD蛋白,纯化的蛋白与含FOX家族DNA结合基序(G/ATAAACA)的DNA序列显示良好的结合特性。结论:建立了FOXO1-DBD蛋白高效表达、纯化的方法,验证了FOXO1蛋白在识别DNA上的复杂性。.

  17. Zinc complexes of the antibacterial drug oxolinic acid: structure and DNA-binding properties.

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    Tarushi, Alketa; Psomas, George; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P

    2009-06-01

    The neutral mononuclear zinc complexes with the quinolone antibacterial drug oxolinic acid in the absence or presence of a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized and characterized. The experimental data suggest that oxolinic acid is on deprotonated mode acting as a bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ion through the ketone and one carboxylato oxygen atoms. The crystal structures of (chloro)(oxolinato)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II), 2, and bis(oxolinato)(1,10-phenanthroline)zinc(II), 3, have been determined with X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV and fluorescence spectroscopies. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that they can bind to CT DNA and the DNA-binding constants have been calculated. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that complex 3 exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with EB.

  18. Evolutionary conservation and DNA binding properties of the Ssh7 proteins from Sulfolobus shibatae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xulin(陈绪林); GUO; Rong(郭荣); HUANG; Li(黄力); Ray; Hong

    2002-01-01

    The thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae synthesizes a large amount of the 7-ku DNA binding proteins known as Ssh7. Our hybridization experiments showed that two Ssh7-encoding genes existed in the genome of S. Shibatae. These two genes, designated ssh7a and ssh7b, have been cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The two Ssh7 proteins differ only at three amino acid positions. In addition, the cis-regulatory sequences of the ssh7a and ssh7b genes are highly conserved. These results suggest the presence of a selective pressure to maintain not only the sequence but also the expression of the two genes. We have also found that there are two genes encoding the 7-ku protein in Sulfolobus solfataricus. Based on this and other studies, we suggest that the gene encoding the 7-ku protein underwent duplication before the separation of Sulfolobus species. Binding of native Ssh7 and recombinant (r)Ssh7 to short duplex DNA fragments was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Both native and recombinant forms of the protein behaved in a similar fashion in the assays, suggesting that the interaction of Ssh7 with DNA is not affected either by specific lysine methylation found in the native Ssh7 proteins or by the difference between the two Ssh7 isomers in amino acid sequence. Our data show that Ssh7 binds duplex DNA fragments with a binding size of ~ 6.6 base pairs and an apparent dissociation constant of (0.7-1.0)×10-7 mol/L under the assay conditions employed in the present study. In addition, Ssh7 binds more tightly to negatively supercoiled DNA than to linear or relaxed DNA.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding properties, fluorescence studies and toxic activity of cobalt(III) and ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Shilpa, Mynam; Latha, J Naveena Lavanya; Bhatnagar, Ira; Srinivas, P N B S; Kumar, Yata Praveen; Reddy, Kotha Laxma; Satyanarayana, Sirasani

    2011-03-01

    The new ligand 4-(isopropylbenzaldehyde)imidazo[4,5-f ][1,10]phenanthroline (ippip) and its complexes [Ru(phen)(2)(ippip)](2+)(1),[Co(phen)(2)(ippip)](3+)(2),[Ru(bpy)(2)(ippip)](2+)(3),[Co(bpy)(2)(ippip)](3+)(4)(bpy=2,2-bipyridine) and (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by ES(+)-MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR. The DNA binding properties of the four complexes were investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that complexes bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. When irradiated at 365 nm, the complexes promote the photocleavage of pBR322 DNA, and complex 1 cleaves DNA more effectively than 2, 3, 4 complexes under comparable experimental conditions. Furthermore, photocleavage studies reveal that singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) plays a significant role in the photocleavage.

  20. Elucidation of the DNA binding specificity of the natural plant alkaloid chelerythrine: a biophysical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Pritha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2014-09-05

    Interaction of the anticancer plant alkaloid chelerythrine with four sequence specific synthetic polynucleotides was studied by spectroscopy and calorimetry experiments. The binding resulted in strong hypochromic and bathochromic effects in the absorption spectrum of the alkaloid, enhancement in the fluorescence with the AT polynucleotides and the homo-GC polynucleotide and quenching with the hetero-GC polynucleotide. Cooperative binding was observed with all the polynucleotides. Fluorescence polarization anisotropy, iodide quenching and viscosity results confirmed intercalative binding of the alkaloid. The binding resulted in the thermal stabilization of the polynucleotides and moderate perturbations in the B-conformation of the DNA. The high binding affinity values (∼10(6) M(-1)) evaluated from the spectroscopic data was in excellent agreement with those obtained from calorimetry. The binding was exothermic and favoured by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropic contributions in all cases other than homo-AT polynucleotide, where it was endothermic and entropy driven. Salt-dependent calorimetry data revealed that the binding reaction was driven mostly by non-polyelectrolytic forces. The magnitude of the negative heat capacity values confirmed the role of significant hydrophobic effects in the interaction profile of the alkaloid with the polynucleotides. The results revealed the specificity of chelerythrine to follow homo-GC>hetero-GC>hetero-AT=homo-AT polynucleotide.

  1. A Fungal Effector With Host Nuclear Localization and DNA-Binding Properties Is Required for Maize Anthracnose Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Walter A; Sanz-Martín, José M; Rech, Gabriel E; Armijos-Jaramillo, Vinicio D; Rivera, Lina P; Echeverria, María Mercedes; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-02-01

    Plant pathogens have the capacity to manipulate the host immune system through the secretion of effectors. We identified 27 putative effector proteins encoded in the genome of the maize anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola that are likely to target the host's nucleus, as they simultaneously contain sequence signatures for secretion and nuclear localization. We functionally characterized one protein, identified as CgEP1. This protein is synthesized during the early stages of disease development and is necessary for anthracnose development in maize leaves, stems, and roots. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies confirmed that this effector targets the host's nucleus and defines a novel class of double-stranded DNA-binding protein. We show that CgEP1 arose from a gene duplication in an ancestor of a lineage of monocot-infecting Colletotrichum spp. and has undergone an intense evolution process, with evidence for episodes of positive selection. We detected CgEP1 homologs in several species of a grass-infecting lineage of Colletotrichum spp., suggesting that its function may be conserved across a large number of anthracnose pathogens. Our results demonstrate that effectors targeted to the host nucleus may be key elements for disease development and aid in the understanding of the genetic basis of anthracnose development in maize plants.

  2. ALOG domains: provenance of plant homeotic and developmental regulators from the DNA-binding domain of a novel class of DIRS1-type retroposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the Arabidopsis LSH1 and Oryza G1 (ALOG family of proteins have been shown to function as key developmental regulators in land plants. However, their precise mode of action remains unclear. Using sensitive sequence and structure analysis, we show that the ALOG domains are a distinct version of the N-terminal DNA-binding domain shared by the XerC/D-like, protelomerase, topoisomerase-IA, and Flp tyrosine recombinases. ALOG domains are distinguished by the insertion of an additional zinc ribbon into this DNA-binding domain. In particular, we show that the ALOG domain is derived from the XerC/D-like recombinases of a novel class of DIRS-1-like retroposons. Copies of this element, which have been recently inactivated, are present in several marine metazoan lineages, whereas the stramenopile Ectocarpus, retains an active copy of the same. Thus, we predict that ALOG domains help establish organ identity and differentiation by binding specific DNA sequences and acting as transcription factors or recruiters of repressive chromatin. They are also found in certain plant defense proteins, where they are predicted to function as DNA sensors. The evolutionary history of the ALOG domain represents a unique instance of a domain, otherwise exclusively found in retroelements, being recruited as a specific transcription factor in the streptophyte lineage of plants. Hence, they add to the growing evidence for derivation of DNA-binding domains of eukaryotic specific TFs from mobile and selfish elements.

  3. Rhenium complexes of chromophore-appended dipicolylamine ligands: syntheses, spectroscopic properties, DNA binding and X-ray crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullice, L.A.; Buurma, N.J.; Pope, S.J.A. [Cardiff Univ., School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Laye, R.H. [Sheffield Univ., Dept. of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Harding, L.P. [Huddersfield Univ., School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The syntheses of two chromophore-appended dipicolylamine-derived ligands and their reactivity with penta-carbonyl-chloro-rhenium have been studied. The resultant complexes each possess the fac-Re(CO){sub 3} core. The ligands L{sup 1} 1-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-pyrene and L{sup 2} 2-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-quinoxaline were isolated via a one-pot reductive amination in moderate yield. The corresponding rhenium complexes were isolated in good yields and characterised by {sup 1}H NMR, MS, IR and UV-Vis studies. X-Ray crystallographic data were obtained for fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}), C{sub 34}H{sub 26}BF{sub 4}N{sub 4}O{sub 3}Re: monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a 18.327(2) Angstroms, {alpha} = 90.00 degrees, b 14.1537(14) Angstroms, {beta}96.263(6) degrees, c = 23.511(3) Angstroms, {gamma} 90.00 Angstroms, 6062.4(11) (Angstroms){sup 3}, Z=8. The luminescence properties of the ligands and complexes were also investigated, with the emission attributed to the appended chromophore in each case. Isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) self-aggregates cooperatively in aqueous solution, probably forming micelle-like aggregates with a cmc of 0.18 mM. Investigations into the DNA-binding properties of fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) were undertaken and revealed that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) binding to fish sperm DNA (binding constant 1.5 {+-} 0.2 * 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}, binding site size 3.2 {+-} 0.3 base pairs) is accompanied by changes in the UV-Vis spectrum as typically observed for pyrene-based intercalators while the calorimetrically determined binding enthalpy (-14 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup -1}) also agrees favourably with values as typically found for intercalators. (authors)

  4. Influence of Solvent Polarity and DNA-Binding on Spectral Properties of Quaternary Benzo[c]phenanthridine Alkaloids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rájecký

    Full Text Available Quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of the plant families Papaveraceae, Rutaceae, and Ranunculaceae with anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Their spectral changes induced by the environment could be used to understand their interaction with biomolecules as well as for analytical purposes. Spectral shifts, quantum yield and changes in lifetime are presented for the free form of alkaloids in solvents of different polarity and for alkaloids bound to DNA. Quantum yields range from 0.098 to 0.345 for the alkanolamine form and are below 0.033 for the iminium form. Rise of fluorescence lifetimes (from 2-5 ns to 3-10 ns and fluorescence intensity are observed after binding of the iminium form to the DNA for most studied alkaloids. The alkanolamine form does not bind to DNA. Acid-base equilibrium constant of macarpine is determined to be 8.2-8.3. Macarpine is found to have the highest increase of fluorescence upon DNA binding, even under unfavourable pH conditions. This is probably a result of its unique methoxy substitution at C12 a characteristic not shared with other studied alkaloids. Association constant for macarpine-DNA interaction is 700000 M(-1.

  5. Synthesis, antiproliferative activity and DNA binding properties of novel 5-aminobenzimidazo[1,2-a]quinoline-6-carbonitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Nataša; Nhili, Raja; Ester, Katja; Laine, William; Karminski-Zamola, Grace; Kralj, Marijeta; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Hranjec, Marijana

    2014-06-10

    The synthesis of 5-amino substituted benzimidazo[1,2-a]quinolines prepared by microwave assisted amination from halogeno substituted precursor was described. The majority of compounds were active at micromolar concentrations against colon, lung and breast carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The N,N-dimethylaminopropyl 9 and piperazinyl substituted derivative 19 showed the most pronounced activity towards all of the three tested tumor cell lines, which could be correlated to the presence of another N heteroatom and its potential interactions with biological targets. The DNA binding studies, consisting of UV/Visible absorbency, melting temperature studies, and fluorescence and circular dichroism titrations, revealed that compounds 9, 19 and 20 bind to DNA as strong intercalators. The cellular distribution analysis, based on compounds' intrinsic fluorescence, showed that compound 20 does not enter the cell, while compounds 9 and 19 do, which is in agreement with their cytotoxic effects. Compound 9 efficiently targets the nucleus whereas 19, which also showed DNA intercalating properties in vitro, was mostly localised in the cytoplasm suggesting that the antitumor mechanism of action is DNA-independent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. New metal based drugs: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding, surface morphology and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Aysegul; Demirtaş, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The NSAID piroxicam (PRX) drug was used for complex formation reactions with Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) metal salts have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the complexes were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSFSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the PRX and its complexes with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. The morphology of the FSdsDNA, PRX, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with FSdsDNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at FSdsDNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism. The effect of proliferation PRX and complexes were examined on the HeLA and C6 cells using real-time cell analyzer with four different concentrations.

  7. DNA binding properties and biological evaluation of dihydropyrimidinones derivatives as potential antitumor agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongke; Li, Xiangrong; Gou, Yaping; Chen, Yuhan; Yan, Changling; Lu, Yan

    2013-10-01

    The binding properties of two medicinally important dihydropyrimidinones derivatives 5-(Ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-phenyl-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMPD) and 5-(Ethoxycarbonyl)-6-methyl-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (EMCD) with calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by spectroscopy, viscosity, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular modeling techniques. Simultaneously, their biological activities were evaluated with MTT assay method. The binding constants determined with spectroscopic titration and ITC were found to be in the same order of 104 M-1. According to the results of viscosity studies, fluorescence competitive binding experiment and ITC investigations, intercalative binding was evaluated as the dominant binding modes between the two compounds and ctDNA. Furthermore, the results of molecular modeling corroborated those obtained from spectroscopic, viscosimetric and ITC investigations. Evaluation of the antitumor activities of the two derivatives against different tumor cell lines proved that they exhibited significant tumor cell inhibition rate, accordingly blocking DNA transcription and replication. The present results favor the development of potential drugs related with dihydropyrimidinones derivatives in the treatment of some diseases.

  8. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  9. Synthesis,Crystal Structure and DNA-binding Properties of a New Copper(Ⅱ) Schiff Base Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Bei

    2012-01-01

    A new asymmetric bidentate copper(Ⅱ) complex,CuL 2(HL=2-((E)-(4-bromophenylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol),has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 /c with a=11.218(3),b=9.355(3),c=13.449(4),β=108.722(4)°,V=1336.8(6)3,Z=2,Dc=2.008 g/cm 3,μ(MoKα)=7.024 mm-1,F(000)=806,S=0.999,the final R=0.0342 and wR=0.0641for2611observed reflections (I〉2σ(I)).The central copper(Ⅱ) is four-coordinate and bonds to two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms from two Schiff base ligands.The complex is linked into a two-dimensional supramolecular structure by weak intermolecular interactions.In addition,DNA-binding properties of the metal complex were investigated using spectrometric titrations and viscosity measurements.The results show that the complex binds with calf-thymus DNA(CT-DNA),presumably via a partial intercalative mode.The intrinsic binding constant of the Cu(Ⅱ) complex with DNA is 7.335×10 3 M-1.

  10. Alternative splicing in the fiddler crab cognate ecdysteroid receptor: variation in receptor isoform expression and DNA binding properties in response to hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durica, David S; Das, Sunetra; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Phillips, Barret; Kappalli, Sudha; Anilkumar, Gopinathan

    2014-09-15

    RXR cDNA cloning from three Uca species led to the identification of 4 conserved isoforms, indicative of alternative splicing in the hinge and ligand binding domains (LBD). Sequencing of overlapping clones from a Ucapugilator genomic library identified EcR isoforms matching previously identified cDNA variants; in addition, a cryptic exon in the LBD was detected and evidence for expression of this new isoform was obtained from next-generation sequencing. RNA-seq analysis also identified a new amino terminal EcR variant. EcR and RXR transcript abundance increases throughout ovarian maturation in U. pugilator, while cognate receptor transcript abundance remains constant in a related Indo-Pacific species with a different reproductive strategy. To examine if crab RXR LBD isoforms have different physical properties in vitro, electromobility shift assays were performed with different EcR isoforms. The cognate crab and fruit fly receptors differ in their responses to hormone. Ecdysteroids did not increase DNA binding for the crab heterodimers, while ecdysteroids stimulate binding for Drosophilamelanogaster EcR/USP heterodimers. In swapping experiments, UpEcR/USP heterodimers did not show ligand-responsive differences in DNA binding; both crab RXR LBD isoforms, however, conferred ligand-responsive increases in DNA binding with DmEcRs. These data indicate that both UpRXR LBD isoforms can heterodimerize with the heterologous DmEcR receptors and promote ligand and DNA binding. Unresponsiveness of the cognate receptors to ecdysteroid, however, suggest additional factors may be required to mediate endogenous, perhaps isoform-specific, differences in EcR conformation, consistent with previously reported effects of UpRXR isoforms on UpEcR ligand-binding affinities.

  11. DNA Binding and Photocleavage Properties, Cellular Uptake and Localization, and in-Vitro Cytotoxicity of Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Varying Lengths in Bridging Alkyl Linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Wu, Bao-Yan; Liu, Jin; Dai, Yong-Cheng; Wang, You-Jun; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    Two new dinuclear Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes containing three and ten methylene chains in their bridging linkers are synthesized and characterized. Their calf thymus DNA-binding and plasmid DNA photocleavage behaviors are comparatively studied with a previously reported, six-methylene-containing analog by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA viscosity measurements, DNA thermal denaturation, and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses. Theoretical calculations applying the density functional theory (DFT) method for the three complexes are also performed to understand experimentally observed DNA binding properties. The results show that the two complexes partially intercalate between the base pairs of DNA. Cellular uptake and colocalization studies have demonstrated that the complexes could enter HeLa cells efficiently and localize within lysosomes. The in-vitro antitumor activity against HeLa and MCF-7 tumor cells of the complexes are studied by MTT cytotoxic analysis. A new method, high-content analysis (HCA), is also used to assess cytotoxicity, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of the three complexes. The results show that the lengths of the alkyl linkers could effectively tune their biological properties and that HCA is suitable for rapidly identifying cytotoxicity and can be substituted for MTT assays to evaluate the cell cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Bio-sensitive activities of coordination compounds containing 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand: Synthesis, structural elucidation and DNA binding properties of metal(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Natarajan; Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Mitu, Liviu

    2014-10-01

    Present work reports the DNA binding and cleavage characteristics of a series of mixed-ligand complexes having the composition [M(L)(phen)2]Cl2 (where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) and phen as co-ligand) in detail. Their structural features and other properties have been deduced from their elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The UV-Vis, magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectral data of metal complexes suggest an octahedral geometry. The binding properties of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been explored using electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The DNA-binding constants for Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) complexes are 6.14 × 105 M-1, 1.8 × 105 M-1, 6.7 × 104 M-1 and 2.5 × 104 M-1 respectively. Detailed analysis reveals that these complexes interact with DNA through intercalation binding. Nuclease activity has also been investigated by gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the synthesized Schiff base and its mixed-ligand complexes have been screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The data reveal that the complexes exhibit higher activity than the parent ligand.

  13. A plant small polypeptide is a novel component of DNA-binding protein phosphatase 1-mediated resistance to plum pox virus in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló, María José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Daniel, Jacques; Granot, David; Vera, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    DNA-binding protein phosphatases (DBPs) have been identified as a novel class of plant-specific regulatory factors playing a role in plant-virus interactions. NtDBP1 from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was shown to participate in transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to virus infection in compatible interactions, and AtDBP1, its closest relative in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), has recently been found to mediate susceptibility to potyvirus, one of the most speciose taxa of plant viruses. Here, we report on the identification of a novel family of highly conserved small polypeptides that interact with DBP1 proteins both in tobacco and Arabidopsis, which we have designated DBP-interacting protein 2 (DIP2). The interaction of AtDIP2 with AtDBP1 was demonstrated in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and AtDIP2 was shown to functionally interfere with AtDBP1 in yeast. Furthermore, reducing AtDIP2 gene expression leads to increased susceptibility to the potyvirus Plum pox virus and to a lesser extent also to Turnip mosaic virus, whereas overexpression results in enhanced resistance. Therefore, we describe a novel family of conserved small polypeptides in plants and identify AtDIP2 as a novel host factor contributing to resistance to potyvirus in Arabidopsis.

  14. Pasteurellaceae ComE1 proteins combine the properties of fibronectin adhesins and DNA binding competence proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Mullen

    Full Text Available A novel fibronectin-binding protein from Pasteurella multocida (PM1665 that binds to the fibronectin type III(9-10 modules via two helix-hairpin-helix motifs has recently been described [1]. This protein shares homology with competence-related DNA-binding and uptake proteins (ComEA and ComE from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that recombinant PM1665 (now designated ComE1 also binds to DNA through the same helix-hairpin-helix motifs required for fibronectin-binding. This binding to DNA is non sequence-specific and is confined to double-stranded DNA. We have cloned and expressed ComE1 proteins from five members of the Pasteurellaceae in order to further investigate the function(s of these proteins. When expressed as recombinant GST-fusion proteins, all of the homologues bound both to fibronectin and to double-stranded DNA. Inactivation of the gene encoding the ComE1 homologue in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae indicates major roles for these proteins in at least two processes: natural transformation, and binding of bacteria to fibronectin.

  15. In Vitro Antitumor Activity of a Keggin Vanadium-Substituted Polyoxomolybdate and Its ctDNA Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Qi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Keggin vanadium-substituted polyoxomolybdate, K5PMo10V2O40 (PMo10V2, has been synthesized and it’s antitumor effect against Hela cells was investigated. The calf thymus DNA (ctDNA binding ability of PMo10V2 was also evaluated by UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra. The identity and high purity of PMo10V2 was confirmed by elemental analysis and IR analysis. And the antitumor activity test of PMo10V2 was carried out on Hela cancer cells line by MTT assay. The results of MTT assay show that PMo10V2 significantly reduced the viability of Hela cells in a dose-dependent manner and exhibited stronger inhibitory activity against Hela cells at an IC50 of 800 μg/mL, which is more effective than the positive control, 5-Fu (P<0.05. The results of the UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra indicated the groove or outside stacking binding between PMo10V2 and ctDNA. These results show that the antitumor activity of PMo10V2 may be caused by the interactions between DNA and PMo10V2.

  16. Carboxylate-bridged Cu(II) coordination polymeric complex: synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic properties, DNA binding and electrochemical studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SABITHAKALA THATITURI; BHARGAVI GOVINDUGARI; VENKATA RAMANA REDDY CHITTIREDDY

    2017-08-01

    A novel water-soluble carboxylate-bridged copper(II) coordination polymer,Cu-BIG was formed by the reaction of Cu(ClO₄)₂ ·6H₂O and tridentate benzimidazole-glycine conjugate ligand, 2-((1H-benzimidazol- 2-yl)methylamino) acetic acid, BIGH and its structure has been determined by IR, UV, powder XRD, VSM, CV, TGA, DTA, EPR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic studies indicate it to be a coordination polymer with P¯ı Space group. The asymmetric unit of complex contains two Cu(II) ions with elongated square pyramid geometry.The axial positions of theCu(II) atoms are occupied by the carbonyl oxygen of the carboxylate group with the bond distances Cu(1)–O(5)axial , 2.28Å, and Cu(2)–O(2)axial , 2.26Å. The two Cu(II) are connected through the carboxylic group present in BIGH, which provides electron mobilisation in the molecule and hence results in the soft ferromagnetic polymer. An in vitro antibacterial activity study of BIGH and Cu-BIG showed moderate activity against Bacillus subtilis. The DNA binding studies showed the interaction of Cu-BIG with CT-DNA.

  17. Oligomeric properties and DNA binding specificities of repressor isoforms from the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S E; Smith, M C

    1998-05-15

    Three protein isoforms (74, 54 and 42 kDa) are expressed from repressor gene c in the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage phiC31. Because expression of the two smaller isoforms, 54 and 42 kDa, is sufficient for superinfection immunity, the interaction between these isoforms was studied. The native 42 kDa repressor (Nat42) and an N-terminally 6x histidine-tagged 54 kDa isoform (His54) were shown by co-purification on a Ni-NTA column to interact in Streptomyces lividans . In vitro three repressor preparations, containing Nat42, His54 and the native 54 and 42 kDa isoforms expressed together (Nat54&42), were subjected to chemical crosslinking and gel filtration analysis. Homo- and hetero-tetramers were observed. Previous work showed that the smallest isoform bound to 17 bp operators containing aconservedinvertedrepeat (CIR) and that the CIRs were located at 16 loci throughout the phiC31 genome. One of the CIRs (CIR6) is believed to be critical for regulating the lytic pathway. The DNA binding activities of the three repressor preparations were studied using fragments containing CIRs (CIR3-CIR6) from the essential early region as templates for DNase I footprinting. Whereas Nat42 bound to CIR6, poorly to CIR5 but undetectably to CIR3 or CIR4, the Nat54&42 preparation could bind to all CIRs tested, albeit poorly to CIR3 and CIR4. The His54 isoform bound all CIRs tested. Isoforms expressed from the phiC31 repressor gene, like those which are expressed from many eukaryotic transcription factor genes, apparently have different binding specificities.

  18. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila;

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites f...

  19. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy=2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip=2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5±1.4)×10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  20. Novel substituted benzothiophene and thienothiophene carboxanilides and quinolones: synthesis, photochemical synthesis, DNA-binding properties, antitumor evaluation and 3D-derived QSAR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, Maja; Bertoša, Branimir; Nhili, Raja; Uzelac, Lidija; Jarak, Ivana; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Kralj, Marijeta; Tomić, Sanja; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2012-06-14

    A series of new N,N-dimethylaminopropyl- and 2-imidazolinyl-substituted derivatives of benzo[b]thienyl- and thieno[2,3-b]thienylcarboxanilides and benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]- and thieno[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones were prepared. Quinolones were prepared by the reaction of photochemical dehydrohalogenation of corresponding anilides. Carboxanilides and quinolones were tested for the antiproliferative activity. 2-Imidazolinyl-substituted derivatives showed very prominent activity. By use of the experimentally obtained antitumor measurements, 3D-derived QSAR analysis was performed for the set of compounds. Highly predictive 3D-derived QSAR models were obtained, and molecular properties that have the highest impact on antitumor activity were identified. Carboxanilides 6a-c and quinolones 9a-c and 11a were evaluated for DNA binding propensities and topoisomerases I and II inhibition as part of their mechanism of action assessment. The evaluated differences in the mode of action nicely correlate with the results of the 3D-QSAR analysis. Taken together, the results indicate which modifications of the compounds from the series should further improve their anticancer properties.

  1. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  2. Antioxidation and DNA-binding properties of binuclear lanthanide(III) complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde and benzoylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Kejun; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Junying; Liu, Jianning

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde (8-HQ-7-CA), Schiff-base ligand 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde benzoylhydrazone, and binuclear complexes [LnL(NO(3))(H(2)O)(2)](2) were prepared from the ligand and equivalent molar amounts of Ln(NO(3))·6H(2)O (Ln=La(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+), Yb(3+), resp.). Ligand acts as dibasic tetradentates, binding to Ln(III) through the phenolate O-atom, N-atom of quinolinato unit, and C=N and -O-C=N- groups of the benzoylhydrazine side chain. Dimerization of this monomeric unit occurs through the phenolate O-atoms leading to a central four-membered (LnO)(2) ring. Ligand and all of the Ln(III) complexes can strongly bind to CT-DNA through intercalation with the binding constants at 10(5)-10(6) M(-1). Moreover, ligand and all of the Ln(III) complexes have strong abilities of scavenging effects for hydroxyl (HO·) radicals. Both the antioxidation and DNA-binding properties of Ln(III) complexes are much better than that of ligand.

  3. Synthesis, photochemical properties and DNA binding studies of dna cleaving agents based on chiral dipyridine dihydrodioxins salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaev, Alexei

    activated by UV-light. The mechanism of o-quinone release and intramolecular ET was studied in detail by methods of Ultrafast Transient Absortion Spectroscopy and supported by high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The binding properties of chiral intercalators based on PDHD to various DNA oligonucleotides were studied by various methods and DNA cleavage properties indicating strong binding and cleaving ability of the synthesized PDHDs. Also, a new method for synthesis of cyclohexa[e]pyrenes which possibly capable of intramolecular ET and electron transfer-oxidative stress (ET-OS) DNA cleavage was developed and partially accomplished.

  4. The effects of structural variations of thiophene-containing Ru(II) complexes on the acid-base and DNA binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cui-Li; Zhang, An-Guo; Zheng, Ze-Bo; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    A phenylthiophenyl-bearing Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)](PF₆)₂ {bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, Hbptip = 2-(4-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ¹H NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of the complex were studied by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations and the negative logarithm values of the ground-state acid ionization constants were derived to be pK(a1) = 1.31 ± 0.09 and pK(a2) = 5.71 ± 0.11 with the pK(a2) associated deprotonation/protonation process occurring over 3 pK(a) units more acidic than thiophenyl-free parent complex of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hpip)]²⁺ {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}. The calf thymus DNA-binding properties of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hbptip)]²⁺ in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.1 and 50 mM NaCl) were investigated by DNA viscosities and density functional theoretical calculations as well as UV-visible and emission spectroscopy techniques of UV-visible and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)₆]⁴⁻, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, DNA melting experiments, and reverse salt effects. The complex was evidenced to bind to the DNA intercalatively with binding affinity being greater than those for previously reported analogs of [Ru(bpy)₂(Hip)]²⁺, [Ru(bpy)₂(Htip)]²⁺, and [Ru(bpy)₂(Haptip)]²⁺ {Hip = 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Htip = 2-thiophenimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, Haptip = 2-(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}.

  5. The DNA binding property of PML/RARA but not the integrity of PML nuclear bodies is indispensable for leukemic transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Liu

    Full Text Available PML/RARA is the oncoprotein driving acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. It suppresses genes expression by recruitment of a number of transcriptional repressors, resulting in differentiation block and malignant transformation of hematopoietic cells. Here, we found that mice primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs, transduced by DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants, were deficient in colony formation. Further experiments showed that DNA-binding-defective PML/RARA mutants could not repress the transcription of retinoic acid regulated genes. Intriguingly, there were no significant differences of the micro-speckled intracellular distribution between the mutants and wild-type PML/RARA. Some retinoic acid target genes regulated by PML/RARA are involved in not only differentiation block but also hematopoietic cell self-renewal. Altogether, our data demonstrate that direct DNA-binding is essential for PML/RARA to immortalize hematopoietic cells, while disruption of PML-nuclear body does not seem to be a prerequisite for hematopoietic cell transformation.

  6. Intercalator conjugates of pyrimidine locked nucleic acid-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides: improving DNA binding properties and reaching cellular activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Erika; Corgnali, Maddalena; Perrouault, Loïc; Roig, Victoria; Asseline, Ulysse; Sørensen, Mads D.; Babu, B. Ravindra; Wengel, Jesper; Giovannangeli, Carine

    2005-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are powerful tools to interfere sequence-specifically with DNA-associated biological functions. (A/T,G)-containing TFOs are more commonly used in cells than (T,C)-containing TFOs, especially C-rich sequences; indeed the low intracellular stability of the non-covalent pyrimidine triplexes make the latter less active. In this work we studied the possibility to enhance DNA binding of (T,C)-containing TFOs, aiming to reach cellular activities; to this end, we used locked nucleic acid-modified TFOs (TFO/LNAs) in association with 5′-conjugation of an intercalating agent, an acridine derivative. In vitro a stable triplex was formed with the TFO-acridine conjugate: by SPR measurements at 37°C and neutral pH, the dissociation equilibrium constant was found in the nanomolar range and the triplex half-life ∼10 h (50-fold longer compared with the unconjugated TFO/LNA). Moreover to further understand DNA binding of (T,C)-containing TFO/LNAs, hybridization studies were performed at different pH values: triplex stabilization associated with pH decrease was mainly due to a slower dissociation process. Finally, biological activity of pyrimidine TFO/LNAs was evaluated in a cellular context: it occurred at concentrations ∼0.1 μM for acridine-conjugated TFO/LNA (or ∼2 μM for the unconjugated TFO/LNA) whereas the corresponding phosphodiester TFO was inactive, and it was demonstrated to be triplex-mediated. PMID:16049028

  7. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3DNA-binding properties are also discussed. Moreover, the complex 3 possess significant antioxidant activity against superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and the scavenging effects of it are stronger than standard mannitol and vitamin C.

  8. The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor: definition of its consensus binding sequence and analysis of its DNA binding and repressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinte, Sébastien; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Deltour, Sophie; Rood, Brian R; Guérardel, Cateline; Leprince, Dominique

    2004-09-10

    HIC1 (hypermethylated in cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p13.3, a region frequently hypermethylated or deleted in human tumors and in a contiguous-gene syndrome, the Miller-Dieker syndrome. HIC1 is a transcriptional repressor containing five Krüppel-like C(2)H(2) zinc fingers and an N-terminal dimerization and autonomous repression domain called BTB/POZ. Although some of the HIC1 transcriptional repression mechanisms have been recently deciphered, target genes are still to be discovered. In this study, we determined the consensus binding sequence for HIC1 and investigated its DNA binding properties. Using a selection and amplification of binding sites technique, we identified the sequence 5'-(C)/(G)NG(C)/(G)GGGCA(C)/(A) CC-3' as an optimal binding site. In silico and functional analyses fully validated this consensus and highlighted a GGCA core motif bound by zinc fingers 3 and 4. The BTB/POZ domain inhibits the binding of HIC1 to a single site but mediates cooperative binding to a probe containing five concatemerized binding sites, a property shared by other BTB/POZ proteins. Finally, full-length HIC1 proteins transiently expressed in RK13 cells and more importantly, endogenous HIC1 proteins from the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line, repress the transcription of a reporter gene through their direct binding to these sites, as confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments. The definition of the HIC1-specific DNA binding sequence as well as the requirement for multiple sites for optimal binding of the full-length protein are mandatory prerequisites for the identification and analyses of bona fide HIC1 target genes.

  9. CRN13 candidate effectors from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens are DNA-binding proteins which trigger host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcés, Diana; Camborde, Laurent; Pel, Michiel J C; Jauneau, Alain; Martinez, Yves; Néant, Isabelle; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    To successfully colonize their host, pathogens produce effectors that can interfere with host cellular processes. Here we investigated the function of CRN13 candidate effectors produced by plant pathogenic oomycetes and detected in the genome of the amphibian pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (BdCRN13). When expressed in Nicotiana, AeCRN13, from the legume root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, increases the susceptibility of the leaves to the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. When transiently expressed in amphibians or plant cells, AeCRN13 and BdCRN13 localize to the cell nuclei, triggering aberrant cell development and eventually causing cell death. Using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments in plant cells, we showed that both CRN13s interact with nuclear DNA and trigger plant DNA damage response (DDR). Mutating key amino acid residues in a predicted HNH-like endonuclease motif abolished the interaction of AeCRN13 with DNA, the induction of DDR and the enhancement of Nicotiana susceptibility to P. capsici. Finally, H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage, and enhanced expression of genes involved in the DDR were observed in A. euteiches-infected Medicago truncatula roots. These results show that CRN13 from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens promotes host susceptibility by targeting nuclear DNA and inducing DDR.

  10. Di- and polynuclear silver(I) saccharinate complexes of tertiary diphosphane ligands: synthesis, structures, in vitro DNA binding, and antibacterial and anticancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Veysel T; Gocmen, Elif; Icsel, Ceyda; Cengiz, Murat; Susluer, Sunde Y; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    A series of new silver(I) saccharinate (sac) complexes, [Ag2(sac)2(μ-dppm)H2O]·H2O (1), {[Ag2(μ-sac)2(μ-dppe)]·3H2O·CH2Cl2} n (2), [Ag2(μ-sac)2(μ-dppp)] n (3), and [Ag(sac)(μ-dppb)] n (4) [dppm is 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)methane, dppe is 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, dppp is 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane, and dppb is 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane], have been synthesized and characterized by C, H, N elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis. Single-crystal X-ray studies show that the diphosphanes act as bridging ligands to yield a dinuclear complex (1) and one-dimensional coordination polymers (2 and 4), whereas the sac ligand adopts a μ2-N/O bridging mode in 2, and is N-coordinated in 1 and 4. The interaction of the silver(I) complexes with fish sperm DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis. The binding studies indicate that the silver(I) complexes can interact with fish sperm DNA through intercalation, and complexes 1 and 3 have the highest binding affinity. The gel electrophoresis assay further confirms the binding of the complexes with the pBR322 plasmid DNA. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the complexes indicate that complex 1 exhibits very high antibacterial activity against standard bacterial strains of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus, being much higher than those of AgNO3, silver sulfadiazine, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin. Moreover, complexes 1-3 exhibit very high cytotoxic activity against A549 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines, compared with AgNO3 and cisplatin. The bacterial and cell growth inhibitions of the silver(I) complexes are closely related to their DNA binding affinities.

  11. Variables influencing DNA-binding in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H G

    1987-01-01

    The suitability of certain mouse strains for carcinogenicity testing has been questioned. Some chemicals increase the incidence of liver tumors above a relatively high background, an effect not seen in rats. This raises the question whether species and tissue specific effects are involved which are reflected in the DNA binding of metabolites. DNA binding indices in mouse liver have been determined in only a few instances. They are comparable to those found for rat liver DNA with aniline, benzo(a)-pyrene, butadiene, dimethylnitrosamine, methylnitrosourea and they are lower in the mouse with aflatoxin B1, trans-4-acetylaminostilbene and 2-aminofluorene derivatives. The available data on DNA binding in mouse liver suggest that the same adducts are formed as in rats but that metabolism and repair are variables which can modify the extent of DNA damage. However, the extent of DNA binding does not always correlate with the susceptibility of this tissue to carcinogenesis. But mouse liver is no exception in this respect. It is concluded that the formation of mouse liver tumors in long term studies with genotoxic chemicals indicates tumor initiating potential. In contrast, there are other chemicals such as chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides which do not bind to DNA to any extent and which are not genotoxic in common short term tests and yet give rise to liver tumors in mice but not in rats. Positive results in long term studies are suggested to indicate promoting properties of such compounds.

  12. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  13. Anilides and quinolones with nitrogen-bearing substituents from benzothiophene and thienothiophene series: synthesis, photochemical synthesis, cytostatic evaluation, 3D-derived QSAR analysis and DNA-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, Maja; Bertoša, Branimir; Nhili, Raja; Depauw, Sabine; Martin-Kleiner, Irena; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Tomić, Sanja; Kralj, Marijeta; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2014-01-01

    A series of new anilides (2a-c, 4-7, 17a-c, 18) and quinolones (3a-b, 8a-b, 9a-b, 10-15, 19) with nitrogen-bearing substituents from benzo[b]thiophene and thieno[2,3-c]thiophene series are prepared. Benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]- and thieno[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones (3a-b, 8a-b) are synthesized by the reaction of photochemical dehydrohalogenation from corresponding anilides. Anilides and quinolones were tested for the antiproliferative activity. Fused quinolones bearing protonated aminium group, quaternary ammonium group, N-methylated and protonated aminium group, amino and protonated amino group (8a, 9b, 10-12) showed very prominent anticancer activity, whereby the hydrochloride salt of N',N'-dimethylaminopropyl-substituted quinolone (14) was the most active one, having the IC50 concentration at submicromolar range in accordance with previous QSAR predictions. On the other hand, flexible anilides were among the less active. Chemometric analysis of investigated compounds was performed. 3D-derived QSAR analysis identified solubility, metabolitic stability and the possibility of the compound to be ionized at pH 4-8 as molecular properties that are positively correlated with anticancer activity of investigated compounds, while molecular flexibility, polarizability and sum of hydrophobic surface areas were found to be negatively correlated. Anilides 2a-b, 4-7 and quinolones 3a-b, 8a-b, 9b and 10-14 were evaluated for DNA binding propensities and topoisomerases I/II inhibition as part of their mechanism of action. Among the anilides, only compound 7 presented some DNA binding propensity whereas the quinolones 8b, 9b and 10-14 intercalate in the DNA base pairs, compounds 8b, 9b and 14 being the most efficient ones. The strongest DNA intercalators, compounds 8b, 9b and 14, were clearly distinguished from the other compounds according to their molecular descriptors by the PCA and PLS analysis.

  14. Synthesis and Characterisation of Copper(II Complexes with Tridentate NNO Functionalized Ligand: Density Function Theory Study, DNA Binding Mechanism, Optical Properties, and Biological Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The photo physical properties of two mononuclear pentacoordinated copper(II complexes formulated as [Cu(L(Cl(H2O] (1 and [Cu(L(Br(H2O] (2 HL = (1-[(3-methyl-pyridine-2-ylimino-methyl]-naphthalen-2-ol were synthesized and characterized by elemental, physicochemical, and spectroscopic methods. The density function theory calculations are used to investigate the electronic structures and the electronic properties of ligand and complex. The interactions of copper(II complexes towards calf thymus DNA were examined with the help of absorption, viscosity, and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques at pH 7.40. All spectroscopy's result indicates that complexes show good binding activity to calf thymus DNA through groove binding. The optical absorption and fluorescence emission properties of microwires were characterized by fluorescence microscope. From a spectroscopic viewpoint, all compounds strongly emit green light in the solid state. The microscopy investigation suggested that microwires exhibited optical waveguide behaviour which are applicable as fluorescent nanomaterials and can be used as building blocks for miniaturized photonic devices. Antibacterial study reveals that complexes are better antimicrobial agents than free Schiff base due to bacterial cell penetration by chelation. Moreover, the antioxidant study of the ligand and complexes is evaluated by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free-radical assays, which demonstrate that the complexes are of higher antioxidant activity than free ligand.

  15. Optical, redox, and DNA-binding properties of phenanthridinium chromophores: elucidating the role of the phenyl substituent for fluorescence enhancement of ethidium in the presence of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunkl, Christa; Pichlmaier, Markus; Winter, Rainer; Kharlanov, Vladimir; Rettig, Wolfgang; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2010-03-15

    The phenanthridinium chromophores 5-ethyl-6-phenylphenanthridinium (1), 5-ethyl-6-methylphenanthridinium (2), 3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-methylphenanthridinium (3), and 3,8-diamino-5-ethyl-6-(4-N,N-diethylaminophenyl)phenanthridinium (4) were characterized by their optical and redox properties. All dyes were applied in titration experiments with a random-sequence 17mer DNA duplex and their binding affinities were determined. The results were compared to well-known ethidium bromide (E). In general, this set of data allows the influence of substituents in positions 3, 6, and 8 on the optical properties of E to be elucidated. Especially, compound 4 was used to compare the weak electron-donating character of the phenyl substituent at position 6 of E with the more electron-donating 4-N,N-diethylaminophenyl group. Analysis of all of the measurements revealed two pairs of chromophores. The first pair, consisting of 1 and 2, lacks the amino groups in positions 3 and 8, and, as a result, these dyes exhibit clearly altered optical and electrochemical properties compared with E. In the presence of DNA, a significant fluorescence quenching was observed. Their binding affinity to DNA is reduced by nearly one order of magnitude. The electronic effect of the phenyl group in position 6 on this type of dye is rather small. The properties of the second set, 3 and 4, are similar to E due to the presence of the two strongly electron-donating amino groups in positions 3 and 8. However, in contrast to 1 and 2, the electron-donating character of the substituent in position 6 of 3 and 4 is critical. The binding, as well as the fluorescence enhancement, is clearly related to the electron-donating effect of this substituent. Accordingly, compound 4 shows the strongest binding affinity and the strongest fluorescence enhancement. Quantum chemical calculations reveal a general mechanism related to the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) model. Accordingly, an increase of the twist angle

  16. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels.

  17. Characterization and DNA-binding specificities of Ralstonia TAL-like effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) from Xanthomonas sp. have been used as customizable DNA-binding modules for genome-engineering applications. Ralstonia solanacearum TALE-like proteins (RTLs) exhibit similar structural features to TALEs, including a central DNA-binding domain composed of 35 amino acid-long repeats. Here, we characterize the RTLs and show that they localize in the plant cell nucleus, mediate DNA binding, and might function as transcriptional activators. RTLs have a unique DNA-binding architecture and are enriched in repeat variable di-residues (RVDs), which determine repeat DNA-binding specificities. We determined the DNA-binding specificities for the RVD sequences ND, HN, NP, and NT. The RVD ND mediates highly specific interactions with C nucleotide, HN interacts specifically with A and G nucleotides, and NP binds to C, A, and G nucleotides. Moreover, we developed a highly efficient repeat assembly approach for engineering RTL effectors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that RTLs are unique DNA-targeting modules that are excellent alternatives to be tailored to bind to user-selected DNA sequences for targeted genomic and epigenomic modifications. These findings will facilitate research concerning RTL molecular biology and RTL roles in the pathogenicity of Ralstonia spp. © 2013 The Author.

  18. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins based on sequential and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Qing; Feng, Kai-Yan; Ding, Juan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in many biological processes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction, it is necessary to identify the DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins. In the last decade, computational approaches have been developed to predict protein-DNA-binding sites based solely on protein sequences. In this study, we developed a novel predictor based on support vector machine algorithm coupled with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy method followed by incremental feature selection. We incorporated not only features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, but also five three-dimensional (3D) structural features calculated from PDB data to predict the protein-DNA interaction sites. Feature analysis showed that 3D structural features indeed contributed to the prediction of DNA-binding site and it was demonstrated that the prediction performance was better with 3D structural features than without them. It was also shown via analysis of features from each site that the features of DNA-binding site itself contribute the most to the prediction. Our prediction method may become a useful tool for identifying the DNA-binding sites and the feature analysis described in this paper may provide useful insights for in-depth investigations into the mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction.

  19. Structural Basis for DNA Binding Specificity by the Auxin-Dependent ARF Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.R.; Freire Rios, A.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Saaki, T.; Manfield, I.W.; Kepinski, S.; López-Vidrieo, I.; Franco-Zorilla, J.M.; Vries, de S.C.; Solano, R.; Weijers, D.; Coll, M.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin regulates numerous plant developmental processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs), yet the mechanistic basis for generating specificity in auxin response is unknown. Here, we address this question by solving

  20. CSI-FID: high throughput label-free detection of DNA binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Karl E; Stover, James S; Boger, Dale L; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2009-07-15

    Determining the sequence specifity of DNA binding molecules is a non-trivial task. Here we describe the development of a platform for assaying the sequence specificity of DNA ligands using label free detection on high density DNA microarrays. This is achieved by combining Cognate Site Identification (CSI) with Fluorescence Intercalation Displacement (FID) to create CSI-FID. We use the well-studied small molecule DNA ligand netropsin to develop this high throughput platform. Analysis of the DNA binding properties of protein- and small molecule-based libraries with CSI-FID will advance the development of genome-anchored molecules for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Characterization of the target DNA sequence for the DNA-binding domain of zinc finger protein 191

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haoyue Wang; Ruilin Sun; Guoxiang Liu; Minghui Yao; Jian Fei; Hebai Shen

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the DNA-binding properties of transcription factors are important in searching for the downstream genes regulated by these factors. In the present study, we report on the DNA-binding property of a Cys2His2-type transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (Zfp191), which has been newly found to play a significant role in mice.By constructing a fusion protein containing the DNA-binding domain of Zfp191,we characterized target DNA by determining the protein's binding specificity and dependence on zinc.The data showed that the DNA-binding domain of Zfp191can specifically bind to the TCAT repeat motif and that there is a cooperative effect among the target DNA's multiple binding sites.Furthermore,the binding reaction is dependent on zinc.This work provides a foundation for further studies on the role of Zfp191 in gene regulation and development.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of DNA binding by a Bacillus single stranded DNA binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas-Fiss Esther E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB are essential for DNA replication, repair, and recombination in all organisms. SSB works in concert with a variety of DNA metabolizing enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Results We have cloned and purified SSB from Bacillus anthracis (SSBBA. In the absence of DNA, at concentrations ≤100 μg/ml, SSBBA did not form a stable tetramer and appeared to resemble bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. Fluorescence anisotropy studies demonstrated that SSBBA bound ssDNA with high affinity comparable to other prokaryotic SSBs. Thermodynamic analysis indicated both hydrophobic and ionic contributions to ssDNA binding. FRET analysis of oligo(dT70 binding suggested that SSBBA forms a tetrameric assembly upon ssDNA binding. This report provides evidence of a bacterial SSB that utilizes a novel mechanism for DNA binding through the formation of a transient tetrameric structure. Conclusions Unlike other prokaryotic SSB proteins, SSBBA from Bacillus anthracis appeared to be monomeric at concentrations ≤100 μg/ml as determined by SE-HPLC. SSBBA retained its ability to bind ssDNA with very high affinity, comparable to SSB proteins which are tetrameric. In the presence of a long ssDNA template, SSBBA appears to form a transient tetrameric structure. Its unique structure appears to be due to the cumulative effect of multiple key amino acid changes in its sequence during evolution, leading to perturbation of stable dimer and tetramer formation. The structural features of SSBBA could promote facile assembly and disassembly of the protein-DNA complex required in processes such as DNA replication.

