WorldWideScience

Sample records for plantar cutaneous mechanoreceptors

  1. Effect of plantar cutaneous inputs on center of pressure during quiet stance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that mechanical facilitation of sensation on the plantar soles enhanced postural stability in older adults. The results show that plantar cutaneous inputs provide information that leads to reduced postural sway in healthy older adults. This could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  2. Effects of reduced plantar cutaneous sensation on static postural control in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyeongtak; Kang, Tae Kyu; Wikstrom, Erik A; Jun, Hyung-Pil; Lee, Sae Yong

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how reduced plantar cutaneous sensation influences static postural control in individuals with and without CAI. A case-control study design. Twenty-six individuals with self-reported CAI and 26 matched healthy controls participated in this study. The plantar aspect of the participants' foot was then submersed in ice water (0°C) for 10min to reduce plantar sensation. Before and after the cooling procedure, plantar cutaneous sensation thresholds and single leg balance with eyes open and closed were assessed. Significantly, higher scores were observed in both groups after ice water submersion (ppostural control improvement in both groups post-cooling. In single limb balance with eyes closed, Group×Intervention interactions were observed for the TTB AP mean (p=0.003) and TTB AP SD (p=0.017); indicating postural control deficits in CAI group post-cooling, but no changes in the control group. The main finding of this study was that reduced plantar cutaneous sensation induced by an ice submersion procedure caused eyes closed postural control impairments in those with CAI but not healthy controls. The present investigation demonstrated that the ability to dynamically reweight among sensory inputs to maintain postural stability appears to be diminished in CAI patients compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Superficial plantar cutaneous sensation does not trigger barefoot running adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M A; Hoffman, K M

    2017-09-01

    It has long been proposed that the gait alterations associated with barefoot running are mediated by alterations in sensory feedback, yet there has been no data to support this claim. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the role of superficial plantar cutaneous feedback in barefoot and shod running. 10 healthy active subjects (6 male, 4 female); mass: 65.2+9.7kg; age: 27+7.1years participated in this study. 10 over-ground running trials were completed in each of the following conditions: barefoot (BF), shod (SHOD), anesthetized barefoot (ANEST BF) and anesthetized shod (ANEST SHOD). For the anesthetized conditions 0.1-0.3mL of 1% lidocaine was injected into the dermal layer of the plantar foot below the metatarsal heads, lateral column and heel. 3-dimensional motion analysis and ground reaction force (GRF) data were captured as subjects ran over a 20m runway with a force plate at 12m. Kinematic and kinetic differences were analyzed via two-way repeated measure ANOVAs. The differences in gait between the BF and SHOD conditions were consistent with previous research, with subjects exhibiting a significant decrease in stride length and changing from rearfoot strike when SHOD to fore/midfoot strike when BF. Additionally, BF running was associated with decreased impact peak magnitudes and peak vertical GRFs. Despite anesthetizing the plantar surface, there was no difference between the BF and ANEST BF conditions in terms of stride length, foot strike or GRFs. Superficial cutaneous sensory receptors are not primarily responsible for the gait changes associated with barefoot running. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. How plantar exteroceptive efficiency modulates postural and oculomotor control: inter-individual variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eFoisy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous experiment, we showed that among young and healthy subjects, thin plantar inserts improve postural control and modify vergence amplitudes. In this experiment, however, significant inter-individual variability was observed. We hypothesize that its origin could be attributed to a different reliance upon feet cutaneous afferents. In order to test this hypothesis, we re-analyzed the data relative to 31 young (age 25,7±3,8 and healthy subjects who participated in the first experiment after having classified them into two groups depending on their Plantar Quotient (PQ = Surface area of CoP foam / Surface area of CoP firm ground x100. Foam decreases the information arising from the feet, normally resulting in a PQ>100. Hence, the PQ provides information on the weight of plantar cutaneous afferents used in postural control. Twelve people were Plantar-Independent Subjects, as indicated by a PQ<100. These individuals did not behave like the Normal Plantar Quotient Subjects: they were almost insensitive to the plantar stimulations in terms of postural control and totally insensitive in terms of oculomotor control. We conclude that the inter-individual variability observed in our first experiment is explained by the subjects’ degree of plantar reliance. We propose that plantar independence is a dysfunctional situation revealing an inefficiency in plantar cutaneous afferents. The latter could be due to a latent somatosensory dysfunction generating a noise which prevents the CNS from correctly processing and using feet somatosensory afferents both for balance and vergence control: Plantar Irritating Stimulus. Considering the non-noxious nature and prevalence of this phenomenon, these results can be of great interest to researchers and clinicians who attempt to trigger postural or oculomotor responses through mechanical stimulation of the foot sole.

  5. The importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz-Montecinos, Carlos; Maas, Huub; Pellegrin-Friedmann, Carla; Tapia, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of cutaneous feedback on neural activation during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar flexors. Methods: The effects of cutaneous plantar anaesthesia were assessed in 15 subjects and compared to 15 controls,

  6. Simultaneous Disruption of Mouse ASIC1a, ASIC2 and ASIC3 Genes Enhances Cutaneous Mechanosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sinyoung; Jang, Jun Ho; Price, Margaret P.; Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Gong, Huiyu; Welsh, Michael J.; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Three observations have suggested that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) might be mammalian cutaneous mechanoreceptors; they are structurally related to Caenorhabditis elegans mechanoreceptors, they are localized in specialized cutaneous mechanosensory structures, and mechanical displacement generates an ASIC-dependent depolarization in some neurons. However, previous studies of mice bearing a single disrupted ASIC gene showed only subtle or no alterations in cutaneous mechanosensitivity. Because functional redundancy of ASIC subunits might explain limited phenotypic alterations, we hypothesized that disrupting multiple ASIC genes would markedly impair cutaneous mechanosensation. We found the opposite. In behavioral studies, mice with simultaneous disruptions of ASIC1a, -2 and -3 genes (triple-knockouts, TKOs) showed increased paw withdrawal frequencies when mechanically stimulated with von Frey filaments. Moreover, in single-fiber nerve recordings of cutaneous afferents, mechanical stimulation generated enhanced activity in A-mechanonociceptors of ASIC TKOs compared to wild-type mice. Responses of all other fiber types did not differ between the two genotypes. These data indicate that ASIC subunits influence cutaneous mechanosensitivity. However, it is unlikely that ASICs directly transduce mechanical stimuli. We speculate that physical and/or functional association of ASICs with other components of the mechanosensory transduction apparatus contributes to normal cutaneous mechanosensation. PMID:22506072

  7. The mechanoreceptors of the costo-vertebral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Austen, R. B.

    1969-01-01

    1. Unitary recording in the thoracic dorsal roots of mechanoreceptor discharges from the costo-vertebral joints was carried out in the cat and rabbit. Criteria for the identification of costo-vertebral joint mechanoreceptors were established. 2. The majority of rib joint mechanoreceptors are slowly adapting and fifty-three such receptors were studied. Five rapidly adapting receptors were also identified. 3. The responses of these receptors have been correlated with rib position and movement. The slowly adapting receptors gave a monotonic response to different rib positions. 72% showed an increase of discharge rate with displacements towards expiratory rib positions. 4. In response to manually imposed rib movements slowly adapting joint mechanoreceptors gave a dynamic response which was directly related to the velocity of the movement and adapted within 2 sec. The movements of breathing produced a corresponding alteration of the discharge frequency of the slowly adapting receptors. 5. Slowly adapting receptors were localized to the capsule of the costo-transverse joint by probing. They responded to increased intra-articular pressure with an increase of discharge rate and were silenced by intra-articular lignocaine, 0·4%. 6. Rapidly adapting joint mechanoreceptors responded to rib movement with a brief burst of discharges. 7. The rib joint mechanoreceptors signal rib joint position, and the direction and velocity of rib movement. It is suggested that these afferent discharges provide the basis for the perception of respiratory movements of the chest. The significance of these receptors to the `sense of effort' resulting from a resistance to breathing is discussed. PMID:5789947

  8. The characteristics of the mechanoreceptors of the hip with arthrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Mechanoreceptors have been extensively studied in different joints and distinct signals that convey proprioceptive information to the cortex. Several clinical reports have established a link between the number of mechanoreceptors and a deficient proprioceptive system; however, little or no literature suggest concentration of mechanoreceptors might be affected by hip arthrosis. The purpose of this study is first to determine the existence of mechanoreceptors and free nerve endings in the hip joint and to distinguish between their conditions: those with arthrosis and without arthrosis. Samples of 45 male hips were analyzed: 30 taken from patients with arthrosis that were submitted to total arthroplasty and 15 taken from male cadavers without arthrosis. The patients' ages ranged from 38 to75 years (average 56.5) and the cadavers' ages ranged from 21 to 50 years (average 35.5). The capsule, labrum, and femoral head ligament tissues were obtained during the arthroplasty procedure from 30 patients with arthrosis and from 15 male cadavers. The tissue was cut into fragments of around 3 mm. Each fragment was then immediately stained with gold chloride 1% solution and divided into sections of 6 μm thickness. The Mann-Whitney test was used for two groups and the ANOVA, Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests for more than two groups. Results show the mechanoreceptors (Pacini, Ruffini and Golgi corpuscles) and free nerve endings are present in the capsule, femoral head ligament, and labrum of the hip joint. When all the densities of the nerve endings were examined with regard to those with arthrosis and those without arthrosis, the mechanoreceptors of cadavers without arthrosis were found to be more pronounced and an increase in free nerve endings could be observed (p = 0.0082). Further studies, especially electrophysiological studies, need to be carried out to clarify the functions of the mechanoreceptors in the joints. PMID:22087603

  9. Cryotherapy usage to treat plantar warts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Diaz, BelkisTamara

    2010-01-01

    Treating dermatosis with liquid nitrogen as cryogen (substance generating cold) allows cellular destruction in more than 5 mm depth, making it indispensable to use it treating cutaneous cancers; besides that, it is cheap, easy to conserve and manage, and it is not considered flammable or toxic. Its applying retains the growth factor inside the injury, the collagen is not damaged as it is in burning by hot, there is not almost injury contraction, the perineurium is not altered, and when the tissue necrosis takes place, it retains tissue necrosis factor, helping to increase the necrosis of tissues. Taking into account the high incidence of dermatosis that can be treated with cryogen, in our consultation; we decided to generalize this treatment at the Provincial Interior Ministry Clinic. Plantar warts represent a big percent, limiting our patients in developing their working activities. This cutaneous viral disease is favored by the patients' systemic immunodepressions, hyperhidrosis and podalic disturbances. We selected the patients assisting to our extern al consultation with plantar wart clinical diagnosis in the period from September 2006 to September 2007. They signed an act of informed consent where the possible side effects are explained. Liquid nitrogen was applied with cotton applicators once a week after mechanical reduction. We made a clinical evolving evaluation fortnightly during the treatment, according to the elements and clinical characteristics referred by the patient, and proved by the physical examination carried out by the main investigator, because of the likelihood of short and long time side effects. This investigation demonstrated that cryotherapy is efficacious in treating plantar warts, since all the patients were healed in a short time period, most of them without side effects

  10. Mechanoreceptors in Diseased Cervical Intervertebral Disc and Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Yang, Cheng; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Xinwu; Yang, Yi; Peng, Baogan

    2017-04-15

    We collected the samples of cervical intervertebral discs from patients with vertigo to examine the distribution and types of mechanoreceptors in diseased cervical disc. The aim of this study was to determine whether mechanoreceptors are distributed more abundantly in cervical discs from patients with cervical spondylosis, and whether they are related to vertigo. Previous limited studies have found that normal cervical intervertebral discs are supplied with mechanoreceptors that have been considered responsible for proprioceptive functions. Several clinical studies have indicated that the patients with cervical spondylosis manifested significantly impaired postural control and subjective balance disturbance. We collected 77 samples of cervical discs from 62 cervical spondylosis patients without vertigo, 61 samples from 54 patients with vertigo, and 40 control samples from 8 cadaveric donors to investigate distribution of mechanoreceptors containing neurofilament (NF200) and S-100 protein immunoreactive nerve endings. The immunohistochemical investigation revealed that the most frequently encountered mechanoreceptors were the Ruffini corpuscles in all groups of cervical disc samples. They were obviously increased in the number and deeply ingrown into inner annulus fibrosus and even into nucleus pulposus in the diseased cervical discs from patients with vertigo in comparison with the discs from patients without vertigo and control discs. Only three Golgi endings were seen in the three samples from patients with vertigo. No Pacinian corpuscles were found in any samples of cervical discs. The diseased cervical discs from patients with vertigo had more abundant distribution of Ruffini corpuscles than other discs. A positive association between the increased number and ingrowth of Ruffini corpuscles in the diseased cervical disc and the incidence of vertigo in the patients with cervical spondylosis was found, which may indicate a key role of Ruffini corpuscles in the

  11. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...... joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases....

  12. Efficacy and Tolerability of Topical Green Tea Extract (Polyphenon E) Application in a “Therapy-Resistant” Plantar Wart

    OpenAIRE

    Giancarlo Meloni; Massimo Milani

    2018-01-01

    Plantar warts account for 30% of all cutaneous warts. These lesions could be very painful, especially if the lesion is located over pressure sites such as the metatarsal head. Plantar wart treatment remains a challenging therapeutic problem. A 67-year-old immunocompetent nonsmoking man presented with a large mosaic plantar wart on his right foot. The lesion had been present for 5 years. Several cryotherapy sessions (a total of 6 procedures) had been performed with no success. The lesion was t...

  13. Influence of the plantar cutaneous information in postural regulation depending on the age and the physical activity status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Maitre

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to compare the balance control adaptation to different supporting surfaces depending on the age and the physical activity status. The balance control of two groups of young (n=17 and old (n=17 participants who practised regular physical activity (active groups and two groups of young (n=17 and old (n=17 participants who did not practise physical activity (non-active groups was compared on a firm surface and on a foam surface. The parameters of the centre of foot pressure displacement were compared between the groups. The two older groups were more disturbed than the two younger groups when they stood on a foam surface and there was no difference between active and non-active groups. This result may be linked to the structural and functional involutions of the plantar cutaneous sole and foot that occur with age advancement. The participants’ physical activity practice might be not specific enough to generate a more efficient postural adaption to the foam condition for the active groups than the non-active groups within their respective age groups.

  14. Evolutionary diversification of secondary mechanoreceptor cells in tunicata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, Francesca; Stach, Thomas; Caicci, Federico; Gasparini, Fabio; Burighel, Paolo; Manni, Lucia

    2013-06-04

    Hair cells are vertebrate secondary sensory cells located in the ear and in the lateral line organ. Until recently, these cells were considered to be mechanoreceptors exclusively found in vertebrates that evolved within this group. Evidence of secondary mechanoreceptors in some tunicates, the proposed sister group of vertebrates, has recently led to the hypothesis that vertebrate and tunicate secondary sensory cells share a common origin. Secondary sensory cells were described in detail in two tunicate groups, ascidians and thaliaceans, in which they constitute an oral sensory structure called the coronal organ. Among thaliaceans, the organ is absent in salps and it has been hypothesised that this condition is due to a different feeding system adopted by this group of animals. No information is available as to whether a comparable structure exists in the third group of tunicates, the appendicularians, although different sensory structures are known to be present in these animals. We studied the detailed morphology of appendicularian oral mechanoreceptors. Using light and electron microscopy we could demonstrate that the mechanosensory organ called the circumoral ring is composed of secondary sensory cells. We described the ultrastructure of the circumoral organ in two appendicularian species, Oikopleura dioica and Oikopleura albicans, and thus taxonomically completed the data collection of tunicate secondary sensory cells. To understand the evolution of secondary sensory cells in tunicates, we performed a cladistic analysis using morphological data. We constructed a matrix consisting of 19 characters derived from detailed ultrastructural studies in 16 tunicate species and used a cephalochordate and three vertebrate species as outgroups. Our study clearly shows that the circumoral ring is the appendicularian homologue of the coronal organ of other tunicate taxa. The cladistic analysis enabled us to reconstruct the features of the putative ancestral hair cell in

  15. Plantar fascia softening in plantar fasciitis with normal B-mode sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2015-11-01

    To investigate plantar fascia elasticity in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis but normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography. Twenty patients with plantar fasciitis (10 unilateral and 10 bilateral) and 30 healthy volunteers, all with normal plantar fascia morphology on B-mode sonography, were included in the study. Plantar fascia elasticity was evaluated by sonoelastographic examination. All sonoelastograms were quantitatively analyzed, and less red pixel intensity was representative of softer tissue. Pixel intensity was compared among unilateral plantar fasciitis patients, bilateral plantar fasciitis patients, and healthy volunteers by one-way ANOVA. A post hoc Scheffé's test was used to identify where the differences occurred. Compared to healthy participants (red pixel intensity: 146.9 ± 9.1), there was significantly less red pixel intensity in the asymptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (140.4 ± 7.3, p = 0.01), symptomatic sides of unilateral plantar fasciitis (127.1 ± 7.4, p plantar fasciitis (129.4 ± 7.5, p plantar fascia thickness or green or blue pixel intensity among these groups. Sonoelastography revealed that the plantar fascia is softer in patients with typical clinical manifestations of plantar fasciitis, even if they exhibit no abnormalities on B-mode sonography.

  16. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of mechanoreceptors in the human posterior cruciate ligament: a demonstration of its proprioceptive role and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, M E; Harwin, S F; Maestro, A; Murcia, A; Vega, J A

    1998-12-01

    Although long-term studies report successful results with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), performed with or without posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retention, controversy exists as to which is preferable in regard to patient outcome and satisfaction. The possible proprioceptive role of the PCL may account for a more normal feeling of the arthroplasty. Although the PCL has been examined using various histological techniques, immunohistochemical techniques are the most sensitive for neural elements. Therefore an immunohistochemical study was designed to determine the patterns of innervation, the morphological types of the proprioceptors, and their immunohistochemical profile. During TKA, samples were obtained from 22 osteoarthritic PCLs and subjected to immunohistochemical analysis with mouse monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), S100 protein (S100P), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and vimentin (all present in neuromechanoreceptors). Three normal PCLs from cadaveric specimens were also obtained and analyzed for comparison. Five types of sensory corpuscles were observed in both the normal and the arthritic PCLs: simple lamellar, Pacini-like, Ruffini, Krause-like, and morphologically unclassified. Their structure included a central axon, inner core, and capsule in lamellar and Pacini corpuscles and variable intracorpuscular axons and periaxonal cells in the Ruffini and Krause-like corpuscles. The immunohistochemical profile showed the central axon to have NFP immunoreactivity, periaxonal cells to have S100P and vimentin immunoreactivity, and the capsule to have EMA and vimentin immunoreactivity. Nerve fibers and free nerve endings displayed NFP and S100P immunoreactivity. The immunohistochemical profile of the PCL sensory corpuscles is almost identical to that of cutaneous sensory corpuscles. Some prior histological studies of the PCL reported Golgi-like mechanoreceptors, and others found encapsulated corpuscles but no Golgi-like structures

  18. Localized palmar-plantar epidermal hyperplasia: a previously undefined dermatologic toxicity to sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldner, Matthew; Jacobson, Michael; Burges, Gene E; Dewaay, Deborah; Maize, John C; Chaudhary, Uzair B

    2007-10-01

    The development of multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors has provided significant advances in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. This case describes initial therapy for managing renal cell cancer with the administration of sorafenib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We report the development of localized palmar-plantar epidermal hyperplasia, a rare but significant cutaneous adverse event from sorafenib therapy. Mild-to-moderate dermatologic toxicity from sorafenib has been well described in the literature. We also review the current knowledge and the proposed hypothesis for the development of cutaneous events related to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This particular case represents a unique form of dermatologic toxicity to sorafenib that has not previously been described in the literature.

  19. Plantar fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities in moderation can also help. Images Plantar fascia Plantar fasciitis References Abu-Laban RB, Rose NGW. Ankle ... Elsevier; 2016:970. Kadakia AR. Heel pain and plantar fasciitis In: Miller MD, ... of tendons and fascia and adolescent and adult pes planus. In: Canale ...

  20. Múltiplos cornos cutâneos em coxins palmares e plantares de um gato persa Multiple cutaneous horns on the footpads of a persian cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Justen Moreira de Souza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cornos cutâneos são infrequentes em gatos, principalmente em felinos jovens. Neste trabalho, é relatado um caso de um felino da raça Persa, macho, com oito meses de idade e apresentando histórico de espirros. Ao exame clínico, identificaram-se projeções corniformes originadas nos coxins palmares e plantares. A avaliação histológica de biópsia excisional demonstrou hiperqueratose densa, com numerosos queratinócitos sobre epiderme hiperplásica, não sendo identificado nenhum grau de malignidade. Não foi constatada a associação das lesões com a infecção pelo vírus da leucemia felina. O tratamento instituído incluiu excisão parcial mensal dos cornos cutâneos e acompanhamento clínico do animal.Cutaneous horns are seldom seen in cats, especially in young ones. A case of a Persian cat, male, eight months old, with a history of sneezes is described. During physical examination, multiple horns on the all footpads were noticed. The histopathological diagnosis of excisional biopsy was dense hyperkeratosis, with numerous keratinocytes above hyperplastic epidermis and no evidence of malignity. There was no association between the lesions and infection with leukemia virus. The treatment was mensal trimming off the cutaneous horns and clinical follow up of the animal.

  1. Cutaneous fibroma in a captive common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Viera, O; Bauer, G; Bauer, A; Aguiar, L S; Brito, L T; Catão-Dias, J L

    2012-11-01

    An adult female common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) had a mass on the plantar surface of the right forelimb that was removed surgically. Microscopical examination revealed many spindle cells with mild anisocytosis and anisokaryosis and a surrounding collagenous stroma. There were no mitoses. Immunohistochemistry showed that the spindle cells expressed vimentin, but not desmin. A diagnosis of cutaneous fibroma was made. Tumours are reported uncommonly in chelonian species. Cutaneous fibroma has been diagnosed in an alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii), but not previously in a common snapping turtle. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoscopic Plantar Fascia Debridement for Chronic Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S

    2016-10-01

    When conservative therapy fails for chronic plantar fasciitis, surgical intervention may be an option. Surgical techniques that maintain the integrity of the plantar fascia will have less risk of destabilizing the foot and will retain foot function. Endoscopic debridement of the plantar fascia can be performed reproducibly to reduce pain and maintain function of the foot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vibrotactile stimulation of fast-adapting cutaneous afferents from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Bent, Leah R

    2016-04-15

    It has previously been shown that cutaneous sensory input from across a broad region of skin can influence proprioception at joints of the hand. The present experiment tested whether cutaneous input from different skin regions across the foot can influence proprioception at the ankle joint. The ability to passively match ankle joint position (17° and 7° plantar flexion and 7° dorsiflexion) was measured while cutaneous vibration was applied to the sole (heel, distal metatarsals) or dorsum of the target foot. Vibration was applied at two different frequencies to preferentially activate Meissner's corpuscles (45 Hz, 80 μm) or Pacinian corpuscles (255 Hz, 10 μm) at amplitudes ∼3 dB above mean perceptual thresholds. Results indicated that cutaneous input from all skin regions across the foot could influence joint-matching error and variability, although the strongest effects were observed with heel vibration. Furthermore, the influence of cutaneous input from each region was modulated by joint angle; in general, vibration had a limited effect on matching in dorsiflexion compared with matching in plantar flexion. Unlike previous results in the upper limb, we found no evidence that Pacinian input exerted a stronger influence on proprioception compared with Meissner input. Findings from this study suggest that fast-adapting cutaneous input from the foot modulates proprioception at the ankle joint in a passive joint-matching task. These results indicate that there is interplay between tactile and proprioceptive signals originating from the foot and ankle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G.; Challies, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  5. Plantar vein thrombosis: a rare cause of plantar foot pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, Daniel S.; Wu, Jim S.; Brennan, Darren D.; Hochman, Mary G. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Challies, Tracy [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Plantar vein thrombosis is a rare condition, with only a handful of cases reported in the literature. The cause is unknown; however, the disease has been attributed to prior surgery, trauma, and paraneoplastic conditions. We present a case of a 32-year-old female runner with plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed on contrast-enhanced MRI and confirmed on ultrasound. The symptoms resolved with conservative treatment and evaluation revealed the presence of a prothrombin gene mutation and use of oral contraceptive pills. To our knowledge, this is the first case of plantar vein thrombosis diagnosed initially by MRI. Moreover, this case suggests that plantar vein thrombosis should be considered in patients with hypercoagulable states and plantar foot pain. (orig.)

  6. Selective plantar fascia release for nonhealing diabetic plantar ulcerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Young; Hwang, Seungkeun; Lee, Yoonjung

    2012-07-18

    Achilles tendon lengthening can decrease plantar pressures, leading to resolution of forefoot ulceration in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, this procedure has been reported to have a complication rate of 10% to 30% and can require a long period of postoperative immobilization. We have developed a new technique, selective plantar fascia release, as an alternative to Achilles tendon lengthening for managing these forefoot ulcers. We evaluated sixty patients with diabetes for a mean of 23.5 months after selective plantar fascia release for the treatment of nonhealing diabetic neuropathic ulcers in the forefoot. Preoperative and postoperative dorsiflexion range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint and wound-healing data were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the procedure and to determine the relationship between plantar fascia release and ulcer healing. Complications were recorded. Thirty-six (56%) of the ulcers healed within six weeks, including twenty-nine (60%) of the plantar toe ulcers and seven (44%) of the metatarsophalangeal joint ulcers. The mean range of motion of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint increased from 15.3° ± 7.8° to 30.6° ± 14.1° postoperatively (p plantar fascia release. Our results suggest that selective plantar fascia release can lead to healing of neuropathic plantar forefoot ulcers in diabetic patients. Ulcers in patients in whom the preoperative dorsiflexion angle of the affected metatarsophalangeal joint is between 5° and 30° and in whom the increase in range of motion is ≥13° postoperatively have the greatest chance of being cured. Therapeutic level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of the levels of evidence.

  7. The correlation between plantar fascia thickness and symptoms of plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Sarah; Legge, Bradford S; Grady, John F

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in plantar fascia thickness are a reliable gauge of efficacy of treatment protocols for plantar fasciitis. Thirty-nine feet (30 patients) with plantar fasciitis received an ultrasound examination to measure the thickness of the medial band of the plantar fascia. Each patient assessed his or her pain using the visual analogue scale. Following various treatments, a second ultrasound examination was performed and the thickness of the plantar fascia was again measured and subjective pain level assessed. Twenty-nine feet (74.4%) showed a decrease in plantar fascia thickness and a decrease in pain. One foot (2.6%) experienced an increase in fascia thickness and reported an increase in pain. Four feet (10.3%) had an increase in thickness of the plantar fascia and reported no change in pain level. Three feet had minor increases in fascia thickness but reported a decrease in pain (7.7%). One foot (2.6%) had no change in fascia thickness but a decrease in pain and one foot (2.6%) had a decrease in the plantar fascia but no change in pain level. The average reduction in fascia thickness was 0.82 mm ± 1.04 mm, correlating with an average improvement in pain of 3.64 ± 2.7 (P plantar fascia is a valid objective measurement to assess effectiveness of new or existing treatment protocols.

  8. Cutaneous reaction associated with weekly docetaxel administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lita; Chuen, Vivianne Shih Lee

    2009-03-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy will remain clinically relevant and many of our patients will continue to receive the drug. In a recent phase 2 study of docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (weekly) in patients with metastatic breast cancer, the incidence of grade 3 cutaneous toxicity is 19%. The skin toxicity observed consists of limb/palmar-plantar erythematous reactions, or fixed-plaque erythrodysesthesia. Case series or reports have reported varied manifestations of skin reactions and include erythema multiforme, nail changes (onycholysis, pigmentation, paronychia), scleroderma, supravenous discoloration, radiation recall dermatitis, and flagellate erythema. We would like to report four patients with cutaneous reactions resulting from weekly administration of docetaxel. All cases are heavily pre-treated patients, receiving docetaxel as second or third line therapy. The cutaneous reactions occur at cycle 5. The time between chemotherapy to development of skin lesions is from 1 to 7 days. Lesions usually resolve with desquamation leaving behind areas with hyper-pigmentation or hypo-pigmentation over a period of 2 to 3 weeks. The management strategies include hand elevation, warm or cold compresses, topical and/or systemic antibiotics, topical and/or systemic corticosteroids, and cessation of drug. There is a need for a systematic approach to manage these cutaneous reactions. Oncology trained pharmacists play vital roles in assessing, managing, documenting and patient education.

  9. Plantar fibromatosis. Ultrasound assessment; La fibromatosi plantare: risultati ecografici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solivetti, F.R.; Luzi, F.; Bucher, S.; Thorel, M.F.; Muscardin, L. [Rome Ospedale Santa Maria e San Gallicano, Rome (Italy)

    1999-05-01

    In 1998-99, six patients with plantar fibromatosis were submitted to US (ultrasound) with plantar fibromatosis were submitted to US with 13 MHz linear array and 20 MHz mechanical annular array probes. All patients were examined in prone recumbency with the probe positioned on the sole of the foot. Only some of them were subsequently submitted to surgery. Plantar fibromatosis exhibited an almost pathognomonic pattern and US proved to be a quick, noninvasive and cost-effective technique to confirm clinical diagnosis. The nodule is typically single and iso echoic, with maximum diameter of about 1 cm, inhomogeneous internal structure and few thin hyperechoic septa. The nodular fibrous proliferation adheres with the major axis along the plantar fascia; it exhibits clear-cut margins and US beam transmission is good. No calcifications or fluid collections are seen within the nodule. Color and power Doppler show no flow inside. It is demonstrated that US is an adequate tool for the study of plantar fibromatosis. [Italian] Negli anni 1998-99 sono stati osservati ben sei casi di fibromatosi plantare, solo in parte trattati chirurgicamente. Tutti sono stati studiati con ecografia, con apparecchiatura in tempo reale e sonde lineari da 13 MHz e anulari da 20 MHz. Si puo' descrivere un quadro tipico della malattia diagnosticabile con l'ecografia, specie in associazione con sintomi clinici caratteristici.

  10. Mechanoreceptor afferent activity compared with receptor field dimensions and pressure changes in feline urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, J W; Armour, J A

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between vesical mechanoreceptor field dimensions and afferent nerve activity recorded in pelvic plexus nerve filaments was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Orthogonal receptor field dimensions were monitored with piezoelectric ultrasonic crystals. Reflexly generated bladder contractile activity made measurements difficult, therefore data were collected from cats subjected to actual sacral rhizotomy. Afferent activity was episodic and was initiated at different pressure and receptor field dimension thresholds. Maximum afferent activity did not correlate with maximum volume or pressure. Furthermore, activity was not linearly related to intravesical pressure, receptor field dimensions, or calculated wall tension. Pressure-length hysteresis of the receptor fields occurred. The responses of identified afferent units and their associated receptor field dimensions to brief contractions elicited by the ganglion stimulant 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (2.5-20 micrograms i.a.), studied under constant volume or constant pressure conditions, are compatible with bladder mechanoreceptors behaving as tension receptors. Because activity generated by bladder mechanoreceptors did not correlate in a simple fashion with intravesical pressure or receptor field dimensions, it is concluded that such receptors are influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the bladder wall. Furthermore, as a result of the heterogeneity of the bladder wall, receptor field tension appears to offer a more precise relationship with the activity of bladder wall mechanoreceptors than does intravesical pressure.

  11. Plantar flaps based on perforators of the plantar metatarsal/common digital arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Georgescu Alexandru; Rodica, Matei Ileana; Manuel, Llusa

    2014-09-01

    Because of the unique characteristics of its integument, the affirmation "replacing like with like" becomes more than evident in the reconstruction of defects of the ultraspecialized plantar skin. But, the paucity of local resources, and especially in the forefoot, transforms this attempt in a very challenging problem. Many techniques, including skin grafts and various types of flaps were used in the management of defects in the forefoot. We present a new useful flap in the reconstruction of skin defects in the forefoot, based on small perforator vessels originating either from the plantar metatarsal arteries or plantar common digital arteries. Starting with June 2011, this flap was performed, as plantar transposition perforator flap, plantar propeller flap, or plantar propeller perforator plus flap, in seven patients with ulcers over the plantar forefoot. During a follow-up of 7 to 17 months (mean, 9.8 months), the local evolution regarding flap integration, pain, relapse, sensitive recovery, donor site, and footwear quality was analyzed. We registered a 100% survival rate of the flaps, with delayed healing in only one case. The gait resumption was possible after 6 weeks in all cases. This new flap, based on small perforator vessels from the plantar metatarsal or common digital arteries, and which provides a good, stable, and sensory recovery, seems to be a promising method in the reconstruction of plantar skin defects over the metatarsal heads. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. When does mechanical plantar stimulation promote sensory re-weighing: standing on a firm or compliant surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preszner-Domjan, Andrea; Nagy, Edit; Szíver, Edit; Feher-Kiss, Anna; Horvath, Gyöngyi; Kranicz, Janos

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different types of mechanical stimulation of the sole on standing postural stability in healthy, young adults. Fifty subjects (34 women, 16 men; mean age 23 ± 2 (mean ± SE)) stood barefoot on fixed force plates both with open and closed eyes on firm surface and then on compliant surface (foam). A modified clinical test of sensory interaction on balance protocol was employed to assess the center of gravity (COG) excursions along anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) axes on each surface and visual condition. After the baseline measurement, a stimulation was applied with an elastic spiked layer topped to the firm and then foam surface, and the COG excursions were measured during the stimulation, and then at least 30 min after the stimulation of the spiked layer, we used 10 min of manual static and glide pressure applied to the plantar surface of both feet. Immediately after manual stimulation, static balance parameters were measured again. Results showed that after manual stimulation, the sway path with closed eyes decreased significantly on the AP and ML directions on firm surface conditions. The spiked layer caused significantly decreased sway path on firm platform in both directions, but it was ineffective on compliant surface. Our results established that the activation of plantar mechanoreceptors by 10-min manual stimulation can partially compensate subjects for the absence of visual input and the lack of accurate pressure information from the supporting surface, too.

  13. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Through Two Medial Portals for the Treatment of Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashhab, Mohamed Ebrahim; Elbegawy, Hossam El-Dein A; Hasan, Hala Ali Abed

    Plantar fasciopathy is a common cause of heel pain. Endoscopic plantar fasciotomy has the advantage of less surgical trauma and rapid recovery. The aim of the present prospective study was to delineate the results of endoscopic plantar fascia release through 2 medial portals. The present study included 2 groups. The first group included 27 feet in 25 patients that had undergone endoscopic plantar fascia release followed up for 19.7 (range 12 to 33) months. The second group, the control group, included 20 feet in 16 patients treated conservatively and followed up for 16.4 (range 12 to 24) months. The results of endoscopic plantar fascia release were superior to the conservative methods. The surgically treated group experienced significantly less pain, activity limitations, and gait abnormality. The presence of a calcaneal spur had no effect on the final postoperative score. In conclusion, endoscopic plantar fascia release through 2 medial portals is an effective procedure for treatment of resistant plantar fasciopathy that fails to respond to conservative management options. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon: a histomorphological study in pigs with clinical significance for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Daneva, Eleni; Givissis, Panagiotis; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    Tendons contain neurosensory elements called mechanoreceptors which contribute to the neuromuscular system as sources of reflex signals. The literature is lacking in histological assessment of mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon in piglets and our aim was to indicate their types, location and quantity. The study was performed using histological tissue samples from the Achilles tendon of ten healthy pigs, five left, five right, six males, four females. The samples were taken up to 12 hours after death. Immediately after removal, the tendons were placed in the laboratory where sections were taken and examined microscopically. The tendons were stained with the gold chloride method. The results showed that Golgi tendon organs, free nerve endings and Pacinian-like corpuscles were found in the Achilles tendon of pigs. Most structures were near the osteotendinous and myotendinous junctions, away from the middle portion of the tendon. As shown in other studies and similarly in ours, mechanoreceptors tend to be close to the distant thirds and not in the middle third of the tendon. This study could have clinical application on human Achilles tendon and its repair after damage. IV.

  15. Plantar fascia coronal length: a new parameter for plantar fascia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ahmet Sinan; Demircay, Emre; Cakmak, Gokhan; Sahin, M Sukru; Tuncay, I Cengiz; Altun, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    The effects of gender and various anthropometric variables were previously reported as significant predictors of plantar fascia thickness. Although a strong correlation between either the body weight or body mass index (BMI) and plantar fascia thickness were not demonstrated, a moderate relation was stated. We retrospectively investigated the role of gender, height, weight, and body mass index on plantar fascia thickness at the calcaneal origin (PFCO) and 1 cm distal from the calcaneal origin (PF1cm) and the coronal length of the plantar fascia at the calcaneal origin (CLPF) in healthy subjects. The PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF were retrospectively measured from magnetic resonance images of 100 healthy subjects. The gender, height, weight, and body mass index of the participants were also noted. Gender was a predictive factor for the length of the CLPF. The subjects with a BMI >25 kg/m(2) had a significantly greater PFCO, PF1cm, and CLPF. Height was mildly and BMI and weight were moderately related to the PFCO. However the CLPF showed a better correlation with height, BMI, and weight than that of plantar fascia thickness. CLPF better reflected the role of weight, BMI, and height than its thickness. It is a new parameter that could be valuable in the evaluation of plantar fascia disorders. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship of Plantar Fascia Thickness and Preoperative Pain, Function, and Quality of Life in Recalcitrant Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Carlo; Sala-Pujals, Aleix; Perez-Prieto, Daniel; Ares-Vidal, Jesus; Solano-Lopez, Alberto; Gonzalez-Lucena, Gemma; Ginés-Caspedosa, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    The measurement of plantar fascia thickness has been advocated as a diagnostic and prognostic instrument in patients with plantar fasciitis, but there are no data relative to it in recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correlation between plantar fascia thickness and pain, functional score, and health perception in patients with this condition. Thirty-eight feet were studied with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to measure plantar fascia thickness. The visual analogue scale (VAS), American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Hindfoot Score (AOFAS), and SF-36 were then recorded for each patient. The relationship between the fascia and these scores was analyzed to evaluate the correlation of thickness with pain, functional level, and health perception of patients. In patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia thickness did not correlate with pain (VAS), AOFAS, or any item of the SF-36. The thickness of the plantar fascia in patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis did not correlate with its clinical impact, and thus, we believe it should not be used in treatment planning. Level IV, case series.

  17. Use of Preputial Skin as Cutaneous Graft after Nevus Excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D'Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a four-year-old boy with a nevus covering all the plantar side of his second finger on the left foot. He was also affected by congenital phimosis. Surgical excision of the nevus was indicated, but the skin defect would have been too large to be directly closed. The foreskin was taken as a full-thickness skin graft to cover the cutaneous defect of the finger. The graft intake was favourable and provided a functional repair with good aesthetic characteristic.

  18. Biomechanical consequences of adding plantar fascia release to metatarsal osteotomies: Changes in forefoot plantar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Umur; Roush, Evan P; Moore, Blake E; Andrews, Seth H; Lewis, Gregory S

    2017-04-01

    Destruction of the normal metatarsal arch by a long metatarsal is often a cause for metatarsalgia. When surgery is warranted, distal oblique, or proximal dorsiflexion osteotomies of the long metatarsal bones are commonly used. The plantar fascia has anatomical connection to all metatarsal heads. There is controversial scientific evidence on the effect of plantar fascia release on forefoot biomechanics. In this cadaveric biomechanical study, we hypothesized that plantar fascia release would augment the plantar metatarsal pressure decreasing effects of two common second metatarsal osteotomy techniques. Six matched pairs of foot and ankle specimens were mounted on a pressure mat loading platform. Two randomly assigned surgery groups, which had received either distal oblique, or proximal dorsiflexion osteotomy of the second metatarsal, were evaluated before and after plantar fasciectomy. Specimens were loaded up to a ground reaction force of 400 N at varying Achilles tendon forces. Average pressures, peak pressures, and contact areas were analyzed. Supporting our hypothesis, average pressures under the second metatarsal during 600 N Achilles load were decreased by plantar fascia release following proximal osteotomy (p plantar fascia release following modified distal osteotomy, under multiple Achilles loading conditions (p Plantar fasciotomy should not be added to distal metatarsal osteotomy in the treatment of metatarsalgia. If proximal dorsiflexion osteotomy would be preferred, plantar fasciotomy should be approached cautiously not to disturb the forefoot biomechanics. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:800-804, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle relieves chronic tension-type headache caused by tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle in patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    Proprioceptively innervated intramuscular connective tissues in Müller's muscle function as exterior mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the levator and occipitofrontalis muscles. In aponeurotic blepharoptosis, since the levator aponeurosis is disinserted from the tarsus, stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle is increased even on primary gaze to induce phasic and tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. It was hypothesised that in certain patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, the presence of tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle due to the sensitised mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle, can cause chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) associated with occipitofrontalis tenderness. To verify this hypothesis, this study evaluated (1) what differentiates patients with CTTH from patients without CTTH, (2) how pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres as a method for desensitising the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle affects electromyographic activity of the frontalis muscle, and (3) how surgical aponeurotic reinsertion to desensitise the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle electromyographically or subjectively affects activities of the occipitofrontalis muscle or CTTH. It was found that patients had sustained CTTH when light eyelid closure did not markedly reduce eyebrow elevation. However, pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres or surgery to desensitise the mechanoreceptor electromyographically reduced the tonic contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle on primary gaze and subjectively relieved aponeurotic blepharoptosis-associated CTTH. Over-stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle on primary gaze may induce CTTH due to tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. Therefore, surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appears to relieve CTTH.

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  1. Plantar fascia: imaging diagnosis and guided treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Eugene G; Shetty, Shilpa

    2010-09-01

    Plantar fasciopathy is a common cause of heel pain. This article covers the imaging anatomy of the hindfoot, the imaging findings on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of plantar fasciopathy, plantar fibromas, trauma, Achilles tendonopathy, neural compression, stress fractures of the os calcis and other heel pad lesions. Thickening of the plantar fascia insertion more than 5 mm either on ultrasound or MRI is suggestive of plantar fasciopathy. Ultrasound is superior to MRI for diagnosis of plantar fibroma as small low signal lesions on MRI are similar to the normal plantar fascia signal. Ultrasound demonstrates low echogenicity compared with the echogenic plantar fascia. Penetrating injuries can appear bizarre due to associated foreign body impaction and infection. Achilles tendonopathy can cause heel pain and should be considered as a possible diagnosis. Treatment options include physical therapy, ECSWT, corticosteroid injection, and dry needling. Percutaneous US guided treatment methods will be described. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  2. Ultrasound diagnosis and evaluation of plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argerakis, Nicholas G; Positano, Rock G; Positano, Rock C J; Boccio, Ashley K; Adler, Ronald S; Saboeiro, Gregory R; Dines, Joshua S

    2015-03-01

    One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis; however, there are other pathologic disorders that can mimic the symptoms and clinical presentation of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review the prevalence of various pathologic disorders on ultrasound in patients with proximal plantar heel pain. The medical records and diagnostic ultrasound reports of patients presenting with plantar heel pain between March 1, 2006, and March 31, 2007, were reviewed retrospectively, and the prevalence of various etiologies was collected. The inclusion criteria were based on their clinical presentation of plantar fasciitis or previous diagnosis of plantar fasciitis from an unknown source. Ultrasound evaluation was then performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis. We examined 175 feet of 143 patients (62 males and 81 females; age range, 16-79 years). Plantar fibromas were present in 90 feet (51%). Plantar fasciitis was diagnosed in 128 feet (73%). Coexistent plantar fibroma and plantar fascial thickening was found in 63 feet (36%). Of the 47 feet that were negative for plantar fasciitis on ultrasound, 27 (57%) revealed the presence of plantar fibroma. Diagnostic ultrasound can effectively and safely identify the prevalence of various etiologies of heel pain. The high prevalence of plantar fibromas and plantar fascial tears cannot be determined by clinical examination alone, and, therefore, ultrasound evaluation should be performed for confirmation of diagnosis.

  3. Plantar fascia-specific stretching versus radial shock-wave therapy as initial treatment of plantar fasciopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, Jan D; Cacchio, Angelo; Weil, Lowell; Furia, John P; Haist, Joachim; Reiners, Volker; Schmitz, Christoph; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-11-03

    Whether plantar fascia-specific stretching or shock-wave therapy is effective as an initial treatment for proximal plantar fasciopathy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the effectiveness of these two forms of treatment for patients who had unilateral plantar fasciopathy for a maximum duration of six weeks and which had not been treated previously. One hundred and two patients with acute plantar fasciopathy were randomly assigned to perform an eight-week plantar fascia-specific stretching program (Group I, n = 54) or to receive repetitive low-energy radial shock-wave therapy without local anesthesia, administered weekly for three weeks (Group II, n = 48). All patients completed the seven-item pain subscale of the validated Foot Function Index and a patient-relevant outcome questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at two, four, and fifteen months after baseline. The primary outcome measures were a mean change in the Foot Function Index sum score at two months after baseline, a mean change in item 2 (pain during the first few steps of walking in the morning) on this index, and satisfaction with treatment. No difference in mean age, sex, weight, or duration of symptoms was found between the groups at baseline. At two months after baseline, the Foot Function Index sum score showed significantly greater changes for the patients managed with plantar fascia-specific stretching than for those managed with shock-wave therapy (p plantar fascia is superior to repetitive low-energy radial shock-wave therapy for the treatment of acute symptoms of proximal plantar fasciopathy.