  3. Sequence-selective DNA binding with cell-permeable oligoguanidinium-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Jesús; Sánchez, Mateo I; Valero, Julián; de Mendoza, Javier; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-03-21

    Conjugation of a short peptide fragment from a bZIP protein to an oligoguanidinium tail results in a DNA-binding miniprotein that selectively interacts with composite sequences containing the peptide-binding site next to an A/T-rich tract. In addition to stabilizing the complex with the target DNA, the oligoguanidinium unit also endows the conjugate with cell internalization properties.

  4. SUMO-1 possesses DNA binding activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieruszeski Jean-Michel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugation of small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs is a frequent post-translational modification of proteins. SUMOs can also temporally associate with protein-targets via SUMO binding motifs (SBMs. Protein sumoylation has been identified as an important regulatory mechanism especially in the regulation of transcription and the maintenance of genome stability. The precise molecular mechanisms by which SUMO conjugation and association act are, however, not understood. Findings Using NMR spectroscopy and protein-DNA cross-linking experiments, we demonstrate here that SUMO-1 can specifically interact with dsDNA in a sequence-independent fashion. We also show that SUMO-1 binding to DNA can compete with other protein-DNA interactions at the example of the regulatory domain of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase and, based on these competition studies, estimate the DNA binding constant of SUMO1 in the range 1 mM. Conclusion This finding provides an important insight into how SUMO-1 might exert its activity. SUMO-1 might play a general role in destabilizing DNA bound protein complexes thereby operating in a bottle-opener way of fashion, explaining its pivotal role in regulating the activity of many central transcription and DNA repair complexes.

  5. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinara Mônica Vitalino de Almeida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a–h were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 M−1 and quenching constants from −0.2 × 104 to 2.18 × 104 M−1 indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N- (4-chlorophenyl hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f, while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a. There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties.

  6. DNA Binding Proteins and Drug Delivery Vehicles: Tales of Elephants and Snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    We compare the DNA-interactive properties of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) with those of crotamine, a component of the venom of the South American rattlesnake. Gene 32 protein is a classical single-stranded DNA binding protein that has served as a model for this class of proteins. We discuss its biological functions, structure, binding specificities, and how it controls its own expression. In addition, we delineate the roles of the structural domains of gp32 and how they regulate the protein's various activities. Crotamine, a component of the venom of the South American rattlesnake, is probably not a DNA binding protein in nature, but clearly shows significant DNA binding in vitro. Crotamine has been shown to selectively disrupt rapidly dividing cells and this specificity has been demonstrated for crotamine-facilitated delivery of plasmid DNA Thus, crotamine, or a variant of the protein, could have important clinical and/or diagnostic roles. Understanding its DNA binding properties may therefore lead to more effective drug delivery vehicles.

  7. Structural Determinants of DNA Binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 Transcriptional Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel (Princeton); (UW-MED)

    2010-11-05

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan Apetala2 (AP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical Apicomplexan AP2 protein, PF14{_}0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a {beta}-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent {alpha}-helix supports the {beta}-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the {alpha}-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the {beta}-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14{_}0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multisite binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14{_}0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation.

  8. Copper(II) complexes of salicylic acid combining superoxide dismutase mimetic properties with DNA binding and cleaving capabilities display promising chemotherapeutic potential with fast acting in vitro cytotoxicity against cisplatin sensitive and resistant cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mark; Kellett, Andrew; McCann, Malachy; Rosair, Georgina; McNamara, Mary; Howe, Orla; Creaven, Bernadette S; McClean, Siobhán; Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn-Arfa; O'Shea, Denis; Devereux, Michael

    2012-03-08

    The complexes [Cu(salH)(2)(H(2)O)] (1), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(H(2)O)] (2), {Cu(3-MeOsal)(H(2)O)(0.75)}(n) (3), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(BZDH)(2)] (4), [Cu(dipsH)(2)(2-MeOHBZDH)(2)]·EtOH (5), [Cu(sal)(phen)] (6), [Cu(dips)(phen)]·H(2)O (7), and [Cu(3-MeOsal)(phen)]·H(2)O (8) (salH(2) = salicylic acid; dipsH(2) = 3,5-diisopropylsalicylic acid; 3-MeOsalH(2) = 3-methoxysalicylic acid; BZDH = benzimidazole; 2-MeOHBZDH = 2 methanolbenzimidazole and phen =1,10-phenanthroline) were prepared and characterized. Structures of 4, 5, and 8 were determined by X-ray crystallography. Compounds 1-8 are potent superoxide dismutase mimetics, and they are inactive as inhibitors of COX-2 activity. Compounds 1, 4, and 5 exhibit moderate inhibition of COX-1. Complexes 6-8 display rapid micromolar cytotoxicity against cisplatin sensitive (breast (MCF-7), prostate (DU145), and colon (HT29)) and cisplatin resistant (ovarian (SK-OV-3)) cell lines compared to 1-5, and they exhibit potent in vitro DNA binding and cleavage capabilities.

  9. A seven-coordinated manganese(II) complex with V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine: synthesis, structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huilu; Yuan, Jingkun; Bai, Ying; Wang, Hua; Pan, Guolong; Kong, Jin

    2012-11-05

    A manganese(II) complex of the type, [MnL(pic)(2)]·H(2)O, was obtained by the reaction of the V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine (L) with Mn(pic)(2) (pic=picrate). The ligand L and Mn(II) complex were confirmed on the basis of elemental analysis, molarconductivities, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-vis spectra and X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal X-ray revealed that central Mn(II) atom is seven-coordinate with a MnN(3)O(4) environment, in which ligand L acts as a tridentate N-donor. The remaining coordination sites were occupied by four O atoms afforded by two picrate anion. Interaction of the free ligand L and Mn(II) complex with DNA were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that both ligand L and Mn(II) complex bind to DNA in an intercalative binding mode, and DNA-binding affinity of the Mn(II) complex is stronger than that of ligand L. Moreover, antioxidant assay in vitro shows the Mn(II) complex possesses significant antioxidant activities.

  10. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...... was validated by the identification of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins, and its use provided evidence that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase exhibits DNA sequence-specific binding to DNA....

  11. Affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed t...

  12. Domain Structure of the Redβ Single-Strand Annealing Protein: the C-terminal Domain is Required for Fine-Tuning DNA-binding Properties, Interaction with the Exonuclease Partner, and Recombination in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher E; Bell, Charles E

    2016-02-13

    Redβ is a component of the Red recombination system of bacteriophage λ that promotes a single strand annealing (SSA) reaction to generate end-to-end concatemers of the phage genome for packaging. Redβ interacts with λ exonuclease (λexo), the other component of the Red system, to form a "synaptosome" complex that somehow integrates the end resection and annealing steps of the reaction. Previous work using limited proteolysis and chemical modification revealed that Redβ consists of an N-terminal DNA binding domain, residues 1-177, and a flexible C-terminal "tail", residues 178-261. Here, we quantitatively compare the binding of the full-length protein (Redβ(FL)) and the N-terminal domain (Redβ(177)) to different lengths of ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product. We find that in general, Redβ(FL) binds more tightly to annealed duplex product than to ssDNA substrate, while Redβ(177) binds more tightly to ssDNA. In addition, the C-terminal region of Redβ corresponding to residues 182-261 was purified and found to fold into an α-helical domain that is required for the interaction with λexo to form the synaptosome complex. Deletion analysis of Redβ revealed that removal of just eleven residues from the C-terminus disrupts the interaction with λexo as well as ssDNA and dsDNA recombination in vivo. By contrast, the determinants for self-oligomerization of Redβ appear to reside solely within the N-terminal domain. The subtle but significant differences in the relative binding of Redβ(FL) and Redβ(177) to ssDNA substrate and annealed duplex product may be important for Redβ to function as a SSA protein in vivo.

  13. A rapid synthesis of 2-substituted 1,2,3- triazole-1-oxide derivative starting from 4-(methyl)isonitrosoacetophenone and its Ni(II) complex: Characterization, DNA binding and cleavage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Erer, Oktay; Dilek, Nefise

    2017-02-01

    An efficient route, not including any metal salt as a catalyst, for the synthesis of a new 2-substituted 1,2,3- triazole-1-oxide is reported in this paper. The title compound has been synthesized via reacting 4-(methyl)isonitrosoacetophenone with hydrazine hydrate and dipyridyl ketone in high yield under mild reaction condition. The structure of the new 1,2,3-triazole-1-oxide has been characterized via single crystal X-ray and spectral studies. The 1:1 ratio reaction of the 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand with nickel(II) chloride gives the mononuclear complex [Ni(L)(DMF)(Cl)2] which is hexa-coordinated within an octahedral geometry. Characterization of the 1,2,3-triazole compound and its Ni(II) complex with FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-vis, TGA and elemental analysis also confirm the proposed structures for the compounds. The interactions of the compounds with Calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated via UV-visible spectra and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that both ligand and Ni(II) complex bind to DNA in electrostatic interaction and/or groove binding with a slight partial intercalation. DNA cleavage experiments have been also investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent (H2O2). Both 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand and nickel(II) complex show nuclease activity, which significantly depends on concentrations of the compounds, both in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent. DNA binding and cleavage affinities of the Ni(II) complex is stronger than that of the 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand.

  14. One-pot synthesis of a new 2-substituted 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide derivative from dipyridyl ketone and isonitrosoacetophenone hydrazone: Nickel(II) complex, DNA binding and cleavage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Erer, Oktay; Dilek, Nefise

    2017-04-01

    An efficient and simple one-pot synthesis of a new 1,2,3-triazole-1-oxide via reaction between isonitrosoacetophenone hydrazone and dipyridyl ketone in the EtOH/AcOH at room temperature has been developed smoothly in high yield. The reaction proceeds via metal salt free, in-situ formation of asymmetric azine followed by cyclization to provide 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide compound. It has been structurally characterized. The 1:1 ratio reaction of the 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand with nickel(II) chloride gives the mononuclear complex [Ni(L)(DMF)Cl2], hexa-coordinated within an octahedral geometry. Characterization of the 1,2,3-triazole compound and its Ni(II) complex with FTIR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, UV-vis and elemental analysis also confirms the proposed structures of the compounds. The interactions of the compounds with Calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by UV-visible spectra and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that both ligand and Ni(II) complex bind to DNA in electrostatic interaction and/or groove binding, also with a slight partial intercalation in the case of ligand. DNA cleavage experiments have been also investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent (H2O2). Both 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand and its nickel(II) complex show nuclease activity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. DNA binding and cleavage affinities of the 1,2,3-triazole 1-oxide ligand is stronger than that of the Ni(II) complex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  16. Communication routes in ARID domains between distal residues in helix 5 and the DNA-binding loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Invernizzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ARID is a DNA-binding domain involved in several transcriptional regulatory processes, including cell-cycle regulation and embryonic development. ARID domains are also targets of the Human Cancer Protein Interaction Network. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms related to conformational changes in the family of ARID domains. Thus, we have examined their structural dynamics to enrich the knowledge on this important family of regulatory proteins. In particular, we used an approach that integrates atomistic simulations and methods inspired by graph theory. To relate these properties to protein function we studied both the free and DNA-bound forms. The interaction with DNA not only stabilizes the conformations of the DNA-binding loops, but also strengthens pre-existing paths in the native ARID ensemble for long-range communication to those loops. Residues in helix 5 are identified as critical mediators for intramolecular communication to the DNA-binding regions. In particular, we identified a distal tyrosine that plays a key role in long-range communication to the DNA-binding loops and that is experimentally known to impair DNA-binding. Mutations at this tyrosine and in other residues of helix 5 are also demonstrated, by our approach, to affect the paths of communication to the DNA-binding loops and alter their native dynamics. Overall, our results are in agreement with a scenario in which ARID domains exist as an ensemble of substates, which are shifted by external perturbation, such as the interaction with DNA. Conformational changes at the DNA-binding loops are transmitted long-range by intramolecular paths, which have their heart in helix 5.

  17. Communication routes in ARID domains between distal residues in helix 5 and the DNA-binding loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Gaetano; Tiberti, Matteo; Lambrughi, Matteo; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Papaleo, Elena

    2014-09-01

    ARID is a DNA-binding domain involved in several transcriptional regulatory processes, including cell-cycle regulation and embryonic development. ARID domains are also targets of the Human Cancer Protein Interaction Network. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms related to conformational changes in the family of ARID domains. Thus, we have examined their structural dynamics to enrich the knowledge on this important family of regulatory proteins. In particular, we used an approach that integrates atomistic simulations and methods inspired by graph theory. To relate these properties to protein function we studied both the free and DNA-bound forms. The interaction with DNA not only stabilizes the conformations of the DNA-binding loops, but also strengthens pre-existing paths in the native ARID ensemble for long-range communication to those loops. Residues in helix 5 are identified as critical mediators for intramolecular communication to the DNA-binding regions. In particular, we identified a distal tyrosine that plays a key role in long-range communication to the DNA-binding loops and that is experimentally known to impair DNA-binding. Mutations at this tyrosine and in other residues of helix 5 are also demonstrated, by our approach, to affect the paths of communication to the DNA-binding loops and alter their native dynamics. Overall, our results are in agreement with a scenario in which ARID domains exist as an ensemble of substates, which are shifted by external perturbation, such as the interaction with DNA. Conformational changes at the DNA-binding loops are transmitted long-range by intramolecular paths, which have their heart in helix 5.

  18. Both HMG boxes in Hmo1 are essential for DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Ayako; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Kasahara, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Hmo1, a member of the high mobility group B family proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, associates with the promoters of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) to direct accurate transcriptional initiation. Here, to identify factors involved in the binding of Hmo1 to its targets and the mechanism of Hmo1-dependent transcriptional initiation, we developed a novel reporter system using the promoter of the RPG RPS5. A genetic screen did not identify any factors that influence Hmo1 binding, but did identify a number of mutations in Hmo1 that impair its DNA binding activity in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that Hmo1 binds to its target promoters autonomously without any aid of additional factors. Furthermore, characterization of Hmo1 mutants showed that the box A domain plays a pivotal role in DNA binding and may be required for the recognition of structural properties of target promoters that occur in native chromatin.

  19. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  20. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K. (VCU); (Mount Sinai Hospital)

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  1. A novel DNA-binding domain in the Shrunken initiator-binding protein (IBP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugert, T; Werr, W

    1994-06-01

    South-western screening of lambda gt11 expression library with a fragment of the Shrunken promoter containing the initiator element resulted in cloning of a novel maize gene. The encoded initiator-binding protein (IBP1) interacts at the transcription start site of the Shrunken promoter. Analysis of the 680 amino acid (aa) long polypeptide revealed a novel bipartite DNA-binding domain at the carboxyl terminus. In its amino-terminal part, it is weakly related to Myb R-repeats but the following basic region is also essential for DNA binding. A region of similarity to the conserved 2.1 and 2.2 motifs in bacterial sigma-factors is located close to the IBP1 amino terminus. Two putative nuclear localization signals are compatible with the presence of antigenically related polypeptides in nuclear protein extracts. The IBP1 gene was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 9 (9L095); a second highly related gene IBP2 is located on the short arm of chromosome 1 (1S014). Both genes encode proteins sharing 93% similarity and are transcribed with similar activity in different plant organs. A small 82 nucleotide intron in the IBP2 transcript is found unspliced to a variable degree in different tissues. Translation of this incompletely processed transcript would result in a truncated amino-terminal polypeptide lacking the DNA-binding domain.

  2. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-05-26

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner.

  3. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple

  4. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovir

  5. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  6. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  7. Programmable DNA-binding proteins from Burkholderia provide a fresh perspective on the TALE-like repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Dietze, Jörn; Elsaesser, Janett; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The tandem repeats of transcription activator like effectors (TALEs) mediate sequence-specific DNA binding using a simple code. Naturally, TALEs are injected by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells to manipulate the host transcriptome. In the laboratory TALE DNA binding domains are reprogrammed and used to target a fused functional domain to a genomic locus of choice. Research into the natural diversity of TALE-like proteins may provide resources for the further improvement of current TALE technology. Here we describe TALE-like proteins from the endosymbiotic bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica, termed Bat proteins. Bat repeat domains mediate sequence-specific DNA binding with the same code as TALEs, despite less than 40% sequence identity. We show that Bat proteins can be adapted for use as transcription factors and nucleases and that sequence preferences can be reprogrammed. Unlike TALEs, the core repeats of each Bat protein are highly polymorphic. This feature allowed us to explore alternative strategies for the design of custom Bat repeat arrays, providing novel insights into the functional relevance of non-RVD residues. The Bat proteins offer fertile grounds for research into the creation of improved programmable DNA-binding proteins and comparative insights into TALE-like evolution.

  8. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van, J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus-infected cells increased expression of LEF-3, LEF-4, and P35. In contrast, expression of the structural genes coding for P39 and polyhedrin was suppressed while expression of genes coding for P1...

  9. Spectroscopic, DNA binding ability, biological activity, DFT calculations and non linear optical properties (NLO) of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes with ONS Schiff base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A.; Elantabli, Fatma M.; Moustafa, H.; El-Medani, Samir M.

    2017-08-01

    The reaction of Co(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) with the synthesized N-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylidene)-2-aminothiophenol Schiff base ligand (H2L) at room temperature resulted in the formation of the five complexes; [Co(HL)2]H2O, 1; [M(HL)2] (M = Cu, Zn and Cd), (2-4) and [Hg(HL)Cl], 5. The ligand and its complexes were characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, 1H NMR, magnetic measurement, molar conductance, and thermal analysis. Coats and Redfern method was used to compute the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. Antimicrobial activities of H2L and its complexes have been studied. The binding of Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated using UV-Vis and fluorescence absorption spectra. The results indicated that the ligand and its complexes may bind to DNA by intercalation modes, with a much higher binding affinity of the complexes than that of the ligand. The equilibrium geometries of the studied complexes are investigated theoretically at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory, and it was found that these geometries are non-linear. The calculated EHOMO and ELUMO energies of the studied complexes can be used to calculate the global properties. The calculated nonlinear optical parameters (NLO); first order hyperpolarizibility (β) of the studied complexes show promising optical properties.

  10. Co(III and Ni(II Complexes Containing Bioactive Ligands: Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Photocleavage Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Prabhakara

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA binding and photocleavage characteristics of a series of mixed ligand complexes of the type [M(bpy2qbdp](PF6n⋅xH2O (where M=Co(III or Ni(II, bpy=2.2′-bipryidine, qbdp = Quinolino[3,2-b]benzodiazepine, n=3 or 2 and x=5 or 2 have been investigated. The DNA binding property of the complexes with calf thymus DNA has been investigated by using absorption spectra, viscosity measurements, as well as thermal denaturation studies. Intrinsic binding constant (Kb has been estimated under similar set of experimental conditions. Absorption spectral studies indicate that the Co(III and Ni(II complexes intercalate between the base pairs of the CT-DNA tightly with intrinsic DNA binding constant of 1.3×106 and 3.1×105 M-1 in Tris-HCl buffer containing 50 mM NaCl, respectively. The proposed DNA binding mode supports the large enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA on binding to quinolo[3,2-b]benzodiazepine. The oxidative as well as photo-induced cleavage reactions were monitered by gel electrophoresis for both complexes. The photocleavage experiments showed that the cobalt(III complex can cleave pUC19 DNA effectively in the absence of external additives as an effective inorganic nuclease.

  11. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats.

  12. Synthesis, spectral properties and DNA binding and nuclease activity of lanthanide (III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine benzhydrazone: X-ray crystal structure, Hirshfeld studies and nitrate- interactions of cerium(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karreddula Raja; Akkili Suseelamma; Katreddi Hussain Reddy

    2016-01-01

    The lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula of [Ln(BPBH)2(NO3)3] (where, Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd and BPBH = 2-benzoylpyridine benzhydrazone) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, spectroscopic (UV, IR), electrochemical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The coordination mode of the ligand and the geometry of [Ce(BPBH)2(NO3)3] are confirmed by single crystal X-ray studies. The crystals are monoclinic with C2/c crystallographic symmetry. The central metal is 12 coordinated and the coordination polyhedron around the cerium atom can be described as a distorted icosahedron. The existence of nitrate. . . and CH. . . stacking interactions in the [Ce(BPBH)2(NO3)3] leads to a supramolecular arrangement in its network. The binding properties of these complexes with calf-thymus DNA have been investigated by viscosity measurements. The complexes show more nuclease activity in the presences of H2O2.

  13. Evolution of the B3 DNA binding superfamily: new insights into REM family gene diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisson A C Romanel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B3 DNA binding domain includes five families: auxin response factor (ARF, abscisic acid-insensitive3 (ABI3, high level expression of sugar inducible (HSI, related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV and reproductive meristem (REM. The release of the complete genomes of the angiosperm eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, the monocot Orysa sativa, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens,the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri and the red algae Cyanidioschyzon melorae provided an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of this superfamily. METHODOLOGY: In order to better understand the origin and the diversification of B3 domains in plants, we combined comparative phylogenetic analysis with exon/intron structure and duplication events. In addition, we investigated the conservation and divergence of the B3 domain during the origin and evolution of each family. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that showed that the B3 containing genes have undergone extensive duplication events, and that the REM family B3 domain has a highly diverged DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the founding member of the B3 gene family is likely to be similar to the ABI3/HSI genes found in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Among the B3 families, ABI3, HSI, RAV and ARF are most structurally conserved, whereas the REM family has experienced a rapid divergence. These results are discussed in light of their functional and evolutionary roles in plant development.

  14. Molecular basis for oligomeric-DNA binding and episome maintenance by KSHV LANA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Domsic

    Full Text Available LANA is the KSHV-encoded terminal repeat binding protein essential for viral replication and episome maintenance during latency. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of LANA C-terminal DNA binding domain (LANADBD to reveal its capacity to form a decameric ring with an exterior DNA binding surface. The dimeric core is structurally similar to EBV EBNA1 with an N-terminal arm that regulates DNA binding and is required for replication function. The oligomeric interface between LANA dimers is dispensable for single site DNA binding, but is required for cooperative DNA binding, replication function, and episome maintenance. We also identify a basic patch opposite of the DNA binding surface that is responsible for the interaction with BRD proteins and contributes to episome maintenance function. The structural features of LANADBD suggest a novel mechanism of episome maintenance through DNA-binding induced oligomeric assembly.

  15. spectral characterization and dna binding properties of lanthanide(iii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complexes undergo quasi-reversible one electron reduction. The binding interaction ... cleavage activities of transition metal complex, herein we report synthesis, spectral ... instruments 660C Electrochemical analyzer and a conventional three electrode, Ag/AgCl reference ..... F.19-106/2013(BSR)] for financial support.

  16. Synthesis, DNA binding and cytotoxic evaluation of aminoquinoline scaffolds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopal Senthil Kumar; Mohamed Ashraf Ali; Tan Soo Choon; Rajendra Prasad Karnam Jayarampillai

    2016-03-01

    An effortless synthetic route has been developed for the synthesis of a new class of aminoquinoline substituted isoindolin-1,3-diones from regio-isomerical hydrazinylquinolines with phthalic anhydride in presence of Eaton’s reagent. DNA binding studies of selected isomeric compounds showed interaction withDNA via intercalation mode with higher binding affinity of 4-substituted quinolines rather than 2-substituted counterparts. Further, all compounds were screened for cytotoxic activity against three human cancer cell lines,among them compound 2c outranged standard doxorubicin against CCRF-CEM cell line.

  17. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together......Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...

  18. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-05

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1).

  19. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  20. Cytotoxic, DNA binding, DNA cleavage and antibacterial studies of ruthenium-fluoroquinolone complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan N Patel; Hardik N Joshi; Chintan R Patel

    2014-05-01

    Six new Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, LC-MS, electronic spectra, IR spectra and magnetic moment measurements. DNA-binding properties of Ru complexes have been studied by means of absorption spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements as well as their HS DNA cleavage properties by means of agarose gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that all the complexes can bind to DNA via partial intercalative mode. The b values of complexes were found in the range 2.14 × 104 to 2.70 × 105 M-1. All the complexes show excellent efficiency of cleaving DNA than respective fluoroquinolones. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay has been performed to check the cytotoxic activity. The IC50 values of the complexes are in the range of 6.27 to 16.05 g mL-1.

  1. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  2. gDNA-Prot: Predict DNA-binding proteins by employing support vector machine and a novel numerical characterization of protein sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Ping; Wuyunqiqige; Zheng, Wei; Liu, Shuyi; Zhao, Chunguang

    2016-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins are the functional proteins in cells, which play an important role in various essential biological activities. An effective and fast computational method gDNA-Prot is proposed to predict DNA-binding proteins in this paper, which is a DNA-binding predictor that combines the support vector machine classifier and a novel kind of feature called graphical representation. The DNA-binding protein sequence information was described with the 20 probabilities of amino acids and the 23 new numerical graphical representation features of a protein sequence, based on 23 physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids. The Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed as feature selection method for removing the irrelevant features and reducing redundant features. The Sigmod function and Min-max normalization methods for PCA were applied to accelerate the training speed and obtain higher accuracy. Experiments demonstrated that the Principal Components Analysis with Sigmod function generated the best performance. The gDNA-Prot method was also compared with the DNAbinder, iDNA-Prot and DNA-Prot. The results suggested that gDNA-Prot outperformed the DNAbinder and iDNA-Prot. Although the DNA-Prot outperformed gDNA-Prot, gDNA-Prot was faster and convenient to predict the DNA-binding proteins. Additionally, the proposed gNDA-Prot method is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gdnaprot.

  3. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  4. Anticancer and DNA binding activities of platinum (IV) complexes; importance of leaving group departure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryasin, Zahra; Yousefi, Reza; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Hamidizadeh, Peyman; Alavianmehr, Mohammad-Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2014-03-01

    The two six-coordinate Pt(IV) complexes, containing bidentate nitrogen donor/methyl ligands with general formula [Pt(X)2Me2((t)bu2bpy)], where (t)bu2bpy = 4,4'-ditert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine and X = Cl (C1) or Br (C2), serving as the leaving groups were synthesized for evaluation of their anticancer activities and DNA binding properties. To examine anticancer activities of the synthetic complexes, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and ethidium bromide/acridine orange (EB/AO) staining method were performed. The binding properties of these complexes to DNA and purine nucleotides were examined, using different spectroscopic techniques. These complexes demonstrated significant anticancer activities against three cancer cell lines Jurkat, K562, and MCF-7. On the basis of the results of EB/AO staining, C1 and C2 were also capable to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. These complexes comprise halide leaving groups, displaying different departure rates; accordingly, they demonstrated slightly dissimilar anticancer activity and significantly different DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. The results of DNA interaction studies of these complexes suggest a mixed-binding mode, comprising partial intercalation and groove binding. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that the newly synthesized Pt(IV) complexes are promising class of the potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing novel platinum anticancer drugs. This study also highlights the importance of leaving group in anticancer activity and DNA binding properties of Pt(IV) complexes.

  5. Dynamics of nucleosome invasion by DNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Hannah S; Gurunathan, Kaushik; Levitus, Marcia; Widom, Jonathan

    2011-08-12

    Nucleosomes sterically occlude their wrapped DNA from interacting with many large protein complexes. How proteins gain access to nucleosomal DNA target sites in vivo is not known. Outer stretches of nucleosomal DNA spontaneously unwrap and rewrap with high frequency, providing rapid and efficient access to regulatory DNA target sites located there; however, rates for access to the nucleosome interior have not been measured. Here we show that for a selected high-affinity nucleosome positioning sequence, the spontaneous DNA unwrapping rate decreases dramatically with distance inside the nucleosome. The rewrapping rate also decreases, but only slightly. Our results explain the previously known strong position dependence on the equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA, which is characteristic of both selected and natural sequences. Our results point to slow nucleosome conformational fluctuations as a potential source of cell-cell variability in gene activation dynamics, and they reveal the dominant kinetic path by which multiple DNA binding proteins cooperatively invade a nucleosome.

  6. Synthesis, DNA binding and topoisomerase inhibition of mononaphthalimide homospermidine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yong Tian; Hong Xia Ma; Song Qiang Xie; Xue Wang; Jin Zhao; Chao Jie Wang; Wen Yuan Gao

    2008-01-01

    Two novel mononaphthalimide homospermidine derivatives (2a, 2b) with three or four methylene unit as linkages weresynthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against human leukemia K562, murine melanoma B 16 and Chinese hamster ovary CHOcell lines. The presence of homospermidine motif could greatly elevate the potency of 1,8-naphthalimide. Conjugate 2b with longerspacer exhibited higher in vitro cytotoxicity than 2a. The DNA binding experiments indicated that conjugates 2b could bind toherring sperm DNA. The topoisomerase Ⅱ poison trials revealed that 2b could inhibit the activity of top. Ⅱ.2008 Chao Jie Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA-binding specificities of human transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolma, Arttu; Yan, Jian; Whitington, Thomas; Toivonen, Jarkko; Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Rastas, Pasi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Enge, Martin; Taipale, Mikko; Wei, Gonghong; Palin, Kimmo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Vincentelli, Renaud; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Hughes, Timothy R; Lemaire, Patrick; Ukkonen, Esko; Kivioja, Teemu; Taipale, Jussi

    2013-01-17

    Although the proteins that read the gene regulatory code, transcription factors (TFs), have been largely identified, it is not well known which sequences TFs can recognize. We have analyzed the sequence-specific binding of human TFs using high-throughput SELEX and ChIP sequencing. A total of 830 binding profiles were obtained, describing 239 distinctly different binding specificities. The models represent the majority of human TFs, approximately doubling the coverage compared to existing systematic studies. Our results reveal additional specificity determinants for a large number of factors for which a partial specificity was known, including a commonly observed A- or T-rich stretch that flanks the core motifs. Global analysis of the data revealed that homodimer orientation and spacing preferences, and base-stacking interactions, have a larger role in TF-DNA binding than previously appreciated. We further describe a binding model incorporating these features that is required to understand binding of TFs to DNA.

  8. The DNA-binding box of human SPARTAN contributes to the targeting of Polη to DNA damage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Agnes; Hegedus, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Haracska, Lajos; Burkovics, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate repair of UV-induced DNA damage results in human diseases such as Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is associated with an extremely high risk of skin cancer. A variant form of XP is caused by the absence of Polη, which is normally able to bypass UV-induced DNA lesions in an error-free manner. However, Polη is highly error prone when replicating undamaged DNA and, thus, the regulation of the proper targeting of Polη is crucial for the prevention of mutagenesis and UV-induced cancer formation. Spartan is a novel regulator of the damage tolerance pathway, and its association with Ub-PCNA has a role in Polη targeting; however, our knowledge about its function is only rudimentary. Here, we describe a new biochemical property of purified human SPARTAN by showing that it is a DNA-binding protein. Using a DNA binding mutant, we provide in vivo evidence that DNA binding by SPARTAN regulates the targeting of Polη to damage sites after UV exposure, and this function contributes highly to its DNA-damage tolerance function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of Protein-DNA binding by Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuefan; Eisenberg, Moises; Korobka, Alex

    1997-08-01

    We present an analysis and prediction of protein-DNA binding specificity based on the hydrogen bonding between DNA, protein, and auxillary clusters of water molecules. Zif268, glucocorticoid receptor, λ-repressor mutant, HIN-recombinase, and tramtrack protein-DNA complexes are studied. Hydrogen bonds are approximated by the Lennard-Jones potential with a cutoff distance between the hydrogen and the acceptor atoms set to 3.2 Åand an angular component based on a dipole-dipole interaction. We use a three-stage docking algorithm: geometric hashing that matches pairs of hydrogen bonding sites; (2) least-squares minimization of pairwise distances to filter out insignificant matches; and (3) Monte Carlo stochastic search to minimize the energy of the system. More information can be obtained from our first paper on this subject [Y.Deng et all, J.Computational Chemistry (1995)]. Results show that the biologically correct base pair is selected preferentially when there are two or more strong hydrogen bonds (with LJ potential lower than -0.20) that bind it to the protein. Predicted sequences are less stable in the case of weaker bonding sites. In general the inclusion of water bridges does increase the number of base pairs for which correct specificity is predicted.

  10. Genomic DNA binding to ZnO microrods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Cardozo, M. Orrego; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, ZnO microrods were produced by hydrothermal synthesis. DNA was extracted from pork spleen cells by cellular lysis, deproteinization and precipitation. The analysis of the DNA binding to the ZnO was performed using Raman spectroscopy a technique that allowed for the evaluation of the effect that the presence of the ZnO in the complex has on the DNA structure. Vibrational spectral bands from the DNA molecule and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO were observed and classified as E2(M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO) and 2LO. The Raman signals from the vibrational bands corresponding to the phosphodiester bond 5‧-C-O-P-O-C-3‧ and bond stretching of the PO2- group, as well as ring vibrations of the nitrogenous bases of the DNA, were enhanced by the presence of the ZnO microrods. The bands from the modes corresponding to the C-O and Odbnd Psbnd O- molecules of the DNA backbone were observed to exhibit larger spectral shifts due to the compression and tensile stresses generated at the ZnO/DNA interface, respectively. In addition, the relative vibrational mode intensities of the nitrogenous bases increased.

  11. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  12. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  13. Structure-based analysis of HU-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Rice, Phoebe A

    2007-01-26

    HU and IHF are prokaryotic proteins that induce very large bends in DNA. They are present in high concentrations in the bacterial nucleoid and aid in chromosomal compaction. They also function as regulatory cofactors in many processes, such as site-specific recombination and the initiation of replication and transcription. HU and IHF have become paradigms for understanding DNA bending and indirect readout of sequence. While IHF shows significant sequence specificity, HU binds preferentially to certain damaged or distorted DNAs. However, none of the structurally diverse HU substrates previously studied in vitro is identical with the distorted substrates in the recently published Anabaena HU(AHU)-DNA cocrystal structures. Here, we report binding affinities for AHU and the DNA in the cocrystal structures. The binding free energies for formation of these AHU-DNA complexes range from approximately 10-14.5 kcal/mol, representing K(d) values in the nanomolar to low picomolar range, and a maximum stabilization of at least approximately 6.3 kcal/mol relative to complexes with undistorted, non-specific DNA. We investigated IHF binding and found that appropriate structural distortions can greatly enhance its affinity. On the basis of the coupling of structural and relevant binding data, we estimate the amount of conformational strain in an IHF-mediated DNA kink that is relieved by a nick (at least 0.76 kcal/mol) and pinpoint the location of the strain. We show that AHU has a sequence preference for an A+T-rich region in the center of its DNA-binding site, correlating with an unusually narrow minor groove. This is similar to sequence preferences shown by the eukaryotic nucleosome.

  14. Structure-based Analysis to Hu-DNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinger,K.; Rice, P.

    2007-01-01

    HU and IHF are prokaryotic proteins that induce very large bends in DNA. They are present in high concentrations in the bacterial nucleoid and aid in chromosomal compaction. They also function as regulatory cofactors in many processes, such as site-specific recombination and the initiation of replication and transcription. HU and IHF have become paradigms for understanding DNA bending and indirect readout of sequence. While IHF shows significant sequence specificity, HU binds preferentially to certain damaged or distorted DNAs. However, none of the structurally diverse HU substrates previously studied in vitro is identical with the distorted substrates in the recently published Anabaena HU(AHU)-DNA cocrystal structures. Here, we report binding affinities for AHU and the DNA in the cocrystal structures. The binding free energies for formation of these AHU-DNA complexes range from 10-14.5 kcal/mol, representing K{sub d} values in the nanomolar to low picomolar range, and a maximum stabilization of at least 6.3 kcal/mol relative to complexes with undistorted, non-specific DNA. We investigated IHF binding and found that appropriate structural distortions can greatly enhance its affinity. On the basis of the coupling of structural and relevant binding data, we estimate the amount of conformational strain in an IHF-mediated DNA kink that is relieved by a nick (at least 0.76 kcal/mol) and pinpoint the location of the strain. We show that AHU has a sequence preference for an A+T-rich region in the center of its DNA-binding site, correlating with an unusually narrow minor groove. This is similar to sequence preferences shown by the eukaryotic nucleosome.

  15. Antifungal properties of Brazilian cerrado plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto e

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanolic extracts from leaves of Hyptis ovalifolia, H. suaveolens, H. saxatilis, Hyptidendrum canum, Eugenia uniflora, E. dysenterica, Caryocar brasiliensis and Lafoensia pacari were investigated for their antifungal activity against dermatophytes. The most effective plants were H. ovalifolia and E. uniflora, while Trichophyton rubrum was the most sensitive among the four dermatophytes species evaluated. This study has demonstrated antifungal properties of Brazilian Cerrado plant extracts in "in vitro" assays.

  16. Endonuclease-rolling circle amplification-based method for sensitive analysis of DNA-binding protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li Li; Dong Rui Zhou; Hong Zhao; Jin Ke Wang; Zu Hong Lu

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive approach for the qualitative detection of DNA-binding protein on the microarray was developed. DNA complexes in which a partial duplex region is formed from a biotin-primer and a circle single strand DNA (ssDNA) were spotted on a microarray. The endonuclease recognition site (ERS) and the DNA-binding sites (DBS) were arranged side by side within the duplex region. The working principle of the detection system is described as follows: when the DNA-binding protein capture the DBS, the endonuclease could not attach to the ERS, and the immobilized primer in the DNA complex could be extended along the circle ssDNA by rolling circle amplification (RCA). When no protein protects the DBS, the ERS could be attacked by the endonuclease and subsequently no rolling circle amplification occurs. Thereby we can detect the sequence specific DNA-binding activity with high-sensitivity due to the signal amplification of RCA.

  17. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH2 groups (CONH2-SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH2-SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  18. Discovery, optimization and validation of an optimal DNA-binding sequence for the Six1 homeodomain transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubing; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Martel, André; Antoun, Alen; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    The Six1 transcription factor is a homeodomain protein involved in controlling gene expression during embryonic development. Six1 establishes gene expression profiles that enable skeletal myogenesis and nephrogenesis, among others. While several homeodomain factors have been extensively characterized with regards to their DNA-binding properties, relatively little is known of the properties of Six1. We have used the genomic binding profile of Six1 during the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts to obtain a better understanding of its preferences for recognizing certain DNA sequences. DNA sequence analyses on our genomic binding dataset, combined with biochemical characterization using binding assays, reveal that Six1 has a much broader DNA-binding sequence spectrum than had been previously determined. Moreover, using a position weight matrix optimization algorithm, we generated a highly sensitive and specific matrix that can be used to predict novel Six1-binding sites with highest accuracy. Furthermore, our results support the idea of a mode of DNA recognition by this factor where Six1 itself is sufficient for sequence discrimination, and where Six1 domains outside of its homeodomain contribute to binding site selection. Together, our results provide new light on the properties of this important transcription factor, and will enable more accurate modeling of Six1 function in bioinformatic studies.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  20. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes c...

  1. Structural Basis for p53 Lys120-Acetylation-Dependent DNA-Binding Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainer, Radion; Cohen, Sarit; Shahar, Anat; Zarivach, Raz; Arbely, Eyal

    2016-07-31

    Normal cellular homeostasis depends on tight regulation of gene expression, which requires the modulation of transcription factors' DNA-binding specificity. That said, the mechanisms that allow transcription factors to distinguish between closely related response elements following different cellular signals are not fully understood. In the tumor suppressor protein p53, acetylation of loop L1 residue Lys120 within the DNA-binding domain has been shown to promote the transcription of proapoptotic genes such as bax. Here, we report the crystal structures of Lys120-acetylated p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with a consensus response element and with the natural BAX response element. Our structural analyses reveal that Lys120 acetylation expands the conformational space of loop L1 in the DNA-bound state. Loop L1 flexibility is known to increase p53's DNA-binding specificity, and Lys120-acetylation-dependent conformational changes in loop L1 enable the formation of sequence-dependent DNA-binding modes for p53. Furthermore, binding to the natural BAX response element is accompanied by global conformational changes, deformation of the DNA helical structure, and formation of an asymmetric tetrameric complex. Based on these findings, we suggest a model for p53's Lys120 acetylation-dependent DNA-binding mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-Wide Motif Statistics are Shaped by DNA Binding Proteins over Evolutionary Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Long; Kussell, Edo

    2016-10-01

    The composition of a genome with respect to all possible short DNA motifs impacts the ability of DNA binding proteins to locate and bind their target sites. Since nonfunctional DNA binding can be detrimental to cellular functions and ultimately to organismal fitness, organisms could benefit from reducing the number of nonfunctional DNA binding sites genome wide. Using in vitro measurements of binding affinities for a large collection of DNA binding proteins, in multiple species, we detect a significant global avoidance of weak binding sites in genomes. We demonstrate that the underlying evolutionary process leaves a distinct genomic hallmark in that similar words have correlated frequencies, a signal that we detect in all species across domains of life. We consider the possibility that natural selection against weak binding sites contributes to this process, and using an evolutionary model we show that the strength of selection needed to maintain global word compositions is on the order of point mutation rates. Likewise, we show that evolutionary mechanisms based on interference of protein-DNA binding with replication and mutational repair processes could yield similar results and operate with similar rates. On the basis of these modeling and bioinformatic results, we conclude that genome-wide word compositions have been molded by DNA binding proteins acting through tiny evolutionary steps over time scales spanning millions of generations.

  3. DNA binding dynamics and energetics of cobalt, nickel, and copper metallopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-06-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) and Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis of the DNA binding properties of three metallopeptides to the Drew-Dickerson dodecamer DNA: Co(II) -Gly(1) -Gly(2) -His, Ni(II) -Gly(1) -Gly(2) -His and Cu(II) -Gly(1) -Gly(2) -His. Fairly extensive MD simulations were run on each system until a stable binding mode for each ligand was sampled. Clustering analysis was used in an attempt to find representative structures for the most populated clusters sampled during the MD, and a QTAIM analysis was performed. Additionally, MM-PBSA analysis was performed to obtain approximate binding energies for each complex. The results suggest that stable DNA-metallopeptide complexes are formed with each of the three ligands, and that the most stable interaction is with Co(GGH), then Ni(GGH), and finally Cu(GGH). Bond Critical Points (BCP) information between the minor groove of the DNA and the metallopeptides shows an increase in electronic density between Gly(1) , the His residues, and the oxygen atoms of the thymine nucleotide. Overall, we present a detailed theoretical study of the specific interactions involved and the binding properties of each complex formed.

  4. Effects of Simvastatin on NF-κB-DNA Binding Activity and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Expression in a Rabbit Model of Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoyun; WANG Lin; ZENG Hesong; DUBEY Laxman; ZHOU Ning; PU Jun

    2006-01-01

    To observe the effects of simvastatin on nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB)-DNA binding activity and on the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in atherosclerotic plaque in rabbits and to explore the anti-atherosclerotic properties beyond its lipid-lowering effects.Thirty-six New Zealand male rabbits were randomly divided into low-cholesterol group (LC), highcholesterol group (HC), high-cholesterol+ simvastatin group (HC+S) and then were fed for 12weeks. At the end of theexperiment, standard enzymatic assays, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), immunohistochemical staining, and morphometry were performed to observe serum lipids, NF-κB-DNA binding activity, MCP-1 protein expression, intima thickness and plaque area of aorta respectively in all three groups. Our results showed that the serum lipids, NF-κB-DNA binding activity, expression of MCP-1 protein, intima thickness, and plaque area of aorta in the LC and HC+S groups were significantly lower than those in the HC group (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in the serum lipids between the LC and HC+S groups (P>0.05), but the NF-κB-DNA binding activity, the expression of MCP-1 protein and the intima thickness and plaque area of aorta in the HC+S group were significantly decreased as compared to the LC group (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that simvastatin could decrease atherosclerosis by inhibiting the NFκB-DNA binding activity and by reducing the expression of MCP-1 protein.

  5. Properties of Plant Fiber Yarn Polymer Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    of aligned hemp yarn composites have been investigated. Moisture diffusion is non-Fickian, and is characterised by so-called two-stage diffusion behaviour, which is a well-known phenomenon in synthetic fibre composites. The rate of moisture diffusion is largest along the fibres, and also different in the two....... This underlines a critical aspect in the use of plant fibres; i.e. their properties are less controllable in comparison to the properties of synthetic fibres. The axial tensile properties of the composites are affected only little by the degree of fibre/matrix compatibility. Even for composites with a strong...

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, DFT calculation and DNA binding studies of new water-soluble derivatives of dppz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Mohammad; Eslami, Abbas; Kia, Reza; Aleeshah, Roghayeh

    2017-10-01

    Diquaternarization of dipyrido-[2,3-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine,(dppz) and its analogous dipyrido-[2,3-a:2‧,3‧-c]-dimethylphenazine,(dppx) using 1,3-dibromopropane afford new water-soluble derivatives of phenazine, propylene-bipyridyldiylium-phenazine (1) and propylene-bipyridyldiylium-dimethylphenazine (2). The compounds have been characterized by means of FT-IR, NMR, elemental analysis and conductometric measurements and their structure were determined by X-ray crystallography. The experimental studies on the compounds have been accompanied computationally by Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The DNA binding properties of both compounds to calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by UV-Vis absorption and emission methods. The expanded UV-Vis spectral data matrix was analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) technique to obtain the concentration profile and pure spectra of all reaction species which existed in the interaction procedure. Multivariate curve resolution may help us to give a better understanding of the 1(Cl)2-ctDNA and 2(Cl)2-ctDNA interaction mechanism. The results suggest that both compounds bind tightly to DNA through intercalation mechanism and the DNA binding affinity of 2 is slightly lower than that of 1 due to steric hindrance of the methyl group. Also, thermal denaturation studies reveal that these compounds show strong affinity for binding with calf thymus DNA. The thermodynamic parameters of the DNA binding process were obtained from the temperature dependence of the binding constants and the results showed that binding of both compounds to DNA is an enthalpically driven process that is in agreement with proposed DNA intercalation capability of these compounds.

  7. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus.

  8. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  9. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  11. DNA binding, DNA cleavage, and cytotoxicity studies of two new copper (II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Rezvani, Alireza; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2011-05-01

    The DNA binding behavior of [Cu(phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (1) and [Cu(bpy)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (2) was studied with a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and viscometric methods. Cytotoxicity effect and DNA unwinding properties were also investigated. The results indicate that the Cu(II) complexes interact with calf-thymus DNA by both partially intercalative and hydrogen binding. These findings have been further substantiated by the determination of intrinsic binding constants spectrophotometrically, 12.5 × 10(5) and 5 × 10(5) for 1 and 2, respectively. Our findings suggest that the type of ligands and structure of complexes have marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes involving CT-DNA. Circular dichroism results show that complex 1 causes considerable increase in base stacking of DNA, whereas 2 decreases the base stacking, which is related to more extended aromatic area of 1,10-phenanthroline in 1 rather than bipyridine in 2. Slow decrease in DNA viscosity indicates partially intercalative binding in addition to hydrogen binding on the surface of DNA. The second binding mode was also confirmed by additional tests: interaction in denaturation condition and acidic pH. Also, these new complexes induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cells.