  4. Plantar fasciitis (fasciosis) treatment outcome study: plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound and correlated with patient self-reported improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, Jerry M; Park, Tae Soon

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound, well recognized as an effective diagnostic tool, reveals a thickening of the plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis/fasciosis disease. The authors hypothesized that ultrasound would also reveal a decrease in the plantar fascia thickness for patients undergoing treatment for the disease, a hypothesis that, heretofore, had been only tested on a limited number of subjects. They conducted a more statistically significant study that found that clinical treatment with injection and biomechanical correction does indeed diminish plantar fascia thickness as shown on ultrasound. The study also revealed that patients experience the most heightened plantar fascia tenderness toward the end of the day, and improvement in their symptomatic complaints were associated with a reduction in plantar fascia thickness. As a result, the authors conclude that office-based ultrasound can help diagnose and confirm plantar fasciitis/fasciosis through the measurement of the plantar fascia thickness. Because of the advantages of ultrasound--that it is non-invasive with greater patient acceptance, cost effective and radiation-free--the imaging tool should be considered and implemented early in the diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis/fasciosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Tien, Kuang Lung; Jung, Hye Jeon; Lee, Kyoung Tae; Yoon, Yong Kyu [Eulji College of Medicine Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of plantar fasciitis. Both feet of 30 patients(mean age, 44years) in whom plantar fasciitis had been clinically diagnosed, and those of healthy volunteers(mean age, 34years) were evaluated with ultrasound(US) using a 7.0MHz linear array transducer. Heel pain was unilateral in 26 patients and bilateral in four. Sagittal sonograms were obtained in the prone position, and the thickness of the plantar fascia was measured at its proximal end near its insertion into the calcaneus. We also evaluated hypoechoic fascia, perifascial fluid collection, fiber rupture, calcaneal spur and calcifications. Plantar fascia thickness was significantly greater in the heels of patients with plantar fasciitis(3.2-8mm; mean, 5.1{+-}1.12) than in their asymptomatic heels(1.3-5mm; mean, 3.5{+-}0.78)(p<0.0001), in which it was similar to that of heels of patients in the control group(1.8-5mm; mean, 3.0{+-}0.71)(p<0.0001). The proximal plantar fascia was hypoechoic in 31 symptomatic heels(91.2%), in four asymptomatic heels(15.4%), and in none of the patients in the control group. Calcaneal spurs were identified in sixteen symptomatic heels(47.1%), and in two which were asymptomatic(7.7%). Perifascial fluid collection was identified in only two symptomatic heels(5.9%). In plantar fasciitis, sonography demonstrates that the fascia is thicker as well as hypoechic. For the clinical diagnosis of planter fasciitis, US can therefore be used as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis.

  6. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Tien, Kuang Lung; Jung, Hye Jeon; Lee, Kyoung Tae; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the sonographic findings of plantar fasciitis. Both feet of 30 patients(mean age, 44years) in whom plantar fasciitis had been clinically diagnosed, and those of healthy volunteers(mean age, 34years) were evaluated with ultrasound(US) using a 7.0MHz linear array transducer. Heel pain was unilateral in 26 patients and bilateral in four. Sagittal sonograms were obtained in the prone position, and the thickness of the plantar fascia was measured at its proximal end near its insertion into the calcaneus. We also evaluated hypoechoic fascia, perifascial fluid collection, fiber rupture, calcaneal spur and calcifications. Plantar fascia thickness was significantly greater in the heels of patients with plantar fasciitis(3.2-8mm; mean, 5.1±1.12) than in their asymptomatic heels(1.3-5mm; mean, 3.5±0.78)(p<0.0001), in which it was similar to that of heels of patients in the control group(1.8-5mm; mean, 3.0±0.71)(p<0.0001). The proximal plantar fascia was hypoechoic in 31 symptomatic heels(91.2%), in four asymptomatic heels(15.4%), and in none of the patients in the control group. Calcaneal spurs were identified in sixteen symptomatic heels(47.1%), and in two which were asymptomatic(7.7%). Perifascial fluid collection was identified in only two symptomatic heels(5.9%). In plantar fasciitis, sonography demonstrates that the fascia is thicker as well as hypoechic. For the clinical diagnosis of planter fasciitis, US can therefore be used as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis

  7. Effect of viscoelastic properties of plantar soft tissues on plantar pressures at the first metatarsal head in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Rong, Daqian; Lung, Chi-Wen; Cuaderes, Elena; Boyce, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most serious complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Current research studies have demonstrated that biomechanical alterations of the diabetic foot contribute to the development of foot ulcers. However, the changes of soft tissue biomechanical properties associated with diabetes and its influences on the development of diabetic foot ulcers have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of diabetes on the biomechanical properties of plantar soft tissues and the relationship between biomechanical properties and plantar pressure distributions. We used the ultrasound indentation tests to measure force-deformation relationships of plantar soft tissues and calculate the effective Young's modulus and quasi-linear viscoelastic parameters to quantify biomechanical properties of plantar soft tissues. We also measured plantar pressures to calculate peak plantar pressure and plantar pressure gradient. Our results showed that diabetics had a significantly greater effective Young's modulus and initial modulus of quasi-linear viscoelasticity compared to non-diabetics. The plantar pressure gradient and biomechanical properties were significantly correlated. Our findings indicate that diabetes is linked to an increase in viscoelasticity of plantar soft tissues that may contribute to a higher peak plantar pressure and plantar pressure gradient in the diabetic foot. (paper)

  8. Effectiveness of Plantar Fascia-Specific Stretching Exercises in Plantar Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim Özer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Plantar fasciitis (PF is a painful and disabling disease that affects the quality of life and daily activities of patients and it is the most common cause of heel pain in adults. In primary treatment, conservative treatment is suggested and different conservative options are described in the literature. In our study, we evaluated the efficacy of plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises in the treatment of PF. Methods: Twenty-nine feet - 21 patients with the mean age of 49.3 years were included in the study. The mean length of follow-up was 19.8 months and the mean length of exercise period was 4.94 months. Non-weight bearing plantar fascia-specific stretching exercise was done twice daily, for 10 times at each session. In addition to exercises, silicone heel pad and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID were added. Visual analog scale (VAS was used for pain evaluation. Results: Full recovery detected in 15 feet in 10 patients (52% and a decrease in pain was seen in 10 feet in 8 patients (34%. There was no response in 4 feet in 3 patients (14%. There was statistically significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment visual analog scale scores (p=0.0001. Conclusion: Plantar fascia-specific stretching exercise is an effective treatment option in PF.

  9. Metatarsophalangeal joint extension changes ultrasound measurements for plantar fascia thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Michael J; Lohman, Everett B; Gordon, Keith E; Daher, Noha S

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound is an inexpensive method for quantifying plantar fascia thickness, especially in those with plantar fasciitis. Ultrasound has also been used to assess the effectiveness of various treatments for plantar fasciitis by comparing plantar fascia thickness before and after an intervention period. While a plantar fascia thickness over 4 mm via ultrasound has been proposed to be consistent with plantar fasciitis, some researchers believe the 4 mm plantar fascia thickness level to be a dubious guideline for diagnosing plantar fasciitis due to the lack of standardization of the measurement process for plantar fascia thickness. In particular, no universal guidelines exist on the positioning of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints during the procedure and the literature also has inconsistent protocols. The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the influence of MTP joint extension on plantar fascia thickness in healthy participants and those with unilateral plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia thickness of forty participants (20 with unilateral plantar fasciitis and 20 control) was measured via ultrasound three times at three different MTP joint positions: 1) at rest, 2) 30° of extension from the plantar surface, and 3) maximal extension possible. The plantar fascia became significantly thinner as MTP joint extension increased in both the plantar fasciitis group ( p  plantar fasciitis group, the involved plantar fascia was 1.2 to 1.3 mm thicker (p plantar fascia thickness between the two sides was less than 0.1 mm ( p  plantar fascia thickness. It is recommended that plantar fascia thickness measurements be performed with the toes at rest. If MTP joints must be extended, then the toes should be extended maximally and then noted to ensure subsequent ultrasound procedures are repeated. Standardizing the position of the MTP joints is not only important for attaining the most accurate thickness measurement of the plantar fascia, but is also

  10. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  11. Many faces of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Arfan Ul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is known for its clinical diversity and increasing numbers of new and rare variants of the disease are being reported these days. Aim: The aim of this descriptive study was to look for and report the atypical presentations of this common disease occurring in Pakistan. Methods: The study was carried out in three hospitals (MH, Rawalpindi; PAF Hospital, Sargodha; and CMH, Muzaffarabad from 2002 to 2006. Military and civilian patients of all ages, both males and females, belonging to central and north Punjab province and Kashmir were included in the study. Clinical as well as parasitological features of cutaneous leishmaniasis were studied. The unusual lesions were photographed and categorized accordingly using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 718 patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis, 41 (5.7% had unusual presentations. The commonest among unusual morphologies was lupoid leishmaniasis 14 (34.1%, followed by sporotrichoid 5 (12.1%, paronychial 3 (7.3%, lid leishmaniasis 2 (4.9%, psoriasiform 2 (4.9%, mycetoma-like 2 (4.9%, erysipeloid 2 (4.9%, chancriform 2 (4.9%, whitlow 1 (2.4%, scar leishmaniasis 1 (2.4%, DLE-like 1 (2.4%, ′squamous cell carcinoma′-like 1 (2.4%, zosteriform 1 (2.4%, eczematous 1 (2.4%, verrucous 1 (2.4%, palmar/plantar 1 (2.4% and mucocutaneous 1 (2.4%. Conclusion: In Pakistan, an endemic country for CL, the possibility of CL should be kept in mind while diagnosing common dermatological diseases like erysipelas, chronic eczema, herpes zoster, paronychia; and uncommon disorders like lupus vulgaris, squamous cell carcinoma, sporotrichosis, mycetoma and other deep mycoses.

  12. Effectiveness of the Simultaneous Stretching of the Achilles Tendon and Plantar Fascia in Individuals With Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkananuwat, Phoomchai; Kanlayanaphotporn, Rotsalai; Purepong, Nithima

    2018-01-01

    Since the plantar fascia and the Achilles tendon are anatomically connected, it is plausible that stretching of both structures simultaneously will result in a better outcome for plantar fasciitis. Fifty participants aged 40 to 60 years with a history of plantar fasciitis greater than 1 month were recruited. They were prospectively randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 was instructed to stretch the Achilles tendon while group 2 simultaneously stretched the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia. After 4 weeks of both stretching protocols, participants in group 2 demonstrated a significantly greater pressure pain threshold than participants in group 1 ( P = .040) with post hoc analysis. No significant differences between groups were demonstrated in other variables ( P > .05). Concerning within-group comparisons, both interventions resulted in significant reductions in pain at first step in the morning and average pain at the medial plantar calcaneal region over the past 24 hours, while there were increases in the pressure pain threshold, visual analog scale-foot and ankle score, and range of motion in ankle dorsiflexion ( P plantar fascia for 4 weeks was a more effective intervention for plantar fasciitis. Patients who reported complete relief from symptoms at the end of the 4-week intervention in the simultaneous stretching group (n = 14; 56%) were double that of the stretching of the Achilles tendon-only group (n = 7; 28%). II, lesser quality RCT or prospective comparative study.

  13. Fascitis plantar

    OpenAIRE

    López Pérez, Diego

    2014-01-01

    La fascitis plantar (FP) es una de las causas más frecuentes de dolor en el pie, afectando al talón. Es un síndrome degenerativo de la fascia plantar que se produce como resultado de traumas repetidos en el origen de ésta, en el calcáneo, y es la causa más común de dolor en el talón en las personas adultas. Suele presentarse en atletas y corredores, aunque también aparece en la población general, afectando aproximadamente a un 10% en ambos casos. La función que desempeña la fascia es doble...

  14. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409.

  15. Spontaneous distal rupture of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2018-07-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the plantar fascia are uncommon injuries. They typically occur at its calcaneal insertion and usually represent a complication of plantar fasciitis and local treatment with steroid injections. In contrast, distal ruptures commonly result from traumatic injuries. We describe the case of a spontaneous distal rupture of the plantar fascia in a 48-year-old woman with a low level of physical activity and no history of direct injury to the foot, plantar fasciitis, or steroid injections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sonoelastography of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chueh-Hung; Chang, Ke-Vin; Mio, Sun; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2011-05-01

    To compare the stiffness of the plantar fascia by using sonoelastography in healthy subjects of different ages, as well as patients with plantar fasciitis. The study protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the hospital, and all of the subjects gave their informed consent. Bilateral feet of 40 healthy subjects and 13 subjects with plantar fasciitis (fasciitis group) were examined by using color-coded sonoelastography. Healthy subjects were divided into younger (18-50 years) and older (> 50 years) groups. The color scheme was red (hard), green (medium stiffness), and blue (soft). The color histogram was subsequently analyzed. Each pixel of the image was separated into red, green, and blue components (color intensity range, 0-255). The color histogram then computed the mean intensity of each color component of the pixels within a standardized area. Mixed model for repeated measurements was used for comparison of the plantar fascia thickness and the intensity of the color components on sonoelastogram. Quantitative analysis of the color histogram revealed a significantly greater intensity of blue in older healthy subjects than in younger (94.5 ± 5.6 [± standard deviation] vs 90.0 ± 4.6, P = .002) subjects. The intensity of red and green was the same between younger and older healthy subjects (P = .68 and 0.12). The intensity of red was significantly greater in older healthy subjects than in the fasciitis group (147.8 ± 10.3 vs 133.7 ± 13.4, P plantar fascia softens with age and in subjects with plantar fasciitis. RSNA, 2011

  17. Incidence of plantar fascia ruptures following corticosteroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul; Cashdollar, Michael R; Mendicino, Robert W; Catanzariti, Alan R; Fuge, LaDonna

    2010-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is commonly treated with corticosteroid injections to decrease pain and inflammation. Therapeutic benefits often vary in terms of efficacy and duration. Rupture of the plantar fascia has been reported as a possible complication following corticosteroid injection. A retrospective chart review of 120 patients who received corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis was performed at the authors' institution to determine the incidence of plantar fascia rupture. The plantar fascia rupture was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Various factors were analyzed, including the number of injections, interval between injections, body mass index (BMI), and activity level. Four patients (2.4%) consequently experienced plantar fascia rupture following an average of 2.67 injections. The average BMI of these patients was 38.6 kg/m². The authors conclude that corticosteroid injection therapy appears to be a safe and effective form of nonoperative treatment with minimal complications and a relatively low incident of plantar fascia rupture.

  18. Association between plantar fascia vascularity and morphology and foot dysfunction in individuals with chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongying; Ho, Hok-Ming; Ying, Michael; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2013-10-01

    Single-cohort laboratory-based study. To identify whether plantar fascia vascularity and thickness are associated with foot pain and dysfunction in individuals with chronic plantar fasciitis. Background Altered plantar fascia vascularity and thickening of the fascia have been identified in individuals with chronic plantar fasciitis. Thirty-eight patients with chronic unilateral plantar fasciitis and 21 controls participated in this study. Proximal plantar fascia vascularization and thickness were assessed using ultrasound imaging, and pain and foot dysfunction were quantified with a visual analog scale and the Chinese version of the Foot Function Index, respectively. Paired t tests were used to assess the side-to-side differences in fascia thickness and vascularity index (VI) in the control and patient groups, and an unpaired t test was used to make comparisons with the patient group. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify whether the VI and fascia thickness were associated with pain and foot dysfunction. There were significantly higher VI (mean ± SD, 2.4% ± 1.4%) and fascia thickness (5.0 ± 1.3 mm) values in the affected feet when compared with the unaffected feet in the patient group (VI, 1.4% ± 0.5%; fascia thickness, 3.3 ± 0.7 mm) and with the dominant side of the controls (VI, 1.6% ± 0.4%; fascia thickness, 2.9 ± 0.6 mm). After accounting for age, gender, body mass index, and duration of symptoms, the VI explained 13% and 33% of the variance in pain scores measured with a visual analog scale and the pain subscale of the Foot Function Index, respectively; the VI and fascia thickness explained 42% of the variance in the Foot Function Index. Individuals with unilateral chronic plantar fasciitis demonstrated significantly greater vascularity and thickened fascia on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and also to healthy controls. Fascia vascularity was associated independently with self-perceived pain, and both fascia

  19. [Assessment of plantar fasciitis using shear wave elastography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lining; Wan, Wenbo; Zhang, Lihai; Xiao, Hongyu; Luo, Yukun; Fei, Xiang; Zheng, Zhixin; Tang, Peifu

    2014-02-01

    To assess the stiffness and thickness of the plantar fascia using shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers of different ages and in patients with plantar fasciitis. The bilateral feet of 30 healthy volunteers and 23 patients with plantar fasciitis were examined with SWE. The plantar fascia thickness and elasticity modulus value were measured at the insertion of the calcaneus and at 1 cm from the insertion. The elderly volunteers had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness measured using conventional ultrasound (P=0.005) and a significantly lower elasticity modulus value than the young volunteers (P=0.000). The patients with fasciitis had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness (P=0.001) and a lower elasticity modulus value than the elderly volunteers (P=0.000). The elasticity modulus value was significantly lower at the calcaneus insertion than at 1 cm from the insertion in patients with fasciitis (P=0.000) but showed no significantly difference between the two points in the elderly or young volunteers (P=0.172, P=0.126). SWE allows quantitative assessment of the stiffness of the plantar fascia, which decreases with aging and in patients with plantar fasciitis.

  20. Risk factors affecting chronic rupture of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seong; Choi, Young Rak; Kim, Sang Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Seo, Jeong Ho; Jeong, Jae Jung

    2014-03-01

    Prior to 1994, plantar fascia ruptures were considered as an acute injury that occurred primarily in athletes. However, plantar fascia ruptures have recently been reported in the setting of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We analyzed risk factors causing plantar fascia rupture in the presence of preexisting plantar fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed 286 patients with plantar fasciitis who were referred from private clinics between March 2004 and February 2008. Patients were divided into those with or without a plantar fascia rupture. There were 35 patients in the rupture group and 251 in the nonrupture group. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for plantar fascia rupture were compared between the 2 groups. We compared age, gender, the affected site, visual analog scale pain score, previous treatment regimen, body mass index, degree of ankle dorsiflexion, the use of steroid injections, the extent of activity, calcaneal pitch angle, the presence of a calcaneal spur, and heel alignment between the 2 groups. Of the assessed risk factors, only steroid injection was associated with the occurrence of a plantar fascia rupture. Among the 35 patients with a rupture, 33 had received steroid injections. The odds ratio of steroid injection was 33. Steroid injections for plantar fasciitis should be cautiously administered because of the higher risk for plantar fascia rupture. Level III, retrospective comparative study.

  1. Manual therapy for plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Yosefa; Shashua, Anat; Kalichman, Leonid

    2018-03-01

    Manual therapy employed in the treatment of plantar heel pain includes joint or soft tissue mobilizations. Efficacy of these methods is still under debate. To determine whether manual therapy, consisting of deep massage, myofascial release or joint mobilization is effective in treating plantar heel pain. A critical review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. PubMed, PEDro, and Google Scholar databases were searched for keywords relating to plantar heel pain, joint, and soft tissue mobilizations. There were no search limitations or language restrictions. The reference lists of all retrieved articles were searched. The PEDro score was used to assess the quality of the reviewed papers. A total of six relevant RCTs were found: two examined the effectiveness of joint mobilization on plantar heel pain and four the effectiveness of soft tissue techniques. Five studies showed a positive short-term effect after manual therapy treatment, mostly soft tissue mobilizations, with or without stretching exercises for patients with plantar heel pain, compared to other treatments. One study observed that adding joint mobilization to the treatment of plantar heel pain was not effective. The quality of all studies was moderate to high. According to reviewed moderate and high-quality RCTs, soft tissue mobilization is an effective modality for treating plantar heel pain. Outcomes of joint mobilizations are controversial. Further studies are needed to evaluate the short and long-term effect of different soft tissue mobilization techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An exploratory study on differences in cumulative plantar tissue stress between healing and non-healing plantar neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bril, Adriaan; Wissink, Marieke; Bus, Sicco A.

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical stress is important in causing and healing plantar diabetic foot ulcers, but almost always studied as peak pressure only. Measuring cumulative plantar tissue stress combines plantar pressure and ambulatory activity, and better defines the load on ulcers. Our aim was to explore differences

  3. Getting to the heel of the problem: plantar fascia lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeswani, T.; Morlese, J.; McNally, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    Heel pain is a frequent disabling symptom. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult with a large range of possible diagnoses. Lesions of the plantar fascia form an important group. We present a review describing the common lesions of the plantar fascia, including plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia rupture, plantar fibromatosis, and plantar xanthoma, and illustrate them with appropriate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. We also address foreign-body reactions, enthesopathy, and diabetic fascial disease.

  4. Getting to the heel of the problem: plantar fascia lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeswani, T. [Department of Radiology, Worthing and Southlands Hospitals, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Morlese, J. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital, Pond street, London, NW3 2QG (United Kingdom); McNally, E.G. [Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: eugene.mcnally@gmail.com

    2009-09-15

    Heel pain is a frequent disabling symptom. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult with a large range of possible diagnoses. Lesions of the plantar fascia form an important group. We present a review describing the common lesions of the plantar fascia, including plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia rupture, plantar fibromatosis, and plantar xanthoma, and illustrate them with appropriate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. We also address foreign-body reactions, enthesopathy, and diabetic fascial disease.

  5. Getting to the heel of the problem: plantar fascia lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeswani, T; Morlese, J; McNally, E G

    2009-09-01

    Heel pain is a frequent disabling symptom. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult with a large range of possible diagnoses. Lesions of the plantar fascia form an important group. We present a review describing the common lesions of the plantar fascia, including plantar fasciitis, plantar fascia rupture, plantar fibromatosis, and plantar xanthoma, and illustrate them with appropriate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging. We also address foreign-body reactions, enthesopathy, and diabetic fascial disease.

  6. Mechanical Information of Plantar Fascia during Normal Gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yaodong; Li, Zhiyong

    The plantar fascia is an important foot tissue in stabilizing the longitudinal arch of human foot. Direct measurement to monitor the mechanical situation of plantar fascia at human locomotion is difficult. The purpose of this study was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the internal stress/strain value of plantar fascia during different stage of gait. The simulated stress distribution of plantar fascia was the lowest at heel-strike, which concentrated on the medial side of calcaneal tubercle. The peak stress of plantar fascia was appeared at push-off, and the value is more than 5 times of the heel-strike position. Current FE model was able to explore the plantar fascia tension trend at the main sub-phases of foot. More detailed fascia model and intrinsic muscle forces could be developed in the further study.

  7. Management of plantar fasciitis in the outpatient setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ang Tee; How, Choon How; Tan, Benedict

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a very common cause of inferior heel pain that can be triggered and aggravated by prolonged standing, walking, running and obesity, among other factors. Treatments are largely noninvasive and efficacious. Supportive treatments, including the plantar fascia-specific stretch, calf stretching, appropriate orthotics and night dorsiflexion splinting, can alleviate plantar fascia pain. While local injections of corticosteroids can help with pain relief, the effects are short-lived and must be weighed against the risk of fat pad atrophy and plantar fascia rupture. Ultrasonography-guided focal extracorporeal shock wave therapy is useful for patients with chronic plantar fasciitis and referrals for this treatment can be made in recalcitrant cases. Activity modification to decrease cyclical repetitive loading of the plantar fascia should be advised during the treatment phase regardless of the chosen treatment modality. PMID:27075037

  8. Targeting the Plantar Fascia for Corticosteroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is often a difficult condition to treat. It is related to repetitive strain of the fascia at its attachment to the heel bone. This condition quite often appears with the concomitant presence of a plantar calcaneal heel spur. Corticosteroid injection is a popular treatment choice for plantar fasciitis, and accurate localization of the injected medication is essential for successful resolution of symptoms after the injection. In the present brief technical communication, a method for targeting the attachment of the plantar fascia to the medial tubercle of the tuberosity of the calcaneus is described. The targeting method uses the lateral radiograph of the foot to aid in localization of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia to the calcaneus. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Talalgia: plantar fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cardenuto Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis is a very common painful syndrome, but its exact etiology still remains obscure. The diagnosis is essentially clinical, based on history-taking and physical examination. Complementary laboratory tests and imaging examinations may be useful for differential diagnoses. The treatment is essentially conservative, with a high success rate (around 90%. The essence of the conservative treatment is the home-based program of exercises to stretch the plantar fascia. Indications for surgical treatment are only made when the symptoms persist without significant improvement, after at least six months of conservative treatment supervised directly by the doctor.

  10. Talalgia: plantar fasciitis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenuto Ferreira, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a very common painful syndrome, but its exact etiology still remains obscure. The diagnosis is essentially clinical, based on history-taking and physical examination. Complementary laboratory tests and imaging examinations may be useful for differential diagnoses. The treatment is essentially conservative, with a high success rate (around 90%). The essence of the conservative treatment is the home-based program of exercises to stretch the plantar fascia. Indications for surgical treatment are only made when the symptoms persist without significant improvement, after at least six months of conservative treatment supervised directly by the doctor. PMID:26229803

  11. Ultrasound evaluation of a spontaneous plantar fascia rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwers, Michael J; Sabb, Brian; Pangilinan, Percival H

    2010-11-01

    Plantar fascia rupture is an occasional complication in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis or in patients with plantar fasciitis treated with steroid injection. Very few cases of spontaneous plantar fascia rupture have been reported in the literature (Herrick and Herrick, Am J Sports Med 1983;11:95; Lun et al, Clin J Sports Med 1999;9:48-9; Rolf et al, J Foot Ankle Surg 1997;36:112-4; Saxena and Fullem, Am J Sports Med 2004;32:662-5). Spontaneous medial plantar fascia rupture in a 37-yr-old man with no preceding symptoms or steroid injections was confirmed with diagnostic ultrasound, which revealed severe fasciitis at the calcaneal insertion with partial tearing. After conservative treatment, the patient returned to full activities. We discuss the anatomy, risk factors, examination findings, and treatment for this condition, as well as the unique benefits that ultrasound offers over magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to consider plantar fascia rupture in patients with hindfoot pain and medioplantar ecchymosis, particularly if an injury occurred during acceleration maneuvers. Ultrasound in these cases can be used to diagnose a plantar fascia tear quickly, accurately, and cost-effectively.

  12. Endoscopic plantar fascia release via a suprafascial approach is effective for intractable plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Wataru; Yasui, Youichi; Miki, Shinya; Kawano, Hirotaka; Takao, Masato

    2017-10-14

    To evaluate the medium-term clinical results of endoscopic plantar fascia release (EPFR) using a suprafascial approach for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Twenty-four feet of twenty-three patients who underwent EPFR using a suprafascial approach were followed up for more than 2 years using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The AOFAS score at final follow-up was compared between patients who participated in athletic activity (group A) and those who were sedentary (group S) and between those with and those without calcaneal spur (group with CS and group without CS, respectively). The ability of patients to return to athletic activity, and if so, the time interval between surgery and return to athletic activity, were investigated in group A. Complications were recorded. The median follow-up duration was 48 months. The mean AOFAS score in all patients increased significantly between before surgery and final follow-up (P plantar nerve occurred in three feet. EPFR using a suprafascial approach was effective for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. However, the prognosis of sedentary patients was inferior to that of patients engaged in athletic activity. IV.

  13. Percutaneous release of the plantar fascia. New surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Plantar fasciopathy presents with pain at the plantar and medial aspect of the heel. If chronic, it can negatively impact on quality of life. Plantar fasciopathy is not always self-limiting, and can be debilitating. Surgical management involves different procedures. We describe a percutaneous plantar fascia release. A minimally invasive access to the plantar tuberosity of the calcaneus is performed, and a small scalpel blade is used to release the fascia. With this procedure, skin healing problems, nerve injuries, infection and prolonged recovery time are minimised, allowing early return to normal activities. V.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure.

  15. Plantar pressure during gait in pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Bertuit, Jeanne; Leyh, Clara; Rooze, Marcel; Feipel, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Background: During pregnancy, physical and hormonal modifications occur. Morphologic alterations of the feet are found. These observations can induce alterations in plantar pressure. This study sought to investigate plantar pressures during gait in the last 4 months of pregnancy and in the postpartum period. A comparison with nulliparous women was conducted to investigate plantar pressure modifications during pregnancy. Methods: Fifty-eight women in the last 4 months of pregnancy, nine postpa...

  16. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  17. Plantar Fascia Rupture: Ultrasound to Facilitate Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servey, Jessica T; Jonas, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Plantar fascia rupture in the absence of previous diagnosis of plantar fasciitis, corticosteroid injection, or injury is a rare occurrence with only 7 case reports in the literature since 1978. This is a case of spontaneous plantar fascia rupture in a 38-year-old active-duty US military member with current considerations in musculoskeletal ultrasound, other radiologic imaging, treatment, and followup of this diagnosis. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis and relation to body mass index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, Huseyin [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey)]. E-mail: ozdemir@firat.edu.tr; Yilmaz, Erhan [Department Orthopedic Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Murat, Ayse [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey); Karakurt, Lokman [Department Orthopedic Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Poyraz, A. Kursad [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey); Ogur, Erkin [Department of Radiology Firat University, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig 23119 (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: We have investigated the role of sonography in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Materials and methods: This study evaluates 39 patients with plantar fasciitis and control group of 22 healthy volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured 5 mm distal to the insertion of the calcaneus of plantar aponeurosis. Qualitative parameters such as decreased echogenity, biconvexity, perifascial fluid and calcification of plantar fascia were also noted. Results: Mean plantar fascia thickness was measured 2.9 mm in patients with unilateral heel pain, 2.2 mm for contralateral normal heel and 2.5 mm for control group. There was a statistically significant difference between heel with plantar fasciitis, contralateral normal heel and control groups (p = 0.009 and 0.0001, respectively). Mean body mass index was 28 kg/m{sup 2} in patients with heel pain and 25 kg/m{sup 2} in control group. Body mass index measurements were significantly different between plantar fasciitis and control groups. We found reduced plantar fascia echogenity in 16 cases (41%), calcaneal spur in 20 cases (51%), biconvex appearance in two cases (5.1%) and perifascial fluid in one case (2.5%). Conclusion: We conclude that in patients with plantar fasciitis, ultrasound may detect relatively small differences in plantar fascia thickness even in clinically unequivocal plantar fasciitis.

  19. Sonographic evaluation of plantar fasciitis and relation to body mass index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Huseyin; Yilmaz, Erhan; Murat, Ayse; Karakurt, Lokman; Poyraz, A. Kursad; Ogur, Erkin

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have investigated the role of sonography in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Materials and methods: This study evaluates 39 patients with plantar fasciitis and control group of 22 healthy volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured 5 mm distal to the insertion of the calcaneus of plantar aponeurosis. Qualitative parameters such as decreased echogenity, biconvexity, perifascial fluid and calcification of plantar fascia were also noted. Results: Mean plantar fascia thickness was measured 2.9 mm in patients with unilateral heel pain, 2.2 mm for contralateral normal heel and 2.5 mm for control group. There was a statistically significant difference between heel with plantar fasciitis, contralateral normal heel and control groups (p = 0.009 and 0.0001, respectively). Mean body mass index was 28 kg/m 2 in patients with heel pain and 25 kg/m 2 in control group. Body mass index measurements were significantly different between plantar fasciitis and control groups. We found reduced plantar fascia echogenity in 16 cases (41%), calcaneal spur in 20 cases (51%), biconvex appearance in two cases (5.1%) and perifascial fluid in one case (2.5%). Conclusion: We conclude that in patients with plantar fasciitis, ultrasound may detect relatively small differences in plantar fascia thickness even in clinically unequivocal plantar fasciitis

  20. Fascitis plantar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinorah Artidiello Bustio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la fascitis plantar es la inflamación del tejido denso que ocupa la parte anterior del tubérculo interno del calcáneo y constituye la causa más frecuente de dolor en la planta de los pies y dificulta en gran medida el desempeño laboral del individuo. Objetivo: caracterizar la fascitis plantar en pacientes asistidos en los servicios del Hospital General Docente "Abel Santamaría Cuadrado" en Pinar del Río. Material y método: estudio descriptivo, longitudinal y aplicado en el Departamento de Medicina Física y Rehabilitación del Hospital "Abel Santamaría Cuadrado", en el periodo comprendido desde abril del 2013 hasta abril del 2014, a los pacientes con diagnóstico de fascitis plantar. El universo coincidió con la muestra (60 pacientes. Resultados: de la muestra distribuida según ocupación laboral, 53 permanecen el mayor tiempo de pie, siendo el sexo femenino más predominante que el masculino y la edad promedio más afectada es de 40 a 49 años. El 70,0% de los pacientes mostraron dolor en las categorías de moderado a severo. Conclusiones: el sobrepeso y la obesidad crean un estrés adicional. Otro de los factores a considerar, son las neuropatías, el abuso del alcohol y el factor hereditario.

  1. Shall We Inject Superficial or Deep to the Plantar Fascia? An Ultrasound Study of the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcay, Eda; Kara, Murat; Karaahmet, Ozgur Zeliha; Ata, Ayşe Merve; Onat, Şule Şahin; Özçakar, Levent

    We compared the effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid, injected superficial or deep to the fascia, in patients with plantar fasciitis. Thirty patients (24 females [75%] and 6 males [25%]) with unilateral chronic plantar fasciitis were divided into 2 groups according to the corticosteroid injection site: superficial (n = 15) or deep (n = 15) to the plantar fascia. Patient heel pain was measured using a Likert pain scale and the Foot Ankle Outcome Scale (FAOS) for foot disability, evaluated at baseline and repeated in the first and sixth weeks. The plantar fascia and heel pad thicknesses were assessed on US scans at baseline and the sixth week. The groups were similar in age, gender, and body mass index (p > .05 for all). Compared with the baseline values, the Likert pain scale (p plantar fascia thickness had decreased significantly in both groups at the sixth week (p  .05 for both). The difference in the FAOS subscales (pain, p = .002; activities of daily living, p = .003; sports/recreational activities, p = .008; quality of life, p = .009) and plantar fascia thickness (p = .049) showed better improvement in the deep than in the superficial injection group. US-guided corticosteroid injections are safe and effective in the short-term therapeutic outcome of chronic plantar fasciitis. Additionally, injection of corticosteroid deep to the fascia might result in greater reduction in plantar fascia thickness, pain, and disability and improved foot-related quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The upright posture improves plantar stepping and alters responses to serotonergic drugs in spinal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sławińska, Urszula; Majczyński, Henryk; Dai, Yue; Jordan, Larry M

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies on the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury have employed robotic means of positioning rats above a treadmill such that the animals are held in an upright posture and engage in bipedal locomotor activity. However, the impact of the upright posture alone, which alters hindlimb loading, an important variable in locomotor control, has not been examined. Here we compared the locomotor capabilities of chronic spinal rats when placed in the horizontal and upright postures. Hindlimb locomotor movements induced by exteroceptive stimulation (tail pinching) were monitored with video and EMG recordings. We found that the upright posture alone significantly improved plantar stepping. Locomotor trials using anaesthesia of the paws and air stepping demonstrated that the cutaneous receptors of the paws are responsible for the improved plantar stepping observed when the animals are placed in the upright posture.We also tested the effectiveness of serotonergic drugs that facilitate locomotor activity in spinal rats in both the horizontal and upright postures. Quipazine and (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) improved locomotion in the horizontal posture but in the upright posture either interfered with or had no effect on plantar walking. Combined treatment with quipazine and 8-OH-DPAT at lower doses dramatically improved locomotor activity in both postures and mitigated the need to activate the locomotor CPG with exteroceptive stimulation. Our results suggest that afferent input from the paw facilitates the spinal CPG for locomotion. These potent effects of afferent input from the paw should be taken into account when interpreting the results obtained with rats in an upright posture and when designing interventions for restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury.

  3. Sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections: where does the injectate go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Eugene; Presley, James C; Murthy, Naveen; Pawlina, Wojciech; Smith, Jay

    2013-08-01

    To determine the distribution of sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections in an unembalmed cadaveric model. A single experienced operator completed 10 sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections in 10 unembalmed cadaveric specimens (5 right and 5 left) obtained from 6 donors (2 male and 4 female) aged 49 to 95 years (mean, 77.5 years) with a mean body mass index of 23.2 kg/m(2) (range, 18.4-26.3 kg/m(2)). A 12-3-MHz linear array transducer was used to direct a 22-gauge, 38-mm stainless steel needle deep to the plantar fascia at the anterior aspect of the calcaneus using an in-plane, medial-to-lateral approach. In each case, 1.5 mL of 50% diluted colored latex was injected deep to the plantar fascia. After a minimum of 72 hours, study coinvestigators dissected each specimen to assess injectate placement. All 10 injections accurately placed latex adjacent to the deep side of the plantar fascia at the anterior calcaneus. However, the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) origin from the plantar fascia variably limited direct latex contact with the plantar fascia, and small amounts of latex interdigitated with the FDB origin in 90% (9 of 10). In all 10 specimens, latex also covered the traversing first branch of the lateral plantar nerve (FBLPN, ie, Baxter nerve) between the FDB and quadratus plantae muscles. No latex was found in the plantar fat pad or plantar fascia in any specimen. Sonographically guided deep plantar fascia injections reliably deliver latex deep to the plantar fascia while avoiding intrafascial injection. However, the extent of direct plantar fascia contact is variable due to the intervening FDB. On the contrary, the traversing FBLPN is reliably covered by the injection. Deep plantar fascia injections may have a role in the management of refractory plantar fasciitis, particularly following failed superficial perifascial or intrafascial injections, in cases of preferential deep plantar fascia involvement, or when entrapment

  4. A patient case highlighting the myriad of cutaneous adverse effects of prolonged use of hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Brett; Ryser, Ted; Neill, John; Aires, Daniel; Rajpara, Anand

    2017-11-15

    Hydroxyurea is an antimetabolite primarily used to treat myeloproliferative disorders, and chronic treatment is associated with many cutaneous adverse effects ranging in severity from ichthyosis to aggressive nonmelanoma skin cancer. We report a 67-year-oldman with a history of polycythemia vera who was referred for management of progressively worsening dorsal hand lesions. The patient presented withhyperpigmentation, ichthyosis, plantar keratoderma, dermatomyositis-like eruptions, two squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratoses. The adversereactions observed were acknowledged to be related to chronic hydroxyurea use. The patient underwent Mohs excision of the squamous cell carcinomas and thehydroxyurea was promptly discontinued; subsequent cutaneous improvement of the dermatomyositislike lesions ensued. Another clinically suspicious aggressive squamous cell carcinoma was suspected and the patient was referred to the plastic surgery department for complete excision because of the size of the lesion. The patient remains on periodic dermatology follow up. We report a case that exemplifies the cutaneous adverse effects of chronic hydroxyurea therapy. Although many cases improve after drug discontinuation, strict photoprotection and ongoing surveillance are indicated given the recently proposed premalignant potential of dermatomyositis-like eruptions and the aggressive nature of hydroxyurea-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer.

  5. Additional diagnostic value of digital radiology in plantar fasciitis diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Prasetyo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasonography (USG is regarded as the gold standard to differentiate normal plantar fascia and plantar fasciitis. Conventional radiography or plain X-ray is typically used to exclude differential diagnosis. Lately, conventional radiography has been digitalized and leads to better visualization of the soft tissue. However, it is not known whether digital radiography evaluation for calcaneus area, both qualitative and quantitative, has a similar diagnostic value as USG findings. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate whether there is a strong correlation between digital radiographic and USG findings for diagnosing plantar fasciitis.Methods: This is a cross sectional study examining adult patients (>18 years old presenting with inferior heel pain. Plantar aponeurosis thickness was measured by digital radiography and ultrasonography; measurement was performed three times in each modality, and the average value was recorded. Fat stranding, presence of calcaneal enthesophyte, and microfracture were also evaluated in digital radiography. Measurement results were classified into plantar fasciitis diagnosis using the cut-off value 4 mm.Results: There was no significant correlation between plantar aponeurosis thickness measured by digital radiography and by ultrasonography (r=0.069, p=0.688. There was no significant association between plantar fasciitis diagnosis by digital radiography and ultrasonography (p=0.162. However, digital radiography showed good sensitivity to detect plantar fasciitis using a cut-off value of >4 mm plantar fascia thickness.Conclusion: Digital radiography might be used to aid definitive diagnosis for plantar fasciitis.

  6. Identification of Foot Pathologies Based on Plantar Pressure Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linah Wafai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Foot pathologies can negatively influence foot function, consequently impairing gait during daily activity, and severely impacting an individual’s quality of life. These pathologies are often painful and correspond with high or abnormal plantar pressure, which can result in asymmetry in the pressure distribution between the two feet. There is currently no general consensus on the presence of asymmetry in able-bodied gait, and plantar pressure analysis during gait is in dire need of a standardized method to quantify asymmetry. This paper investigates the use of plantar pressure asymmetry for pathological gait diagnosis. The results of this study involving plantar pressure analysis in fifty one participants (31 healthy and 20 with foot pathologies support the presence of plantar pressure asymmetry in normal gait. A higher level of asymmetry was detected at the majority of the regions in the feet of the pathological population, including statistically significant differences in the plantar pressure asymmetry in two regions of the foot, metatarsophalangeal joint 3 (MPJ3 and the lateral heel. Quantification of plantar pressure asymmetry may prove to be useful for the identification and diagnosis of various foot pathologies.

  7. Whole plantar nerve conduction study with disposable strip electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmi, Shoji; Kurokawa, Katsumi; Nagai, Taiji; Okamoto, Toshio; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2016-02-01

    A new method to evaluate whole plantar nerve conduction with disposable strip electrodes (DSEs) is described. Whole plantar compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) were recorded at the ankle. DSEs were attached to the sole for simultaneous stimulation of medial and lateral plantar nerves. We also conducted medial plantar nerve conduction studies using an established method and compared the findings. Whole plantar CNAPs were recorded bilaterally from 32 healthy volunteers. Mean baseline to peak amplitude for CNAPs was 26.9 ± 11.8 μV, and mean maximum conduction velocity was 65.8 ± 8.3 m/s. The mean amplitude of CNAPs obtained by our method was 58.2% higher than that of CNAPs obtained by the Saeed method (26.9 μV vs. 17.0 μV; P < 0.0001). The higher mean amplitude of whole plantar CNAPs obtained by our method suggests that it enables CNAPs to be obtained easily, even in elderly people. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Semicircular canals circumvent Brownian Motion overload of mechanoreceptor hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Mees; Heeck, Kier; Elemans, Coen P H

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate semicircular canals (SCC) first appeared in the vertebrates (i.e. ancestral fish) over 600 million years ago. In SCC the principal mechanoreceptors are hair cells, which as compared to cochlear hair cells are distinctly longer (70 vs. 7 μm), 10 times more compliant to bending (44 vs. 500...... nN/m), and have a 100-fold higher tip displacement threshold (hair cells where the bundle is approximated as a stiff, cylindrical elastic rod subject to friction and thermal agitation. Our models suggest that the above...... differences aid SCC hair cells in circumventing the masking effects of Brownian motion noise of about 70 nm, and thereby permit transduction of very low frequency (

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of plantar aponeurosis lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, B.; Christel, P.; Poux, D.

    1987-01-01

    Exploration of sporting injuries to plantar aponeurosis (PA) has up to now been based mainly on clinical examination, from which the diagnosis was established. Imaging technics such as standard radiography and ultrasound scanning have limitations allowing diagnosis to be made usually only by elimination, the lesion being very rarely visualized directly. Ten patients with hyperalgic lesion of plantar arch and functional impotence were explored by MR imaging, and in all cases this examination provided superior data confirmed at operation. The examination is painless and little invasive and can be carried out during the acute phase. The plantar aponeurosis is visualized directly between the muscle mass of the plantar arch and the fatty cushion. All three spatial planes can be investigated, most interesting data being obtained from the sagittal (in the PA axis) and frontal (comparative) planes [fr

  10. Plantar tendons of the foot: MR imaging and US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Blonder, David B; Ciavarra, Gina A; Adler, Ronald Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tendon disorders along the plantar aspect of the foot may lead to significant symptoms but are often clinically misdiagnosed. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the plantar tendons and its appearance at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasonography (US) is essential for recognizing plantar tendon disorders. At MR imaging, the course of the plantar tendons is optimally visualized with dedicated imaging of the midfoot and forefoot. This imaging should include short-axis images obtained perpendicular to the long axis of the metatarsal shafts, which allows true cross-sectional evaluation of the plantar tendons. Normal plantar tendons appear as low-signal-intensity structures with all MR sequences. At US, accurate evaluation of the tendons requires that the ultrasound beam be perpendicular to the tendon. The normal tendon appears as a compact linear band of echogenic tissue that contains a fine, mixed hypoechoic and hyperechoic internal fibrillar pattern. Tendon injuries can be grouped into six major categories: tendinosis, peritendinosis, tenosynovitis, entrapment, rupture, and instability (subluxation or dislocation) and can be well assessed with both MR imaging and US. The radiologist plays an important role in the diagnosis of plantar tendon disorders, and recognizing their imaging appearances at MR imaging and US is essential.

  11. Using Plantar Electrical Stimulation to Improve Postural Balance and Plantar Sensation Among Patients With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized Double Blinded Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K; Grewal, Gurtej Singh; Menzies, Robert; Armstrong, David G; Lavery, Lawrence A

    2017-07-01

    People with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) often exhibit deteriorations in motor-performance mainly due to lack of plantar-sensation. The study explored effectiveness of plantar electrical-stimulation therapy to enhance motor-performance among people with DPN. Using a double-blinded model, 28 volunteers with DPN (age: 57.8 ± 10.2 years) were recruited and randomized to either intervention (IG: n = 17) or control (CG: n = 11) group. Both groups received identical plantar-stimulation devices for six weeks of daily use at home; however, only the IG devices were set to deliver stimulation. Balance (ankle, hip, and center of mass [COM] sway) and gait (stride velocity [SV], stride time [ST], stride length [SL], and cadence) were measured using validated wearable sensors. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at six-week. Clinical assessment including vascular as measured by ankle-brachial-index (ABI) and plantar-sensation as quantified by vibratory plantar threshold (VPT) were also measured at baseline and six weeks. No difference were observed between groups for baseline characteristics ( P > .050). Posttherapy, ankle and COM sway with eyes open were significantly improved ( P 1.20 ( P = .041, d = 0.99) Conclusion: This study suggests that daily home use of plantar electrical-stimulation may be a practical means to enhance motor-performance and plantar-sensation in people with DPN.