  12. Quantifying the DNA binding characteristics of ruthenium based threading intercalator Λ Λ -P with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, Nicholas; McCauley, Micah; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Utilizing optical tweezers, biophysics researchers have been able to study drug-DNA interactions on the single molecule level. Binuclear ruthenium complexes are a particular type of drug molecule that have been found to have potential cancer-fighting qualities, due to their high binding affinity and low dissociation rates. These complexes are threading intercalators, meaning that they must thread their bulky side chains through DNA base pairs to allow the central planar moiety to intercalate between the bases. In this study, we explored the binding properties of the binuclear ruthenium complex, ΛΛ -P (ΛΛ -[µ-bidppz(phen)4Ru2]4+) . A single DNA molecule is held at a constant force and the ΛΛ -P solution introduced to the system in varying concentrations until equilibrium is reached. DNA extension data at various concentrations of ΛΛ -P recorded as a function of time provide the DNA binding kinetics and equilibrium binding affinity. Preliminary data analysis suggests that ΛΛ -P exhibits fast binding kinetics compared to the very similar ΔΔ -P. These complexes have the same chemical structure and only differ in their chirality, which suggests that the left handed (ΛΛ) threading moieties require less DNA structural distortion for threading compared with the right handed (ΔΔ) threading moieties.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  14. Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and protein docking studies of two flexible imine oximes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUNUS KAYA

    2016-09-01

    Two flexible imine oxime molecules, namely, 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-butan-2-one oxime (HL¹) and 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-pentan-2-one oxime (HL²) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR techniques. The conformational behavior was investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method combined with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. As a result of the conformational studies, three stable molecules and the most stable conformer were determined for the both imine oximes. The spectroscopic properties such as vibrational and NMR were calculated for the most stable conformer of the HL¹ and HL². The calculation results were applied to simulate infrared spectra of the title compounds, which show good agreement with observed spectra. In addition, the stable three molecules of the both imine oximes have been used to carry out DNA binding and protein docking studies with DNA and protein structures (downloaded from Protein Data Bank) using Discovery Studio 3.5 to find the most preferred binding mode of the ligands inside the DNA and protein cavity.

  15. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-01-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C...

  16. Reversible supramolecular assembly at specific DNA sites: nickel-promoted bivalent DNA binding with designed peptide and bipyridyl-bis(benzamidine) components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mateo I; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2014-09-01

    At specific DNA sites, nickel(II) salts promote the assembly of designed components, namely a bis(histidine)-modified peptide that is derived from a bZIP transcription factor and a bis(benzamidine) unit that is equipped with a bipyridine. This programmed supramolecular system with emergent properties reproduces some key characteristics of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins, such as bivalence, selectivity, responsiveness to external agents, and reversibility.

  17. PLANT ISOFLAVONES: BIOSYNHTESIS, DETECTION AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Naumenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological properties, chemical structures and biosynthesis pathways of plant isoflavones, especially soybean isoflavones (daidzein, genistein and glycitein are reviewed. The structures of isoflavones, and their aglicone and glucosides (glycosides forms as well as isoflavone biosynthesis pathways are described. General information about the advanced methods for the detection of isoflavones and their conjugates are considered. The importance of the profiling of isoflavones, flavonoids and their conjugates by means of analytical tools and methods to dissolve some questions in biology and medicine is discussed. The review provides data on the major isoflavone content in some vegetable crops and in the tissues of different soybean varieties. Health benefits and treatment or preventive properties of isoflavones for cancer, cardiovascular, endocrine diseases and metabolic disorders are highlighted. The mechanisms that may explain their positive biological effects are considered. The information on the application of advanced technologies to create new plant forms producing isoflavonoids with a predicted level of isoflavones, which is the most favorable for the treatment is given. The possibilities to use the metabolic engineering for the increasing of accumulation and synthesis of isoflavones at the non-legume crops such as tobacco, Arabidopsis and maize are considered. The examples how the plant tissues, which are not naturally produced of the isoflavones, can obtain potential for the synthesis of biologically active compounds via inducing of the activity of the introduced enzyme isoflavon synthase, are given. Specific biochemical pathways for increasing the synthesis of isoflavone genistein in Arabidopsis thaliana tissues are discussed. It is concluded that plant genetic engineering which is focused on modification of the secondary metabolites contain in plant tissues, enables to create the new crop varieties with improved agronomic properties and

  18. Characterization of DNA-binding proteins from pea mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzack, F.A.; Dombrowski, S.; Brennicke, A.

    1998-01-01

    We studied transcription initiation in the mitochondria of higher plants, with particular respect to promoter structures. Conserved elements of these promoters have been successfully identified by in vitro transcription systems in different species, whereas the involved protein components are still...

  19. Differential sensitivity to methylated DNA by ETS-family transcription factors is intrinsically encoded in their DNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Dominique C; Poon, Gregory M K

    2016-10-14

    Transactivation by the ETS family of transcription factors, whose members share structurally conserved DNA-binding domains, is variably sensitive to methylation of their target genes. The mechanism by which DNA methylation controls ETS proteins remains poorly understood. Uncertainly also pervades the effects of hemi-methylated DNA, which occurs following DNA replication and in response to hypomethylating agents, on site recognition by ETS proteins. To address these questions, we measured the affinities of two sequence-divergent ETS homologs, PU.1 and Ets-1, to DNA sites harboring a hemi- and fully methylated CpG dinucleotide. While the two proteins bound unmethylated DNA with indistinguishable affinity, their affinities to methylated DNA are markedly heterogeneous and exhibit major energetic coupling between the two CpG methylcytosines. Analysis of simulated DNA and existing co-crystal structures revealed that hemi-methylation induced non-local backbone and groove geometries that were not conserved in the fully methylated state. Indirect readout of these perturbations was differentially achieved by the two ETS homologs, with the distinctive interfacial hydration in PU.1/DNA binding moderating the inhibitory effects of DNA methylation on binding. This data established a biophysical basis for the pioneering properties associated with PU.1, which robustly bound fully methylated DNA, but not Ets-1, which was substantially inhibited. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Identification of the DNA-Binding Domains of Human Replication Protein A That Recognize G-Quadruplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication protein A (RPA, a key player in DNA metabolism, has 6 single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA- binding domains (DBDs A-F. SELEX experiments with the DBDs-C, -D, and -E retrieve a 20-nt G-quadruplex forming sequence. Binding studies show that RPA-DE binds preferentially to the G-quadruplex DNA, a unique preference not observed with other RPA constructs. Circular dichroism experiments show that RPA-CDE-core can unfold the G-quadruplex while RPA-DE stabilizes it. Binding studies show that RPA-C binds pyrimidine- and purine-rich sequences similarly. This difference between RPA-C and RPA-DE binding was also indicated by the inability of RPA-CDE-core to unfold an oligonucleotide containing a TC-region 5′ to the G-quadruplex. Molecular modeling studies of RPA-DE and telomere-binding proteins Pot1 and Stn1 reveal structural similarities between the proteins and illuminate potential DNA-binding sites for RPA-DE and Stn1. These data indicate that DBDs of RPA have different ssDNA recognition properties.

  1. Zinc-regulated DNA binding of the yeast Zap1 zinc-responsive activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery G Frey

    Full Text Available The Zap1 transcription factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in zinc homeostasis by controlling the expression of genes involved in zinc metabolism. Zap1 is active in zinc-limited cells and repressed in replete cells. At the transcriptional level, Zap1 controls its own expression via positive autoregulation. In addition, Zap1's two activation domains are regulated independently of each other by zinc binding directly to those regions and repressing activation function. In this report, we show that Zap1 DNA binding is also inhibited by zinc. DMS footprinting showed that Zap1 target gene promoter occupancy is regulated with or without transcriptional autoregulation. These results were confirmed using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Zinc regulation of DNA binding activity mapped to the DNA binding domain indicating other parts of Zap1 are unnecessary for this control. Overexpression of Zap1 overrode DNA binding regulation and resulted in constitutive promoter occupancy. Under these conditions of constitutive binding, both the zinc dose response of Zap1 activity and cellular zinc accumulation were altered suggesting the importance of DNA binding control to zinc homeostasis. Thus, our results indicated that zinc regulates Zap1 activity post-translationally via three independent mechanisms, all of which contribute to the overall zinc responsiveness of Zap1.

  2. DNA binding protein identification by combining pseudo amino acid composition and profile-based protein representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Shanyi; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins play an important role in most cellular processes. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient predictor for identifying DNA-binding proteins only based on the sequence information of proteins. The bottleneck for constructing a useful predictor is to find suitable features capturing the characteristics of DNA binding proteins. We applied PseAAC to DNA binding protein identification, and PseAAC was further improved by incorporating the evolutionary information by using profile-based protein representation. Finally, Combined with Support Vector Machines (SVMs), a predictor called iDNAPro-PseAAC was proposed. Experimental results on an updated benchmark dataset showed that iDNAPro-PseAAC outperformed some state-of-the-art approaches, and it can achieve stable performance on an independent dataset. By using an ensemble learning approach to incorporate more negative samples (non-DNA binding proteins) in the training process, the performance of iDNAPro-PseAAC was further improved. The web server of iDNAPro-PseAAC is available at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/iDNAPro-PseAAC/.

  3. Super-Resolution Microscopy and Tracking of DNA-Binding Proteins in Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to detect individual fluorescent molecules inside living cells has enabled a range of powerful microscopy techniques that resolve biological processes on the molecular scale. These methods have also transformed the study of bacterial cell biology, which was previously obstructed by the limited spatial resolution of conventional microscopy. In the case of DNA-binding proteins, super-resolution microscopy can visualize the detailed spatial organization of DNA replication, transcription, and repair processes by reconstructing a map of single-molecule localizations. Furthermore, DNA binding activities can be observed directly by tracking protein movement in real time. This allows identifying subpopulations of DNA-bound and diffusing proteins, and can be used to measure DNA-binding times in vivo. This chapter provides a detailed protocol for super-resolution microscopy and tracking of DNA-binding proteins in Escherichia coli cells. The protocol covers the construction of cell strains and describes data acquisition and analysis procedures, such as super-resolution image reconstruction, mapping single-molecule tracks, computing diffusion coefficients to identify molecular subpopulations with different mobility, and analysis of DNA-binding kinetics. While the focus is on the study of bacterial chromosome biology, these approaches are generally applicable to other molecular processes and cell types. PMID:27283312

  4. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  5. Synthesis, DNA-binding and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes of phenyl-(4,5,9,14-tetraaza-benzo[]triphenylen-1,1-)-methanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li-Feng Tan; Xue-Jiao Chen; Jian-Liang Shen; Xi-Ling Liang

    2009-07-01

    A novel polypyridyl ligand phenyl-(4,5,9,14-tetraaza-benzo[]triphenylen-1,1-)-methanone (PTBM) and its complexes [Ru(phen)2(PTBM)]2+ (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and [Ru(bpy)2 (PTBM)]2+ (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectroscopy, and 1H NMR. The DNA-binding properties of the two complexes were investigated by spectroscopic and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that both complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative mode and the DNA-binding affinity of complex 1 is greater than that of complex 2. When irradiated at 365 nm, complex 1 was found to be a more-effective DNA-cleaving agent than complex 2.

  6. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  7. Rapid detection and purification of sequence specific DNA binding proteins using magnetic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIJANA SAVIC

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method for the rapid identification and purification of sequence specific DNA binding proteins based on magnetic separation is presented. This method was applied to confirm the binding of the human recombinant USF1 protein to its putative binding site (E-box within the human SOX3 protomer. It has been shown that biotinylated DNA attached to streptavidin magnetic particles specifically binds the USF1 protein in the presence of competitor DNA. It has also been demonstrated that the protein could be successfully eluted from the beads, in high yield and with restored DNA binding activity. The advantage of these procedures is that they could be applied for the identification and purification of any high-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding protein with only minor modifications.

  8. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  9. Structure and DNA-binding traits of the transition state regulator AbrB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew L; Tucker, Ashley T; Bobay, Benjamin G; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Thompson, Richele J; Cavanagh, John

    2014-11-04

    The AbrB protein from Bacillus subtilis is a DNA-binding global regulator controlling the onset of a vast array of protective functions under stressful conditions. Such functions include biofilm formation, antibiotic production, competence development, extracellular enzyme production, motility, and sporulation. AbrB orthologs are known in a variety of prokaryotic organisms, most notably in all infectious strains of Clostridia, Listeria, and Bacilli. Despite its central role in bacterial response and defense, its structure has been elusive because of its highly dynamic character. Orienting its N- and C-terminal domains with respect to one another has been especially problematic. Here, we have generated a structure of full-length, tetrameric AbrB using nuclear magnetic resonance, chemical crosslinking, and mass spectrometry. We note that AbrB possesses a strip of positive electrostatic potential encompassing its DNA-binding region and that its C-terminal domain aids in DNA binding.

  10. Functional diversification of paralogous transcription factors via divergence in DNA binding site motif and in expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry N Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene duplication is a major driver of evolutionary innovation as it allows for an organism to elaborate its existing biological functions via specialization or diversification of initially redundant gene paralogs. Gene function can diversify in several ways. Transcription factor gene paralogs in particular, can diversify either by changes in their tissue-specific expression pattern or by changes in the DNA binding site motif recognized by their protein product, which in turn alters their gene targets. The relationship between these two modes of functional diversification of transcription factor paralogs has not been previously investigated, and is essential for understanding adaptive evolution of transcription factor gene families. FINDINGS: Based on a large set of human paralogous transcription factor pairs, we show that when the DNA binding site motifs of transcription factor paralogs are similar, the expressions of the genes that encode the paralogs have diverged, so in general, at most one of the paralogs is highly expressed in a tissue. Moreover, paralogs with diverged DNA binding site motifs tend to be diverged in their function. Conversely, two paralogs that are highly expressed in a tissue tend to have dissimilar DNA binding site motifs. We have also found that in general, within a paralogous family, tissue-specific decrease in gene expression is more frequent than what is expected by chance. CONCLUSIONS: While previous investigations of paralogous gene diversification have only considered coding sequence divergence, by explicitly quantifying divergence in DNA binding site motif, our work presents a new paradigm for investigating functional diversification. Consistent with evolutionary expectation, our quantitative analysis suggests that paralogous transcription factors have survived extinction in part, either through diversification of their DNA binding site motifs or through alterations in their tissue-specific expression

  11. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, superoxide scavenging activity and DNA-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.

    2012-05-01

    A new series of nickel(II) complexes with the tetraaza macrocyclic ligand have been synthesized as possible functional models for nickel-superoxide dismutase enzyme. The reaction of 5-amino-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-4-carbaldehyde (AMPC) with itself in the presence of nickel(II) ion yields, the new macrocyclic cationic complex, [NiL(NO3)2], containing a ligand composed of the self-condensed AMPC (4 mol) bound to a single nickel(II) ion. A series of metathetical reactions have led to the isolation of a number of newly complexes of the types [NiL]X2; X = ClO4 and BF4, [NiLX2], X = Cl and Br (Scheme 1). Structures and characterizations of these complexes were achieved by several physicochemical methods namely, elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductivity, and spectral (IR and UV-Vis) measurements. The electrochemical properties and thermal behaviors of these chelates were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) techniques. A distorted octahedral stereochemistry has been proposed for the six-coordinate nitrato, and halogeno complexes. For the four-coordinate, perchlorate and fluoroborate, complex species a square-planar geometry is proposed. The measured superoxide dismutase mimetic activities of the complexes indicated that they are potent NiSOD mimics and their activities are compared with those obtained previously for nickel(II) complexes. The probable mechanistic implications of the catalytic dismutation of O2rad - by the synthesized nickel(II) complexes are discussed. The DNA-binding properties of representative complexes [NiLCl2] and [NiL](PF4)2 have been investigated by the electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. The results obtained suggest that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode and the binding affinity for DNA follows the order: [NiLCl2] □ [NiL](PF4)2.

  13. Two DNA-binding and Nick Recognition Modules in Human DNA Ligase III*

    OpenAIRE

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Human DNA ligase III contains an N-terminal zinc finger domain that binds to nicks and gaps in DNA. This small domain has been described as a DNA nick sensor, but it is not required for DNA nick joining activity in vitro. In light of new structural information for mammalian ligases, we measured the DNA binding affinity and specificity of each domain of DNA ligase III. These studies identified two separate, independent DNA-binding modules in DNA ligase III that each bin...

  14. CLK-1 protein has DNA binding activity specific to O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2002-04-10

    Mutations in the clk-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans extend worm life span and slow down a variety of physiological processes. Here we report that C. elegans CLK-1 as well as its mouse homologue have DNA binding activity that is specific to the O(L) region of mitochondrial DNA. DNA binding activity of CLK-1 is inhibited by ADP, and is altered by mutations that extend nematode life span. Our results suggest that, in addition to its enzymatic function in ubiquinone biosynthesis, CLK-1 is involved in the regulation of mtDNA replication or transcription.

  15. Semi-automated high-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement-based discovery of cytotoxic DNA binding agents from a large compound library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Lateca S; Bapat, Aditi; Kelley, Mark R; Georgiadis, Millie M; Long, Eric C

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement (HT-FID) was adapted to the semi-automated screening of a commercial compound library containing 60,000 molecules resulting in the discovery of cytotoxic DNA-targeted agents. Although commercial libraries are routinely screened in drug discovery efforts, the DNA binding potential of the compounds they contain has largely been overlooked. HT-FID led to the rapid identification of a number of compounds for which DNA binding properties were validated through demonstration of concentration-dependent DNA binding and increased thermal melting of A/T- or G/C-rich DNA sequences. Selected compounds were assayed further for cell proliferation inhibition in glioblastoma cells. Seven distinct compounds emerged from this screening procedure that represent structures unknown previously to be capable of targeting DNA leading to cell death. These agents may represent structures worthy of further modification to optimally explore their potential as cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. In addition, the general screening strategy described may find broader impact toward the rapid discovery of DNA targeted agents with biological activity.

  16. Effects of temperature on the p53-DNA binding interactions and their dynamical behavior: comparing the wild type to the R248Q mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Barakat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protein p53 plays an active role in the regulation of cell cycle. In about half of human cancers, the protein is inactivated by mutations located primarily in its DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, a number of these mutations possess temperature-induced DNA-binding characteristics. A striking example is the mutation of Arg248 into glutamine or tryptophan. These mutants are defective for binding to DNA at 310 K although they have been shown to bind specifically to several p53 response elements at sub-physiological temperatures (298-306 K. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This important experimental finding motivated us to examine the effects of temperature on the structure and configuration of R248Q mutant and compare it to the wild type protein. Our aim is to determine how and where structural changes of mutant variants take place due to temperature changes. To answer these questions, we compared the mutant to the wild-type proteins from two different aspects. First, we investigated the systems at the atomistic level through their DNA-binding affinity, hydrogen bond networks and spatial distribution of water molecules. Next, we assessed changes in their long-lived conformational motions at the coarse-grained level through the collective dynamics of their side-chain and backbone atoms separately. CONCLUSIONS: The experimentally observed effect of temperature on the DNA-binding properties of p53 is reproduced. Analysis of atomistic and coarse-grained data reveal that changes in binding are determined by a few key residues and provide a rationale for the mutant-loss of binding at physiological temperatures. The findings can potentially enable a rescue strategy for the mutant structure.

  17. Experimental DNA-binding and computer modelling studies on an analogue of the anti-tumor drug amsacrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Z H; Agbandje, M; Neidle, S; Acheson, R M

    1988-12-01

    The DNA-binding properties of the anti-cancer drug amsacrine and a 9-aminoacridine analogue substituted at the 4 position with a 4-methanesulphonanilido-group, have been examined by means of unwinding, melting and equilibrium binding experiments. These find that the latter compound is at least as effective as a DNA-binder and intercalator as amsacrine itself. Molecular modelling and energetic calculations have confirmed this, and have produced plausible intercalation geometries. These show that there are subtle differences in the low-energy minor groove arrangements adopted by the substituents of the two drugs. Speculation is advanced that these differences may be relevant to the marked differences in cytotoxicity shown by the two compounds.

  18. In vitro evaluation of Zn-norfloxacin complex as a potent cytotoxic and antibacterial agent, proposed model for DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, F; Saberkari, M; Abiri, R; Motlagh, H Mohammadi; Saberkari, H

    2013-06-01

    A tetrahedral Zn(II) complex with the second generation fluoroquinolone, norfloxacin, was prepared and characterized (NOR-Zn complex, NZC). The antibacterial efficiency of the NZC was tested on two Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria by minimum inhibitory concentration method. The cytotoxic potential of NZC on MDA (human breast adenocarcinoma), Caco-2 (human colon adenocarcinoma), and Hela (human cervix carcinoma) cell lines was studied. The DNA interaction property of the NZC has been investigated using UV-vis, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared, as well as cyclic voltammetry methods. Intrinsic binding constant (K(b)), thermodynamic, and other spectroscopic and voltammetric data indicate that the NZC has more affinity for DNA than for norfloxacin and interacted with DNA via two modes: electrostatic and outside hydrogen binding. The proposed DNA binding mode supports the large enhancement in the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of NZC.

  19. New non detrimental DNA binding mutants of the Escherichia coli initiator protein DnaA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, Marlene; Atlung, Tove

    2004-01-01

    an extensive mutational analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Escherichia coli DnaA protein using mutagenic PCR. We analyzed mutants exhibiting more or less partial activity by selecting for complementation of a dnaA(Ts) mutant strain at different expression levels of the new mutant proteins. The selection...

  20. The DNA-binding factor Ctcf critically controls gene expression in macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Nikolic (Tatjana); D. Movita (Dowty); M.E.H. Lambers (Margaretha); C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); P.J. Biesta (Paula); K. Kreefft (Kim); M.J.W. de Bruijn (Marjolein); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); N.J. Galjart (Niels); P.A. Boonstra (André); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMacrophages play an important role in immunity and homeostasis. Upon pathogen recognition via specific receptors, they rapidly induce inflammatory responses. This process is tightly controlled at the transcriptional level. The DNA binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (Ctcf) i

  1. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper (b

  2. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper

  3. Molecular dynamics study of DNA binding by INT-DBD under a polarized force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xue X; Ji, Chang G; Xie, Dai Q; Zhang, John Z H

    2013-05-15

    The DNA binding domain of transposon Tn916 integrase (INT-DBD) binds to DNA target site by positioning the face of a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet within the major groove. As the negatively charged DNA directly interacts with the positively charged residues (such as Arg and Lys) of INT-DBD, the electrostatic interaction is expected to play an important role in the dynamical stability of the protein-DNA binding complex. In the current work, the combined use of quantum-based polarized protein-specific charge (PPC) for protein and polarized nucleic acid-specific charge (PNC) for DNA were employed in molecular dynamics simulation to study the interaction dynamics between INT-DBD and DNA. Our study shows that the protein-DNA structure is stabilized by polarization and the calculated protein-DNA binding free energy is in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, our study revealed a positive correlation between the measured binding energy difference in alanine mutation and the occupancy of the corresponding residue's hydrogen bond. This correlation relation directly relates the contribution of a specific residue to protein-DNA binding energy to the strength of the hydrogen bond formed between the specific residue and DNA.

  4. A filter microplate assay for quantitative analysis of DNA binding proteins using fluorescent DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, William C; Swartz, James R

    2011-08-15

    We present a rapid method for quantifying the apparent DNA binding affinity and capacity of recombinant transcription factors (TFs). We capture His6-tagged TFs using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose and incubate the immobilized TFs with fluorescently labeled cognate DNA probes. After washing, the strength of the fluorescence signal indicates the extent of DNA binding. The assay was validated using two pluripotency-regulating TFs: SOX2 and NANOG. Using competitive binding analysis with nonlabeled competitor DNA, we show that SOX2 and NANOG specifically bind to their consensus sequences. We also determined the apparent affinity of SOX2 and NANOG for their consensus sequences to be 54.2±9 and 44.0±6nM, respectively, in approximate agreement with literature values. Our assay does not require radioactivity, but radioactively labeling the TFs enables the measurement of absolute amounts of immobilized SOX2 and NANOG and, hence, a DNA-to-protein binding ratio. SOX2 possesses a 0.95 DNA-to-protein binding ratio, whereas NANOG possesses a 0.44 ratio, suggesting that most of the SOX2 and approximately half of the NANOG are competent for DNA binding. Alternatively, the NANOG dimer may be capable of binding only one DNA target. This flexible DNA binding assay enables the analysis of crude or purified samples with or without radioactivity.

  5. enDNA-Prot: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins by Applying Ensemble Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins are crucial for various cellular processes, such as recognition of specific nucleotide, regulation of transcription, and regulation of gene expression. Developing an effective model for identifying DNA-binding proteins is an urgent research problem. Up to now, many methods have been proposed, but most of them focus on only one classifier and cannot make full use of the large number of negative samples to improve predicting performance. This study proposed a predictor called enDNA-Prot for DNA-binding protein identification by employing the ensemble learning technique. Experiential results showed that enDNA-Prot was comparable with DNA-Prot and outperformed DNAbinder and iDNA-Prot with performance improvement in the range of 3.97–9.52% in ACC and 0.08–0.19 in MCC. Furthermore, when the benchmark dataset was expanded with negative samples, the performance of enDNA-Prot outperformed the three existing methods by 2.83–16.63% in terms of ACC and 0.02–0.16 in terms of MCC. It indicated that enDNA-Prot is an effective method for DNA-binding protein identification and expanding training dataset with negative samples can improve its performance. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, we developed a user-friendly web-server for enDNA-Prot which is freely accessible to the public.

  6. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer.

  7. Pentaprobe: a comprehensive sequence for the one-step detection of DNA-binding activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ann H Y; Czolij, Robert; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2003-10-15

    The rapid increase in the number of novel proteins identified in genome projects necessitates simple and rapid methods for assigning function. We describe a strategy for determining whether novel proteins possess typical sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Many proteins bind recognition sequences of 5 bp or less. Given that there are 4(5) possible 5 bp sites, one might expect the length of sequence required to cover all possibilities would be 4(5) x 5 or 5120 nt. But by allowing overlaps, utilising both strands and using a computer algorithm to generate the minimum sequence, we find the length required is only 516 base pairs. We generated this sequence as six overlapping double-stranded oligonucleotides, termed pentaprobe, and used it in gel retardation experiments to assess DNA binding by both known and putative DNA-binding proteins from several protein families. We have confirmed binding by the zinc finger proteins BKLF, Eos and Pegasus, the Ets domain protein PU.1 and the treble clef N- and C-terminal fingers of GATA-1. We also showed that the N-terminal zinc finger domain of FOG-1 does not behave as a typical DNA-binding domain. Our results suggest that pentaprobe, and related sequences such as hexaprobe, represent useful tools for probing protein function.

  8. CK2 phosphorylation inactivates DNA binding by the papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Stephen; Ruse, Cristian; Stenlund, Arne

    2013-07-01

    Papillomaviruses have complex life cycles that are understood only superficially. Although it is well established that the viral E1 and E2 proteins play key roles in controlling viral transcription and DNA replication, how these factors are regulated is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation by the protein kinase CK2 controls the biochemical activities of the bovine papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins by modifying their DNA binding activity. Phosphorylation at multiple sites in the N-terminal domain in E1 results in the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding activity, a feature that is also conserved in human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 proteins. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) E2 protein, when phosphorylated by CK2 on two specific sites in the hinge, also loses its site-specific DNA binding activity. Mutation of these sites in E2 results in greatly increased levels of latent viral DNA replication, indicating that CK2 phosphorylation of E2 is a negative regulator of viral DNA replication during latent viral replication. In contrast, mutation of the N-terminal phosphorylation sites in E1 has no effect on latent viral DNA replication. We propose that the phosphorylation of the N terminus of E1 plays a role only in vegetative viral DNA replication, and consistent with such a role, caspase 3 cleavage of E1, which has been shown to be necessary for vegetative viral DNA replication, restores the DNA binding activity to phosphorylated E1.

  9. The role of the adenovirus DNA binding protein in DNA replication and recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukelen, B. van

    2003-01-01

    Replication of adenovirus DNA in infected cells is an efficient process that, compared to cellular replication, has the use of a protein primer as a hallmark. The mechanism of this DNA replication process and especially the role of one of the replication proteins, the DNA binding protein DBP, is the

  10. A physiological role for androgen actions in the absence of androgen receptor DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tammy P S; Clarke, Michele V; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Lee, Nicole K L; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that androgens have physiological actions via non-DNA binding-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways in males, using our genetically modified mice that express a mutant AR with deletion of the 2nd zinc finger of the DNA binding domain (AR(ΔZF2)) that cannot bind DNA. In cultured genital skin fibroblasts, the mutant AR(ΔZF2) has normal ligand binding ability, phosphorylates ERK-1/2 in response to 1 min DHT treatment (blocked by the AR antagonist bicalutamide), but has reduced androgen-dependent nuclear localization compared to wildtype (WT). AR(ΔZF2) males have normal baseline ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, with a 1.5-fold increase in Akt phosphorylation in AR(ΔZF2) muscle vs WT. To identify physiological actions of non-DNA binding-dependent AR signaling, AR(ΔZF2) males were treated for 6 weeks with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Cortical bone growth was suppressed by DHT in AR(ΔZF2) mice (6% decrease in periosteal and 7% decrease in medullary circumference vs untreated AR(ΔZF2) males). In conclusion, these data suggest that non-DNA binding dependent AR actions suppress cortical bone growth, which may provide a mechanism to fine-tune the response to androgens in bone.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of ETS-family DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gong-Hong; Badis, Gwenael; Berger, Michael F; Kivioja, Teemu; Palin, Kimmo; Enge, Martin; Bonke, Martin; Jolma, Arttu; Varjosalo, Markku; Gehrke, Andrew R; Yan, Jian; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Turunen, Mikko; Taipale, Mikko; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Ukkonen, Esko; Hughes, Timothy R; Bulyk, Martha L; Taipale, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Members of the large ETS family of transcription factors (TFs) have highly similar DNA-binding domains (DBDs)—yet they have diverse functions and activities in physiology and oncogenesis. Some differences in DNA-binding preferences within this family have been described, but they have not been analysed systematically, and their contributions to targeting remain largely uncharacterized. We report here the DNA-binding profiles for all human and mouse ETS factors, which we generated using two different methods: a high-throughput microwell-based TF DNA-binding specificity assay, and protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). Both approaches reveal that the ETS-binding profiles cluster into four distinct classes, and that all ETS factors linked to cancer, ERG, ETV1, ETV4 and FLI1, fall into just one of these classes. We identify amino-acid residues that are critical for the differences in specificity between all the classes, and confirm the specificities in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) for a member of each class. The results indicate that even relatively small differences in in vitro binding specificity of a TF contribute to site selectivity in vivo. PMID:20517297

  12. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  13. Exploiting anthracene photodimerization within peptides: light induced sequence-selective DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Gemma A; Tucker, James H R; Peacock, Anna F A

    2015-05-11

    The unprecedented use of anthracene photodimerization within a protein or peptide system is explored through its incorporation into a DNA-binding peptide, derived from the GCN4 transcription factor. This study demonstrates an effective and dynamic interplay between a photoreaction and a peptide-DNA assembly, with each process able to exert control over the other.

  14. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  15. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assembly of custom TALE-type DNA binding domains by modular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Robert; Elsaesser, Janett; Hausner, Jens; Lahaye, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding proteins show tremendous potential as molecular tools for targeted binding to any desired DNA sequence. Their DNA binding domain consists of tandem arranged repeats, and due to this repetitive structure it is challenging to generate designer TALEs (dTALEs) with user-defined specificity. We present a cloning approach that facilitates the assembly of multiple repeat-encoding DNA fragments that translate into dTALEs with pre-defined DNA binding specificity. This method makes use of type IIS restriction enzymes in two sequential cut-ligase reactions to build dTALE repeat arrays. We employed this modular approach for generation of a dTALE that differentiates between two highly similar DNA sequences that are both targeted by the Xanthomonas TALE, AvrBs3. These data show that this modular assembly system allows rapid generation of highly specific TALE-type DNA binding domains that target binding sites of predefined length and sequence. This approach enables the rapid and flexible production of dTALEs for gene regulation and genome editing in routine and high-throughput applications.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the DNA-binding with one zinc finger (Dof) transcription factor family in bananas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Hu, Huigang; Xie, Jianghui

    2016-12-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (Dof) domain proteins are a multigene family of plant-specific transcription factors involved in numerous aspects of plant growth and development. In this study, we report a genome-wide search for Musa acuminata Dof (MaDof) genes and their expression profiles at different developmental stages and in response to various abiotic stresses. In addition, a complete overview of the Dof gene family in bananas is presented, including the gene structures, chromosomal locations, cis-regulatory elements, conserved protein domains, and phylogenetic inferences. Based on the genome-wide analysis, we identified 74 full-length protein-coding MaDof genes unevenly distributed on 11 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis with Dof members from diverse plant species showed that MaDof genes can be classified into four subgroups (StDof I, II, III, and IV). The detailed genomic information of the MaDof gene homologs in the present study provides opportunities for functional analyses to unravel the exact role of the genes in plant growth and development.

  18. Cryptic DNA-binding domain in the C terminus of RNA polymerase II general transcription factor RAP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S; Garrett, K P; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1994-10-11

    The C terminus of mammalian transcription factor RAP30 has been found to be a cryptic DNA-binding domain strikingly similar to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain present in conserved region 4 of members of the sigma 70 family of bacterial sigma factors. This RAP30 domain shares strongest sequence similarity with the DNA-binding domain present in region 4 of Bacillus subtilis sporulation-specific sigma K. Like the region 4 DNA-binding activity of Escherichia coli sigma 70, the RAP30 C-terminal DNA binding activity is masked in intact RAP30 but is readily detectable when the RAP30 C terminus is expressed as a fusion protein. Consistent with a role for RAP30 DNA-binding activity in transcription, mutations that abolish DNA binding also abolish transcription. Therefore, RAP30 may function at least in part through the action of an evolutionarily ancient DNA-binding domain that first appeared prior to the divergence of bacteria and eukaryotes.

  19. hCLOCK's DNA-binding Peptide通过细胞膜屏障的机理探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭涛; 杨春蕾; 肖静; 王跃琦; 王正荣; 王浴生

    2003-01-01

    @@ 目的:研究八聚精氨酸(Arg8)对一种新的人体蛋白结构域(Circadian locomoter output cycles kaput protein's DNA-binding peptide, hCLOCK's DNA-BIND)内化入细胞的竞争性抑制作用.

  20. Probing the electrostatics and pharmacological modulation of sequence-specific binding by the DNA-binding domain of the ETS family transcription factor PU.1: a binding affinity and kinetics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munde, Manoj; Poon, Gregory M K; Wilson, W David

    2013-05-27

    Members of the ETS family of transcription factors regulate a functionally diverse array of genes. All ETS proteins share a structurally conserved but sequence-divergent DNA-binding domain, known as the ETS domain. Although the structure and thermodynamics of the ETS-DNA complexes are well known, little is known about the kinetics of sequence recognition, a facet that offers potential insight into its molecular mechanism. We have characterized DNA binding by the ETS domain of PU.1 by biosensor-surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis revealed a striking kinetic profile for DNA binding by the PU.1 ETS domain. At low salt concentrations, it binds high-affinity cognate DNA with a very slow association rate constant (≤10(5)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)), compensated by a correspondingly small dissociation rate constant. The kinetics are strongly salt dependent but mutually balance to produce a relatively weak dependence in the equilibrium constant. This profile contrasts sharply with reported data for other ETS domains (e.g., Ets-1, TEL) for which high-affinity binding is driven by rapid association (>10(7)M(-)(1)s(-)(1)). We interpret this difference in terms of the hydration properties of ETS-DNA binding and propose that at least two mechanisms of sequence recognition are employed by this family of DNA-binding domain. Additionally, we use SPR to demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of sequence-specific ETS-DNA binding, using the minor groove-binding distamycin as a model compound. Our work establishes SPR as a valuable technique for extending our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ETS-DNA interactions as well as developing potential small-molecule agents for biotechnological and therapeutic purposes.

  1. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  2. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Gutsche

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF PERIANTHIA (PAN regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG, which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly

  3. NF-κB DNA-binding activity in embryos responding to a teratogen, cyclophosphamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brill Alexander

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rel/NF-κB transcription factors have been shown to regulate apoptosis in different cell types, acting as inducers or blockers in a stimuli- and cell type-dependent fashion. One of the Rel/NF-κB subunits, RelA, has been shown to be crucial for normal embryonic development, in which it functions in the embryonic liver as a protector against TNFα-induced physiological apoptosis. This study assesses whether NF-κB may be involved in the embryo's response to teratogens. Fot this, we evaluated how NF-KappaB DNA binding activity in embryonic organs demonstraiting differential sensitivity to a reference teratogen, cyclophosphamide, correlates with dysmorphic events induced by the teratogen at the cellular level (excessive apoptosis and at the organ level (structural anomalies. Results The embryonic brain and liver were used as target organs. We observed that the Cyclophosphamide-induced excessive apoptosis in the brain, followed by the formation of severe craniofacial structural anomalies, was accompanied by suppression of NF-κB DNA-binding activity as well as by a significant and lasting increase in the activity of caspases 3 and 8. However, in the liver, in which cyclophosphamide induced transient apoptosis was not followed by dysmorphogenesis, no suppression of NF-κB DNA-binding activity was registered and the level of active caspases 3 and 8 was significantly lower than in the brain. It has also been observed that both the brain and liver became much more sensitive to the CP-induced teratogenic insult if the embryos were exposed to a combined treatment with the teratogen and sodium salicylate that suppressed NF-κB DNA-binding activity in these organs. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that suppression of NF-κB DNA-binding activity in embryos responding to the teratogenic insult may be associated with their decreased resistance to this insult. They also suggest that teratogens may suppress NF-κB DNA-binding

  4. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  5. The repertoire of DNA-binding transcription factors in prokaryotes: functional and evolutionary lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rueda, Ernesto; Martinez-Nuñez, Mario Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities of organisms to contend with environmental changes depend on their genes and their ability to regulate their expression. DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in this process, because they regulate gene expression positively and/or negatively, depending on the operator context and ligand-binding status. In this review, we summarise recent findings regarding the function and evolution of TFs in prokaryotes. We consider the abundance of TFs in bacteria and archaea, the role of DNA-binding domains and their partner domains, and the effects of duplication events in the evolution of regulatory networks. Finally, a comprehensive picture for how regulatory networks have evolved in prokaryotes is provided.

  6. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    CERN Document Server

    Teif, Vladimir B

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibriums measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quant...

  7. Structural Analysis of Rtt106p Reveals a DNA Binding Role Required for Heterochromatin Silencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.; Huang, H; Zhou, B; Wang, S; Hu, Y; Li, X; Liu, J; Niu, L; Wu, J; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Rtt106p is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone chaperone with roles in heterochromatin silencing and nucleosome assembly. The molecular mechanism by which Rtt106p engages in chromatin dynamics remains unclear. Here, we report the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the core domain of Rtt106p, which adopts an unusual 'double pleckstrin homology' domain architecture that represents a novel structural mode for histone chaperones. A histone H3-H4-binding region and a novel double-stranded DNA-binding region have been identified. Mutagenesis studies reveal that the histone and DNA binding activities of Rtt106p are involved in Sir protein-mediated heterochromatin formation. Our results uncover the structural basis of the diverse functions of Rtt106p and provide new insights into its cellular roles.

  8. Tetrameric ZBRK1 DNA binding domain has affinity towards cognate DNA in absence of zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Lumbini R; Biswal, Mahamaya N; Vikrant; Hosur, M V; Varma, Ashok K

    2014-07-18

    Zinc finger transcription regulatory proteins play crucial roles in cell-cycle regulation, DNA damage response and tumor genesis. Human ZBRK1 is a zinc-finger transcription repressor protein, which recognizes double helical DNA containing consensus sequences of 5'GGGXXXCAGXXXTTT3'. In the present study, we have purified recombinant DNA binding domain of ZBRK1, and studied binding with zinc ions and DNA, using biophysical techniques. The elution profile of the purified protein suggests that this ZBRK1 forms a homotetramer in solution. Dissociation and pull down assays also suggest that this domain forms a higher order oligomer. The ZBRK1-DNA binding domain acquires higher stability in the presence of zinc ions and DNA. The secondary structure of the ZBRK1-DNA complex is found to be significantly altered from the standard B-DNA conformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved detection of DNA-binding proteins via compression technology on PSSM information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubo; Ding, Yijie; Guo, Fei; Wei, Leyi; Tang, Jijun

    2017-01-01

    Since the importance of DNA-binding proteins in multiple biomolecular functions has been recognized, an increasing number of researchers are attempting to identify DNA-binding proteins. In recent years, the machine learning methods have become more and more compelling in the case of protein sequence data soaring, because of their favorable speed and accuracy. In this paper, we extract three features from the protein sequence, namely NMBAC (Normalized Moreau-Broto Autocorrelation), PSSM-DWT (Position-specific scoring matrix-Discrete Wavelet Transform), and PSSM-DCT (Position-specific scoring matrix-Discrete Cosine Transform). We also employ feature selection algorithm on these feature vectors. Then, these features are fed into the training SVM (support vector machine) model as classifier to predict DNA-binding proteins. Our method applys three datasets, namely PDB1075, PDB594 and PDB186, to evaluate the performance of our approach. The PDB1075 and PDB594 datasets are employed for Jackknife test and the PDB186 dataset is used for the independent test. Our method achieves the best accuracy in the Jacknife test, from 79.20% to 86.23% and 80.5% to 86.20% on PDB1075 and PDB594 datasets, respectively. In the independent test, the accuracy of our method comes to 76.3%. The performance of independent test also shows that our method has a certain ability to be effectively used for DNA-binding protein prediction. The data and source code are at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5104084.

  10. Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome (PC110091)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome (PC110091) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roderick T Hori, PhD...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Prostate Cancer, Methylated DNA, Methyl- CpG Binding Domain, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation 14. ABSTRACT The purpose...of this study is to generate a genome-wide association profile of Methyl- CpG Domain-containing (MBD) proteins, such as MeCP2, MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4, in

  11. RAD50 and NBS1 form a stable complex functional in DNA binding and tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eddy; Sanchez, Humberto; Kinoshita, Eri; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2009-04-01

    The RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 protein complex (RMN) plays an essential role during the early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Previous data suggest that one important role for RMN in DSB repair is to provide a link between DNA ends. The striking architecture of the complex, a globular domain from which two extended coiled coils protrude, is essential for this function. Due to its DNA-binding activity, ability to form dimers and interact with both RAD50 and NBS1, MRE11 is considered to be crucial for formation and function of RMN. Here, we show the successful expression and purification of a stable complex containing only RAD50 and NBS1 (RN). The characteristic architecture of the complex was not affected by absence of MRE11. Although MRE11 is a DNA-binding protein it was not required for DNA binding per se or DNA-tethering activity of the complex. The stoichiometry of NBS1 in RMN and RN complexes was estimated by SFM-based volume analysis. These data show that in vitro, R, M and N form a variety of stable complexes with variable subunit composition and stoichiometry, which may be physiologically relevant in different aspects of RMN function.

  12. Multiple DNA binding proteins contribute to timing of chromosome replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Leise; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is initiated from a single origin, oriC. Initiation involves a number of DNA binding proteins, but only DnaA is essential and specific for the initiation process. DnaA is an AAA+ protein that binds both ATP and ADP with similar high affinities. Dna...... replication is initiated, or the time window in which all origins present in a single cell are initiated, i.e. initiation synchrony, or both. Overall, these DNA binding proteins modulate the initiation frequency from oriC by: (i) binding directly to oriC to affect DnaA binding, (ii) altering the DNA topology...... in or around oriC, (iii) altering the nucleotide bound status of DnaA by interacting with non-coding chromosomal sequences, distant from oriC, that are important for DnaA activity. Thus, although DnaA is the key protein for initiation of replication, other DNA-binding proteins act not only on ori...

  13. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  14. Predicting a DNA-binding protein using random forest with multiple mathematical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Changge; Niu, Xiaohui; Shi, Feng; Yang, Kun; Li, Nana

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are involved and play a crucial role in a lot of important biological processes. Hence, the identification of the DNA-binding proteins is a challenging and significant problem. In order to reveal the intrinsic information correlated to DNA-binding, nine classes of candidate features based on different mathematical fields are applied to construct the prediction model with random forest. They are fractal dimension, conjoint triad feature, Hilbert-Huang Transformation, amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, chaos game representation, and the corresponding information entropies. These mathematical expressions are evaluated with 5-fold cross validation test. The results of numerical simulations show that the mathematical features consisted of amino acid composition, fractal dimension and information entropies of amino acid and chaos game representation achieve the best performance. Its accuracy is 0.8157, and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) achieves 0.5968 on the benchmark dataset from DNA-Prot. By analyzing the components of top combination of the nine candidate features, the concepts of fractal dimension and information entropy are the effective and vital features, which can provide complementary sequence-order information on the basis of amino acid composition.

  15. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  16. Fluorescence-based electrophoretic mobility shift assay in the analysis of DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Sebastian; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Changes in gene expression mediated by DNA-binding protein factors are a crucial part of many signal transduction pathways. Generally, these regulatory proteins are low abundant and thus their purification and characterisation is labour- and time-intensive. Here we describe a workflow for purification, characterisation and identification of DNA-binding proteins. We show the use of a fluorescence-based electrophoretic mobility shift assay (fEMSA) and describe its advantages for a rapid and convenient screening for regulatory cis-elements. This involves a crude enrichment of nucleic acid binding proteins by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and the characterisation of fractions using overlapping fluorescence-labelled DNA probes spanning the promoter region of interest. The determined protein-binding sites can then be used for sequence-specific DNA-affinity chromatography to purify specifically interacting proteins. Finally, the DNA-binding complexes can be characterised and identified using two-dimensional EMSA, UV-cross-linking and mass spectrometry.

  17. Observations on Snake Repellent Property of Some Plant Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Renapurkar

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The repellent property of certain plant extracts and oils against snakes has been investigated. For this purpose 15 hexane extracts of plants and 11 oils were tested in the laboratory in a specially designed cage. Out of the materials tested. Across calamus extract and pine oil were found to exhibit excellent snake repellent property.

  18. An improved method for TAL effectors DNA-binding sites prediction reveals functional convergence in TAL repertoires of Xanthomonas oryzae strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro L Pérez-Quintero

    Full Text Available Transcription Activators-Like Effectors (TALEs belong to a family of virulence proteins from the Xanthomonas genus of bacterial plant pathogens that are translocated into the plant cell. In the nucleus, TALEs act as transcription factors inducing the expression of susceptibility genes. A code for TALE-DNA binding specificity and high-resolution three-dimensional structures of TALE-DNA complexes were recently reported. Accurate prediction of TAL Effector Binding Elements (EBEs is essential to elucidate the biological functions of the many sequenced TALEs as well as for robust design of artificial TALE DNA-binding domains in biotechnological applications. In this work a program with improved EBE prediction performances was developed using an updated specificity matrix and a position weight correction function to account for the matching pattern observed in a validation set of TALE-DNA interactions. To gain a systems perspective on the large TALE repertoires from X. oryzae strains, this program was used to predict rice gene targets for 99 sequenced family members. Integrating predictions and available expression data in a TALE-gene network revealed multiple candidate transcriptional targets for many TALEs as well as several possible instances of functional convergence among TALEs.

  19. DNA binding, DNA cleavage and HSA interaction of several metal complexes containing N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N'-benzoylthiourea and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Gao, Zhuantao; Li, Xibo; Li, Tingting; Chen, Guorong; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Ji

    2016-10-01

    Four novel ternary metal complexes of the type [M(Phen)(L1)2)] [phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, L1 = N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N'-benzoylthiourea, M = Ni(II)(1), Co(II) (2), Cu(II) (3), Pd(II) (4)] were synthesized. The organic ligands and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, element analysis, infrared radiation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectra. DNA binding and cleavage studies of these complexes were conducted in detail. In vitro DNA-binding properties were studied by electronic absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra methods. The results indicate that all of the ternary metal complexes can efficiently bind to DNA via intercalation mode. The DNA-binding constants for all ternary compounds are around 4 × 10(6) M(-1). The binding propensity of the complexes to human serum albumin (HSA) was also investigated. Agarose gel electrophoresis study revealed that the metal complexes could cleave super-coiled pBR322 DNA to a nicked form in the absence of external agents. In vitro anti bacterial studies show that copper complex has weak antibacterial activities. Copper complex exhibits a better biological activity among all complexes. This study provides a new perspective and evaluation on the role and importance of the effect factors on the medicinal properties of benzoylthiourea compounds. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of HSA (10 μM) as a function of concentration of the complexes 1-4.

  20. Substitution of glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain affects DNA binding ability of HapR by inducing structural deformity in the DNA binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Singh

    Full Text Available HapR has been given the status of a high cell density master regulatory protein in Vibrio cholerae. Though many facts are known regarding its structural and functional aspects, much still can be learnt from natural variants of the wild type protein. This work aims at investigating the nature of functional inertness of a HapR natural variant harboring a substitution of a conserved glutamate residue at position 117 which participates in forming a salt bridge by lysine (HapRV2G-E(117K. Experimental evidence presented here reveals the inability of this variant to interact with various cognate promoters by in vitro gel shift assay. Furthermore, the elution profiles of HapRV2G-E(117K protein along with the wild type functional HapRV2G in size-exclusion chromatography as well as circular dichroism spectra did not reflect any significant differences in its structure, thereby indicating the intactness of dimer in the variant protein. To gain further insight into the global shape of the proteins, small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS was performed. Intriguingly, increased radius of gyration of HapRV2G-E(117K of 27.5 Å in comparison to the wild type protein from SAXS data analyses implied a significant alteration in the global shape of the dimeric HapRV2G-E(117K protein. Structure reconstruction brought forth that the DNA binding domains were substantially "parted away" in this variant. Taken together, our data illustrates that substitution of the conserved glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain induces separation of the two DNA binding domains from their native-like positioning without altering the dimeric status of HapR variant.

  1. Substitution of glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain affects DNA binding ability of HapR by inducing structural deformity in the DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Richa; Rathore, Yogendra Singh; Singh, Naorem Santa; Peddada, Nagesh; Ashish; Raychaudhuri, Saumya

    2013-01-01

    HapR has been given the status of a high cell density master regulatory protein in Vibrio cholerae. Though many facts are known regarding its structural and functional aspects, much still can be learnt from natural variants of the wild type protein. This work aims at investigating the nature of functional inertness of a HapR natural variant harboring a substitution of a conserved glutamate residue at position 117 which participates in forming a salt bridge by lysine (HapRV2G-E(117)K). Experimental evidence presented here reveals the inability of this variant to interact with various cognate promoters by in vitro gel shift assay. Furthermore, the elution profiles of HapRV2G-E(117)K protein along with the wild type functional HapRV2G in size-exclusion chromatography as well as circular dichroism spectra did not reflect any significant differences in its structure, thereby indicating the intactness of dimer in the variant protein. To gain further insight into the global shape of the proteins, small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) was performed. Intriguingly, increased radius of gyration of HapRV2G-E(117)K of 27.5 Å in comparison to the wild type protein from SAXS data analyses implied a significant alteration in the global shape of the dimeric HapRV2G-E(117)K protein. Structure reconstruction brought forth that the DNA binding domains were substantially "parted away" in this variant. Taken together, our data illustrates that substitution of the conserved glutamate residue by lysine in the dimerization domain induces separation of the two DNA binding domains from their native-like positioning without altering the dimeric status of HapR variant.

  2. Preliminary investigation of sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and their function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文; 姜志胜; 倪菊华; 陈光慧; 刘乃奎; 汤健; 贾弘褆; 唐朝枢

    2000-01-01

    To observe the binding of plasmid DNA to non-nuclear DNA binding proteins in sar-coplasmic reticulum (SR) and the effects of this binding on SR function, sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins in rat skeletal muscle were isolated by differential centrifuge and sucrose density-gradient centrifuge. The results showed that there are two sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in SR proteins, the molecular weights of which are 83 and 58 ku, respectively. Ca2+ uptake and release of SR were remarkably promoted by the binding of plasmid DNA to DNA binding proteins in SR, the mechanism is probably through increasing of Ca2+-ATPase activity in SR and changing of character of Ca2+ release channel ryanodine receptors induced by the binding. These results suggest that there exist DNA binding proteins in SR and its binding to DNA may affect Ca2+ transport of SR.

  3. Preliminary investigation of sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and their function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To observe the binding of plasmid DNA to non-nuclear DNA binding proteins in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the effects of this binding on SR function, sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins in rat skeletal muscle were isolated by differential centrifuge and sucrose density-gradient centrifuge. The results showed that there are two sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in SR proteins, the molecular weights of which are 83 and 58 ku, respectively. Ca2+ uptake and release of SR were remarkably promoted by the binding of plasmid DNA to DNA binding proteins in SR, the mechanism is probably through increasing of Ca2+-ATPase activity in SR and changing of character of Ca2+ release channel ryanodine receptors induced by the binding. These results suggest that there exist DNA binding proteins in SR and its binding to DNA may affect Ca2+ transport of SR.

  4. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitsugu Fujita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas (CRISPR/Cas system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing.

  5. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  6. Role of aldo-keto reductases and other doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes in doxorubicin resistance, DNA binding, and subcellular localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Since proteins involved in chemotherapy drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have a strong impact on the uptake, metabolism, and efflux of such drugs, they likely play critical roles in resistance to chemotherapy drugs in cancer patients. Methods To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a whole genome microarray study to identify difference in the expression of genes between isogenic doxorubicin-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast tumour cells. We then assessed the degree of over-representation of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic genes in the dataset of doxorubicin resistance genes. Results Of 27,958 Entrez genes on the array, 7.4 per cent or 2,063 genes were differentially expressed by ≥ 2-fold between wildtype and doxorubicin-resistant cells. The false discovery rate was set at 0.01 and the minimum p value for significance for any gene within the “hit list” was 0.01. Seventeen and 43 per cent of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes were over-represented in the hit list, depending upon whether the gene name was identical or within the same gene family, respectively. The most over-represented genes were within the 1C and 1B families of aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), which convert doxorubicin to doxorubicinol. Other genes convert doxorubicin to other metabolites or affect the influx, efflux, or cytotoxicity of the drug. In further support of the role of AKRs in doxorubicin resistance, we observed that, in comparison to doxorubicin, doxorubincol exhibited dramatically reduced cytotoxicity, reduced DNA-binding activity, and strong localization to extra nuclear lysosomes. Pharmacologic inhibition of the above AKRs in doxorubicin-resistant cells increased cellular doxorubicin levels, restored doxorubicin cytotoxicity and re-established doxorubicin localization to the nucleus. The properties of doxorubicinol were unaffected. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the utility of using curated pharmacokinetic and

  7. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Leila; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-06-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork.

  8. The effect of 17beta-estradiol on IL-6 secretion and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paimela, Tuomas; Ryhänen, Tuomas; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Ojala, Johanna; Kalesnykas, Giedrius; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2007-06-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and inflammatory cascades participate in the pathology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The effect of estrogens on the development of AMD is poorly understood, although many studies indicate that these compounds can modulate inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of TLR agonists and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) on IL-6 expression and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). The inflammatory response of ARPE-19 cells to various TLR agonists, e.g. Pam, zymosan, flagellin, SLTA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures were examined via the secretion of IL-6 cytokine as analyzed by ELISA. In addition, the IL-6 responses to the estrogen-receptor agonist, E(2), and to the estrogen-receptor antagonist ICI 182.780 as well as to the NF-kappaB inhibitor helenalin were compared. The DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB transcription factor of nuclear cell extracts was analyzed by the gel mobility shift assay (EMSA). TLR4 gene expression was studied by quantitave PCR. The TLR4 agonist, LPS, caused a clear IL-6 response that was attenuated by E(2) in ARPE-19-cells. The anti-inflammatory properties of E(2) were mediated through estrogen receptors and were associated with decreased NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity. The level of TLR4 gene expression was not affected by LPS exposure. Our results indicate that IL-6 expression is regulated through NF-kappaB transcription factor and stereoid-receptor signalling pathways in ARPE-19 cells.

  9. Antimicrobial properties of Honduran medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, D L; Clark, A M; Hufford, C D; Meurer-Grimes, B; Passreiter, C M; Cordero, J; Ibrahimi, O; Okunade, A L

    1998-12-01

    Ninety-two plants used in the traditional pharmacopoeia of the Pech and neighboring Mestizo peoples of central Honduras are reported. The results of in vitro antimicrobial screens showed that 19 of the extracts from medicinal plants revealed signs of antifungal activity while 22 demonstrated a measurable inhibitory effect on one or more bacterial cultures. Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from Mikania micrantha, Neurolaena lobata and Piper aduncum produced weak to moderately active isolates. The broad spectrum of activity of the extracts helps to explain the widespread use of these plants for wound healing and other applications.

  10. Antimalarial properties of South African medicinal plants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pillay, P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available of structure-activity derivatives around these simplified structures is currently under way. CONCLUSIONS The study identified a number of promising South African medicinal plants for further investigation as plant-based antimalarial agents. The overall... as potential sources of antimalarial lead compounds. REFERENCES Clarkson, C., Maharaj, V.J., Crouch, N.R., Grace, O.M., Pillay, P., Matsabisa, M.G., Bhagwandin, N., Smith, P.J., Folb, P.I., 2004. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of medicinal plants native...

  11. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Pohl, Ehmke, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, (United Kingdom); Usón, Isabel, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); University of Göttingen, (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The structure solution of DNA-binding protein structures and complexes based on the combination of location of DNA-binding protein motif fragments with density modification in a multi-solution frame is described. Protein–DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein–DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein–DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein–DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  12. STN1 OB Fold Mutation Alters DNA Binding and Affects Selective Aspects of CST Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Anukana; Stewart, Jason; Chaiken, Mary; Price, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1) participates in multiple aspects of telomere replication and genome-wide recovery from replication stress. CST resembles Replication Protein A (RPA) in that it binds ssDNA and STN1 and TEN1 are structurally similar to RPA2 and RPA3. Conservation between CTC1 and RPA1 is less apparent. Currently the mechanism underlying CST action is largely unknown. Here we address CST mechanism by using a DNA-binding mutant, (STN1 OB-fold mutant, STN1-OBM) to examine the relationship between DNA binding and CST function. In vivo, STN1-OBM affects resolution of endogenous replication stress and telomere duplex replication but telomeric C-strand fill-in and new origin firing after exogenous replication stress are unaffected. These selective effects indicate mechanistic differences in CST action during resolution of different replication problems. In vitro binding studies show that STN1 directly engages both short and long ssDNA oligonucleotides, however STN1-OBM preferentially destabilizes binding to short substrates. The finding that STN1-OBM affects binding to only certain substrates starts to explain the in vivo separation of function observed in STN1-OBM expressing cells. CST is expected to engage DNA substrates of varied length and structure as it acts to resolve different replication problems. Since STN1-OBM will alter CST binding to only some of these substrates, the mutant should affect resolution of only a subset of replication problems, as was observed in the STN1-OBM cells. The in vitro studies also provide insight into CST binding mechanism. Like RPA, CST likely contacts DNA via multiple OB folds. However, the importance of STN1 for binding short substrates indicates differences in the architecture of CST and RPA DNA-protein complexes. Based on our results, we propose a dynamic DNA binding model that provides a general mechanism for CST action at diverse forms of replication stress. PMID:27690379

  13. Cross-talk between the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Greene, Geoffrey L; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Yang, Sichun

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a hormone-responsive transcription factor that contains several discrete functional domains, including a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a DNA-binding domain (DBD). Despite a wealth of knowledge about the behaviors of individual domains, the molecular mechanisms of cross-talk between LBD and DBD during signal transduction from hormone to DNA-binding of ERα remain elusive. Here, we apply a multiscale approach combining coarse-grained (CG) and atomistically detailed simulations to characterize this cross-talk mechanism via an investigation of the ERα conformational landscape. First, a CG model of ERα is built based on crystal structures of individual LBDs and DBDs, with more emphasis on their interdomain interactions. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented and enhanced sampling is achieved via the "push-pull-release" strategy in the search for different LBD-DBD orientations. Third, multiple energetically stable ERα conformations are identified on the landscape. A key finding is that estradiol-bound LBDs utilize the well-described activation helix H12 to pack and stabilize LBD-DBD interactions. Our results suggest that the estradiol-bound LBDs can serve as a scaffold to position and stabilize the DBD-DNA complex, consistent with experimental observations of enhanced DNA binding with the LBD. Final assessment using atomic-level simulations shows that these CG-predicted models are significantly stable within a 15-ns simulation window and that specific pairs of lysine residues in close proximity at the domain interfaces could serve as candidate sites for chemical cross-linking studies. Together, these simulation results provide a molecular view of the role of ERα domain interactions in response to hormone binding.

  14. The nuclear proteome and DNA-binding fraction of human Raji lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Silke; Cordwell, Stuart J; Crossett, Ben; Baker, Mark S; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-04-01

    Purification of organelles and analysis of their proteins is an important initial step for biological proteomics, simplifying the proteome prior to analysis by established techniques such as two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2-DLC) or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Nuclear proteins play a central role in regulating gene expression, but are often under-represented in proteomic studies due to their lower abundance in comparison to cellular 'housekeeping' metabolic enzymes and structural proteins. A reliable procedure for separation and proteomic analysis of nuclear proteins would be useful for investigations of cell proliferation and differentiation during disease processes (e.g., human cancer). In this study, we have purified nuclei from the human Burkitt's lymphoma B-cell line, Raji, using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The integrity and purity of the nuclei were assessed by light microscopy and proteins from the nuclear fractions were separated by 2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A total of 124 unique proteins were identified, of which 91% (n=110) were predicted to be nuclear using PSORT. Proteins from the nuclear fraction were subjected to affinity chromatography on DNA-agarose to isolate DNA-binding proteins. From this purified fraction, 131 unique proteins were identified, of which 69% (n=90) were known or predicted DNA-binding proteins. Purification of nuclei and subsequent enrichment of DNA-binding proteins allowed identification of a total of 209 unique proteins, many involved in transcription and/or correlated with lymphoma, leukemia or cancer in general. The data obtained should be valuable for identification of biomarkers and targets for cancer therapy, and for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphoma development and progression.

  15. CETCh-seq: CRISPR epitope tagging ChIP-seq of DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Partridge, E Christopher; Newberry, Kimberly M; Smith, Sophia B; Meadows, Sarah K; Roberts, Brian S; Mackiewicz, Mark; Mendenhall, Eric M; Myers, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a widely used technique for identifying transcription factor (TF) binding events throughout an entire genome. However, ChIP-seq is limited by the availability of suitable ChIP-seq grade antibodies, and the vast majority of commercially available antibodies fail to generate usable data sets. To ameliorate these technical obstacles, we present a robust methodological approach for performing ChIP-seq through epitope tagging of endogenous TFs. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-based genome editing technology to develop CRISPR epitope tagging ChIP-seq (CETCh-seq) of DNA-binding proteins. We assessed the feasibility of CETCh-seq by tagging several DNA-binding proteins spanning a wide range of endogenous expression levels in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Our data exhibit strong correlations between both replicate types as well as with standard ChIP-seq approaches that use TF antibodies. Notably, we also observed minimal changes to the cellular transcriptome and to the expression of the tagged TF. To examine the robustness of our technique, we further performed CETCh-seq in the breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF7 as well as mouse embryonic stem cells and observed similarly high correlations. Collectively, these data highlight the applicability of CETCh-seq to accurately define the genome-wide binding profiles of DNA-binding proteins, allowing for a straightforward methodology to potentially assay the complete repertoire of TFs, including the large fraction for which ChIP-quality antibodies are not available.

  16. Zuotin, a putative Z-DNA binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Lockshin, C.; Herbert, A.; Winter, E.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    A putative Z-DNA binding protein, named zuotin, was purified from a yeast nuclear extract by means of a Z-DNA binding assay using [32P]poly(dG-m5dC) and [32P]oligo(dG-Br5dC)22 in the presence of B-DNA competitor. Poly(dG-Br5dC) in the Z-form competed well for the binding of a zuotin containing fraction, but salmon sperm DNA, poly(dG-dC) and poly(dA-dT) were not effective. Negatively supercoiled plasmid pUC19 did not compete, whereas an otherwise identical plasmid pUC19(CG), which contained a (dG-dC)7 segment in the Z-form was an excellent competitor. A Southwestern blot using [32P]poly(dG-m5dC) as a probe in the presence of MgCl2 identified a protein having a molecular weight of 51 kDa. The 51 kDa zuotin was partially sequenced at the N-terminal and the gene, ZUO1, was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli; the expressed zuotin showed similar Z-DNA binding activity, but with lower affinity than zuotin that had been partially purified from yeast. Zuotin was deduced to have a number of potential phosphorylation sites including two CDC28 (homologous to the human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdc2) phosphorylation sites. The hexapeptide motif KYHPDK was found in zuotin as well as in several yeast proteins, DnaJ of E.coli, csp29 and csp32 proteins of Drosophila and the small t and large T antigens of the polyoma virus. A 60 amino acid segment of zuotin has similarity to several histone H1 sequences. Disruption of ZUO1 in yeast resulted in a slow growth phenotype.

  17. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  18. p53 Requires an Intact C-Terminal Domain for DNA Binding and Transactivation

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a critical role in mediating cellular response to a wide range of environmental stresses. p53 regulates these processes mainly by acting as a short-lived DNA binding protein that stimulates transcription from numerous genes involved in cell cycle arrest, programmed cell death, and other processes. To investigate the importance of C-terminal domain of p53, we generated a series of deletion and point mutations in this region and analyzed their effects on p53 trans...

  19. Altered Specificity of DNA-Binding Proteins with Transition Metal Dimerization Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenoud, Bernard; Schepartz, Alanna

    1993-01-01

    The bZIP motif is characterized by a leucine zipper domain that mediates dimerization and a basic domain that contacts DNA. A series of transition metal dimerization domains were used to alter systematically the relative orientation of basic domain peptides. Both the affinity and the specificity of the peptide-DNA interaction depend on domain orientation. These results indicate that the precise configuration linking the domains is important; dimerization is not always sufficient for DNA binding. This approach to studying the effect of orientation on protein function complements mutagenesis and could be used in many systems.

  20. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  1. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  2. Increased Stability and DNA Site Discrimination of Single Chain Variants of the Dimeric beta-Barrel DNA Binding Domain of the Human Papillomavirus E2 Transcriptional Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellarole,M.; Sanchez, I.; Freire, E.; de Prat-Gay, G.

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infects millions of people worldwide and is a causal agent of cervical cancer in women. The HPV E2 protein controls the expression of all viral genes through binding of its dimeric C-terminal domain (E2C) to its target DNA site. We engineered monomeric versions of the HPV16 E2C, in order to probe the link of the dimeric {beta}-barrel fold to stability, dimerization, and DNA binding. Two single-chain variants, with 6 and 12 residue linkers (scE2C-6 and scE2C-12), were purified and characterized. Spectroscopy and crystallography show that the native structure is unperturbed in scE2C-12. The single chain variants are stabilized with respect to E2C, with effective concentrations of 0.6 to 6 mM. The early folding events of the E2C dimer and scE2C-12 are very similar and include formation of a compact species in the submillisecond time scale and a non-native monomeric intermediate with a half-life of 25 ms. However, monomerization changes the unfolding mechanism of the linked species from two-state to three-state, with a high-energy intermediate. Binding to the specific target site is up to 5-fold tighter in the single chain variants. Nonspecific DNA binding is up to 7-fold weaker in the single chain variants, leading to an overall 10-fold increased site discrimination capacity, the largest described so far for linked DNA binding domains. Titration calorimetric binding analysis, however, shows almost identical behavior for dimer and single-chain species, suggesting very subtle changes behind the increased specificity. Global analysis of the mechanisms probed suggests that the dynamics of the E2C domain, rather than the structure, are responsible for the differential properties. Thus, the plastic and dimeric nature of the domain did not evolve for a maximum affinity, specificity, and stability of the quaternary structure, likely because of regulatory reasons and for roles other than DNA binding played by partly folded dimeric or monomeric conformers.

  3. Intellectual property rights, international trade and plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eaton, D.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Seed is the physical embodiment of the invention of the plant breeder. Plant varieties thus constitute a special form of innovation, and an assessment of intellectual property right (IPR) systems needs to take this into account. This thesis concentrates on IPRs but breeders do have a number of means

  4. New mixed ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) that incorporate a modified phenanthroline ligand: Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Murali; C V Sastri; Bhaskar G Maiya

    2002-08-01

    The hexafluorophosphate and chloride salts of two ruthenium(II) complexes, viz. [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+, where ptzo = 1,10-phenanthrolino[5,6-]1,2,4-triazine-3-one (ptzo) - a new modified phenanthroline (phen) ligand, have been synthesised. These complexes have been characterised by infrared, UV-Vis, steady-state emission and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods. Results of absorption and fluorescence titration as well as thermal denaturation studies reveal that both the bis- and tris-complexes of ptzo show moderately strong affinity for binding with calf thymus (CT) DNA with the binding constants being close to 105M-1 in each case. An intercalative mode of DNA binding has been suggested for both the complexes. Emission studies carried out in non-aqueous solvents and in aqueous media without DNA reveal that both [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+ are weakly luminescent under these solution conditions. Successive addition of CT DNA to buffered aqueous solutions containing [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ results in an enhancement of the emission. These results have been discussed in the light of the dependence of the structure-specific deactivation processes of the MLCT state of the metallointercalator with the characteristic features of its DNA interaction. In doing so, attempts have been made to compare and contrast its properties with those of the analogous phenanthroline-based complexes including the ones reported by us previously.

  5. The incorporation of radiolabelled sulphur from captan into protein and its impact on a DNA binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, W M; Eyton-Jones, H; Lappin, G; Pritchard, D; Moore, R B; Green, T

    1995-05-19

    Repeated administration of high doses of captan is known to produce tumours specifically in the duodenum of mice. Captan is not carcinogenic in the rat. In this study, DNA purified from the liver, stomach, duodenum and jejenum of mice dosed with 35S radiolabelled captan was found to contain radioactivity equivalent to Covalent Binding Indices in the range 38-91; that from the bone marrow had a CBI of 2.8. The distribution of radioactivity between the various tissues did not reflect the target organ specificity of captan. Attempts to further purify the DNA samples using caesium chloride gradients resulted in partial separation of the radioactivity from the DNA suggesting that covalent binding to the DNA may not have occurred. A study of the chemical breakdown of captan showed that captan is unstable, producing a variety of potentially reactive species containing sulphur. Evidence was further obtained to show that the sulphur of captan is incorporated into endogenous amino acids and protein. Hepatic DNA from mice dosed with 35S radiolabelled N-acetylcysteine, and two thiazolidine derivatives which are analogous to known metabolites of captan, was radiolabelled to a similar extent to that from captan treated mice. Furthermore, the DNA from each of these treatments had similar properties on caesium chloride gradients. It was concluded that the radioactivity associated with DNA in the captan DNA binding study was present in the low levels of protein which are always associated with purified DNA samples.

  6. DNA-binding specificity, transcriptional activation potential, and the rin mutation effect for the tomato fruit-ripening regulator RIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Mamiko; Ihashi, Nao; Yabe, Kimiko; Kimbara, Junji; Yasuda, Junichi; Ito, Hirotaka; Inakuma, Takahiro; Hiroi, Seiji; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2008-07-01

    The RIN gene encodes a putative MADS box transcription factor that controls tomato fruit ripening, and its ripening inhibitor (rin) mutation yields non-ripening fruit. In this study, the molecular properties of RIN and the rin mutant protein were clarified. The results revealed that the RIN protein accumulates in ripening fruit specifically and is localized in the nucleus of the cell. In vitro studies revealed that RIN forms a stable homodimer that binds to MADS domain-specific DNA sites. Analysis of binding site selection experiments revealed that the consensus binding sites of RIN highly resemble those of the SEPALLATA (SEP) proteins, which are Arabidopsis MADS box proteins that control the identity of floral organs. RIN exhibited a transcription-activating function similar to that exhibited by the SEP proteins. These results indicate that RIN exhibits similar molecular functions to SEP proteins although they play distinctly different biological roles. In vivo assays revealed that RIN binds to the cis-element of LeACS2. Our results also revealed that the rin mutant protein accumulates in the mutant fruit and exhibits a DNA-binding activity similar to that exhibited by the wild-type protein, but has lost its transcription-activating function, which in turn would inhibit ripening in mutant fruit.

  7. Intellectual Property for Plant innovation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordberg, Ana; Sonne, Maria Lillie

    2017-01-01

    Innovation in plant bioscience offers prospects for solving important and urgent issues regarding the future of mankind: Food security, renewable energy sources, and medicines. It is also connected closely to questions of environmental protection, global warming, biodiversity, sustainable devel-o...

  8. The tumorigenic diversity of the three PLAG family members is associated with different DNA binding capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Karen; Van Valckenborgh, Isabelle C C; Kas, Koen; Van de Ven, Wim J M; Voz, Marianne L

    2002-03-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma gene (PLAG) 1, the main translocation target in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, is a member of a new subfamily of zinc finger proteins comprising the tumor suppressor candidate PLAG-like1 (also called ZAC1 or lost on transformation 1) and PLAGL2. In this report, we show that NIH3T3 cells overexpressing PLAG1 or PLAGL2 display the typical markers of neoplastic transformation: (a) the cells lose cell-cell contact inhibition; (b) show anchorage-independent growth; and (c) are able to induce tumors in nude mice. In contrast, PLAGL1 has been shown to prevent the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This difference in function is also reflected in their DNA binding, as we show here that the three PLAG proteins, although highly homologous in their DNA-binding domain, bind different DNA sequences in a distinct fashion. Interestingly, the PLAG1- and PLAGL2-induced transformation is accompanied by a drastic up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor-II, which we prove is a target of PLAG1 and PLAGL2. This strongly suggests that the oncogenic capacity of PLAG1 and PLAGL2 is mediated at least partly by activating the insulin-like growth factor-II mitogenic pathway.

  9. Characterization and DNA binding studies of unexplored imidazolidines by electronic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Nosheen, Erum; Munir, Shamsa; Badshah, Amin; Qureshi, Rumana; Rehman, Zia-Ur-; Muhammad, Niaz; Hussain, Hidayat

    2013-03-05

    UV-Vis spectroscopic behavior of four imidazolidine derivatives i.e., [5-benzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (NBI), 5-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (HBI), 5-(4-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (MBI) and 5-(3,4-di-methoxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (DBI)] was studied in a wide pH range. Spectroscopic response of the studied compounds was found sensitive to pH and the attached substituents. Incited by anti-tumor activity, structural miscellany and biological applications of imidazolidines, the DNA binding affinity of some novel derivatives of this class of compounds was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectroscopy at pH values of blood (7.4) and lysosomes (4.5). The CV results showed the following order of binding strength: KNBI (6.40×10(6)M(-1))>KHBI (1.77×10(5)M(-1))>KMBI (2.06×10(4)M(-1))>KDBI (1.01×10(4)M(-1)) at pH 7.4. The same order was also obtained from UV-Vis spectroscopy. The greater affinity of NBI justified its preferred candidature as an effective anti-cancer drug. The DNA binding propensity of these compounds was found comparable or greater than most of the clinically used anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural evidence suggests that antiactivator ExsD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a DNA binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhards, R.C.; Robinson, H.; Jing, X.; Vogelaar, N. J.; Schubot, F. D.

    2009-03-01

    The opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa utilizes a type III secretion system (T3SS) to support acute infections in predisposed individuals. In this bacterium, expression of all T3SS-related genes is dependent on the AraC-type transcriptional activator ExsA. Before host contact, the T3SS is inactive and ExsA is repressed by the antiactivator protein ExsD. The repression, thought to occur through direct interactions between the two proteins, is relieved upon opening of the type III secretion (T3S) channel when secretion chaperone ExsC sequesters ExsD. We have solved the crystal structure of ?20ExsD, a protease-resistant fragment of ExsD that lacks only the 20 amino terminal residues of the wild-type protein at 2.6 {angstrom}. Surprisingly the structure revealed similarities between ExsD and the DNA binding domain of transcriptional repressor KorB. A model of an ExsD-DNA complex constructed on the basis of this homology produced a realistic complex that is supported by the prevalence of conserved residues in the putative DNA binding site and the results of differential scanning fluorimetry studies. Our findings challenge the currently held model that ExsD solely acts through interactions with ExsA and raise new questions with respect to the underlying mechanism of ExsA regulation.

  11. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  12. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  13. In vitro DNA binding of purified CcpA protein from Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Magdalena; Borcz, Barbara; Płochocka, Danuta; Bardowski, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    During this study His-tagged CcpA protein purified under native conditions to obtain a biologically active protein was used for molecular analysis of CcpA-dependent regulation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays it was demonstrated that CcpA of L. lactis can bind DNA in the absence of the HPr-Ser-P corepressor and exhibits DNA-binding affinity for nucleotide sequences lacking cre sites. However, purified HPr-Ser-P protein from Bacillus subtilis was shown to slightly increase the DNA-binding capacity of the CcpA protein. It was also observed that CcpA bound to the cre box forms an apparently more stable complex than that resulting from unspecific binding. Competition gel retardation assay performed on DNA sequences from two PEP:PTS regions demonstrated that the ybhE, bglS, rheB, yebE, ptcB and yecA genes situated in these regions are most probably directly regulated by CcpA.

  14. Ribosomal DNA-binding proteins in the nucleolus of Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham-Lorence, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    In Physarum polycephalum, the nucleoli are extra chromosomal structures containing 200 to 400 copies of a linear 60 kilobase palindromic rDNA molecule. These rDNA molecules are organized into minichromosomes which apparently are held within a nucleolar protein matrix. To obtained evidence for attachment of the rDNA to such a matrix, both intact and lithium diiodosalicylate/NaCl-extracted nucleoli were digested for various lengths of time with micrococcal nuclease, so that portions of the rDNA molecules not attached within the nucleolar structure would be released. Nucleolar DNA-binding proteins were determined by blotting electrophoretically separated proteins from SDS-polyacrylamide gels onto nitrocellulose paper and probing them with radiolabeled DNA. In addition to the histones and lexosome proteins, eight DNA-binding proteins were identified having molecular weights of 25, 38, 47, 53, 55, 67, and 70 kD, with the 47, 53, 67, and 70 kD proteins requiring Ca{sup 2+} for binding.

  15. A Review of Protein-DNA Binding Motif using Association Rule Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Kumar Tripathi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival of gene regulation and life mechanisms is pre-request of finding unknown pattern of transcription factor binding sites. The discovery motif of gene regulation in bioinformatics is challenging jobs for getting relation between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites. The increasing size and length of string pattern of motif is issued a problem related to modeling and optimization of gene selection process. In this paper we give a survey of protein-DNA binding using association rule mining. Association rule mining well known data mining technique for pattern analysis. The capability of negative and positive pattern generation help full for discovering of new pattern in DNA binding bioinformatics data. The other data mining approach such as clustering and classification also applied the process of gene selection grouping for known and unknown pattern. But faced a problem of valid string of DNA data, the rule mining principle find a better relation between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites.

  16. p53 DNA Binding Cooperativity Is Essential for Apoptosis and Tumor Suppression In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Timofeev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Four molecules of the tumor suppressor p53 assemble to cooperatively bind proapoptotic target genes. The structural basis for cooperativity consists of interactions between adjacent DNA binding domains. Mutations at the interaction interface that compromise cooperativity were identified in cancer patients, suggesting a requirement of cooperativity for tumor suppression. We report on an analysis of cooperativity mutant p53E177R mice. Apoptotic functions of p53 triggered by DNA damage and oncogenes were abolished in these mice, whereas functions in cell-cycle control, senescence, metabolism, and antioxidant defense were retained and were sufficient to suppress development of spontaneous T cell lymphoma. Cooperativity mutant mice are nevertheless highly cancer prone and susceptible to different oncogene-induced tumors. Our data underscore the relevance of DNA binding cooperativity for p53-dependent apoptosis and tumor suppression and highlight cooperativity mutations as a class of p53 mutations that result in a selective loss of apoptotic functions due to an altered quaternary structure of the p53 tetramer.

  17. ACETYLATION INCREASES EWS-FLI1 DNA BINDING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eSchlottmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ewing Sarcoma (ES is associated with a balanced chromosomal translocation that in most cases leads to the expression of the oncogenic fusion protein and transcription factor EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 has been shown to be crucial for ES cell survival and tumor growth. However, its regulation is still enigmatic. To date, no functionally significant posttranslational modifications of EWS-FLI1 have been shown. Since ES are sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors, and these inhibitors are advancing in clinical trials, we sought to identify if EWS-FLI1 is directly acetylated. We convincingly show acetylation of the C-terminal FLI1 (FLI1-CTD domain, which is the DNA binding domain of EWS-FLI1. In vitro acetylation studies showed that acetylated FLI1-CTD has higher DNA binding activity than the non-acetylated protein. Over-expression of PCAF or treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI increased the transcriptional activity of EWS-FLI1, when co-expressed in COS7 cells. However, our data that evaluates the acetylation of ful-length EWS-FLI1 remains unclear, despite creating acetylation specific antibodies to four potential acetylation sites. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 may either gain access to chromatin as a result of histone acetylation or undergo regulation by direct acetylation. These data should be considered when patients are treated with HDAC inhibitors. Further investigation of this phenomenon will reveal if this potential acetylation has an impact on tumor response.

  18. Cdc13 N-Terminal Dimerization DNA Binding and Telomere Length Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Mitchell; J Smith; M Mason; S Harper; D Speicher; F Johnson; E Skordalakes

    2011-12-31

    The essential yeast protein Cdc13 facilitates chromosome end replication by recruiting telomerase to telomeres, and together with its interacting partners Stn1 and Ten1, it protects chromosome ends from nucleolytic attack, thus contributing to genome integrity. Although Cdc13 has been studied extensively, the precise role of its N-terminal domain (Cdc13N) in telomere length regulation remains unclear. Here we present a structural, biochemical, and functional characterization of Cdc13N. The structure reveals that this domain comprises an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold and is involved in Cdc13 dimerization. Biochemical data show that Cdc13N weakly binds long, single-stranded, telomeric DNA in a fashion that is directly dependent on domain oligomerization. When introduced into full-length Cdc13 in vivo, point mutations that prevented Cdc13N dimerization or DNA binding caused telomere shortening or lengthening, respectively. The multiple DNA binding domains and dimeric nature of Cdc13 offer unique insights into how it coordinates the recruitment and regulation of telomerase access to the telomeres.

  19. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  20. The DNA Binding Activity of p53 Displays Reaction-Diffusion Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinow, Peter; Rogers, Carl E.; Barbieri, Christopher E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele

    2006-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in maintaining the genomic stability of mammalian cells and preventing malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the intracellular diffusion of a p53-GFP fusion protein using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We show that the diffusion of p53-GFP within the nucleus is well described by a mathematical model for diffusion of particles that bind temporarily to a spatially homogeneous immobile structure with binding and release rates k1 and k2, respectively. The diffusion constant of p53-GFP was estimated to be Dp53-GFP = 15.4 μm2 s−1, significantly slower than that of GFP alone, DGFP = 41.6 μm2 s−1. The reaction rates of the binding and unbinding of p53-GFP were estimated as k1 = 0.3 s−1 and k2 = 0.4 s−1, respectively, values suggestive of nonspecific binding. Consistent with this finding, the diffusional mobilities of tumor-derived sequence-specific DNA binding mutants of p53 were indistinguishable from that of the wild-type protein. These data are consistent with a model in which, under steady-state conditions, p53 is latent and continuously scans DNA, requiring activation for sequence-specific DNA binding. PMID:16603489

  1. Generalizing and learning protein-DNA binding sequence representations by an evolutionary algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka Chun

    2011-02-05

    Protein-DNA bindings are essential activities. Understanding them forms the basis for further deciphering of biological and genetic systems. In particular, the protein-DNA bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) play a central role in gene transcription. Comprehensive TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs have been found in a recent study. However, they are in one-to-one mappings which cannot fully reflect the many-to-many mappings within the bindings. An evolutionary algorithm is proposed to learn generalized representations (many-to-many mappings) from the TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs (one-to-one mappings). The generalized pairs are shown to be more meaningful than the original TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs. Some representative examples have been analyzed in this study. In particular, it shows that the TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs are not presumably in one-to-one mappings. They can also exhibit many-to-many mappings. The proposed method can help us extract such many-to-many information from the one-to-one TF-TFBS binding sequence pairs found in the previous study, providing further knowledge in understanding the bindings between TFs and TFBSs. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  2. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaneta Odrowaz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  3. Intrinsic Differences in Backbone Dynamics between Wild Type and DNA-Contact Mutants of the p53 DNA Binding Domain Revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasquinha, Juhi A; Bej, Aritra; Dutta, Shraboni; Mukherjee, Sujoy

    2017-09-07

    Mutations in p53's DNA binding domain (p53DBD) are associated with 50% of all cancers, making it an essential system to investigate and understand the genesis and progression of cancer. In this work, we studied the changes in the structure and dynamics of wild type p53DBD in comparison with two of its "hot-spot" DNA-contact mutants, R248Q and R273H, by analysis of backbone amide chemical shift perturbations and (15)N spin relaxation measurements. The results of amide chemical shift changes indicated significantly more perturbations in the R273H mutant than in wild type and R248Q p53DBD. Analysis of (15)N spin relaxation rates and the resulting nuclear magnetic resonance order parameters suggests that for most parts, the R248Q mutant exhibits limited conformational flexibility and is similar to the wild type protein. In contrast, R273H showed significant backbone dynamics extending up to its β-sandwich scaffold in addition to motions along the DNA binding interface. Furthermore, comparison of rotational correlation times between the mutants suggests that the R273H mutant, with a higher correlation time, forms an enlarged structural fold in comparison to the R248Q mutant and wild type p53DBD. Finally, we identify three regions in these proteins that show conformational flexibility to varying degrees, which suggests that the R273H mutant, in addition to being a DNA-contact mutation, exhibits properties of a conformational mutant.

  4. Defining the sequence specificity of DNA-binding proteins by selecting binding sites from random-sequence oligonucleotides: analysis of yeast GCN4 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A R; Brandl, C J; Struhl, K

    1989-07-01

    We describe a new method for accurately defining the sequence recognition properties of DNA-binding proteins by selecting high-affinity binding sites from random-sequence DNA. The yeast transcriptional activator protein GCN4 was coupled to a Sepharose column, and binding sites were isolated by passing short, random-sequence oligonucleotides over the column and eluting them with increasing salt concentrations. Of 43 specifically bound oligonucleotides, 40 contained the symmetric sequence TGA(C/G)TCA, whereas the other 3 contained sequences matching six of these seven bases. The extreme preference for this 7-base-pair sequence suggests that each position directly contacts GCN4. The three nucleotide positions on each side of this core heptanucleotide also showed sequence preferences, indicating their effect on GCN4 binding. Interestingly, deviations in the core and a stronger sequence preference in the flanking region were found on one side of the central C . G base pair. Although GCN4 binds as a dimer, this asymmetry supports a model in which interactions on each side of the binding site are not equivalent. The random selection method should prove generally useful for defining the specificities of other DNA-binding proteins and for identifying putative target sequences from genomic DNA.

  5. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  6. Properties for sourcing Nigerian larvicidal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebajo, Adeleke Clement; Famuyiwa, Funmilayo Gladys; Aliyu, Fatima Abosede

    2014-06-19

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of chikungunya, yellow and dengue fevers. Dengue fever is the major cause of child morbidity and hospitalisation in some Asian and African countries, while yellow fever is prevalent in Nigeria. The development of resistance to the available insecticides has necessitated the continued search for safer ones from plants. Eighteen plant extracts with ethnomedical claims of or demonstrated febrifuge, antimalarial, insecticidal and insect repellent biological activities were tested for activity against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti. About 61% of the eighteen extracts demonstrated high to moderate larvicidal activity. Extracts of Piper nigrum and Abrus precatorius seeds were the most active and the larvicidal constituent(s) of the latter should be determined.

  7. Properties for Sourcing Nigerian Larvicidal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke Clement Adebajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of chikungunya, yellow and dengue fevers. Dengue fever is the major cause of child morbidity and hospitalisation in some Asian and African countries, while yellow fever is prevalent in Nigeria. The development of resistance to the available insecticides has necessitated the continued search for safer ones from plants. Eighteen plant extracts with ethnomedical claims of or demonstrated febrifuge, antimalarial, insecticidal and insect repellent biological activities were tested for activity against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti. About 61% of the eighteen extracts demonstrated high to moderate larvicidal activity. Extracts of Piper nigrum and Abrus precatorius seeds were the most active and the larvicidal constituent(s of the latter should be determined.

  8. Antiplasmodial properties of some Malaysian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor Rain, A; Khozirah, S; Mohd Ridzuan, M A R; Ong, B K; Rohaya, C; Rosilawati, M; Hamdino, I; Badrul, Amin; Zakiah, I

    2007-06-01

    Seven Malaysian medicinal plants were screened for their antiplasmodial activities in vitro. These plants were selected based on their traditional claims for treatment or to relieve fever. The plant extracts were obtained from Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM). The antiplasmodial activities were carried out using the pLDH assay to Plasmodium falciparum D10 strain (sensitive strain) while the cytotoxic activities were carried out towards Madin- Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells using MTT assay. The concentration of extracts used for both screening assays were from the highest concentration 64 microg/ml, two fold dilution to the lowest concentration 0.03 microg/ml. Goniothalamus macrophyllus (stem extract) showed more than 60% growth inhibition while Goniothalamus scortechinii root and stem extract showed a 90% and more than 80% growth inhibition at the last concentration tested, 0.03 microg/ml. The G. scortechini (leaves extract) showed an IC50 (50% growth inhibition) at 8.53 microg/ml, Ardisia crispa (leaves extract) demonstrated an IC50 at 5.90 +/- 0.14 microg/ml while Croton argyratus (leaves extract) showed a percentage inhibition of more than 60% at the tested concentration. Blumea balsamifera root and stem showed an IC50 at 26.25 +/- 2.47 microg/ml and 7.75 +/- 0.35 microg/ ml respectively. Agathis borneensis (leaves extract) demonstrated a 50% growth inhibition at 11.00 +/- 1.41 microg/ml. The study gives preliminary scientific evidence of these plant extracts in line with their traditional claims.

  9. Invasive Plants Rapidly Reshape Soil Properties in a Grassland Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Sean M; Lekberg, Ylva; Mummey, Daniel L; Sangwan, Naseer; Ramsey, Philip W; Gilbert, Jack A

    2017-01-01

    Plant invasions often reduce native plant diversity and increase net primary productivity. Invaded soils appear to differ from surrounding soils in ways that impede restoration of diverse native plant communities. We hypothesize that invader-mediated shifts in edaphic properties reproducibly alter soil microbial community structure and function. Here, we take a holistic approach, characterizing plant, prokaryotic, and fungal communities and soil physicochemical properties in field sites, invasion gradients, and experimental plots for three invasive plant species that cooccur in the Rocky Mountain West. Each invader had a unique impact on soil physicochemical properties. We found that invasions drove shifts in the abundances of specific microbial taxa, while overall belowground community structure and functional potential were fairly constant. Forb invaders were generally enriched in copiotrophic bacteria with higher 16S rRNA gene copy numbers and showed greater microbial carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolic potential. Older invasions had stronger effects on abiotic soil properties, indicative of multiyear successions. Overall, we show that plant invasions are idiosyncratic in their impact on soils and are directly responsible for driving reproducible shifts in the soil environment over multiyear time scales. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show how invasive plant species drive rapid shifts in the soil environment from surrounding native communities. Each of the three plant invaders had different but consistent effects on soils. Thus, there does not appear to be a one-size-fits-all strategy for how plant invaders alter grassland soil environments. This work represents a crucial step toward understanding how invaders might be able to prevent or impair native reestablishment by changing soil biotic and abiotic properties.

  10. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoxi [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi [College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan Institute of Bioengineering, Wuhan 430415 (China); Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  11. The bldC Developmental Locus of Streptomyces coelicolor Encodes a Member of a Family of Small DNA-Binding Proteins Related to the DNA-Binding Domains of the MerR Family

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, AC; Servin-Gonzalez, L; Kelemen, GH; Buttner, MJ

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-n...

  12. Relationship between Soil Properties and Plant Diversity in Semiarid Grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Dölarslan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In ecological studies, soil-plant interaction is an important environmental factor. Soil chemical and physical properties affect plant richness and diversity. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between soil physical and chemical properties, and plant diversity indexes (Shannon-Weiner and Simpson in semiarid grassland. Plant diversity indexes and soil properties were determined using 34 quadrats (5x5m on different parent materials (chrome, marble, serpentine, red chalk and red chalk mostra in semiarid grasslands in the Central Anatolia Region in Turkey. Plant samples were collected and recorded periodically from April to September (the vegetation period in 2014 for each quadrat. In order to determine the plant richness and diversity indexes, 3 sub-quadrats (1x1m were randomly added into each of 34 (5x5 m quadrats. To evaluate the relationship between plant diversity indexes and soil properties, composite soil samples were collected from the four corners, and the center of each quadrat 0-30 cm in depth, and which was mixing of those subsamples. Soil sand-silt-clay contents, soil reaction (pH, bulk density (BD, electrical conductivity (EC, CaCO3 and soil organic matter (SOM contents were measured. Relationship between plant diversity indexes measured in different months during vegetation period and soil properties of different parent material was statistically analysed using correlation analysis in SPSS 20.0. Modest correlation coefficient was found between the Simpson diversity index and SOM content, sand-silt-clay content, pH and EC for different months in vegetation period.

  13. Properties of shaker-type potassium channels in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambale, F; Uozumi, N

    2006-03-01

    Potassium (K(+)), the most abundant cation in biological organisms, plays a crucial role in the survival and development of plant cells, modulation of basic mechanisms such as enzyme activity, electrical membrane potentials, plant turgor and cellular homeostasis. Due to the absence of a Na(+)/K(+) exchanger, which widely exists in animal cells, K(+) channels and some type of K(+) transporters function as K(+) uptake systems in plants. Plant voltage-dependent K(+) channels, which display striking topological and functional similarities with the voltage-dependent six-transmembrane segment animal Shaker-type K(+) channels, have been found to play an important role in the plasma membrane of a variety of tissues and organs in higher plants. Outward-rectifying, inward-rectifying and weakly-rectifying K(+) channels have been identified and play a crucial role in K(+) homeostasis in plant cells. To adapt to the environmental conditions, plants must take advantage of the large variety of Shaker-type K(+) channels naturally present in the plant kingdom. This review summarizes the extensive data on the structure, function, membrane topogenesis, heteromerization, expression, localization, physiological roles and modulation of Shaker-type K(+) channels from various plant species. The accumulated results also help in understanding the similarities and differences in the properties of Shaker-type K(+) channels in plants in comparison to those of Shaker channels in animals and bacteria.

  14. Structural and functional studies of a large winged Z-DNA-binding domain of Danio rerio protein kinase PKZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Vinod Kumar; Kim, Doyoun; Yun, Kyunghee; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The Z-DNA-binding domain of PKZ from zebrafish (Danio rerio; drZαPKZ ) contains the largest β-wing among known Z-DNA-binding domains. To elucidate the functional implication of the β-wing, we solved the crystal structure of apo-drZαPKZ . Structural comparison with its Z-DNA-bound form revealed a large conformational change within the β-wing during Z-DNA binding. Biochemical studies of protein mutants revealed that two basic residues in the β-wing are responsible for Z-DNA recognition as well as fast B-Z transition. Therefore, the extra basic residues in the β-wing of drZαPKZ are necessary for the fast B-Z transition activity.

  15. APE1/Ref-1 enhances DNA binding activity of mutant p53 in a redox-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun, Yanping; Dai, Nan; Li, Mengxia; Xiong, Chengjie; Zhang, Qinhong; Sui, Jiangdong; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a dual function protein; in addition to its DNA repair activity, it can stimulate DNA binding activity of numerous transcription factors as a reduction-oxidation (redox) factor. APE1/Ref-1 has been found to be a potent activator of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding in vitro and in vivo. Although p53 is mutated in most types of human cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), little is known about whether APE1/Ref-1 can regulate mutant p53 (mutp53). Herein, we reported the increased APE1/Ref-1 protein and accumulation of mutp53 in HCC by immunohistochemistry. Of note, it was observed that APE1/Ref-1 high-expression and mutp53 expression were associated with carcinogenesis and progression of HCC. To determine whether APE1/Ref-1 regulates DNA binding of mutp53, we performed electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HCC cell lines. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, reduced mutp53 efficiently bound to nonlinear DNA, but not to linear DNA. Notably, overexpression of APE1/Ref-1 resulted in increased DNA binding activity of mutp53, while downregulation of APE1/Ref-1 caused a marked decrease of mutp53 DNA binding. In addition, APE1/Ref-1 could not potentiate the accumulation of p21 mRNA and protein in mutp53 cells. These data indicate that APE1/Ref-1 can stimulate mutp53 DNA binding in a redox-dependent manner.