  12. Applicability of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broholm, R; Pingel, J; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J; Johannsen, F

    2017-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is used to visualize the microvascularization in various tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CEUS could be used to visualize the microvascular volume (MV) in the plantar fascia, and to compare the method to clinical symptoms and B-mode ultrasound (US) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF). Twenty patients with unilateral PF were included and were divided by US in insertional thickening (10), midsubstance thickening (5), and no US changes (5). The MV was measured simultaneously in both heels. Four areas in the plantar fascia and plantar fat pad were measured independently by two observers. Inter- and intra-observer correlation analyses were performed. The asymptomatic heels showed a constantly low MV, and for the whole group of patients, a significantly higher MV was found in the symptomatic plantar fascia and plantar fat pad. Inter-observer correlation as well as intra-observer agreement was excellent. The MV in the plantar fascia and plantar fat pad can be measured reliably using CEUS, suggesting that it is a reproducible method to examine patients with plantar fasciitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Merkel cells and Meissner's corpuscles in human digital skin display Piezo2 immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mesa, Y; García-Piqueras, J; García, B; Feito, J; Cabo, R; Cobo, J; Vega, J A; García-Suárez, O

    2017-12-01

    The transformation of mechanical energy into electrical signals is the first step in mechanotransduction in the peripheral sensory nervous system and relies on the presence of mechanically gated ion channels within specialized sensory organs called mechanoreceptors. Piezo2 is a vertebrate stretch-gated ion channel necessary for mechanosensitive channels in mammalian cells. Functionally, it is related to light touch, which has been detected in murine cutaneous Merkel cell-neurite complexes, Meissner-like corpuscles and lanceolate nerve endings. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of Piezo2 in human cutaneous mechanoreceptors has never been investigated. Here, we used simple and double immunohistochemistry to investigate the occurrence of Piezo2 in human digital glabrous skin. Piezo2 immunoreactivity was detected in approximately 80% of morphologically and immunohistochemically characterized (cytokeratin 20 + , chromogranin A + and synaptophisin + ) Merkel cells. Most of them were in close contact with Piezo2 - nerve fibre profiles. Moreover, the axon, but not the lamellar cells, of Meissner's corpuscles was also Piezo2 + , but other mechanoreceptors, i.e. Pacinian or Ruffini's corpuscles, were devoid of immunoreactivity. Piezo2 was also observed in non-nervous tissue, especially the basal keratinocytes, endothelial cells and sweat glands. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of Piezo2 in cutaneous sensory nerve formations that functionally work as slowly adapting (Merkel cells) and rapidly adapting (Meissner's corpuscles) low-threshold mechanoreceptors and are related to fine and discriminative touch but not to vibration or hard touch. These data offer additional insight into the molecular basis of mechanosensing in humans. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  14. Sensory Innervation of the Gills: O2-Sensitive Chemoreceptors and Mechanoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleson, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Physical characteristics of water (O2 solubility and capacitance) dictate that cardiovascular and ventilatory performance be controlled primarily by the need for oxygen uptake rather than carbon dioxide excretion, making O2 receptors more important in fish than in terrestrial vertebrates. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of mechanoreception and O2 chemoreception in fishes is important, because water breathing is the primitive template upon which the forces of evolution have modified into the various cardioventilatory modalities we see in extant terrestrial species. Key to these changes are the O2-sensitive chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors, their mechanisms and central pathways. PMID:19193399

  15. Plantar Pressure During Gait in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuit, Jeanne; Leyh, Clara; Rooze, Marcel; Feipel, Véronique

    2016-11-01

    During pregnancy, physical and hormonal modifications occur. Morphologic alterations of the feet are found. These observations can induce alterations in plantar pressure. This study sought to investigate plantar pressures during gait in the last 4 months of pregnancy and in the postpartum period. A comparison with nulliparous women was conducted to investigate plantar pressure modifications during pregnancy. Fifty-eight women in the last 4 months of pregnancy, nine postpartum women, and 23 healthy nonpregnant women (control group) performed gait trials on an electronic walkway at preferred speeds. The results for the three groups were compared using analysis of variance. During pregnancy, peak pressure and contact area decreased for the forefoot and rearfoot. These parameters increased significantly for the midfoot. The gait strategy seemed to be lateralization of gait with an increased contact area of the lateral midfoot and both reduced pressure and a later peak time on the medial forefoot. In the postpartum group, footprint parameters were modified compared with the pregnant group, indicating a trend toward partial return to control values, although differences persisted between the postpartum and control groups. Pregnant women had altered plantar pressures during gait. These findings could define a specific pattern of gait footprints in late pregnancy because plantar pressures had characteristics that could maintain a stable and safe gait.

  16. Hardness and posting of foot orthoses modify plantar contact area, plantar pressure, and perceived comfort when cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousie, Jaquelin A; Blanch, Peter; McPoil, Thomas G; Vicenzino, Bill

    2018-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of hardness and posting of orthoses on plantar profile and perceived comfort and support during cycling. A repeated measures study with randomised order of orthoses, hardness, and posting conditions. Twenty-three cyclists cycled at a cadence of 90rpm and a perceived exertion rating of twelve. Contoured soft and hard orthoses with or without a medial forefoot or lateral forefoot post were evaluated. Plantar contact area, mean pressure and peak pressure were measured for nine plantar regions using the pedar ® -X system and represented as a percentage of the total (CA%, MP%, and PP% respectively). Perceived comfort and support was rated on a visual analogue scale. The softer orthosis significantly increased CA% (p=0.014) across the midfoot and heel with a decrease in the toe region and forefoot. MP% (p=0.034) and PP% (p=0.012) were significantly increased at the mid and lateral forefoot with reductions in MP% at the midfoot and in PP% at the hallux and toes. Forefoot posting significantly increased CA% (p=0.018) at the toes and forefoot and decreased it at the heel. PP% was significantly altered (p=0.013) based on posting position. Lateral forefoot posting significantly decreased heel comfort (p=0.036). When cycling, a soft, contoured orthosis increased contact across the midfoot and heel, modulating forefoot and midfoot plantar pressures but not altering comfort or support. Forefoot postings significantly modified contact areas and plantar pressures and reduced comfort at the heel. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Determinants of footwear difficulties in people with plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Justin; Pappas, Evangelos; Adams, Roger; Crosbie, Jack; Burns, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Plantar heel pain is a common foot disorder aggravated by weight-bearing activity. Despite considerable focus on therapeutic interventions such as orthoses, there has been limited investigation of footwear-related issues in people with plantar heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether people with plantar heel pain experience footwear-related difficulties compared to asymptomatic individuals, as well as identifying factors associated with footwear comfort, fit and choice. The footwear domain of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) was assessed in 192 people with plantar heel pain and 69 asymptomatic controls. The plantar heel pain group was also assessed on a variety of measures including: foot posture, foot strength and flexibility, pedobarography and pain level. A univariate analysis of covariance, with age as the covariate, was used to compare the heel pain and control groups on the FHSQ footwear domain score. A multiple regression model was then constructed to investigate factors associated with footwear scores among participants with plantar heel pain. When compared to asymptomatic participants, people with plantar heel pain reported lower FHSQ footwear domain scores (mean difference -24.4; p footwear scores were associated with maximum force beneath the postero-lateral heel during barefoot walking, toe flexor strength and gender. People with plantar heel pain experience difficulty with footwear comfort, fit and choice. Reduced heel loading during barefoot walking, toe flexor weakness and female gender are all independently associated with reports of footwear difficulties in people with heel pain. Increased focus, in both clinical and research settings, is needed to address footwear-related issues in people with plantar heel pain.

  18. Applicability of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Rikke; Pingel, Jessica; Simonsen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    -mode ultrasound (US) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF). 20 patients with unilateral PF were included and were divided by US in insertional thickening (10), midsubstance thickening (5) and no US changes (5). The MV was measured simultaneously in both heels. Four areas in the plantar fascia and plantar fat...... pad were measured independently by two observers. Inter- and intra-observer correlation analyses were performed. The asymptomatic heels showed a constantly low MV, and for the whole group of patients a significantly higher MV was found in the symptomatic plantar fascia and plantar fat pad. Inter...

  19. Discrete sensors distribution for accurate plantar pressure analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Laetitia; Ille, Anne; Moretto, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of discrete sensors under the footprint for accurate plantar pressure analyses. For this purpose, two different sensor layouts have been tested and compared, to determine which was the most accurate to monitor plantar pressure with wireless devices in research and/or clinical practice. Ten healthy volunteers participated in the study (age range: 23-58 years). The barycenter of pressures (BoP) determined from the plantar pressure system (W-inshoe®) was compared to the center of pressures (CoP) determined from a force platform (AMTI) in the medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Then, the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) obtained from both W-inshoe® and force platform was compared for both layouts for each subject. The BoP and vGRF determined from the plantar pressure system data showed good correlation (SCC) with those determined from the force platform data, notably for the second sensor organization (ML SCC= 0.95; AP SCC=0.99; vGRF SCC=0.91). The study demonstrates that an adjusted placement of removable sensors is key to accurate plantar pressure analyses. These results are promising for a plantar pressure recording outside clinical or laboratory settings, for long time monitoring, real time feedback or for whatever activity requiring a low-cost system. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plantar Pressure Detection with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsair-Chun Liang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel fiber-optic sensing system based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs to measure foot plantar pressure is proposed. This study first explores the Pedar-X insole foot pressure types of the adult-size chart and then defines six measurement areas to effectively identify four foot types: neutral foot, cavus foot, supinated foot and flat foot. The plantar pressure signals are detected by only six FBGs, which are embedded in silicone rubber. The performance of the fiber optic sensing is examined and compared with a digital pressure plate of i-Step P1000 with 1024 barometric sensors. In the experiment, there are 11 participants with different foot types to participate in the test. The Pearson correlation coefficient, which is determined from the measured results of the homemade fiber-optic plantar pressure system and i-Step P1000 plantar pressure plate, reaches up to 0.671 (p < 0.01. According to the measured results from the plantar pressure data, the proposed fiber optic sensing system can successfully identify the four different foot types. Measurements of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed system so that it can be an alternative for plantar pressure detection systems.

  1. Plantar fibromatosis and Dupuytren’s contracture in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fibromatosis represents a wide group of benign, locally proliferative disorders of fibroblasts. Dupuytren` s disease is a benign proliferative disease of palmar aponeurosis which usually affects adults between 40 and 60 years of age. Ledderhose`s disease or plantar fibromatosis is plantar equivalent of Dupuyten`s disease most often affecting middle- aged and older men, usually bilateral, represented with painless nodule in the medial division of plantar fascia. Case report. We presented a 19-year old adolescent that turned to a plastic surgeon complaining to his small finger contracture. He noticed palmar thickening with nodule over the metacarpophalangeal joint of small finger of his right hand when he was 16 years old. A year later a finger started to band. During physical checkup we noticed plantar nodule that also had his father and grandmother. Magnetic resonance and tumor biopsy confirmed a suspicion on plantar fibromatosis - Ledderhose`s disease. Clinical exam of the hand clearly led to a conclusion that the patient had Dupuytren`s contracture with pretendinous cord over the small finger flexor tendons and lack of extension of proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint. On the extensor side of the PIP joints there were Garrod`s nodes. The patient refused surgical treatment of plantar tumor, but agreed to surgical correction of finger contracture. Conclusion. Despite the fact that Dupuytren`s disease and plantar fibromatosis are diseases of adults, the possibility of conjoint appearance of these forms of fibromatosis in adolescent period of life should be kept in mind especially in patients with strong genetic predisposition.

  2. Calcaneal attachment of the plantar fascia: MR findings in asymptomatic volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Christine; Maier, Matthias; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Sutter, Reto

    2014-09-01

    To determine the spectrum of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings at the calcaneal attachment of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic volunteers. The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. MR imaging was performed in 77 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48.0 years; age range, 23-83 years) with use of a 1.5-T system. There were 40 women (mean age, 49.0 years; age range, 24-83 years) and 37 men (mean age, 48.0 years; age range, 23-83 years). Signal intensity characteristics and thickness of the medial, central, and lateral fascicles of the plantar fascia were assessed independently by two radiologists. The presence of soft-tissue edema, bone marrow edema, and bone spur formation at the attachment of the plantar fascia was noted. Datasets were analyzed with inferential statistic procedures. The mean thickness of the plantar fascia was 0.6 mm (medial fascicle), 4.0 mm (central fascicle), and 2.3 mm (lateral fascicle). Increased signal intensity in the plantar fascia was seen with the T1-weighted sequence in 16 of the 77 volunteers (21%), the T2-weighted sequence in six (7.8%), and the short inversion time inversion-recovery sequence in six (7.8%). Soft-tissue edema was seen deep to the plantar fascia in five of the 77 volunteers (6.5%) and superficial to the plantar fascia in 16 (21%). A calcaneal spur was detected in 15 of the 77 volunteers (19%). Calcaneal bone marrow edema was present in four volunteers (5.2%). T1-weighted signal intensity changes in the plantar fascia, soft-tissue edema superficial to the plantar fascia, and calcaneal spurs are common findings in asymptomatic volunteers and should be used with caution in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Increased signal intensity within the plantar fascia with fluid-sensitive sequences is uncommon in asymptomatic volunteers.

  3. The relationship between the flexible flatfoot and plantar fasciitis: ultrasonographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chi; Wang, Lin-Yi; Wang, Her-Cherng; Chang, Kai-Lan; Leong, Chau-Peng

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between flexible flatfoot and plantar fasciitis. Twenty-three subjects with flexible flatfoot and 23 subjects with normal arched feet were enrolled. Footprint analysis was used to evaluate the foot conditions in both groups to calculate the individual arch index. We compared the sonographic images of plantar fascia in the flexible flatfoot group with the normal arch group using high-frequency ultrasound. The analysis results indicated that the thickening of the plantar fascia in the flexible flatfoot group was significantly different from the normal arch group. In the flexible flatfoot group, 10 of 23 patients (43.4%) had plantar fasciitis, but only two subjects (8.7%) in the normal arch group had plantar fasciitis. There was a higher incidence of plantar fasciitis in the flexible flatfoot group than the normal arch control group in this study.

  4. Potential Relationship between Passive Plantar Flexor Stiffness and Running Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2018-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between passive stiffness of the plantar flexors and running performance in endurance runners. Forty-eight well-trained male endurance runners and 24 untrained male control subjects participated in this study. Plantar flexor stiffness during passive dorsiflexion was calculated from the slope of the linear portion of the torque-angle curve. Of the endurance runners included in the present study, running economy in 28 endurance runners was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-min trials (14, 16, and 18 km/h) of submaximal treadmill running. Passive stiffness of the plantar flexors was significantly higher in endurance runners than in untrained subjects. Moreover, passive plantar flexor stiffness in endurance runners was significantly correlated with a personal best 5000-m race time. Furthermore, passive plantar flexor stiffness in endurance runners was significantly correlated with energy cost during submaximal running at 16 km/h and 18 km/h, and a trend towards such significance was observed at 14 km/h. The present findings suggest that stiffer plantar flexors may help achieve better running performance, with greater running economy, in endurance runners. Therefore, in the clinical setting, passive stiffness of the plantar flexors may be a potential parameter for assessing running performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The influence of foot position on stretching of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Ryan M; Nawoczenski, Deborah A; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hulin; DiGiovanni, Benedict F

    2007-07-01

    A recent study found nonweightbearing stretching exercises specific to the plantar fascia to be superior to the standard program of weightbearing Achilles tendon-stretching exercises in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis. The present study used a cadaver model to demonstrate the influence of foot and ankle position on stretching of the plantar fascia. Twelve fresh-frozen lower-leg specimens were tested in 15 different configurations representing various combinations of ankle and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint dorsiflexion, midtarsal transverse plane abduction and adduction, and forefoot varus and valgus. Measurements were recorded by a differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT) implanted into the medial band of the plantar fascia, and primary measurement was a percent deformation of the plantar fascia (stretch) with respect to a reference position (90 degrees ankle dorsiflexion, 0 degrees midtarsal and forefoot orientation, and 0 degrees MTP dorsiflexion). Ankle and MTP joint dorsiflexion produced a significant increase (14.91%) in stretch compared to the position of either ankle dorsiflexion alone (9.31% increase, p plantar fascia tissue-specific stretching exercises and lends support to the use of ankle and MTP joint dorsiflexion when employing stretching protocols for nonoperative treatment in patients with chronic proximal plantar fasciitis.

  6. Relative sensitivity of depth discrimination for ankle inversion and plantar flexion movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Georgia; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger

    2014-02-01

    25 participants (20 women, 5 men) were tested for sensitivity in discrimination between sets of six movements centered on 8 degrees, 11 degrees, and 14 degrees, and separated by 0.3 degrees. Both inversion and plantar flexion movements were tested. Discrimination of the extent of inversion movement was observed to decline linearly with increasing depth; however, for plantar flexion, the discrimination function for movement extent was found to be non-linear. The relatively better discrimination of plantar flexion movements than inversion movements at around 11 degrees from horizontal is interpreted as an effect arising from differential amounts of practice through use, because this position is associated with the plantar flexion movement made in normal walking. The fact that plantar flexion movements are discriminated better than inversion at one region but not others argues against accounts of superior proprioceptive sensitivity for plantar flexion compared to inversion that are based on general properties of plantar flexion such as the number of muscle fibres on stretch.

  7. Is There a Role for MRI in Plantar Heel Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Muhammad Ali; Tsekes, Demetris; Baloch, Irshad

    2018-06-01

    There is an increasing trend to investigate plantar heel pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan though plantar fasciitis is the most common cause. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of MRI in patients presenting with plantar heel pain. Case notes and MRI scans of 141 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis were reviewed retrospectively. There were 98 females and 43 males patients. Fourteen patients had bilateral symptoms. Average age for male patients was 51 years (range = 26-78 years), and for female patients the average age was 52 years (range = 29-76 years). A total of 121 feet had MRI features suggestive of plantar fasciitis. MRI was normal in 32 feet. There was one case of stress fracture of calcaneus and another of a heel fibroma diagnosed on MRI scan. In our study, MRI scan was normal in 20.7% of the cases; 1.3% had a diagnosis other than plantar fasciitis but no sinister pathology. We therefore conclude that MRI scan is not routinely indicated and key is careful clinical assessment. Therapeutic, Level IV: Retrospective, Case series.

  8. Function of chemo- and mechanoreceptors in lobster (Homarus americanus) feeding behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, C D; Atema, J

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of lobsters preying on live mussels (Mytilus edulis) was observed before and after chemosensory-mechanosensory deafferentation of different sensory appendages. Deafferentation of the antennules, leg tips, or maxillipeds (but not the carapace or proximal leg segments) interfered with feeding performance by causing an increase in the time necessary to crush a mussel after search initiation. In addition, deafferentation of the leg tips or the maxillipeds caused a decline in number of mussels crushed but for different reasons. Deafferentation of leg chemoreceptors resulted in the same behavioural deficiencies as deafferentation of leg chemo- and mechanoreceptors, demonstrating that it is the leg chemoreceptors that are essential in releasing this grasping response. Chemoreceptors on different appendages of lobsters therefore fulfill different functional roles in their feeding behavior.

  9. Application of ultrasound in the assessment of plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni-Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Nakhaee, Masoomeh; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Shakourirad, Ali; Safari, Mohammad Reza; Vahab Kashani, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Plantar fasciitis (PFS) is one of the most common causes of heel pain, estimated to affect 10% of the general population during their lifetime. Ultrasound (US) imaging technique is increasingly being used to assess plantar fascia (PF) thickness, monitor the effect of different interventions and guide therapeutic interventions in patients with PFS. The purpose of the present study was to systematically review previously published studies concerning the application of US in the assessment of PF in patients with PFS. A literature search was performed for the period 2000-2012 using the Science Direct, Scopus, PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, Embase and Springer databases. The key words used were: ultrasound, sonography, imaging techniques, ultrasonography, interventional ultrasonography, plantar fascia and plantar fasciitis. The literature search yielded 34 relevant studies. Sixteen studies evaluated the effect of different interventions on PF thickness in patients with PFS using US; 12 studies compared PF thickness between patients with and without PFS using US; 6 studies investigated the application of US as a guide for therapeutic intervention in patients with PFS. There were variations among studies in terms of methodology used. The results indicated that US can be considered a reliable imaging technique for assessing PF thickness, monitoring the effect of different interventions and guiding therapeutic interventions in patients with PFS. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Plantar-flexion of the ankle joint complex in terminal stance is initiated by subtalar plantar-flexion: A bi-planar fluoroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Lee, Kyoung Min; Cha, Young Joo

    2015-10-01

    Gross motion of the ankle joint complex (AJC) is a summation of the ankle and subtalar joints. Although AJC kinematics have been widely used to evaluate the function of the AJC, the coordinated movements of the ankle and subtalar joints are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify the individual kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the intact foot during ground walking by using a bi-planar fluoroscopic system. Bi-planar fluoroscopic images of the foot and ankle during walking and standing were acquired from 10 healthy subjects. The three-dimensional movements of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus were calculated with a three-dimensional/two-dimensional registration method. The skeletal kinematics were quantified from 9% to 86% of the full stance phase because of the limited camera speed of the X-ray system. At the beginning of terminal stance, plantar-flexion of the AJC was initiated in the subtalar joint on average at 75% ranging from 62% to 76% of the stance phase, and plantar-flexion of the ankle joint did not start until 86% of the stance phase. The earlier change to plantar-flexion in the AJC than the ankle joint due to the early plantar-flexion in the subtalar joint was observed in 8 of the 10 subjects. This phenomenon could be explained by the absence of direct muscle insertion on the talus. Preceding subtalar plantar-flexion could contribute to efficient and stable ankle plantar-flexion by locking the midtarsal joint, but this explanation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Increasing preferred step rate during running reduces plantar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, James M; Bonanno, Daniel R

    2018-01-01

    Increasing preferred step rate during running is a commonly used strategy in the management of running-related injuries. This study investigated the effect of different step rates on plantar pressures during running. Thirty-two healthy runners ran at a comfortable speed on a treadmill at five step rates (preferred, ±5%, and ±10%). For each step rate, plantar pressure data were collected using the pedar-X in-shoe system. Compared to running with a preferred step rate, a 10% increase in step rate significantly reduced peak pressure (144.5±46.5 vs 129.3±51 kPa; P=.033) and maximum force (382.3±157.6 vs 334.0±159.8 N; P=.021) at the rearfoot, and reduced maximum force (426.4±130.4 vs 400.0±116.6 N; P=.001) at the midfoot. In contrast, a 10% decrease in step rate significantly increased peak pressure (144.5±46.5 vs 161.5±49.3 kPa; P=.011) and maximum force (382.3±157.6 vs 425.4±155.3 N; P=.032) at the rearfoot. Changing step rate by 5% provided no effect on plantar pressures, and no differences in plantar pressures were observed at the medial forefoot, lateral forefoot or hallux between the step rates. This study's findings indicate that increasing preferred step rate by 10% during running will reduce plantar pressures at the rearfoot and midfoot, while decreasing step rate by 10% will increase plantar pressures at the rearfoot. However, changing preferred step rate by 5% will provide no effect on plantar pressures, and forefoot pressures are unaffected by changes in step rate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in People With and Without Plantar Heel Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotchett, Matthew; Munteanu, Shannon E; Landorf, Karl B

    2016-08-01

    Depression, anxiety, and stress are prevalent in patients with musculoskeletal pain, but the impact of these emotional states has not been evaluated in people with plantar heel pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between depression, anxiety, and stress with plantar heel pain. Forty-five participants with plantar heel pain were matched by sex and age (±2 years) to 45 participants without plantar heel pain. Levels of depression, anxiety, and stress were measured using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (short version) in participants with and without plantar heel pain. Logistic regression was conducted to determine if levels of depression, anxiety, or stress were associated with having plantar heel pain. Univariate analysis indicated that participants with plantar heel pain had greater levels of depression (mean difference = 4.4, 95% CI 2.3 to 6.5), anxiety (mean difference = 2.6, 95% CI 0.9 to 4.3), and stress (mean difference = 4.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 7.8). After adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and education, for every 1 unit increase in depression, anxiety, or stress (in the DASS subscales), the odds ratios for having plantar heel pain were increased by 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.6), 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.5), and 1.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.3), respectively. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress were independently associated with plantar heel pain. Larger prospective studies are necessary to evaluate the temporal association between these emotional states and plantar heel pain. Level III, cross sectional, observational. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Reproducibility of sonographic measurement of thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Wen; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Yu, Tung-Yang; Huang, Kuo-Yao

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the intra- and interrater reliability of ultrasonographic measurements of the thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia. Eleven patients (20 feet), who complained of inferior heel pain, and 26 volunteers (52 feet) were enrolled. Two sonographers independently imaged the plantar fascia in both longitudinal and transverse planes. Volunteers were assessed twice to evaluate intrarater reliability. Quantitative evaluation of the echogenicity of the plantar fascia was performed by measuring the mean gray level of the region of interest using Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine viewer software. Sonographic evaluation of the thickness of the plantar fascia showed high reliability. Sonographic evaluations of the presence or absence of hypoechoic change in the plantar fascia showed surprisingly low agreement. The reliability of gray-scale evaluations appears to be much better than subjective judgments in the evaluation of echogenicity. Transverse scanning did not show any advantage in sonographic evaluation of the plantar fascia. The reliability of sonographic examination of the thickness of the plantar fascia is high. Mean gray-level analysis of quantitative sonography can be used for the evaluation of echogenicity, which could reduce discrepancies in the interpretation of echogenicity by different sonographers. Longitudinal instead of transverse scanning is recommended for imaging the plantar fascia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The effect of the gastrocnemius on the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier

    2014-12-01

    Although anatomic and functional relationship has been established between the gastrocnemius muscle, via the Achilles tendon, and the plantar fascia, the exact role of gastrocnemius tightness in foot and plantar fascia problems is not completely understood. This article summarizes past and current literature linking these 2 structures and gives a mechanical explanation based on functional models of the relationship between gastrocnemius tightness and plantar fascia. The effect of gastrocnemius tightness on the sagittal behavior of the foot is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Experimental research of gaits based on young plantar pressure test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyun; Tan, Shili; Yu, Hongliu; Shen, Lixing; Zhuang, Jianhai; Wang, Jinwu

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is to study the center line of the plantar pressure of normal young people, and to find the relation between center line of the plantar pressure and gait stability and balance. The paper gives the testing principle and calculating methods for geometric center of plantar pressure distribution and the center of pressure due to the techniques of footprint frame. The calculating formulas in both x direction and y direction are also deduced in the paper. In the experiments carried out in our laboratory, the gait parameters of 131 young subjects walking as usual speed were acquired, and 14 young subjects of the total were specially analyzed. We then provided reference data for the walking gait database of young people, including time parameters, space parameters and plantar pressure parameters. We also obtained the line of geometry center and pressure center under the foot. We found that the differences existed in normal people's geometric center line and the pressure center line. The center of pressure trajectory revealed foot movement stability. The length and lateral changes of the center line of the plantar pressure could be applied to analysis of the plantar pressure of all kinds of people. The results in this paper are useful in clinical foot disease diagnosis and evaluation of surgical effect.

  16. Can foot anthropometric measurements predict dynamic plantar surface contact area?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Natalie

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have suggested that increased plantar surface area, associated with pes planus, is a risk factor for the development of lower extremity overuse injuries. The intent of this study was to determine if a single or combination of foot anthropometric measures could be used to predict plantar surface area. Methods Six foot measurements were collected on 155 subjects (97 females, 58 males, mean age 24.5 ± 3.5 years. The measurements as well as one ratio were entered into a stepwise regression analysis to determine the optimal set of measurements associated with total plantar contact area either including or excluding the toe region. The predicted values were used to calculate plantar surface area and were compared to the actual values obtained dynamically using a pressure sensor platform. Results A three variable model was found to describe the relationship between the foot measures/ratio and total plantar contact area (R2 = 0.77, p R2 = 0.76, p Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the clinician can use a combination of simple, reliable, and time efficient foot anthropometric measurements to explain over 75% of the plantar surface contact area, either including or excluding the toe region.

  17. Modified uniportal endoscopic plantar fasciotomy: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angthong, Chayanin; Charoenthamruksa, Chatchavan; Chumchuen, Sukanis; Kanitnate, Supakit; Khadsongkram, Anuwat; Angthong, Wirana

    2012-10-01

    Several authors have reported the benefits of the recent procedure of the dual portal endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). However, very little is known concerning its potential capability via the single portal EPF without special cutting device. The present study aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of uniportal EPF in a patient with severe intractable plantar fasciitis following a failure of several conservative treatments. The recent technique; uniportal EPF under modified method, without a special cutting device, was reviewed in an effort to improve its capability for plantar release and to provide information for the avoidance of this procedure's complications. A patient, with the recalcitrant conditions and the progression of the severe plantar fasciitis of bilateral feet after a failure of the conservative treatments for 13-month period, was included in this report. All data of the preoperative and each successive postoperative period (1, 6 months and last follow-up) were prospectively collected including American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, Visual Analogue Scale-Foot and Ankle (VAS-FA) score and any related complications. The operations were carried out by a single surgeon with the modified uniportal EPF via a simple hooked soft-tissue blade, without a special cutting device, on both feet simultaneously. All feet had uniportal EPF with transection of the medial 50% of the plantar fascia. Postoperatively, a patient was instructed to have partial-weight bearing for the first 2 weeks with wearing of full-length silicone insoles. Then, she is allowed to start to fully weightbear with the insoles. She is advised to cautiously return to daily activities and works at 2nd week after the operation. In regard to the EPF in two feet, there were clearly improvements in the comparison between preoperative and last follow-up period in terms of the increasing AOFAS scores, and VAS-FA scores. There were no significant iatrogenic-related complications

  18. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  19. Finite element modelling of Plantar Fascia response during running on different surface types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, A. H. A.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Salleh, A. F.; Rusli, W. M. R.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Daud, R.

    2017-10-01

    Plantar fascia is a ligament found in human foot structure located beneath the skin of human foot that functioning to stabilize longitudinal arch of human foot during standing and normal gait. To perform direct experiment on plantar fascia seems very difficult since the structure located underneath the soft tissue. The aim of this study is to develop a finite element (FE) model of foot with plantar fascia and investigate the effect of the surface hardness on biomechanical response of plantar fascia during running. The plantar fascia model was developed using Solidworks 2015 according to the bone structure of foot model that was obtained from Turbosquid database. Boundary conditions were set out based on the data obtained from experiment of ground reaction force response during running on different surface hardness. The finite element analysis was performed using Ansys 14. The results found that the peak of stress and strain distribution were occur on the insertion of plantar fascia to bone especially on calcaneal area. Plantar fascia became stiffer with increment of Young’s modulus value and was able to resist more loads. Strain of plantar fascia was decreased when Young’s modulus increased with the same amount of loading.

  20. Increased plantar foot pressure in persons affected by leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slim, Frederik J.; van Schie, Carine H.; Keukenkamp, Renske; Faber, William R.; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Although foot pressure has been reported to be increased in people affected by leprosy, studies on foot pressure and its determinants are limited. Therefore, the aim was to assess barefoot plantar foot pressure and to identify clinical determinants of increased plantar foot pressure in leprosy

  1. Effect of Gender on Mechanical Properties of the Plantar Fascia and Heel Fat Pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Serkan

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the plantar fascia and heel fat pad stiffness and thickness parameters in females and compare these values with those of males. This study was carried out in 60 healthy sedentary participants (30 female, 30 male) between the ages of 19 and 50 years. Shear wave velocity (SWV) and thickness of the plantar fascia and heel fat pad were measured with an ultrasonography device. Males had a higher plantar fascia ( P = .037) and heel fat pad ( P = .001) thickness compared with females, but SWV of the plantar fascia ( P = .673), heel fat pad microchamber layer ( P = .240), and heel fat pad macrochamber layer ( P = .636) were similar in both groups. Body mass had a strong correlation with the plantar fascia ( r = 0.64, P plantar fascia ( r = 0.44, P Plantar fascia and heel fat pad stiffness were similar in both genders; however, females had a lower plantar fascia and heel fat pad thickness compared with males. Correlation analysis results suggest that higher plantar fascia and heel fat pad thickness in males may be related to higher body mass and height. Level III, Retrospective comparative study.

  2. Prognostic Value of Diagnostic Sonography in Patients With Plantar Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Adam E; Albright, Rachel H; Crews, Ryan T; Kelil, Tatiana; Wrobel, James S

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the sonographic appearance of the plantar fascia is predictive of the treatment (ie, pain) response in patients receiving supportive therapy for proximal plantar fasciitis. This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained from a randomized controlled trial of ambulatory adults, which examined the efficacy of 3 different foot supports for plantar fasciitis. Participants underwent diagnostic sonographic examinations of their heel at baseline and again at 3 months by a single experienced foot and ankle surgeon. Quantitative (eg, thickness) and qualitative (eg, biconvexity) characteristics of the fascia were recorded according to a standard protocol. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of the pain response. Seventy patients completed a baseline evaluation, and 63 patients completed a 3-month follow-up assessment. The pain response was not associated with the type of foot support (P> .05). The only significant indicator of an unfavorable response in the univariate and multivariate analyses was biconvexity of the plantar fascia on sonography at presentation (multivariate odds ratio, 4.76 [95% confidence interval, 1.16-19.5; P= .030). Furthermore, changes in self-reported pain over the 3-month study period were not accompanied by alterations in plantar fascia thickness over this time (r = .056; P = .671). We conclude that patients who present with biconvexity of the plantar fascia may be less responsive to tier 1 treatment regimens that center around mechanical support of the plantar fascia. Furthermore, follow-up measurements of the fascia in this population should not weigh heavily in decisions such as return to play. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  3. Plantar fascia evaluation with a dedicated magnetic resonance scanner in weight-bearing position: our experience in patients with plantar fasciitis and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutera, R; Iovane, A; Sorrentino, F; Candela, F; Mularo, V; La Tona, G; Midiri, M

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of upright weight-bearing examination of the ankle/hind foot performed with a dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner in the evaluation of the plantar fascia in healthy volunteers and in patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis. Between January and March 2009, 20 patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis (group A) and a similar number of healthy volunteers (group B) underwent MR imaging of the ankle/hind foot in the upright weight-bearing and conventional supine position. A 0.25-Tesla MR scanner (G-Scan, Esaote SpA, Genoa, Italy) was used with a dedicated receiving coil for the ankle/hind foot. Three radiologists, blinded to patients' history and clinical findings, assessed in consensus morphological and dimensional changes and signal intensity alterations on images acquired in both positions, in different sequences and in different planes. In group A, MR imaging confirmed the diagnosis in 15/20 cases; in 4/15 cases, a partial tear of the plantar fascia was identified in the upright weight-bearing position alone. In the remaining 5/20 cases in group A and in all cases in group B, the plantar fascia showed no abnormal signal intensity. Because of the increased stretching of the plantar fascia, in all cases in group A and B, thickness in the proximal third was significantly reduced (pplantar fascia, which could be overlooked in the supine position.

  4. [Parkinson gait analysis using in-shoe plantar pressure measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihet, D; Moretto, P; Defebvre, L; Thevenon, A

    2006-02-01

    The literature reports some studies describing the walking pattern of patients with Parkinson's disease, its deterioration with disease severity and the effects of various treatments. Other studies concerned the plantar pressure distribution when walking. The aim of this study was to validate the use of baropodometric measurements for gait analysis of parkinsonian patients at various stages of disease severity and in on and off phases. Fifteen normal control subjects and fifteen parkinsonian patients equipped with a plantar pressure measurement system performed walking tests. The parkinsonian patients performed the walking tests in off phase then in on phase. A clinical examination was performed to score the motor handicap on the UPDRS scale. Analysis of the plantar pressures of the parkinsonian subjects under various footprint areas detected significant baropodometric differences compared with controls, between groups with different UPDRS scores, and before and after L-Dopa treatment. Plantar pressures measurements allow a sufficiently fine discrimination for using it to detect parkinsonism and monitor patients with Parkinson's disease.

  5. Plantar Pressure Variation during Jogging with Different Heel Height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the key testing and analysis results of an investigation on the effect of heel height on the plantar pressure over different foot areas in jogging. It is important in improving the understanding of jogging with high heels and damage/injury prevention. It can also potentially guide the development of suitable/adaptive exercise schemes in between daily activities with high heels. In this work, plantar pressure data were collected from 10 habituated healthy female subjects (aged 21–25 years at their natural jogging speed with three different conditions: flat heeled shoes (0.8 cm, low heeled shoes (4.0 cm, and high heeled shoes (6.6 cm. Data analysis showed significantly differences in plantar pressure distribution associated with the heel heights with increased pressure in the first metatarsal region and decreased pressure in the lateral metatarsal and midfoot sections. However, there is no significant alteration of plantar pressure in the central area of the forefoot with jogging gait.

  6. Function and morphology correlates of rectal nerve mechanoreceptors innervating the guinea pig internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, P A; Brookes, S J H

    2011-01-01

    Mechanoreceptors to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) contribute to continence and normal defecation, yet relatively little is known about their function or morphology. We investigated the function and structure of mechanoreceptors to the guinea pig IAS. Extracellular recordings from rectal nerve branches to the IAS in vitro, combined with anterograde labeling of recorded nerve trunks, were used to characterize extrinsic afferent nerve endings activated by circumferential distension. Slowly adapting, stretch-sensitive afferents were recorded in rectal nerves to the IAS. Ten of 11 were silent under basal conditions and responded to circumferential stretch in a saturating linear manner. Rectal nerve afferents responded to compression with von Frey hairs with low thresholds (0.3-0.5 mN) and 3.4 ± 0.5 discrete, elongated mechanosensitive fields of innervation aligned parallel to circular muscle bundles (length = 62 ± 16 mm, n = 10). Anterogradely labeled rectal nerve axons typically passed through sparse irregular myenteric ganglia adjacent to the IAS, before ending in extensive varicose arrays within the circular muscle and, to a lesser extent, the longitudinal muscle overlying the IAS. Few (8%) IAS myenteric ganglia contained intraganglionic laminar endings. In eight preparations, mechanotransduction sites were mapped in combination with successful anterograde fills. Mechanotransduction sites were strongly associated with extensive fine varicose arrays within the circular muscle (P IAS are likely to correspond to extensive fine varicose arrays within the circular muscle. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Nonlinear finite element analysis of the plantar fascia due to the windlass mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lin, Chun-Li; Chou, Shih-Wei; Wang, Hsien-Wen

    2008-08-01

    Tightening of plantar fascia by passively dorsiflexing the toes during walking has functional importance. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the influence of big toe dorsiflexion angles upon plantar fascia tension (the windlass effect) with a nonlinear finite element approach. A two-dimensional finite element model of the first ray was constructed for biomechanical analysis. In order to imitate the windlass effect and to evaluate the mechanical responses of the plantar fascia under various conditions, 12 model simulations--three dorsiflexion angles of the big toe (45 degrees, 30 degrees, and 15 degrees), two plantar fascia properties (linear, nonlinear), and two weightbearing conditions (with body weight, without body weight)--were designed and analyzed. Our results demonstrated that nonlinear modeling of the plantar fascia provides a more sophisticated representation of experimental data than the linear one. Nonlinear plantar fascia setting also predicted a higher stress distribution along the fiber directions especially with larger toe dorsiflexion angles (45 degrees>30 degrees>15 degrees). The plantar fascia stress was found higher near the metatarsal insertion and faded as it moved toward the calcaneal insertion. Passively dorsiflexing the big toe imposes tension onto the plantar fascia. Windlass mechanism also occurs during stance phase of walking while the toes begin to dorsiflex. From a biomechanical standpoint, the plantar fascia tension may help propel the body upon its release at the point of push off. A controlled stretch via dorsiflexing the big toe may have a positive effect on treating plantar fasciitis by providing proper guidance for collagen regeneration. The windlass mechanism is also active during the stance phase of walking when the toes begin to dorsiflex.

  8. The Characteristics of Static Plantar Loading in the First-Division College Sprint Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Tong-Hsien Chow

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plantar pressure measurement is an effective method for assessing plantar loading and can be applied to evaluating movement performance of the foot. The purpose of this study is to explore the sprint athletes' plantar loading characteristics and pain profiles in static standing. Methods: Experiments were undertaken on 80 first-division college sprint athletes and 85 healthy non-sprinters. 'JC Mat', the optical plantar pressure measurement was applied to examining the differences b...

  9. OA03.12. Herbal socks an effective medication against plantar hyperkeratosis

    OpenAIRE

    Geethadevi, C; Rajendran, R; Radhai, R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Plantar hyperkeratosis commonly called cracked heel is a common condition among adults. Causes for plantar hyperkeratosis are many and include genetic defects reflected in skin structure, allergic dermatoses, and paraneoplastic syndromes seen with particular forms of internal malignancy. Treatment for this condition could be possibly done using traditional herbs. The current study throws light on the cure of plantar hyperkeratosis using socks worn daily. Method: Solanum xanthocarpum ...

  10. Contributions of foot muscles and plantar fascia morphology to foot posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2018-03-01

    The plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia differ between different foot postures. However, how each individual plantar structure contribute to foot posture has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between static foot posture and morphology of plantar foot muscles and plantar fascia and thus the contributions of these structures to static foot posture. A total of 111 participants were recruited, 43 were classified as having pes planus and 68 as having normal foot posture using Foot Posture Index assessment tool. Images from the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles, and the calcaneal (PF1), middle (PF2) and metatarsal (PF3) regions of the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. In order of decreasing contribution, PF3 > FHB > FHL > PER > FDB were all associated with FPI and able to explain 69% of the change in FPI scores. PF3 was the highest contributor explaining 52% of increases in FPI score. Decreased thickness was associated with increased FPI score. Smaller cross sectional area (CSA) in FHB and PER muscles explained 20% and 8% of increase in FPI score. Larger CSA of FDB and FHL muscles explained 4% and 14% increase in FPI score respectively. The medial plantar structures and the plantar fascia appear to be the major contributors to static foot posture. Elucidating the individual contribution of multiple muscles of the foot could provide insight about their role in the foot posture. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamuli Eugena

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA 95% CI: 85.09-117.26 more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial (EVerT trial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plantar warts (verrucae) are extremely common. Although many will spontaneously disappear without treatment, treatment may be sought for a variety of reasons such as discomfort. There are a number of different treatments for cutaneous warts, with salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen being two of the most common forms of treatment. To date, no full economic evaluation of either salicylic acid or cryotherapy has been conducted based on the use of primary data in a pragmatic setting. This paper describes the cost-effectiveness analysis which was conducted alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised trial evaluating the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus 50% salicylic acid of the treatment of plantar warts. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken alongside a pragmatic multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical effectiveness of 50% salicylic acid and cryotherapy using liquid nitrogen at 12 weeks after randomisation of patients. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as the additional cost required to completely cure the plantar warts of one additional patient. A NHS perspective was taken for the analysis. Results Cryotherapy costs on average £101.17 (bias corrected and accelerated (BCA) 95% CI: 85.09-117.26) more per participant over the 12 week time-frame, while there is no additional benefit, in terms of proportion of patients healed compared with salicylic acid. Conclusions Cryotherapy is more costly and no more effective than salicylic acid. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18994246 [controlled-trials.com] and National Research Register N0484189151. PMID:22369511

  13. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia during walking: a quasi-static simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Chang, Chih-Wei; Li, Chun-Ting; Chang, Chih-Han; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The plantar fascia is a primary arch supporting structure of the foot and is often stressed with high tension during ambulation. When the loading on the plantar fascia exceeds its capacity, the inflammatory reaction known as plantar fasciitis may occur. Mechanical overload has been identified as the primary causative factor of plantar fasciitis. However, a knowledge gap exists between how the internal mechanical responses of the plantar fascia react to simple daily activities. Therefore, this study investigated the biomechanical responses of the plantar fascia during loaded stance phase by use of the finite element (FE) modeling. A 3-dimensional (3-D) FE foot model comprising bones, cartilage, ligaments, and a complex-shaped plantar fascia was constructed. During the stance phase, the kinematics of the foot movement was reproduced and Achilles tendon force was applied to the insertion site on the calcaneus. All the calculations were made on a single healthy subject. The results indicated that the plantar fascia underwent peak tension at preswing (83.3% of the stance phase) at approximately 493 N (0.7 body weight). Stress concentrated near the medial calcaneal tubercle. The peak von Mises stress of the fascia increased 2.3 times between the midstance and preswing. The fascia tension increased 66% because of the windlass mechanism. Because of the membrane element used in the ligament tissue, this FE model was able to simulate the mechanical structure of the foot. After prescribing kinematics of the distal tibia, the proposed model indicated the internal fascia was stressed in response to the loaded stance phase. Based on the findings of this study, adjustment of gait pattern to reduce heel rise and Achilles tendon force may lower the fascia loading and may further reduce pain in patients with plantar fasciitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Variability and repeatability analysis of plantar pressure during gait in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Pedro S; Silva, Caio Borella P da; Rocha, Emmanuel S da; Carpes, Felipe P

    2015-01-01

    Repeatability and variability of the plantar pressure during walking are important components in the clinical assessment of the elderly. However, there is a lack of information on the uniformity of plantar pressure patterns in the elderly. To analyze the repeatability and variability in plantar pressure considering mean, peak and asymmetries during aged gait. Plantar pressure was monitored in four different days for ten elderly subjects (5 female), with mean±standard-deviation age of 73±6 years, walking barefoot at preferred speed. Data were compared between steps for each day and between different days. Mean and peak plantar pressure values were similar between the different days of evaluation. Asymmetry indexes were similar between the different days evaluated. Plantar pressure presented a consistent pattern in the elderly. However, the asymmetry indexes observed suggest that the elderly are exposed to repetitive asymmetric loading during locomotion. Such result requires further investigation, especially concerning the role of these asymmetries for development of articular injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hohmann, Peter Reaburn, Kevin Tetsworth, Andreas Imhoff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001, forefoot (p = 0.0001, midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006, hindfoot (p = 0.0001, first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001 and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001. Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance.