  16. Influence of Planting Spacing on Mechanical Properties of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla Planted in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HENSON; Michael

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand influence of planting spacing on mechanical properties of Eucalyptus grandis × E. urophylla planted as a potential species for solid wood products in China. Four trees at age of 13 were selected from each of 6 groups of planting spacing and a total of 24 sampling trees were selected from the Dongmen Forestry Center of Guangxi Province in China. Furthermore, a one-meter-long log from each tree was cut into small blocks for wood properties testing. MOE, MOR and co...

  17. Antihypertensive Properties of Plant-Based Prebiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Siok-Koon; Ooi, Lay-Gaik; Lim, Ting-Jin; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although various drugs for its treatment have been synthesized, the occurring side effects have generated the need for natural interventions for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. Dietary intervention such as the administration of prebiotics has been seen as a highly acceptable approach. Prebiotics are indigestible food ingredients that bypass digestion and reach the lower gut as substrates for indigenous microflora. Most of the prebiotics used as food adjuncts, such as inulin, fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and gums, are derived from plants. Experimental evidence from recent studies has suggested that prebiotics are capable of reducing and preventing hypertension. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms involved, the evidence generated from both in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials and some controversial findings that are raised. PMID:20111692

  18. Antihypertensive Properties of Plant-Based Prebiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tze Liong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although various drugs for its treatment have been synthesized, the occurring side effects have generated the need for natural interventions for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. Dietary intervention such as the administration of prebiotics has been seen as a highly acceptable approach. Prebiotics are indigestible food ingredients that bypass digestion and reach the lower gut as substrates for indigenous microflora. Most of the prebiotics used as food adjuncts, such as inulin, fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and gums, are derived from plants. Experimental evidence from recent studies has suggested that prebiotics are capable of reducing and preventing hypertension. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms involved, the evidence generated from both in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials and some controversial findings that are raised.

  19. Antihypertensive properties of plant-based prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Siok-Koon; Ooi, Lay-Gaik; Lim, Ting-Jin; Liong, Min-Tze

    2009-08-10

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although various drugs for its treatment have been synthesized, the occurring side effects have generated the need for natural interventions for the treatment and prevention of hypertension. Dietary intervention such as the administration of prebiotics has been seen as a highly acceptable approach. Prebiotics are indigestible food ingredients that bypass digestion and reach the lower gut as substrates for indigenous microflora. Most of the prebiotics used as food adjuncts, such as inulin, fructooligosaccharides, dietary fiber and gums, are derived from plants. Experimental evidence from recent studies has suggested that prebiotics are capable of reducing and preventing hypertension. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms involved, the evidence generated from both in-vitro experiments and in-vivo trials and some controversial findings that are raised.

  20. Plant Phenolics: Extraction, Analysis and Their Antioxidant and Anticancer Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Dai

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolics are broadly distributed in the plant kingdom and are the most abundant secondary metabolites of plants. Plant polyphenols have drawn increasing attention due to their potent antioxidant properties and their marked effects in the prevention of various oxidative stress associated diseases such as cancer. In the last few years, the identification and development of phenolic compounds or extracts from different plants has become a major area of health- and medical-related research. This review provides an updated and comprehensive overview on phenolic extraction, purification, analysis and quantification as well as their antioxidant properties. Furthermore, the anticancer effects of phenolics in-vitro and in-vivo animal models are viewed, including recent human intervention studies. Finally, possible mechanisms of action involving antioxidant and pro-oxidant activity as well as interference with cellular functions are discussed.

  1. Obesity risk gene TMEM18 encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana M Jurvansuu

    Full Text Available Transmembrane protein 18 (TMEM18 has previously been connected to cell migration and obesity. However, the molecular function of the protein has not yet been described. Here we show that TMEM18 localises to the nuclear membrane and binds to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The protein binds DNA with its positively charged C-terminus that contains also a nuclear localisation signal. Increase in the amount of TMEM18 in cells suppresses expression from a reporter vector with the TMEM18 target sequence. TMEM18 is a small protein of 140 residues and is predicted to be mostly alpha-helical with three transmembrane parts. As a consequence the DNA binding by TMEM18 would bring the chromatin very near to nuclear membrane. We speculate that this closed perinuclear localisation of TMEM18-bound DNA might repress transcription from it.

  2. DNA binding during expanded bed adsorption and factors affecting adsorbent aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Mathiasen, N.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    tolerance of anion exchangers when binding DNA. However, more importantly. with the adsorbents examined here. attempts to reduce bed aggregation by feedstock conditioning with added salt may increase DNA binding leading to a reduction in expanded bed adsorption performance compromising protein capture...... ligand densities to be examined. Very high dynamic binding capacities at 10% breakthrough were found in the absence of added salt. However, the highest binding capacities (similar to 10 and similar to 19mg DNA ml(-1) gel) were found in buffers containing added salt at concentrations of either 0.25 or 0......) even though the dynamic binding capacity was reduced as DNA concentration was increased. The extent of bed contraction during DNA loading was found to be a function of added salt concentration and ligand density of the adsorbent. The results imply that ligand density significantly affects the salt...

  3. ATPase-dependent auto-phosphorylation of the open condensin hinge diminishes DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Yuko; Kanai, Ryuta; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Ebe, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-12-01

    Condensin, which contains two structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) subunits and three regulatory non-SMC subunits, is essential for many chromosomal functions, including mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation. The ATPase domain of the SMC subunit comprises two termini connected by a long helical domain that is interrupted by a central hinge. The role of the ATPase domain has remained elusive. Here we report that the condensin SMC subunit of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is phosphorylated in a manner that requires the presence of the intact SMC ATPase Walker motif. Principal phosphorylation sites reside in the conserved, glycine-rich stretch at the hinge interface surrounded by the highly basic DNA-binding patch. Phosphorylation reduces affinity for DNA. Consistently, phosphomimetic mutants produce severe mitotic phenotypes. Structural evidence suggests that prior opening (though slight) of the hinge is necessary for phosphorylation, which is implicated in condensin's dissociation from and its progression along DNA.

  4. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles for staining human cervical cancer cells and DNA binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Swati; Kundu, Rikta; Ghorai, Atanu; Mandal, Ranju Prasad; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been functionalized by non-ionic surfactants (polysorbates) used in pharmaceutical formulations. This results in the formation of more well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (GNPs) than the GNPs formed in neat water. The synthesized GNPs show good temporal stability. The synthesis conditions are mild and environmentally benign. The GNPs can bind to ct-DNA and displace bound dye molecules. The DNA-binding assay is significant as it preliminarily indicated that DNA-GNP conjugates can be formed. Such conjugates are extremely promising for applications in nanobiotechnology. The GNPs can also stain the human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells over a wide concentration range while remaining non-cytotoxic, thus providing a non invasive cell staining method. This result is very promising as we observe staining of HeLa cells at very low GNP concentrations (1 μM) while the cell viability is retained even at 10-fold higher GNP concentrations.

  5. Designable DNA-binding domains enable construction of logic circuits in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Rok; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Šter, Branko; Dobnikar, Andrej; Benčina, Mojca; Jerala, Roman

    2014-03-01

    Electronic computer circuits consisting of a large number of connected logic gates of the same type, such as NOR, can be easily fabricated and can implement any logic function. In contrast, designed genetic circuits must employ orthogonal information mediators owing to free diffusion within the cell. Combinatorial diversity and orthogonality can be provided by designable DNA- binding domains. Here, we employed the transcription activator-like repressors to optimize the construction of orthogonal functionally complete NOR gates to construct logic circuits. We used transient transfection to implement all 16 two-input logic functions from combinations of the same type of NOR gates within mammalian cells. Additionally, we present a genetic logic circuit where one input is used to select between an AND and OR function to process the data input using the same circuit. This demonstrates the potential of designable modular transcription factors for the construction of complex biological information-processing devices.

  6. The role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Karapetyan, Sargis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ul...

  7. Effect of DNA binding protein Ssh12 from hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae on DNA supercoiling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼慧强; 黄力; VietQ.Mai

    1999-01-01

    An 11.5-ku DNA binding protein, designated as Sshl2, was purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae by column chromatography in SP Sepharose, DNA cellulose and phosphocellulose. Sshl2 accounts for about 4 % of the total cellular protein. The protein is capable of binding to both negatively supercoiled and relaxed DNAs. Nick closure analysis revealed that Sshl2 constrains negative supercoils upon binding to DNA. While the ability of the protein to constrain supercoils is weak at 22℃ , it is enhanced substantially at temperatures higher than 37℃ . Both the cellular content and supercoil-constraining ability of Sshl2 suggest that the protein may play an important role in the organization and stabilization of the chromosome of S. shibatae.

  8. Studies on a Novel Minor-groove Targeting Artificial Nuclease: Synthesis and DNA Binding Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nucleases play an important role in molecular biology, for example, in DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as a novel tool for the selective inhibition of gene expressions and also as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this article, the synthesis of a novel minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, an oligopyrrol-containing compound, has been reported. It was found that this novel compound can bind DNA in AT-rich minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by using UV-Vis and CD. It is indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of DNA from 80. 4 C to 84. 4 ℃ and that it possesses a high binding constant value(Kb = 3.05×104 L/mol).

  9. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, B

    2006-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are required for repair, recombination and replication in all organisms. Eukaryotic SSBs are regulated by phosphorylation on serine and threonine residues. To our knowledge, phosphorylation of SSBs in bacteria has not been reported. A systematic search...... for phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in Streptomyces griseus by immunoaffinity chromatography identified bacterial SSBs as a novel target of bacterial tyrosine kinases. Since genes encoding protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have not been recognized in streptomycetes, and SSBs from Streptomyces coelicolor (Sc......SSB) and Bacillus subtilis (BsSSB) share 38.7% identity, we used a B.subtilis protein-tyrosine kinase YwqD to phosphorylate two cognate SSBs (BsSSB and YwpH) in vitro. We demonstrate that in vivo phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB occurs on tyrosine residue 82, and this reaction is affected antagonistically...

  10. MARs Wars: heterogeneity and clustering of DNA-binding domains in the nuclear matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioudinkova E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. CO326 is a chicken nuclear scaffold/matrix attachment region (MAR associated with the nuclear matrix in several types of chicken cells. It contains a binding site for a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, F326. We have studied its interaction with the nuclear matrix. Methods. We have used an in vitro MAR assay with isolated matrices from chicken HD3 cells. Results. We have found that an oligonucleotide binding site for the F326 inhibits binding of the CO326 to the nuclear matrix. At the same time, the binding of heterologous MARs is enhanced. Conclusions. Taken together, these data suggest that there exist several classes of MARs and MAR-binding domains and that the MAR-binding proteins may be clustered in the nuclear matrix.

  11. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  12. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  13. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  14. The inhibition of anti-DNA binding to DNA by nucleic acid binding polymers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and can mediate disease pathogenesis by the formation of immune complexes. Since blocking immune complex formation can attenuate disease manifestations, the effects of nucleic acid binding polymers (NABPs on anti-DNA binding in vitro were investigated. The compounds tested included polyamidoamine dendrimer, 1,4-diaminobutane core, generation 3.0 (PAMAM-G3, hexadimethrine bromide, and a β-cylodextrin-containing polycation. As shown with plasma from patients with SLE, NABPs can inhibit anti-DNA antibody binding in ELISA assays. The inhibition was specific since the NABPs did not affect binding to tetanus toxoid or the Sm protein, another lupus autoantigen. Furthermore, the polymers could displace antibody from preformed complexes. Together, these results indicate that NABPs can inhibit the formation of immune complexes and may represent a new approach to treatment.

  15. Replication protein A and more: single-stranded DNA-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Liu; Jun Huang

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play essential roles in DNA replication,recombinational repair,and maintenance of genome stability.In human,the major SSB,replication protein A (RPA),is a stable heterotrimer composed of subunits of RPA1,RPA2,and RPA3,each df which is conserved not only in mammals but also in all other eukaryotic species.In addition to RPA,other SSBs have also been identified in the human genome,including sensor of single-stranded DNA complexes 1 and 2 (SOSS1/2).In this review,we summarize our current understanding of how these SSBs contribute to the maintenance of genome stability.

  16. Filter transfer of genomic libraries in a state accessible to DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebee, T J

    1987-04-01

    I have developed a method for transferring plaque DNA of lambda genomic libraries onto 3MM filters in a state accessible to DNA-binding proteins. DNA bound to 3MM is available to proteins as large as Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and maintains template activity similar to that in free solution. Lambda Plaques can be lifted onto 3MM filter disks, deproteinized, and used for transcription assays in vitro. The RNA synthesized is complementary to phage rather than to E. coli DNA and plaques can be identified by autoradiography. Furthermore, the filters can subsequently be probed with radioactive nucleic acids under standard hybridization conditions. Finally, colorimetric assays can be employed with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A in which plaques are identified by the localized reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium.

  17. Immobilization of proteins onto microbeads using a DNA binding tag for enzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takaaki; Mizoguchi, Takuro; Ota, Eri; Hata, Jumpei; Homma, Keisuke; Zhu, Bo; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    A novel DNA-binding protein tag, scCro-tag, which is a single-chain derivative of the bacteriophage lambda Cro repressor, has been developed to immobilize proteins of interest (POI) on a solid support through binding OR consensus DNA (ORC) that is tightly bound by the scCro protein. The scCro-tag successfully bound a transglutaminase 2 (TGase 2) substrate and manganese peroxidase (MnP) to microbeads via scaffolding DNA. The resulting protein-coated microbeads can be utilized for functional analysis of the enzymatic activity using flow cytometry. The quantity of bead-bound proteins can be enhanced by increasing the number of ORCs. In addition, proteins with the scCro-tag that were synthesized using a cell-free protein synthesis system were also immobilized onto the beads, thus indicating that this bead-based system would be applicable to high-throughput analysis of various enzymatic activities.

  18. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  19. [Protective properties of avermectine complex and plant growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamborko, N A; Pindrus, A A

    2009-01-01

    Antimutagen properties of avermectine complex of Avercom synthesized by Streptomyces avermitilis UCM Ac-2161, and growth regulators of plants (GRP) of bioagrostim-extra, ivin and emistim-C have been revealed in experiments with test-cultures of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100, TA 98. Avercom and plant growth regulators neutralize by toxication 27-48% and mutagen action of pesticides on soil microbial associations by 19.0-30.0%.

  20. Multiple DNA-binding modes for the ETS family transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shingo; Evich, Marina G; Erlitzki, Noa; Germann, Markus W; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-09-29

    The eponymous DNA-binding domain of ETS (E26 transformation-specific) transcription factors binds a single sequence-specific site as a monomer over a single helical turn. Following our previous observation by titration calorimetry that the ETS member PU.1 dimerizes sequentially at a single sequence-specific DNA-binding site to form a 2:1 complex, we have carried out an extensive spectroscopic and biochemical characterization of site-specific PU.1 ETS complexes. Whereas 10 bp of DNA was sufficient to support PU.1 binding as a monomer, additional flanking bases were required to invoke sequential dimerization of the bound protein. NMR spectroscopy revealed a marked loss of signal intensity in the 2:1 complex, and mutational analysis implicated the distal surface away from the bound DNA as the dimerization interface. Hydroxyl radical DNA footprinting indicated that the site-specifically bound PU.1 dimers occupied an extended DNA interface downstream from the 5'-GGAA-3' core consensus relative to its 1:1 counterpart, thus explaining the apparent site size requirement for sequential dimerization. The site-specifically bound PU.1 dimer resisted competition from nonspecific DNA and showed affinities similar to other functionally significant PU.1 interactions. As sequential dimerization did not occur with the ETS domain of Ets-1, a close structural homolog of PU.1, 2:1 complex formation may represent an alternative autoinhibitory mechanism in the ETS family at the protein-DNA level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Miz-1 activates gene expression via a novel consensus DNA binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Barrilleaux

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences--ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2--bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate.

  2. Quantitation of glucocorticoid receptor DNA-binding dynamics by single-molecule microscopy and FRAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke L Groeneweg

    Full Text Available Recent advances in live cell imaging have provided a wealth of data on the dynamics of transcription factors. However, a consistent quantitative description of these dynamics, explaining how transcription factors find their target sequences in the vast amount of DNA inside the nucleus, is still lacking. In the present study, we have combined two quantitative imaging methods, single-molecule microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, to determine the mobility pattern of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR, two ligand-activated transcription factors. For dexamethasone-activated GR, both techniques showed that approximately half of the population is freely diffusing, while the remaining population is bound to DNA. Of this DNA-bound population about half the GRs appeared to be bound for short periods of time (∼ 0.7 s and the other half for longer time periods (∼ 2.3 s. A similar pattern of mobility was seen for the MR activated by aldosterone. Inactive receptors (mutant or antagonist-bound receptors show a decreased DNA binding frequency and duration, but also a higher mobility for the diffusing population. Likely, very brief (≤ 1 ms interactions with DNA induced by the agonists underlie this difference in diffusion behavior. Surprisingly, different agonists also induce different mobilities of both receptors, presumably due to differences in ligand-induced conformational changes and receptor complex formation. In summary, our data provide a consistent quantitative model of the dynamics of GR and MR, indicating three types of interactions with DNA, which fit into a model in which frequent low-affinity DNA binding facilitates the search for high-affinity target sequences.

  3. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of K(b), 5.21×10(4)M(-1) that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; K(b), 1.73×10(4)M(-1)) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the E(pc) and E(0)' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HO()) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  4. Characterization of Sac10a, a hyperthermophile DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Stephen P; Kahsai, Mebrahtu A; Gupta, Ramesh; Shriver, John W

    2004-10-19

    Sac10a is a member of a group of basic DNA-binding proteins thought to be important in chromatin structure and regulation in the archaeon Sulfolobus. We describe here the isolation, gene identification, and biophysical characterization of native Sac10a. The protein exists as a 23.8 kDa homodimer at pH 7 and unfolds with a T degrees of 122 degrees C. Dissociation of the dimer into folded globular subunits is promoted by decreased pH and salt concentration. Thermal unfolding of the monomeric subunits occurred with two transitions, indicating two independent domains. The dimer demonstrated a high affinity for duplex poly(dAdT) with a K(D) of 5 x 10(-)(10) M and a site size of 17 bp (in 0.15 M KCl, pH 7), with only weak binding (K(D) > 5 x 10(-)(6) M) to poly(dA)-poly(dT), poly(dGdC), poly(dG)-poly(dC), and Escherichia coli DNA under similar conditions. Binding to poly(dAdT) resulted in distortions in the DNA duplex that were consistent with overwinding as indicated by inversion of the CD spectrum of the DNA. The monomeric subunits are predicted to adopt a winged helix DNA-binding motif which dimerizes through formation of a two-stranded coiled coil involving an extended C-terminal helix with more than four heptad repeats (about 45 A in length). This is the first example of the conserved archaeal transcription regulator domain COG3432 to be characterized. Sequences for homologous proteins containing both COG3432 and predicted coiled coil domains occur in the genomes of both crenarchaeota (Sulfolobus, Pyrobaculum, Aeropyrum) and euryarchaeota (Methanosarcina, Methanococcus, Archaeoglobus, Thermoplasma), with multiple genes in some species. Sac10a shows no sequence similarity to the other Sulfolobus chromatin proteins Sac7d, Sac8, Sso10b2, and Alba.

  5. Neighboring genes for DNA-binding proteins rescue male sterility in Drosophila hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Araripe, Luciana O; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-07-19

    Crosses between closely related animal species often result in male hybrids that are sterile, and the molecular and functional basis of genetic factors for hybrid male sterility is of great interest. Here, we report a molecular and functional analysis of HMS1, a region of 9.2 kb in chromosome 3 of Drosophila mauritiana, which results in virtually complete hybrid male sterility when homozygous in the genetic background of sibling species Drosophila simulans. The HMS1 region contains two strong candidate genes for the genetic incompatibility, agt and Taf1 Both encode unrelated DNA-binding proteins, agt for an alkyl-cysteine-S-alkyltransferase and Taf1 for a subunit of transcription factor TFIID that serves as a multifunctional transcriptional regulator. The contribution of each gene to hybrid male sterility was assessed by means of germ-line transformation, with constructs containing complete agt and Taf1 genomic sequences as well as various chimeric constructs. Both agt and Taf1 contribute about equally to HMS1 hybrid male sterility. Transgenes containing either locus rescue sterility in about one-half of the males, and among fertile males the number of offspring is in the normal range. This finding suggests compensatory proliferation of the rescued, nondysfunctional germ cells. Results with chimeric transgenes imply that the hybrid incompatibilities result from interactions among nucleotide differences residing along both agt and Taf1 Our results challenge a number of preliminary generalizations about the molecular and functional basis of hybrid male sterility, and strongly reinforce the role of DNA-binding proteins as a class of genes contributing to the maintenance of postzygotic reproductive isolation.

  6. BuD, a helix–loop–helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, Stefano [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza [Cellectis, 8 Rue de la Croix Jarry, 75013 Paris (France); Campos-Olivas, Ramon [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); Duchateau, Phillippe [Cellectis, 8 Rue de la Croix Jarry, 75013 Paris (France); Montoya, Guillermo, E-mail: guillermo.montoya@cpr.ku.dk [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Calle de Melchor Fernández Almagro 3, 28029 Madrid (Spain); University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 3B, 2200 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of BurrH and the BurrH–DNA complex are reported. DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein–DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing ‘toolkits’ for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix–loop–helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  7. Review: African medicinal plants with wound healing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Christian; Boakye, Yaw Duah; Bekoe, Emelia Oppong; Hensel, Andreas; Dapaah, Susana Oteng; Appiah, Theresa

    2016-01-11

    Wounds of various types including injuries, cuts, pressure, burns, diabetic, gastric and duodenal ulcers continue to have severe socio-economic impact on the cost of health care to patients, family and health care institutions in both developing and developed countries. However, most people in the developing countries, especially Africa, depend on herbal remedies for effective treatment of wounds. Various in vitro and in vivo parameters are used for the evaluation of the functional activity of medicinal plants by using extracts, fractions and isolated compounds. The aim of the review is to identify African medicinal plants with wound healing properties within the last two decades. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Scifinder(®) and Google Scholar were used to search and filter for African medicinal plants with wound healing activity. The methods employed in the evaluation of wound healing activity of these African medicinal plants comprise both in vivo and in vitro models. In vivo wound models such as excision, incision, dead space and burn wound model are commonly employed in assessing the rate of wound closure (contraction), tensile strength or breaking strength determination, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, hydroxyproline content assay and histological investigations including epithelialisation, collagen synthesis, and granulation tissue formation. In in vitro studies, single cell systems are mostly used to study proliferation and differentiation of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes by monitoring typical differentiation markers like collagen and keratin. In this study, 61 plants belonging to 36 families with scientifically demonstrated or reported wound healing properties were reviewed. Various plant parts including leaves, fruits, stem bark and root extracts of the plants are used in the evaluation of plants for wound healing activities. Although, a variety of medicinal plants for wound healing can be found in literature, there is a need for the

  8. Synthesis, Cytotoxic Activity, and DNA Binding Properties of Copper (II Complexes with Hesperetin, Naringenin, and Apigenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiong Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of copper (II with hesperetin, naringenin, and apigenin of general composition [CuL2(H2O2]⋅nH2O (1–3 have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, ESI-MS, and TG-DTG thermal analysis. The free ligands and the metal complexes have been tested in vitro against human cancer cell lines hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2, gastric carcinomas (SGC-7901, and cervical carcinoma (HeLa. Complexes 1 and 3 were found to exhibit growth inhibition of SGC-7901 and HepG2 cell lines with respect to the free ligands; the inhibitory rate of complex 1 is 43.2% and 43.8%, while complex 3 is 46% and 36%, respectively. The interactions of complex 1 and its ligand Hsp with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis, fluorescence, and CD spectra. Both complex 1 and Hsp were found to bind DNA in intercalation modes, and the binding affinity of complex 1 was stronger than that of free ligand.

  9. Nuclear Localization and DNA Binding Properties of a Protein Expressed by Human c-myc Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Hakan; Leder, Philip

    1984-08-01

    Antisera to the human cellular myc oncogene product were used to identify a human c-myc specific protein with a molecular weight of 65,000. Subcellular fractionation showed that the human c-myc protein is predominantly found in the cell nucleus. The p65 Kc-myc protein binds to double- and single-stranded DNA as measured by a DNA affinity chromatography assay.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, thermal and DNA-binding properties of new zinc complexes with 2-hydroxyphenones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkalić, Emina; Zianna, Ariadni; Psomas, George; Gdaniec, Maria; Czapik, Agnieszka; Coutouli-Argyropoulou, Evdoxia; Lalia-Kantouri, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The neutral mononuclear zinc complexes with 2-hydroxyphenones (ketoH) having the formula [Zn(keto)2(H2O)2] and [Zn(keto)2(enR)], where enR stands for a N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,2'-dipyridylamine (dpamH), have been synthesized and characterized by IR, UV and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. The 2-hydroxyphenones are chelated to the metal ion through the phenolate and carbonyl oxygen atoms. The crystal structures of [bis(2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II)] dimethanol solvate and [bis(2-hydroxy-benzophenone)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II)] dimethanol solvate have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The thermal stability of the zinc complexes has been investigated by simultaneous TG/DTG-DTA technique. The ability of the complexes to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been studied by UV-absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy as well as viscosity measurements. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that they can bind to CT DNA and the corresponding binding constants to DNA have been calculated and evaluated. The complexes most probably bind to CT DNA via intercalation as concluded by studying the viscosity of a DNA solution in the presence of the complexes. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that the reported complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB, suggesting strong competition with EB for the intercalation site.

  11. The Bacillus subtilis flagellar regulatory protein sigma D: overproduction, domain analysis and DNA-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y F; Helmann, J D

    1995-06-16

    Flagellar biosynthesis requires an alternative sigma (sigma) subunit of RNA polymerase to allow recognition of the promoters for flagellin and other late genes of the flagellar regulon. We have now overproduced and characterized Bacillus subtilis sigma D: the prototype of the sigma 28 family of flagellar sigma factors. Limited protease digestion studies indicate that sigma D contains an amino-terminal domain, comprising conserved regions 1.2 and 2, and a carboxyl-terminal domain containing conserved regions 3.2 and 4. The protease-sensitive region between these two domains correlates with a region of very low sequence conservation among bacterial sigma factors. Unlike the primary sigma factor, sigma D binds to DNA. In non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the sigma D-DNA complex has an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 1 microM. Binding of sigma D to the promoter for flagellin, PD-6, appears to lead to an altered DNA structure near the -35 and -10 recognition elements as detected by DNase I footprinting and by the enhanced reactivity of several bases to dimethylsulfate.

  12. IMPORTANT FINDINGS ON PLANTS HAVING ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purkayastha Sanhita

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants have certain biologically active molecules and many of the present drug discoveries are based on these molecules found in the plants used in traditional system of medicine. In this review paper 20 plants (Emblica officinalis Linn., Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.Nees, Curcuma domestica Valet, Trigonella foenumgraecum Linn., Camellia sinensis assamica (Masters Kitomura, Centella asiatica (L.Urban, Mangifera indica Linn., Hypericum perforatum L., Cymbopogon citratus(DCStaf, Vitex negundo Linn., Hemidesmus indicus R.Br., Catharanthus roseus(Linn.G.Don, Euphorbia hirta Linn., Prunus persica (Linn.Stokes, Oxalis corniculata Linn., Withania somnifera, Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers ex Hook. F. & Thoms, Amaranthus spinosus L.,Alternanthera sessilis (L. R. Br. ex. DC., Garcinia cowa Roxb. are viewed which have antioxidant property. Studies on these plants may throw light on various therapeutic potential and uses of these herbs and plants.

  13. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Vacheron, Jordan; Yvan Moënne-Loccoz; Dubost, Audrey; Maximilien Gonçalves-Martins; Daniel Muller; Claire Prigent-Combaret

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties...

  14. Substitution of Ala564 in the first zinc cluster of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding domain of the androgen receptor by Asp, Asn, or Leu exerts differential effects on DNA binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J.M. Lobaccaro; L. Chiche; C. Sultan; J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractIn the androgen receptor of a patient with androgen insensitivity, the alanine residue at position 564 in the first zinc cluster of the DNA-binding domain was substituted by aspartic acid. In other members of the steroid receptor family, either valine or ala

  15. Functional studies of ssDNA binding ability of MarR family protein TcaR from Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available The negative transcription regulator of the ica locus, TcaR, regulates proteins involved in the biosynthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG. Absence of TcaR increases PNAG production and promotes biofilm formation in Staphylococci. Previously, the 3D structure of TcaR in its apo form and its complex structure with several antibiotics have been analyzed. However, the detailed mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR family proteins such as TcaR is unclear and only restricted on the binding ability of double-strand DNA (dsDNA. Here we show by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, electron microscopy (EM, circular dichroism (CD, and Biacore analysis that TcaR can interact strongly with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, thereby identifying a new role in MarR family proteins. Moreover, we show that TcaR preferentially binds 33-mer ssDNA over double-stranded DNA and inhibits viral ssDNA replication. In contrast, such ssDNA binding properties were not observed for other MarR family protein and TetR family protein, suggesting that the results from our studies are not an artifact due to simple charge interactions between TcaR and ssDNA. Overall, these results suggest a novel role for TcaR in regulation of DNA replication. We anticipate that the results of this work will extend our understanding of MarR family protein and broaden the development of new therapeutic strategies for Staphylococci.

  16. Investigation of DNA binding, DNA photocleavage, topoisomerase I inhibition and antioxidant activities of water soluble titanium(IV) phthalocyanine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Arzu; Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya

    2016-04-01

    The binding mode of water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted titanium(IV) phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and thermal denaturation studies in this work. The results of DNA binding constants (Kb) and the changes in the thermal denaturation profile of DNA with the addition of Pc compounds indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 are able to bind to CT-DNA with different binding affinities. DNA photocleavage studies of Pc compounds were performed in the absence and presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ascorbic acid (AA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) using the agarose gel electrophoresis method at irradiation 650 nm. According to the results of electrophoresis studies, Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 cleaved of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway. The Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds were examined for topoisomerase I inhibition by measuring the relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA. The all of Pc compounds inhibited topoisomerase I at 20 μM concentration. A series of antioxidant assays, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide radical scavenging (SOD) assay and metal chelating effect assay were performed for Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds. The results of antioxidant assays indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities, moderate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activities and metal chelating effect activities. All the experimental studies showed that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds bind to CT-DNA via minor groove binding, cleave of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway, inhibit topoisomerase I and have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities. Thanks to these properties the Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds are suitable agents for photo dynamic therapy.

  17. DNA binding, BSA interaction and SOD activity of two new nickel(II) complexes with glutamine Schiff base ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Dong, Jianfang; Zhao, Peiran; Li, Manman; Cheng, Fengling; Kong, Jinming; Li, Lianzhi

    2016-08-01

    Two hexacoordinated octahedral nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(o-van-gln)(phen)(H2O)](1) and [Ni(sal-gln)(phen)(H2O)](2) [o-van-gln=a Schiff base derived from o-vanillin and glutamine, sal-gln=a Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and glutamine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray studies showed that nickel atoms of both 1 and 2 exhibit distorted NiN3O3 octahedral geometry. In each crystal, intermolecular hydrogen bonds form a two-dimensional network structure. DNA-binding properties of these two nickel(II) complexes were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the two complexes can bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) via an intercalative mode, and complex 1 exhibits higher interaction with CT-DNA than complex 2. Furthermore, the interactions between the nickel(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been studied by spectroscopies. The results indicated that both complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. The binding constants (Kb) and the numbers of binding sites (n) obtained are 1.10×10(5)M(-1) and 1.05 for complex 1 and 5.05×10(4)M(-1) and 0.997 for complex 2, respectively. Site-selective competitive binding investigation indicated that the binding sites of both the complexes are located in site I of sub-domains IIA of BSA. Assay of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the nickel(II) complexes revealed that they exhibit significant superoxide scavenging activity with IC50=3.4×10(-5)M for complex 1 and 4.3×10(-5)M for complex 2, respectively.

  18. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  19. DNA-binding antitumor agents: from pyrimido[5,6,1-de]acridines to other intriguing classes of acridine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Ippolito

    2002-09-01

    In the field of antitumor DNA-binding agents, the class of acridine derivatives play an important role either as number of compounds or as importance of their anticancer properties. We have synthesized a number of acridine derivatives as potential antitumor drugs, in which the chromophore is fully or partially constituted by acridine or by 9-acridone ring systems: from the pyrimido[5,6,1-de]acridines, to the pyrimido[4,5,6-kl]acridines, the bis(amine-functionalized) 9-acridone-4-carboxamides, the bis(amine-functionalized) acridine-4-carboxamides, and the pyrazolo[3,4,5-kl]acridine-5-carboxamides. In the present revue we will describe the rational design, the synthesis, and the salient biological characteristics of these classes of acridine derivatives.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and DNA-binding studies of 2-carboxybenzaldehydeisonicotinoylhydrazone and its La(III), Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Zheng-Yin

    2007-02-01

    2-Carboxybenzaldehydeisonicotinoylhydrazone (HL), and its three lanthanide complexes, LnL 3·4H 2O [Ln = La( 1), Sm( 2), Eu( 3)], have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivities, IR spectra and thermal analyses. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the ligand and its complexes have been investigated by absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The experimental results indicated that the complexes ( 2) and ( 3) can bind to DNA, but the ligand and the complex ( 1) cannot; the binding affinity of the complex ( 3) is higher than that of the complex ( 2) and the intrinsic binding constant Kb of the complex ( 3) is 7.86 × 10 4 M -1.

  1. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Eric L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1, and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3. PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. Results We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. Conclusion These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1

  2. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMeo, Stephen D; Lombel, Rebecca M; Cronin, Melissa; Smith, Eric L; Snowflack, Danielle R; Reinert, Kristy; Clever, Sheila; Wightman, Bruce

    2008-01-07

    The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1), and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3). PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1 and NR2E3 subclasses. For the NR2E1 protein NHR-67, Asp

  3. Structured and disordered regions cooperatively mediate DNA-binding autoinhibition of ETS factors ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Simon L.; Lau, Desmond K. W.; Doane, Jedediah J.; Whitby, Frank G.; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoinhibition enables spatial and temporal regulation of cellular processes by coupling protein activity to surrounding conditions, often via protein partnerships or signaling pathways. We report the molecular basis of DNA-binding autoinhibition of ETS transcription factors ETV1, ETV4 and ETV5, which are often overexpressed in prostate cancer. Inhibitory elements that cooperate to repress DNA binding were identified in regions N- and C-terminal of the ETS domain. Crystal structures of these three factors revealed an α-helix in the C-terminal inhibitory domain that packs against the ETS domain and perturbs the conformation of its DNA-recognition helix. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that the N-terminal inhibitory domain (NID) is intrinsically disordered, yet utilizes transient intramolecular interactions with the DNA-recognition helix of the ETS domain to mediate autoinhibition. Acetylation of selected lysines within the NID activates DNA binding. This investigation revealed a distinctive mechanism for DNA-binding autoinhibition in the ETV1/4/5 subfamily involving a network of intramolecular interactions not present in other ETS factors. These distinguishing inhibitory elements provide a platform through which cellular triggers, such as protein–protein interactions or post-translational modifications, may specifically regulate the function of these oncogenic proteins. PMID:28161714

  4. Characterization of the Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein SsbB Encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Zweig, Maria; Peeters, Eveline; Siewering, Katja; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; van der Does, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in

  5. DNA-binding factor CTCF and long-range gene interactions in V(D)J recombination and oncogene activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ribeiro de Almeida (Claudia); R. Stadhouders (Ralph); S. Thongjuea (Supat); E. Soler (Eric); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRegulation of V(D)J recombination events at immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor loci in lymphoid cells is complex and achieved via changes in substrate accessibility. Various studies over the last year have identified the DNA-binding zinc-finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as

  6. Protein kinase A phosphorylates serine 267 in the homeodomain of engrailed-2 leading to decreased DNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Majbrit; Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole N

    2004-01-01

    Engrailed-2 (En-2) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved family of DNA binding homeodomain-containing proteins that are expressed in mammalian brain during development. Here, we demonstrate that serine 267 in the homeodomain of En-2 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) in forskolin-treate...

  7. The binding of in vitro synthesized adenovirus DNA binding protein to single-stranded DNA is stimulated by zinc ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, H.L.; Lee, F.M. van der; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    We have synthesized wild type DNA binding protein (DBP) of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) and several truncated forms of this protein by a combination of in vitro transcription and translation. The proteins obtained were tested for binding to a single-stranded DNA-cellulose column. It could be shown that f

  8. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  9. Anthelmintic properties of traditional African and Caribbean medicinal plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R.; Soelberg, Jens; Jäger, Anna

    2016-01-01

    -infection and the threat of drug resistance mean that complementary treatment options would be highly valuable. Here, we screened ethanolic extracts from 29 medicinal plants used in Africa (Ghana) and the Caribbean (US Virgin Islands) for in vitro anthelmintic properties against Ascaris suum, a swine parasite that is very...... results encourage further investigation of their use as complementary treatment options for ascariasis, alongside MDA....

  10. Genome-Wide DNA Binding of GBF1 IsModulated by Its Heterodimerizing ProteinPartners, HY5 and HYH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Dear Editor, In today's post-genomic era where direct targets of manytranscription factors have been identified, it is becomingincreasingly evident that transcriptional networks are verycomplex. Heterodimerization of transcription factors is oneof the several methods by which these complex transcrip-tional networks are formed. By heterodimerization, DNA-binding specificity and affinity, transactivation properties,and ultimately cell physiology might be altered (Naar et al.,2001). The formation of heterodimers has the potential torecognize additional binding sites and increase the rangeof DNA-binding specificity (Foster et al., 1994). Further, het-erodimerization also allows the production of new proteinconfigurations. For example, the protein STF1 from soybeancan dimerize with GBF proteins and this dimerization bringstogether the acidic region from STF1 and the proline-richregion of the GBF proteins into one binding element (Cheonget al., 1998). These results highlight the importance and/orconsequences of heterodimerization of transcription factorsat particular locus. However, to understand the complex tran-scriptional networks, it is important to investigate that howheterodimerization affects the whole-genome-wide bind-ing and transcriptional properties of a transcription factor.Here in this study, we have investigated genome-wide DNAbinding of bZIP transcription factor GBF1, and analyzed theimportance of its heterodimerization with HY5 and HYH forits genome-wide binding. We have found that GBF1 bindingsites are enriched within the 1-kb regions upstream to thetranscription start sites of target genes. Moreover, the bind-ings of GBF1 to most of its targets are largely dependent onHY5, while HYH only affects the binding of GBF1 to somespecific sites.

  11. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, Arata, E-mail: anishimo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Li, Tao-Sheng [Department of Stem Cell Biology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Hamano, Kimikazu [Department of Surgery and Clinical Science, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minami-Kogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  12. Identification and characterization of GIP1, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that enhances the DNA binding affinity and reduces the oligomeric state of G-box binding factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul C. SEHNKE; Beth J. LAUGHNER; Carla R. LYERLY LINEBARGER; William B. GURLEY; Robert J.FERL

    2005-01-01

    Environmental control of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and other stress response genes in plants is in part brought about by transcriptional regulation involving the G-box cis-acting DNA element and bZIP G-box Binding Factors (GBFs).The mechanisms of GBF regulation and requirements for additional factors in this control process are not well understood.In an effort to identify potential GBF binding and control partners, maize GBF1 was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an A. thaliana cDNA library. GBF Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) arose from the screen as a 496 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 53,748 kDa that strongly interacts with GBFs. Northern analysis of A.thaliana tissue suggests a 1.8-1.9 kb GIP1 transcript, predominantly in roots. Immunolocalization studies indicate that GIP1 protein is mainly localized to the nucleus. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays using an Adh G-box DNA probe and recombinant A. thaliana GBF3 or maize GBF1, showed that the presence of GIP1 resulted in a tenfold increase in GBF DNA binding activity without altering the migration, suggesting a transient association between GIP1 and GBF. Addition of GIP1 to intentionally aggregated GBF converted GBF to lower molecular weight macromolecular complexes and GIP1 also refolded denatured rhodanese in the absence of ATP. These data suggest GIP1 functions to enhance GBF DNA binding activity by acting as a potent nuclear chaperone or crowbar, and potentially regulates the multimeric state of GBFs, thereby contributing to bZIP-mediated gene regulation.

  13. Spectrum of Antimicrobial Properties of Tinctures of Medical Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Rotar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the biological properties of herbal preparations, which are not widely used in practical medicine, that’s why their usage in purulent septic infections could not cause widespread resistance. The purpose of this work is to establish and to compare the spectrum of antimicrobial properties of tinctures of medical plants in order to form a reserve of new sources of antimicrobial agents, some of which can be extracted from plants. Screening of antimicrobial properties in vitro was carried out for 12 herbal tinctures on 15 test strains of microorganisms. There has been revealed the presence of antimicrobial properties in the tinctures of medical plants, most convincing results were observed in infusions of mountain arnica, Echinacea Purpurea and eucalyptus. As for the reference strains of microorganisms, the minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration of which ranged from 1 : 128 to 1 : 3, the moderate activity ha been observed in tinctures of peppermint and Sophora Japanese with indicators from 1 : 32 to 1 : 8. In turn, spectrum of antimicrobial properties appeared to be broad to collection strains that was predictable, but the results obtained from researches of the impact on clinical strains of microorganisms, which are resistant to many antibiotics, deserve special attention. Thus, the antimicrobial activity of herbal tinctures reduced to one dilution for each type of sensitive species, and sometimes coincided, indicating the absence of resistance to these drugs and determining as uniformly sensitive ones the reference collection and clinical strains to plant extracts. The findings demonstrated that plant extracts are a potential reserve for the creation of new sources of antimicrobial agents, particularly in relation to antibiotic-resistant clinical strains of microorganisms that are formed under the constant influence of synthetic and semi-synthetic drugs.

  14. Defining the DNA Binding Site Recognized by the Fission Yeast Zn2Cys6 Transcription Factor Pho7 and Its Role in Phosphate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Garg, Angad; Chatterjee, Debashree; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-08-15

    Fission yeast phosphate homeostasis entails transcriptional induction of genes encoding phosphate-mobilizing proteins under conditions of phosphate starvation. Transcription factor Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the starvation response. The DNA binding sites in the promoters of phosphate-responsive genes have not been defined, nor have any structure-function relationships been established for the Pho7 protein. Here we narrow this knowledge gap by (i) delineating an autonomous DNA-binding domain (DBD) within Pho7 that includes the Zn2Cys6 module, (ii) deploying recombinant Pho7 DBD in DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to map the Pho7 recognition sites in the promoters of the phosphate-regulated pho1 and tgp1 genes to a 12-nucleotide sequence motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA], (iii) independently identifying the same motif as a Pho7 recognition element via in silico analysis of available genome-wide ChIP-seq data, (iv) affirming that mutations in the two Pho7 recognition sites in the pho1 promoter efface pho1 expression in vivo, and (v) establishing that the zinc-binding cysteines and a pair of conserved arginines in the DBD are essential for Pho7 activity in vivoIMPORTANCE Fungi respond to phosphate starvation by inducing the transcription of a set of phosphate acquisition genes that comprise a phosphate regulon. Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the phosphate starvation response in fission yeast. The present study identifies a 12-nucleotide Pho7 DNA binding motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA] in the promoters of phosphate-regulated genes, pinpoints DNA and protein features important for Pho7 binding to DNA, and correlates them with Pho7-dependent gene expression in vivo The results highlight distinctive properties of Pho7 vis-a-vis other fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors as well as the

  15. Novel approach for selecting the best predictor for identifying the binding sites in DNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R; Ahmad, Shandar; Gromiha, M Michael

    2013-09-01

    Protein-DNA complexes play vital roles in many cellular processes by the interactions of amino acids with DNA. Several computational methods have been developed for predicting the interacting residues in DNA-binding proteins using sequence and/or structural information. These methods showed different levels of accuracies, which may depend on the choice of data sets used in training, the feature sets selected for developing a predictive model, the ability of the models to capture information useful for prediction or a combination of these factors. In many cases, different methods are likely to produce similar results, whereas in others, the predictors may return contradictory predictions. In this situation, a priori estimates of prediction performance applicable to the system being investigated would be helpful for biologists to choose the best method for designing their experiments. In this work, we have constructed unbiased, stringent and diverse data sets for DNA-binding proteins based on various biologically relevant considerations: (i) seven structural classes, (ii) 86 folds, (iii) 106 superfamilies, (iv) 194 families, (v) 15 binding motifs, (vi) single/double-stranded DNA, (vii) DNA conformation (A, B, Z, etc.), (viii) three functions and (ix) disordered regions. These data sets were culled as non-redundant with sequence identities of 25 and 40% and used to evaluate the performance of 11 different methods in which online services or standalone programs are available. We observed that the best performing methods for each of the data sets showed significant biases toward the data sets selected for their benchmark. Our analysis revealed important data set features, which could be used to estimate these context-specific biases and hence suggest the best method to be used for a given problem. We have developed a web server, which considers these features on demand and displays the best method that the investigator should use. The web server is freely available at

  16. The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known and is able to repair an unusually large amount of DNA damage without induced mutation. Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB protein is an essential protein in all organisms and is involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. The published genomic sequence from Deinococcus radiodurans includes a putative single-stranded DNA-binding protein gene (ssb; DR0100 requiring a translational frameshift for synthesis of a complete SSB protein. The apparently tripartite gene has inspired considerable speculation in the literature about potentially novel frameshifting or RNA editing mechanisms. Immediately upstream of the ssb gene is another gene (DR0099 given an ssb-like annotation, but left unexplored. Results A segment of the Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 genome encompassing the ssb gene has been re-sequenced, and two errors involving omitted guanine nucleotides have been documented. The corrected sequence incorporates both of the open reading frames designated DR0099 and DR0100 into one contiguous ssb open reading frame (ORF. The corrected gene requires no translational frameshifts and contains two predicted oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB folds. The protein has been purified and its sequence is closely related to the Thermus thermophilus and Thermus aquaticus SSB proteins. Like the Thermus SSB proteins, the SSBDr functions as a homodimer. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB homodimer stimulates Deinococcus radiodurans RecA protein and Escherichia coli RecA protein-promoted DNA three-strand exchange reactions with at least the same efficiency as the Escherichia coli SSB homotetramer. Conclusions The correct Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene is a contiguous open reading frame that codes for the largest bacterial SSB monomer identified to date. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB protein includes two OB folds per monomer and functions as a

  17. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-07-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein-DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD-DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein-DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw.

  18. Determination of Properties of Selected Fresh and Processed Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley G. Cabrera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the chemical properties, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity and toxicity level of fresh and processed medicinal plants such as corn (Zea mays silk, pancitpancitan (Peperomiapellucida leaves, pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius leaves, and commercially available tea. The toxicity level of the samples was measured using the Brine Shrimp Lethality Assay (BSLA. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Results showed that in terms of chemical properties there is significant difference between fresh and processed corn silk except in crude fiber content was noted. Based on proximate analyses of fresh and processed medicinal plants specifically in terms of % moisture, %crude protein and % total carbohydrates were also observed. In addition, there is also significant difference on bioactive compound contents such as total flavonoids and total phenolics between fresh and processed corn silk except in total vitamin E (TVE content. Pandan and pancit-pancitan showed significant difference in all bioactive compounds except in total antioxidant content (TAC. Fresh pancit-pancitan has the highest total phenolics content (TPC and TAC, while the fresh and processed corn silk has the lowest TAC and TVE content, respectively. Furthermore, results of BSLA for the three medicinal plants and commercially available tea extract showed after 24 hours exposure significant difference in toxicity level was observed. The percentage mortality increased with an increase in exposure time of the three medicinal plants and tea extract. The results of the study can served as baseline data for further processing and commercialization of these medicinal plants.