  16. Radial shock wave treatment alone is less efficient than radial shock wave treatment combined with tissue-specific plantar fascia-stretching in patients with chronic plantar heel pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompe, Jan D; Furia, John; Cacchio, Angelo; Schmitz, Christoph; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Whether shock wave therapy or shock wave therapy combined with plantar fascia-specific stretching is more efficient in treating chronic plantar heel pain remains unclear. The aim of the study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference of these two forms of management for patients who had unilateral plantar fasciopathy for a minimum duration of twelve months and which had failed at least three other forms of treatment. One hundred and fifty-two patients with chronic plantar fasciopathy were assigned to receive repetitive low-energy radial shock-wave therapy without local anesthesia, administered weekly for three weeks (Group 1, n = 73) or to receive the identical shock wave treatment and to perform an eight-week plantar fascia-specific stretching program (Group 2, n = 79). All patients completed the nine-item pain subscale of the validated Foot Function Index and a subject-relevant outcome questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at baseline, and at two, four, and twenty-four months after baseline. The primary outcome measures were a mean change in the Foot Function Index sum score at two months after baseline, a mean change in item 2 (pain during the first steps of walking in the morning) on this Index, and satisfaction with treatment. No difference in mean age, sex, weight or duration of symptoms was found between the groups at baseline. At two months after baseline, the Foot Function Index sum score showed significantly greater changes for the patients managed with shock-wave therapy plus plantar fascia-specific stretching than those managed with shock-wave therapy alone (p plantar fascia in combination with repetitive low-energy radial shock-wave therapy is more efficient than repetitive low-energy radial shock-wave therapy alone for the treatment of chronic symptoms of proximal plantar fasciopathy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Histologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of cutaneous cysts in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome: clues for differentiation of nonsyndromic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Mariantonieta; Ständer, Sonja; Metze, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Goltz-Gorlin syndrome presents with multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and cutaneous cysts, among other manifestations. The cutaneous cysts have been described as both epidermoid cysts and keratocysts but were not further characterized. Light microscopic examinations were made on 23 cutaneous cysts in 4 patients associated with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome located on extremities, face, trunk, palms, and soles and compared with nonsyndromic vellus hair cysts, steatocystomas, and hybrid cysts. Twenty-one of the syndromic cysts revealed alternating infundibular-like and steatocystoma-like squamous epitheliums in varying proportions. The cysts were lined by both smooth and corrugated squamous epithelium. The horny layer was composed by alternating areas of thin, lamellate, and compact eosinophilic keratin. Only 2 cases showed an exclusive steatocystoma-like type of epithelium very similar to odontogenic keratocysts. Sebaceous glands and follicular structures were absent. There were no differences between palmar and plantar cysts and other anatomic locations. The ultrastructural findings in syndromatic cysts confirmed variable expression of keratohyalin granules. Only 3 of 6 cases of nonsyndromic hybrid cysts showed overlapping features with syndromic cysts. Immunohistochemical profiling of keratin, involucrin, filaggrin, loricrin, and BCL-2 expression in syndromatic cysts showed exclusive positivity of K19 and continuous staining for BCL-2. In summary, 2 types of cutaneous cysts are characteristic of Goltz-Gorlin, irrelevant of their anatomic location, namely steatocystoma-like and more frequently hybrid-like. The diagnosis of syndromic hybrid-like cysts should be considered whenever infundibular and steatocystoma differentiation alternate and overlap. Altogether, these findings in epithelial cysts may raise the suspicion of Goltz-Gorlin as an underlying cause.

  18. The plantar plate of the first metatarsophalangeal joint: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Douglas E; Philbin, Terrence; Hatic, Safet

    2014-04-01

    The plantar plate of the first metatarsophalangeal (MP) joint is a critical structure of the forefoot that has been identified as a major stabilizer within the capsuloligamentous complex. Many studies have clarified and documented the anatomy of the lesser toe MP plantar plates, but few have looked closely at the anatomy of the first MP joint. Ten cadaveric specimens were examined to identify and document the objective anatomic relationship of the plantar plate, tibial sesamoid, and surrounding osseus structures. The average distance of the plantar plate distal insertion from the joint line into the proximal phalanx was 0.33 mm. The plantar plate was inserted into the metatarsal head on average 17.29 mm proximal from the joint line. The proximal aspect of the sesamoid was 18.55 mm proximal to the distal attachment of the plantar plate to the phalanx. The distal aspect of the sesamoid averaged 4.69 mm away from the distal attachment into the proximal phalanx. The footprint of the distal plate insertion was on average 6.33 mm in length in the sagittal plane. The authors hope that these objective data measures can aid in the understanding and subsequent surgical repair of this important forefoot structure.

  19. Thinner plantar fascia predicts decreased pain after extracorporeal shock wave therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2007-07-01

    Increased plantar fascia thickness is common with chronic plantar fasciitis, and reduction of the thickness after extracorporeal shock wave therapy or steroid injection has been reported. We hypothesized a decrease of plantar fascia thickness was associated with pain reduction after extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Fifty-three eligible patients with 78 symptomatic feet were randomly treated with piezoelectric-type extracorporeal shock wave therapy of two intensity levels (0.12 and 0.56 mJ/mm2). Two thousand shock waves for three consecutive sessions were applied at weekly intervals. A visual analog scale for pain, the Foot Function Index, the Short Form-36 Health Survey, and ultrasonographic measurement of plantar fascia thickness were evaluated at baseline and 3 and 6 months after treatment. We analyzed the association between pain level and plantar fascia thickness with generalized estimating equation analysis and adjusted for demographic and treatment-related variables. Patients with thinner plantar fascia experienced less pain after treatment; high-intensity treatment and regular exercise were associated with lower pain level. The overall success rates were 63% and 60% at the 3- and 6-month followups. High- and low-intensity treatments were associated with similar improvements in pain and function. Receiving high-intensity treatment, although associated with less pain at followup, did not provide a higher success rate.

  20. Plantar Fascia Rupture in a Professional Football Referee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürhan Dönmez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Painful plantar heel in athletes can cause significant discomfort and limping due to difficulty in weight-bearing. Plantar fasciitis and calcaneal spurs are frequently associated with this condition. Herein, a 33-year-old male football referee with plantar fascia rupture following a local corticosteroid injection for the relief of heel pain due to calcaneal bony spur is presented. The diagnosis was confirmed through ultrasonography (USG of the heel, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP injection was performed under USG guidance. With a well designed rehabilitation program, he returned to his previous activity level on the 10th week of injury, without any complications. This case report is presented to highlight the potential complications of blinded corticosteroid injections amongst professional athletes, and it cautions physicians who prescribe or intervene by using.

  1. Anatomical features of plantar aponeurosis: cadaveric study using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes do Carmo, Clarissa Canella; Fonseca de Almeida Melao, Lina Isabel; Valle de Lemos Weber, Marcio Freitas; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [UCSD, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Abnormalities of the plantar aponeurosis are commonly encountered in patients with subcalcaneal heel pain. Understanding normal anatomy is required to accurately diagnose some disorders of the foot. The purpose of our study was to describe the normal anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis, using ultrasonography and MRI with close anatomic correlation in cadavers. After MRI and ultrasonography of 10 cadaveric foot specimens, the thickness of the central and lateral portions of the plantar aponeurosis displayed by imaging studies was measured by three radiologists. One specimen was sectioned in the transverse plane, one in the coronal plane, one in the sagittal plane, and two in a sagittal oblique plane. Normal anatomy was identified and similar measurements of the plantar aponeurosis were also made. An average value was determined and a statistical analysis was accomplished. The calcaneal insertions of the plantar aponeurosis were better visualized than its distal portions with both MRI and ultrasonography. The measurements of the plantar aponeurosis made by three different radiologists were different, but without statistical significance. The average measurements for the central and lateral portions of the plantar aponeurosis with both imaging methods were different from each other because of differences in the morphology of these structures. The values obtained with ultrasonography and MRI, were also different from each other for both the central and lateral portions of the plantar aponeurosis, but with no statistical significance. We have described the detailed anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis with emphasis on the more distal structures that can be visualized with MRI. There was no statistically significant difference between the accuracy of ultrasonography and MRI regarding the measurements of the thickness of the central and lateral portions of the plantar aponeurosis. Knowledge of the normal anatomy of these structures enables the radiologist to identify early

  2. Effect of Achilles tendon loading on plantar fascia tension in the standing foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming; An, Kai-Nan

    2006-02-01

    The plantar fascia, which is one of the major arch-supporting structures of the human foot, sustains high tensions during weight-bearing. A positive correlation between Achilles tendon loading and plantar fascia tension has been reported. Excessive stretching and tightness of the Achilles tendon are thought to be the risk factors of plantar fasciitis but their biomechanical effects on the plantar fascia have not been fully addressed. A three-dimensional finite element model of the human foot and ankle, incorporating geometrical and material nonlinearity, was employed to investigate the loading response of the plantar fascia in the standing foot with different magnitudes of Achilles tendon loading. With the total ground reaction forces of one foot maintained at 350 N to represent half body weight, an increase in Achilles tendon load from (0-700 N) resulted in a general increase in total force and peak plantar pressure at the forefoot of up to about 250%. There was a lateral and anterior shift of the centre of pressure and a reduction in the arch height with an increasing Achilles tendon load as a result of the plantar flexion moment on the calcaneus. From the finite element predictions of simulated balanced standing, Achilles tendon forces of 75% of the total weight on the foot (350 N) were found to provide the closest match of the measured centre of pressure of the subject during balanced standing. Both the weight on the foot and Achilles tendon loading resulted in an increase in tension of the plantar fascia with the latter showing a two-times larger straining effect. Increasing tension on the Achilles tendon is coupled with an increasing strain on the plantar fascia. Overstretching of the Achilles tendon resulting from intense muscle contraction and passive stretching of tight Achilles tendon are plausible mechanical factors for overstraining of the plantar fascia.

  3. Innovations in plantar pressure and foot temperature measurements in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Plantar pressure and temperature measurements in the diabetic foot primarily contribute to identifying abnormal values that increase risk for foot ulceration, and they are becoming increasingly more integrated in clinical practice and daily life of the patient. While plantar pressure measurements

  4. Effects of plantar fascia stiffness on the biomechanical responses of the ankle-foot complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming; An, Kai-Nan

    2004-10-01

    The plantar fascia is one of the major stabilizing structures of the longitudinal arch of human foot, especially during midstance of the gait cycle. Knowledge of its functional biomechanics is important for establishing the biomechanical rationale behind different rehabilitation, orthotic and surgical treatment of plantar fasciitis. This study aims at quantifying the biomechanical responses of the ankle-foot complex with different plantar fascia stiffness. A geometrical detailed three-dimensional finite element model of the human foot and ankle, incorporating geometric and contact nonlinearities was constructed by 3D reconstruction of MR images. A sensitivity study was conducted to evaluate the effects of varying elastic modulus (0-700 MPa) of the plantar fascia on the stress/strain distribution of the bony, ligamentous and encapsulated soft tissue structures. The results showed that decreasing the Young's modulus of plantar fascia would increase the strains of the long and short plantar and spring ligaments significantly. With zero fascia Young's modulus to simulate the plantar fascia release, there was a shift in peak von Mises stresses from the third to the second metatarsal bones and increased stresses at the plantar ligament attachment area of the cuboid bone. Decrease in arch height and midfoot pronation were predicted but did not lead to the total collapse of foot arch. Surgical dissection of the plantar fascia may induce excessive strains or stresses in the ligamentous and bony structures. Surgical release of plantar fascia should be well-planned to minimise the effect on its structural integrity to reduce the risk of developing arch instability and subsequent painful foot syndrome.

  5. Foot modeling and smart plantar pressure reconstruction from three sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaida, Hussein Abou; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In order to monitor pressure under feet, this study presents a biomechanical model of the human foot. The main elements of the foot that induce the plantar pressure distribution are described. Then the link between the forces applied at the ankle and the distribution of the plantar pressure is established. Assumptions are made by defining the concepts of a 3D internal foot shape, which can be extracted from the plantar pressure measurements, and a uniform elastic medium, which describes the soft tissues behaviour. In a second part, we show that just 3 discrete pressure sensors per foot are enough to generate real time plantar pressure cartographies in the standing position or during walking. Finally, the generated cartographies are compared with pressure cartographies issued from the F-SCAN system. The results show 0.01 daN (2% of full scale) average error, in the standing position.

  6. Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma: a rare cutaneous neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leiomyomas are firm, round to oval, skin-coloured to brownish papules and nodules that may present as a solitary, few discrete or multiple clustered lesions. Different uncommon patterns of multiple leiomyoma distribution have been noted as bilateral, symmetrical, linear, zosteriform, or dermatomal-like arrangement. One such rare presentation was seen in a 23-year-old patient who presented with zosteriform skin coloured, occasionally painful cutaneous lesions over left shoulder region. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. He was symptomatically managed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and topical capcicum cream. Case is reported here due to rare occurrence of this benign cutaneous neoplasm in an atypical pattern and on uncommon site. (author)

  7. Imaging of plantar fascia and Achilles injuries undertaken at the London 2012 Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, David A; Carne, Andrew; Bethapudi, Sarath; Engebretsen, Lars; Budgett, Richard; O'Connor, Philip

    2013-12-01

    Plantar fascia and distal Achilles injuries are common in elite athletes. Acute athletic injuries of the plantar fascia include acute plantar fasciopathy and partial or complete tears. Underlying most acute injuries is a background of underlying chronic plantar fasciopathy. Injuries may affect the central or less commonly lateral portions of the fascia and acute tears are generally proximal. Athletic Achilles injuries may occur at the mid tendon or the distal insertion, and there may be an underlying chronic tendinopathy. Acute or chronic paratendinopathy may occur as a separate entity or combined with Achilles injury. In this article, the spectrum of athletic injuries of the plantar fascia and Achilles is described, illustrated by imaging findings from the London 2012 Olympic games.

  8. A COMPARITIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPING WITH IONTOPHORESIS AND TAPING ALONE IN CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Chetri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by microtrauma to plantar fascia due to overuse. It is a most common cause of heel pain in runners. Various studies proved taping and Iontophoresis as effective in the treating plantar fasciitis. But there are no studies comparing the combined effect of iontophoresis with taping and taping alone in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: 50 patients suffering from plantar fasciitis who met the inclusion criteria were selected. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups i.e. Group A and Group B. Group A received taping, iontophoresis with plantar fascia stretching. Group B received taping and plantar fascia stretching. A total of 6 treatment sessions were given on alternate days over a period of two weeks for both the groups. Results: VAS and FFI scores across baseline and post intervention showed a significant improvement statistically in their mean scores between Groups A and B (P<0.05. Between group comparison of VAS and FFI scores, it showed that subject treated with Iontophoresis in combination with taping and plantar fascia stretch (Group A had significant improvement in VAS and functional ability when compared to subjects treated with taping and plantar fascia stretching alone (Group B. Conclusion: Iontophoresis along with Taping and plantar fascia stretching gave an additional benefit when compared with Taping and plantar fascia stretching alone in reducing pain and improving function in plantar fasciitis.

  9. [The use of papain in plantar ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otuka, E S; Pedrazzani, E S; Pioto, M P

    1996-01-01

    This work has as a goal to contribute to decrease the inability in leprosy and continuous recurrence of plantar ulcers, through the use of a treatment method using papaine and actions of health education. This work has been done in a health centre with patients that presented plantar ulcers and agreed to participate in the proposed treatment. Analysing and comparing the obtained data before and after treatment, a greater adhesion of patients to this treatment, a quicker healing in relation to other methods used before and a greater interaction with the patient has been observed.

  10. Can plantar soft tissue mechanics enhance prognosis of diabetic foot ulcer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemi, R; Chatzistergos, P; Suresh, S; Sundar, L; Chockalingam, N; Ramachandran, A

    2017-04-01

    To investigate if the assessment of the mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can increase the accuracy of predicting Diabetic Foot Ulceration (DFU). 40 patients with diabetic neuropathy and no DFU were recruited. Commonly assessed clinical parameters along with plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness were measured at baseline using ultrasound elastography technique. 7 patients developed foot ulceration during a 12months follow-up. Logistic regression was used to identify parameters that contribute to predicting the DFU incidence. The effect of using parameters related to the mechanical behaviour of plantar soft tissue on the specificity, sensitivity, prediction strength and accuracy of the predicting models for DFU was assessed. Patients with higher plantar soft tissue thickness and lower stiffness at the 1st Metatarsal head area showed an increased risk of DFU. Adding plantar soft tissue stiffness and thickness to the model improved its specificity (by 3%), sensitivity (by 14%), prediction accuracy (by 5%) and prognosis strength (by 1%). The model containing all predictors was able to effectively (χ 2 (8, N=40)=17.55, P<0.05) distinguish between the patients with and without DFU incidence. The mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue can be used to improve the predictability of DFU in moderate/high risk patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A new method for synchronization of motion capture and plantar pressure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam L

    2010-06-01

    A common plantar pressure analysis technique requires dividing the pressure distribution into regions based on key landmarks of the foot. Typically, this is done using visual inspection of the footprint and is subject to error when there is abnormal foot contact. A novel, robust method of synchronizing motion capture and plantar pressure data was created that allows for motion capture markers to be projected onto the plantar pressure mat for accurate subdivision of the foot. Validation studies showed that spatial synchronization of the plantar pressure and motion capture systems was determined to be accurate within 1 sensel. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of the difference in the plantar flexor strength of the ankle joint in the affected side among hemiplegic patients on the plantar pressure and walking asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Young Youl; Chung, Sin Ho; Lee, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the changes in the gait lines and plantar pressures in static and dynamic circumstances, according to the differences in the strengths of the plantar flexors in the ankle joints on the affected sides of hemiplegic patients, and to determine their impacts on walking symmetry. [Subjects and Methods] A total of thirty hospitalized stroke patients suffering from hemiplegia were selected in this study. The subjects had ankylosing patterns in the ankle joints of the affected sides. Fifteen of the patients had plantar flexor manual muscle testing scores between poor and fair, while fifteen of the patients had zero and trace. [Results] The contact pattern of the plantar surface with the ground is a reliable method for walking analysis, which is an important index for understanding the ankle mechanism and the relationship between the plantar surface and the ground. [Conclusion] The functional improvement of patients with stroke could be supported through a verification of the analysis methods of the therapy strategy and walking pattern.

  13. Saccadic Eye Movement Improves Plantar Sensation and Postural Balance in Elderly Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youngsook

    2016-06-01

    Vision, proprioception and plantar sensation contribute to the control of postural balance (PB). Reduced plantar sensation alters postural response and is at an increased risk of fall, and eye movements reduce the postural sway. Therefore, the aim of this study was to study the improvement of plantar sensation and PB after saccadic eye movement (SEM) and pursuit eye movement (PEM) in community-dwelling elderly women. Participants (104 females; 75.11 ± 6.25 years) were randomly allocated into the SEM group (n = 52) and PEM groups (n = 52). The SEM group performed eye fixation and SEM for 5 minutes, and the PEM group performed eye fixation and PEM for 5 minutes. The plantar sensation was measured according to the plantar surface area of the feet in contact with the floor surface before and after the intervention. Before and after SEM and PEM with the eyes open and closed, PB was measured as the area (mm(2)), length (cm), and velocity (cm/s) of the fluctuation of the center of pressure (COP). The plantar sensation of both feet improved in both groups (p eye open and close in both groups (p < 0.01). The length and velocity of the COP significantly decreased in the SEM group compared to the PEM group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, SEM and PEM are effective interventions for improving plantar sensation and PB in elderly women, with greater PB improvement after SEM.

  14. Can static plantar pressures of prepubertal children be predicted by inked footprints?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Annaliese M; Steele, Julie R; Baur, Louise A

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether a pedograph could be used as a field-based screening tool to predict pressures generated on the plantar surfaces of the feet of prepubertal children during single-limb weightbearing stance. Plantar pressures were collected in 51 primary school-aged children using a pressure distribution measurement system. Statistically significant negative correlations were found between footprint angle and both peak force (r = -0.453) and peak area (r = -0.539), and statistically significant positive correlations were found between the Chippaux-Smirak Index and both peak force (rho= 0.285) and peak area (rho = 0.559). Although statistically significant, the weak relationships precluded foot structure variables from being used to predict the plantar pressures of children during static weightbearing. It is therefore recommended that an alternative field-based tool that directly measures plantar pressures be used to screen children in the public school system to identify those at risk of excessive plantar pressures.

  15. The relationship between plantar pressure and footprint shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Kevin G; Dingwall, Heather L; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Richmond, Brian G

    2013-07-01

    Fossil footprints preserve the only direct evidence of the external foot morphologies and gaits of extinct hominin taxa. However, their interpretation requires an understanding of the complex interaction among foot anatomy, foot function, and soft sediment mechanics. We applied an experimental approach aimed at understanding how one measure of foot function, the distribution of plantar pressure, influences footprint topography. Thirty-eight habitually unshod and minimally shod Daasanach individuals (19 male, 19 female) walked across a pressure pad and produced footprints in sediment directly excavated from the geological layer that preserves 1.5 Ma fossil footprints at Ileret, Kenya. Calibrated pressure data were collected and three-dimensional models of all footprints were produced using photogrammetry. We found significant correlations (Spearman's rank, p plantar pressure distribution and relative footprint depths at ten anatomical regions across the foot. Furthermore, plantar pressure distributions followed a pattern similar to footprint topography, with areas of higher pressure tending to leave deeper impressions. This differs from the results of experimental studies performed in different types of sediment, supporting the hypothesis that sediment type influences the relationship between plantar pressure and footprint topography. Our results also lend support to previous interpretations that the shapes of the Ileret footprints preserve evidence of a medial transfer of plantar pressure during late stance phase, as seen in modern humans. However, the weakness of the correlations indicates that much of the variation in relative depths within footprints is not explained by pressure distributions under the foot when walking on firm ground, using the methods applied here. This warrants caution when interpreting the unique foot anatomies and foot functions of extinct hominins evidenced by their footprint structures. Further research is necessary to clarify how

  16. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  17. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  18. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6 were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55% had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48% had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5. Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0, report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8 and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4. No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis.

  19. Redistribution of joint moments is associated with changed plantar pressure in diabetic polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Paul JB

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN are often confronted with ulceration of foot soles. Increased plantar pressure under the forefoot has been identified as a major risk factor for ulceration. This study sets out to test the hypothesis that changes in gait characteristics induced by DPN related muscle weakness are the origin of the elevated plantar pressures. Methods Three groups of subjects participated: people diagnosed with diabetes without polyneuropathy (DC, people diagnosed with diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN and healthy, age-matched controls (HC. In all subjects isometric strength of plantar and dorsal flexors was assessed. Moreover, joint moments at ankle, knee and hip joints were determined while walking barefoot at a velocity of 1.4 m/s. Simultaneously plantar pressure patterns were measured. Results Compared to HC-subjects, DPN-participants walked with a significantly increased internal plantar flexor moment at the first half of the stance phase. Also in DPN-subjects the maximal braking and propelling force applied to the floor was decreased. Moreover, in DPN-subjects the ratio of forefoot-to-rear foot plantar pressures was increased. Body-mass normalized strength of dorsal flexors showed a trend to be reduced in people with diabetes, both DC and DPN, compared to HC-subjects. Plantar flexors tended to be less weak in DC compared to HC and in DPN relative to DC. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that adverse plantar pressure patterns are associated with redistribution of joint moments, and a consequent reduced capacity to control forward velocity at heel strike.

  20. A constitutive model for the mechanical characterization of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, Arturo N; Pavan, Piero G; Stecco, Carla

    2010-10-01

    A constitutive model is proposed to describe the mechanical behavior of the plantar fascia. The mechanical characterization of the plantar fascia regards the role in the foot biomechanics and it is involved in many alterations of its functional behavior, both of mechanical and nonmechanical origin. The structural conformation of the plantar fascia in its middle part is characterized by the presence of collagen fibers reinforcing the tissue along a preferential orientation, which is that supporting the major loading. According to this anatomical evidence, the tissue is described by developing an isotropic fiber-reinforced constitutive model and since the elastic response of the fascia is here considered, the constitutive model is based on the theory of hyperelasticity. The model is consistent with a kinematical description of large strains mechanical behavior, which is typical of soft tissues. A fitting procedure of the constitutive model is implemented making use of experimental curves taken from the literature and referring to specimens of human plantar fascia. A satisfactory fitting of the tensile behavior of the plantar fascia has been performed, showing that the model correctly interprets the mechanical behavior of the tissue in the light of comparison to experimental data at disposal. A critical analysis of the model with respect to the problem of the identification of the constitutive parameters is proposed as the basis for planning a future experimental investigation of mechanical behavior of the plantar fascia.

  1. Sonographic and MRI evaluation of the plantar plate: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Julie; Silberstein, Morry; Schneider, Timothy; Marks, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the accuracy of ultrasound in the examination of the plantar plate by comparing it with MRI, or if available, surgical findings. The lesser metatarsophalangeal joint plantar plates of 40 symptomatic and 40 asymptomatic feet (160 asymptomatic and 160 symptomatic plantar plates) were examined with ultrasound and MRI. Patients treated with surgery were chosen on a clinical basis and provided surgical correlation for the imaging techniques. Symptomatic patients with metatatarsalgia and suspected metatarsophalangeal joint instability were referred by an orthopedic foot specialist; asymptomatic feet were obtained either through examination of the contralateral foot of the symptomatic patients or volunteers. Ultrasound detected 75/160 and 139/160 plantar plates torn in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, respectively. MRI detected 56/160 and 142/160 tears in the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups, respectively. The sensitivity of MRI and ultrasound with surgical correlation was calculated to be 87 and 96%, respectively, with poor specificity. Ultrasound correlates moderately with MRI in the evaluation of the plantar plate. Surgical correlations, although limited (n=10), indicate ultrasound is superior to MRI with more accurate detection of tears. (orig.)

  2. A COMPARITIVE STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TAPING WITH IONTOPHORESIS AND TAPING ALONE IN CHRONIC PLANTAR FASCITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Biju Chetri, U.T. Ifthikar Ali, Madhusmita Koch, Abhijit Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by microtrauma to plantar fascia due to overuse. It is a most common cause of heel pain in runners. Various studies proved taping and Iontophoresis as effective in the treating plantar fasciitis. But there are no studies comparing the combined effect of iontophoresis with taping and taping alone in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods: 50 patients suffering from plantar fasciitis who met the inclusion criteria were selected...

  3. Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique: a retrospective study of 46 feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Praveen K; Japour, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of anatomy at the surgical site. This technique uses small arthroscopic dissecting instruments through a 0.5-cm incision, allowing the surgeon to avoid the larger and more tissue-disruptive incision that is traditionally used for plantar heel spur resection and plantar fascia releases. Forty-one patients (46 feet) were selected for the study. The mean patient age was 47 years. Twenty-nine were considered obese with a body mass index greater than 30 kg/m(2). Patients were functionally and subjectively evaluated 4 weeks after surgery using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle and Hindfoot Rating Scale. Results from the study show a significant improvement (P = .05 confidence level) 4 weeks postoperatively for the 41 patients (46 feet), compared to their preoperative condition. The mean pretest score was 33.6 (range 10-52); this score improved to 88.0 (range 50-100), 4 weeks postoperatively. There were no postoperative infections or complications. The ultrasound-guided plantar fascia release technique is a practical surgical procedure for the relief of chronic plantar fascia pain because the surgeon is able to clearly visualize the plantar fascia by ultrasound. In addition, there is minimal disruption to surrounding tissue because small instruments are passed through a small 0.5-cm incision. The traditional open method of heel spur surgery, in contrast, uses a larger skin incision of 3 to 5 cm, followed by larger instruments to dissect to the plantar fascia.

  4. Comparison Of Medial Arch-Supporting Insoles And Heel Pads In The Treatment Of Plantar Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkoc Melih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis is a disorder caused by inflammation of the insertion point of the plantar fascia over the medial tubercle of the calcaneus. Foot orthotics are used to treat plantar fasciitis. Heel pads medialise the centre of force, whereas medial arch supporting insoles lateralise the force. We assessed the clinical results of the treatment of plantar fasciitis with silicone heel pads and medial arch-supported silicone insoles.

  5. Total contact cast wall load in patients with a plantar forefoot ulcer and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Lindy; McLaughlin, Patrick; Vicaretti, Mauro; Fletcher, John; Burns, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The total contact cast (TCC) is an effective intervention to reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer. The walls of the TCC have been indirectly shown to bear approximately 30 % of the plantar load. A new direct method to measure inside the TCC walls with capacitance sensors has shown that the anterodistal and posterolateral-distal regions of the lower leg bear the highest load. The objective of this study was to directly measure these two regions in patients with Diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer to further understand the mechanism of pressure reduction in the TCC. A TCC was applied to 17 patients with Diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer. TCC wall load (contact area, peak pressure and max force) at the anterodistal and posterolateral-distal regions of the lower leg were evaluated with two capacitance sensor strips measuring 90 cm(2) (pliance®, novel GmbH, Germany). Plantar load (contact area, peak pressure and max force) was measured with a capacitance sensor insole (pedar®, novel GmbH, Germany) placed inside the TCC. Both pedar® and pliance® collected data simultaneously at a sampling rate of 50Hz synchronised to heel strike. The magnitude of TCC wall load as a proportion of plantar load was calculated. The TCC walls were then removed to determine the differences in plantar loading between the TCC and the cut down shoe-cast for the whole foot, rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot (region of interest). TCC wall load was substantial. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 48 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 34 % of plantar contact area. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 28 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 12 % of plantar peak pressure. The anterodistal lower leg recorded 12 % and the posterolateral-distal lower leg recorded 4 % of plantar max force. There were significant differences in plantar load between the TCC and the cut down shoe-cast for the whole foot, rearfoot, midfoot and

  6. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on stroke patients with plantar fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gon; Bae, Sea Hyun; Kim, Gye Yeop; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to analyze the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of stroke patients with plantar fasciitis. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 10 stroke patients diagnosed with plantar fasciitis who were administered 3 sessions of extracorporeal shock wave therapy per week. After the last session, they performed stretching exercises for their Achilles tendon and plantar fascia for 30 min/day, 5 times a week for 6 months. The following parameters were measured and compared prior to therapy, 6 weeks after therapy, and 6 months after therapy: thickness of the plantar fascia, using an ultrasonic imaging system; degree of spasticity, using a muscle tension measuring instrument; degree of pain, using the visual analogue scale; and gait ability, using the Functional Gait Assessment. [Results] Decreased plantar fascia thickness, spasticity, and pain and increased gait ability were noted after therapy. These changes were significantly greater at 6 months after therapy than at 6 weeks after therapy. [Conclusion] These results indicated that extracorporeal shock wave therapy reduced tension in the plantar fascia, relieving pain and improving gait ability in stroke patients. PMID:25729207

  7. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia secondary to docetaxel chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Niaimi Amjad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Docetaxel is a chemotherapeutic agent used alone or in combination for the management of many neoplastic conditions. Numerous side effects are well described as a consequence. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, although a relatively common side effect of some types of chemotherapy, occurs infrequently with docetaxel and is often attributed to other drug agents. Case Presentation We report the case of a 66-year-old Caucasian woman who received adjuvant docetaxel monotherapy for invasive breast cancer. She developed palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia following her first cycle of treatment, which necessitated a change in management. Conclusion Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia is a relatively common side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy, particularly with drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine and liposomal doxorubicin. Docetaxel is commonly used both alone and in combination with a number of these agents for the management of various malignant conditions. We would like to highlight the occurrence of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia as a result of docetaxel monotherapy so that it can be considered as a potential cause in patients receiving combination treatment with chemotherapeutic agents better known to cause this toxicity.

  8. Objective assessment of corticosteroid effect in plantar fasciitis: additional utility of ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Asmaa Mahmoud Ali; Hassanein, Eshrak; Foti, Calogero

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background although plantar fascia thickening is well documented as a sonographic criterion for the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis (PF), however it was less evaluated as an objective measure of response to treatment. It is unknown to what extent if any different responses to different treatments are related to the ultrasound (US) morphology changes. We aimed to evaluate changes in US findings in correlation to pain reported. Methods this prospective observational trial included 21 plantar fasciitis patients (26 feet), resistant to conservative treatment for at least 2 months. Plantar fascia thickness and echogenicity were evaluated, compared to asymptomatic feet and correlated with visual analogue scale (VAS) and Heel Tenderness Index (HTI), before and after dexam-ethasone (DXM) iontophoresis in group I, and DXM injection in group II. Results increased thickness and reduced echogenicity were constant in symptomatic feet, with high statistical significant difference compared to asymptomatic side. Correlation between plantar fascia thickness with VAS and HTI before and after treatment showed statistically significant positive correlation (pplantar fascia thickness by US in response to DXM had 100% sensitivity, 65.2% specificity and 69% accuracy, with higher specificity and accuracy than VAS. Conclusion US changes showed concurrent validity correlated with self-reported clinical improvement. Accordingly, ultrasound can be considered an objective useful tool for monitoring response to corticosteroid in patients with plantar fasciitis. PMID:26958538

  9. Low Incidence Of Extensor Plantar Reflex In Newborns In An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthy term newborns with Apgar score of 8 and above at one minute were recruited into the study consecutively in a maternity hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. The plantar reflex was elicited by stroking the lateral side of the sole with firm pressure, between 24 - 48 hours after delivery. Results Of 461 newborns, the plantar reflex ...

  10. Distribution and correlates of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions are common in older people and are associated with pain, mobility impairment and functional limitations. However, little has been documented in relation to the frequency or distribution of these lesions. The aim of this study was to document the occurrence of plantar hyperkeratotic lesions and the patterns in which they occur in a random sample of older people. Methods A medical history questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 301 people living independently in the community (117 men, 184 women aged between 70 and 95 years (mean 77.2, SD 4.9, who also underwent a clinical assessment of foot problems, including the documentation of plantar lesion locations, toe deformities and the presence and severity of hallux valgus. Results Of the 301 participants, 180 (60% had at least one plantar hyperkeratotic lesion. Those with plantar lesions were more likely to be female (χ2 = 18.75, p 2 = 6.15, p vs 36.3 ± 8.4°; t = 2.68, df = 286, p vs 4.8 ± 1.3 hours, t = -2.46, df = 299, p = 0.01. No associations were found between the presence of plantar lesions and body mass index, obesity, foot posture, dominant foot or forefoot pain. A total of 53 different lesions patterns were observed, with the most common lesion pattern being "roll-off" hyperkeratosis on the medial aspect of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ, accounting for 12% of all lesion patterns. "Roll-off" lesions under the 1st MPJ and interphalangeal joint were significantly associated with moderate to severe hallux valgus (p p Conclusion Plantar hyperkeratotic lesions affect 60% of older people and are associated with female gender, hallux valgus, toe deformity, increased ankle flexibility and time spent on feet, but are not associated with obesity, limb dominance, forefoot pain or foot posture. Although there are a wide range of lesion distribution patterns, most can be classified into medial, central or lateral groups. Further

  11. Diagnostic imaging for chronic plantar heel pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is a generalised term used to describe a range of undifferentiated conditions affecting the plantar heel. Plantar fasciitis is reported as the most common cause and the terms are frequently used interchangeably in the literature. Diagnostic imaging has been used by many researchers and practitioners to investigate the involvement of specific anatomical structures in CPHP. These observations help to explain the underlying pathology of the disorder, and are of benefit in forming an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic imaging features associated with CPHP, and evaluate study findings by meta-analysis where appropriate. Methods Bibliographic databases including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SportDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched electronically on March 25, 2009. Eligible articles were required to report imaging findings in participants with CPHP unrelated to inflammatory arthritis, and to compare these findings with a control group. Methodological quality was evaluated by use of the Quality Index as described by Downs and Black. Meta-analysis of study data was conducted where appropriate. Results Plantar fascia thickness as measured by ultrasonography was the most widely reported imaging feature. Meta-analysis revealed that the plantar fascia of CPHP participants was 2.16 mm thicker than control participants (95% CI = 1.60 to 2.71 mm, P plantar fascia thickness values greater than 4.0 mm (OR = 105.11, 95% CI = 3.09 to 3577.28, P = 0.01). CPHP participants were also more likely to show radiographic evidence of subcalcaneal spur than control participants (OR = 8.52, 95% CI = 4.08 to 17.77, P plantar fascia and inferior calcaneum in people with CPHP. Analysis of these studies found that people with CPHP are likely to have a thickened plantar fascia with associated fluid collection, and that thickness values >4.0 mm are diagnostic of

  12. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: A rare isolated cutaneous vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar A Subbanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN is a rare form of cutaneous vasculitis that involves small and medium sized arteries of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue without systemic involvement. It presents with tender subcutaneous nodules, digital gangrene, livedo reticularis and subcutaneous ulcerations. The diagnosis is by skin biopsy and characteristic pathologic feature is a leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the small to medium-sized arterioles of the dermis. We report a rare case of benign cutaneous PAN in a 14-year-old girl who presented with history of fever, subcutaneous nodules with cutaneous ulcer and digital gangrene. The skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis in the dermal vessels. She received treatment with steroids and lesions resolved completely over a period of month.

  13. Detection of normal plantar fascia thickness in adults via the ultrasonographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul, Kadir; Ozer, Devrim; Sakizlioglu, Secil Sezgin; Buyuk, Abdul Fettah; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    Heel pain is a prevalent concern in orthopedic clinics, and there are numerous pathologic abnormalities that can cause heel pain. Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, and the plantar fascia thickens in this process. It has been found that thickening to greater than 4 mm in ultrasonographic measurements can be accepted as meaningful in diagnoses. Herein, we aimed to measure normal plantar fascia thickness in adults using ultrasonography. We used ultrasonography to measure the plantar fascia thickness of 156 healthy adults in both feet between April 1, 2011, and June 30, 2011. These adults had no previous heel pain. The 156 participants comprised 88 women (56.4%) and 68 men (43.6%) (mean age, 37.9 years; range, 18-65 years). The weight, height, and body mass index of the participants were recorded, and statistical analyses were conducted. The mean ± SD (range) plantar fascia thickness measurements for subgroups of the sample were as follows: 3.284 ± 0.56 mm (2.4-5.1 mm) for male right feet, 3.3 ± 0.55 mm (2.5-5.0 mm) for male left feet, 2.842 ± 0.42 mm (1.8-4.1 mm) for female right feet, and 2.8 ± 0.44 mm (1.8-4.3 mm) for female left feet. The overall mean ± SD (range) thickness for the right foot was 3.035 ± 0.53 mm (1.8-5.1 mm) and for the left foot was 3.053 ± 0.54 mm (1.8-5.0 mm). There was a statistically significant and positive correlation between plantar fascia thickness and participant age, weight, height, and body mass index. The plantar fascia thickness of adults without heel pain was measured to be less than 4 mm in most participants (~92%). There was no statistically significant difference between the thickness of the right and left foot plantar fascia.

  14. Correlative physiological and morphological studies of rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors in cat's glabrous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iggo, A; Ogawa, H

    1977-01-01

    1. A total of fifty-four mechanoreceptor afferent units with fast conducting axons in the tibial nerve innervating the glabrous skin of the hind leg were isolated in anaesthetized cats. 2. Twenty-six rapidly adapting units (RA), eighteen slowly adapting units (SA) and ten Pacinian corpuscle units (PC) were differentiated from each other mainly on the presence of the off response in RA and PC units to a ramp stimulation, the persistence of discharges of the SA units during steady pressure on the receptive field and the classical tuning curve seen in the PC units. A few PC units in the hairy skin were also studied for comparison. 3. Lamellated corpuscles were found histologically in the skin of the receptive field of RA units and identified as Krause's corpuscle of cylindrical type by their superficial location in the cutaneous tissue and their structure revealed by electron microscopy. 4. Physiological characteristics of RA units to various forms of mechanical stimulation were studied and compared with those of the other two kinds of units. SA units had the lowest critical slope among three groups and PC units the highest. 5. The discharge pattern of RA and PC units to a ramp stimulation was found to be time-locked, whereas with SA unites only the first spike appeared at a fixed latency from the start of stimulation. 6. Some RA units showed a tuning curve which was flat from 10 to 200 Hz. Those with narrowly tuned curves had a best turning frequency at around 20 Hz. They were easily differentiated from the SA and PC units. SA units were tuned best at 5 HZ or less, and PC units at around 200 HZ. 7. The relation between the indentation velocity and amplitude of the ramp and the spike discharges was analysed in eleven RA units. In most cases the relation between identation velocity and maximum instataneous frequency was found to be best fit with a power function although other kinds of functions (linear, logarithmic, and logarithmic hyperbolic tangent) could also fit

  15. Comparison between extracorporeal shockwave therapy, placebo ESWT and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy for the treatment of chronic plantar heel pain in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Fournier, Magali; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2012-10-01

    Plantar fasciitis can be a chronic and debilitating condition affecting athletes of all levels. The aim of this study is to compare treatment outcomes for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis in athletes, comparing focused extra corporeal sound wave therapy (ESWT) and the surgical endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). A total of 37 eligible patients were enrolled in the study between May 2006 and December 2008 at a single institution. Patients were either enrolled in the surgical group, or to the ESWT group which included a placebo controlled, randomized group (P-ESWT). Pre and post Visual Analog Scores (VAS) and Roles and Maudlsey (RM) scores were recorded and compared between the three groups. The patient's return to activity (RTA) was also documented. The results showed statistical improvement within the EPF and ESWT groups with both VAS & RM scores, with EPF being significantly better than both ESWT and P-ESWT in terms of treatment outcomes. Patients enrolled in the ESWT were able though to continue with their exercise regimen, while the EPF group was able to return to their athletic activity in an average of 2.8 months. In conclusion, EPF and ESWT are both effective forms of treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis; EPF being superior in outcomes yet ESWT treatment could be preferable since the athlete can remain active during treatment. II.

  16. The influence of athletic activity on the plantar fascia in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Murat; Cetinus, Ercan; Ekerbicer, H Cetin; Karaoguz, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Complaints deriving from the plantar fascia are relatively common in athletes. This study aimed to investigate the changes of thickness of plantar fascia via sonography in healthy young adults with different levels of activity. One hundred ten adults with normal body mass index were separated into three groups according to activity level: sedentary (group 1, n = 50), athletic activity less than 7 hours per week (group 2, n = 30), and athletic activity 7 or more hours per week (group 3, n = 30). The thicknesses of the plantar fascia at origin and at a point 5 mm distal to origin were measured via sonography. The mean values of the thickness of the proximal plantar fascia (PFp) and the distal plantar fascia (PFd) in group 1 were similar to those of groups 2 and 3 (p > 0.05). The mean values of PFp and PFd were significantly higher in men than in women (p 0.05). There were moderate positive correlations between PFp and weight, height, and body mass index but no correlation between PFp and amount of athletic activity. The thickness of the plantar fascia at origin did not change with athletic activity at the amateur level. Copyright 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Ultrasonographic examination of plantar fasciitis: a comparison of patient positions during examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Choong Woo; Park, ChanJoo; Kim, Yoon-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a non-invasive and low-cost modality for real-time visualisation of the plantar fascia. Ultrasound examination for plantar fasciitis is generally performed with the patient in a prone position, although the rational for using a prone position has not been validated. The aim of the study was to investigate if ultrasound examination in a supine position, which is more comfortable than the prone position, is valid. We conducted a prospective study of 30 participants with plantar fasciitis, 8 men (27 %) and 22 women (73 %), with a mean age of 53.9 ± 12.6 (range, 32 to 77) years, and an equal distribution of left and right feet. The plantar heel was divided into three portions for ultrasound examination: medial, central and lateral. Two measurements of plantar fascia thickness were obtained for each portion, with participants in 2 positions (supine and prone) and for 2 ankle postures (neutral and 15° of plantarflexion). Mean measurements of plantar fascia thickness were compared between the two positions (Wilcoxon signed rank tests for non-normally distributed data and paired t-tests for normally distributed data). Participants were asked to report their preferred position for examination, supine or prone. The measured thickness was comparable for both supine and prone positions, for both ankle postures, neutral and 15° of plantarflexion (p > 0.05). A specific self-reported preferred position was not identified. Ultrasound examination of plantar fasciitis can be performed in the supine position without any significant difference in measurement compared to examination in the conventional prone position. The Catholic Medical Center Office of Human Research Protection Program (CMC-OHRP)/Institutional Review Board approved the current study (Approval No. KC12DISI0338), and all participants provided their written informed consent for participation and publication.

  18. Enthesopathy of the lateral cord of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Douglas F; Nazarian, Levon N; Smith, Jay

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to raise awareness of the diagnosis of enthesopathy of the lateral cord of the plantar fascia (LCPF) and describe its sonographic findings. We conducted a retrospective case series of 13 sonographic examinations with the diagnosis of LCPF enthesopathy. Two cadaver dissections of the plantar foot were performed for anatomic correlation. Sonographic findings of LCPF enthesopathy included generalized or focal hypoechoic thickening, loss of the normal fibrillar echo texture, cortical irregularity of the fifth metatarsal tuberosity, and vascularity on color Doppler imaging. Anatomic dissections of the plantar foot detailed the course of the LCPF and served as a guide for optimal sonographic imaging. Enthesopathy of the LCPF is an important etiology of nontraumatic pain at the base of the fifth metatarsal. Sonographic evaluation can readily show the characteristic findings of LCPF enthesopathy. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Changes in foot plantar pressure in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Enas; Devreux, Isabelle; Embaby, Heba; Alsayed, Amani; Alshehri, Maram

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, the body undergoes many hormonal and anatomical changes causing several medical problems as the musculoskeletal system problems. To investigate the plantar pressure distribution during pregnancy. Twenty two pregnant and non-pregnant females were selected from the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah. All females were evaluated by inspection regarding their deformities of the spine, pelvis, lower extremities and feet. Pain was assessed by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the weight and height were recorded using a calibrated weighing scale. Finally, the plantar pressure distribution was examined by a Global Postural Analysis device (GPA). The results revealed significant asymmetry of weight bearing in the study group (pregnant) compared to the control group (non-pregnant) (p 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant direct relationship between the month of pregnancy and increased weight bearing on the 5th metatarsal in the study group (p= 0.04). There is an effect of pregnancy on plantar pressure distribution as well as weight symmetry which should be considered when designing an antenatal program.

  20. Effect of gender, age and anthropometric variables on plantar fascia thickness at different locations in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier; Alarcón García, Juan María

    2007-06-01

    The study was aimed to investigate plantar fascia thickness at different locations in healthy asymptomatic subjects and its relationship to the following variables: weight, height, sex and age. The study evaluates 96 feet of healthy asymptomatic volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured at four different locations: 1cm proximal to the insertion of the plantar fascia, at the insertion of the plantar fascia on the calcaneus and separate out 1 cm + 2 cm distal to the insertion. A 10 MHz linear-array transducer was used. There were statistically significant differences in plantar fascia thickness at the four different locations (pplantar fascia thickness at 1cm proximal to the insertion. At origin and 1cm distal to insertion weight was an independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness. There are differences of thickness at different locations of plantar fascia measured by ultrasonography. Thickness at 1cm proximal to the insertion is influenced by sex and thickness at origin and at 1cm distal to the insertion has a direct relationship with body weight. This could be attributed to the overloading effect that weight has on plantar fascia in healthy symptomatic subjects at these two locations. Height and age did not seem to influence as independent variables in plantar fascia thickness among non-painful subjects.

  1. A CLINICAL STUDY OF PLANTAR ULCERS IN LEPROSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilakumari Subramoniam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Deformity prevention is one of the top priorities in leprosy elimination programme. Plantar ulcer and foot deformities are commonly seen in leprosy patients causing considerable physical disability. This can be prevented by early and regular MDT, proper practice of feet care, correction of deformities and management of infections. The study was to assess the above factors contributing to the development and recurrences of plantar ulcers among our leprosy patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS 66 leprosy patients with plantar ulcers were evaluated for delay of treatment, practice of feet care, site of ulcer, concomitant deformities and bone changes. Identification of infective agent is done by culture and sensitivity test. RESULTS Majority of patients belonged to the borderline spectrum. Delay in starting anti-leprosy treatment ranged from 2 months to 12 years. The main reasons for the delay in treatment are the patients ignored the lesions because they are asymptomatic or treatment with other modalities like homeo/ayurvedic drugs. 92% of patients studied were not practicing feet care. Common site of ulcer was beneath the heads of metatarsals and big toe. Foot drop was seen in 15% and claw toes in 33%. Osteomyelitis observed in 20% of patients. Common pathogen isolated was staphylococcus seen in 75% of cases followed by Streptococcus and Klebsiella. 50% of Staphylococci isolated were found to be penicillin resistant. CONCLUSION The occurrence of plantar ulcers and its complications are not an inevitable sequelae of leprosy and is totally preventable if appropriate measures are undertaken.

  2. Cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts (verrucae): a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Jayakody, Shalmini; Kang’ombe, Arthur Ricky; Stamuli, Eugena; Turner, Gwen; Thomas, Kim; Curran, Mike; Denby, Gary; Hashmi, Farina; McIntosh, Caroline; McLarnon, Nichola; Torgerson, David; Watt, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of cryotherapy versus salicylic acid for the treatment of plantar warts. Design A multicentre, open, two arm randomised controlled trial. Setting University podiatry school clinics, NHS podiatry clinics, and primary care in England, Scotland, and Ireland. Participants 240 patients aged 12 years and over, with a plantar wart that in the opinion of the healthcare professional was suitable for treatment with both cryotherapy and salicylic acid. Interventions Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by a healthcare professional, up to four treatments two to three weeks apart. Patient self treatment with 50% salicylic acid (Verrugon) daily up to a maximum of eight weeks. Main outcome measures Complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were (a) complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks controlling for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of wart, (b) patient self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months, (c) time to clearance of plantar wart, (d) number of plantar warts at 12 weeks, and (e) patient satisfaction with the treatment. Results There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in the proportions of participants with complete clearance of all plantar warts at 12 weeks (17/119 (14%) v 15/110 (14%), difference 0.65% (95% CI –8.33 to 9.63), P=0.89). The results did not change when the analysis was repeated but with adjustment for age, whether the wart had been treated previously, and type of plantar wart or for patients’ preferences at baseline. There was no evidence of a difference between the salicylic acid and cryotherapy groups in self reported clearance of plantar warts at six months (29/95 (31%) v 33/98 (34%), difference –3.15% (–16.31 to 10.02), P=0.64) or in time to clearance (hazard ratio 0.80 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.25), P=0.33). There was also no evidence of a difference in the number of plantar

  3. Effects of Body Mass Index on Mechanical Properties of the Plantar Fascia and Heel Pad in Asymptomatic Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taş, Serkan; Bek, Nilgün; Ruhi Onur, Mehmet; Korkusuz, Feza

    2017-07-01

    Musculoskeletal foot disorders have a high incidence among overweight and obese individuals. One of the important factors causing this high incidence may be plantar fascia and heel pad (HP)-related mechanical changes occurring in these individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the plantar fascia and HP stiffness and thickness parameters in overweight and obese individuals and compare these values with those of normal-weight individuals. This study was carried out in 87 (52 female, 35 male) healthy sedentary individuals between the ages of 19 and 58 years (34 ± 11 years). Participants were subsequently categorized according to body mass index (BMI) as normal weight (18.5 kg/m 2 Plantar fascia and HP thickness and stiffness were measured with an ultrasonography device using a linear ultrasonography probe. Overweight and obese individuals had higher HP thickness ( P plantar fascia thickness ( P = .001), heel pad microchamber layer (MIC) stiffness ( P plantar fascia stiffness ( P plantar fascia thickness ( P = .001, r = 0.536), MIC stiffness ( P plantar fascia stiffness ( P plantar fascia and an increase in the thickness of the plantar fascia as well as the thickness and stiffness of HP. Increased body mass could cause changes in the mechanical properties of HP and plantar fascia. Level 3, comparative study.

  4. Plantar pain is not always fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Romano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The case is described of a patient with chronic plantar pain, diagnosed as fasciitis, which was not improved by conventional treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, which improved after local glucocorticoid injection.

  5. Vendaje Funcional para la Fascitis Plantar

    OpenAIRE

    Julián Rochina, Iván

    2012-01-01

    El profesor Vicente Tormo aplica un vendaje funcional que aproxima a su centro geométrico las estructuras que configuran la planta del pie, con el objetivo de mantener relajada la fascia plantar durante la bipedestación.

  6. Influence of dental occlusion on postural control and plantar pressure distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnweber, Benjamin; Adjami, Frederic; Schuster, Gabriele; Kopp, Stefan; Natrup, Jörg; Erbe, Christina; Ohlendorf, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    The number of studies investigating correlations between the temporomandibular system and body posture, postural control or plantar pressure distribution is continuously increasing. If a connection can be found, it is often of minor influence or for only a single parameter. However, small subject groups are critical. This study was conducted to define correlations between dental parameters, postural control and plantar pressure distribution in healthy males. In this study, 87 male subjects with an average age of 25.23 ± 3.5 years (ranging from 18 to 35 years) were examined. Dental casts of the subjects were analyzed. Postural control and plantar pressure distribution were recorded by a force platform. Possible orthodontic and orthopedic factors of influence were determined by either an anamnesis or a questionnaire. All tests performed were randomized and repeated three times each for intercuspal position (ICP) and blocked occlusion (BO). For a statistical analysis of the results, non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon-Matched-Pairs-Test, Kruskall-Wallis-Test) were used. A revision of the results via Bonferroni-Holm correction was considered. ICP increases body sway in the frontal (p ≤ 0.01) and sagittal planes (p ≤ 0.03) compared to BO, whereas all other 29 correlations were independent of the occlusion position. For both of the ICP or BO cases, Angle-class, midline-displacement, crossbite, or orthodontic therapy were found to have no influence on postural control or plantar pressure distribution (p > 0.05). However, the contact time of the left foot decreased (p ≤ 0.001) while detecting the plantar pressure distribution in each position. Persistent dental parameters have no effect on postural sway. In addition, postural control and plantar pressure distribution have been found to be independent postural criteria.

  7. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for treatment of plantar fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastgir, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with chronic plantar faciitis. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Department of Orhopaedic, Regional Hospital, Limerick, Ireland from January to December 2004 and comprised 70 heels in 62 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis in whom conventional conservative treatment consisting of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heel cup, orthoses and/or shoe modifications, local steroid injections had failed, and they were treated with low energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Patients were reviewed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks post treatment. Results: At follow-up there was significant decrease in pain on the visual analogue scale (p<0.027), with significant improvement in pain score (p<0.009) and in functional score (p<0.001). The comfortable walking distance had increased significantly and there were no reported side effects. Conclusion: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is a new modality providing good pain relief and a satisfactory clinical outcome in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis. (author)

  8. Diagnostic imaging for chronic plantar heel pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett Joanna T

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP is a generalised term used to describe a range of undifferentiated conditions affecting the plantar heel. Plantar fasciitis is reported as the most common cause and the terms are frequently used interchangeably in the literature. Diagnostic imaging has been used by many researchers and practitioners to investigate the involvement of specific anatomical structures in CPHP. These observations help to explain the underlying pathology of the disorder, and are of benefit in forming an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic imaging features associated with CPHP, and evaluate study findings by meta-analysis where appropriate. Methods Bibliographic databases including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SportDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched electronically on March 25, 2009. Eligible articles were required to report imaging findings in participants with CPHP unrelated to inflammatory arthritis, and to compare these findings with a control group. Methodological quality was evaluated by use of the Quality Index as described by Downs and Black. Meta-analysis of study data was conducted where appropriate. Results Plantar fascia thickness as measured by ultrasonography was the most widely reported imaging feature. Meta-analysis revealed that the plantar fascia of CPHP participants was 2.16 mm thicker than control participants (95% CI = 1.60 to 2.71 mm, P P = 0.01. CPHP participants were also more likely to show radiographic evidence of subcalcaneal spur than control participants (OR = 8.52, 95% CI = 4.08 to 17.77, P Conclusion This systematic review has identified 23 studies investigating the diagnostic imaging appearance of the plantar fascia and inferior calcaneum in people with CPHP. Analysis of these studies found that people with CPHP are likely to have a thickened plantar fascia with associated fluid collection, and that

  9. Quantitative tissue parameters of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in healthy subjects using a handheld myotonometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orner, Sarah; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Schmidberger, Julian; Grüner, Beate

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the quantitative tissue properties of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia using a handheld, non-invasive MyotonPRO device, in order to generate normal values and examine the biomechanical relationship of both structures. Prospective study of a large, healthy sample population. The study sample included 207 healthy subjects (87 males and 120 females) for the Achilles tendon and 176 healthy subjects (73 males and 103 females) for the plantar fascia. For the correlations of the tissue parameters of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia an intersection of both groups was formed which included 150 healthy subjects (65 males and 85 females). All participants were measured in a prone position. Consecutive measurements of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia were performed by MyotonPRO device at defined sites. For the left and right Achilles tendons and plantar fasciae all five MyotonPRO parameters (Frequency [Hz], Decrement, Stiffness [N/m], Creep and Relaxation Time [ms]) were calculated of healthy males and females. The correlation of the tissue parameters of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia showed a significant positive correlation of all parameters on the left as well as on the right side. The MyotonPRO is a feasible device for easy measurement of passive tissue properties of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in a clinical setting. The generated normal values of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia are important for detecting abnormalities in patients with Achilles tendinopathy or plantar fasciitis in the future. Biomechanically, both structures are positively correlated. This may provide new aspects in the diagnostics and therapy of plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanical consequences of plantar fascial release or rupture during gait. Part II: alterations in forefoot loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, N A; Donahue, S W; Ferris, L

    1999-02-01

    With a model using feet from cadavers, we tested the hypothesis that plantar fascial release or rupture alters the loading environment of the forefoot during the latter half of the stance phase of gait. The model simulated the position and loading environment of the foot at two instants: early in terminal stance immediately after heel-off and late in terminal stance just preceding contralateral heel strike. Eight feet were loaded at both positions by simulated plantar flexor contraction, and the distribution of plantar pressure was measured before and after progressive release of the plantar fascia. Strain in the diaphysis of the second metatarsal was also measured, from which the bending moments and axial force imposed on the metatarsal were calculated. Cutting the medial half of the central plantar fascial band significantly increased peak pressure under the metatarsal heads but had little effect on pressures in other regions of the forefoot or on second metatarsal strain and loading. Dividing the entire central band or completely releasing the plantar fascia from the calcaneus had a much greater effect and caused significant shifts in plantar pressure and force from the toes to beneath the metatarsal heads. These shifts were accompanied by significantly increased strain and bending in the second metatarsal. Complete fasciotomy increased the magnitude of strain in the dorsal aspect of the second metatarsal by more than 80%, suggesting that plantar fascial release or rupture accelerates the accumulation of fatigue damage in these bones. Altered forefoot loading may be a potential complication of plantar fasciotomy.

  11. Effect of gender, age and anthropometric variables on plantar fascia thickness at different locations in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier [Department of Podiatry, Universidad Europea de Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: javier.pascual@uem.es; Alarcon Garcia, Juan Maria [Ultrasound Unit, Hospital Nuestra Senora de America, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: The study was aimed to investigate plantar fascia thickness at different locations in healthy asymptomatic subjects and its relationship to the following variables: weight, height, sex and age. Material and methods: The study evaluates 96 feet of healthy asymptomatic volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured at four different locations: 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the plantar fascia, at the insertion of the plantar fascia on the calcaneus and separate out 1 cm + 2 cm distal to the insertion. A 10 MHz linear-array transducer was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences in plantar fascia thickness at the four different locations (p < 0.001) although no differences in PF thickness were found between the two distal from insertion locations (1 and 2 cm). Multiple regression analysis showed sex as independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion. At origin and 1 cm distal to insertion weight was an independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness. Conclusions: There are differences of thickness at different locations of plantar fascia measured by ultrasonography. Thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion is influenced by sex and thickness at origin and at 1 cm distal to the insertion has a direct relationship with body weight. This could be attributed to the overloading effect that weight has on plantar fascia in healthy symptomatic subjects at these two locations. Height and age did not seem to influence as independent variables in plantar fascia thickness among non-painful subjects.

  12. Effect of gender, age and anthropometric variables on plantar fascia thickness at different locations in asymptomatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier; Alarcon Garcia, Juan Maria

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The study was aimed to investigate plantar fascia thickness at different locations in healthy asymptomatic subjects and its relationship to the following variables: weight, height, sex and age. Material and methods: The study evaluates 96 feet of healthy asymptomatic volunteers. The plantar fascia thickness was measured at four different locations: 1 cm proximal to the insertion of the plantar fascia, at the insertion of the plantar fascia on the calcaneus and separate out 1 cm + 2 cm distal to the insertion. A 10 MHz linear-array transducer was used. Results: There were statistically significant differences in plantar fascia thickness at the four different locations (p < 0.001) although no differences in PF thickness were found between the two distal from insertion locations (1 and 2 cm). Multiple regression analysis showed sex as independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion. At origin and 1 cm distal to insertion weight was an independent predictor of plantar fascia thickness. Conclusions: There are differences of thickness at different locations of plantar fascia measured by ultrasonography. Thickness at 1 cm proximal to the insertion is influenced by sex and thickness at origin and at 1 cm distal to the insertion has a direct relationship with body weight. This could be attributed to the overloading effect that weight has on plantar fascia in healthy symptomatic subjects at these two locations. Height and age did not seem to influence as independent variables in plantar fascia thickness among non-painful subjects

  13. Evaluating plantar fascia strain in hyperpronating cadaveric feet following an extra-osseous talotarsal stabilization procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael E; Jawrani, Nikhil T; Goel, Vijay K

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal talotarsal joint mechanics leading to hyperpronation is implicated as one of the most common causes of plantar fasciopathy. In patients with hyperpronating feet, the plantar fascia experiences excessive tensile forces during static and dynamic weight-bearing activities because of excessive medial longitudinal arch depression. For the purposes of this study, we hypothesized that plantar fascia strain in hyperpronating cadaveric feet would decrease after intervention with an extra-osseous talotarsal stabilization (EOTTS) device. A miniature differential variable reluctance transducer was used to quantify the plantar fascia strain in 6 fresh-frozen cadaver foot specimens exhibiting flexible instability of the talotarsal joint complex (i.e., hyperpronation). The strain was measured as the foot was moved from its neutral to maximally pronated position, before and after intervention using the HyProCure(®) EOTTS device. The mean plantar fascia elongation was 0.83 ± 0.27 mm (strain 3.62% ± 1.17%) and 0.56 ± 0.2 mm (strain 2.42% ± 0.88%) before and after intervention, respectively (N = 18, variation reported is ± 1 SD). The average plantar fascia strain decreased by 33%, and the difference was statistically significant with p plantar fascia strain suggests that an EOTTS device might be effective in stabilizing the pathologic talotarsal joint complex and the medial longitudinal arch and in eliminating hyperpronation. An EOTTS procedure might offer a possible treatment option for plantar fasciopathy in cases in which the underlying etiology is abnormal talotarsal biomechanics. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in recently diagnosed type II diabetes: role of body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Di Carlo, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2012-07-01

    Previous research has shown that plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in diabetes. The aims of present study were to assess whether tendon changes can occur in the early stages of the disease and to evaluate the extent of the influence of body mass index (BMI). The study population included 51 recent-onset type II diabetic subjects, who were free from diabetic complications, divided according to BMI into three groups (normal weight, overweight, and obese). Eighteen non-diabetic, normal-weight subjects served as controls. Plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was measured by means of sonography. The groups were well balanced for age and sex. In all the diabetic subjects, plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness was increased compared to the controls (p plantar fascia thickness and BMI values (r = 0.749, p plantar fascia and Achilles tendon thickness is increased in the early stages of type II diabetes and that BMI is related more to plantar fascia than Achilles tendon thickness. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether these early changes can overload the metatarsal heads and increase the stress transmitted to plantar soft tissues, thus representing an additional risk factor for foot ulcer development.

  15. Higher plantar pressure on the medial side in four soccer-related movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pui-lam; Chamari, Karim; Mao, De Wei; Wisløff, Ulrik; Hong, Youlian

    2007-02-01

    To measure the plantar pressure in four soccer-related movements in 15 male soccer players (mean (SD) age 20.9 (1.3) years, height 173 (4) cm, weight 61.7 (3.6) kg). To record plantar pressure distribution, the players wore soccer boots with 12 circular studs and with an insole pressure recorder device equipped with 99 sensors. Plantar pressure was recorded in five successful trials in each of the four soccer-related movements: running, sideward cutting, 45 degrees cutting and landing from a vertical jump. Each footprint was divided into 10 recorded areas for analysis. Compared with running at 3.3 m/s, maximal speed sideward cutting and 45 degrees cutting induced higher peak pressure (pplantar surface as compared with the lateral side. These data suggest that the medial side of the plantar surface may be more prone to injuries, and that foot orthosis adoption, improved soccer boot design and specific muscle training could be considered to reduce pressure and the subsequent risk of injury.

  16. Resistance exercise prevents plantar flexor deconditioning during bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Hunter, G. R.; Stevens, B. R.; Guilliams, M. E.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REX) and unloading induce opposing neuromuscular adaptations, we tested the efficacy of REX against the effects of 14 d of bed rest unloading (BRU) on the plantar flexor muscle group. Sixteen men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NOE, N = 8) or REX (N = 8). REX performed 5 sets x 6-10 repetitions to failure of constant resistance concentric/eccentric plantar flexion every other day during BRU. One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was tested on the training device. The angle-specific torque-velocity relationship across 5 velocities (0, 0.52, 1.05, 1.75, and 2.97 rad.s-1) and the full range-of-motion power-velocity relationship were assessed on a dynamometer. Torque-position analyses identified strength changes at shortened, neutral, and stretched muscle lengths. Concentric and eccentric contractile work were measured across ten repetitions at 1.05 rad.s-1. Maximal neural activation was measured by surface electromyography (EMG). 1RM decreased 9% in NOE and improved 11% in REX (P joint positions. Concentric (15%) and eccentric (11%) contractile work fell in NOE (P < 0.05) but not in REX. Maximal plantar flexor EMG did not change in either group. In summary, constant resistance concentric/eccentric REX completely prevented plantar flexor performance deconditioning induced by BRU. The reported benefits of REX should prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity and for patients susceptible to functional decline during bed- or chair-bound hospital stays.

  17. Sonographic evaluation of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, N; Kichouh, M; Boulet, C; Machiels, F; De Mey, J; De Maeseneer, M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the appearance of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic subjects. Thirty-one asymptomatic subjects were examined by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists. The plantar fascia was evaluated for thickness, echogenicity, vascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, andcalcifications. The study included 14 men and 17 women (age, 17-79 years; mean, 45 years). The mean thickness of the plantar fascia in men was 3.7 mm (range 2.5-7 mm), and in women 3.5 mm (range, 1.7-5.1 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 4 men (bilateral in 2). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in men was 5.4 mm (range, 4.3-7 mm). The thickness was greater than 4 mm in 5 women ( bilateral in 4). The mean thickness of fascias thicker than 4 mm in women was 4.7 mm (range, 4.2-5.1 mm). There was no statistically significant difference between men and women and between both heels. Hypoechogenicity was observed in 3 men (bilateral in 2), and in 5 women (bilateral in 6). Hypervascularity, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications were not observed. A thickness greater than 4 mm and hypoechogenicity, are common in the plantar fascia of asymptomatic subjects. Findings that were not seen in asymptomatic subjects include a thickness greater than 7 mm, hypervascularity on power Doppler, rupture, fluid adjacent to the fascia, and calcifications.

  18. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S.; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the ...

  19. Diabetic foot ulcer incidence in relation to plantar pressure magnitude and measurement location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, William R; Shofer, Jane B; Cowley, Matthew S; Ahroni, Jessie H; Cohen, Victoria; Boyko, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively examined the relationship between site-specific peak plantar pressure (PPP) and ulcer risk. Researchers have previously reported associations between diabetic foot ulcer and elevated plantar foot pressure, but the effect of location-specific pressures has not been studied. Diabetic subjects (n=591) were enrolled from a single VA hospital. Five measurements of in-shoe plantar pressure were collected using F-Scan. Pressures were measured at 8 areas: heel, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, first metatarsal, second through fourth metatarsal, fifth metatarsal, hallux, and other toes. The relationship between incident plantar foot ulcer and PPP or pressure-time integral (PTI) was assessed using Cox regression. During follow-up (2.4years), 47 subjects developed plantar ulcers (10 heel, 12 metatarsal, 19 hallux, 6 other). Overall mean PPP was higher for ulcer subjects (219 vs. 194kPa), but the relationship differed by site (the metatarsals with ulcers had higher pressure, while the opposite was true for the hallux and heel). A statistical analysis was not performed on the means, but hazard ratios from a Cox survival analysis were nonsignificant for PPP across all sites and when adjusted for location. However, when the metatarsals were considered separately, higher baseline PPP was significantly associated with greater ulcer risk; at other sites, this relationship was nonsignificant. Hazard ratios for all PTI data were nonsignificant. Location must be considered when assessing the relationship between PPP and plantar ulceration. © 2013.

  20. Uso da papaína na úlcera plantar

    OpenAIRE

    Otuka, Elizabet Shizue; Pedrazzani, Elisete Silva; Pioto, Mariangela Pedroso

    1996-01-01

    Este trabalho teve por objetivo contribuir para a diminuição da incapacidade em hanseníase e as contínuas recidivas de úceras plantares, através da utilização de um método de tratamento com o uso da papaína e ações de educação em saúde. Foi realizado em um Centro de Saúde com pacientes que apresentavam úcera plantar e que concordaram em participar do tratamento proposto. Analisando e comparando os dados obtidos antes e após o tratamento, concluímos que durante o tratamento foi observada uma m...

  1. Tratamiento de necrosis plantar postsepsis neumocóccica con terapia V.A.C.® Treatment of post-pneumococcal plantar necrosis with VAC® therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guisantes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La terapia VAC® es un dispositivo que favorece la curación de las heridas mediante un sistema cerrado que aplica presión negativa sobre el lecho. Este tratamiento favorece la cicatrización porque reduce el edema y el líquido intersticial, mejora la microcirculación, disminuye el riesgo de infección y favorece la granulación del tejido. Presentamos un caso clínico de un varón de 31 años con un defecto amplio plantar tras necrosis distal por sepsis neumocóccica. Tras 20 días de terapia VAC® la granulación fue adecuada y permitió la cobertura del defecto con un injerto de piel. La terapia VAC® es una opción útil para la reconstrucción de defectos plantares amplios de forma sencilla.VAC® Therapy is a device that lets promote wound healing through a closed system that applies negative pressure on the wound bed. This treatment promotes healing by reducing edema and interstitial fluid, improving microcirculation, reducing the risk of infection and promoting tissue granulation. We report the case of a 31 year old man with a large plantar defect due to distal necrosis after pneumococcal sepsis. After 20 days of VAC® therapy, the granulation was adequate and allowed the coverage of the defect with a skin graft. VAC® therapy is a useful and simple option for reconstruction of broad plantar defects.

  2. Rearfoot eversion has indirect effects on plantar fascia tension by changing the amount of arch collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sae Yong; Hertel, Jay; Lee, Sung Cheol

    2010-01-01

    Rearfoot eversion motion and arch height are believed to contribute to increased tension on the plantar fascia and arch collapse during gait but the specifics of these relationships are not clear. To examine the relationships among static arch height, rearfoot eversion, dynamic arch height, and plantar fascia tension. 28 healthy males participated. After static arch height was measured, the subjects were asked to run at 4.5m/s while frontal plane rearfoot motion, dynamic arch height, and ground reaction forces were collected. The relationships among variables were examined with bivariate correlations and path analysis. The results indicated a high correlation between dynamic arch height and static arch height (r=0.642), plantar fascia tension (r=-0.797), and maximum rearfoot eversion motion during gait (r=-0.518). The path analysis model without the direct rearfoot eversion effect explained 81.2% of the variance in plantar fascia tension, while the model with the direct rearfoot eversion effect explained 82.1% of the variance in plantar fascia tension. Including the indirect effect of maximum rearfoot eversion motion on plantar fascia tension through control of dynamic arch height is the model that best explains the interrelationships of these foot characteristics. The amount of maximum rearfoot eversion motion itself is not a good predictor of plantar fascia tension, however, together with the arch height, maximum rearfoot eversion motion is a good predictor because it has a pronounced indirect effect on plantar fascia tension. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The Effects of Various Running Inclines on Three-Segment Foot Mechanics and Plantar Fascia Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. There has yet to be a combined analysis of three-dimensional multi-segment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in running gait at various degrees of inclination. The aim of the current study was therefore to investigate the above during treadmill running at different inclines (0°, 5°, 10° and 15°. Methods. Twelve male participants ran at 4.0 m · s-1 in the four different inclinations. Three-dimensional kinematics of the foot segments and plantar fascia strain were quantified for each incline and contrasted using one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Results and conclusions. The results showed that plantar fascia strain increased significantly as a function of running incline. Given the projected association between plantar fascia strain and the aetiology of injury, inclined running may be associated with a greater incidence of injury to the plantar fascia.

  4. Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia with Palmo-plantar Keratoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumar

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and palmo-plantar keratoderma is presented. Palmo-planta keratoderma is an unusual association with this disease. Atopic dermatitis was another associated condition in this patient.

  5. Plantar Sole Unweighting Alters the Sensory Transmission to the Cortical Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Mouchnino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that somatosensory inputs to the cortex undergo an early and a later stage of processing. The later has been shown to be enhanced when the earlier transmission decreased. In this framework, mechanical factors such as the mechanical stress to which sensors are subjected when wearing a loaded vest are associated with a decrease in sensory transmission. This decrease is in turn associated with an increase in the late sensory processes originating from cortical areas. We hypothesized that unweighting the plantar sole should lead to a facilitation of the sensory transmission. To test this hypothesis, we recorded cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs of individuals following cutaneous stimulation (by mean of an electrical stimulation of the foot sole in different conditions of unweighting when standing still with eyes closed. To this end, the effective bodyweight (BW was reduced from 100% BW to 40% BW. Contrary to what was expected, we found an attenuation of sensory information when the BW was unweighted to 41% which was not compensated by an increase of the late SEP component. Overall these results suggested that the attenuation of sensory transmission observed in 40 BW condition was not solely due to the absence of forces acting on the sole of the feet but rather to the current relevance of the afferent signals related to the balance constraints of the task.

  6. Cutaneous Pseudolymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Pérez, D; Blanes Martínez, M; Encabo-Durán, B

    2016-10-01

    The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to benign reactive lymphoid proliferations in the skin that simulate cutaneous lymphomas. It is a purely descriptive term that encompasses various reactive conditions with a varied etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histology, and behavior. We present a review of the different types of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. To reach a correct diagnosis, it is necessary to contrast clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings. Even with these data, in some cases only the clinical course will confirm the diagnosis, making follow-up essential. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of mechanical strain in the intact plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ross A; Franklyn-Miller, Andrew; Falvey, Eanna; Bryant, Adam L; Bartold, Simon; McCrory, Paul

    2009-09-01

    A method of measuring tri-axial plantar fascia strain that is minimally affected by external compressive force has not previously been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of micro-strain gauges to examine strain in the different axes of the plantar fascia. Two intact limbs from a thawed, fresh-frozen cadaver were dissected, and a combination of five linear and one three-way rosette gauges were attached to the fascia of the foot and ankle. Strain was assessed during two trials, both consisting of an identical controlled, loaded dorsiflexion. An ICC analysis of the results revealed that the majority of gauge placement sites produced reliable measures (ICC>0.75). Strain mapping of the plantar fascia indicates that the majority of the strain is centrally longitudinal, which provides supportive evidence for finite element model analysis. Although micro-strain gauges do possess the limitation of calibration difficulty, they provide a repeatable measure of fascial strain and may provide benefits in situations that require tri-axial assessment or external compression.

  8. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia associated with capecitabine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of a 62 year-old patient who developed Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia upon receiving four cycles of capacitabine-based chemotherapy. She was on post surgical adjuvant treatment for invasive well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon. The clinical and therapeutic aspects of this ...

  9. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia under stretch-the relative contribution of windlass mechanism and Achilles tendon force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Lin, Chun-Li; Wang, Hsien-Wen; Chou, Shih-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Stretching plays an important role in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Information on the internal stresses/strains of the plantar fascia under stretch is useful in enhancing knowledge on the stretch mechanisms. Although direct measurement can monitor plantar fascia changes, it is invasive and gathers only localized information. The purpose of this paper was to construct a three-dimensional finite element model of the foot to calculate the stretch effects on plantar fascia and monitor its stress/strain distributions and concentrations. A three-dimensional foot model was developed and contained 26 bones with joint cartilages, 67 ligaments and a fan-like solid plantar fascia modeling. All tissues were idealized as linear elastic, homogeneous and isotropic whilst the plantar fascia was assigned as hyperelastic to represent its nonlinearity. The plantar fascia was monitored for its biomechanical responses under various stretch combinations: three toe dorsiflexion angles (windlass effect: 15 degrees , 30 degrees and 45 degrees ) and five Achilles tendon forces (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500N). Our results indicated that the plantar fascia strain increased as the dorsiflexion angles increased, and this phenomenon was enhanced by increasing Achilles tendon force. A stress concentration was found near the medial calcaneal tubercle, and the fascia stress was higher underneath the first foot ray and gradually decreased as it moved toward the fifth ray. The current model recreated the position of the foot when stretch is placed on the plantar fascia. The results provided a general insight into the mechanical and biomechanical aspects of the influences of windlass mechanism and Achilles tendon force on plantar fascia stress and strain distribution. These findings might have practical implications onto plantar fascia stretch approaches, and provide guidelines to its surgical release.

  10. Higher plantar pressure on the medial side in four soccer‐related movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pui‐lam; Chamari, Karim; De Wei Mao; Wisløff, Ulrik; Hong, Youlian

    2007-01-01

    Objective To measure the plantar pressure in four soccer‐related movements in 15 male soccer players (mean (SD) age 20.9 (1.3) years, height 173 (4) cm, weight 61.7 (3.6) kg). Design To record plantar pressure distribution, the players wore soccer boots with 12 circular studs and with an insole pressure recorder device equipped with 99 sensors. Plantar pressure was recorded in five successful trials in each of the four soccer‐related movements: running, sideward cutting, 45° cutting and landing from a vertical jump. Each footprint was divided into 10 recorded areas for analysis. Results Compared with running at 3.3 m/s, maximal speed sideward cutting and 45° cutting induced higher peak pressure (pplantar surface as compared with the lateral side. Conclusions These data suggest that the medial side of the plantar surface may be more prone to injuries, and that foot orthosis adoption, improved soccer boot design and specific muscle training could be considered to reduce pressure and the subsequent risk of injury. PMID:17178776

  11. Using an optimization approach to design an insole for lowering plantar fascia stress--a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chun; Gung, Yih-Wen; Shih, Shih-Liang; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Yu, Chung-Huang; Chen, Chen-Sheng

    2008-08-01

    Plantar heel pain is a commonly encountered orthopedic problem and is most often caused by plantar fasciitis. In recent years, different shapes of insole have been used to treat plantar fasciitis. However, little research has been focused on the junction stress between the plantar fascia and the calcaneus when wearing different shapes of insole. Therefore, this study aimed to employ a finite element (FE) method to investigate the relationship between different shapes of insole and the junction stress, and accordingly design an optimal insole to lower fascia stress.A detailed 3D foot FE model was created using ANSYS 9.0 software. The FE model calculation was compared to the Pedar device measurements to validate the FE model. After the FE model validation, this study conducted parametric analysis of six different insoles and used optimization analysis to determine the optimal insole which minimized the junction stress between plantar fascia and calcaneus. This FE analysis found that the plantar fascia stress and peak pressure when using the optimal insole were lower by 14% and 38.9%, respectively, than those when using the flat insole. In addition, the stress variation in plantar fascia was associated with the different shapes of insole.

  12. Plantar reflex excitability is increased in the evening in restless legs syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafkin, Chloe; Green, Andrew; Olivier, Benita; McKinon, Warrick; Kerr, Samantha

    2017-11-01

    To investigate if diurnal changes in spinal excitability (plantar reflex) occur in restless legs syndrome (RLS) participants compared to healthy matched controls. Thirteen RLS participants and 13 healthy control participants' plantar reflex responses were evaluated in the evening (PM) and the morning (AM). Plantar reflex responses were assessed electromyographically, using motion analysis (kinematically) and by subjective nociception (Visual Analogue Scale). RLS participants showed a circadian variation in plantar reflex responses whilst control participants did not. Evening ankle angle changes were larger and faster in RLS participants compared to morning responses. In addition RLS participants displayed significantly smaller change in ankle angle and significantly slower ankle movements in the evening and the morning as well as significantly lower lateral gastrocnemius maximum amplitude in the compared to control participants. The findings of the current study support the theory of RLS circadian fluctuations in spinal excitability. An unexpected finding was decreased plantar reflex responses in RLS participants compared to healthy control participants. However this finding supports the theory of mechanical hypoesthesia in RLS. The results of this study provide further insight into the pathophysiology of RLS, highlighting that not all sensory processing is affected in the same manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrated kinematics-kinetics-plantar pressure data analysis: a useful tool for characterizing diabetic foot biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guiotto, Annamaria; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental cause of lower-extremity complications in diabetes is chronic hyperglycemia leading to diabetic foot ulcer pathology. While the relationship between abnormal plantar pressure distribution and plantar ulcers has been widely investigated, little is known about the role of shear stress. Moreover, the mutual relationship among plantar pressure, shear stress, and abnormal kinematics in the etiology of diabetic foot has not been established. This lack of knowledge is determined by the lack of commercially available instruments which allow such a complex analysis. This study aims to develop a method for the simultaneous assessment of kinematics, kinetics, and plantar pressure on foot subareas of diabetic subjects by means of combining three commercial systems. Data were collected during gait on 24 patients (12 controls and 12 diabetic neuropathics) with a motion capture system synchronized with two force plates and two baropodometric systems. A four segment three-dimensional foot kinematics model was adopted for the subsegment angles estimation together with a three segment model for the plantar sub-area definition during gait. The neuropathic group exhibited significantly excessive plantar pressure, ground reaction forces on each direction, and a reduced loading surface on the midfoot subsegment (pfoot ulcerations, and help planning prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Plantar fascia calcification a sequelae of corticosteroid injection in the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Thomas Peter; Oliver, Govind; Wek, Caesar; Hester, Thomas

    2013-08-16

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman suffering with severe plantar fasciitis who received a therapeutic corticosteroid injection. Two-and-a-half years after the injection she developed a small calcified lump under the skin which subsequently caused ulceration and infection. She went on to develop a diabetic foot infection requiring an extended course of intravenous antibiotics.

  15. Factors Associated With Callus in Patients with Diabetes, Focused on Plantar Shear Stress During Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Masako; Mori, Taketoshi; Oe, Makoto; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Takehara, Kimie; Amemiya, Ayumi; Ohashi, Yumiko; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to identify whether plantar shear stress in neuropathic patients with diabetes with callus is increased compared with those without callus. The differences in foot deformity, limited joint mobility, repetitive stress of walking, and ill-fitting shoes between patients with callus and those without callus were also determined. Subjects were recruited from the Diabetic Foot Outpatient Clinic. A newly developed in-shoe measurement system, which has flexible and thin insoles, enabled measurement of both plantar pressure and shear stress simultaneously when subjects walked as usual on a 10 m walkway. It was found that plantar shear stress adjusted for weight during the push-off phase was increased by 1.32 times in patients with callus compared with those without callus (mean ± SD: 0.0500 ± 0.0160 vs 0.0380 ± 0.0144, P = .031). Moreover, hallux valgus deformity, reduction in dorsiflexion of the ankle joint and increase in plantar flexion were showed in feet with callus. Increased plantar shear stress may be caused by gait change that patients having callus push off with the metatarsal head instead of the toe as a result of foot deformity and limited joint mobility. It was found that plantar shear stress adjusted for weight during the push-off phase was increased in patients with callus compared with those without callus by using the newly developed measurement system. These results suggest that reduction of plantar shear stress during the push-off phase can prevent callus formation in neuropathic patients with diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. Different types of additional somatosensory information do not promote immediate benefits on gait in patients with Parkinson's disease and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lirani-Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPlantar cutaneous stimulation has been shown to improve gait in Parkinson's disease (PD, but the effects of different types of insoles have not been tested. We evaluated the immediate effect of different types of insoles on gait in PD patients and healthy older adults. Nineteen PD patients and nineteen healthy older adults performed and performed a walking task at their self-selected speed in three conditions: conventional insole, insole with a raised ridge around the foot perimeter, and insole with half-spheres. Plantar sensation was evaluated before and after the walking protocol. There were no differences between groups for plantar sensation before and after the walking task. PD patients demonstrated reduced stride length and stride velocity. There were no immediate benefits offered by the insoles on gait of either group. The increased plantar cutaneous stimulation does not promote immediate benefits on gait in PD patients and healthy older adults.

  17. The Effect of Landing Surface on the Plantar Kinetics of Chinese Paratroopers Using Half-Squat Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wu, Ji; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Rong Rong; Na, Yuhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zengshun; Wu, Di

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of landing surface on plantar kinetics during a half-squat landing. Twenty male elite paratroopers with formal parachute landing training and over 2 years of parachute jumping experience were recruited. The subjects wore parachuting boots in which pressure sensing insoles were placed. Each subject was instructed to jump off a platform with a height of 60 cm, and land on either a hard or soft surface in a half-squat posture. Outcome measures were maximal plantar pressure, time to maximal plantar pressure (T-MPP), and pressure-time integral (PTI) upon landing on 10 plantar regions. Compared to a soft surface, hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1st to 4th metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5th metatarsal region. Shorter T- MPP was found during hard surface landing in the 1st and 2nd metatarsal and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface landing resulted in a lower PTI than a soft surface in the 1stphalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the1st to 4thmetatarsal region for hard surface landing, and the 1stphalangeal and 5thmetatarsal region for soft surface landing. Key Points Understanding plantar kinetics during the half-squat landing used by Chinese paratroopers can assist in the design of protective footwear. Compared to landing on a soft surface, a hard surface produced higher maximal plantar pressure in the 1st to 4th metatarsal and mid-foot regions, but lower maximal plantar pressure in the 5th metatarsal region. A shorter time to maximal plantar pressure was found during a hard surface landing in the 1st and 2nd metatarsals and medial rear foot. Landing on a hard surface resulted in a lower pressure-time integral than landing on a soft surface in the 1st phalangeal region. For Chinese paratroopers, specific foot prosthesis should be designed to protect the 1st to 4th metatarsal

  18. The effect of low-Dye taping on plantar pressures, during gait, in subjects with navicular drop exceeding 10 mm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Belinda; Chipchase, Lucy; Evans, Angela

    2004-04-01

    A preintervention and postintervention, repeated-measures experimental design. To investigate the immediate effect of low-Dye taping on peak and mean plantar pressures during gait in subjects with navicular drop exceeding 10 mm. Low-Dye taping is commonly used to support the longitudinal and transverse arches of the foot in an attempt to reduce the effects of symptoms associated with excessive pronation. Plantar pressure measurement has been used as an indirect indicator of pronation during gait. METHOD AND MEASURES: The right foot of 60 subjects was tested using the Emed-AT system to obtain plantar pressure values. Subjects performed 6 barefoot walks over the Emed pressure platform while taped and a further 6 walks while untaped. Plantar pressures were recorded. Each footprint obtained was divided into 10 sections or 'masks.' Average peak and mean plantar pressure values (N/cm2) were calculated for both taped and untaped walks for each mask. Paired t tests demonstrated significant changes in peak plantar pressure in 8 of the 10 areas of the foot and significant changes in mean plantar pressure in 9 of the 10 areas of the foot. Low-Dye taping significantly decreased pressure under the heel and the medial and middle forefoot, while increasing pressure under the lateral midfoot and under the toes. A significant decrease in mean plantar pressure was observed under the lateral forefoot, while no significant difference was demonstrated in peak plantar pressure under this area. The area under the medial midfoot demonstrated no significant change in either peak or mean pressure. Low-Dye taping significantly altered peak and mean plantar pressure values in subjects with navicular drop exceeding 10 mm. In particular, peak and mean plantar pressure increased under the lateral midfoot and under the toes, and decreased under the heel and forefoot, suggesting that a decrease in the amount of pronation occurred.

  19. Plantar fascia rupture in a professional soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Kato, Kenji; Takao, Shoichiro; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Takeda, Yoshitsugu; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old male professional soccer player who presented with symptoms of plantar fasciitis. His symptoms occurred with no remarkable triggers and gradually worsened despite conservative treatments including taping, use of insoles, and physical therapy. Local corticosteroid injection was given twice as a further intervention, but his plantar fascia partially ruptured 49 days after the second injection. He was treated conservatively with platelet-rich plasma, and magnetic resonance imaging showed regenerative change of the ruptured fascia. Five months after the rupture, he returned to his original level of training. If professional athletes find it difficult to refrain from athletic activity, as in the present case, the risk of rupture due to corticosteroid injection should not be overlooked.

  20. Plantar pitted keratolysis: a study from non-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Feride Kaptanoglu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitted keratolysis is an acquired, superficial bacterial infection of the skin which is characterized by typical malodor and pits in the hyperkeratotic areas of the soles. It is more common in barefooted people in tropical areas, or those who have to wear occlusive shoes, such as soldiers, sailors and athletes. In this study, we evaluated 41 patients who had been diagnosed with plantar pitted keratolysis. The patients were of high socioeconomic status, were office-workers, and most had a university degree. Malodor and plantar hyperhydrosis were the most frequently reported symptoms. The weight-bearing metatarsal parts of the feet were those most affected. Almost half the women in the study gave a history of regular pedicure and foot care in a spa salon. Mean treatment duration was 19 days. All patients were informed about the etiology of the disease, predisposing factors and preventive methods. Recurrences were observed in only 17% of patients during the one year follow-up period. This study emphasizes that even malodorous feet among non-risk city dwellers may be a sign of plantar pitted keratolysis. A study of the real incidence of the disease in a large population-based series is needed.

  1. Development of a wearable plantar force measurement device for gait analysis in remote conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Rawnak; Wijesundara, Suharshani; McMillan, Lachlan; Scott, David; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Ebeling, Peter R; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-07-01

    The pressure field that exists between the foot and the supporting surface is identified as the foot plantar pressure. The information obtained from foot plantar pressure measurements has useful applications that include diagnosis of gait disturbances, optimization of footwear design, sport biomechanics and prevention of injury. Using wearable technology to measure foot plantar pressure continuously allows the collection of comprehensive real-life data sets while interfering minimally with the subject's daily activities. This paper presents the design of a wearable device to measure foot plantar pressure. Mechanical and electrical design considerations as well as data analysis are discussed. A pilot study involving 20 physically fit volunteers (15 males and 5 females, ageing from 20 - 45) performing a variety of physical activities (such as standing, walking, jumping and climbing up and down stairs) illustrate the potential of the device in terms of its wearability, and suitability for unobtrusive long-term monitoring.

  2. OA03.12. Herbal socks an effective medication against plantar hyperkeratosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethadevi, C; Rajendran, R; Radhai, R

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Plantar hyperkeratosis commonly called cracked heel is a common condition among adults. Causes for plantar hyperkeratosis are many and include genetic defects reflected in skin structure, allergic dermatoses, and paraneoplastic syndromes seen with particular forms of internal malignancy. Treatment for this condition could be possibly done using traditional herbs. The current study throws light on the cure of plantar hyperkeratosis using socks worn daily. Method: Solanum xanthocarpum powder and Aleo vera were subjected to different solvent extracts and its antimicrobial activity against isolated organism was studied. The solvent extract showing highest zone of inhibition was chosen and nanoparticle was synthesized by ionic gelification method and characterized physically and chemically. Synthesized nanoparticles were coated onto the socks using pad dry cure method. The antibacterial activity of the socks was then studied using AATCC 100 and 147. The nanoparticle treated socks was chemically characterized using FTIR analysis. The socks were then analyzed in vivo. Result: The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using HRTEM analysis and it was spherical. The nanoparticles coated socks showed a better activity against the organisms isolated from patients having plantar hyperkeratosis. The activity of the socks was tested in vivo among 20 patients and this proved to be promising cure. The wash durability of the socks was effective until 20 washes. Conclusion: The results showed that the formulated socks were effective against treatment of cracked heel and it also proves to be antimicrobial in nature. The effective durability of the socks was due the control and sustained release of herbal extracts from nanoparticle. Plantar hyperkeratosis could burden immune compromised patients such as diabetes, these kinds of herbal socks would be a better option for this treatment than the conventionally used time consuming treatments.

  3. Characteristics of Plantar Pressures and Related Pain Profiles in Elite Sprinters and Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Tong-Hsien; Chen, Yih-Shyuan; Wang, Jia-Chang

    2018-01-01

    Plantar pressure measurement is effective for assessing plantar loading and can be applied to evaluating foot performance. We sought to explore the characteristics of plantar pressures in elite sprinters and recreational runners during static standing and walking. Arch index (AI) values, regional plantar pressure distributions (PPDs), and footprint characteristics were examined in 80 elite sprinters and 90 recreational runners using an optical plantar pressure measurement system. Elite sprinters' pain profiles were examined to evaluate their most common pain areas. In recreational runners, AI values in males were in the normal range and in females were high arch type. The AI values were significantly lower in elite sprinters than in recreational runners. In elite sprinters, particularly males, the static PPD of both feet was higher at the medial metatarsal bone and the lateral heel and lower at the medial and lateral longitudinal arches. Elite male sprinters' PPD of both feet was mainly transferred to the medial metatarsal bone and decreased at the lateral longitudinal arch and the medial heel during the midstance phase of walking. The lateral knee joint and biceps femoris were the most common sites of musculoskeletal pain in elite sprinters. Elite sprinters' AI values could be classified as high arches, and their PPD tended to parallel the features of runners and high-arched runners. These findings correspond to the profile of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS)-related plantar pressure. The pain profiles seemed to resonate with the symptoms of high-arched runners and PFPS. A possible link between high-arched runners and PFPS warrants further study.