  19. Nuclear TAR DNA-binding protein 43 A new target for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Zheng; Yujie Shi; Dongsheng Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusion bodies can be detected in the degener-ative neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we induced chronic oxidative stress in-jury by applying malonate to cultured mouse cortical motor neurons. In the later stages of the ma-lonate insult, TDP-43 expression reduced in the nuclei and transferred to the cytoplasm. This was accompanied by neuronal death, mimicking the pathological changes in TDP-43 that are seen in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interestingly, in the early stages of the response to ma-lonate treatment, nuclear TDP-43 expression increased, and neurons remained relatively intact, without inclusion bodies or fragmentation. Therefore, we hypothesized that the increase of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be a pro-survival factor against oxidative stress injury. This hypothesis was confirmed by an in vitro transgenic experiment, in which overexpression of wild type mouse TDP-43 in cultured cortical motor neurons significantly reduced malonate-induced neuronal death. Our findings suggest that the loss of function of TDP-43 is an important cause of neuronal dege-neration, and upregulation of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be neuroprotective in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  20. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides: synthesis, DNA-binding and cell cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, Vyankat A; Lawande, Pravin P; Kate, Anup N; Khan, Ayesha; Joshi, Rakesh; Kumbhar, Anupa A; Shinde, Vaishali S

    2016-04-26

    An efficient route was developed for synthesis of bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides from readily available d-glucose. The key reactions were Vörbruggen glycosylation and ring closing metathesis (RCM). Primarily, to understand the mode of DNA binding, we performed a molecular docking study and the binding was found to be in the minor groove region. Based on the proposed binding model, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques using calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) demonstrated a non-intercalative mode of binding. Antiproliferative activity of nucleosides was tested against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and found to be active at low micromolar concentrations. Compounds and displayed significant antiproliferative activity as compared to and with the reference anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Cell cycle analysis showed that nucleoside induced cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Confocal microscopy has been performed to validate the induction of cellular apoptosis. Based on these findings, such modified bicyclic benzimidazole nucleosides will make a significant contribution to the development of anticancer drugs.

  2. Phase Behavior of DNA in the Presence of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Treut, Guillaume; Képès, François; Orland, Henri

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the thermodynamical equilibrium of DNA chains interacting with a solution of nonspecific binding proteins, we implemented a Flory-Huggins free energy model. We explored the dependence on DNA and protein concentrations of the DNA collapse. For physiologically relevant values of the DNA-protein affinity, this collapse gives rise to a biphasic regime with a dense and a dilute phase; the corresponding phase diagram was computed. Using an approach based on Hamiltonian paths, we show that the dense phase has either a molten globule or a crystalline structure, depending on the DNA bending rigidity, which is influenced by the ionic strength. These results are valid at the thermodynamical equilibrium and therefore should be consistent with many biological processes, whose characteristic timescales range typically from 1 ms to 10 s. Our model may thus be applied to biological phenomena that involve DNA-binding proteins, such as DNA condensation with crystalline order, which occurs in some bacteria to protect their chromosome from detrimental factors; or transcription initiation, which occurs in clusters called transcription factories that are reminiscent of the dense phase characterized in this study.

  3. Mutation and Methylation Analysis of the Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA Binding 5 Gene in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie L. Gorringe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5 is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04. The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  4. A review of the electrophilic reaction chemistry involved in covalent DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, S J; Cronin, M T D

    2010-09-01

    The need to assess the ability of a chemical to act as a mutagen or a genotoxic carcinogen (collectively termed genotoxicity) is one of the primary requirements in regulatory toxicology. Several pieces of legislation have led to an increased interest in the use of in silico methods, specifically the formation of chemical categories for the assessment of toxicological endpoints. A key step in the development of chemical categories for genotoxicity is defining the organic chemistry associated with the formation of a covalent bond between DNA and an exogenous chemical. This organic chemistry is typically defined as structural alerts. To this end, this article has reviewed the literature defining the structural alerts associated with covalent DNA binding. Importantly, this review article also details the mechanistic organic chemistry associated with each of the structural alerts. This information is extremely important in terms of meeting regulatory requirements for the acceptance of the chemical category approach. The structural alerts and associated mechanistic chemistry have been incorporated into the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (Q)SAR Application Toolbox.

  5. Synthesis, DNA Binding and Topoisomerase I Inhibition Activity of Thiazacridine and Imidazacridine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Almeida Lafayette

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 104 to 6.01 × 104 M−1. UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  6. Design, synthesis and DNA-binding study of some novel morpholine linked thiazolidinone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Srivastava, Savitri Devi

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of multiple drug resistance amongst bacterial strains resulted in many clinical drugs to be ineffective. Being vulnerable to bacterial infections any lack in the development of new antimicrobial drugs could pose a serious threat to public health. Here we report design and synthesis of a novel class of morpholine linked thiazolidinone hybrid molecules. The compounds were characterized by FT-IR, NMR and HRMS techniques. Susceptibility tests showed that most of the synthesized molecules were highly active against multiple bacterial strains. Compound 3f displayed MIC values which were better than the standard drug for most of the tested strains. DNA being a well defined target for many antimicrobial drugs was probed as possible target for these synthetic molecules. DNA-binding study of 3f with sm-DNA was probed through UV-vis absorption, fluorescence quenching, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking techniques. The studies revealed that compound 3f has strong affinity towards DNA and binds at the minor groove. The docking studies revealed that the compound 3f shows preferential binding towards A/T residues.

  7. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  8. Competition for DNA binding sites using Promega DNA IQ™ paramagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; De Moors, Anick

    2012-09-01

    The Promega DNA IQ™ system is easily amenable to automation and has been an integral part of standard operating procedures for many forensic laboratories including those of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) since 2004. Due to some failure to extract DNA from samples that should have produced DNA using our validated automated DNA IQ™-based protocol, the competition for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ magnetic beads was more closely examined. Heme from heavily blooded samples interfered slightly with DNA binding. Increasing the concentration of Proteinase K during lysis of these samples did not enhance DNA recovery. However, diluting the sample lysate following lysis prior to DNA extraction overcame the reduction in DNA yield and preserved portions of the lysates for subsequent manual or automated extraction. Dye/chemicals from black denim lysates competed for binding sites on the DNA IQ™ beads and significantly reduced DNA recovery. Increasing the size or number of black denim cuttings during lysis had a direct adverse effect on DNA yield from various blood volumes. The dilution approach was successful on these samples and permitted the extraction of high DNA yields. Alternatively, shortening the incubation time for cell lysis to 30 min instead of the usual overnight at 56 °C prevented competition from black denim dye/chemicals and increased DNA yields.

  9. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  10. Single-Molecule Counting of Point Mutations by Transient DNA Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin; Li, Lidan; Wang, Shanshan; Hao, Dandan; Wang, Lei; Yu, Changyuan

    2017-03-01

    High-confidence detection of point mutations is important for disease diagnosis and clinical practice. Hybridization probes are extensively used, but are hindered by their poor single-nucleotide selectivity. Shortening the length of DNA hybridization probes weakens the stability of the probe-target duplex, leading to transient binding between complementary sequences. The kinetics of probe-target binding events are highly dependent on the number of complementary base pairs. Here, we present a single-molecule assay for point mutation detection based on transient DNA binding and use of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Statistical analysis of single-molecule kinetics enabled us to effectively discriminate between wild type DNA sequences and single-nucleotide variants at the single-molecule level. A higher single-nucleotide discrimination is achieved than in our previous work by optimizing the assay conditions, which is guided by statistical modeling of kinetics with a gamma distribution. The KRAS c.34 A mutation can be clearly differentiated from the wild type sequence (KRAS c.34 G) at a relative abundance as low as 0.01% mutant to WT. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analysis of clinically relevant biological samples, we used this technology to detect mutations in single-stranded DNA generated from asymmetric RT-PCR of mRNA from two cancer cell lines.

  11. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  12. Structural determinants of HIV-1 Vif susceptibility and DNA binding in APOBEC3F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Karen K; Sultana, Azmiri; Azimi, Farshad C; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA cytosine deaminases serves as a front-line intrinsic immune response to inhibit the replication of diverse retroviruses. APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are the most potent factors against HIV-1. As a countermeasure, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) targets APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. Here we report the crystal structure of the Vif-binding domain in APOBEC3F and a novel assay to assess Vif-APOBEC3 binding. Our results point to an amphipathic surface that is conserved in APOBEC3s as critical for Vif susceptibility in APOBEC3F. Electrostatic interactions likely mediate Vif binding. Moreover, structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a straight ssDNA-binding groove distinct from the Vif-binding site, and an 'aromatic switch' is proposed to explain DNA substrate specificities across the APOBEC3 family. This study opens new lines of inquiry that will further our understanding of APOBEC3-mediated retroviral restriction and provides an accurate template for structure-guided development of inhibitors targeting the APOBEC3-Vif axis.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, DNA-binding studies and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity of new 3-formyl chromone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Mehtab; Malla, Ali Mohammed; Yaseen, Zahid; Ali, Akhtar; Alam, Mahboob

    2014-01-05

    A series of new substituted 3-formyl chromone derivatives (4-6) were synthesized by one step reaction methodology by knoevenagel condensation, structurally similar to known bisintercalators. The new compounds were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS and analytical data. The in vitro DNA binding profile of compounds (4-6) was carried out by absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. It was found that synthesized compounds, especially compound 6 (evident from binding constant value) bind strongly with calf thymus DNA, presumably via an intercalation mode. Additionally, molecular docking studies of compounds (4-6) were carried out with B-DNA (PDBID: 1BNA) which revealed that partial intercalative mode of mechanism is operational in synthesized compounds (4-6) with CT-DNA. The binding constants evaluated from fluorescence spectroscopy of compounds with CT-DNA follows the order compound 6>compound 5>compound 4. All the compounds (4-6) were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay. It can be inferred from data, that compound (6) showed potent AChE inhibition having IC50=0.27μM, almost in vicinity to reference drug Tacrine (IC50=0.19μM). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutation and methylation analysis of the chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding 5 gene in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorringe, Kylie L; Choong, David Yh; Williams, Louise H; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Sridhar, Anita; Qiu, Wen; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Campbell, Ian G

    2008-11-01

    Chromodomain, helicase, DNA binding 5 (CHD5) is a member of a subclass of the chromatin remodeling Swi/Snf proteins and has recently been proposed as a tumor suppressor in a diverse range of human cancers. We analyzed all 41 coding exons of CHD5 for somatic mutations in 123 primary ovarian cancers as well as 60 primary breast cancers using high-resolution melt analysis. We also examined methylation of the CHD5 promoter in 48 ovarian cancer samples by methylation-specific single-stranded conformation polymorphism and bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to previous studies, no mutations were identified in the breast cancers, but somatic heterozygous missense mutations were identified in 3 of 123 ovarian cancers. We identified promoter methylation in 3 of 45 samples with normal CHD5 and in 2 of 3 samples with CHD5 mutation, suggesting these tumors may have biallelic inactivation of CHD5. Hemizygous copy number loss at CHD5 occurred in 6 of 85 samples as assessed by single nucleotide polymorphism array. Tumors with CHD5 mutation or methylation were more likely to have mutation of KRAS or BRAF (P = .04). The aggregate frequency of CHD5 haploinsufficiency or inactivation is 16.2% in ovarian cancer. Thus, CHD5 may play a role as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer; however, it is likely that there is another target of the frequent copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity observed at 1p36.

  15. TALEored Epigenetics: A DNA-Binding Scaffold for Programmable Epigenome Editing and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-06-02

    Epigenetic modification of the cytosine 5-position is an important regulator of gene expression with essential roles in genome stability, development, and disease. In addition to 5-methylcytosine (mC), the oxidized mC derivatives 5-hydroxymethyl-, 5-formyl-, and 5-carboxylcytosine (hmC, fC, and caC) have recently been discovered. These are intermediates of an active demethylation pathway but might also represent new epigenetic marks with individual biological roles. This increase in chemical complexity of DNA-encoded information has created a pressing need for new approaches that allow reading and editing of this information. Transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) are DNA-binding domains with programmable sequence selectivity that enable the direct reading of epigenetic cytosine modifications but can also guide enzymatic editing domains to genomic loci of choice. Here, we review recent advances in employing TALEs for these applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Can DNA-binding proteins of replisome tautomerize nucleotide bases? Ab initio model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Yurenko, Yevgen P; Dubey, Igor Ya; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2012-01-01

    Ab initio quantum-chemical study of specific point contacts of replisome proteins with DNA modeled by acetic acid with canonical and mutagenic tautomers of DNA bases methylated at the glycosidic nitrogen atoms was performed in vacuo and continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ ∼ 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interaction. All tautomerized complexes were found to be dynamically unstable, because the electronic energies of their back-reaction barriers do not exceed zero-point vibrational energies associated with the vibrational modes whose harmonic vibrational frequencies become imaginary in the transition states of the tautomerization reaction. Additionally, based on the physicochemical arguments, it was demonstrated that the effects of biomolecular environment cannot ensure dynamic stabilization. This result allows suggesting that hypothetically generated by DNA-binding proteins of replisome rare tautomers will have no impact on the total spontaneous mutation due to the low reverse barrier allowing a quick return to the canonical form.

  17. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Selvaganapathy, M.; Mahalakshmi, R.

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL1/KHL2 have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL1/KHL2 are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2rad -) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method.

  18. Human single-stranded DNA binding proteins: guardians of genome stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanzhong Wu; Jinping Lu; Tiebang Kang

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are essential for maintaining the integrity of the genome in all organisms.All processes related to DNA,such as replication,excision,repair,and recombination,require the participation of SSBs whose oligonucleotideaoligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain is responsible for the interaction with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA).For a long time,the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex was believed to be the only nuclear SSB in eukanyotes to participate in ssDNA processing,while mitochondrial SSBs that are consewed with prokaryotic SSBs were shown to be essential for maintaining genome stability in eukaryotic mitochondria.In recent years,two new proteins,hSSB1 and hSSB2 (human SSBs 1/2),were identified and have better sequence similarity to bacterial and archaeal SSBs than RPA.This review summarizes the current understanding of these human SSBs in DNA damage repair and in cell-cycle checkpoint activation following DNA damage,as well as their relationships with cancer.

  19. The Sso7d DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus has ribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehi, E; Serina, S; Fumagalli, G; Vanoni, M; Consonni, R; Zetta, L; Dehò, G; Tortora, P; Fusi, P

    2001-05-25

    Sso7d is a small, basic, abundant protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. Previous research has shown that Sso7d can bind double-stranded DNA without sequence specificity by placing its triple-stranded beta-sheet across the minor groove. We previously found RNase activity both in preparations of Sso7d purified from its natural source and in recombinant, purified protein expressed in Escherichia coli. This paper provides conclusive evidence that supports the assignment of RNase activity to Sso7d, shown by the total absence of activity in the single-point mutants E35L and K12L, despite the preservation of their overall structure under the assay conditions. In keeping with our observation that the residues putatively involved in RNase activity and those playing a role in DNA binding are located on different surfaces of the molecule, the activity was not impaired in the presence of DNA. If a small synthetic RNA was used as a substrate, Sso7d attacked both predicted double- and single-stranded RNA stretches, with no evident preference for specific sequences or individual bases. Apparently, the more readily attacked bonds were those intrinsically more unstable.

  20. CpG methylation increases the DNA binding of 9-aminoacridine carboxamide Pt analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kava, Hieronimus W; Murray, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of CpG methylation on the DNA binding of cisplatin analogues with an attached aminoacridine intercalator. DNA-targeted 9-aminoacridine carboxamide Pt complexes are known to bind at 5'-CpG sequences. Their binding to methylated and non-methylated 5'-CpG sequences was determined and compared with cisplatin. The damage profiles of each platinum compound were quantified via a polymerase stop assay with fluorescently labelled primers and capillary electrophoresis. Methylation at 5'-CpG was shown to significantly increase the binding intensity for the 9-aminoacridine carboxamide compounds, whereas no significant increase was found for cisplatin. 5'-CpG methylation had the largest effect on the 9-ethanolamine-acridine carboxamide Pt complex, followed by the 9-aminoacridine carboxamide Pt complex and the 7-fluoro complex. The methylation state of a cell's genome is important in maintaining normal gene expression, and is often aberrantly altered in cancer cells. An analogue of cisplatin which differentially targets methylated DNA may be able to improve its therapeutic activity, or alter its range of targets and evade the chemoresistance which hampers cisplatin efficacy in clinical use.

  1. DNA-binding studies and biological activities of new nitrosubstituted acyl thioureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Shaista; Badshah, Amin; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Tabassum, Saira; Patujo, Jahangir Ali; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar

    2015-11-01

    Four new nitrosubstituted acylthioureas i.e. 1-acetyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU1), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU2), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU3) and 1-acetyl-3-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU4) have been synthesized and characterized (by C13 and H1 nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction). As a preliminary investigation of the anti-cancer potencies of the said compounds, DNA interaction studies have been carried out using cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy along with verification from computational studies. The drug-DNA binding constants are found to be in the order, KTU3 9.04 × 106 M-1 > KTU4 8.57 × 106 M-1 > KTU2 6.05 × 106 M-1 > KTU1 1.16 × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been carried out against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-dipicrylhydrazyl), Brine shrimp eggs, gram positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter aerogens) and fungal cultures (Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor species, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus) respectively.

  2. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröpper, Kevin; Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M; Pohl, Ehmke; Usón, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein-DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein-DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein-DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  3. Evidence for glycosylation on a DNA-binding protein of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Igor C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All organisms living under aerobic atmosphere have powerful mechanisms that confer their macromolecules protection against oxygen reactive species. Microorganisms have developed biomolecule-protecting systems in response to starvation and/or oxidative stress, such as DNA biocrystallization with Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells. Dps is a protein that is produced in large amounts when the bacterial cell faces harm, which results in DNA protection. In this work, we evaluated the glycosylation in the Dps extracted from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This Dps was purified from the crude extract as an 18-kDa protein, by means of affinity chromatography on an immobilized jacalin column. Results The N-terminal sequencing of the jacalin-bound protein revealed 100% identity with the Dps of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Methyl-alpha-galactopyranoside inhibited the binding of Dps to jacalin in an enzyme-linked lectin assay, suggesting that the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD of jacalin is involved in the interaction with Dps. Furthermore, monosaccharide compositional analysis showed that Dps contained mannose, glucose, and an unknown sugar residue. Finally, jacalin-binding Dps was detected in larger amounts during the bacterial earlier growth periods, whereas high detection of total Dps was verified throughout the bacterial growth period. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that Dps undergoes post-translational modifications in the pre- and early stationary phases of bacterial growth. There is also evidence that a small mannose-containing oligosaccharide is linked to this bacterial protein.

  4. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnikova, A D; Kuznetsova, A A; Kuznetsov, N A; Fedorova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5'-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1' hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of "crystalline" water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5'-phosphate-2'-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step.

  5. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Guillière

    Full Text Available While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  6. Gene regulation knowledge commons: community action takes care of DNA binding transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sushil; Vercruysse, Steven; Chawla, Konika; Christie, Karen R; Blake, Judith A; Huntley, Rachael P; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning; Thommesen, Liv; Lægreid, Astrid; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A large gap remains between the amount of knowledge in scientific literature and the fraction that gets curated into standardized databases, despite many curation initiatives. Yet the availability of comprehensive knowledge in databases is crucial for exploiting existing background knowledge, both for designing follow-up experiments and for interpreting new experimental data. Structured resources also underpin the computational integration and modeling of regulatory pathways, which further aids our understanding of regulatory dynamics. We argue how cooperation between the scientific community and professional curators can increase the capacity of capturing precise knowledge from literature. We demonstrate this with a project in which we mobilize biological domain experts who curate large amounts of DNA binding transcription factors, and show that they, although new to the field of curation, can make valuable contributions by harvesting reported knowledge from scientific papers. Such community curation can enhance the scientific epistemic process.Database URL: http://www.tfcheckpoint.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  8. A novel DNMT3B splice variant expressed in tumor and pluripotent cells modulates genomic DNA methylation patterns and displays altered DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Suhasni; Van Emburgh, Beth O; Shan, Jixiu; Su, Zhen; Fields, C Robert; Vieweg, Johannes; Hamazaki, Takashi; Schwartz, Philip H; Terada, Naohiro; Robertson, Keith D

    2009-10-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mark essential for mammalian development, genomic stability, and imprinting. DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B. Interestingly, all three DNMTs make use of alternative splicing. DNMT3B has nearly 40 known splice variants expressed in a tissue- and disease-specific manner, but very little is known about the role of these splice variants in modulating DNMT3B function. We describe here the identification and characterization of a novel alternatively spliced form of DNMT3B lacking exon 5 within the NH(2)-terminal regulatory domain. This variant, which we term DNMT3B3Delta5 because it is closely related in structure to the ubiquitously expressed DNMT3B3 isoform, is highly expressed in pluripotent cells and brain tissue, is downregulated during differentiation, and is conserved in the mouse. Creation of pluripotent iPS cells from fibroblasts results in marked induction of DNMT3B3Delta5. DNMT3B3Delta5 expression is also altered in human disease, with tumor cell lines displaying elevated or reduced expression depending on their tissue of origin. We then compared the DNA binding and subcellular localization of DNMT3B3Delta5 versus DNMT3B3, revealing that DNMT3B3Delta5 possessed significantly enhanced DNA binding affinity and displayed an altered nuclear distribution. Finally, ectopic overexpression of DNMT3B3Delta5 resulted in repetitive element hypomethylation and enhanced cell growth in a colony formation assay. Taken together, these results show that DNMT3B3Delta5 may play an important role in stem cell maintenance or differentiation and suggest that sequences encoded by exon 5 influence the functional properties of DNMT3B.

  9. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Endonuclease-based Method for Detecting the Sequence Specific DNA Binding Protein on Double-stranded DNA Microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Fei BAI; Qin Yu GE; Tong Xiang LI; Jin Ke WANG; Quan Jun LIU; Zu Hong LU

    2005-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) probe contains two different protein binding sites.One is for DNA- binding proteins to be detected and the other is for a DNA restriction enzyme.The two sites were arranged together with no base interval. The working principle of the capturing dsDNA probe is described as follows: the capturing probe can be cut with the DNA restriction enzyme (such as EcoR I) to cause a sticky terminal, if the probe is not bound with a target protein, and the sticky terminal can be extended and labeled with Cy3-dUTP by DNA polymerase. When the probe is bound with a target protein, the probe is not capable to be cut by the restriction enzyme because of space obstruction. The amount of the target DNA binding proteins can be measured according to the variations of fluorescent signals of the corresponding probes.

  11. DNA intercalators induce specific release of HMG 14, HMG 17 and other DNA-binding proteins from chicken erythrocyte chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, H; Maier, G; Ponstingl, H; Nordheim, A

    1985-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei were incubated with DNA intercalating agents in order to isolate from chromatin specific DNA-binding proteins whose binding specificity may be determined by DNA secondary and/or tertiary structure. The intercalating agents ethidium bromide (EtBr) and propidium iodide induce the specific release of high mobility group proteins HMG 14 and HMG 17 under low ionic strength conditions. Chloroquine (CQ) intercalation also results in the selective liberation of HMG 14 and HMG 17, but, in addition, selectively releases other nuclear proteins (including histone H1A) in a pH- and ionic strength-dependent fashion. The use of this new 'elutive intercalation' technique for the isolation and purification of 'sequence-specific' and 'helix-specific' DNA-binding proteins is suggested. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4092697

  12. Role of teh Rad52 Amino-terminal DNA Binding Activity in DNA Strand Capture in Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Idina; Hallwyl, Swee Chuang Lim; Seong, Changhyun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein promotes homologous recombination by nucleating the Rad51 recombinase onto replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA strands and also by directly annealing such strands. We show that the purified rad52-R70A mutant protein, with a compromised amino...... conversion intermediates reveals that rad52-R70A cells can mediate DNA strand invasion but are unable to complete the recombination event. These results provide evidence that DNA binding by the evolutionarily conserved amino terminus of Rad52 is needed for the capture of the second DNA end during homologous......-terminal DNA binding domain, is capable of Rad51 delivery to DNA but is deficient in DNA annealing. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments find that rad52-R70A associates with DNA double-strand breaks and promotes recruitment of Rad51 as efficiently as wild-type Rad52. Analysis of gene...

  13. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

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    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  14. Nucleotide specificity of DNA binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor:ARNT complex is unaffected by ligand structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent.

  15. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  16. A DNA-binding peroxiredoxin of Coxiella burnetii is involved in countering oxidative stress during exponential-phase growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Linda D; Raghavan, Rahul; Battisti, James M; Minnick, Michael F

    2010-04-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that resides within the harsh, acidic confines of a lysosome-like compartment of the host cell that is termed a parasitophorous vacuole. In this study, we characterized a thiol-specific peroxidase of C. burnetii that belongs to the atypical 2-cysteine subfamily of peroxiredoxins, commonly referred to as bacterioferritin comigratory proteins (BCPs). Coxiella BCP was initially identified as a potential DNA-binding protein by two-dimensional Southwestern (SW) blots of the pathogen's proteome, probed with biotinylated C. burnetii genomic DNA. Confirmation of the identity of the DNA-binding protein as BCP (CBU_0963) was established by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Recombinant Coxiella BCP (rBCP) was generated, and its DNA binding was demonstrated by two independent methods, including SW blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). rBCP also demonstrated peroxidase activity in vitro that required thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (Trx-TrxR). Both the DNA-binding and peroxidase activities of rBCP were lost upon heat denaturation (100 degrees C, 10 min). Functional expression of Coxiella bcp was demonstrated by trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli bcp mutant, as evidenced by the strain's ability to grow in an oxidative-stress growth medium containing tert-butyl hydroperoxide to levels that were indistinguishable from, or significantly greater than, those observed with its wild-type parental strain and significantly greater than bcp mutant levels (P exponential-growth phase in an experiment involving synchronized infection of an epithelial (Vero) host cell line. Taken as a whole, the results show that Coxiella BCP binds DNA and likely serves to detoxify endogenous hydroperoxide byproducts of Coxiella's metabolism during intracellular replication.

  17. Quantitative radiommunoassay for DNA-binding antibodies. [Iodine 131, Iodine 125

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.H.; Guyer, R.L.; Minami, R.M.; Teplitz, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) is described for the measurement of serum immunoglobulins capable of binding to double-standard or single-standard DNA. DNA attached to Sephadex G-50 by ultraviolet radiation was used as a solid- phase immunoabsorbent for DNA-binding proteins from serum. Goat anti-human (GAH) IgG (/sup 125/I-labeled) were used to detect the human immunoglobulins bound onto the washed DNA-Sephadex. The quantities of immunoglobulins bound were determined by comparison with a standard curve constructed by dilution of a plasma from an systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient containing known amounts of bound, DNA-specific IgM and IgG. Another RIA was employed for measuring levels of IgG and IgM. In combination with measurements of the total serum IgM and IgG, the RIA allowed for the determination of the fraction of the total serum IgM or IgG that was specific for double- or single-standard DNA. For a pool of normal human sera the quantities were as follows: 0.04% of the total IgM and 0.001% of the total IgG bound double-standard DNA; 0.22% of the total IgM and 0.05% of the total IgG bound single-stranded DNA. This capability is important because information regarding the quantitative measurement of antibodies to DNA and their class determination may be of significance in monitoring the status of subjects with SLE.

  18. Structural basis for sequence specific DNA binding and protein dimerization of HOXA13.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Zhang

    Full Text Available The homeobox gene (HOXA13 codes for a transcription factor protein that binds to AT-rich DNA sequences and controls expression of genes during embryonic morphogenesis. Here we present the NMR structure of HOXA13 homeodomain (A13DBD bound to an 11-mer DNA duplex. A13DBD forms a dimer that binds to DNA with a dissociation constant of 7.5 nM. The A13DBD/DNA complex has a molar mass of 35 kDa consistent with two molecules of DNA bound at both ends of the A13DBD dimer. A13DBD contains an N-terminal arm (residues 324 - 329 that binds in the DNA minor groove, and a C-terminal helix (residues 362 - 382 that contacts the ATAA nucleotide sequence in the major groove. The N370 side-chain forms hydrogen bonds with the purine base of A5* (base paired with T5. Side-chain methyl groups of V373 form hydrophobic contacts with the pyrimidine methyl groups of T5, T6* and T7*, responsible for recognition of TAA in the DNA core. I366 makes similar methyl contacts with T3* and T4*. Mutants (I366A, N370A and V373G all have decreased DNA binding and transcriptional activity. Exposed protein residues (R337, K343, and F344 make intermolecular contacts at the protein dimer interface. The mutation F344A weakens protein dimerization and lowers transcriptional activity by 76%. We conclude that the non-conserved residue, V373 is critical for structurally recognizing TAA in the major groove, and that HOXA13 dimerization is required to activate transcription of target genes.

  19. Synthesis and DNA-binding study of imidazole linked thiazolidinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Srivastava, Savitri Devi

    2017-02-01

    A novel series of imidazole-linked thiazolidinone hybrid molecules were designed and synthesized through a feasible synthetic protocol. The molecules were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13) C NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) techniques. In vitro susceptibility tests against Gram-positive (S. aureus and B. subtilis) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) gave highly promising results. The most active molecule (3e) gave a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 3.125 μg/mL which is on par with the reference drug streptomycin. Structure-activity relationships revealed activity enhancement by nitro and chloro groups when they occupied meta position of the arylidene ring in 2-((3-(imidazol-1-yl)propyl)amino)-5-benzylidenethiazolidin-4-ones. DNA-binding study of the most potent molecule 3e with salmon milt DNA (sm-DNA) under simulated physiological pH was probed with UV-visible absorption, fluorescence quenching, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking techniques. These studies established that compound 3e has a strong affinity towards DNA and binds at DNA minor groove with a binding constant (Kb ) 0.18 × 10(2)  L mol(-1) . Molecular docking simulations predicted strong affinity of 3e towards DNA with a binding affinity (ΔG) -8.5 kcal/mol. Van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were predicted as the main forces of interaction. The molecule 3e exhibited specific affinity towards adenine-thiamine base pairs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Damaged DNA binding protein 2 plays a role in breast cancer cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilal Kattan

    Full Text Available The Damaged DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, is involved in nucleotide excision repair as well as in other biological processes in normal cells, including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Loss of DDB2 function may be related to tumor susceptibility. However, hypothesis of this study was that DDB2 could play a role in breast cancer cell growth, resulting in its well known interaction with the proliferative marker E2F1 in breast neoplasia. DDB2 gene was overexpressed in estrogen receptor (ER-positive (MCF-7 and T47D, but not in ER-negative breast cancer (MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 or normal mammary epithelial cell lines. In addition, DDB2 expression was significantly (3.0-fold higher in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumor samples (P = 0.0208 from 16 patients with breast carcinoma. Knockdown of DDB2 by small interfering RNA in MCF-7 cells caused a decrease in cancer cell growth and colony formation. Inversely, introduction of the DDB2 gene into MDA-MB231 cells stimulated growth and colony formation. Cell cycle distribution and 5 Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by flow cytometry analysis showed that the growth-inhibiting effect of DDB2 knockdown was the consequence of a delayed G1/S transition and a slowed progression through the S phase of MCF-7 cells. These results were supported by a strong decrease in the expression of S phase markers (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, cyclin E and dihydrofolate reductase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that DDB2 can play a role as oncogene and may become a promising candidate as a predictive marker in breast cancer.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Shah, Naseer Ali; Sohail, Manzar; Pandarinathan, Vedapriya

    2015-08-01

    A new binuclear O-bridged Cu(II) complex with 4-chlorophenyl acetate and 2,2‧-bipyridine has been synthesized and characterized using FT-IR, powder and single crystal XRD and electrochemical solution studies. The results revealed that the two penta-coordinated Cu(II) centers are linked by two carboxylate ligands in end-on bonding fashion. The coordination geometry is slightly distorted square pyramidal (SP) with bridging oxygen atoms occupying the apical position and other ligands lying in the equatorial plane. The striking difference in Cu-O bond distance of the bridging oxygen atom in the complex may be responsible for the SP geometry of Cu(II) ion. The complex gave rise to metal centered irreversible electro-activity where one electron Cu(II)/Cu(III) oxidation process and a single step two electron Cu(II)/Cu(0) reduction process was observed. The redox processes were found predominantly adsorption controlled. The values of diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous rate constant for oxidation process were 6.98 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 4.60 × 10-5 cm s-1 while the corresponding values for reduction were 5.30 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 and 5.41 × 10-6 cm s-1, respectively. The formal potential and charge transfer coefficient were also calculated. The DNA-binding ability was explored through cyclic voltammetry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Diminution in the value of Do for oxidation indicated the binding of the complex with DNA corresponding to Kb = 8.58 × 104 M-1. UV-Visible spectroscopy yielded ε = 49 L mol-1 cm-1 and Kb = 2.96 × 104 M-1. The data of both techniques support each other. The self-induced redox activation of the complex, as indicated by cyclic voltammetry heralds its potential applications in redox catalysis and anticancer activity.

  2. Selective disruption of ER{alpha} DNA-binding activity alters uterine responsiveness to estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; O'Brien, Jeanne E; Jameson, J Larry; Kissling, Grace E; Korach, Kenneth S

    2009-12-01

    In vitro models have been used to demonstrate that estrogen receptors (ERs) can regulate estrogen-responsive genes either by directly interacting with estrogen-responsive element (ERE) DNA motifs or by interacting with other transcription factors such as AP1. In this study, we evaluated estrogen (E(2))-dependent uterine gene profiles by microarray in the KIKO mouse, an in vivo knock-in mouse model that lacks the DNA-binding function of ERalpha and is consequently restricted to non-ERE-mediated responses. The 2- or 24-h E(2)-mediated uterine gene responses were distinct in wild-type (WT), KIKO, and alphaERKO genotypes, indicating that unique sets of genes are regulated by ERE and non-ERE pathways. After 2 h E(2) treatment, 38% of the WT transcripts were also regulated in the KIKO, demonstrating that the tethered mechanism does operate in this in vivo model. Surprisingly, 1438 E(2)-regulated transcripts were unique in the KIKO mouse and were not seen in either WT or alphaERKO. Pathway analyses revealed that some canonical pathways, such as the Jak/Stat pathway, were affected in a similar manner by E(2) in WT and KIKO. In other cases, however, the WT and KIKO differed. One example is the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway; this pathway was impacted, but different members of the pathway were regulated by E(2) or were regulated in a different manner, consistent with differences in biological responses. In summary, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of uterine genes regulated by E(2) via ERE and non-ERE pathways.

  3. HCV NS5A abrogates p53 protein function by interfering with p53-DNA binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Zhong Gong; Yong-Fang Jiang; Yan He; Li-Ying Lai; Ying-Hua Zhu; Xian-Shi Su

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the inhibition effect of HCV NS5A on p53 transactivation on p21 promoter and explore its possible mechanism for influencing p53 function.METHODS: p53 function of transactivation on p21 promoter was studied with a luciferase reporter system in which the luciferase gene is driven by p21 promoter, and the p53-DNA binding ability was observed with the use of electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Lipofectin mediated p53 or HCV NS5A expression vectors were used to transfect hepatoma cell lines to observe whether HCV NS5A could abrogate the binding ability of p53 to its specific DNA sequence and p53 transactivation on p21 promoter.Western blot experiment was used for detection of HCV NS5A and p53 proteins expression.RESULTS: Relative luciferase activity driven by p21 promoter increased significantly in the presence of endogenous p53 protein. Compared to the control group, exogenous p53 protein also stimulated p21 promoter driven luciferase gene expression in a dose-dependent way. HCV NS5A protein gradually inhibited both endogenous and exogenous p53 transactivation on p21 promoter with increase of the dose of HCV NS5A expression plasmid. By the experiment of EMSA, we could find p53 binding to its specific DNA sequence and, when co-transfected with increased dose of HCV NS5A expression vector, the p53 binding affinity to its DNA gradually decreased and finally disappeared. Between the Huh 7 cells transfected with p53 expression vector alone or co-transfected with HCV NS5A expression vector, there was no difference in the p53 protein expression.CONCLUSION: HCV NS5A inhibits p53 transactivation on p21 promoter through abrogating p53 binding affinity to its specific DNA sequence. It does not affect p53 protein expression.

  4. Single strand DNA binding proteins 1 and 2 protect newly replicated telomeres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peili Gu; Wei Deng; Ming Lei; Sandy Chang

    2013-01-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (hSSB1 and 2) are components of the hSSB1/2-INTS3-C9orf80 heterotrimeric protein complex shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability.However,their roles at telomeres remain unknown.Here,we generated murine SSB1 conditional knockout mice and cells and found that mSSB1 plays a critical role in telomere end protection.Both mSSB1 and mSSB2 localize to a subset of telomeres and are required to repair TRF2-deficient telomeres.Deletion of mSSB1 resulted in increased chromatid-type fusions involving both leading-and lagging-strand telomeric DNA,suggesting that it is required for the protection of G-overhangs.mSSB1's interaction with INTS3 is required for its localization to damaged DNA.mSSB1 interacts with Potla,but not Potlb,and its association with telomeric ssDNA requires Potla.mSSB1△/△ mice die at birth with developmental abnormalities,while mice with the hypomorphic mSSB1F/F allele are born alive and display increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR).Our results suggest that mSSB1 is required to maintain genome stability,and document a previously unrecognized role for mSSB1/2 in the protection of newly replicated leading-and lagging-strand telomeres.

  5. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  6. ACCORDING TO TURKISH ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ACCOUNTING OF PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, Gamze Ayça

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Turkish Accounting Standard 16-Property, Plant and Equipment, explain recognition and measurement of property, plant and equipments. Property, plant and equipments is significant amounts of business's balance sheets. Therefore the accounting of property, plant and equipments is of great importance. The purpose of this study is to explain the standard of TAS 16 with examples. The elements of cost, cost method, revaluation method, depreciation methods (straight-line depreciation ...

  7. Anthelmintic properties of extracts from Artemisia plants against nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Afshan, K; Mirza, B; Miller, J E; Manan, A; Irum, S; Rizvi, S S R; Qayyum, M

    2015-06-01

    Artemisia plant genus, natural inhabitant of northern Punjab Pakistan, is well known for its anthelmintic properties; many Artemisia species have not been so far scientifically proved. The aim of this study was to assess in vitro anthelmintic activity of Artemisia indica and Artemisia roxburghiana against mixed infection of gastrointestinal nematodes in small ruminants. This study is first scientifically proven study on anthelmintic activity of A. indica and A. roxburghiana. Five different concentrations (50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.75 mg/mL) accompanied by negative control (PBS) and positive control (albendazole, 10%) were used to carry out the egg hatch inhibition assay, larval mortality assay and adult worm mortality assay. The Baermann technique was used first time in larval mortality assay and proved to be effective. The results revealed that methanolic extracts of both A. indica and A. roxburghiana, showed maximum anthelmintic activity at concentration of 50 mg/ml by egg hatch inhibition (85±21.2; 80±28.3), larvae mortality (18±2.8; 17±4.2) and adult worm mortality (8.5±2.1; 8±2.8) assays. However, at concentration of 50 mg/ml both plant extracts in comparison to albendazole showed statistically insignificant (p≤0.05) results. The A. indica showed higher anthelmintic activity at all concentrations as compared to A. roburghiana. It has been concluded both plants exhibit anthelmintic activity and further evaluation of these plants should be carried out to purify the active ingredients for anthelmintic activity. Moreover, the decoctions of these plants could be used to GINs after confirming anthelmintic properties through in vivo.

  8. Non-enolisable Knoevenagel condensate appended Schiff bases-metal (II) complexes: Spectral characteristics, DNA-binding and nuclease activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubendran, Ammavasi; Kesavan, Mookkandi Palsamy; Ayyanaar, Srinivasan; Mitu, Liviu; Athappan, Periyakaruppan; Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban

    2017-06-01

    New Schiff base complexes [Cu(L1)Cl] (1), [Ni(L1)Cl] (2), [Zn(L1)Cl] (3), and [Fe(L2)H2OCl] (4) {L1 = (4E)-3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)pentan-2-one, L2 = 2,2‧-(1E,1‧E)-(3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-pentane-2,4-diylidene)bis(azan-1-yl-1 idene)diphenol} have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR, FAB-mass, EPR, spectral studies and electrochemical studies, the ligands L1 &L2 were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Complex 1 show a visible spectral d-d band near 600 nm and display cyclic voltammetric quasireversible response for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple vs Ag/AgCl in DMSO. The EPR spectrum of 1 show g‖ > g⊥ suggesting a square planar geometry around copper with dx2 - y2 as the ground state. The mass spectral results have confirmed the proposed structure for complexes 1-4. DNA binding properties of these complexes 1-4 have been investigated by absorption titrations, cyclic voltammetric studies and circular dichroism studies. On titration with DNA, the complexes 1-4 show hypochromism at the MLCT band (13-31%) with a red shift of 1-8 nm in the electronic spectrum and positive shift of voltammetric E1/2 in the CV studies are in favour of intercalative binding. CD spectra of 1 showed an increase in molar ellipticity (θ278) of the positive band with a minor red shift indicating the transition of B-form of DNA to A like form. DNA cleavage studies of complexes 1 and 4 with pUC18 DNA were studied by gel electrophoresis and complex 4 cleaves supercoiled pUC18 DNA in an oxidative manner in the presence of H2O2 and on photo irradiation at 312 nm.

  9. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  10. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D. O.; Newman, Joseph A.; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40–200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors. PMID:25866208

  11. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), bot...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.......The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both...... encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U...

  12. The velvet family of fungal regulators contains a DNA-binding domain structurally similar to NF-κB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Luqman Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological development of fungi and their combined production of secondary metabolites are both acting in defence and protection. These processes are mainly coordinated by velvet regulators, which contain a yet functionally and structurally uncharacterized velvet domain. Here we demonstrate that the velvet domain of VosA is a novel DNA-binding motif that specifically recognizes an 11-nucleotide consensus sequence consisting of two motifs in the promoters of key developmental regulatory genes. The crystal structure analysis of the VosA velvet domain revealed an unforeseen structural similarity with the Rel homology domain (RHD of the mammalian transcription factor NF-κB. Based on this structural similarity several conserved amino acid residues present in all velvet domains have been identified and shown to be essential for the DNA binding ability of VosA. The velvet domain is also involved in dimer formation as seen in the solved crystal structures of the VosA homodimer and the VosA-VelB heterodimer. These findings suggest that defence mechanisms of both fungi and animals might be governed by structurally related DNA-binding transcription factors.

  13. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-01

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses.

  14. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, DK; Prasad, SK; Kumar, R; Hemalatha, S

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world's population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species) with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity) and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3- O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles. PMID:23569923

  15. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patel DK; Prasad SK; Kumar R; Hemalatha S

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world’s population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species) with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity) and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3- O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles.

  16. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DK Patel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world's population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3-O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles.

  17. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, D K; Prasad, S K; Kumar, R; Hemalatha, S

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world's population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species) with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity) and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3- O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles.

  18. Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Plant Cell Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Vogler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape and stability of a plant depend on the flexibility and integrity of its cell walls, which, at the same time, need to allow cell expansion for growth, while maintaining mechanical stability. Biomechanical studies largely vanished from the focus of plant science with the rapid progress of genetics and molecular biology since the mid-twentieth century. However, the development of more sensitive measurement tools renewed the interest in plant biomechanics in recent years, not only to understand the fundamental concepts of growth and morphogenesis, but also with regard to economically important areas in agriculture, forestry and the paper industry. Recent advances have clearly demonstrated that mechanical forces play a crucial role in cell and organ morphogenesis, which ultimately define plant morphology. In this article, we will briefly review the available methods to determine the mechanical properties of cell walls, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM and microindentation assays, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. But we will focus on a novel methodological approach, called cellular force microscopy (CFM, and its automated successor, real-time CFM (RT-CFM.

  19. Optical Property Analyses of Plant Cells for Adaptive Optics Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Yosuke; Murata, Takashi; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2014-04-01

    In astronomy, adaptive optics (AO) can be used to cancel aberrations caused by atmospheric turbulence and to perform diffraction-limited observation of astronomical objects from the ground. AO can also be applied to microscopy, to cancel aberrations caused by cellular structures and to perform high-resolution live imaging. As a step toward the application of AO to microscopy, here we analyzed the optical properties of plant cells. We used leaves of the moss Physcomitrella patens, which have a single layer of cells and are thus suitable for optical analysis. Observation of the cells with bright field and phase contrast microscopy, and image degradation analysis using fluorescent beads demonstrated that chloroplasts provide the main source of optical degradations. Unexpectedly, the cell wall, which was thought to be a major obstacle, has only a minor effect. Such information provides the basis for the application of AO to microscopy for the observation of plant cells.

  20. Antioxidant properties of some plants growing wild in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serteser, A.; Kargioglu, M.; Gok, V.; Bagci, Y.; Musa Ozcan, M.; Arslan, D.

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the antioxidant activity of 50% aqueous methanol extracts of 38 plants growing in the Afyonkarahisar province of Turkey were evaluated by various antioxidant assay, including free radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) scavenging and metal (Fe{sup 2}+) chelating activities. The methanolic fruit extracts of the Cornus and Morus species (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and DPPH scavenging activities, Fe{sup 2}+ chelating activity) and the methanolic leaf extracts of the Mentha species (DPPH scavenging activities) examined in the assay showed the strongest activities. These antioxidant properties depended on the concentration of samples. (Author) 30 refs.

  1. Commercially important properties of plants of the genus Plantago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The centuries-old experience of folk medicine, nutritional traditions, and the results of numerous research studies show that plants of the genus Plantago can be used for medicinal, cosmetic, dietetic, and ritual purposes. In the phytochemical composition of Plantago, there is an abundance of biologically active substances (among others, glycosides, flavonoids, polysaccharides, and vitamins exhibiting beneficial effects and, simultaneously, there is a low content of compounds that may exert a toxic effect. Scientific research has confirmed that Plantago plants have antioxidative, apoptosis-inhibiting, protective, healing-enhancing, spasmolytic, anthelmintic, and antimicrobial properties; they inhibit the development of some tumours, reduce the level of lipids in blood and inhibit tissue glycation. In phytotherapy, leaves, stems, and/or seeds of different plantain species are used. Plantago leaves and seeds are also used to manufacture creams, lotions, and face masks. Different parts of these plants (fresh plant material, extracts, or isolated substances are also used in human and animal nutrition. Plantain leaves can be eaten like lettuce or added to salads, fried in pastry, used to prepare a tea, juice, or wine. Its seeds are added to cakes, bread, breakfast cereals, ice cream, and drinks, or they are cooked like groats. Animals fed with plantain can live longer and are healthier, while meat derived from such animals is tastier and healthier to humans. Plantago seeds are readily eaten by cage birds. Plantain pollen, produced in large amounts (up to 20,000 pollen grains per 1 stamen of P. lancolata, can cause allergies in sensitive people. Due to a long flowering period of plants of the genus Plantago, the effect of the allergenic factor persists for many weeks. In Poland days with the maximum concentration of airborne plantain pollen most often occur in July.

  2. Triazolopyridyl ketones as a novel class of antileishmanial agents. DNA binding and BSA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosa; Bilbao-Ramos, Pablo; López-Molina, Sonia; Abarca, Belén; Ballesteros, Rafael; González-Rosende, M Eugenia; Dea-Ayuela, M Auxiliadora; Alzuet-Piña, Gloria

    2014-08-01

    A new series of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones has been synthetized by regioselective lithiation of the corresponding [1,2,3]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine at 7 position followed by reaction with different electrophiles. The in vitro antileishmanial activity of these compounds was evaluated against Leishmaniainfantum, Leishmaniabraziliensis, Leishmaniaguyanensis and Leishmaniaamazonensis. Compounds 6 and 7 were found to be the most active leishmanicidal agents. Both of them showed activities at micromolar concentration against cultured promastigotes of Leishmania spp. (IC₅₀=99.8-26.8 μM), without cytotoxicity on J774 macrophage cells. These two compounds were also tested in vivo in a murine model of acute infection by L. infantum. The triazolopyridine derivative 6 was effective against both spleen and liver parasites forms, while 7 was inactive against liver parasites. Mechanistic aspects of the antileishmanial activity were investigated by means of DNA binding studies (UV-titration and viscosimetry). Results have revealed that these active ligands are able to interact strongly with DNA [Kb=1.14 × 10(5)M(-1) (6) and 3.26 × 10(5)M(-1) (7)]. Moreover, a DNA groove binding has been proposed for both 6 and 7. To provide more insight on the mode of action of compounds 6 and 7 under biological conditions, their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by fluorescence titrations and UV-visible spectroscopy. The quenching constants and binding parameters were determined. Triazolopyridine ketones 6 and 7 have exhibited significant affinity towards BSA [Kb=2.5 × 10(4)M(-1) (6) and 1.9 × 10(4)M(-1) (7)]. Finally, to identify the binding location of compounds 6 and 7 on the BSA, competitive binding experiments were carried out, using warfarin, a characteristic marker for site I, and ibuprofen as one for site II. Results derived from these studies have indicated that both compounds interact at BSA site I and, to a lesser extent, at site II.