  4. Reconstruction of soft-tissue lesions of the foot with the use of the medial plantar flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Lessa Soares de Macedo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To study use of the medial plantar flap for reconstruction of the heel and foot. METHOD: The authors share their clinical experience with the use of the medial plantar artery flap for coverage of tissue defects around the foot and heel after trauma. Twelve cases of medial plantar artery flap performed from January 2001 to December 2013 were included. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients, ten were male and two were female. The indications were traumatic loss of the heel pad in ten cases and the dorsal foot in two cases. All the flaps healed uneventfully without major complications, except one case with partial flap loss. The donor site was covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The flaps had slightly inferior protective sensation compared with the normal side. CONCLUSION: From these results, the authors suggest that the medial plantar artery flap is a good addition to the existing armamentarium for coverage of the foot and heel. It is versatile flap that can cover defects on the heel, over the Achilles tendon and plantar surface, as well as the dorsal foot. It provides tissue to the plantar skin with a similar texture and intact protective sensation.

  5. Assessment of sub-division of plantar pressure measurement in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, J A; Harrington, M E; Giacomozzi, C; Thompson, N; Zavatsky, A; Theologis, T N

    2005-12-01

    Methods for the measurement of plantar pressure are poorly defined particularly when describing sub-sections of the plantar surface of the foot in the presence of deformity. The aim of this study was to assess foot pressure measurement in healthy children, using an automatic technique of sub-area definition that has the potential for objective evaluation of treatment of foot deformity. Twelve healthy children were examined on three occasions. Plantar pressure data were collected and time synchronised with force plate and stereophotogrammetric data. The footprint was divided into five sub-sections by using the position of the markers on the foot at mid-stance projected onto the pressure footprint. Repeatability for peak pressure and peak force was assessed. Automatic sub-area definition based on marker placement was found to be reliable in healthy children. A comparison of results revealed that peak vertical force was a more consistent measure than peak pressure for each of the five sub-areas. This suggests that force may be a more appropriate measurement for outcome studies.

  6. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shurong; Hersh, Andrew M; Naughton, Greg; Mullins, Kevin; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2013-11-15

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii commonly causes localized cutaneous disease with lymphocutaneous distribution. However, disseminated sporotrichosis occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV with a CD4 count of 208. The patient presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules as well as fever and malaise. Tissue culture and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sporotrichosis. He was started on itraconazole 200mg twice a day with rapid resolution of fever along with cessation of the development of new lesions.

  7. Comparative study between cryotherapy and salicylic acid in the treatment of plantar warts in Erbil - Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Naz Hoshyar Muhamad Tahir; Alaa Abdulrahman Sulaiman

    2018-01-01

    Background and objective: Plantar warts are hard, grainy growths that usually appear on the heels or balls of feet. Plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus, usually self-limiting, but treatment is generally recommended to lessen symptoms, decrease duration, and reduce transmission. The study aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of topical 40% salicylic acid in comparison to cryotherapy in the treatment of plantar wart. Methods: This study was conducted from March 2...

  8. Metatarsophalangeal joint stability: A systematic review on the plantar plate of the lesser toes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N.M.G. (Nico M.G.); M. van der Grinten (Margot); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Instability of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of the lesser toes (digiti 2-5) is increasingly being treated by repair of the plantar plate (PP). This systematic review examines the anatomy of the plantar plate of the lesser toes, and the relation between the integrity

  9. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  10. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A McDonald

    Full Text Available Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert, and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption and the arch (energy production during recoil. This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  11. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  12. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P 0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the flexor digitorum brevis and PF. The cadaveric sections revealed different

  13. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P<0.01). The interobserver agreement for all measurements was good (Pearson >0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the

  14. Biomechanical analysis of the support in race walking. Relationship between footprint, subtalar joint angles, and plantar pressures Análisis biomecánico del apoyo plantar en la marcha atlética. Relación entre la huella plantar, ángulos de la articulación subastragalina y presiones plantares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The aims were to describe the behavior of the subtalar joint and foot in the race walk, and seek for correlations between them and the footprint. 12 race walkers participated in the study. The arch index was calculated on their footprints. Plantar pressures were measured and 3D photogrammetry used on a single support while they race walked at their own competitive speed. Maximum pressures were calculated in each region of the foot and also the maximum and minimum values of the three angles that describe the subtalar joint. The maximum pronation was higher than that described in the walking gait and similar to that of the running gait (-13.6 ± 3.90. In the beginning of the support the subtalar joint was between the walking and the running gaits. This suggests that the cushioning mechanism of this joint is adjusted according to the type of locomotion. The region of the foot that registered higher pressures was the external rearfoot (21.02 kPa/kg followed by the internal forefoot (13.12 kPa/kg, showing a different behaviour to that of the running gait, in which both present similar maximum pressures. The subjects with lower arches tended to support with the internal face of the foot (r=-0.713 and with the leg inclined medially (r=0.874. Likewise, the racewalkers with higher arches registered higher pressures in the external part of the rearfoot, whereas the lowest ones did it in the internal part of the midfoot.
    Key Words: Biomechanics, race walk, footprint, subtalar joint, plantar pressure.

    Los objetivos fueron describir el comportamiento de la articulación subastragalina y el pie en la marcha atlética y buscar correlaciones entre estos y la huella plantar. Participaron 12 marchadores. Se calculó el índice del arco sobre sus huellas plantares. Se registraron presiones plantares y se aplicó fotogrametría 3D durante un apoyo

  15. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landorf Karl B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i real dry needling or (ii sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version. Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will

  16. Relationship of body mass index, ankle dorsiflexion, and foot pronation on plantar fascia thickness in healthy, asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Huerta, Javier; García, Juan Maria Alarcón; Matamoros, Eva Cosin; Matamoros, Julia Cosin; Martínez, Teresa Díaz

    2008-01-01

    We sought to investigate the thickness of plantar fascia, measured by means of ultrasonographic evaluation in healthy, asymptomatic subjects, and its relationship to body mass index, ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion, and foot pronation in static stance. One hundred two feet of 51 healthy volunteers were examined. Sonographic evaluation with a 10-MHz linear array transducer was performed 1 and 2 cm distal to its insertion. Physical examination was also performed to assess body mass index, ankle joint dorsiflexion, and degree of foot pronation in static stance. Both examinations were performed in a blinded manner. Body mass index showed moderate correlation with plantar fascia thickness at the 1- and 2-cm locations. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion showed no correlation at either location. Foot pronation showed an inverse correlation with plantar fascia thickness at the 2-cm location and no correlation at the 1-cm location. Body mass index and foot supination at the subtalar joint are related to increased thickness at the plantar fascia in healthy, asymptomatic subjects. Although the changes in thickness were small compared with those in patients with symptomatic plantar fasciitis, they could play a role in the mechanical properties of plantar fascia and in the development of plantar fasciitis.

  17. Basketball lay-up - foot loading characteristics and the number of trials necessary to obtain stable plantar pressure variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, YaoHui K; Quek, Raymond K K; Kong, Pui W

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed (1) to profile the plantar loading characteristics when performing the basketball lay-up in a realistic setting and (2) to determine the number of trials necessary to establish a stable mean for plantar loading variables during the lay-up. Thirteen university male basketball players [age: 23.0 (1.4) years, height: 1.75 (0.05) m, mass: 68.4 (8.6) kg] performed ten successful basketball lay-ups from a stationary position. Plantar loading variables were recorded using the Novel Pedar-X in-shoe system. Loading variables including peak force, peak pressure, and pressure-time integral were extracted from eight foot regions. Performance stability of plantar loading variables during the take-off and landing steps were assessed using the sequential averaging technique and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). High plantar loadings were experienced at the heel during the take-off steps, and both the heel and forefoot regions upon landing. The sequential estimation technique revealed a five-eight trial range to achieve a stable mean across all plantar loading variables, whereas ICC analysis was insensitive to inter-trial differences of repeated lay-up performances. Future studies and performance evaluation protocols on plantar loading during basketball lay-ups should include at least eight trials to ensure that the measurements obtained are sufficiently stable.

  18. LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID VS. AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD FOR PLANTAR FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Sunder B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain for which professional care is sought. Initially thought of as an inflammatory process, plantar fasciitis is a disorder of degenerative changes in the fascia and maybe more accurately termed plantar fasciosis. Traditional therapeutic efforts have been directed at decreasing the presumed inflammation. These treatments include icing, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs, rest and activity modification, corticosteroids, botulinum toxin type A, splinting, shoe modifications and orthosis. Other treatment techniques have been directed at resolving the degeneration caused by the disease process. In general, these techniques are designed to create an acute inflammatory reaction with the goal of restarting the healing process. These techniques include autologous blood injection, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP injection, nitroglycerin patches, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT and surgical procedures. Recently, research has focused on regenerative therapies with high expectations of success. The use of autologous growth factors is thought to heal through collagen regeneration and the stimulation of a well-ordered angiogenesis. These growth factors are administered in the form of autologous whole blood or Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP. Platelets can be isolated using simple cell-separating systems. The degranulation of the alpha granules in the platelets releases many different growth factors that play a role in tissue regeneration processes. Platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-P, vascular-derived endothelial growth factor, epithelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor are examples of such growth factors. Injections with autologous growth factors are becoming common in clinical practice. The present study was an attempt to compare the efficacy of autologous blood injection in plantar fasciitis by comparing it with the local

  19. Plantar pressures are higher in cases with diabetic foot ulcers compared to controls despite a longer stance phase duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu E; Crowther, Robert G; Lazzarini, Peter A; Sangla, Kunwarjit S; Wearing, Scott; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-09-15

    Current international guidelines advocate achieving at least a 30 % reduction in maximum plantar pressure to reduce the risk of foot ulcers in people with diabetes. However, whether plantar pressures differ in cases with foot ulcers to controls without ulcers is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess if plantar pressures were higher in patients with active plantar diabetic foot ulcers (cases) compared to patients with diabetes without a foot ulcer history (diabetes controls) and people without diabetes or a foot ulcer history (healthy controls). Twenty-one cases with diabetic foot ulcers, 69 diabetes controls and 56 healthy controls were recruited for this case-control study. Plantar pressures at ten sites on both feet and stance phase duration were measured using a pre-established protocol. Primary outcomes were mean peak plantar pressure, pressure-time integral and stance phase duration. Non-parametric analyses were used with Holm's correction to correct for multiple testing. Binary logistic regression models were used to adjust outcomes for age, sex and body mass index. Median differences with 95 % confidence intervals and Cohen's d values (standardised mean difference) were reported for all significant outcomes. The majority of ulcers were located on the plantar surface of the hallux and toes. When adjusted for age, sex and body mass index, the mean peak plantar pressure and pressure-time integral of toes and the mid-foot were significantly higher in cases compared to diabetes and healthy controls (p diabetic foot ulcers despite having a longer stance phase duration which would be expected to lower plantar pressure. Whether plantar pressure changes can predict ulcer healing should be the focus of future research. These results highlight the importance of offloading feet during active ulceration in addition to before ulceration.

  20. Dose-Related Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Kang, Jung-Ho; Kim, Ja-Young; Kim, Jin-Hong; Jung, Kwang-Ik

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the dose-related effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for plantar fasciitis. Methods Sixty patients with plantar fasciitis despite conservative treatment were enrolled. The patients were divided into a low-energy group (group L: n=30, 1,000 shocks/session, energy flux density [EFD] per shock 0.08 mJ/mm2) and a medium-energy group (group M: n=30, 1,000 shocks/session, EFD 0.16 mJ/mm2). The main outcome measures were visual analogue scale (VAS), Roles and Maudsley (RM) score, and thickness of plantar fascia (PF). To compare the effects between each group, follow-up was carried out 1 week after 3 and 6 sessions, and 1 and 3 months after ESWT. Results Significant VAS and RM score improvement, and PF thickness reduction were observed in both groups (p0.05). Conclusion Therapeutic effect might disclose a dose-related relationship; therefore, EFD and the times of the session are considerable factors when treating with ESWT. PMID:23869336

  1. Ultrasound-guided injection for plantar fasciitis: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis (PF is a distressing condition experienced by many patients. Although self-limiting, it tends to become a chronic ailment if the precipitating factors are not addressed. One of the modality of treating PF is intra-lesional corticosteroid injection. This was done using palpation technique earlier but nowadays many specialists use ultrasound (US imaging as a guide to give injection accurately instead of inadvertently damaging the plantar fascia or injecting into surrounding soft tissue, both of which can have serious implications. We did a literature search in Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases to find out articles describing US-guided corticosteroid injection for treating PF and whether guided injection was effective than injection given by palpation.

  2. Relationships between static foot alignment and dynamic plantar loads in runners with acute and chronic stages of plantar fasciitis: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana P.; Sacco, Isabel C. N.; Dinato, Roberto C.; João, Silvia M. A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for the development of plantar fasciitis (PF) have been associated with the medial longitudinal arch (MLA), rearfoot alignment and calcaneal overload. However, the relationships between the biomechanical variables have yet to be determined. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between the MLA, rearfoot alignment, and dynamic plantar loads in runners with unilateral PF in acute and chronic phases. METHOD: Cross-sectional study which thirty-five runners with unilateral PF were evaluated: 20 in the acute phase (with pain) and 15 with previous chronic PF (without pain). The MLA index and rearfoot alignment were calculated using digital images. The contact area, maximum force, peak pressure, and force-time integral over three plantar areas were acquired with Pedar X insoles while running at 12 km/h, and the loading rates were calculated from the vertical forces. RESULTS: The multiple regression analyses indicated that both the force-time integral (R 2=0.15 for acute phase PF; R 2=0.17 for chronic PF) and maximum force (R 2=0.35 for chronic PF) over the forefoot were predicted by an elevated MLA index. The rearfoot valgus alignment predicted the maximum force over the rearfoot in both PF groups: acute (R 2=0.18) and chronic (R 2=0.45). The rearfoot valgus alignment also predicted higher loading rates in the PF groups: acute (R 2=0.19) and chronic (R 2=0.40). CONCLUSION: The MLA index and the rearfoot alignment were good predictors of plantar loads over the forefoot and rearfoot areas in runners with PF. However, rearfoot valgus was demonstrated to be an important clinical measure, since it was able to predict the maximum force and both loading rates over the rearfoot. PMID:26786073

  3. Plantar pressures in children with and without sever's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa Iglesias, Marta Elena; Rodríguez Sanz, David; Prados Frutos, Juan Carlos; Salvadores Fuentes, Paloma; Chicharro, José López

    2011-01-01

    a case-control study was conducted to compare static plantar pressures and distribution of body weight across the two lower limbs, as well as the prevalence of gastrocnemius soleus equinus, in children with and without calcaneal apophysitis (Sever's disease). the participants were 54 boys enrolled in a soccer academy, of which eight were lost to follow-up. Twenty-two boys with unilateral Sever's disease comprised the Sever's disease group and 24 healthy boys constituted a control group. Plantar pressure data were collected using pedobarography, and gastrocnemius soleus equinus was assessed. peak pressure and percentage of body weight supported were significantly higher in the symptomatic feet of the Sever's disease group than in the asymptomatic feet of the Sever's disease group and the control group. Every child in the Sever's disease group had bilateral gastrocnemius equinus, while nearly all children in the control group had no equinus. high plantar foot pressures are associated with Sever's disease, although it is unclear whether they are a predisposing factor or a result of the condition. Gastrocnemius equinus may be a predisposing factor for Sever's disease. Further research is needed to identify other factors involved in the disease and to better understand the factors that contribute to abnormal distribution of body weight in the lower limbs.

  4. Effect of custom-made and prefabricated insoles on plantar loading parameters during running with and without fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Macián-Romero, Cecili; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Controversy exists whether custom-made insoles are more effective in reducing plantar loading compared to prefabricated insoles. Forty recreational athletes ran using custom-made, prefabricated, and the original insoles of their running shoes, at rest and after a fatigue run. Contact time, stride rate, and plantar loading parameters were measured. Neither the insole conditions nor the fatigue state modified contact time and stride rate. Addressing prevention of running injuries, post-fatigue loading values are of great interest. Custom-made insoles reduced the post-fatigue loading under the hallux (92 vs. 130 kPa, P heel compared to the prefabricated insoles. Finally, fatigue state did not influence plantar loading regardless the insole condition. In long-distance races, even a slight reduction in plantar loading at each foot strike may suppose a significant decrease in the overall stress experienced by the foot, and therefore the use of insoles may be an important protective mechanism for plantar overloading.

  5. Foot mobility and plantar fascia elasticity in patients with plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Namık; Oztürk, Alpaslan; Atıcı, Teoman

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the radiologic changes of feet in sagittal plane under weightbearing either with or without plantar fasciitis. The study includes 64 feet of the 42 subjects with heel pain (Group 1: 32 women, 10 men, mean age 48 years, range 33-57 years) and 80 feet of the 40 patients (Group 2: 30 women, 10 men, mean age 47.2 years, range 35-56 years) without heel pain. Calcaneal inclination angle (CIA), calcaneal-first metatarsal angle (CMA), and plantar fascia length (PFL) were measured in the lateral radiographs of the weightbearing and non-weightbearing foot. The values of Group 1 and Group 2 were compared. The mean CIA was 26° (range 18-35°), CMA was 121° (range 115-133°), and PFL was 131 mm (range 110-158 mm) in non-weightbearing position for Group 1. The mean CIA was 27° (range 17-38°), CMA was 122° (range 110-135°), and PFL was 136 mm (range 120-155 mm) in non-weightbearing position for Group 2. The mean CIA was 13.6° (range 5-25°), CMA was 138° (range 130-153°), and PFU was 143.8 mm (range 118-158 mm) in weightbearing position for Group 1. The mean CIA was 9.9° (range 4-25°), CMA was 145° (range 130-155°), and PFU was 151.4 mm (range 137-167 mm) in weightbearing position for Group 2. The difference between CIA, CMA, and PFL values were -13°, 17°, and 12 mm under condition of weightbearing and nonweightbearing position values for Group 1; and -17°, 23°, and 15 mm for Group 2. The differences were significant between weightbearing and non-weightbearing position values (pplantar fascia elasticity, which may lead to posterior heel pain syndrome.

  6. Tratamiento podológico de la fascitis plantar en el deportista

    OpenAIRE

    Prats Climent, Baldiri; Vázquez Amela, F. Xavier (Francesc Xavier)

    1994-01-01

    Podemos definir la fascitis plantar como la inflamación del origen de la fascia plantar a nivel de la tuberosidad interna del calcáneo. La molestia principal que presenta es el dolor y la hipersensibilidad debajo de la porción anterior del talón, que frecuentemente se irradia a la planta del pie. Aparece frecuentemente en deportistas, principalmente aquellos que presentan marcha con pronación acentuada. Puede acompañarse con la presencia de un espolón de calcáneo que en ningún caso es la caus...

  7. Effect of variable body mass on plantar foot pressure and off-loading device efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirozzi, Kelly; McGuire, James; Meyr, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence has implicated obesity as having a negative effect on the development, treatment, and outcome of lower extremity pathologic entities, including diabetic foot disease. The objective of the present study was to increase the body of knowledge with respect to the effects of obesity on foot function. Specifically, we attempted to (1) describe the relationship between an increasing body mass index (BMI) on plantar foot pressures during gait, and (2) evaluate the efficacy of commonly prescribed off-loading devices with an increasing BMI. A repeated measures design was used to compare the peak plantar foot pressures under multiple test conditions, with the volunteers acting as their own controls. The primary outcome measure was the mean peak plantar pressure in the heel, midfoot, forefoot, and first metatarsal, and the 2 variables were modification of patient weight (from "normal" BMI to "overweight," "obese," and "morbidly obese") and footwear (from an athletic sneaker to a surgical shoe, controlled ankle motion walker, and total contact cast). Statistically significant increases in the peak plantar pressures were observed with increasing volunteer BMI weight class, regardless of the off-loading device used. The present investigation has provided unique and specific data with respect to the changes that occur in the peak plantar pressures with variable BMIs across different anatomic levels and with commonly used off-loading devices. From our results, we have concluded that although the plantar pressures increase with increasing weight, it appears that at least some reduction in pressure can be achieved with an off-loading device, most effectively with the total contact cast, regardless of the patient's BMI. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stage-dependent analgesia of electro-acupuncture in a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Cui, Ke-Mi; Liu, Qiong; Dong, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jun; Sha, Hong; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2006-11-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most effective alternative medical treatments in pain management with the advantages of simple application, low cost and minimal side effects. However its scientific evidence and laws of action are not very clear in cancer pain relieving. The aim of this study was to examine the immediate and therapeutic anti-hyperalgesic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on a mouse model of cutaneous cancer pain. B16-BL6 melanoma cells were inoculated into the plantar region of unilateral hind paw and the thermal hyperalgesia was measured by using radiant heat test and hot plate test. C57BL/6 mice showed moderate and marked hyperalgesia during days 8-12 and from day 14 after the orthotopic inoculation of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into the hind paw. Single EA on day 8 after inoculation showed significant analgesic effect immediately after the treatment, the analgesic effect reached its maximum within 15-30min and declined to its minimum at 50min after EA treatment. Single EA treatment on day 20 showed no significant analgesic effect; Repeated EA treatments (started from day 8, once every other day) showed therapeutic analgesic effect, while it showed no therapeutic effect when started from day 16, a relatively late stage of this cancer pain model. The results demonstrated that EA had anti-hyperalgesic effect on early stage of cutaneous cancer pain but not on late stage. These results indicated a tight correlation of EA anti-hyperalgesic effects with the time window of cancer pain.

  9. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch to improve appearance of reconstructed fingers: Anatomical and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lin-Feng; Ju, Ji-Hui; Liu, Yue-Fei; Lan, Bo; Hou, Rui-Xing

    2018-02-01

    To investigate blood supply features of the flap based on the plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery, and the treatment of outcomes of reconstructed fingers by the plantar digital artery arch branch island flap. Eight fresh foot specimens were employed with red emulsion infusion and microdissection. The vascular organization was observed in the second toe, such as initiation site, the course, and the number of the plantar digital artery arch branch. There were 15 fingers of 13 patients (8 males and 5 females) with finger defects accompanied by toe transfer, using the plantar digital artery arch branch flap inserted in the neck of the second toe to correct the appearance defect caused by a narrow "neck" and a bulbous tip. The intact plantar digital arches were identified in all specimens. The plantar digital artery arch had 5 branches. The range of external diameter of the arch branch was 0.4-0.6 mm. All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and the reconstructed fingers survived. These cases were conducted with a follow-up period for 3-18 months (average, 9 months). All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and reconstructed fingers demonstrated a satisfactory appearance and favorable sense function. The reconstructed finger-tip characteristic was good, with no obvious scar hyperplasia. The range of flexion and extension of reconstructed fingers was favorable as well. The plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery possess regular vasa vasorum and abundant vascularity. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch is an ideal selection for plastic surgery of reconstructed fingers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A new method to normalize plantar pressure measurements for foot size and foot progression angle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, N.L.; Stolwijk, N.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressure measurement provides important information about the structure and function of the foot and is a helpful tool to evaluate patients with foot complaints. In general, average and maximum plantar pressure of 6-11 areas under the foot are used to compare groups of subjects. However,

  11. Long-Term Outcome of Open Plantar Fascia Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnes, Alasdair; Roberts, Sam C; Kimpton, Jessica; Pillai, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is thought to be a self-limiting condition best treated by conservative measures, but despite this many patients have a prolonged duration of symptoms and surgery may be indicated. Partial plantar fascial release is reported to have a short-term success rate of up to 80%, but anecdotally this was not thought to represent our local experience. An audit of long-term patient-reported outcomes following open partial plantar fascia release was performed. A total of 30 patients (33 feet) were identified over a 10-year period and case notes were reviewed. Patients were contacted by letter and invited to complete 2 validated patient-reported outcome score questionnaires (Visual Analog Scale-Foot and Ankle [VAS-FA] and Manchester Oxford Foot Questionnaire [MOXFQ]). Responses were received from 24 patients (26 feet). The average ages were 42.4 (range 24-61) for male and 46.2 (range 33-60) for female patients, with a female/male ratio of 2.7:1. The average duration of treatment prior to operative intervention was 3.1 years (range 1-5). Preoperatively, our cohort underwent a range of conservative measures. All patients were reviewed postoperatively, and average time from surgery to completion of questionnaires was 80 months (range 14-130). The outcomes were worse in patients who had received preoperative steroid injections and this was found to be statistically significant. The mean MOXFQ score was 33.6 ± 3.9 (0-64). Mean VAS-FA score was 57.8 ± 4.9 (24-100). This study found a negative correlation between duration of follow-up and outcome, in both MOXFQ and VAS-FA, showing that patients continued to improve many years postoperatively. The authors also found worse outcomes with preoperative steroid injections, better outcomes in older patients, and a weak gender bias, suggesting results in men were better than those in women. A prolonged recovery period and generally poor outcomes leads the authors to suggest that open plantar fascia release is of

  12. Use of high-resolution ultrasound to measure changes in plantar fascia thickness resulting from tissue creep in runners and walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Aaron B; Haun, Daniel W; Clark, Thomas B; Kettner, Norman W

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to use high-resolution ultrasound to measure changes in plantar fascia thickness as a result of tissue creep generated by walking and running. Independent samples of participants were obtained. Thirty-six walkers and 25 runners walked on a treadmill for 10 minutes or ran for 30 minutes, respectively. Standardized measures of the thickness of the plantar fascia were obtained in both groups using high-resolution ultrasound. The mean thickness of the plantar fascia was measured immediately before and after participation. The mean plantar fascia thickness was decreased by 0.06 ± 0.33 mm SD after running and 0.03 ± 0.22 mm SD after walking. The difference between groups was not significant. Although the parameters of this study did not produce significant changes in the plantar fascia thickness, a slightly higher change in the mean thickness of the plantar fascia in the running group deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of plantar-flexor muscle fatigue on the magnitude and regularity of center-of-pressure fluctuations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Hlavackova, P.; Vuillerme, N.

    2011-01-01

    Control of bipedal posture is highly automatized but requires attentional investment, the amount of which varies between participants and with postural constraints, such as plantar-flexor muscle fatigue. Elevated attentional demands for standing with fatigued plantar flexors have been demonstrated

  14. A quantitative index for classification of plantar thermal changes in the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Contreras, D.; Peregrina-Barreto, H.; Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; Gonzalez-Bernal, J. A.; Altamirano-Robles, L.

    2017-03-01

    One of the main complications caused by diabetes mellitus is the development of diabetic foot, which in turn, can lead to ulcerations. Because ulceration risks are linked to an increase in plantar temperatures, recent approaches analyze thermal changes. These approaches try to identify spatial patterns of temperature that could be characteristic of a diabetic group. However, this is a difficult task since thermal patterns have wide variations resulting on complex classification. Moreover, the measurement of contralateral plantar temperatures is important to determine whether there is an abnormal difference but, this only provides information when thermal changes are asymmetric and in absence of ulceration or amputation. Therefore, in this work is proposed a quantitative index for measuring the thermal change in the plantar region of participants diagnosed diabetes mellitus regards to a reliable reference (control) or regards to the contralateral foot (as usual). Also, a classification of the thermal changes based on a quantitative index is proposed. Such classification demonstrate the wide diversity of spatial distributions in the diabetic foot but also demonstrate that it is possible to identify common characteristics. An automatic process, based on the analysis of plantar angiosomes and image processing, is presented to quantify these thermal changes and to provide valuable information to the medical expert.

  15. Circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis: report of a Korean case and published work review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, You Chan; Kim, Soo-Chan

    2006-06-01

    Circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis is a rare dermatosis characterized by a solitary, well-circumscribed patch with scaly borders chiefly on the palm or sole; it usually occurs in middle-aged or elderly women. We report the case of a 52-year-old Korean woman with two characteristic lesions of circumscribed palmar hypokeratosis on the left palm. Clinically, the lesions simulated porokeratosis of Mibelli, but histologically there was no cornoid lamellation in the serial sections and there were the characteristic histopathological features of circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis including a stair-like configuration with an abrupt thinning of the stratum corneum and a decreased granular layer. We also review the 16 cases of circumscribed palmar or plantar hypokeratosis reported in the published work.

  16. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  17. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Becker, Alexandra; Schneider, Michael; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Christiansen, Hans; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice

  18. Novel and Conservative Approaches Towards Effective Management of Plantar Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Awaiz; Kiani, Immad; Ghani, Usman; Wadhera, Vikram; Tom, Todd N

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of the different treatments for plantar fasciitis (PF) based on the changes in functional outcomes. A systematic literature search was carried out and studies from 2010 to 2016 were included in this review. The databases from Google Scholar, PubMed and Cochrane were used for the various treatment modalities of plantar fasciitis. The objectives measured included visual analog scale (VAS), Roles and Maudsley scale, foot function index (FFI), plantar fascia thickness and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hind foot scale as the tools to predict the improvement in symptoms of pain and discomfort. Eight randomized controlled trails that met the selection criteria were included in this review. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) with botulinum toxin type A, corticosteroid injections, autologous whole blood and plasma treatment, novel treatments like cryopreserved human amniotic membrane, effect of placebo, platelet rich plasma injections and corticosteroid injections, physiotherapy and high strength training were analyzed. All the treatment modalities applied did lead to the reduction in pain scores, but for long term management autologous condition plasma and platelet rich plasma are the preferred treatment options. Impact of physiotherapy and high strength training is equivalent to corticosteroid injections and hence is suited for patients avoiding invasive forms of treatment.  PMID:28083457

  19. Imaging of plantar fascia disorders: findings on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Gitto, Salvatore; Bortolotto, Chandra; Draghi, Anna Guja; Ori Belometti, Gioia

    2017-02-01

    Plantar fascia (PF) disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population. Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis. This review article aims to provide simple and systematic guidelines for imaging assessment of PF disease, focussing on key findings detectable on plain radiography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sonographic characteristics of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, loss of fibrillar structure, perifascial collections, calcifications and hyperaemia on Doppler imaging. Thickening and signal changes in the PF as well as oedema of adjacent soft tissues and bone marrow can be assessed on MRI. Radiographic findings of plantar fasciitis include PF thickening, cortical irregularities and abnormalities in the fat pad located deep below the PF. Plantar fibromatosis appears as well-demarcated, nodular thickenings that are iso-hypoechoic on ultrasound and show low-signal intensity on MRI. PF tears present with partial or complete fibre interruption on both ultrasound and MRI. Imaging description of further PF disorders, including xanthoma, diabetic fascial disease, foreign-body reactions and plantar infections, is detailed in the main text. Ultrasound and MRI should be considered as first- and second-line modalities for assessment of PF disorders, respectively. Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography. Teaching Points • PF disorders commonly cause heel pain and disability in the general population.• Imaging is often required to confirm diagnosis or reveal concomitant injuries.• Ultrasound and MRI respectively represent the first- and second-line modalities for diagnosis.• Indirect findings of PF disease can be ruled out on plain radiography.

  20. Comparison of Plantar Pressure Distribution in Dominant & Non-dominant leg of female Kata and Kumite National Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Dizaji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the plantar pressure distribution of dominant and non-dominant legs of females who were participated in the kata and kumite national team. Methods: Twelve kumite and 8 kata female athletes of the Karate national team participated in this study. Plantar pressure was measured using emed platform during barefoot walking. After dividing the foot into 10 masks, peak pressure, pressure-time integral, maximum force and force-time integral were calculated. Wilcoxon and U-Mann-Witney tests were used to analyze parameters at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results: In comparison of kata and kumite teams it was found that, kata plantar pressure parameters in Metatarsal-2 (p=0.05 and Metatarsals-3, 4, 5 (p=0.04 were significantly less than those in kumite. Also, in comparison of dominant and non-dominant leg, plantar pressure parameters of dominant leg were less in Metatarsal-2 (p=0.04 and more in Bigtoe (p=0.04 and Toes-3, 4, 5 (p=0.03 than those in the non-dominant leg. Conclusion: Results may be indicative different of natures of the two athletic fields in that Kumite has a higher impact on plantar pressure due to higher mechanical loads. Furthermore, the unequal use of the legs may affect plantar pressure because of leg dominance. Thus, further and more comprehensive studies are necessary to prevent exercise-induced adaptations in professional levels and their treatments.

  1. Multi-segment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain during treadmill and overground running

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Jonathan Kenneth; Taylor, Paul John; Vincent, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    Although physiologically beneficial, running is known to be associated with a high incidence of chronic injuries. Excessive coronal and transverse plane motions of the foot segments and strain experienced by the plantar fascia are linked to the development of a number of chronic injuries. This study examined differences in multi-segment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain during treadmill and overground running. Twelve male recreational runners ran at 4.0 m.s-1 in both treadmill and ove...

  2. Assessment of the Medial Longitudinal Arch in children with Flexible Pes Planus by Plantar Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoatasem, E M; Eid, M A

    2016-12-01

    Plantar Pressure mapping was introduced as a new modality for assessment of the height of the medial longitudinal arch of the foot. Therefore, the aim of this study is to correlate the plantar pressure mapping readings of arch index contact force ratio (AICFR) in children with flexible pes planus with radiographic measurements and static plantar footprints in order to determine the reliability of pressure mapping as a modality for the assessment and follow up of the flat foot deformity. Radiographic measurements, foot prints, and pressure mapping scans were recorded for each foot at initial presentation and at latest follow up in 28 children (56 feet) with flexible pes planus. A positive correlation of pressure mapping results was found with the talo-first metatarsal angle, the calcaneal pitch angle, as well as the footprint scans (P plantar pressure mapping is a reliable and effective tool in screening, diagnosis, and follow up of children with flexible pes planus.

  3. Are Pressure Time Integral and Cumulative Plantar Stress Related to First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Pain? Results From a Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Smita; Douglas Gross, K; Niu, Jingbo; Nevitt, Michael C; Lewis, Cora E; Torner, James C; Hietpas, Jean; Felson, David; Hillstrom, Howard J

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationship between plantar stress over a step, cumulative plantar stress over a day, and first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint pain among older adults. Plantar stress and first MTP pain were assessed within the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. All included participants were asked if they had pain, aching, or stiffness at the first MTP joint on most days for the past 30 days. Pressure time integral (PTI) was quantified as participants walked on a pedobarograph, and mean steps per day were obtained using an accelerometer. Cumulative plantar stress was calculated as the product of regional PTI and mean steps per day. Quintiles of hallucal and second metatarsal PTI and cumulative plantar stress were generated. The relationship between predictors and the odds ratio of first MTP pain was assessed using a logistic regression model. Feet in the quintile with the lowest hallux PTI had 2.14 times increased odds of first MTP pain (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.42-3.25, P pain (95% CI 1.01-2.23, P = 0.042). Cumulative plantar stress was unassociated with first MTP pain. Lower PTI was modestly associated with increased prevalence of frequent first MTP pain at both the hallux and second metatarsal. Lower plantar loading may indicate the presence of an antalgic gait strategy and may reflect an attempt at pain avoidance. The lack of association with cumulative plantar stress may suggest that patients do not limit their walking as a pain-avoidance mechanism. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. MRI of the plantar structures of the foot after falanga torture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savnik, A.; Roegind, H.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, B.; Bliddal, H.; Boesen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Falanga is an ancient form of punishment or torture but is still commonly reported by our refugees. The late result of caning the heel and ball of the foot is a chronic painful condition with few clinical signs. The aim of the present study was to assess, by MRI, possible morphologic characteristics of the heel and ball of the foot, related to falanga and pain in correlation to clinical findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the foot was obtained in 12 victims exposed to falanga torture and 9 healthy volunteers. Sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo images (TR 616-840 ms, TE 20 ms), T2-weighted spin-echo images (TR 1900 ms, TE 90 ms), and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images (TR 1200 ms, TE 15 ms, TI 100 ms) were performed. The central portion of the plantar aponeurosis was generally significantly thicker in victims exposed to falanga torture as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). In all except one of the victims, MRI demonstrated two layers of the thickened plantar aponeurosis: a deeper portion with normal homogeneous low signal intensity (SI) appearance, and a superficial layer with characteristic areas of mixed SI on both T1- and T2-weighted images. There were no signs of chronic muscular compartment syndromes, and the thickness of the plantar pad did not differ between the two groups. Magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate morphologic characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis which may confirm falanga torture. Further imaging with more specific sequences is warranted to demonstrate the supposed injuries in the compartmental fat tissue chambers and the vascularity of the ball pad of the foot. (orig.)

  5. MRI of the plantar structures of the foot after falanga torture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, A. [Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology; Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Rheumatology; Amris, K.; Prip, K. [Rehabilitation Center for Torture Victims RCT, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roegind, H.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, B.; Bliddal, H. [Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Rheumatology; Bojsen-Moeller, F. [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). Panum Inst.; Bartels, E.M. [The Danish National Library of Science and Medicine, Copenhagen University Library 2, Noerre Alle 49, DK-2200 Copenhagen (Denmark); Boesen, J. [Frederiksberg Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology; Egund, N. [Department of Radiology R, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2000-10-01

    Falanga is an ancient form of punishment or torture but is still commonly reported by our refugees. The late result of caning the heel and ball of the foot is a chronic painful condition with few clinical signs. The aim of the present study was to assess, by MRI, possible morphologic characteristics of the heel and ball of the foot, related to falanga and pain in correlation to clinical findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the foot was obtained in 12 victims exposed to falanga torture and 9 healthy volunteers. Sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo images (TR 616-840 ms, TE 20 ms), T2-weighted spin-echo images (TR 1900 ms, TE 90 ms), and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images (TR 1200 ms, TE 15 ms, TI 100 ms) were performed. The central portion of the plantar aponeurosis was generally significantly thicker in victims exposed to falanga torture as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). In all except one of the victims, MRI demonstrated two layers of the thickened plantar aponeurosis: a deeper portion with normal homogeneous low signal intensity (SI) appearance, and a superficial layer with characteristic areas of mixed SI on both T1- and T2-weighted images. There were no signs of chronic muscular compartment syndromes, and the thickness of the plantar pad did not differ between the two groups. Magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate morphologic characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis which may confirm falanga torture. Further imaging with more specific sequences is warranted to demonstrate the supposed injuries in the compartmental fat tissue chambers and the vascularity of the ball pad of the foot. (orig.)

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of foot muscles and plantar fascia in pes planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Salih; Crofts, Gillian; Mickle, Karen J; Nester, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic soft tissue structures that apply forces and support the medial longitudinal arch have been implicated in pes planus. These structures have common functions but their interaction in pes planus is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to compare the cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness of the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles and plantar fascia thickness between normal and pes planus feet. Forty-nine adults with a normal foot posture and 49 individuals with pes planus feet were recruited from a university population. Images of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL), flexor hallucis longus (FHL), peroneus longus and brevis (PER), flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and abductor hallucis (AbH) muscles and the plantar fascia were obtained using a Venue 40 ultrasound system with a 5-13 MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness of AbH, FHB and PER muscles were significantly smaller (AbH -12.8% and -6.8%, FHB -8.9% and -7.6%, PER -14.7% and -10%), whilst FDL (28.3% and 15.2%) and FHL (24% and 9.8%) were significantly larger in the pes planus group. The middle (-10.6%) and anterior (-21.7%) portions of the plantar fascia were thinner in pes planus group. Greater CSA and thickness of the extrinsic muscles might reflect compensatory activity to support the MLA if the intrinsic foot muscle function has been compromised by altered foot structure. A thinner plantar fascia suggests reduced load bearing, and regional variations in structure and function in feet with pes planus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characteristics of Plantar Loads in Maximum Forward Lunge Tasks in Badminton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyue; Li, Jing Xian; Hong, Youlian; Wang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Badminton players often perform powerful and long-distance lunges during such competitive matches. The objective of this study is to compare the plantar loads of three one-step maximum forward lunges in badminton. Fifteen right-handed male badminton players participated in the study. Each participant performed five successful maximum lunges at three directions. For each direction, the participant wore three different shoe brands. Plantar loading, including peak pressure, maximum force, and contact area, was measured by using an insole pressure measurement system. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was employed to determine the effects of the different lunge directions and different shoes, as well as the interaction of these two variables, on the measurements. The maximum force (MF) on the lateral midfoot was lower when performing left-forward lunges than when performing front-forward lunges (p = 0.006, 95% CI = -2.88 to -0.04%BW). The MF and peak pressures (PP) on the great toe region were lower for the front-forward lunge than for the right-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.047, 95% CI = -3.62 to -0.02%BW; PP, p = 0.048, 95% CI = -37.63 to -0.16 KPa) and left-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.015, 95% CI = -4.39 to -0.38%BW; PP, p = 0.008, 95% CI = -47.76 to -5.91 KPa). These findings indicate that compared with the front-forward lunge, left and right maximum forward lunges induce greater plantar loads on the great toe region of the dominant leg of badminton players. The differences in the plantar loads of the different lunge directions may be potential risks for injuries to the lower extremities of badminton players.

  8. Overload protection: avoidance response to heavy plantar surface loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S E; Hanna, A M; Gouw, G J

    1988-02-01

    Current footwear which are designed for use in running are examples of intentional biomechanical model integration into device design. The inadequacy of this footwear in protecting against injury is postulated to be due to fixation on inadequate models of locomotory biomechanics that do not provide for feedback control; in particular, an hypothesized plantar surface sensory-mediated feedback control system, which imparts overload protection during locomotion. A heuristic approach was used to identify the hypothesized system. A random series of loads (0 to 164 kg) was applied to the knee flexed at 90 degrees. In this testing system, plantar surface avoidance behavior was the difference between the sum of the leg weight and the load applied to the knee, and the load measured at the plantar surface; this was produced by activation of hip flexors. Significant avoidance behavior was found in all of the subjects (P less than 0.001). On all surfaces tested, including modern athletic footwear (P less than 0.001), its magnitude increased directly in relation to the load applied to the knee (P less than 0.001). There were significant differences in avoidance behavior in relation to the weight-bearing surfaces tested (P less than 0.05). With the identification of a feedback control system which would serve to moderate loading during locomotion, an explanation is provided as to why current athletic footwear do not protect and may be injurious; thus allowing the design of footwear which may be truly protective.

  9. Does obesity influence foot structure and plantar pressure patterns in prepubescent children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, A M; Steele, J R; Baur, L A

    2001-06-01

    This study examined the effects of obesity on plantar pressure distributions in prepubescent children. Field-based, experimental data on BMI (body mass index), foot structure and plantar pressures were collected for 13 consenting obese children and 13 non-obese controls. Thirteen obese (age 8.1+/-1.2 y; BMI 25.5+/-2.9 kg/m(2)) and 13 non-obese (age 8.4+/-0.9 y; BMI 16.9+/-1.2 kg/m(2)) prepubescent children, matched to the obese children for gender, age and height. Height and weight were measured to calculate BMI. Static weight-bearing footprints for the right and left foot of each subject were recorded using a pedograph to calculate the footprint angle and the Chippaux-Smirak index as representative measures of the surface area of the foot in contact with the ground. Right and left foot plantar pressures were then obtained using a mini-emed(R) pressure platform to calculate the force and pressure experienced under each child's foot during static and dynamic loaded and unloaded conditions. Obese subjects displayed significantly lower footprint angle (t=4.107; P=plantar pressures between the two subject groups. That is, although rearfoot dynamic forces generated by the obese subjects were significantly higher than those generated by the non-obese subjects, these forces were experienced over significantly higher mean peak areas of contact with the mini-emed(R) system. Therefore, rearfoot pressures experienced by the two subject groups did not differ. However, the mean peak dynamic forefoot pressures generated by the obese subjects (39.3+/-15.7 N.cm(-2); q=3.969) were significantly higher than those generated by the non-obese subjects (32.3+/-9.2 N.cm(-2)). It is postulated that foot discomfort-associated structural changes and increased forefoot plantar pressures in the obese foot may hinder obese children from participating in physical activity and therefore warrants immediate further investigation.

  10. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  11. Ultrasonography and clinical outcome comparison of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and corticosteroid injections for chronic plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ta-Wei; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Chen, Po-Ming; Ku, Ming-Chou

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and corticosteroid injection (CSI) are treatment options for plantar fasciitis. Their clinical outcome comparison remains a debate. Also, the thickness changes of the plantar fascia on objective evaluation under the medium energy ESWT and CSI therapy are elusive. Methods: A total of 97 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were enrolled in the randomized prospective trial. Forty-seven patients received extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), and fifty patients received corticosteroid injection (CSI). The thickness of the plantar fascia was evaluated respectively before ESWT and CSI, and at the 4th and 12th week after ESWT and CSI by ultrasonography. Pain level and clinical outcomes were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS) and 100-points scoring systems. Correlation analysis was performed between the thickness change and clinical outcome. Results: Under ultrasonography, we observed more increase of plantar fascia thickness of ESWT group than CSI group at 4th week (p=0.048). VAS of plantar fasciitis patients receiving ESWT was lower than those who received corticosteroid injection (0.001 and pplantar fascia thickness at 4th week was positively correlated with the decrease of VAS score at 12th week follow-up (R=0.302, P=0.039). Conclusions: At 4th week after treatment, the thickness of plantar fascia increased. Then it decreased gradually, but not to the baseline at 12th week. On the pain level outcome at 12th week, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was more efficient than corticosteroid injection (CSI) on chronic plantar fasciitis. The more change of plantar fascia after ESWT, the more efficient on clinical outcome. PMID:29504578

  12. The plantar fasciotomy: MR imaging findings in asymptomatic volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S.; Ashman, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Smith, G.; Kaeding, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Objective. To determine the postoperative appearance of the plantar fascia on MR imaging after a fasciotomy has been performed, and to compare the postsurgical appearance of the fascia after an open and endoscopic procedure.< rate at head-abs-p1.lf>Design and patients. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (12 women, 3 men; age range 22-49 years, mean age 33 years) with prior fasciotomies for treatment of longstanding plantar fasciitis were studied. Fourteen volunteers had a unilateral release and one volunteer had bilateral releases, allowing for assessment of 16 ankles. Eight fasciotomies were performed through an open incision and eight were performed endoscopically. The average time between surgery and imaging was 24 months (range 11-46 months). The site of surgery was established from the operative reports. Proton density (PD)-weighted and T2-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were obtained on a 1.5-T magnet. In eight studies, T1-weighted sagittal and STIR sagittal images were included. The fascia in each ankle was assessed for morphology and signal intensity. Perifascial soft tissues and bone marrow were assessed for edema. Preoperative MR studies were available in five volunteers.< rate at head-abs-p1.lf>Results. There was no apparent difference in the postoperative appearance of the ankle after an open or endoscopic procedure except for scar formation in the subcutaneous fat which was common after an open procedure (P<0.05). Three ankles had a gap in the fascia (one open, two endoscopic). The plantar fascia measured a mean of 7.0 mm (range 5-10 mm) at the fasciotomy, and 8.3 mm (range 6-12 mm) at the enthesis. At the fasciotomy, 11 of 13 ankles had an indistinct deep contour and 9 of 13 had an indistinct superficial contour. At the enthesis, 13 of 16 ankles had an indistinct deep contour and 6 of 16 had an indistinct superficial contour. Compared with preoperative MR studies there was an average reduction in the fascial thickness at the enthesis of 14

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of lesions to the superficial plantar aponevrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, O.; Dubayle, P.; Boyer, B.; Pharaboz, C.

    1995-01-01

    MRI is an efficient imaging modality to establish the diagnosis of plantar fascia tear and planta fasciitis. MRI allows to differentiate recent rupture from scar and fasciitis. (authors). 13 refs., 6 figs

  14. Enhanced spatio-temporal alignment of plantar pressure image sequences using B-splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francisco P M; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2013-03-01

    This article presents an enhanced methodology to align plantar pressure image sequences simultaneously in time and space. The temporal alignment of the sequences is accomplished using B-splines in the time modeling, and the spatial alignment can be attained using several geometric transformation models. The methodology was tested on a dataset of 156 real plantar pressure image sequences (3 sequences for each foot of the 26 subjects) that was acquired using a common commercial plate during barefoot walking. In the alignment of image sequences that were synthetically deformed both in time and space, an outstanding accuracy was achieved with the cubic B-splines. This accuracy was significantly better (p align real image sequences with unknown transformation involved, the alignment based on cubic B-splines also achieved superior results than our previous methodology (p alignment on the dynamic center of pressure (COP) displacement was also assessed by computing the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) before and after the temporal alignment of the three image sequence trials of each foot of the associated subject at six time instants. The results showed that, generally, the ICCs related to the medio-lateral COP displacement were greater when the sequences were temporally aligned than the ICCs of the original sequences. Based on the experimental findings, one can conclude that the cubic B-splines are a remarkable solution for the temporal alignment of plantar pressure image sequences. These findings also show that the temporal alignment can increase the consistency of the COP displacement on related acquired plantar pressure image sequences.

  15. How to classify plantar plate injuries: parameters from history and physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Coughlin, Michael; Baumfeld, Daniel; Raduan, Fernando; Mann, Tania Szejnfeld; Catena, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    To find the best clinical parameters for defining and classifying the degree of plantar plate injuries. Sixty-eight patients (100 metatarsophalangeal joints) were classified in accordance with the Arthroscopic Anatomical Classification for plantar plate injuries and were divided into five groups (0 to IV). Their medical files were reviewed and the incidence of each parameter for the respective group was correlated. These parameters were: use of high heels, sports, acute pain, local edema, Mulder's sign, widening of the interdigital space, pain in the head of the corresponding metatarsal, touching the ground, "drawer test", toe grip and toe deformities (in the sagittal, coronal and transversal planes). There were no statistically significant associations between the degree of injury and use of high-heel shoes, sports trauma, pain at the head of the metatarsal, Mulder's sign, deformity in pronation or displacement in the transversal and sagittal planes (although their combination, i.e. "cross toe", showed a statistically significant correlation). Positive correlations with the severity of the injuries were found in relation to initial acute pain, progressive widening of the interdigital space, loss of "touching the ground", positive results from the "drawer test" on the metatarsophalangeal joint, diminished grip strength and toe deformity in supination. The "drawer test" was seen to be the more reliable and precise tool for classifying the degree of plantar plate injury, followed by "touching the ground" and rotational deformities. It is possible to improve the precision of the diagnosis and the predictions of the anatomical classification for plantar plate injuries through combining the clinical history and data from the physical examination.

  16. Análise da variabilidade e repetibilidade da pressão plantar durante a marcha de idosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro S. Franco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOIntrodução:A repetibilidade e a variabilidade da pressão plantar em avaliações da marcha são componentes importantes na avaliação clínica do idoso. Contudo, pouco é conhecido sobre a consistência dos padrões de pressão plantar em idosos.Objetivo:Analisar a variabilidade e repetibilidade da pressão plantar durante da marcha de idosos, considerando valores médios, picos e assimetrias.Métodos:A pressão plantar foi avaliada em quatro diferentes dias em 10 idosos (cinco mulheres, com idade média ± desvio-padrão de 73 ± 6 anos, durante o andar descalço em velocidade preferida. Os dados de pressão plantar foram comparados entre as pisadas em cada dia e entre os diferentes dias de avaliação.Resultados:Dados de pressão média e pico foram similares entre os diferentes dias de avaliação. Os índices de assimetria observados foram similares entre os diferentes dias avaliados.Conclusão:A pressão plantar (média e pico apresentou um padrão consistente nos idosos. Contudo, os índices de assimetria observados sugerem que idosos estejam sistematicamente expostos a cargas assimétricas durante a locomoção. Essa observação requer futuras investigações, especialmente em relação ao impacto dessas assimetrias na origem de doenças articulares.

  17. Treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis with extra corporeal shock wave therapy: ultrasonographic morphological aspect and functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Androson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper has the purpose to analyze prospectively the treatment results in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis resistant to conservative treatment who underwent extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT. Methods: We evaluated 30 patients (36 feet; 16 (53.3% patients were male and 14 (47.7% female with mean age of 48.7 y.o., varying from 33 to 78 y.o.; 16 (53.3% present the problem on the left side, 14 (46.7% on the right ones and 6 (20% bilateral; the symptomatology varied from 6 to 60 months, with the average of 13.58 months. These patients were submitted to a weekly ESWT session for 4 consecutive weeks. We measured the plantar fascia thickness millimeters with ultrasound and we applied American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scale for ankle and hindfoot, and Roles & Maudsley scales in pre ESWT, after one, three and six months after and decrease in the plantar fascia thickness by the ultrasound (p = 0.011 along the different moments studied. Results: We observed improvement of the evaluated criteria (p < 0.001 and plantar fascia thickness by ultrasound (p = 0.011 at different time points studied. Conclusion: The ESWT can be considered an important tool in the primary or adjuvant treatment of the chronic plantar fasciitis when associated with conventional therapies. This methodology is safe, non-invasive and provides precocious rehabilitation and return to regular activities considering the results of the statistical analysis. This resource provides decrease in the thickness of the plantar fascia.

  18. Cálculo do índice do arco plantar de staheli e a prevalência de pés planos: estudo em 100 crianças entre 5 e 9 anos de idade Calculation of staheli's plantar arch index and prevalence of flat feet: a study with 100 children aged 5-9 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo José Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores avaliam 100 crianças normais da população geral de ambos os sexos entre 5 e 9 anos de idade com o objetivo de verificar e avaliar o chamado índice do arco plantar e a ocorrência de pé plano. A avaliação do pé plano o foi feita através da obtenção da impressão plantar e do cálculo do índice do arco plantar (IP que estabelece a relação entre a região central e posterior dessa impressão, determinando-se um IP médio e um limite para esse tipo de pé. Concluem que o índice do arco plantar é facilmente obtido a partir da impressão plantar, não existirem diferenças entre os sexos e faixas etárias, que os valores médios do índice do arco plantar nessa faixa etária são estáveis e estão entre 0,61 e 0,67 e que índices do arco plantar acima de 1,15 devem ser considerados como indicativos de pé plano.The authors studied 100 normal children from the general population of both genders with ages ranging from 5 to 9 years old in order to evaluate the plantar arch index and the flat-feet prevalence. The flat-feet evaluation was obtained by means of the footprint and the plantar arch index (IP, which establishes the ratio between central and posterior regions of this footprint, determining a mean IP and a limit to the flat-foot. They conclude that the plantar arch index is easy to obtain from footprints and that there are no differences in terms of gender or age. The mean values of the plantar arch index within this age group are stable and range from 0.61 to 0.67, with plantar arch indexes greater than 1.15 being regarded as flat feet.

  19. Characteristics of Plantar Loads in Maximum Forward Lunge Tasks in Badminton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyue Hu

    Full Text Available Badminton players often perform powerful and long-distance lunges during such competitive matches. The objective of this study is to compare the plantar loads of three one-step maximum forward lunges in badminton.Fifteen right-handed male badminton players participated in the study. Each participant performed five successful maximum lunges at three directions. For each direction, the participant wore three different shoe brands. Plantar loading, including peak pressure, maximum force, and contact area, was measured by using an insole pressure measurement system. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was employed to determine the effects of the different lunge directions and different shoes, as well as the interaction of these two variables, on the measurements.The maximum force (MF on the lateral midfoot was lower when performing left-forward lunges than when performing front-forward lunges (p = 0.006, 95% CI = -2.88 to -0.04%BW. The MF and peak pressures (PP on the great toe region were lower for the front-forward lunge than for the right-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.047, 95% CI = -3.62 to -0.02%BW; PP, p = 0.048, 95% CI = -37.63 to -0.16 KPa and left-forward lunge (MF, p = 0.015, 95% CI = -4.39 to -0.38%BW; PP, p = 0.008, 95% CI = -47.76 to -5.91 KPa.These findings indicate that compared with the front-forward lunge, left and right maximum forward lunges induce greater plantar loads on the great toe region of the dominant leg of badminton players. The differences in the plantar loads of the different lunge directions may be potential risks for injuries to the lower extremities of badminton players.

  20. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária: ácido tranexâmico no tratamento de úlcera plantar Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: tranexamic acid for plantar ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de úlcera plantar por fístula arteriovenosa em paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária ou doença de Rendu-Osler-Weber tratado com ácido tranexâmico. Este fármaco é utilizado para tratamento de epistaxe, referindo-se o principal achado deste artigo ao uso eficaz desse medicamento na terapia de úlceras plantares hemorrágicas. São descritos os aspectos fisiopatológicos e clínicos da doença e as propriedades antifibrinolíticas do ácido tranexâmico. Este foi bem tolerado e apresentou evidências de eficácia na utilização para controle do sangramento e cicatrização da úlcera.Case report of one patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, treated with Tranexamic Acid for arteriovenous plantar ulcer. This drug has proved effective in controlling epistaxis, but the main point of this report is to expose the success use of this medication in the therapy of skin bleeding ulcer. The pathophysiologic and clinical features of the disease are reviewed and also the pharmacological aspects of the antifibrinolytic drugs. This drug was well tolerated by the patient and show evidence of good activity in the bleeding and healed the ulcer.

  1. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  2. The effects of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain in recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Isherwood, Josh; Taylor, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Chronic injuries are a common complaint in recreational runners. Foot orthoses have been shown to be effective for the treatment of running injuries but their mechanical effects are still not well understood. This study aims to examine the influence of orthotic intervention on multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain during running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m · s(-1) with and without orthotics. Multisegment foot kinematics and plantar fascia strain were obtained during the stance phase and contrasted using paired t tests. Relative coronal plane range of motion of the midfoot relative to the rearfoot was significantly reduced with orthotics (1.0°) compared to without (2.2°). Similarly, relative transverse plane range of motion was significantly lower with orthotics (1.1°) compared to without (1.8°). Plantar fascia strain did not differ significantly between orthotic (7.1) and nonorthotic (7.1) conditions. This study shows that although orthotics did not serve to reduce plantar fascia strain, they are able to mediate reductions in coronal and transverse plane rotations of the midfoot.

  3. Effects of low-dye taping on plantar pressure pre and post exercise: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nolan, Damien

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-Dye taping is used for excessive pronation at the subtalar joint of the foot. Previous research has focused on the tape\\'s immediate effect on plantar pressure. Its effectiveness following exercise has not been investigated. Peak plantar pressure distribution provides an indirect representation of subtalar joint kinematics. The objectives of the study were 1) To determine the effects of Low-Dye taping on peak plantar pressure immediately post-application. 2) To determine whether any initial effects are maintained following exercise. METHODS: 12 asymptomatic subjects participated; each being screened for excessive pronation (navicular drop > 10 mm). Plantar pressure data was recorded, using the F-scan, at four intervals during the testing session: un-taped, baseline-taped, post-exercise session 1, and post-exercise session 2. Each exercise session consisted of a 10-minute walk at a normal pace. The foot was divided into 6 regions during data analysis. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess regional pressure variations across the four testing conditions. RESULTS: Reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was the only significant difference immediately post tape application (p = 0.039). This effect was lost after 10 minutes of exercise (p = 0.036). Each exercise session resulted in significantly higher medial forefoot peak pressure compared to un-taped; (p = 0.015) and (p = 0.014) respectively, and baseline-taped; (p = 0.036) and (p = 0.015) respectively. Medial and lateral rearfoot values had also increased after the second session (p = 0.004), following their non-significant reduction at baseline-taped. A trend towards a medial-to-lateral shift in pressure present in the midfoot immediately following tape application was still present after 20 minutes of exercise. CONCLUSION: Low-Dye tape\\'s initial effect of reduced lateral forefoot peak plantar pressure was lost after a 10-minute walk. However, the tape continued

  4. Ultrasound- versus palpation-guided injection of corticosteroid for plantar fasciitis: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonghuan Li

    Full Text Available It is controversial whether ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid is superior to palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided and palpation-guided injection of corticosteroid for the treatment of plantar fasciitis.Databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE and reference lists were searched from their establishment to August 30, 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing ultrasound-guided with palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB tool was used to assess the methodological quality. Outcome measurements were visual analogue scale (VAS, tenderness threshold (TT, heel tenderness index (HTI, response rate, plantar fascia thickness (PFT, hypoechogenicity and heel pad thickness (HPT. The statistical analysis was performed with software RevMan 5.2 and Stata 12.0. When I2<50%, the fixed-effects model was adopted. Otherwise the randomized-effects model was adopted. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE system was used to assess the quality of evidence.Five RCTs with 149 patients were identified and analyzed. Compared with palpation-guided injection, ultrasound-guided injection was superior with regard to VAS, TT, response rate, PFT and hypoechogenicity. However, there was no statistical significance between the two groups for HPT and HTI.Ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid tends to be more effective than palpation-guided injection. However, it needs to be confirmed by further research.

  5. Ultrasound- versus Palpation-Guided Injection of Corticosteroid for Plantar Fasciitis: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Aixi; Qi, Baiwen

    2014-01-01

    Background It is controversial whether ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid is superior to palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided and palpation-guided injection of corticosteroid for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods Databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane library and EMBASE) and reference lists were searched from their establishment to August 30, 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ultrasound-guided with palpation-guided injection for plantar fasciitis. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) tool was used to assess the methodological quality. Outcome measurements were visual analogue scale (VAS), tenderness threshold (TT), heel tenderness index (HTI), response rate, plantar fascia thickness (PFT), hypoechogenicity and heel pad thickness (HPT). The statistical analysis was performed with software RevMan 5.2 and Stata 12.0. When I2<50%, the fixed-effects model was adopted. Otherwise the randomized-effects model was adopted. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess the quality of evidence. Results Five RCTs with 149 patients were identified and analyzed. Compared with palpation-guided injection, ultrasound-guided injection was superior with regard to VAS, TT, response rate, PFT and hypoechogenicity. However, there was no statistical significance between the two groups for HPT and HTI. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided injection of corticosteroid tends to be more effective than palpation-guided injection. However, it needs to be confirmed by further research. PMID:24658102

  6. Foot kinematics in patients with two patterns of pathological plantar hyperkeratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowker Peter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Root paradigm of foot function continues to underpin the majority of clinical foot biomechanics practice and foot orthotic therapy. There are great number of assumptions in this popular paradigm, most of which have not been thoroughly tested. One component supposes that patterns of plantar pressure and associated hyperkeratosis lesions should be associated with distinct rearfoot, mid foot, first metatarsal and hallux kinematic patterns. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which this was true. Methods Twenty-seven subjects with planter pathological hyperkeratosis were recruited into one of two groups. Group 1 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under metatarsal heads 2, 3 and 4 (n = 14. Group 2 displayed pathological plantar hyperkeratosis only under the 1st and 5th metatarsal heads (n = 13. Foot kinematics were measured using reflective markers on the leg, heel, midfoot, first metatarsal and hallux. Results The kinematic data failed to identify distinct differences between these two groups of subjects, however there were several subtle (generally Conclusions There was some evidence of small differences between planter pathological hyperkeratosis groups. Nevertheless, there was too much similarity between the kinematic data displayed in each group to classify them as distinct foot types as the current clinical paradigm proposes.

  7. [Spasticity and dynamic plantar pressure distribution measurements in hemiplegic spastic children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femery, V; Moretto, P; Renaut, H; Thévenon, A

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the plantar pressure distribution in nine hemiplegic spastic children to illustrate the dynamic alteration during stance phase linked spasticity grade. The graduation of the lower limbs muscle tone related to the Aschworth spasticity scale enabled us to identify two groups of hemiplegics subjects. The groups Asch 1 and Asch 3 have respectively presented a low and a strong spasticity. The peak pressures during consecutive gait cycles were determined under the feet of 30 healthy subjects and two cerebral palsy groups using a wearable footprint analysis system. A statistical study showed a similarity between the two disabled groups. Peak pressures under the midfoot were significantly higher compared to the control group. While the plantar pressure distribution profile was specific for each group under all other anatomical structures. The significant alterations were observed under the forefoot and hallux. Spasticity modifies the foot contact to ground and leads to a specific plantar pressure distribution profile linked to the spasticity grade. The equinovarus with clawed toes deformity due to higher spasticity seems to be an important factor in terminal stance phase perturbations. However spastic hemiplegic subjects seem to adopt a gait pattern in agreement with stability optimization criteria.

  8. Effect of eccentric training on the plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieu, Nele Nathalie; McNair, Peter; Cools, Ann; D'Haen, Caroline; Vandermeulen, Katrien; Witvrouw, Erik

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that eccentric training can be effective in the rehabilitation of patients with Achilles tendonopathy. The mechanism behind these results is not clear. However, there is evidence that tendons are able to respond to repeated forces by altering their structure and composition, and, thus, their mechanical properties change. In this regard, the objective of the present study was to investigate whether eccentric training affects the mechanical properties of the plantar flexor's muscle-tendon tissue properties. Seventy-four healthy subjects were randomized into two groups: an eccentric training group and a control group. The eccentric training group performed a 6-wk eccentric training program for the calf muscles. Before and after this period, all subjects were evaluated for dorsiflexion range of motion using universal goniometry, passive resistive torque of the plantar flexors, and stiffness of the Achilles tendon. Passive resistive torque was measured during ankle dorsiflexion on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness of the Achilles tendon was assessed using a dynamometer, in combination with ultrasonography. The results of the study reveal that the dorsiflexion range of motion was significantly increased only in the eccentric training group. The eccentric heel drop program also resulted in a significant decrease of the passive resistive torque of the plantar flexors (from 16.423 +/- 0.827 to 12.651 +/- 0.617 N.m). The stiffness of the Achilles tendon did not change significantly as a result of training. These findings provide evidence that an eccentric training program results in changes to some of the mechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscles. These changes were thought to be associated with modifications to structure rather than to stretch tolerance.

  9. Long-term sensation in the medial plantar flap: a two-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevatt, Alexander E J; Filobbos, George; Ul Haq, Ata; Khan, Umraz

    2014-09-01

    Reconstruction in the foot and ankle region is challenging. This study aimed to quantify objective sensation return when a sensate medial plantar flap is used for like-for-like reconstruction of foot and ankle defects. Two-point discrimination (2PD) was assessed in flap and normal tissue at a minimum of 1 year post-operatively. A paired T-test assessed for significance. 8 patients were included. Mean 2PD in normal tissue and flap was 29 mm (SD: 11.9) and 33 mm (SD: 9.97) respectively with no statistically significant difference between the two (two-tailed p-value: 0.1898). Mean age was 53.2 years (range: 15-84). There was no statistically significant correlation between age and 2PD in flap tissue (r=0.6, p=0.15). This is the largest case series of its kind. Our results suggest that sensation in medial plantar flaps can return to near normal and demonstrate the important role the medial plantar flap plays in soft tissue reconstruction in this region. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  11. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Zong-Hao Ma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1 no socks, system turned-off; (2 wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3 wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p < 0.05, and increased the COP parameters (p < 0.017, indicating increased postural sway. After turning on the biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p < 0.017. The positive results of this study should inspire future development of wearable plantar force-based biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  12. Active signal conduction through the sensory dendrite of a spider mechanoreceptor neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingl, Ewald; French, Andrew S

    2003-07-09

    Rapid responses to sensory stimulation are crucial for survival. This must be especially true for mechanical stimuli containing temporal information, such as vibration. Sensory transduction occurs at the tips of relatively long sensory dendrites in many mechanoreceptors of both vertebrates and invertebrates, but little is known about the electrical properties of these crucial links between transduction and action potential generation. The VS-3 slit-sense organ of the spider Cupiennius salei contains bipolar mechanosensory neurons that allow voltage-clamp recording from the somata, whereas mechanotransduction occurs at the tips of 100- to 200-microm-long sensory dendrites. We studied the properties of VS-3 sensory dendrites using three approaches. Voltage-jump experiments measured the spread of voltage outward from the soma by observing total mechanically transduced charge recovered at the soma as a function of time after a voltage jump. Frequency-response measurements between pseudorandom mechanical stimulation and somatic membrane potential estimated the passive cable properties of the dendrite for voltage spread in the opposite direction. Both of these sets of data indicated that the dendritic cable would significantly attenuate and retard a passively propagated receptor potential. Finally, current-clamp observations of receptor potentials and action potentials indicated that action potentials normally start at the distal dendrites and propagate regeneratively to the soma, reducing the temporal delay of passive conduction.

  13. Ultrasonographic findings of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in patients with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellabban, Abdou S; Kamel, Shereen R; Abo Omar, Hanaa A S; El-Sherif, Ashraf M H; Abdel-Magied, Rasha A

    2012-04-01

    The aims of the study were to detect the frequency of involvement of the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia in patients with calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD) by high-frequency gray-scale ultrasonography (US) and power Doppler sonography (PDS) and to correlate these findings with demographic and clinical data. Two groups of patients were enrolled: group I (38 patients with CPPD) and group II (22 patients with knee OA). US/PDS examination of the heels was performed to both groups. In the CPPD group, US/PDS examination of the Achilles tendon revealed: calcification in 57.9%, enthesophytosis in 57.9%, enthesopathy in 23.7%, vascular sign in 21%, bursitis in 13.2%, and cortical bone irregularity in 10.5%. US/PDS examination of plantar fascia in the CPPD group revealed: calcification in 15.8%, cortical bone irregularity in 78.9%, enthesophytosis in 60.5%, and planter fasciitis in 42.1%. In patients with CPPD, age was significantly correlated with enthesophytosis and deep retrocalcaneal bursitis (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively). Heel tenderness and posterior talalgia were significantly correlated with Achilles tendon enthesopathy, vascular sign, and deep retrocalcaneal bursitis (p = 0.0001 for each). Inferior talalgia was significantly correlated with plantar fasciitis (p = 0.0001). The sensitivity of ultrasonography for detection of calcifications in Achilles tendon and plantar fascia was 57.9% and 15.8%, respectively, and the specificity was 100% for both. To conclude, ultrasonographic Achilles tendon and plantar fascia calcifications are frequent findings in patients with CPPD. These calcifications have a high specificity and can be used as a useful indirect sign of CPPD.

  14. The plantar calcaneal spur: a review of anatomy, histology, etiology and key associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Joshua; Yassaie, Omid; Mirjalili, Seyed Ali

    2017-06-01

    The plantar calcaneal spur (PCS) is a bony outgrowth from the calcaneal tuberosity and has been studied using various methods including cadavers, radiography, histology and surgery. However, there are currently a number of discrepancies in the literature regarding the anatomical relations, histological descriptions and clinical associations of PCS. Historically, authors have described the intrinsic muscles of the foot and/or the plantar fascia as attaching to the PCS. In this article we review the relationship between the PCS and surrounding soft tissues as well as examining the histology of the PCS. We identify a number of key associations with PCS, including age, weight, gender, arthritides, plantar fasciitis and foot position; these factors may function as risk factors in PCS formation. The etiology of these spurs is a contentious issue and it has been explained through a number of theories including the degenerative, inflammatory, traction, repetitive trauma, bone-formers and vertical compression theories. We review these and finish by looking clinically at the evidence that PCS causes heel pain. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  15. Selected plantar pressure characteristics associated with the skating performance of national in-line speed skaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Lan; Hsu, Hsiu-Tao; Chu, I-Hua; Tsai, Feng-Hua; Liang, Jing-Min

    2017-06-01

    In order to help coaches analyse the techniques of professional in-line speed skaters for making the required fine adjustments and corrections in their push-off work, this study analysed the specific plantar pressure characteristics during a 300-m time-trial test. Fourteen elite in-line speed skaters from the national team were recruited in this study. The total completion time of the 300-m time-trial test, duration of each skating phase, and plantar pressure distribution were measured. The correlation between plantar pressure distribution and skating performance was assessed using Pearson correlation analyses. The results showed that the contact time of the total foot and force-time integral (FTI) in the medial forefoot were significantly correlated with the duration of the start phase, and the FTIs in the medial forefoot of the gliding (left) leg and lateral forefoot of the pushing (right) leg were significantly correlated with the duration of the turning phase. The maximum force in the medial heel, medial forefoot, and median forefoot and the FTI in the medial heel and medial forefoot were significantly correlated with the duration of the linear acceleration phase. The results suggest that a correct plantar loading area and push-off strategy can enhance the skating performance.

  16. The effectiveness of combined prescription of ankle–foot orthosis and stretching program for the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehab A.E. Sallam

    2016-01-01

    Combined prescription of night-stretch ankle–foot orthosis and stretching exercises for plantar flexors and fascia had greater therapeutic effects compared with each treatment alone. Stretching exercises alone are not beneficial in the treatment of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis.

  17. Cutaneous signs of piety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, V; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    It is important for dermatologists to be aware of cutaneous changes related to religious practices to help in their recognition and management. The anatomic location of cutaneous lesions associated with friction from praying varies based on religious practice. Allergic contact dermatitis from products and substances commonly used in worshipping also vary by religion. Some religious practices may render individuals prone to infections that manifest on the skin. Tattoos of godly figures also may adorn the body. Religious practices also have been implicated in cases of urticaria, köbnerization, and leukoderma. This article reviews the clinical presentation of some of the most common cutaneous changes that occur in individuals who practice the following religions: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Sikhism.

  18. Pressure-reduction and preservation in custom-made footwear of patients with diabetes and a history of plantar ulceration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, R.; Arts, M. L. J.; Haspels, R.; Busch-Westbroek, T. E.; Nollet, F.; Bus, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 15421549 (2012) Abstract Aims To assess the value of using in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to improve and preserve the offloading properties of custom-made footwear in patients with diabetes. Methods Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressures were measured in new custom-made footwear of

  19. A Vibrotactile and Plantar Force Measurement-Based Biofeedback System: Paving the Way towards Wearable Balance-Improving Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Christina Zong-Hao; Wan, Anson Hong-Ping; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Lee, Winson Chiu-Chun

    2015-12-15

    Although biofeedback systems have been used to improve balance with success, they were confined to hospital training applications. Little attempt has been made to investigate the use of in-shoe plantar force measurement and wireless technology to turn hospital training biofeedback systems into wearable devices. This research developed a wearable biofeedback system which detects body sway by analyzing the plantar force and provides users with the corresponding haptic cues. The effects of this system were evaluated in thirty young and elderly subjects with simulated reduced foot sensation. Subjects performed a Romberg test under three conditions: (1) no socks, system turned-off; (2) wearing five layers of socks, system turned-off; (3) wearing five layers of socks, and system turned-on. Degree of body sway was investigated by computing the center of pressure (COP) movement measured by a floor-mounted force platform. Plantar tactile sensation was evaluated using a monofilament test. Wearing multiple socks significantly decreased the plantar tactile sensory input (p biofeedback system, the COP parameters decreased significantly (p biofeedback systems for improving balance in people with sensory deficits.

  20. Cutaneous Manifestations of Human and Murine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breanna M. Scorza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are diseases caused by pathogenic protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Infections are initiated when a sand fly vector inoculates Leishmania parasites into the skin of a mammalian host. Leishmania causes a spectrum of inflammatory cutaneous disease manifestations. The type of cutaneous pathology is determined in part by the infecting Leishmania species, but also by a combination of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host immune response factors resulting in different clinical outcomes. This review discusses the distinct cutaneous syndromes described in humans, and current knowledge of the inflammatory responses associated with divergent cutaneous pathologic responses to different Leishmania species. The contribution of key hematopoietic cells in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis in mouse models are also reviewed and compared with those observed during human infection. We hypothesize that local skin events influence the ensuing adaptive immune response to Leishmania spp. infections, and that the balance between inflammatory and regulatory factors induced by infection are critical for determining cutaneous pathology and outcome of infection.

  1. Professional technical plantar ability in students of 1er year of the Agricultural specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonel Areces Mireles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article which approaches on the problems as to the development of professional technical plantar ability in the Agricultural Specialty Polytechnic Leonides Blanco González. Splitting of a dialectic materialistic focus various methods were utilized and techniques: Theorists and empiricists, the ones that permitted going into the background and conception assumed for the treatment of professional technical ability like formation of the personality of the future agricultural worker, as well as determining the needs of developmental students of technical plantar ability.

  2. Ultrasound guided injection of dexamethasone versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilheany Mark F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar fasciitis is the most commonly reported cause of chronic pain beneath the heel. Management of this condition commonly involves the use of corticosteroid injection in cases where less invasive treatments have failed. However, despite widespread use, only two randomised trials have tested the effect of this treatment in comparison to placebo. These trials currently offer the best available evidence by which to guide clinical practice, though both were limited by methodological issues such as insufficient statistical power. Therefore, the aim of this randomised trial is to compare the effect of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection versus placebo for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Methods The trial will be conducted at the La Trobe University Podiatry Clinic and will recruit 80 community-dwelling participants. Diagnostic ultrasound will be used to diagnose plantar fasciitis and participants will be required to meet a range of selection criteria. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: (i ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL of 4 mg/mL dexamethasone sodium phosphate (experimental group, or (ii ultrasound-guided injection of the plantar fascia with 1 mL normal saline (control group. Blinding will be applied to participants and the investigator performing procedures, measuring outcomes and analysing data. Primary outcomes will be pain measured by the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and plantar fascia thickness measured by ultrasound at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. All data analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Conclusion This will be a randomised trial investigating the effect of dexamethasone injection on pre-specified treatment outcomes in people with plantar fasciitis. Within the parameters of this protocol, the trial findings will be used to make evidence-based recommendations regarding the use of corticosteroid injection for treatment of this

  3. ¿Dónde estamos en la patología de la fascitis plantar?

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    La fascitis plantar es uno de los problemas musculoesqueléticos más frecuentes en las extremidades inferiores. Es una de las pocas áreas de la práctica podológica donde hay un conjunto de pruebas que evalúan el tratamiento y el diagnóstico. Esta presentación le permitirá navegar a través de la investigación para explorar los problemas actuales en el diagnóstico de fascitis plantar, incluyendo la presentación clínica y diagnóstico diferencial. Universidad de Málaga. Campus de Excelencia Int...

  4. Plantar pressure and EMG activity of simulated and actual ski jumping take-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmavirta, M; Komi, P V

    2001-10-01

    Plantar pressures and activation of the four muscles (VL - vastus lateralis, GL - gluteus, TA - tibialis anterior and GA - lat. gastrocnemius) were measured from ten ski jumpers under simulated laboratory conditions with training shoes (Lab TS) and with jumping boots (Lab JB) as well as in actual hill jumping conditions (Hill). The most significant differences between measured conditions were found in muscle activation patterns and plantar pressures prior to take-off. The centrifugal force due to the curvature of the inrun under actual hill jumping conditions caused extra pressure under the fore and rear parts of the feet (Pknee and hip extensor muscles.

  5. Prevention of recurrent foot ulcers with plantar pressure-based in-shoe orthoses: the CareFUL prevention multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrecht, Jan S; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T; Cavanagh, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3-8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure-based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Prevention of Recurrent Foot Ulcers With Plantar Pressure–Based In-Shoe Orthoses: The CareFUL Prevention Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Hurley, Timothy; Mauger, David T.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the efficacy of in-shoe orthoses that were designed based on shape and barefoot plantar pressure in reducing the incidence of submetatarsal head plantar ulcers in people with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and a history of similar prior ulceration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Single-blinded multicenter randomized controlled trial with subjects randomized to wear shape- and pressure-based orthoses (experimental, n = 66) or standard-of-care A5513 orthoses (control, n = 64). Patients were followed for 15 months, until a study end point (forefoot plantar ulcer or nonulcerative plantar forefoot lesion) or to study termination. Proportional hazards regression was used for analysis. RESULTS There was a trend in the composite primary end point (both ulcers and nonulcerative lesions) across the full follow-up period (P = 0.13) in favor of the experimental orthoses. This trend was due to a marked difference in ulcer occurrence (P = 0.007) but no difference in the rate of nonulcerative lesions (P = 0.76). At 180 days, the ulcer prevention effect of the experimental orthoses was already significant (P = 0.003) when compared with control, and the benefit of the experimental orthoses with respect to the composite end point was also significant (P = 0.042). The hazard ratio was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–8.7) for the occurrence of a submetatarsal head plantar ulcer in the control compared with experimental arm over the duration of the study. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that shape- and barefoot plantar pressure–based orthoses were more effective in reducing submetatarsal head plantar ulcer recurrence than current standard-of-care orthoses, but they did not significantly reduce nonulcerative lesions. PMID:24760263

  7. Dynamic plantar pressure proles of South African university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Footscan technology allows for assessment of injury risk and walking mechanics, yet there is a dearth of normative data pertaining to the normal, injury-free foot in a South African (SA) context. Objective. To generate normative tables from plantar pressure prole data gathered from students at an SA university.

  8. Neomycin damage and regeneration of hair cells in both mechanoreceptor and electroreceptor lateral line organs of the larval Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunxin; Zou, Sha; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Song, Jiakun

    2016-05-01

    The lateral line found in some amphibians and fishes has two distinctive classes of sensory organs: mechanoreceptors (neuromasts) and electroreceptors (ampullary organs). Hair cells in neuromasts can be damaged by aminoglycoside antibiotics and they will regenerate rapidly afterward. Aminoglycoside sensitivity and the capacity for regeneration have not been investigated in ampullary organs. We treated Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii) larvae with neomycin and observed loss and regeneration of sensory hair cells in both organs by labeling with DASPEI and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The numbers of sensory hair cells in both organs were reduced to the lowest levels at 6 hours posttreatment (hpt). New sensory hair cells began to appear at 12 hpt and were regenerated completely in 7 days. To reveal the possible mechanism for ampullary hair cell regeneration, we analyzed cell proliferation and the expression of neural placodal gene eya1 during regeneration. Both cell proliferation and eya1 expression were concentrated in peripheral mantle cells and both increased to the highest level at 12 hpt, which is consistent with the time course for regeneration of the ampullary hair cells. Furthermore, we used Texas Red-conjugated gentamicin in an uptake assay following pretreatment with a cation channel blocker (amiloride) and found that entry of the antibiotic was suppressed in both organs. Together, our results indicate that ampullary hair cells in Siberian sturgeon larvae can be damaged by neomycin exposure and they can regenerate rapidly. We suggest that the mechanisms for aminoglycoside uptake and hair cell regeneration are conserved for mechanoreceptors and electroreceptors. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1443-1456, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Children with ADHD Show No Deficits in Plantar Foot Sensitivity and Static Balance Compared to Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Gunther; Neubert, Tom; Worenz, Andreas; Milani, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate plantar foot sensitivity and balance control of ADHD (n = 21) impaired children compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25). Thresholds were measured at 200 Hz at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot area of both feet (hallux, first metatarsal head (METI) and heel). Body balance was…

  10. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Sarah; Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be in...

  11. Quantifying dynamic changes in plantar pressure gradient in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wen Lung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers remain one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Peak plantar pressure (PPP and peak pressure gradient (PPG during walking have been shown to be associated with the development of diabetic foot ulcers. To gain further insight into the mechanical etiology of diabetic foot ulcers, examination of the pressure gradient angle (PGA has been recently proposed. The PGA quantifies directional variation or orientation of the pressure gradient during walking, and provides a measure of whether pressure gradient patterns are concentrated or dispersed along the plantar surface. We hypothesized that diabetics at risk of foot ulceration would have smaller PGA in key plantar regions, suggesting less movement of the pressure gradient over time. A total of 27 participants were studied, including 19 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 non-diabetic control subjects. A foot pressure measurement system was used to measure plantar pressures during walking. PPP, PPG and PGA were calculated for four foot regions - 1st toe (T1, 1st metatarsal head (M1, 2nd metatarsal head (M2, and heel (HL. Consistent with prior studies, PPP and PPG were significantly larger in the diabetic group compared to non-diabetic controls in the T1 and M1 regions, but not M2 or HL. For example, PPP was 165% (P=0.02 and PPG was 214% (P<0.001 larger in T1. PGA was found to be significantly smaller in the diabetic group in T1 (46%, P=0.04, suggesting a more concentrated pressure gradient pattern under the toe. The proposed PGA may improve our understanding of the role of pressure gradient on the risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  12. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  13. Mini-Invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy for resistant or recurrent neuropathic plantar metatarsal head ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Eran; Finestone, Aharon S; Avisar, Erez; Agar, Gabriel

    2016-07-11

    Patients with peripheral neuropathy and pressure under a relatively plantar deviated metatarsal head frequently develop plantar foot ulcers. When conservative management with orthotics and shoes does not cure the ulcer, surgical metatarsal osteotomy may be indicated to relieve the pressure and enable the ulcer to heal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of a mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy in treating recalcitrant ulcers or recurrent ulcers plantar to the metatarsal heads in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) related neuropathy. Computerized medical files of patients with diabetic neuropathy treated with an osteotomy during 2013 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 20 osteotomies performed on 17 patients (mean age 58 years). The patients had a diagnosis of DM for a mean of 17 years. All ulcers were University of Texas grade 1A; mean ulcer age was 19 months. After 17/20 operations, the ulcer completely resolved after 6 weeks and did not recur after a mean follow-up of 11.5 months. One patient developed an early post-operative infection with osteomyelitis at the osteotomy site (proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal) that needed debridement and IV antibiotics. In the other 19 cases, the surgical wound healed within 1 week. Asymptomatic radiological non-union developed in six cases (30 %). Mini-invasive floating metatarsal osteotomy can cure resistant and recurrent University of Texas grade 1A ulcerations plantar to the metatarsal heads in neuropathic patients.

  14. Anatomy and biomechanical properties of the plantar aponeurosis: a cadaveric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-wei Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the anatomy of the plantar aponeurosis (PA and its biomechanical effects on the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP joint and foot arch. METHODS: Anatomic parameters (length, width and thickness of each central PA bundle and the main body of the central part were measured in 8 cadaveric specimens. The ratios of the length and width of each bundle to the length and width of the central part were used to describe these bundles. Six cadaveric specimens were used to measure the range of motion of the first MTP joint before and after releasing the first bundle of the PA. Another 6 specimens were used to evaluate simulated static weight-bearing. Changes in foot arch height and plantar pressure were measured before and after dividing the first bundle. RESULTS: The average width and thickness of the origin of the central part at the calcaneal tubercle were 15.45 mm and 2.79 mm respectively. The ratio of the length of each bundle to the length of the central part was (from medial to lateral 0.29, 0.30, 0.28, 0.25, and 0.27, respectively. Similarly, the ratio of the widths was 0.26, 0.25, 0.23, 0.19 and 0.17. The thickness of each bundle at the bifurcation of the PA into bundles was (from medial to lateral 1.26 mm, 1.04 mm, 0.91 mm, 0.84 mm and 0.72 mm. The average dorsiflexion of the first MTP joint increased 10.16° after the first bundle was divided. Marked acute changes in the foot arch height and the plantar pressure were not observed after division. CONCLUSIONS: The first PA bundle was not the longest, widest, or the thickest bundle. Releasing the first bundle increased the range of motion of the first MTP joint, but did not acutely change foot arch height or plantar pressure during static load testing.

  15. Remote Cutaneous Breast Carcinoma Metastasis Mimicking Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annakan V Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from primary internal malignancies are an uncommon presentation. Cutaneous metastases are more frequently seen in breast cancer than in any other visceral malignancy in women. Medical practitioners should be vigilant of the possibility of unusual presentations of metastatic disease in breast cancer patients with lobular carcinoma presenting as cutaneous lesions mimicking benign dermatological conditions. Herein, we present a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with cutaneous lobular breast carcinoma metastases on her anterior right leg, which had previously been misdiagnosed as dermatitis for 9 years.

  16. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Ben

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plantar heel pain is a commonly occurring foot complaint. Stretching is frequently utilised as a treatment, yet a systematic review focusing only on its effectiveness has not been published. This review aimed to assess the effectiveness of stretching on pain and function in people with plantar heel pain. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2010. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were independently assessed, and their quality evaluated using the modified PEDro scale. Results Six studies including 365 symptomatic participants were included. Two compared stretching with a control, one study compared stretching to an alternative intervention, one study compared stretching to both alternative and control interventions, and two compared different stretching techniques and durations. Quality rating on the modified Pedro scale varied from two to eight out of a maximum of ten points. The methodologies and interventions varied significantly between studies, making meta-analysis inappropriate. Most participants improved over the course of the studies, but when stretching was compared to alternative or control interventions, the changes only reached statistical significance in one study that used a combination of calf muscle stretches and plantar fascia stretches in their stretching programme. Another study comparing different stretching techniques, showed a statistically significant reduction in some aspects of pain in favour of plantar fascia stretching over calf stretches in the short term. Conclusions There were too few studies to assess whether stretching is effective compared to control or other interventions, for either pain or function. However, there is some evidence that plantar fascia stretching may be more effective than Achilles tendon stretching alone in the short-term. Appropriately powered randomised controlled trials, utilizing validated outcome

  17. [Neurophysiological investigations of information processing in the somato-sensory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunesch, E

    2009-08-01

    The ability of the human hand to perform complex sensorimotor tasks such as tactile exploration and grasping is based on 1. exact encoding of somatosensory information by cutaneous mechanoreceptors, 2. elaborated processing of afferent signals in somatosensory relay stations and cortex fields, 3. rapid and effective interaction of sensory feedback with motor programs, and 4. different modes of sensory control, which can be switched over. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  18. Comparison of plantar pressures and contact area between normal and cavus foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Seguín, Lourdes M; Diaz Mancha, Juan Antonio; Sánchez Rodríguez, Raquel; Escamilla Martínez, Elena; Gómez Martín, Beatriz; Ramos Ortega, Javier

    2014-02-01

    In pes cavus, the medial longitudinal arch elevation reduces the contact surface area and consequently increases the corresponding plantar pressure measurements. This poor distribution of loads may produce associated pathology and pain in this or other areas of the body. Normal reference values need to be established in order to determine which patterns are prone to pathology. To compare the plantar pressures and weight-bearing surface in a population with pes cavus to a population with neutral feet. The sample comprised 68 adults, 34 with pes cavus and 34 with neutral feet. The Footscan USB Gait Clinical System(®) was used as a platform to measure the total contact area and plantar pressure under the forefoot, midfoot, hindfoot, each metatarsal head, and the overall metatarsal area. A statistical analysis of the data was performed using Student's t-test for independent samples. The pes cavus subjects showed a significant reduction in their weight-bearing area [neutral feet: 165.04 ( ± 20.68) cm(2); pes cavus: 118.26 ( ± 30.31) cm(2); p contact surface and the load under the first toe. A significant increase is present in the load under the metatarsal areas, but the relative distribution of this load is similar in both groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Amniotic Tissues for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciosis and Achilles Tendinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Werber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Allogeneic amniotic tissue and fluid may be used to treat chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis. This innovative approach involves delivering a unique allograft of live human cells in a nonimmunogenic structural tissue matrix to treat chronic tendon injury. These tissues convey very positive regenerative attributes; procurement is performed with maternal consent during elective caesarian birth. Materials and Methods. In the present investigation all patients were unresponsive to multiple standard therapies for a minimum of 6 months and were treated with one implantation of PalinGen SportFLOW around the plantar fascia and/or around the Achilles paratenon. The patients were given a standard protocol for postimplant active rehabilitation. Results. The analogue pretreatment pain score (VAS of 8. By the fourth week after treatment, all patients had significantly reduced self-reported pain. Twelve weeks following the procedure the average pain level had reduced to only 2. No adverse reactions were reported in any of the patients. Conclusion. All patients in this study experienced heel or Achilles pain, unresponsive to standard therapy protocols. After treatment all patients noted significant pain reduction, indicating that granulized amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid can be successfully used to treat both chronic plantar fasciosis and Achilles tendinosis.