  3. Relationship of Structure and Function of DNA-Binding Domain in Vitamin D Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yan Wan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the structure of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the vitamin D receptor (VDR has been determined in great detail, the roles of its domains and how to bind the motif of its target genes are still under debate. The VDR DBD consists of two zinc finger modules and a C-terminal extension (CTE, at the end of the C-terminal of each structure presenting α-helix. For the first zinc finger structure, N37 and S-box take part in forming a dimer with 9-cis retinoid X receptor (RXR, while V26, R50, P-box and S-box participate in binding with VDR response elements (VDRE. For the second zinc finger structure, P61, F62 and H75 are essential in the structure of the VDR homodimer with the residues N37, E92 and F93 of the downstream of partner VDR, which form the inter-DBD interface. T-box of the CTE, especially the F93 and I94, plays a critical role in heterodimerization and heterodimers–VDRE binding. Six essential residues (R102, K103, M106, I107, K109, and R110 of the CTE α-helix of VDR construct one interaction face, which packs against the DBD core of the adjacent symmetry mate. In 1,25(OH2D3-activated signaling, the VDR-RXR heterodimer may bind to DR3-type VDRE and ER9-type VDREs of its target gene directly resulting in transactivation and also bind to DR3-liked nVDRE of its target gene directly resulting in transrepression. Except for this, 1α,25(OH2D3 ligand VDR-RXR may bind to 1αnVDRE indirectly through VDIR, resulting in transrepression of the target gene. Upon binding of 1α,25(OH2D3, VDR can transactivate and transrepress its target genes depending on the DNA motif that DBD binds.

  4. Investigating the rheological properties of native plant latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Georg; Friedrich, Christian; Gillig, Carina; Vollrath, Fritz; Speck, Thomas; Holland, Chris

    2014-01-06

    Plant latex, the source of natural rubber, has been of interest to mankind for millennia, with much of the research on its rheological (flow) properties focused towards industrial application. However, little is known regarding the rheology of the native material as produced by the plant, a key factor in determining latex's biological functions. In this study, we outline a method for rheological comparison between native latices that requires a minimum of preparatory steps. Our approach provides quantitative insights into the coagulation mechanisms of Euphorbia and Ficus latex allowing interpretation within a comparative evolutionary framework. Our findings reveal that in laboratory conditions both latices behave like non-Newtonian materials with the coagulation of Euphorbia latex being mediated by a slow evaporative process (more than 60 min), whereas Ficus appears to use additional biochemical components to increase the rate of coagulation (more than 30 min). Based on these results, we propose two different primary defensive roles for latex in these plants: the delivery of anti-herbivory compounds (Euphorbia) and rapid wound healing (Ficus).

  5. SODs, DNA binding and cleavage studies of new Mn(III) complexes with 2-((3-(benzyloxy)pyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, L.; Shivaprasad, K.; Revanasiddappa, Hosakere D.

    2013-04-01

    Newly synthesized ligand [2-((3-(benzyloxy)pyridin-2-ylimino)methyl)phenol] (Bpmp) react with manganese(II) to form mononuclear complexes [Mn(phen)(Bpmp)(CH3COO)(H2O)]·4H2O (1), (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and [Mn(Bpmp)2(CH3COO)(H2O)]·5H2O (2). These complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, Mass, UV-vis spectral studies. Molar conductance and thermogravimetric analysis of these complexes were also recorded. The in vitro SOD mimic activity of Mn(III) complexes were carried out and obtained with good result. The DNA-binding properties of the complexes 1 and 2 were investigated by UV-spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The spectral results suggest that the complexes 1 and 2 can bind to Calf thymus DNA by intercalation mode. The cleavage properties of these complexes with super coiled pUC19 have been studied using the gel electrophoresis method, wherein both complexes 1 and 2 displayed chemical nuclease activity in the absence and presence of H2O2via an oxidative mechanism. All the complexes inhibit the growth of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria to competent level. The MIC was determined by microtiter method.

  6. Thermostable and site-specific DNA binding of the gene product ORF56 from the Sulfolobus islandicus plasmid pRN1, a putative archael plasmid copy control protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Stegert, Mario; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    There is still a lack of information on the specific characteristics of DNA-binding proteins from hyperthermophiles. Here we report on the product of the gene orf56 from plasmid pRN1 of the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. orf56 has not been characterised yet but low sequence similarily to several eubacterial plasmid-encoded genes suggests that this 6.5 kDa protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. The DNA-binding properties of ORF56, expressed in Escherichia coli, have been investigated by EMSA experiments and by fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Recombinant ORF56 binds to double-stranded DNA, specifically to an inverted repeat located within the promoter of orf56. Binding to this site could down-regulate transcription of the orf56 gene and also of the overlapping orf904 gene, encoding the putative initiator protein of plasmid replication. By gel filtration and chemical crosslinking we have shown that ORF56 is a dimeric protein. Stoichiometric fluorescence anisotropy titrations further indicate that ORF56 binds as a tetramer to the inverted repeat of its target binding site. CD spectroscopy points to a significant increase in ordered secondary structure of ORF56 upon binding DNA. ORF56 binds without apparent cooperativity to its target DNA with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range. Quantitative analysis of binding isotherms performed at various salt concentrations and at different temperatures indicates that approximately seven ions are released upon complex formation and that complex formation is accompanied by a change in heat capacity of –6.2 kJ/mol. Furthermore, recombinant ORF56 proved to be highly thermostable and is able to bind DNA up to 85°C. PMID:11160922

  7. Research on Intellectual Property Rights Protection of Agricultural Plant Genetic Resources in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of definition of agricultural plant genetic resources,this paper takes the two most important forms of intellectual property protection regarding agricultural plant genetic resources-patent rights and new plant variety rights as an example,to expound the current situation of intellectual property protection of agricultural plant genetic resources in China.It reveals the problems of intellectual property protection as follows:the awareness of intellectual property protection of agricultural plant genetic resources is weak;the system of laws and regulations is not sound;the protection system is not perfect;the management system lacks standardization.It further puts forward corresponding countermeasures and suggestions as follows:promote the protection awareness of agricultural plant genetic resources in whole society;enact special law system to protect agricultural plant genetic resources;improve the management system of agricultural plant genetic resources;strengthen the international protection of agricultural plant genetic resources in China.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  9. Cloning of a DNA-binding protein that interacts with the ethylene-responsive enhancer element of the carnation GST1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, J M; Woodson, W R

    1996-07-01

    Ethylene transcriptionally activates a glutathione S-transferase gene (GST1) at the onset of the senescence program in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals. A 126 bp region of the GST1 promoter sequence has been identified as an ethylene-responsive enhancer element (ERE). In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of nuclear proteins from senescing petals to recognize a 22 bp sequence within the ERE (ERE oligonucleotide). Mutation of the ERE oligonucleotide sequence significantly alters the strength of this nuclear protein-DNA association. The wild-type ERE oligonucleotide sequence was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. Nucleotide sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of this cDNA predicted a 32 kDa protein which we have designated carnation ethylene-responsive element-binding protein-1 (CEBP-1). The mRNA expression pattern of CEBP-1 suggests that it is not transcriptionally regulated by ethylene. The amino acid sequence homology of CEBP-1 with other plant nucleic acid binding proteins indicates a conserved nucleic acid binding domain. Within this domain are two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs, RNP-1 and RNP-2. An acidic region and a putative nuclear localization signal are also identified.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  11. Hyperphosphorylation by cyclin B/CDK1 in mitosis resets CUX1 DNA binding clock at each cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansregret, Laurent; Gallo, David; Santaguida, Marianne; Leduy, Lam; Harada, Ryoko; Nepveu, Alain

    2010-10-22

    The p110 CUX1 homeodomain protein participates in the activation of DNA replication genes in part by increasing the affinity of E2F factors for the promoters of these genes. CUX1 expression is very weak in quiescent cells and increases during G(1). Biochemical activities associated with transcriptional activation by CUX1 are potentiated by post-translational modifications in late G(1), notably a proteolytic processing event that generates p110 CUX1. Constitutive expression of p110 CUX1, as observed in some transformed cells, leads to accelerated entry into the S phase. In this study, we investigated the post-translation regulation of CUX1 during mitosis and the early G(1) phases of proliferating cells. We observed a major electrophoretic mobility shift and a complete inhibition of DNA binding during mitosis. We show that cyclin B/CDK1 interacts with CUX1 and phosphorylates it at multiple sites. Serine to alanine replacement mutations at 10 SP dipeptide sites were required to restore DNA binding in mitosis. Passage into G(1) was associated with the degradation of some p110 CUX1 proteins, and the remaining proteins were gradually dephosphorylated. Indirect immunofluorescence and subfractionation assays using a phospho-specific antibody showed that most of the phosphorylated protein remained in the cytoplasm, whereas the dephosphorylated protein was preferentially located in the nucleus. Globally, our results indicate that the hyperphosphorylation of CUX1 by cyclin B/CDK1 inhibits its DNA binding activity in mitosis and interferes with its nuclear localization following cell division and formation of the nuclear membrane, whereas dephosphorylation and de novo synthesis contribute to gradually restore CUX1 expression and activity in G(1).

  12. Evaluation of a modular strategy for the construction of novel polydactyl zinc finger DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, David J; Beerli, Roger R; Blancafort, Pilar; Dreier, Birgit; Effertz, Karin; Huber, Adrian; Koksch, Beate; Lund, Caren V; Magnenat, Laurent; Valente, David; Barbas, Carlos F

    2003-02-25

    In previous studies, we have developed a technology for the rapid construction of novel DNA-binding proteins with the potential to recognize any unique site in a given genome. This technology relies on the modular assembly of modified zinc finger DNA-binding domains, each of which recognizes a three bp subsite of DNA. A complete set of 64 domains would provide comprehensive recognition of any desired DNA sequence, and new proteins could be assembled by any laboratory in a matter of hours. However, a critical parameter for this approach is the extent to which each domain functions as an independent, modular unit, without influence or dependence on its neighboring domains. We therefore examined the detailed binding behavior of several modularly assembled polydactyl zinc finger proteins. We first demonstrated that 80 modularly assembled 3-finger proteins can recognize their DNA target with very high specificity using a multitarget ELISA-based specificity assay. A more detailed analysis of DNA binding specificity for eight 3-finger proteins and two 6-finger proteins was performed using a target site selection assay. Results showed that the specificity of these proteins was as good or better than that of zinc finger proteins constructed using methods that allow for interdependency. In some cases, near perfect specificity was achieved. Complications due to target site overlap were found to be restricted to only one particular amino acid interaction (involving an aspartate in position 2 of the alpha-helix) that occurs in a minority of cases. As this is the first report of target site selection for designed, well characterized 6-finger proteins, unique insights are discussed concerning the relationship of protein length and specificity. These results have important implications for the design of proteins that can recognize extended DNA sequences, as well as provide insights into the general rules of recognition for naturally occurring zinc finger proteins.

  13. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe B; White, Malcolm F; Peng, Xu

    2015-06-19

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5' → 3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition to the previously demonstrated ssDNA endonuclease activity. Further, in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated interactions between gp17 and gp18 and between gp18 and gp19 with the former being mediated by the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of gp17. The strand-displacement replication mode proposed previously for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.

  14. In silico engineering and optimization of Transcription Activator-Like Effectors and their derivatives for improved DNA binding predictions.

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2015-12-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) can be used as adaptable DNAbinding modules to create site-specific chimeric nucleases or synthetic transcriptional regulators. The central repeat domain mediates specific DNA binding via hypervariable repeat di-residues (RVDs). This DNA-Binding Domain can be engineered to bind preferentially to any user-selected DNA sequence if engineered appropriately. Therefore, TALEs and their derivatives have become indispensable molecular tools in site-specific manipulation of genes and genomes. This thesis revolves around two problems: in silico design and improved binding site prediction of TALEs. In the first part, a study is shown where TALEs are successfully designed in silico and validated in laboratory to yield the anticipated effects on selected genes. Software is developed to accompany the process of designing and prediction of binding sites. I expanded the functionality of the software to be used as a more generic set of tools for the design, target and offtarget searching. Part two contributes a method and associated toolkit developed to allow users to design in silico optimized synthetic TALEs with user-defined specificities for various experimental purposes. This method is based on a mutual relationship of three consecutive tandem repeats in the DNA-binding domain. This approach revealed positional and compositional bias behind the binding of TALEs to DNA. In conclusion, I developed methods, approaches, and software to enhance the functionality of synthetic TALEs, which should improve understanding of TALEs biology and will further advance genome-engineering applications in various organisms and cell types.

  15. Characterization of exceptionally thermostable single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickiewicz Małgorzata

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in SSBs because they find numerous applications in diverse molecular biology and analytical methods. Results We report the characterization of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs from the thermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (TmaSSB and Thermotoga neapolitana (TneSSB. They are the smallest known bacterial SSB proteins, consisting of 141 and 142 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 16.30 and 16.58 kDa, respectively. The similarity between amino acid sequences of these proteins is very high: 90% identity and 95% similarity. Surprisingly, both TmaSSB and TneSSB possess a quite low sequence similarity to Escherichia coli SSB (36 and 35% identity, 55 and 56% similarity, respectively. They are functional as homotetramers containing one single-stranded DNA binding domain (OB-fold in each monomer. Agarose mobility assays indicated that the ssDNA-binding site for both proteins is salt independent, and fluorescence spectroscopy resulted in a size of 68 ± 2 nucleotides. The half-lives of TmaSSB and TneSSB were 10 h and 12 h at 100°C, respectively. When analysed by differential scanning microcalorimetry (DSC the melting temperature (Tm was 109.3°C and 112.5°C for TmaSSB and TneSSB, respectively. Conclusion The results showed that TmaSSB and TneSSB are the most thermostable SSB proteins identified to date, offering an attractive alternative to TaqSSB and TthSSB in molecular biology applications, especially with using high temperature e. g. polymerase chain reaction (PCR.

  16. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary studies of the DNA-binding domain Za from ADAR1 complexed to left-handed DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T; Shafer, K; Lowenhaupt, K; Hanlon, E; Herbert, A; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    The proteolytically defined Z-DNA binding domain Za of human adenosine deaminase type 1 (hADAR1) has been crystallized in complex with the DNA oligomer d(TCGCGCG). The crystals were obtained from a solution containing ammonium sulfate as precipitating agent and belong to the tetragonal space group P4212. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The unit-cell dimensions are a = b = 85.9, c = 71.3 A. A Raman spectrum of the complex indicates that the DNA in the complex adopts the left-handed Z conformation.

  18. High-resolution detection of DNA binding sites of the global transcriptional regulator GlxR in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungwirth, Britta; Sala, Claudia; Kohl, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    mapping of these data on the genome sequence of C. glutamicum, 107 enriched DNA fragments were detected from cells grown with glucose as carbon source. GlxR binding sites were identified in the sequence of 79 enriched DNA fragments, of which 21 sites were not previously reported. Electrophoretic mobility...... of the 6C non-coding RNA gene and to non-canonical DNA binding sites within protein-coding regions. The present study underlines the dynamics within the GlxR regulon by identifying in vivo targets during growth on glucose and contributes to the expansion of knowledge of this important transcriptional...

  19. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARREDDULA RAJA; AKKILI SUSEELAMMA; KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula [La(BPAH)₂(NO₃)₃] and [Ce(BPAH)₂(NO₃)(H₂O)₂] 2NO₃.H₂O (where, BPAH = 2-benzoylpyridine acetyl hydrazone), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction and Hirschfeld studies. The central metal ion is 12-coordinate in lanthanum complex and 10-coordinated in the cerium complex. The coordination polyhedra around the lanthanum and cerium were found to have distorted icosahedron and distorted bicapped square antiprism respectively. DNA binding and nuclease activity of these complexes were also investigated in the present work.

  20. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François (Ottawa Hosp.); (Ottawa); (NWU)

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  1. Solution structure of the ETS domain from murine Ets-1: a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, L W; Petersen, J.M.; Graves, B J; McIntosh, L. P.

    1996-01-01

    Ets-1 is the prototypic member of the ets family of transcription factors. This family is characterized by the conserved ETS domain that mediates specific DNA binding. Using NMR methods, we have determined the structure of a fragment of murine Ets-1 composed of the 85 residue ETS domain and a 25 amino acid extension that ends at its native C-terminus. The ETS domain folds into a helix-turn-helix motif on a four-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet scaffold. This structure places Ets-1 in the win...

  2. DNA-binding proteins regulating pIP501 transfer and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Grohmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently found in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual role: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII, thereby indirectly increasing RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII. Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including filamentous streptomycetes and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter, which overlaps with the origin of transfer (oriT. The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4

  3. DNA-Binding Proteins Regulating pIP501 Transfer and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently detected in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual function: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and, in addition, prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII), which indirectly increases RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII). Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including Streptomyces and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter overlapping with the origin of transfer (oriT). The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4-like coupling

  4. FUNGICIDAL PROPERTIES OF ARTEMISIA AROMATIC PLANTS TOWARDS FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Iryna Vіctorovna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article establishes the fungicidal activity of water extracts of Artemisia maritimа L., Artemisia austriaca Jacq., under the concentration of 100, 50 and 25 mg/ml on dry matter with regard to the phytopathogenic mushroom Fusarium oxysporum. It also shows the fungistatic influence of extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. under concentration 25 and 50 mg/ml, fungicidal – under 100 mg/ml. Concerning Artemisia abrotanum L., the slow growth of mushroom is observed under the concentration 25 mg/ml, fungicidal effect – under 50 and 100 mg/ml. The paper provides the information on the component composition of ethereal oil and phenolic compounds of Artemisia maritimа, Artemisia austriaca, Artemisia abrotanum, Artemisia dracunculus, cultivated in Zhytomyr Polissya. The chief ingredients of ethereal oil which is synthesized by the plant of Artemisia abrotanum are 1,8-cineole (30.44% and camphor (31.92%. A high 1,8-cineole and camphor content determines antimicrobial properties of the plants. Amount of phenolic compounds in the air-dry raw Artemisia abrotanum is 2.98 percent. By the method of highly efficient solution chromatography (HESChr in the grass of Artemisia abrotanum we have detected 23 phenolic compounds, of which we identified such flavonoids as rutin, luteolin-7-glycoside as well as caffeic, chlorogenic and isochlorogenic acids. The main compounds of ethereal oil of Artemisia austriaca are trans-verbenole (30.77 %, pinocarvone (10.77 % and sabinilacetate (18.16 %. In the grass of Artemisia austriaca we have detected 31 phenolic compounds, of which we identified such flavonoids as rutin, apigenin, quercetin-bioside and the following acids: caffeic, chlorogenic, and isochlorogenic. Amount of phenolic compounds in the air-dry raw Austrian wormwood is 27.25 mg / g (2.73 %. The main component of ethereal oil of Artemisia dracunculus is methyleugenol (94.65 %. We have discovered 31 phenolic compounds in the grass of linear-leaved wormwood

  5. DNA binding of a non-sequence-specific HMG-D protein is entropy driven with a substantial non-electrostatic contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragan, Anatoly I; Klass, Janet; Read, Christopher; Churchill, Mair E A; Crane-Robinson, Colyn; Privalov, Peter L

    2003-08-22

    The thermal properties of two forms of the Drosophila melanogaster HMG-D protein, with and without its highly basic 26 residue C-terminal tail (D100 and D74) and the thermodynamics of their non-sequence-specific interaction with linear DNA duplexes were studied using scanning and titration microcalorimetry, spectropolarimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and FRET techniques at different temperatures and salt concentrations. It was shown that the C-terminal tail of D100 is unfolded at all temperatures, whilst the state of the globular part depends on temperature in a rather complex way, being completely folded only at temperatures close to 0 degrees C and unfolding with significant heat absorption at temperatures below those of the gross denaturational changes. The association constant and thus Gibbs energy of binding for D100 is much greater than for D74 but the enthalpies of their association are similar and are large and positive, i.e. DNA binding is a completely entropy-driven process. The positive entropy of association is due to release of counterions and dehydration upon forming the protein/DNA complex. Ionic strength variation showed that electrostatic interactions play an important but not exclusive role in the DNA binding of the globular part of this non-sequence-specific protein, whilst binding of the positively charged C-terminal tail of D100 is almost completely electrostatic in origin. This interaction with the negative charges of the DNA phosphate groups significantly enhances the DNA bending. An important feature of the non-sequence-specific association of these HMG boxes with DNA is that the binding enthalpy is significantly more positive than for the sequence-specific association of the HMG box from Sox-5, despite the fact that these proteins bend the DNA duplex to a similar extent. This difference shows that the enthalpy of dehydration of apolar groups at the HMG-D/DNA interface is not fully compensated by the energy of van der Waals interactions

  6. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheron, Jordan; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Dubost, Audrey; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Muller, Daniel; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five). This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads. PMID:27610110

  7. Fluorescent Pseudomonas strains with only few plant-beneficial properties are favored in the maize rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan VACHERON

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five. This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads.

  8. Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strains with only Few Plant-Beneficial Properties Are Favored in the Maize Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheron, Jordan; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Dubost, Audrey; Gonçalves-Martins, Maximilien; Muller, Daniel; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) enhance plant health and growth using a variety of traits. Effective PGPR strains typically exhibit multiple plant-beneficial properties, but whether they are better adapted to the rhizosphere than PGPR strains with fewer plant-beneficial properties is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that strains with higher numbers of plant-beneficial properties would be preferentially selected by plant roots. To this end, the co-occurrence of 18 properties involved in enhanced plant nutrition, plant hormone modulation, or pathogen inhibition was analyzed by molecular and biochemical methods in a collection of maize rhizosphere and bulk soil isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas. Twelve plant-beneficial properties were found among the 698 isolates. Contrarily to expectation, maize preferentially selected pseudomonads with low numbers of plant-beneficial properties (up to five). This selection was not due to the predominance of strains with specific assortments of these properties, or with specific taxonomic status. Therefore, the occurrence of only few plant-beneficial properties appeared favorable for root colonization by pseudomonads.

  9. Drosophila melanogaster "a potential model organism" for identification of pharmacological properties of plants/plant-derived components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Komal; Tiwari, Anand K

    2017-03-18

    Plants/plant-derived components have been used from ancient times to treat/cure several human diseases. Plants and their parts possess several chemical components that play the vital role in the improvement of human health and their life expectancy. Allopathic medicines have been playing a key role in the treatment of several diseases. Though allopathic medicines provide fast relief, long time consumption cause serious health concerns such as hyperallergic reactions, liver damage, etc. So, the study of medicinal plants which rarely cause any side effect is very important to mankind. Plants contain many health benefit properties like antioxidant, anti-aging, neuroprotective, anti-genotoxic, anti-mutagenic and bioinsecticidal activity. Thus, identification of pharmacological properties of plants/plant-derived components are of utmost importance to be explored. Several model organisms have been used to identify the pharmacological properties of the different plants or active components therein and Drosophila is one of them. Drosophila melanogaster "fruit fly" is a well understood, high-throughput model organism being used more than 110 years to study the different biological aspects related to the development and diseases. Most of the developmental and cell signaling pathways and ∼75% human disease-related genes are conserved between human and Drosophila. Using Drosophila, one can easily analyze the pharmacological properties of plants/plant-derived components by performing several assays available with flies such as survivorship, locomotor, antioxidant, cell death, etc. The current review focuses on the potential of Drosophila melanogaster for the identification of medicinal/pharmacological properties associated with plants/plant-derived components.

  10. Symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus assayed on serradella plants

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    Mieczysława Deryło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus nodule isolates were compared to the standard slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strain USDA 3045. Lupine nodules isolates showed typical characteristics for bradyrhizobial strains and nodulated small seed legume, serradella (Ornithopus sativus, in tube test. We observed a permanent physiological segregation of the effective (Fix' and ineffective (Fix- symbiotic phenotype for all tested bradyrhizobial strains during the growth of serradella in plant tube test. The ultrastructural differences between Fix* and Fix serradella nodules were observed. Rapid and visible nodulation as well as easy assay of the reduction of acetylene make serradella a convenient system for studies of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strains in laboratory conditions.

  11. Antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of African medicinal plants

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    Ademola Zaid Aderolu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of Terminalia catappa, Psidium guajava, Alstonia boonei, Morinda lucida (M. lucida and Spondias mombin leave extracts using ethanol, petroleum-ether and aqueous media. Methods: The free radical 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydroazyl was used to measure scavenging activities of extracts, while phenolic and flavonoid content were estimated by spectrophotometry. Antibacterial screening of extracts was done by determining zone of inhibition using disc diffusion method. Plant extracts were tested against five strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. After sterilization, the discs were loaded with concentrations of broad spectrum ciprofloxacin, and prepared extract solutions of different concentrations were refrigerated for 24 h. Determination of minimum inhibitory concentration of extracts in the screening assay was according to micro-broth dilution, while determination of minimum bactericidal concentration was carried out by agar diffusion. Results: The highest radical scavenging effect was found in petroleum ether extracts of all the plants with M. lucida and Psidium guajava having the highest and lowest values respectively. Aqueous solvent recorded highest phenolic content in all extracts with the exception of M. lucida. Flavonoid content was extracted better from Alstonia boonei and M. lucida with ethanol, while aqueous solvent extracted more from the other plants. With exception of extracts from petroleum ether, all others exhibited varying levels of antibacterial activities against E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholera and Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions: This study proved that all crude extracts showed strong antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials, which qualified them as nutraceuticals in fish feed production.

  12. Screening Togolese medicinal plants for few pharmacological properties

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    Simplice D Karou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Terminalia macroptera Guill. et Perr. (Combretaceae, Sida alba L. (Malvaceae, Prosopis africana Guill et Perr. Taub. (Mimosaceae, Bridelia ferruginea Benth. (Euphorbiaceae, and Vetiveria nigritana Stapf. (Asteraceae are traditionally used in Togolese folk medicine to treat several diseases including microbial infections. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial, antioxidant, and hemolytic properties of the crude extracts of the above-mentioned plants. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial and the antioxidant activities were assayed using the NCCLS microdilution method and the DPPH free radical scavenging, respectively. Human A+ red blood cells were used to perform the hemolytic assay. Phenolics were further quantified in the extracts using spectrophotometric methods. Results: Minimal inhibitory concentrations in the range of 230-1800 μg/ml were recorded in the NCCLS broth microdilution for both bacterial and fungal strains with methanol extracts. The DPPH radical scavenging assay yielded interesting antioxidant activities of the extracts of P. africana and T. macroptera (IC 50 values of 0.003 ± 0.00 μg/ml and 0.05 ± 0.03 μg/ml, respectively. These activities were positively correlated with the total phenolic contents and negatively correlated with the proanthocyanidin content of the extracts. The hemolytic assay revealed that great hemolysis occurred with the methanol extracts of T. macroptera, S. longepedunculata, and B. ferruginea. Conclusion: These results support in part the use of the selected plants in the treatment of microbial infections. In addition, the plant showed an interesting antioxidant activity that could be useful in the management of oxidative stress.

  13. Plants genetic manipulation: an approach from intellectual property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Anisley Negrin; Rivero, Lazaro Pino

    2013-01-01

    From the end of the 20th century the Biotechnology has experimented a vertiginous advance so far, putting on approval concepts like bio-security and bioethics; becoming this way, the work with the genome of the plants, in a matter is worthy to be reconsidered by the juridical mark that regulates it, in order to moderate the norm to the new scientific context. The Intellectual Property, when recognizing patent rights on products that have incorporate biological material, as well as to the obtainer about the new vegetable varieties obtained, could mean an obstacle that impedes or hinder the access from the society to that product or that variety. In the same way is worthy of consideration, the fact that such products or varieties can be a risk for the human health or the Environment, and a monopoly of commercial exploitation for the holder of the patent or of the obtainer certificate. This study is about this topic; and valuation about aspects of Biotechnology related with the genome of the plants and their juridical protection, in the international sand as well in Cuba.

  14. DNA binding, antioxidant, cytotoxicity (MTT, lactate dehydrogenase, NO), and cellular uptake studies of structurally different nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes: synthesis, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, R; Kalaivani, P; Huang, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Dallemer, F; Natarajan, K

    2013-02-01

    Three new nickel(II) thiosemicarbazone complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectral, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In complex 1, the ligand 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehydethiosemicarbazone coordinated as a monobasic tridentate donor, whereas in complexes 2 and 3, the ligands salicylaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-4(N)-ethylthiosemicarbazone coordinated as a dibasic tridentate donor. The DNA binding ability of the complexes in calf thymus DNA was explored by absorption and emission titration experiments. The antioxidant property of the new complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed for the new complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. The new compounds overcome cisplatin resistance in the A549 cell line and they were also active in the HepG2 cell line. The cellular uptake study showed the accumulation of the complexes in tumor cells depended on the nature of the ligand attached to the nickel ion.

  15. Effects on differentiation by the promyelocytic leukemia PML/RARalpha protein depend on the fusion of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignani, F; Testa, U; Rogaia, D; Ferrucci, P F; Samoggia, P; Pinto, A; Aldinucci, D; Gelmetti, V; Fagioli, M; Alcalay, M; Seeler, J; Grignani, F; Nicoletti, I; Peschle, C; Pelicci, P G

    1996-01-01

    The block of terminal differentiation is a prominent feature of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and its release by retinoic acid correlates with disease remission. Expression of the APL-specific PML/RARalpha fusion protein in hematopoietic precursor cell lines blocks terminal differentiation, suggesting that PML/ RARalpha may have the same activity in APL blasts. We expressed different PML/RARalpha mutants in U937 and TF-1 cells and demonstrated that the integrity of the PML protein dimerization and RARalpha DNA binding domains is crucial for the differentiation block induced by PML/RARalpha, and that these domains exert their functions only within the context of the fusion protein. Analysis of the in vivo dimerization and cell localization properties of the PML/RARalpha mutants revealed that PML/RARalpha--PML and PML/RARalpha--RXR heterodimers are not necessary for PML/RARalpha activity on differentiation. We propose that a crucial mechanism underlying PML/RARalpha oncogenic activity is the deregulation of a transcription factor, RARalpha, through its fusion with the dimerization interface of another nuclear protein, PML. Images PMID:8890168

  16. Precise Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Genomic Location by Exonuclease Coupled Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP-exo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteau, Dominick; Rodrigue, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins play a crucial role in all living organisms by interacting with various DNA sequences across the genome. While several methods have been used to study the interaction between DNA and proteins in vitro, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) has become the standard technique for identifying the genome-wide location of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. However, the resolution of standard ChIP-seq methodology is limited by the DNA fragmentation process and presence of contaminating DNA. A significant improvement of the ChIP-seq technique results from the addition of an exonuclease treatment during the immunoprecipitation step (ChIP-exo) that lowers background noise and more importantly increases the identification of binding sites to a level near to single-base resolution by effectively footprinting DNA-bound proteins. By doing so, ChIP-exo offers new opportunities for a better characterization of the complex and fascinating architecture that resides in DNA-proteins interactions and provides new insights for the comprehension of important molecular mechanisms.

  17. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  19. Characterization of the single stranded DNA binding protein SsbB encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island.

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    Samta Jain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg(2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands.

  20. Pdx-1 regulation of the INGAP promoter involves sequestration of NeuroD into a non-DNA-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Shi, Wenjing; Hughes, Laura; Vinik, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Islet neogenesis-associated protein (INGAP) can enhance beta-cell mass to offset progression of diabetes. Identifying how transcription factors regulate INGAP gene expression could reveal key checkpoints governing islet neogenesis. Protein complex interactions at the INGAP promoter were detected using a beta-galactosidase reporter, these protein-DNA complexes being validated in competitive electrophoresis mobility shift assays. The relevance of the revealed promoter interactions was confirmed in small interfering RNA (siRNA) gene knockdown studies. Pdx-1 negatively regulates stimulation of the INGAP promoter by Pan-1/NeuroD. Independently, Pdx-1, Pan-1, and NeuroD bind to the INGAP promoter as revealed by electrophoresis mobility shift assay studies. In combination, Pdx-1 selectively displaces NeuroD from a DNA-binding complex with Pan-1 to form a non-DNA-binding unit. The importance of this interaction is shown in HIT cells that have a forced reduction of Pdx-1 expression. In siRNA/Pdx-1-depleted HIT cells, the interaction of Pan-1/NeuroD with the INGAP promoter is increased 6-fold. Furthermore, endogenous INGAP expression is detected in Pdx-1-depleted cells. These data reveal a dynamic interaction between Pdx-1, NeuroD, and Pan-1 for the regulation of INGAP promoter activity. Modulating molecular regulators of DNA expression may be a consideration in diabetic therapies that translate exogenous stimuli into new endogenous beta-cell mass.

  1. Conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins: relationships with precomplex features and contributions to specificity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrabi, Munazah; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ahmad, Shandar

    2014-05-01

    Both Proteins and DNA undergo conformational changes in order to form functional complexes and also to facilitate interactions with other molecules. These changes have direct implications for the stability and specificity of the complex, as well as the cooperativity of interactions between multiple entities. In this work, we have extensively analyzed conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins by superimposing DNA-bound and unbound pairs of protein structures in a curated database of 90 proteins. We manually examined each of these pairs, unified the authors' annotations, and summarized our observations by classifying conformational changes into six structural categories. We explored a relationship between conformational changes and functional classes, binding motifs, target specificity, biophysical features of unbound proteins, and stability of the complex. In addition, we have also investigated the degree to which the intrinsic flexibility can explain conformational changes in a subset of 52 proteins with high quality coordinate data. Our results indicate that conformational changes in DNA-binding proteins contribute significantly to both the stability of the complex and the specificity of targets recognized by them. We also conclude that most conformational changes occur in proteins interacting with specific DNA targets, even though unbound protein structures may have sufficient information to interact with DNA in a nonspecific manner. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the Bloom syndrome complex to maintain normal replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongyi; Muniandy, Parameswary; Leo, Elisabetta; Yin, Jinhu; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Shen, Xi; Ii, Miki; Agama, Keli; Guo, Rong; Fox, David; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wilson, Lauren; Nguyen, Huy; Weng, Nan-ping; Brill, Steven J; Li, Lei; Vindigni, Alessandro; Pommier, Yves; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2010-09-15

    BLM, the helicase defective in Bloom syndrome, is part of a multiprotein complex that protects genome stability. Here, we show that Rif1 is a novel component of the BLM complex and works with BLM to promote recovery of stalled replication forks. First, Rif1 physically interacts with the BLM complex through a conserved C-terminal domain, and the stability of Rif1 depends on the presence of the BLM complex. Second, Rif1 and BLM are recruited with similar kinetics to stalled replication forks, and the Rif1 recruitment is delayed in BLM-deficient cells. Third, genetic analyses in vertebrate DT40 cells suggest that BLM and Rif1 work in a common pathway to resist replication stress and promote recovery of stalled forks. Importantly, vertebrate Rif1 contains a DNA-binding domain that resembles the αCTD domain of bacterial RNA polymerase α; and this domain preferentially binds fork and Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in vitro and is required for Rif1 to resist replication stress in vivo. Our data suggest that Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the BLM complex to restart stalled replication forks.

  3. Structural Evidence Suggests that the Antiactivator ExsD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a DNA binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhards, R.; Jing, X; Vogelaar, N; Robinson, H; Schubot, F

    2009-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa utilizes a type III secretion system (T3SS) to support acute infections in predisposed individuals. In this bacterium, expression of all T3SS-related genes is dependent on the AraC-type transcriptional activator ExsA. Before host contact, the T3SS is inactive and ExsA is repressed by the antiactivator protein ExsD. The repression, thought to occur through direct interactions between the two proteins, is relieved upon opening of the type III secretion (T3S) channel when secretion chaperone ExsC sequesters ExsD. We have solved the crystal structure of {Delta}20ExsD, a protease-resistant fragment of ExsD that lacks only the 20 amino terminal residues of the wild-type protein at 2.6 {angstrom}. Surprisingly the structure revealed similarities between ExsD and the DNA binding domain of transcriptional repressor KorB. A model of an ExsD-DNA complex constructed on the basis of this homology produced a realistic complex that is supported by the prevalence of conserved residues in the putative DNA binding site and the results of differential scanning fluorimetry studies. Our findings challenge the currently held model that ExsD solely acts through interactions with ExsA and raise new questions with respect to the underlying mechanism of ExsA regulation.

  4. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  5. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

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    Wenxin Du

    Full Text Available In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA, the protein-binding microarray (PBM and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq. The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  6. Single-nucleotide mutation matrix: a new model for predicting the NF-κB DNA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenxin; Gao, Jing; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a single nucleotide mutation matrix (SNMM) model based on the relative binding affinities of NF-κB p50 homodimer to a wild-type binding site (GGGACTTTCC) and its all single-nucleotide mutants detected with the double-stranded DNA microarray. We evaluated this model by scoring different groups of 10-bp DNA sequences with this model and analyzing the correlations between the scores and the relative binding affinities detected with three wet experiments, including the electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), the protein-binding microarray (PBM) and the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment-sequencing (SELEX-Seq). The results revealed that the SNMM scores were strongly correlated with the detected binding affinities. We also scored the DNA sequences with other three models, including the principal coordinate (PC) model, the position weight matrix scoring algorithm (PWMSA) model and the Match model, and analyzed the correlations between the scores and the detected binding affinities. In comparison with these models, the SNMM model achieved reliable results. We finally determined 0.747 as the optimal threshold for predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites with the SNMM model. The SNMM model thus provides a new alternative model for scoring the relative binding affinities of NF-κB to the 10-bp DNA sequences and predicting the NF-κB DNA-binding sites.

  7. Structural modeling and DNA binding autoinhibition analysis of Ergp55, a critical transcription factor in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanti P Gangwar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ergp55 protein belongs to Ets family of transcription factor. The Ets proteins are highly conserved in their DNA binding domain and involved in various development processes and regulation of cancer metabolism. To study the structure and DNA binding autoinhibition mechanism of Ergp55 protein, we have produced full length and smaller polypeptides of Ergp55 protein in E. coli and characterized using various biophysical techniques. RESULTS: The Ergp55 polypeptides contain large amount of α-helix and random coil structures as measured by circular dichorism spectroscopy. The full length Ergp55 forms a flexible and elongated molecule as revealed by molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and structural prediction algorithms. The binding analyses of Ergp55 polypeptides with target DNA sequences of E74 and cfos promoters indicate that longer fragments of Ergp55 (beyond the Ets domain showed the evidence of auto-inhibition. This study also revealed the parts of Ergp55 protein that mediate auto-inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE: The current study will aid in designing the compounds that stabilize the inhibited form of Ergp55 and inhibit its binding to promoter DNA. It will contribute in the development of drugs targeting Ergp55 for the prostate cancer treatment.

  8. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the STAT1 DNA-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezaki, Shunichiro; Yamada, Masafumi; Kato, Masahiko; Park, Myoung-Ja; Maruyama, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Chida, Natsuko; Ohara, Osamu; Kobayashi, Ichiro; Ariga, Tadashi

    2012-08-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a heterogeneous group of primary immunodeficiency diseases characterized by chronic and recurrent Candida infections of the skin, nails, and oropharynx. Gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 were very recently shown to be responsible for autosomal-dominant or sporadic cases of CMC. The reported mutations have been exclusively localized in the coiled-coil domain, resulting in impaired dephosphorylation of STAT1. However, recent crystallographic analysis and direct mutagenesis experiments indicate that mutations affecting the DNA-binding domain of STAT1 could also lead to persistent phosphorylation of STAT1. To our knowledge, this study shows for the first time that a DNA-binding domain mutation of c.1153C>T in exon 14 (p.T385M) is the genetic cause of sporadic CMC in two unrelated Japanese patients. The underlying mechanisms involve a gain of STAT1 function due to impaired dephosphorylation as observed in the coiled-coil domain mutations.

  9. Downregulation of Aedes aegypti chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7/Kismet by Wolbachia and its effect on dengue virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Sultan; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus imposing a significant burden on human health around the world. Since current control strategies are not sufficient, there is an urgent need to find alternative methods to control DENV transmission. It has been demonstrated that introduction of Wolbachia pipientis in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can impede DENV transmission with the mechanism(s) not fully understood. Recently, a number of studies have found the involvement of chromodomain DNA binding helicases in case of Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Influenza A virus infection. In this study, we have identified three chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein (CHD) genes in Ae. aegypti and looked at their response in the case of Wolbachia and DENV infections. Foremost amongst them we have found that AeCHD7/Kismet is significantly downregulated in the presence of Wolbachia infection only in female mosquitoes. Furthermore, AeCHD7 levels showed significant increase during DENV infection, and AeCHD7 depletion led to severe reduction in the replication of DENV. Our data have identified AeCHD7 as a novel Ae. aegypti host factor that is important for DENV replication, and Wolbachia downregulates it, which may contribute towards the mechanism(s) of limiting DENV replication. PMID:27827425

  10. CPP1, a DNA-binding protein involved in the expression of a soybean leghemoglobin c3 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Pallisgaard, Niels; Nielsen, Kirsten A.; Hansen, Anette Chemnitz; Larsen, Knud; Pihakaski-Maunsbach, Kaarina; Marcker, Kjeld A.; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2000-01-01

    Nodulin genes are specifically expressed in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We have identified a novel type of DNA-binding protein (CPP1) interacting with the promoter of the soybean leghemoglobin gene Gmlbc3. The DNA-binding domain of CPP1 contains two similar Cys-rich domains with 9 and 10 Cys, respectively. Genes encoding similar domains have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, the mouse, and human. The domains also have some homology to a Cys-rich region present in some polycomb proteins. The cpp1 gene is induced late in nodule development and the expression is confined to the distal part of the central infected tissue of the nodule. A constitutively expressed cpp1 gene reduces the expression of a Gmlbc3 promoter–gusA reporter construct in Vicia hirsuta roots. These data therefore suggest that CPP1 might be involved in the regulation of the leghemoglobin genes in the symbiotic root nodule. PMID:10859345

  11. 哺乳动物转录因子DNA结合谱%DNA-binding profiles of mammalian transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷光明; 王进科

    2012-01-01

    The differential gene expression is the molecular base of development and responses to stimuli of organisms. Transcription factors (TFs) play important regulatory roles in this kind of differential gene expression. Therefore, to elucidate how these TFs regulate the complex differential gene expression, it is necessary to identify all target genes of them and construct the gene transcription regulatory network controlled by them. DNA binding is a key step for TFs regulating gene transcription. Therefore, in order to identify their target genes, it is indispensable to identify all possible DNA sequences that can be recognized and bound by TFs at the molecular level of their interactions with DNA, i.e., construction of the DNA-binding profiles of TFs. In recent years, along with the development of DNA microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing techniques, there appeared some revolutionary new techniques for constructing DNA-binding profiles of TFs, which greatly promotes studies in this field. These techniques include ChlP-chip and ChlP-Seq for constructing in vivo DNA-binding profiles of TFs, dsDNA microarray, SELEX-SAGE, Bind-n-Seq, MMP-SELEX, EMSA-Seq, and HiTS-FLIP for constructing in vitro DNA-binding profiles of TFs. This paper reviewed these techniques.%基因差异表达是生物发育和对刺激作出应答的分子基础,转录因子在这种基因差异表达中发挥着重要的调控作用.因此,要弄清楚转录因子调控基因差异表达的机理,就必须鉴定出它们全部的靶基因并构建其操纵的转录调控网络.对基因组DNA的序列特异性结合是转录因子调控基因转录的关键环节.因此,要鉴定转录因子的靶基因,就必须从它们与DNA相互作用的分子水平,鉴定它们能够识别并结合的全部DNA序列,即转录因子DNA结合谱.近年来随着DNA微阵列芯片和高通量DNA测序技术的产生和快速发展,出现了建立转录因子体内及体外DNA结合谱的一系列革命性的

  12. Role of Structure-Based Changes due to Somatic Mutation in Highly Homologous DNA-Binding and DNA-Hydrolyzing Autoantibodies Exemplified by A23P Substitution in the VH Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozyr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-DNA autoantibodies are responsible for tissue injury in lupus. A subset of DNA-specific antibodies capable of DNA cleavage can be even more harmful after entering the living cells by destroying nuclear DNA. Origins of anti-DNA autoantibodies are not fully understood, and the mechanism of induction of DNA-cleaving activity remains speculative. The autoantibody BV04-01 derived from lupus-prone mouse is the only DNA-hydrolyzing immunoglobulin with known 3D structure. Identification and analysis of antibodies homologous to BV04-01 may help to understand molecular bases and origins of DNA-cleaving activity of autoantibodies. BLAST search identified murine anti-DNA autoantibody MRL-4 with sequences of variable region genes highly homologous to those of autoantibody BV04-01. Despite significant homology to BV04-01, not only MRL-4 had no DNA-cleaving activity, but also reversion of its unusual P23 mutation to the germline alanine resulted in a dramatic loss of affinity to DNA. Contrary to this effect, transfer of the P23 mutation to the BV04-01 has resulted in a significant drop in DNA binding and almost complete loss of catalytic activity. In the present paper we analyzed the properties of two homologous autoantibodies and mutants thereof and discussed the implications of unusual somatic mutations for the development of autoantibodies with DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity.

  13. Identification of residues of the Caenorhabditis elegans LIN-1 ETS domain that are necessary for DNA binding and regulation of vulval cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, Ginger R; Fantz, Douglas; Glossip, Danielle; Lu, Xiaowei; Saito, R Mako; Palmer, Robert E; Inoue, Takao; Van Den Heuvel, Sander; Sternberg, Paul W; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2004-08-01

    LIN-1 is an ETS domain protein. A receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway regulates LIN-1 in the P6.p cell to induce the primary vulval cell fate during Caenorhabditis elegans development. We identified 23 lin-1 loss-of-function mutations by conducting several genetic screens. We characterized the molecular lesions in these lin-1 alleles and in several previously identified lin-1 alleles. Nine missense mutations and 10 nonsense mutations were identified. All of these lin-1 missense mutations affect highly conserved residues in the ETS domain. These missense mutations can be arranged in an allelic series; the strongest mutations eliminate most or all lin-1 functions, and the weakest mutation partially reduces lin-1 function. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to demonstrate that purified LIN-1 protein has sequence-specific DNA-binding activity that required the core sequence GGAA. LIN-1 mutant proteins containing the missense substitutions had dramatically reduced DNA binding. These experiments identify eight highly conserved residues of the ETS domain that are necessary for DNA binding. The identification of multiple mutations that reduce the function of lin-1 as an inhibitor of the primary vulval cell fate and also reduce DNA binding suggest that DNA binding is essential for LIN-1 function in an animal.

  14. Molecular simulations of polycation-DNA binding exploring the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence in nuclear localization sequence based polycations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-10-10

    Gene therapy relies on the delivery of DNA into cells, and polycations are one class of vectors enabling efficient DNA delivery. Nuclear localization sequences (NLS), cationic oligopeptides that target molecules for nuclear entry, can be incorporated into polycations to improve their gene delivery efficiency. We use simulations to study the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence on the DNA-binding behavior of NLS-grafted polycations by systematically mutating the residues in the grafts, which are based on the SV40 NLS (peptide sequence PKKKRKV). Replacing arginine (R) with lysine (K) reduces binding strength by eliminating arginine-DNA interactions, but placing R in a less hindered location (e.g., farther from the grafting point to the polycation backbone) has surprisingly little effect on polycation-DNA binding strength. Changing the positions of the hydrophobic proline (P) and valine (V) residues relative to the polycation backbone changes hydrophobic aggregation within the polycation and, consequently, changes the conformational entropy loss that occurs upon polycation-DNA binding. Since conformational entropy loss affects the free energy of binding, the positions of P and V in the grafts affect DNA binding affinity. The insight from this work guides synthesis of polycations with tailored DNA binding affinity and, in turn, efficient DNA delivery.

  15. Ten1p promotes the telomeric DNA-binding activity of Cdc13p: implication for its function in telomere length regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Qian; Jianyong Wang; Na-Na Jin; Xiao-Hong Fu; Yi-Chien Lin; Jing-Jer Lin; Jin-Qiu Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential gene CDC13 encodes a telomeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein that interacts with Stnlp and Tenlp genetically and physically, and is required for telomere end protection and te-Iomere length control. The molecular mechanism by which Ten1 participates in telomere length regulation and chro-mosome end protection remains elusive. In this work, we observed a weak interaction of Cdc13p and Tenlp in a gel-filtration analysis using purified recombinant Cdc13p and Ten lp. Ten 1p itself exhibits a weak DNA-binding activity, but enhances the telomeric TG1-3 DNA-binding ability of Cdc13p. Cdc13p is co-immunoprecipitated with Ten1p. In the mutant ten1-55 or ten1-66 cells, the impaired interaction between Ten1p and Cdc13p results in much longer telomeres, as well as a decreased association of Cdc13p with telomeric DNA. Consistently, the Ten1-55 and Ten1-66 mutant proteins fail to stimulate the telomeric DNA-binding activity of Cdc13p in vitro. These results suggest that Ten1p enhances the telomeric DNA-binding activity of Cdc13p to negatively regulate telomere length.

  16. In vitro screening of plant lectins and tropical plant extracts for anthelmintic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-de Álvarez, L; Jackson, F; Greer, A; Bartley, Y; Bartley, D J; Grant, G; Huntley, J F

    2012-05-25

    Lectins are plant secondary metabolites (PSM) found in many forages and which may confer anthelmintic properties to gastrointestinal parasites through disrupting the development of parasitic larvae throughout its life cycle. In experiment 1, the ability of the plant lectins jacalin (JAC), concanavalin A (Con A), phytohemagglutinin E2L2 (PHA-E2L2), phytohemagglutinin L4 (PHA-L4), phytohemagglutinin E3L (PHA-E3L), kidney bean albumin (KBA), Robinia pseudoacacia agglutinin (RPA), Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA), Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MAA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) to disrupt the feeding of the first stage larvae (L(1)) of the sheep gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) Teladorsagia circumcincta, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis was investigated using a larval feeding inhibition test (LFIT). Only PHA-E3L, WGA and Con A had a potent effect on disrupting larval feeding of all of the three species of GIN investigated. The lectin concentration required to inhibit feeding in 50% of L(1) (IC50) was 7.3±1.2, 8.3±1.4 and 4.3±1.7 μg/ml for PHA-E3L; 59.1±32.4, 58.7±11.9 and 8.1±7.0 μg/ml for Con A and 78.9±11.2, 69.4±8.1 and 28.0±14.1 μg/ml for WGA for T. circumcincta, H. contortus and T. colubriformis larvae, respectively (P=0.006). The addition of the lectin inhibitors fetuin, glucose/mannose or N-acetylglucosamine for PHA-E3L, Con A and WGA, respectively, caused an increase in the proportion of larvae that had fed at all concentrations for PHA-E3L only. In experiment 2, the effect of extracts from the tropical plants Azadiractha indica, Trichanthera gigantea, Morus alba, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala on the feeding behaviour of H. contortus L(1,) was examined. A. indica, T. gigantea and M. alba failed to inhibit 50% of larvae from feeding at concentrations up to 10mg plant extract per ml. In contrast, both G. sepium and L. leucocephala demonstrated

  17. The bldC developmental locus of Streptomyces coelicolor encodes a member of a family of small DNA-binding proteins related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alison C; Servín-González, Luis; Kelemen, Gabriella H; Buttner, Mark J

    2005-01-01

    The bldC locus, required for formation of aerial hyphae in Streptomyces coelicolor, was localized by map-based cloning to the overlap between cosmids D17 and D25 of a minimal ordered library. Subcloning and sequencing showed that bldC encodes a member of a previously unrecognized family of small (58- to 78-residue) DNA-binding proteins, related to the DNA-binding domains of the MerR family of transcriptional activators. BldC family members are found in a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Constructed DeltabldC mutants were defective in differentiation and antibiotic production. They failed to form an aerial mycelium on minimal medium and showed severe delays in aerial mycelium formation on rich medium. In addition, they failed to produce the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin, and bldC was shown to be required for normal and sustained transcription of the pathway-specific activator gene actII-orf4. Although DeltabldC mutants produced the tripyrrole antibiotic undecylprodigiosin, transcripts of the pathway-specific activator gene (redD) were reduced to almost undetectable levels after 48 h in the bldC mutant, in contrast to the bldC+ parent strain in which redD transcription continued during aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. This suggests that bldC may be required for maintenance of redD transcription during differentiation. bldC is expressed from a single promoter. S1 nuclease protection assays and immunoblotting showed that bldC is constitutively expressed and that transcription of bldC does not depend on any of the other known bld genes. The bldC18 mutation that originally defined the locus causes a Y49C substitution that results in instability of the protein.

  18. Triplex DNA-binding proteins are associated with clinical outcomes revealed by proteomic measurements in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Laura D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in mammalian genomes can induce formation of alternative non-B DNA structures such as triplexes and guanine (G-quadruplexes. These structures can induce mutagenesis, chromosomal translocations and genomic instability. We wanted to determine if proteins that bind triplex DNA structures are quantitatively or qualitatively different between colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissue and if this binding activity correlates with patient clinical characteristics. Methods Extracts from 63 human colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissues were examined by gel shifts (EMSA for triplex DNA-binding proteins, which were correlated with clinicopathological tumor characteristics using the Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s rho, Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox log-rank tests. Biotinylated triplex DNA and streptavidin agarose affinity binding were used to purify triplex-binding proteins in RKO cells. Western blotting and reverse-phase protein array were used to measure protein expression in tissue extracts. Results Increased triplex DNA-binding activity in tumor extracts correlated significantly with lymphatic disease, metastasis, and reduced overall survival. We identified three multifunctional splicing factors with biotinylated triplex DNA affinity: U2AF65 in cytoplasmic extracts, and PSF and p54nrb in nuclear extracts. Super-shift EMSA with anti-U2AF65 antibodies produced a shifted band of the major EMSA H3 complex, identifying U2AF65 as the protein present in the major EMSA band. U2AF65 expression correlated significantly with EMSA H3 values in all extracts and was higher in extracts from Stage III/IV vs. Stage I/II colon tumors (p = 0.024. EMSA H3 values and U2AF65 expression also correlated significantly with GSK3 beta, beta-catenin, and NF- B p65 expression, whereas p54nrb and PSF expression correlated with c-Myc, cyclin D1, and CDK4. EMSA values and expression of all three splicing factors correlated

  19. Surface shapes and surrounding environment analysis of single- and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins in protein-DNA interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Sun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein-DNA bindings are critical to many biological processes. However, the structural mechanisms underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the residues shape (peak, flat, or valley) and the surrounding environment of double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) in protein-DNA interfaces. In the results, we found that the interface shapes, hydrogen bonds, and the surrounding environment present significant differences between the two kinds of proteins. Built on the investigation results, we constructed a random forest (RF) classifier to distinguish DSBs and SSBs with satisfying performance. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein interfaces, which will deepen our understanding of the specificity of proteins binding to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) or dsDNA (double-stranded DNA). Proteins 2016; 84:979-989. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bio-evaluation of South African plants for insecticidal properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maharaj, R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a serious health problem in South Africa affecting the lives of approximately 4 million people. Resistance to the principal vector, Anopheles arabiensis, has initiated a search for new plant-derived insecticides. Plants were selected...

  1. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Antiophidian properties of plant extracts against Lachesis muta venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RC De Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites comprise a serious health problem in several countries due to their global incidence, which exceeds 2.5 million per year, and the elevated number of victim fatalities. To counteract envenomations, antivenoms have been used regularly for more than a century. Apart from side effects including anaphylactic reactions, antivenoms are not able to efficiently neutralize local tissue damage, which contributes to increasing the severity and morbidity observed in patients. This fact, in turn, may be responsible for economic hardship, particularly in rural populations of developing countries. In the present work, we evaluated the antiophidian properties of 12 Brazilian plant extracts against the hemolytic, coagulant, hemorrhagic and proteolytic effects of Lachesis muta venom. Taken together, our data revealed that most of these aqueous products were capable of inhibiting those activities at different levels, except for Sapindus saponaria extract. In contrast, Stryphnodendron barbatiman extract completely neutralized all the analyzed biological activities. Thus, we may conclude that Brazilian flora may also be useful against L. muta accidents.

  3. Plant coilin: structural characteristics and RNA-binding properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Makarov

    Full Text Available Cajal bodies (CBs are dynamic subnuclear compartments involved in the biogenesis of ribonucleoproteins. Coilin is a major structural scaffolding protein necessary for CB formation, composition and activity. The predicted secondary structure of Arabidopsis thaliana coilin (Atcoilin suggests that the protein is composed of three main domains. Analysis of the physical properties of deletion mutants indicates that Atcoilin might consist of an N-terminal globular domain, a central highly disordered domain and a C-terminal domain containing a presumable Tudor-like structure adjacent to a disordered C terminus. Despite the low homology in amino acid sequences, a similar type of domain organization is likely shared by human and animal coilin proteins and coilin-like proteins of various plant species. Atcoilin is able to bind RNA effectively and in a non-specific manner. This activity is provided by three RNA-binding sites: two sets of basic amino acids in the N-terminal domain and one set in the central domain. Interaction with RNA induces the multimerization of the Atcoilin molecule, a consequence of the structural alterations in the N-terminal domain. The interaction with RNA and subsequent multimerization may facilitate coilin's function as a scaffolding protein. A model of the N-terminal domain is also proposed.

  4. Plant Polyphenols and Their Anti-Cariogenic Properties: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pinto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols constitute one of the most common groups of substances in plants. Polyphenolic compounds have been reported to have a wide range of biological activities, many of which are related to their conventional antioxidant action; however, increasing scientific knowledge has highlighted their potential activity in preventing oral disease, including the prevention of tooth decay. The aim of this review is to show the emerging findings on the anti-cariogenic properties of polyphenols, which have been obtained from several in vitro studies investigating the effects of these bioactive molecules against Streptococcus mutans, as well as in vivo studies. The analysis of the literature supports the anti-bacterial role of polyphenols on cariogenic streptococci, suggesting (1 a direct effect against S. mutans; (2 an interaction with microbial membrane proteins inhibiting the adherence of bacterial cells to the tooth surface; and (3 the inhibition of glucosyl transferase and amylase. However, more studies, particularly in vivo and in situ, are necessary to establish conclusive evidence for the effectiveness and the clinical applications of these compounds in the prevention of dental caries. It is essential to better determine the nature and distribution of these compounds in our diet and to identify which of the hundreds of existing polyphenols are likely to provide the greatest effects.

  5. Preliminary Crystallography Confirms that the Archaeal DNA-binding and Tryptophan-sensing Regulator TrpY is a Dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Cafasso; B Manjasetty; E Karr; K Sandman; M Chance; J Reeve

    2011-12-31

    TrpY regulates the transcription of the metabolically expensive tryptophan-biosynthetic operon in the thermophilic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. TrpY was crystallized using the hanging-drop method with ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 87, c = 147 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The possible packing of molecules within the cell based on the values of the Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) and analysis of the self-rotation function are consistent with the asymmetric unit being a dimer. Determining the structure of TrpY in detail will provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA binding, tryptophan sensing and transcription regulation at high temperature by this novel archaeal protein.

  6. Selective permeabilization of cervical cancer cells to an ionic DNA-binding cytotoxin by activation of P2Y receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Maurish; Deng, Han; Jones, Noelle; Towne, Zachary; Woodworth, Craig D; Samways, Damien S K

    2015-06-04

    Extracellular ATP is known to permeabilize certain cell types to polyatomic cations like YO-PRO1. Here, we report that extracellularly applied ATP stimulated rapid uptake and accumulation of an otherwise weakly membrane permeable fluorescent DNA-binding cytotoxin, Hoechst 33258, into cervical cancer cells. While ATP stimulated Hoechst 33258 uptake in 20-70% of cells from seven cervical cancer cell lines, it stimulated uptake in less than 8% of cervical epithelial cells obtained from the normal transformation zone and ectocervix tissue of 11 patients. ATP-evoked Hoechst 33258 uptake was independent of ionotropic P2X receptors, but dependent on activation of P2Y receptors. Thus, we show here that cervical cancer cells can be selectively induced to take up and accumulate an ionic cytotoxin by exposure to extracellular ATP.

  7. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  8. A full-length group 1 bacterial sigma factor adopts a compact structure incompatible with DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Edmund C; Shekhtman, Alexander; Dutta, Kaushik; Pratt, Matthew R; Cowburn, David; Darst, Seth; Muir, Tom W

    2008-10-20

    The sigma factors are the key regulators of bacterial transcription initiation. Through direct read-out of promoter DNA sequence, they recruit the core RNA polymerase to sites of initiation, thereby dictating the RNA polymerase promoter-specificity. The group 1 sigma factors, which direct the vast majority of transcription initiation during log phase growth and are essential for viability, are autoregulated by an N-terminal sequence known as sigma1.1. We report the solution structure of Thermotoga maritima sigmaA sigma1.1. We additionally demonstrate by using chemical crosslinking strategies that sigma1.1 is in close proximity to the promoter recognition domains of sigmaA. We therefore propose that sigma1.1 autoinhibits promoter DNA binding of free sigmaA by stabilizing a compact organization of the sigma factor domains that is unable to bind DNA.

  9. Synthesis of Diphenyl Pyridazinone-based flexible system for conformational studies through weak noncovalent interactions: Application in DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjeet Kumar; Praveen Singh; Archana Gaurav; Pratima Yadav; Ranjana S Khanna; Ashish Kumar Tewari

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports conformational studies of pyridazinone-based flexible dimer connected through diethylamine linker. The conformational studies have been done by X-ray crystal structure and DFT calculation. Further, after crystallization, the compound has shown two types of crystals, one is hydrated and another one is non-hydrated. The hydrated and non-hydrated crystals showed difference in their conformation due to the presence of water in crystal lattice of hydrated crystal. The difference in their conformation has been proved by crystallographic studies, DSC curves and detailed analysis of Hirshfeld surfaces and fingerprint plots facilitating a comparison of intermolecular interactions. Along with conformational studies, this compound also showed DNA binding, as revealed in docking simulation studies.

  10. Discovery of selective inhibitors of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 by targeting the enzyme DNA-binding cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Bradley R; Abdelmalak, Monica; Lopez, Sophia; Tender, Gabrielle; Yan, Chunli; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2016-07-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) processes protein/DNA adducts resulting from abortive DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) activity. TDP2 inhibition could provide synergism with the Top2 poison class of chemotherapeutics. By virtual screening of the NCI diversity small molecule database, we identified selective TDP2 inhibitors and experimentally verified their selective inhibitory activity. Three inhibitors exhibited low-micromolar IC50 values. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a common binding mode for these inhibitors, involving association to the TDP2 DNA-binding cleft. MM-PBSA per-residue energy decomposition identified important interactions of the compounds with specific TDP2 residues. These interactions could provide new avenues for synthetic optimization of these scaffolds.

  11. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-25

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  12. The Drosophila tissue-specific factor Grainyhead contains novel DNA-binding and dimerization domains which are conserved in the human protein CP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uv, A E; Thompson, C R; Bray, S J

    1994-06-01

    We have mapped the regions in the Drosophila melanogaster tissue-specific transcription factor Grainyhead that are required for DNA binding and dimerization. These functional domains correspond to regions conserved between Grainyhead and the vertebrate transcription factor CP2, which we show has similar activities. The identified DNA-binding domain is large (263 amino acids) but contains a smaller core that is able to interact with DNA at approximately 400-fold lower affinity. The major dimerization domain is located in a separate region of the protein and is required to stabilize the interactions with DNA. Our data also suggest that Grainyhead activity can be modulated by an N-terminal inhibitory domain.

  13. bZIP transcription factors in the oomycete phytophthora infestans with novel DNA-binding domains are involved in defense against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Huerta, Apolonio I; Judelson, Howard S

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control development and stress responses in eukaryotes. To date, only one bZIP has been described in any oomycete; oomycetes are members of the stramenopile kingdom. In this study, we describe the identification of 38 bZIPs from the Phytophthora infestans genome. Half contain novel substitutions in the DNA-binding domain at a site that in other eukaryotes is reported to always be Asn. Interspecific comparisons indicated that the novel substitutions (usually Cys, but also Val and Tyr) arose after oomycetes diverged from other stramenopiles. About two-thirds of P. infestans bZIPs show dynamic changes in mRNA levels during the life cycle, with many of the genes being upregulated in sporangia, zoospores, or germinated zoospore cysts. One bZIP with the novel Cys substitution was shown to reside in the nucleus throughout growth and development. Using stable gene silencing, the functions of eight bZIPs with the Cys substitution were tested. All but one were found to play roles in protecting P. infestans from hydrogen peroxide-induced injury, and it is proposed that the novel Cys substitution serves as a redox sensor. A ninth bZIP lacking the novel Asn-to-Cys substitution, but having Cys nearby, was also shown through silencing to contribute to defense against peroxide. Little effect on asexual development, plant pathogenesis, or resistance to osmotic stress was observed in transformants silenced for any of the nine bZIPs.

  14. SUMO-1 regulates the conformational dynamics of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase regulatory domain and competes with its DNA binding activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilebrecht Sebastian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG plays a dual role in base excision repair of G:U/T mismatches and in transcription. Regulation of TDG activity by SUMO-1 conjugation was shown to act on both functions. Furthermore, TDG can interact with SUMO-1 in a non-covalent manner. Results Using NMR spectroscopy we have determined distinct conformational changes in TDG upon either covalent sumoylation on lysine 330 or intermolecular SUMO-1 binding through a unique SUMO-binding motif (SBM localized in the C-terminal region of TDG. The non-covalent SUMO-1 binding induces a conformational change of the TDG amino-terminal regulatory domain (RD. Such conformational dynamics do not exist with covalent SUMO-1 attachment and could potentially play a broader role in the regulation of TDG functions for instance during transcription. Both covalent and non-covalent processes activate TDG G:U repair similarly. Surprisingly, despite a dissociation of the SBM/SUMO-1 complex in presence of a DNA substrate, SUMO-1 preserves its ability to stimulate TDG activity indicating that the non-covalent interactions are not directly involved in the regulation of TDG activity. SUMO-1 instead acts, as demonstrated here, indirectly by competing with the regulatory domain of TDG for DNA binding. Conclusions SUMO-1 increases the enzymatic turnover of TDG by overcoming the product-inhibition of TDG on apurinic sites. The mechanism involves a competitive DNA binding activity of SUMO-1 towards the regulatory domain of TDG. This mechanism might be a general feature of SUMO-1 regulation of other DNA-bound factors such as transcription regulatory proteins.

  15. Temporal pattern of AP-1 DNA-binding activity in the rat hippocampus following a kindled seizure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shomori, T. [Department of Neurology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho Okayama (Japan); Hayabara, T. [Clinical Research Institute, National Sanatorium Minamiokayama Hospital, 4066 Hayashima-cho (Japan); Ishihara, T. [Department of Neuropsychiatry, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho Okayama (Japan); Okada, S. [Department of Neurology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho Okayama (Japan); Akiyama, K. [Department of Neuropsychiatry, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho Okayama (Japan); Sato, K. [Clinical Research Institute, National Sanatorium Minamiokayama Hospital, 4066 Hayashima-cho (Japan); Kashihara, K. [Department of Neurology, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho Okayama (Japan)

    1997-07-28

    DNA binding by transcripton factor AP-1 was enhanced remarkably following kindling stimulation in rat amygdala. Maximum increase occurred 2 h after stimulation with return to baseline within 24 h. Supershift and western analyses revealed that 38,000 mol. wt Fos-related antigen and JunD were the main components of the evoked AP-1 complexes at the time their induction reached maximum. AP-1 induction 2 h after the last kindling stimulation was more prominent in samples from previously kindled rats than in those from non-kindled rats. This study sought to establish the role of AP-1 in plastic changes of the hippocampus associated with kindling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were kindled from the left amygdala until they exhibited Racine [15] class 5 generalized seizures. Nuclear proteins were extracted from dorsal hippocampi obtained from 0 to 24 h after final stimulations. From these, we evaluated the temporal pattern of DNA binding by AP-1 using a gel mobility-shift assay with a {sup 32}P-labelled AP-1 probe. Supershift and western analyses were added to investigate components of the seizure-evoked AP-1 complexes. Our results suggest that the basal level of AP-1 complexes is not associated with the seizure susceptibility in kindling. However, development of kindling appears to facilitate stimulus-evoked AP-1 induction, probably via plastic changes in the central nervous system. AP-1 may mediate such changes by regulating expression of certain genes. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. Characterization of transcriptional activation and DNA-binding functions in the hinge region of the vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Paul L; McDonnell, Donald P; Gewirth, Daniel T

    2005-02-22

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a ligand-responsive transcription factor that forms active, heterodimeric complexes with the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) on vitamin D response elements (VDREs). Both proteins consist of an N-terminal DNA-binding domain, a C-terminal ligand-binding domain, and an intervening hinge region. The length requirements of the hinge for both transcriptional regulation and DNA binding have not been studied to date for any member of the steroid hormone superfamily. We have generated a series of internal deletion mutants of the VDR hinge and found that deletion of as few as five amino acids from the C-terminus of the hinge significantly reduces transcriptional activation in vivo. Replacing deleted residues in the C-terminus of the hinge with alanines restored activity, indicating that this section of the hinge acts as a sequence-independent spacer. The hinge region of VDR forms a long helix, and the geometric consequences of this structure may explain the requirement of the hinge region for transcriptional activity. Interestingly, all of the deletion mutants, even those that do not activate transcription, bind VDREs with equal and high affinity, indicating that the defect in these mutants is not their ability to bind VDREs. In contrast to VDR, constructs of RXR containing deletions of up to 14 amino acids in the hinge region exhibit near wild-type transcriptional activity. The ability to delete more of the RXR hinge may be related to the additional plasticity required by its role as the common heterodimer partner for nuclear receptors on differing DNA elements.

  17. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ding

    Full Text Available Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI. The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ with an invariant glutamine (Q residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11 gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase.

  18. Antineoplastic DNA-binding compounds: intercalating and minor groove binding drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišković, Katarina; Bujak, Maro; Baus Lončar, Mirela; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica

    2013-12-01

    DNA intercalating and minor groove binding compounds are new weapons in the battle against malignant diseases. These antineoplastic agents target the DNA molecule and interfere with the cell cycle leading to rapidly proliferating cell death. They are mainly derivates of a naturally occurring organic compound derived from a microorganism or plant. Intercalators usually act as topoisomerase I and/or II poisons, while the mechanisms of DNA minor groove binders are a combination of several steps including topoisomerase poisoning. This paper gives an overview of some of the developed DNA intercalating and minor groove binding compounds, as well as an explanation of their chemical structures, origins, and application in chemotherapy.

  19. Surface structure and properties of plant seed oil bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzen, J T; Huang, A H

    1992-04-01

    Storage triacylglycerols (TAG) in plant seeds are present in small discrete intracellular organelles called oil bodies. An oil body has a matrix of TAG, which is surrounded by phospholipids (PL) and alkaline proteins, termed oleosins. Oil bodies isolated from mature maize (Zea mays) embryos maintained their discreteness, but coalesced after treatment with trypsin but not with phospholipase A2 or C. Phospholipase A2 or C exerted its activity on oil bodies only after the exposed portion of oleosins had been removed by trypsin. Attempts were made to reconstitute oil bodies from their constituents. TAG, either extracted from oil bodies or of a 1:2 molar mixture of triolein and trilinolein, in a dilute buffer were sonicated to produce droplets of sizes similar to those of oil bodies; these droplets were unstable and coalesced rapidly. Addition of oil body PL or dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, with or without charged stearylamine/stearic acid, or oleosins, to the medium before sonication provided limited stabilization effects to the TAG droplets. High stability was achieved only when the TAG were sonicated with both oil body PL (or dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine) and oleosins of proportions similar to or higher than those in the native oil bodies. These stabilized droplets were similar to the isolated oil bodies in chemical properties, and can be considered as reconstituted oil bodies. Reconstituted oil bodies were also produced from TAG of a 1:2 molar mixture of triolein and trilinolein, dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine, and oleosins from rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), rapeseed (Brassica napus), soybean (Glycine max), or jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis). It is concluded that both oleosins and PL are required to stabilize the oil bodies and that oleosins prevent oil bodies from coalescing by providing steric hindrance. A structural model of an oil body is presented. The current findings on seed oil bodies could be extended to the intracellular storage lipid

  20. /sup 32/P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.; Randerath, E.; Randerath, K.

    1984-02-01

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by /sup 32/P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-/sup 32/P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)phosphate transfer from (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(/sup 8/) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(/sup 5/) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for /sup 32/P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, /sup 32/P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity.

  1. Point mutations in the N-terminal domain of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43) compromise its stability, dimerization, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompeán, Miguel; Romano, Valentina; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Stuani, Cristiana; Baralle, Francisco E; Buratti, Emanuele; Laurents, Douglas V

    2017-07-14

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) performs multiple tasks in mRNA processing, transport, and translational regulation, but it also forms aggregates implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. TDP-43's N-terminal domain (NTD) is important for these activities and dysfunctions; however, there is an open debate about whether or not it adopts a specifically folded, stable structure. Here, we studied NTD mutations designed to destabilize its structure utilizing NMR and fluorescence spectroscopies, analytical ultracentrifugation, splicing assays, and cell microscopy. The substitutions V31R and T32R abolished TDP-43 activity in splicing and aggregation processes, and even the rather mild L28A mutation severely destabilized the NTD, drastically reducing TDP-43's in vitro splicing activity and inducing aberrant localization and aggregation in cells. These findings strongly support the idea that a stably folded NTD is essential for correct TDP-43 function. The stably folded NTD also promotes dimerization, which is pertinent to the protein's activities and pathological aggregation, and we present an atomic-level structural model for the TDP-43 dimer based on NMR data. Leu-27 is evolutionarily well conserved even though it is exposed in the monomeric NTD. We found here that Leu-27 is buried in the dimer and that the L27A mutation promotes monomerization. In conclusion, our study sheds light on the structural and biological properties of the TDP-43 NTD, indicating that the NTD must be stably folded for TDP-43's physiological functions, and has implications for understanding the mechanisms promoting the pathological aggregation of this protein. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  3. Influence of perennial plants on chemical properties of arid calcareous soils in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimian, N.; Razmi, K. (Shiraz Univ. (Iran))

    1990-10-01

    The authors conducted a study in Bajgah to determine the influence of perennial plants on some selected properties of soils formed on the highly calcareous parent material. The major plant genera were determined to be Agropyron, Artemisia, Astragalus, Dianthus, Eryngium, Peganum, Polygonum, Stipa, and Thymus. Tops of plants genera were found to be significantly different in ash, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Zn, and Cu; the concentration of Fe was not significantly different. The authors found the plants to differ significantly in their influence on soil properties. Peganum caused an accumulation of organic matter (OM) as high as 7% in the soil, in an environment where the soils typically contain less than 1% OM. Soil concentrations of P, K, Mn, Zn, and Cu were also found to vary significantly beneath different plant genera. They suggest these differences in OM accumulation were caused by plant litter. Concentration of Fe in the soils formed beneath different plant genera was statistically unchanged.

  4. Antioxidant properties of Mediterranean food plant extracts: geographical differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, S; Schmitt-Schillig, S; Müller, W E; Eckert, G P

    2005-03-01

    Locally grown, wild food plants seasonally contribute a considerable portion of the daily diet in certain Mediterranean areas and it has been suggested that the beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet on human health partly originate from the antioxidant effect of flavonoid-rich food plants. The nutrient content of most wild plants is higher than that of cultivated ones and may vary depending on the prevailing environmental conditions. Accordingly, three local Mediterranean plant foods (i.e. Cichorium intybus, Sonchus oleraceus, Papaver rhoeas) were collected in Greece (Crete), southern Italy, and southern Spain in order to assess possible differences in their in vitro antioxidant potential. The biological assays revealed diverse intra-plant specific antioxidant effects for the tested extracts ranging from no activity to almost complete protection. Furthermore, substantial differences in the polyphenol content were found for the nutritionally used part of the same plant originating from different locations. However, no clear correlations between the polyphenol content and the extracts' antioxidant activities were found. Taken together, the data suggest that certain local Mediterranean plant foods possess promising antioxidant activity and that the observed biological effects are possibly influenced by the geographically-dependent environmental conditions prevailing during plant growth.

  5. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  6. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  7. The UV-damaged DNA binding protein mediates efficient targeting of the nucleotide excision repair complex to UV-induced photo lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, J; Volker, M; Kool, H; Alekseev, S; Vrieling, H; Yasui, A; van Zeeland, AA; Mullenders, LHF

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies point to the XPC-hHR23B complex as the principal initiator of global genome nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, responsible for the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) in human cells. However, the UV-damaged DNA binding protei

  8. An ‘open’ structure of the RecOR complex supports ssDNA binding within the core of the complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Dehez, François; Round, Adam; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA repair is critical for cell survival and the maintenance of genome integrity. The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks within cells. Initiation of this pathway in bacteria can be carried out by either the RecBCD or the RecFOR proteins. An important regulatory player within the RecFOR pathway is the RecOR complex that facilitates RecA loading onto DNA. Here we report new data regarding the assembly of Deinococcus radiodurans RecOR and its interaction with DNA, providing novel mechanistic insight into the mode of action of RecOR in homologous recombination. We present a higher resolution crystal structure of RecOR in an ‘open’ conformation in which the tetrameric RecR ring flanked by two RecO molecules is accessible for DNA binding. We show using small-angle neutron scattering and mutagenesis studies that DNA binding does indeed occur within the RecR ring. Binding of single-stranded DNA occurs without any major conformational changes of the RecOR complex while structural rearrangements are observed on double-stranded DNA binding. Finally, our molecular dynamics simulations, supported by our biochemical data, provide a detailed picture of the DNA binding motif of RecOR and reveal that single-stranded DNA is sandwiched between the two facing oligonucleotide binding domains of RecO within the RecR ring. PMID:23814185

  9. Two residues in the basic region of the yeast transcription factor Yap8 are crucial for its DNA-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Catarina; Pimentel, Catarina; Matos, Rute G; Arraiano, Cecília M; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2013-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Yap8 is a key determinant in arsenic stress response. Contrary to Yap1, another basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) yeast regulator, Yap8 has a very restricted DNA-binding specificity and only orchestrates the expression of ACR2 and ACR3 genes. In the DNA-binding basic region, Yap8 has three distinct amino acids residues, Leu26, Ser29 and Asn31, at sites of highly conserved positions in the other Yap family of transcriptional regulators and Pap1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. To evaluate whether these residues are relevant to Yap8 specificity, we first built a homology model of the complex Yap8bZIP-DNA based on Pap1-DNA crystal structure. Several Yap8 mutants were then generated in order to confirm the contribution of the residues predicted to interact with DNA. Using bioinformatics analysis together with in vivo and in vitro approaches, we have identified several conserved residues critical for Yap8-DNA binding. Moreover, our data suggest that Leu26 is required for Yap8 binding to DNA and that this residue together with Asn31, hinder Yap1 response element recognition by Yap8, thus narrowing its DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore our results point to a role of these two amino acids in the stability of the Yap8-DNA complex.

  10. Vsx2 controls eye organogenesis and retinal progenitor identity via homeodomain and non-homeodomain residues required for high affinity DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Zou

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The homeodomain and adjacent CVC domain in the visual system homeobox (VSX proteins are conserved from nematodes to humans. Humans with missense mutations in these regions of VSX2 have microphthalmia, suggesting both regions are critical for function. To assess this, we generated the corresponding mutations in mouse Vsx2. The homeodomain mutant protein lacked DNA binding activity and the knock-in mutant phenocopied the null mutant, ocular retardation J. The CVC mutant protein exhibited weakened DNA binding; and, although the corresponding knock-in allele was recessive, it unexpectedly caused the strongest phenotype, as indicated by severe microphthalmia and hyperpigmentation of the neural retina. This occurred through a cryptic transcriptional feedback loop involving the transcription factors Mitf and Otx1 and the Cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1. Our data suggest that the phenotypic severity of the CVC mutant depends on the weakened DNA binding activity elicited by the CVC mutation and a previously unknown protein interaction between Vsx2 and its regulatory target Mitf. Our data also suggest that an essential function of the CVC domain is to assist the homeodomain in high-affinity DNA binding, which is required for eye organogenesis and unhindered execution of the retinal progenitor program in mammals. Finally, the genetic and phenotypic behaviors of the CVC mutation suggest it has the characteristics of a recessive neomorph, a rare type of genetic allele.

  11. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  12. A comparison between leaf dielectric properties of stressed and unstressed tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf dielectric properties influence microwave scattering from a vegetation canopy. The dielectric properties of leaves are primarily a function of leaf water content. Understanding the effect of water stress on leaf dielectric properties will give insight in how plant dynamics change as a result of

  13. A comparison between leaf dielectric properties of stressed and unstressed tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Emmerik, T.H.M.; Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Judge, J.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf dielectric properties influence microwave scattering from a vegetation canopy. The dielectric properties of leaves are primarily a function of leaf water content. Understanding the effect of water stress on leaf dielectric properties will give insight in how plant dynamics change as a result of

  14. The DNA-binding and bioactivity of rare earth metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wang, Bochu; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Liancai

    2013-08-01

    Recently more and more attention is paid to the rare earth metal complexes, because the properties of the rare earth metals are similar to those of the transition metals such as the similar atomic and the ionic radius. A large number of rare metal complexes were synthesized, and their bioactivities were also studied. This review highlights recent researches on the interaction of some rare earth metal complexes with DNA, analyzes how the configuration of the complexes influences the binding affinity, and focuses on the pharmacological activities of the complexes, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-virus.

  15. Nonadditivity in the recognition of single-stranded DNA by the schizosaccharomyces pombe protection of telomeres 1 DNA-binding domain, Pot1-DBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Johnny E; Altschuler, Sarah E; Grimm, Nicole E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2009-07-28

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe protection of telomeres 1 (SpPot1) protein recognizes the 3' single-stranded ends of telomeres and provides essential protective and regulatory functions. The ssDNA-binding activity of SpPot1 is conferred by its ssDNA-binding domain, Pot1-DBD (residues 1-389), which can be further separated into two distinct domains, Pot1pN (residues 1-187) and Pot1pC (residues 188-389). Here we show that Pot1pC, like Pot1pN, can function independently of Pot1-DBD and binds specifically to a minimal nonameric oligonucleotide, d(GGTTACGGT), with a K(D) of 400 +/- 70 nM (specifically recognized nucleotides in bold). NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis indicates that the overall structures of the isolated Pot1pN and Pot1pC domains remain intact in Pot1-DBD. Furthermore, alanine scanning reveals modest differences in the ssDNA-binding contacts provided by isolated Pot1pN and within Pot1-DBD. Although the global character of both Pot1pN and Pot1pC is maintained in Pot1-DBD, chemical shift perturbation analysis highlights localized structural differences within the G1/G2 and T3/T4 binding pockets of Pot1pN in Pot1-DBD, which correlate with its distinct ssDNA-binding activity. Furthermore, we find evidence for a putative interdomain interface on Pot1pN that mediates interactions with Pot1pC that ultimately result in the altered ssDNA-binding activity of Pot1-DBD. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the activity and regulation of SpPot1 at the telomere.

  16. Replacement of the C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317 to 314SSSM317) in interferon regulatory factor-2 alters its N-terminal DNA-binding activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna Prakash; Pramod C Rath

    2010-12-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2) is an important transcription factor involved in cell growth regulation, immune response and cancer. IRF-2 can function as a transcriptional repressor and activator depending on its DNA-binding activity and protein–protein interactions. We compared the amino acid sequences of IRF-2 and found a C-terminal tetrapeptide (314PAPV317) of mouse IRF-2 to be different (314SSSM317) from human IRF-2. Recombinant GST-IRF-2 with 314PAPV317 (wild type) and 314SSSM317 (mutant) expressed in Escherichia coli were assessed for DNA-binding activity with 32P-(GAAAGT)4 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Wild type- and mutant GST-IRF-2 showed similar expression patterns and immunoreactivities but different DNA-binding activities. Mutant (mt) IRF-2 formed higher-molecular-mass, more and stronger DNA–protein complexes in comparison to wild type (wt) IRF-2. Anti-IRF-2 antibody stabilized the DNA–protein complexes formed by both wt IRF-2 and mt IRF-2, resolving the differences. This suggests that PAPV and SSSM sequences at 314-317 in the C-terminal region of mouse and human IRF-2 contribute to conformation of IRF-2 and influence DNA-binding activity of the N-terminal region, indicating intramolecular interactions. Thus, evolution of IRF-2 from murine to human genome has resulted in subtle differences in C-terminal amino acid motifs, which may contribute to qualitative changes in IRF-2-dependent DNA-binding activity and gene expression.

  17. Role of cysteines in the stability and DNA-binding activity of the hypochlorite-specific transcription factor HypT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Drazic

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species are important components of the immune response. Hypochlorite (HOCl is produced by neutrophils to kill invading microorganisms. The bactericidal activity of HOCl is due to proteome-wide unfolding and oxidation of proteins at cysteine and methionine residues. Escherichia coli cells are protected from HOCl-killing by the previously identified dodecameric transcription factor HypT (YjiE. Here, we aimed to unravel whether HOCl activates HypT directly or via a reaction product of HOCl with a cellular component. Bacterial viability assays and analysis of target gene regulation indicate that HypT is highly specific to activation by HOCl and that no reaction products of HOCl such as monochloramine, hydroxyl radicals, or methionine sulfoxide activate HypT in vivo. Surprisingly, purified HypT lost its DNA-binding activity upon incubation with HOCl or reaction products that oxidize HypT to form a disulfide-linked dimer, and regained DNA-binding activity upon reduction. Thus, we postulate that the cysteines in HypT contribute to control the DNA-binding activity of HypT in vitro. HypT contains five cysteine residues; a HypT mutant with all cysteines substituted by serine is aggregation-prone and forms tetramers in addition to the typical dodecamers. Using single and multiple cysteine-to-serine mutants, we identified Cys150 to be required for stability and Cys4 being important for oligomerization of HypT to dodecamers. Further, oxidation of Cys4 is responsible for the loss of DNA-binding of HypT upon oxidation in vitro. It appears that Cys4 oxidation upon conditions that are insufficient to stimulate the DNA-binding activity of HypT prevents unproductive interactions of HypT with DNA. Thus, Cys4 oxidation may be a check point in the activation process of HypT.

  18. The individual and common repertoire of DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Corynebacterium efficiens, Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium jeikeium deduced from the complete genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Jörn

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Corynebacterium includes Gram-positive microorganisms of great biotechnologically importance, such as Corynebacterium glutamicum and Corynebacterium efficiens, as well as serious human pathogens, such as Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium jeikeium. Although genome sequences of the respective species have been determined recently, the knowledge about the repertoire of transcriptional regulators and the architecture of global regulatory networks is scarce. Here, we apply a combination of bioinformatic tools and a comparative genomic approach to identify and characterize a set of conserved DNA-binding transcriptional regulators in the four corynebacterial genomes. Results A collection of 127 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators was identified in the C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 genome, whereas 103 regulators were detected in C. efficiens YS-314, 63 in C. diphtheriae NCTC 13129 and 55 in C. jeikeium K411. According to amino acid sequence similarities and protein structure predictions, the DNA-binding transcriptional regulators were grouped into 25 regulatory protein families. The common set of DNA-binding transcriptional regulators present in the four corynebacterial genomes consists of 28 proteins that are apparently involved in the regulation of cell division and septation, SOS and stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and macroelement and metal homeostasis. Conclusion This work describes characteristic features of a set of conserved DNA-binding transcriptional regulators present within the corynebacterial core genome. The knowledge on the physiological function of these proteins should not only contribute to our understanding of the regulation of gene expression but will also provide the basis for comprehensive modeling of transcriptional regulatory networks of these species.

  19. Plant trait-species abundance relationships vary with environmental properties in subtropical forests in eastern china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Rong Yan

    Full Text Available Understanding how plant trait-species abundance relationships change with a range of single and multivariate environmental properties is crucial for explaining species abundance and rarity. In this study, the abundance of 94 woody plant species was examined and related to 15 plant leaf and wood traits at both local and landscape scales involving 31 plots in subtropical forests in eastern China. Further, plant trait-species abundance relationships were related to a range of single and multivariate (PCA axes environmental properties such as air humidity, soil moisture content, soil temperature, soil pH, and soil organic matter, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P contents. At the landscape scale, plant maximum height, and twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, whereas mean leaf area (MLA, leaf N concentration (LN, and total leaf area per twig size (TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. At the plot scale, plant maximum height, leaf and twig dry matter contents, twig and stem wood densities were positively correlated, but MLA, specific leaf area, LN, leaf P concentration and TLA were negatively correlated with species abundance. Plant trait-species abundance relationships shifted over the range of seven single environmental properties and along multivariate environmental axes in a similar way. In conclusion, strong relationships between plant traits and species abundance existed among and within communities. Significant shifts in plant trait-species abundance relationships in a range of environmental properties suggest strong environmental filtering processes that influence species abundance and rarity in the studied subtropical forests.

  20. Synthesis and DNA-binding properties of novel DNA cyclo-intercalators containing purine-glucuronic acid hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renshuai; Chen, Shaopeng; Wang, Xueting; Yu, Rilei; Li, Mingjing; Ren, Sumei; Jiang, Tao

    2016-06-24

    Novel DNA cyclo-intercalators, which incorporated two intercalator subunits linked by two bridges, were synthesized. Binding of the compounds to calf-thymus DNA was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, and docking simulations were used to predict the binding modes of these cyclic compounds. The spectral data demonstrated that all of these compounds can interact with CT-DNA. The sugar moiety played an important role in the process of binding between the intercalators containing glucuronic acid and DNA. The length and flexibility of the connecting bridges affected the binding affinity of the resultant cyclo-intercalators. Docking simulations showed that compounds 7 and 8 interact with DNA as mono-intercalators.

  1. A "coiled-coil" motif is important for oligomerization and DNA binding properties of human cytomegalovirus protein UL77.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sylvia Meissner

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV UL77 gene encodes the essential protein UL77, its function is characterized in the present study. Immunoprecipitation identified monomeric and oligomeric pUL77 in HCMV infected cells. Immunostaining of purified virions and subviral fractions showed that pUL77 is a structural protein associated with capsids. In silico analysis revealed the presence of a coiled-coil motif (CCM at the N-terminus of pUL77. Chemical cross-linking of either wild-type pUL77 or CCM deletion mutant (pUL77ΔCCM implicated that CCM is critical for oligomerization of pUL77. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitations of infected and transfected cells demonstrated that pUL77 interacts with the capsid-associated DNA packaging motor components, pUL56 and pUL104, as well as the major capsid protein. The ability of pUL77 to bind dsDNA was shown by an in vitro assay. Binding to certain DNA was further confirmed by an assay using biotinylated 36-, 250-, 500-, 1000-meric dsDNA and 966-meric HCMV-specific dsDNA designed for this study. The binding efficiency (BE was determined by image processing program defining values above 1.0 as positive. While the BE of the pUL56 binding to the 36-mer bio-pac1 containing a packaging signal was 10.0 ± 0.63, the one for pUL77 was only 0.2±0.03. In contrast to this observation the BE of pUL77 binding to bio-500 bp or bio-1000 bp was 2.2 ± 0.41 and 4.9 ± 0.71, respectively. By using pUL77ΔCCM it was demonstrated that this protein could not bind to dsDNA. These data indicated that pUL77 (i could form homodimers, (ii CCM of pUL77 is crucial for oligomerization and (iii could bind to dsDNA in a sequence independent manner.

  2. Fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy studies on the antioxidation and DNA binding properties of binuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; Jiang, Xinhui; Yang, Zhengyin; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Jianning; Zhou, Tianlin

    2010-09-01

    Tb(III) complexes were prepared from Tb(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O and four Schiff-base ligands derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxaldehyde with aroylhydrazines. X-ray crystal and other structural analyses indicate that Tb(III) and every ligand can form a binuclear Tb(III) complex with 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry and nine-coordination at the Tb(III) center. Viscosity titration experiments and fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes can bind to Calf thymus DNA through intercalation with the binding constants at the order of magnitude of 10(6)-10(7) M(-1), and they may be used as potential anticancer drugs, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups may have stronger antitumor activities. Antioxidation results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes have strong abilities of scavenging hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups show stronger scavenging effects on hydroxyl radicals and complexes containing N-heteroaromatic substituent show stronger scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. However, Tb(III) emission with these systems is not observed, for these ligands rather are quenchers and unable to sensitize this metal ion.

  3. MgaSpn and H-NS: Two Unrelated Global Regulators with Similar DNA-Binding Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Collado, Virtu; Hüttener, Mário; Espinosa, Manuel; Juárez, Antonio; Bravo, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Global regulators play an essential role in the adaptation of bacterial cells to specific niches. Bacterial pathogens thriving in the tissues and organs of their eukaryotic hosts are a well-studied example. Some of the proteins that recognize local DNA structures rather than specific nucleotide sequences act as global modulators in many bacteria, both Gram-negative and -positive. To this class of regulators belong the H-NS-like proteins, mainly identified in γ-Proteobacteria, and the MgaSpn-like proteins identified in Firmicutes. H-NS and MgaSpn from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae, respectively, neither have sequence similarity nor share structural domains. Nevertheless, they display common features in their interaction with DNA, namely: (i) they bind to DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner, (ii) they have a preference for intrinsically curved DNA regions, and (iii) they are able to form multimeric complexes on linear DNA. Using DNA fragments from the hemolysin operon regulatory region of the E. coli plasmid pHly152, we show in this work that MgaSpn is able to recognize particular regions on extended H-NS binding sites. Such regions are either located at or flanked by regions of potential bendability. Moreover, we show that the regulatory region of the pneumococcal P1623B promoter, which is recognized by MgaSpn, contains DNA motifs that are recognized by H-NS. These motifs are adjacent to regions of potential bendability. Our results suggest that both regulatory proteins recognize similar structural characteristics of DNA. PMID:27747214

  4. Copper(II) complexes with 4-hydroxyacetophenone-derived acylhydrazones: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Gökçe, Cansu; Aktürk, Selçuk

    2015-01-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes of Schiff base-hydrazone ligands, hydroxy-N‧-[(1Z)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]benzohydrazide [H3L1] and ethyl 2-(4-(1-(2-(4-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethoxy)benzoyl)hydrazono)ethyl)phenoxy)acetate (HL2) have been synthesized and then characterized by microcopy and spectral studies. X-ray powder diffraction illustrates that [Cu(L2)2] complex is crystalline in nature whereas [Cu(H2L1)2]·2H2O has an amorphous structure. Binding of the copper complexes with Calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by UV-visible spectra, exhibiting non-covalent binding to CT-DNA. DNA cleavage experiments have been also investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent (H2O2). The effect of complex concentration on the DNA cleavage reaction has been also studied. Both copper complexes show nuclease activity, which significantly depends on concentrations of the complexes, in the presence of H2O2 through oxidative mechanism whereas they slightly cleavage DNA in the absence an oxidative agent.

  5. Synthesis, DNA binding, fluorescence measurements and antiparasitic activity of DAPI related diamidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Kumar, Arvind; Say, Martial; Barghash, Alaa El-Din M; Goda, Fatma E; Eisa, Hassan M; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Liu, Yang; Mickelson, Leah; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2010-01-15

    A novel series of extended DAPI analogues were prepared by insertion of either a carbon-carbon triple bond (16a-d) or a phenyl group (21a,b and 24) at position-2. The new amidines were evaluated in vitro against both Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. r.) and Plasmodium falciparum (P. f.). Five compounds (16a, 16b, 16d, 21a, 21b) exhibited IC(50) values against T. b. r. of 9nM or less which is two to nine folds more effective than DAPI. The same five compounds exhibited IC(50) values against P. f. of 5.9nM or less which is comparable to that of DAPI. The fluorescence properties of these new molecules were recorded, however; they do not offer any advantage over those of DAPI.

  6. Synthesis, Cytotoxicity, DNA Binding and Apoptosis of Rhein-Phosphonate Derivatives as Antitumor Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yi Ye

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several rhein-phosphonate derivatives (5a–c were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against HepG-2, CNE, Spca-2, Hela and Hct-116 cell lines. Some compounds showed relatively high cytotoxicity. Especially compounds 5b exhibited the strongest cytotoxicity against HepG-2 and Spca-2 cells (IC50 was 8.82 and 9.01 µM, respectively. All the synthesized c