  20. Healthy older adults have insufficient hip range of motion and plantar flexor strength to walk like healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L

    2014-03-21

    Limited plantar flexor strength and hip extension range of motion (ROM) in older adults are believed to underlie common age-related differences in gait. However, no studies of age-related differences in gait have quantified the percentage of strength and ROM used during gait. We examined peak hip angles, hip torques and plantar flexor torques, and corresponding estimates of functional capacity utilized (FCU), which we define as the percentage of available strength or joint ROM used, in 10 young and 10 older healthy adults walking under self-selected and controlled (slow and fast) conditions. Older adults walked with about 30% smaller hip extension angle, 28% larger hip flexion angle, 34% more hip extensor torque in the slow condition, and 12% less plantar flexor torque in the fast condition than young adults. Older adults had higher FCU than young adults for hip flexion angle (47% vs. 34%) and hip extensor torque (48% vs. 27%). FCUs for plantar flexor torque (both age groups) and hip extension angle (older adults in all conditions; young adults in self-selected gait) were not significantly adults lacked sufficient hip extension ROM to walk with a hip extension angle as large as that of young adults. Similarly, in the fast gait condition older adults lacked the strength to match the plantar flexor torque produced by young adults. This supports the hypothesis that hip extension ROM and plantar flexor strength are limiting factors in gait and contribute to age-related differences in gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Can ultrasound of plantar plate have normal appearance with a positive drawer test?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Eloy de Avila [Affiliated Professor, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), São Paulo (Brazil); Mann, Tania Szejnfeld [Medical Assistant of Medicine and Surgery of the Foot and Ankle Group, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Puchnick, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.ddi@epm.br [Professor and Coordinator of Educational and Research Support, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Tertulino, Franklin de Freitas [Postgraduate Physician, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Cannato, Camila Testoni [Resident Physician, Department of Surgery, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Nery, Caio [Associate Professor, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil); Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Corrêa [Associate Professor, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, EPM-Unifesp, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •We evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound to identify and measure the plantar plate. •We correlate ultrasound findings with those of physical examination and MRI. •Ultrasound and MRI measures of plantar plate were positively correlated. •Ultrasound is efficient in identifying and measuring plantar plate. •Ultrasound may complement physical examination. •Young asymptomatic subjects can present a grade I positive drawer test. -- Abstract: Objectives: The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the reliability of ultrasound (US) examination in the identification and measurement of the metatarsophalangeal plantar plate (MTP-PP) in asymptomatic subjects and (2) to establish the correlation of US findings with those of physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), once it is an important tool in the evaluation of the instability syndrome of the second and third rays. Materials and Methods: US examinations of the second and third MTP-PPs were performed in eight asymptomatic volunteers, totaling 32 MTP joints, by three examiners with different levels of experience in musculoskeletal US. Plantar plate dimensions, integrity and echogenicity, the presence of ruptures, and confidence level in terms of structure identification were determined using conventional US. Vascular flow was assessed using power Doppler. US data were correlated with data from physical examination and MRI. Results: MTP-PPs were ultrasonographically identified in 100% of cases, always showing homogeneous hyperechoic features and no detectable vascular flow on power Doppler, with 100% certainty in identification for all examiners. There was excellent US inter-observer agreement for longitudinal measures of second and third toe MTP-PPs and for transverse measures of the second toe MTP-PP. The MTP drawer test was positive for grade 1 MTP instability in 34.4% of joints with normal US results. Transverse MTP-PP measures were significantly higher in individuals with positive

  2. American cutaneous leishmaniasis triggered byelectrocoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Sales Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis is usually transmitted by infected phlebotomine sand fly bites that initiate local cutaneous lesions. Few reports in the literature describe other modes of transmission. We report a case of a previously healthy 59-year-old woman who underwent electrocoagulation to remove seborrheic keratosis confirmed by dermatoscopy. Three months later, a skin fragment tested positive for Leishmania culture; the parasite was identified as L. (V. braziliensis. Trauma may generate inflammatory cascades that favor Leishmania growth and lesion formation in previously infected patients. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a dynamic disease with unclear pathophysiology because of continually changing environments, demographics, and human behaviors.

  3. The plantar fasciotomy: MR imaging findings in asymptomatic volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.; Ashman, C.; Smith, G.; Kaeding, C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To determine the postoperative appearance of the plantar fascia on MR imaging after a fasciotomy has been performed, and to compare the postsurgical appearance of the fascia after an open and endoscopic procedure. Design and patients. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (12 women, 3 men; age range 22-49 years, mean age 33 years) with prior fasciotomies for treatment of longstanding plantar fasciitis were studied. Fourteen volunteers had a unilateral release and one volunteer had bilateral releases, allowing for assessment of 16 ankles. Eight fasciotomies were performed through an open incision and eight were performed endoscopically. The average time between surgery and imaging was 24 months (range 11-46 months). The site of surgery was established from the operative reports. Proton density (PD)-weighted and T2-weighted images in three orthogonal planes were obtained on a 1.5-T magnet. In eight studies, T1-weighted sagittal and STIR sagittal images were included. The fascia in each ankle was assessed for morphology and signal intensity. Perifascial soft tissues and bone marrow were assessed for edema. Preoperative MR studies were available in five volunteers. Results. There was no apparent difference in the postoperative appearance of the ankle after an open or endoscopic procedure except for scar formation in the subcutaneous fat which was common after an open procedure (P Conclusions. The average thickness of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic volunteers after surgery is nearly 2-3 times that of normal. While there is increased thickness at the site of surgery, the changes in morphology and signal intensity were most prominent at the enthesis. The key observation was absence of edema in the fascia and perifascial soft tissues. This baseline information may be of value when assessing MR studies of symptomatic patients. (orig.)

  4. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in patient with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvegnú, Ana Maria; Stramari, Juliana; Dallazem, Lia Natália Diehl; Chemello, Raíssa Massaia Londero; Beber, André Avelino Costa

    2017-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is the most prevalent subcutaneous mycosis and is characterized by a subacute or chronic development of a cutaneous or subcutaneous nodular lesion. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix spp, which may manifest in different clinical forms. The disseminated cutaneous form is uncommon and is more likely to occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a 47-year-old male patient with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules. The patient was diagnosed with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis based on the isolation and identification of Sporothrix spp. The patient was treated with potassium iodide, which resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions.

  5. Analise dos pés através da baropodometria e da classificação plantar em escolares de Guaratinguetá

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Liliana Aparecida de Paula [UNESP

    2006-01-01

    O presente estudo teve por objetivo realizar um levantamento do padrão do pé em crianças no início da segunda infância. A metodologia utilizou duas plataformas de força para detecção da distribuição das pressões plantares e da impressão plantar para mensurar o arco longitudinal medial, por conseguinte, classificar os tipos de pés. Foram comparadas as forças plantares da porção medial, lateral e as forças plantares da região anterior e posterior dos pés. Os pés, após serem classificados, foram...

  6. Maximum toe flexor muscle strength and quantitative analysis of human plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles by a magnetic resonance imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Otsuka, Mitsuo; Tottori, Nobuaki; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Isaka, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between the maximum isometric toe flexor muscle strength (TFS) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles and to identify the major determinant of maximum TFS among CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Twenty six young healthy participants (14 men, 12 women; age, 20.4 ± 1.6 years) volunteered for the study. TFS was measured by a specific designed dynamometer, and CSA of plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To measure TFS, seated participants optimally gripped the bar with their toes and exerted maximum force on the dynamometer. For each participant, the highest force produced among three trials was used for further analysis. To measure CSA, serial T1-weighted images were acquired. TFS was significantly correlated with CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses identified that the major determinant of TFS was CSA of medial parts of plantar intrinsic muscles (flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae, lumbricals and abductor hallucis). There was no significant difference between men and women in TFS/CSA. CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles is one of important factors for determining the maximum TFS in humans.

  7. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogéria Nobre Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results: A female prevalence (78.8% was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion: Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle.

  8. Effect of arch support insole on plantar pressure distribution in females with mild and moderate hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maedeh Farzadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hallux Valgus is one of the most foot deformities which increase plantar pressure beneath big toe and first metatarsal. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foot orthosis on plantar pressure distribution in subjects with mild and moderate Hallux Valgus. Materials & Methods: in this quasi-experimental study, females 16 with Hallux Valgus were recruited. Plantar pressure in 8 area of foot was measured by Pedar-X insole when wearing standard shoe only shoe with foot orthosis and shoe with foot orthosis after a month of using orthosis. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance test. Results: using foot orthosis for a month leaded to decrease pressure in the big toe (P<0/019 first metatarsal and 3-5 metatarsals (P<0.001 and also increased pressure in medial mid foot (P<0.001. Conclusion: Foot orthosis decreased peak pressure in fore foot and increased it in medial mid foot. Therefore redistribute plantar pressure to the more normal pattern in Hallux Valgus subjects. So it could be one of the effective methods to prevent the progression of this deformity in its initial steps of formation.

  9. Does the thickening of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia contribute to the alteration of diabetic foot loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, C; D'Ambrogi, E; Uccioli, L; Macellari, V

    2005-06-01

    The diabetic foot often undergoes abnormal plantar pressures, changing in walking strategy, ulcerative processes. The present study focuses on the effects that diabetes-induced alterations of Achilles tendon, plantar fascia and first metatarso-phalangeal joint-both anatomical and functional-may have on foot loading. Sixty-one diabetic patients, with or without neuropathy, and 21 healthy volunteers were recruited. Thickness of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia was measured by ultrasound. Flexion-extension of the first metatarso-phalangeal joint was measured passively. Main biomechanic parameters of foot-floor interaction during gait were acquired and related to the above measurements. Plantar fascia and Achilles tendon were significantly (Pplantar fascia, respectively, and 4.0 mm (0.5), 4.6 mm (1.0) and 4.9 mm (1.7) for Achilles tendon, respectively. Flexion-extension of the first metatarso-phalangeal joint was significantly (Pplantar fascia and Achilles tendon in diabetics, more evident in the presence of neuropathy, concurs to develop a rigid foot, which poorly absorbs shock during landing (performs the physiological impact force absorption during landing). More generally, an overall alteration of the foot-ankle complex motion likely occurs throughout the whole gait cycle, which partly explains the abnormal loading under the forefoot.

  10. Glabrous skin reconstruction of palmar/plantar defects: a case for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR LEGBO

    Methods: A prospective descriptive study of consecutive patients with benign soft tissue palmar/plantar defects .... cannot be closed by direct suturing. In the authors' view ... splintage ) did not lead to joint stiffness since majority were children ...

  11. Study II: mechanoreceptive sensation is of increased importance for human postural control under alcohol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modig, F; Patel, M; Magnusson, M; Fransson, P A

    2012-03-01

    Standing postural stability relies on input from visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and mechanoreceptive sensors. When the information from any of these sensors is unavailable or disrupted, the central nervous system maintains postural stability by relying more on the contribution from the reliable sensors, termed sensory re-weighting. Alcohol intoxication is known to affect the integrity of the vestibular and visual systems. The aim was to assess how mechanoreceptive sensory information contributed to postural stability at 0.00% (i.e. sober), 0.06% and 0.10% blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in 25 healthy subjects (mean age 25.1 years). The subjects were assessed with eyes closed and eyes open under quiet standing and while standing was perturbed by repeated, random-length, vibratory stimulation of the calf muscles. Plantar cutaneous mechanoreceptive sensation was assessed for both receptor types: slowly adapting (tactile sensitivity) and rapidly adapting (vibration perception). The correlation between recorded torque variance and the sensation from both mechanoreceptor types was calculated. The recorded stability during alcohol intoxication was significantly influenced by both the tactile sensation and vibration perception of the subjects. Moreover, the study revealed a fluctuating association between the subjects' vibration perception and torque variance during balance perturbations, which was significantly influenced by the level of alcohol intoxication, vision and adaptation. Hence, one's ability to handle balance perturbations under the influence of alcohol is strongly dependent on accurate mechanoreceptive sensation and efficient sensory re-weighting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5.5-year-old male presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques on his scalp and pubic region of 2 months′ duration. He was having productive cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, anorexia and weight loss and receiving antitubercular treatment for these symptoms for last 3 months. Clinical diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic disease was made. Chest x-ray revealed multiple coin shaped shadows on both sides with pleural effusion. Routine investigations were normal except for anemia and hyperuricemia. Biopsy of skin nodules showed features of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Features and significance of cutaneous metastases are discussed.

  13. The effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis in regard to middle-aged patients' activity level and pain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, M.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuyama, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, we compared the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for plantar fasciitis in patients with different activity levels and different pain locations. In total, 92 patients (99 feet) who were over 40 years old with chronic plantar fasciitis were treated with ESWT after being categorized as participating in recreational sports(group R) or only activities of daily living (group D). On the other hand, patients were categorized as having pain in the plantar fascia enthesis (group E) or the entire plantar fascia (group W). Pain during activity and general tenderness were evaluated by using the visual analog scale (VAS) before and after ESWT. Although the VAS for pain score during activity significantly improved in both groups R and D after ESWT (Pplantar fasciitis in middle-aged patients and ESWT was effective in patients not only playing recreational sports but also having activities of daily living. ESWT was more effective in patients with pain in the plantar fascia enthesis than in patients with pain in the entire plantar fascia.

  14. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV. PMID:27828846

  15. High probability of healing without amputation of plantar forefoot ulcers in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is an important entity which in many cases is the first serious complication in diabetes. Although a plantar forefoot location is common, there are few studies on larger cohorts and in such studies there is often a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. The purpose of this study is to discern the outcome of plantar forefoot ulcers and their specific characteristics in a large cohort. All patients (n = 770), presenting with a plantar forefoot ulcer at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic from January 1, 1983 to December 31, 2012 were considered for the study. Seven hundred one patients (median age 67 [22-95]) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were followed according to a preset protocol until final outcome (healing or death). Severe peripheral vascular disease was present in 26% of the patients and 14% had evidence of deep infection upon arrival at the foot clinic. Fifty-five percent (385/701) of the patients healed without foot surgery, 25% (173/701) healed after major debridement, 9% (60/701) healed after minor or major amputation and 12% (83/701) died unhealed. Median healing time was 17 weeks. An ulcer classified as Wagner grade 1 or 2 at inclusion and independent living were factors associated with a higher healing rate. Seventy-nine percent of 701 patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer treated at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic healed without amputation. For one third some form of foot surgery was needed to achieve healing. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  16. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  17. High lateral plantar pressure is related to an increased tibialis anterior/fibularis longus activity ratio in patients with recurrent lateral ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineta S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shinshiro Mineta,1 Takayuki Inami,2 Raldy Mariano,3 Norikazu Hirose4 1Graduate School of Sport Sciences, 2Institute of Physical Education, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, 3Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 4Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Higashifushimi, Nishitokyo, Japan Introduction: Center of pressure (COP is a sudden displacement at the time of a lateral ankle sprain (LAS. It has been suggested that the distribution of plantar pressure and the quantity of COP displacement are important for assessing the risk of LAS. Therefore, we evaluated the plantar pressure during a single-leg balance test with eyes closed (SLB-C to identify the factors and characteristics of plantar pressure in people with repeated cases of LAS.Methods: We recruited 22 collegiate athletes and divided them into an instability group (IG; n=11 and a control group (CG; n=11. We measured the distribution of plantar pressure and lower extremity muscle activity during a SLB-C along with static alignment and isometric ankle strength.Results: The fibularis longus (FL activity was significantly lower in the IG than in the CG. The lateral plantar pressure (LPP/medial plantar pressure (MPP ratio was also higher in the IG than in the CG. In addition, the LPP/MPP ratio was correlated with the tibialis anterior (TA/FL ratio.Conclusion: These results suggest that increased lateral plantar pressure is related to decreased FL activity and increased TA/FL ratio. Keywords: chronic ankle instability, ankle sprain, postural stability, soccer, prevention

  18. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  19. Injury Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape in Marine Corps Basic Training San Diego, CA and Parris Island, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    in excessive pronation, creating a torsional force that repeatedly overstretched the plantar fascia , leading to the fasciitis. On the basis of one...COVERED (From – To) MARCH 2007–OCTOBER 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Injury-Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape... plantar surface influenced injury risk in Marine Corps basic training. After foot examinations, Marine Corps recruits in an experimental group (E

  20. Injury-Reduction Effectiveness of Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape in Marine Corps Basic Training, San Diego, CA, and Parris Island, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    in excessive pronation, creating a torsional force that repeatedly overstretched the plantar fascia , leading to the fasciitis. On the basis of one...COVERED (From – To) MARCH 2007–OCTOBER 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Injury-Reduction Effectiveness of Assigning Running Shoes Based on Plantar Shape... plantar surface influenced injury risk in Marine Corps basic training. After foot examinations, Marine Corps recruits in an experimental group (E

  1. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in patient with alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Benvegnú

    Full Text Available Abstract Sporotrichosis is the most prevalent subcutaneous mycosis and is characterized by a subacute or chronic development of a cutaneous or subcutaneous nodular lesion. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix spp, which may manifest in different clinical forms. The disseminated cutaneous form is uncommon and is more likely to occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a 47-year-old male patient with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules. The patient was diagnosed with disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis based on the isolation and identification of Sporothrix spp. The patient was treated with potassium iodide, which resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions.

  2. Greater Reduction of Balance as a Result of Increased Plantar Fascia Elasticity at Ovulation during the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul

    2015-11-01

    One of the sexual hormones, estrogen, increases elasticity of human connective tissue such as the anterior cruciate ligament during the menstrual cycle in women. In the present investigation, the plantar fascia was investigated to see if there is a difference in elasticity with the menstrual cycle. Fifteen young healthy females in the age range of 18-35 years old with a regular menstrual cycle were tested twice throughout one full menstrual cycle; once during the early follicular phases and once at ovulation. Foot length, while standing on both feet and one foot were used to assess plantar fascia elasticity, ultrasound measured plantar fascia thickness while lying and standing, and posture sway and tremor using a balance platform during 8 different balance tests were assessed to see the impact of elasticity changes. Foot length increased significantly at ovulation compared to menstruation when standing on two feet (p = 0.03) and standing on one foot (p plantar fascia in thinning per kilogram weight applied to the foot at ovulation compared to menstruation (p = 0.014). Associated with this increase in elasticity at ovulation, there was a reduction in balance in the most difficult balance tasks and an increase in tremor during ovulation (p Plantar fascia elasticity change during the menstrual cycle might have effects on posture sway and tremor, which could have a potential risk of falling. Therefore, healthy professionals working with young female adults should recognize these physiological effects.

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with plantar fasciitis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with ultrasonographic and subjective outcome assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Vahdatpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Results of previous studies have been conflicting on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT in the treatment of plantar fasciitis. We evaluated the effects of ESWT on plantar fasciitis in terms of ultrasonographic and subjective evaluations. Materials and Methods: In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, patients with plantar fasciitis were assigned to receive ESWT (4000 shock waves/session of 0.2 mJ/mm 2 in 3 sessions at weekly intervals or sham therapy (n = 20 in each group. Outcomes were documented by the ultrasonographic appearance of the aponeurosis and by patients′ pain scores, performed at baseline and 12 weeks after completion of the therapy. Results : The two groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Over the study period, plantar fascia thickness significantly reduced in the ESWT group (4.1 ± 1.3 to 3.6 ± 1.2 mm, P < 0.001, but slightly increased in the sham group (4.1 ± 0.8 to 4.5 ± 0.9 mm, P = 0.03. Both groups showed significant pain improvement over the course of the study (P < 0.001, though pain scores were significantly more reduced in the ESWT than the sham group (-4.2 ± 2.9 vs. -2.7 ± 1.8, P = 0.049. Conclusions: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy contributes to healing and pain reduction in plantar fasciitis and ultrasound imaging is able to depict the morphologic changes related to plantar fasciitis as a result of this therapy.

  4. Plantar pressure in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with active foot ulceration, previous ulceration and no history of ulceration: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Malindu Eranga; Crowther, Robert George; Pappas, Elise; Lazzarini, Peter Anthony; Cunningham, Margaret; Sangla, Kunwarjit Singh; Buttner, Petra; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Elevated dynamic plantar pressures are a consistent finding in diabetes patients with peripheral neuropathy with implications for plantar foot ulceration. This meta-analysis aimed to compare the plantar pressures of diabetes patients that had peripheral neuropathy and those with neuropathy with active or previous foot ulcers. Published articles were identified from Medline via OVID, CINAHL, SCOPUS, INFORMIT, Cochrane Central EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science via ISI Web of Knowledge bibliographic databases. Observational studies reporting barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in adults with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, where at least one group had a history of plantar foot ulcers were included. Interventional studies, shod plantar pressure studies and studies not published in English were excluded. Overall mean peak plantar pressure (MPP) and pressure time integral (PTI) were primary outcomes. The six secondary outcomes were MPP and PTI at the rear foot, mid foot and fore foot. The protocol of the meta-analysis was published with PROPSERO, (registration number CRD42013004310). Eight observational studies were included. Overall MPP and PTI were greater in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with foot ulceration compared to those without ulceration (standardised mean difference 0.551, 95% CI 0.290-0.811, pdiabetic peripheral neuropathy with a history of foot ulceration compared to those with diabetic neuropathy without a history of ulceration. More homogenous data is needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Tendons in the plantar aspect of the foot: MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rodrigo [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Fleury Medical Center, Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, Rodrigo; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of this anatomic imaging study was to illustrate the normal complex anatomy of tendons of the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with anatomic correlation in cadavers. Seven fresh cadaveric feet (obtained and used according to institutional guidelines, with informed consent from relatives of the deceased) were studied with intermediate-weighted fast-spin-echo MR imaging. For anatomic analysis, cadaveric specimens were sectioned in 3-mm-thick slices in the coronal and axial planes that approximated the sections acquired at MR imaging. The entire courses of the tendons into the plantar aspect of the foot were analyzed. The tibialis posterior tendon has a complex distal insertion. The insertions in the navicular, second, and third cuneiforms bones were identify in all cases using axial and coronal planes. A tendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons was identified in five of our specimens (71%). The coronal plane provided the best evaluation. The peroneus longus tendon changes its direction at three points then obliquely crosses the sole and inserts in the base of the first metatarsal bone and the plantar aspect of the first cuneiform. MR imaging provides detailed information about the anatomy of tendons in the plantar aspect of the ankle and foot. It allows analysis of their insertions and the intertendinous connection between the flexor hallucis longus and the flexor digitorum longus tendons. (orig.)

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTUMENTAL ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION TECHNIQUE WITH STATIC STRETCHING IN SUBJECTS WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Babu. K

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization and static stretching found to be effective in plantar fasciitis, however the combined effectiveness of these techniques were unknown. The purpose of this study is to find the effect of Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization technique for plantar fascia combined with static stretching of triceps surae for subjects with chronic stage of Plantar Fasciitis on pain intensity, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and functional disability. Methods: An experimental study design, selected subjects with chronic Plantar Fasciitis randomized subjects into each Study and Control group. Total of 40 subject’s data who completed study, 20 in each group, was used for analysis. Control group received conventional exercise while Study group received conventional exercises with Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization combined with static stretching of triceps surae muscle. Outcome measurements such as Intensity of pain using Numerical Pain Rating Scale-101 (NPRS-101, function disability using Foot Function Index Pain Subscale (FFI and ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion using Goniometer was measured before and after 2 weeks of intervention. Results: There is statistically significant improvement in means of NRS-101, ankle dorsiflexion active range of motion and Foot Function Index Pain Subscale after intervention in both groups. When the post-intervention means were compared between Study and Control group after 2 weeks of treatment there is statistically significant difference in means between the groups whereas study group showed greater percentage of improvement than control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that Instrumental assisted soft tissue mobilization technique combined with static stretching of triceps surae muscle is significantly effective than conventional exercises on reducing pain, improving ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and functional disability for subjects

  7. Inter- and intra-observer reliability of masking in plantar pressure measurement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, K; Birch, I; Mc Innes, J; Desloovere, K; Matricali, G A

    2009-10-01

    Plantar pressure measurement is an important tool in gait analysis. Manual placement of small masks (masking) is increasingly used to calculate plantar pressure characteristics. Little is known concerning the reliability of manual masking. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of masking on 2D plantar pressure footprints, in a population with forefoot deformity (i.e. hallux valgus). Using a random repeated-measure design, four observers identified the third metatarsal head on a peak-pressure barefoot footprint, using a small mask. Subsequently, the location of all five metatarsal heads was identified, using the same size of masks and the same protocol. The 2D positional variation of the masks and the peak pressure (PP) and pressure time integral (PTI) values of each mask were calculated. For single-masking the lowest inter-observer reliability was found for the distal-proximal direction, causing a clear, adverse impact on the reliability of the pressure characteristics (PP and PTI). In the medial-lateral direction the inter-observer reliability could be scored as high. Intra-observer reliability was better and could be scored as high or good for both directions, with a correlated improved reliability of the pressure characteristics. Reliability of multi-masking showed a similar pattern, but overall values tended to be lower. Therefore, small sized masking in order to define pressure characteristics in the forefoot should be done with care.

  8. The Influence of Running on Foot Posture and In-Shoe Plantar Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Aguilar, María; Gijón-Noguerón, Gabriel; Luque-Suarez, Alejandro; Abian-Vicen, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Running can be considered a high-impact practice, and most people practicing continuous running experience lower-limb injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of 45 min of running on foot posture and plantar pressures. The sample comprised 116 healthy adults (92 men and 24 women) with no foot-related injuries. The mean ± SD age of the participants was 28.31 ± 6.01 years; body mass index, 23.45 ± 1.96; and training time, 11.02 ± 4.22 h/wk. Outcome measures were collected before and after 45 min of running at an average speed of 12 km/h, and included the Foot Posture Index (FPI) and a baropodometric analysis. The results show that foot posture can be modified after 45 min of running. The mean ± SD FPI changed from 6.15 ± 2.61 to 4.86 ± 2.65 (P running. Peak plantar pressures in the forefoot decreased after running. The pressure-time integral decreased during the heel strike phase in the internal edge of the foot. In addition, a decrease was found in the pressure-time integral during the heel-off phase in the internal and rearfoot edges. The findings suggest that after 45 min of running, a pronated foot tends to change into a more neutral position, and decreased plantar pressures were found after the run.

  9. MEMS technology sensors as a more advantageous technique for measuring foot plantar pressure and balance in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Morère, C. (Clara); Surażyński, Ł. (Łukasz); Rodrigo Pérez-Tabernero, A. (Ana); Vihriälä, E. (Erkki); Myllylä, T. (Teemu)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Locomotor activities are part and parcel of daily human life. During walking or running, feet are subjected to high plantar pressure, leading sometimes to limb problems, pain, or foot ulceration. A current objective in foot plantar pressure measurements is developing sensors that are small in size, lightweight, and energy efficient, while enabling high mobility, particularly for wearable applications. Moreover, improvements in spatial resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity are of i...

  10. Development of a high resolution plantar pressure monitoring pad based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R; Bhalla, S; Hao, J; Singh, C

    2015-01-01

    High importance is given to plantar pressure monitoring in the field of biomedical engineering for the diagnosis of posture related ailments associated with diseases such as diabetes and gonarthrosis. This paper presents the proof-of-concept development of a new high resolution plantar pressure monitoring pad based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. In the proposed configuration, the FBG sensors are embedded within layers of carbon composite material (CCM) in turn conforming to an arc shape. A total of four such arc shaped sensors are instrumented in the pad at the locations of the forefoot and the hind foot. As a test of the pad, static plantar pressure is monitored on normal subjects under various posture conditions. The pad is evaluated both as a standalone platform as well as a pad inserted inside a standard shoe. An average pressure sensitivity of 1.2 pm/kPa and a resolution of approximately 0.8 kPa is obtained in this special configuration. The pad is found to be suitable in both configurations- stand-alone pad as well as an insert inside a standard shoe. The proposed set up offers a cost-effective high resolution and accurate plantar pressure measurement system suitable for clinical deployment. The novelty of the developed pressure pad lies in its ability to be used both as platform type as well as inserted in-sole type sensor system.

  11. Treatment of Athlete's Plantar Warts Using a Botanical Blend: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik O; Kozin, Adam F; Ruiz, Guillermo; Lasku, Arben; Langland, Jeffrey O

    2017-05-01

    Context • Viral plantar warts, or verruca plantaris, are a benign epithelial tumor caused by various strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV). Current treatments have had mixed degrees of success, are moderately invasive, and are often incompatible with participation in sports. Objective • The study intended to examine the benefits of treating plantar warts with a topical, botanical blend that has had clinical success treating herpes simplex virus cold sores. Methods • A synergistic botanical blend was applied topically. Setting • The case report was completed at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine (Tempe, Arizona, USA). Participant • The participant was a 24-y-old male soccer player, 177.8 cm tall, and weighing 69 kg with previously diagnosed, viral mosaic warts. Intervention • The patient used a pumice stone during bathing for the first week to remove dead tissue and ensure sufficient contact and entry of the botanical gel into infected tissue. After drying the area, the patient applied the botanical gel blend 1 to 2 times daily postshower, spreading it evenly across the surface of the entire lesion. The patient discontinued the exfoliation technique after the first week. Results • Within the first week of treatment, the patient noted changes to the infected area of the hallux epidermal tissue. The combination of exfoliation and application of the gel caused marked, visible differences in presentation by the fifth day of treatment. At 1-mo postintervention, or day 90, the epidermal tissue was asymptomatic and devoid of petechiae, malformations, or visible infection. Conclusions • The results of the current case study directly contrast with the drawbacks of commonly accepted, first-line interventions in the treatment of viral plantar warts and, in many respects, demonstrate better efficacy and fewer side effects than the standard of care. The positive results also highlight the necessity for additional study in the fields of sports

  12. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum; Radiotherapie des cancers cutanes au cours du xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J. [Service de radiotherapie, CHU Habib-Bourguiba, route Majida-Bouleila, 3029 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  13. MEMS Technology Sensors as a More Advantageous Technique for Measuring Foot Plantar Pressure and Balance in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Sanz Morère

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Locomotor activities are part and parcel of daily human life. During walking or running, feet are subjected to high plantar pressure, leading sometimes to limb problems, pain, or foot ulceration. A current objective in foot plantar pressure measurements is developing sensors that are small in size, lightweight, and energy efficient, while enabling high mobility, particularly for wearable applications. Moreover, improvements in spatial resolution, accuracy, and sensitivity are of interest. Sensors with improved sensing techniques can be applied to a variety of research problems: diagnosing limb problems, footwear design, or injury prevention. This paper reviews commercially available sensors used in foot plantar pressure measurements and proposes the utilization of pressure sensors based on the MEMS (microelectromechanical systems technique. Pressure sensors based on this technique have the capacity to measure pressure with high accuracy and linearity up to high pressure levels. Moreover, being small in size, they are highly suitable for this type of measurement. We present two MEMS sensor models and study their suitability for the intended purpose by performing several experiments. Preliminary results indicate that the sensors are indeed suitable for measuring foot plantar pressure. Importantly, by measuring pressure continuously, they can also be utilized for body balance measurements.

  14. Evaluation and Optimization of Therapeutic Footwear for Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Patients Using In-Shoe Plantar Pressure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Haspels, Rob; Busch-Westbroek, Tessa E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Therapeutic footwear for diabetic foot patients aims to reduce the risk of ulceration by relieving mechanical pressure on the foot. However, footwear efficacy is generally not assessed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to evaluate and optimize the pressure-reducing effects of diabetic therapeutic footwear. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressure distribution was measured in 23 neuropathic diabetic foot patients wearing fully customized footwear. Regions of interest (with peak pressure >200 kPa) were selected and targeted for pressure optimization by modifying the shoe or insole. After each of a maximum of three rounds of modifications, the effect on in-shoe plantar pressure was measured. Successful optimization was achieved with a peak pressure reduction of >25% (criterion A) or below an absolute level of 200 kPa (criterion B). RESULTS In 35 defined regions, mean peak pressure was significantly reduced from 303 (SD 77) to 208 (46) kPa after an average 1.6 rounds of footwear modifications (P diabetic foot. This result provides an objective approach to instantly improve footwear quality, which should reduce the risk for pressure-related plantar foot ulcers. PMID:21610125

  15. Efficacy measures associated to a plantar pressure based classification system in diabetic foot medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Kevin; Matricali, Giovanni Arnoldo; Desmet, Dirk; Roosen, Philip; Keijsers, Noel; Nobels, Frank; Bruyninckx, Herman; Staes, Filip

    2016-09-01

    The concept of 'classification' has, similar to many other diseases, been found to be fundamental in the field of diabetic medicine. In the current study, we aimed at determining efficacy measures of a recently published plantar pressure based classification system. Technical efficacy of the classification system was investigated by applying a high resolution, pixel-level analysis on the normalized plantar pressure pedobarographic fields of the original experimental dataset consisting of 97 patients with diabetes and 33 persons without diabetes. Clinical efficacy was assessed by considering the occurence of foot ulcers at the plantar aspect of the forefoot in this dataset. Classification efficacy was assessed by determining the classification recognition rate as well as its sensitivity and specificity using cross-validation subsets of the experimental dataset together with a novel cohort of 12 patients with diabetes. Pixel-level comparison of the four groups associated to the classification system highlighted distinct regional differences. Retrospective analysis showed the occurence of eleven foot ulcers in the experimental dataset since their gait analysis. Eight out of the eleven ulcers developed in a region of the foot which had the highest forces. Overall classification recognition rate exceeded 90% for all cross-validation subsets. Sensitivity and specificity of the four groups associated to the classification system exceeded respectively the 0.7 and 0.8 level in all cross-validation subsets. The results of the current study support the use of the novel plantar pressure based classification system in diabetic foot medicine. It may particularly serve in communication, diagnosis and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. American cutaneous leishmaniasis triggered by electrocoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Sofia Sales; Santos, Adriana de Oliveira; Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Gomes, Ciro Martins; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro

    2018-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is usually transmitted by infected phlebotomine sand fly bites that initiate local cutaneous lesions. Few reports in the literature describe other modes of transmission. We report a case of a previously healthy 59-year-old woman who underwent electrocoagulation to remove seborrheic keratosis confirmed by dermatoscopy. Three months later, a skin fragment tested positive for Leishmania culture; the parasite was identified as L. (V.) braziliensis. Trauma may generate inflammatory cascades that favor Leishmania growth and lesion formation in previously infected patients. American cutaneous leishmaniasis is a dynamic disease with unclear pathophysiology because of continually changing environments, demographics, and human behaviors.

  17. Impact of foot progression angle on the distribution of plantar pressure in normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Pan, Hui-Fen; Chang, Wei-Ning; Hsu, Chien-Jen; Renn, Jenn-Huei

    2014-02-01

    Plantar pressure distribution during walking is affected by several gait factors, most especially the foot progression angle which has been studied in children with neuromuscular diseases. However, this relationship in normal children has only been reported in limited studies. The purpose of this study is to clarify the correlation between foot progression angle and plantar pressure distribution in normal children, as well as the impacts of age and sex on this correlation. This study retrospectively reviewed dynamic pedobarographic data that were included in the gait laboratory database of our institution. In total, 77 normally developed children aged 5-16 years who were treated between 2004 and 2009 were included. Each child's footprint was divided into 5 segments: lateral forefoot, medial forefoot, lateral midfoot, medial midfoot, and heel. The percentages of impulse exerted at the medial foot, forefoot, midfoot, and heel were calculated. The average foot progression angle was 5.03° toe-out. Most of the total impulse was exerted on the forefoot (52.0%). Toe-out gait was positively correlated with high medial (r = 0.274; P plantar pressure as part of the treatment of various foot pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in subjects with normal and flat feet during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluisio Otavio Vargas Avila

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the possible relationship between loss of thenormal medial longitudinal arch measured by the height of the navicular bone in a static situationand variables related to plantar pressure distribution measured in a dynamic situation. Elevenmen (21 ± 3 years, 74 ± 10 kg and 175 ± 4 cm participated in the study. The Novel Emed-ATSystem was used for the acquisition of plantar pressure distribution data (peak pressure, meanpressure, contact area, and relative load at a sampling rate of 50 Hz. The navicular drop testproposed by Brody (1982 was used to assess the height of the navicular bone for classificationof the subjects. The results were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test, with the level of significanceset at p ≤ 0.05. Differences were observed between the two groups in the mid-foot regionfor all variables studied, with the observation of higher mean values in subjects with flat feet.There were also significant differences in contact area, relative load, peak pressure, and meanpressure between groups. The present study demonstrates the importance of paying attentionto subjects with flat feet because changes in plantar pressure distribution are associated withdiscomfort and injuries.

  19. Effects of age and sex on the results of an ankle plantar-flexor manual muscle test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mei-Hwa; Chai, Huei-Ming; Lin, Yeong-Fwu; Lin, Janice Chien-Ho; Tsai, Li-Ying; Ou, Yu-Chih; Lin, Da-Hon

    2005-10-01

    The ability to perform 20 or more one-leg heel-rises is considered a "normal" grade for muscle strength (force-generating capacity of muscle) of the ankle plantar flexors, regardless of age and sex. Because muscle strength is closely related to age and sex, the "normal" test criterion was re-evaluated in different groups categorized by age and sex. One hundred eighty sedentary volunteers (21-80 years of age) without lower-limb lesions performed as many repetitions of one-leg heel-rise as possible. Lunsford and Perry criteria were used to determine completion of the test. The age and sex of the participants influenced the maximal repetitions of heel-rise, and the repetitions decreased with age and in female subjects. The muscle strength of the ankle plantar flexors, as measured by manual muscle testing, varied with age and sex. Clinicians should consider the variances of age and sex when they perform manual muscle testing of the ankle plantar flexors.

  20. Cutaneous lichen planus: A systematic review of treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim

    2015-06-01

    Various treatment modalities are available for cutaneous lichen planus. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched for all the systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials related to cutaneous lichen planus. Two systematic reviews and nine relevant randomized controlled trials were identified. Acitretin, griseofulvin, hydroxychloroquine and narrow band ultraviolet B are demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous lichen planus. Sulfasalazine is effective, but has an unfavorable safety profile. KH1060, a vitamin D analogue, is not beneficial in the management of cutaneous lichen planus. Evidence from large scale randomized trials demonstrating the safety and efficacy for many other treatment modalities used to treat cutaneous lichen planus is simply not available.

  1. Prevention of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia with an antiperspirant in breast cancer patients treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (SAKK 92/08).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Arnoud J; Ribi, Karin; Surber, Christian; Sun, Hong; Hsu Schmitz, Shu-Fang; Beyeler, Michael; Dietrich, Daniel; Borner, Markus; Winkler, Annette; Müller, Andreas; von Rohr, Lukas; Winterhalder, Ralph C; Rochlitz, Christoph; von Moos, Roger; Zaman, Khalil; Thürlimann, Beat J K; Ruhstaller, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Elevated concentrations of doxorubicin are found in eccrine sweat glands of the palms and soles. We therefore evaluated an antiperspirant as preventive treatment for palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (hand-foot syndrome) in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. An antiperspirant containing aluminum chlorohydrate or placebo cream was applied to the left or right hand and foot in a double-blinded manner (intra-patient randomization). The primary endpoint was the rate of grade 2 or 3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. A secondary endpoint was the patient-reported symptom burden (tingling, numbness, pain, or skin problems). Using McNemar's matched pairs design, 53 patients were needed to detect a 20% difference between the treatment and placebo sides with a significance level of 5% and power of 90%. Grade 2 or 3 PPE occurred in 30 (58%) of 52 evaluable patients; in six patients adverse effects occurred on the placebo side but not on the treatment side, whereas one patient developed palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia on the treatment side only (P = 0.07). Four patients developed grade 2 or 3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia on their foot on the placebo side but not on the treatment side (P = 0.05). In the cohort with grade 2 or 3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia there was a trend towards fewer dermatologic symptomatologies with the active treatment (P = 0.05), and no difference for other adverse events. Using topical aluminum chlorohydrate as an antiperspirant appears to reduce the incidence of grade 2 or 3 palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia following pegylated liposomal doxorubicin chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Localized cutaneous sporotrichosis lasting for 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi S

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available A case of localized cutaneous sporotrichosis lasting for 10 years is being reported. The fixed cutaneous variety creates diagnostic difficulty by mimicking other conditions, chiefly lupus vulgaris.

  3. Activation of plantar flexor muscles is constrained by multiple muscle synergies rather than joint torques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Suzuki

    Full Text Available Behavioral evidence has suggested that a small number of muscle synergies may be responsible for activating a variety of muscles. Nevertheless, such dimensionality reduction may also be explained using the perspective of alternative hypotheses, such as predictions based on linear combinations of joint torques multiplied by corresponding coefficients. To compare the explanatory capacity of these hypotheses for describing muscle activation, we enrolled 12 male volunteers who performed isometric plantar flexor contractions at 10-100% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexor contraction, the knee extensor muscles were isometrically contracted at 0%, 50%, or 100% of maximum effort. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius (MG, lateral gastrocnemius (LG, and soleus muscles and quantified using the average rectified value (ARV. At lower plantar flexion torque, regression analysis identified a clear linear relationship between the MG and soleus ARVs and between the MG and LG ARVs, suggesting the presence of muscle synergy (r2 > 0.65. The contraction of the knee extensor muscles induced a significant change in the slope of this relationship for both pairs of muscles (MG × soleus, P = 0.002; MG × LG, P = 0.006. Similarly, the slope of the linear relationship between the plantar flexion torque and the ARV of the MG or soleus changed significantly with knee extensor contraction (P = 0.031 and P = 0.041, respectively. These results suggest that muscle synergies characterized by non-mechanical constraints are selectively recruited according to whether contraction of the knee extensor muscles is performed simultaneously, which is relatively consistent with the muscle synergy hypothesis.

  4. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent ...

  5. Laser therapy for cutaneous sarcoidosis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Soleymani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a systemic, multi-organ disease of unknown etiology characteristically defined by the development of non-caseating granulomas. The development of sarcoidosis has been associated with a number of environmental and microbacterial factors coupled with genetic susceptibility. Depending on the type, location and distribution of disease, sarcoidosis can cause functional impairment, symptomatic distress, scarring and disfigurement. The advent of lasers as precise, minimally destructive surgical tools has allowed for their development as promising alternatives that minimize the morbidity associated with current therapies.In this paper, we reviewed the role of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis. A comprehensive search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and PUBMED databases was performed to identify relevant literatures investigating the role of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis. In our opinion, laser therapy, particularly PDL, appears to be an effective, safe and generally well-tolerated modality for the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis and should be considered in patients with localized cutaneous disease that is refractory to conventional treatments. Less is known about the efficacy and tolerability of ablative laser therapy for the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis, though the limited data appears promising as well. With that said, however, the data is limited and warrants a need for additional larger, randomized controlled studies to further investigate the utility and efficacy of laser therapy in the treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis.

  6. Adverse Cutaneous Reactions to Psychotropic Drugs: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Novais

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychotropic drugs are often implicated in cutaneous adverse drug reactions. While most of these reactions have a benign character, it is still important, however, to consider its role in the increasing stigma and treatment adherence. A small number of the cutaneous adverse drug reactions can develop into serious and potentially fatal conditions. Objectives: This article aims to review the most common cutaneous adverse drug reactions in patients taking psychotropic drugs. Methods: In this study, a search was carried out in the MEDLINE database for English language articles published , from 1999 to 2014, using as keywords: psychiatric, psychotropic, cutaneous, adverse reaction, antidepressive agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, anticonvulsant, dementia. Information available from the Portuguese regulatory and supervising agency (Infarmed was also included.Results: 121 articles were found with reference to cutaneous adverse drug reactions associated with psychotropic drugs. The drugs most frequently reported as associated with such adverse effects were anticonvulsants used as mood stabilizers, followed by the antipsychotics . The antidementia drugs were rarely associated with serious cutaneous adverse reactions. Discussion and Conclusion: Cutaneous drug adverse reactions are common in psychiatric clinical practice and typically are minor in severity. The most severe reactions are most often associated with the use of mood stabilizing medications. Some of these side effects can be solved with reduction or drug discontinuation. More severe cases should be referred to a specialist in dermatology.

  7. Plantar Fascia Release Through a Single Lateral Incision in the Operative Management of a Cavovarus Foot: A Cadaver Model Analysis of the Operative Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiskaddon, Eric M; Meeks, Brett D; Roberts, Joseph G; Laughlin, Richard T

    2018-04-04

    Plantar fascia release and calcaneal slide osteotomy are often components of the surgical management for cavovarus deformities of the foot. In this setting, plantar fascia release has traditionally been performed through an incision over the medial calcaneal tuberosity, and the calcaneal osteotomy through a lateral incision. Two separate incisions can potentially increase the operative time and morbidity. The purpose of the present study was threefold: to describe the operative technique, use cadaveric dissection to analyze whether a full release of the plantar fascia was possible through the lateral incision, and examine the proximity of the medial neurovascular structures to both the plantar fascia release and calcaneal slide osteotomy when performed together. In our cadaveric dissections, we found that full release of the plantar fascia is possible through the lateral incision with no obvious damage to the medial neurovascular structures. We also found that the calcaneal branch of the tibial nerve reliably crossed the osteotomy in all specimens. We have concluded that both the plantar fascia release and the calcaneal osteotomy can be safely performed through a lateral incision, if care is taken when completing the calcaneal osteotomy to ensure that the medial neurovascular structures remain uninjured. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of foot orthoses for the treatment of plantar heel pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasenberg, Nadine; Riel, Henrik; Rathleff, Michael S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plantar heel pain (PHP) is common. Foot orthoses are often applied as treatment for PHP, even though there is little evidence to support this. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of different orthoses on pain, function and self-reported recovery in patients with PHP and compare them...

  9. Acute effects of 15min static or contract-relax stretching modalities on plantar flexors neuromuscular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babault, Nicolas; Kouassi, Blah Y L; Desbrosses, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of 15 min static or sub-maximal contract-relax stretching modalities on the neuromuscular properties of plantar flexor muscles. Ten male volunteers were tested before and immediately after 15 min static or contract-relax stretching programs of plantar flexor muscles (20 stretches). Static stretching consisted in 30s stretches to the point of discomfort. For the contract-relax stretching modality, subjects performed 6s sub-maximal isometric plantar flexion before 24s static stretches. Measurements included maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVT) and the corresponding electromyographic activity of soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles (RMS values), as well as maximal peak torque (Pt) elicited at rest by single supramaximal electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve. After 15 min stretching, significant MVT and SOL RMS decreases were obtained (-6.9+/-11.6% and -6.5+/-15.4%, respectively). No difference was obtained between stretching modalities. Pt remained unchanged after stretching. MG RMS changes were significantly different between stretching modalities (-9.4+/-18.3% and +3.5+/-11.6% after static and contract-relax stretching modalities, respectively). These findings indicated that performing 15 min static or contract-relax stretching had detrimental effects on the torque production capacity of plantar flexor muscles and should be precluded before competition. Mechanisms explaining this alteration seemed to be stretch modality dependent. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, S.C.; Gussekloo, J.; Egberts, P.F.; Bavinck, J.N.; Waal, M.W. de; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Eekhof, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in

  11. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-12-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as 'fasciacytes'. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm thick

  12. Estudo da impressão plantar obtida durante o teste de Jack em crianças Footprint study in children during the Jack test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar as impressões plantares durante o teste de Jack em crianças quantificando e observando os resultados numa faixa etária crítica para a formação do arco plantar. MÉTODO: Avaliamos 60 crianças brancas (120 pés sendo 35 meninos e 25 meninas com idades entre 2 e 5 anos, sem queixas ortopédicas. Simulamos o teste de Jack com uma órtese em cunha de 45º apoiada sob o hálux. Obtivemos impressões em apoio monopodálico bilateralmente utilizando um pedígrafo. O exame dividiu-se em duas etapas: com e sem o uso da órtese. A metodologia de Valenti e Volpon foi utilizada para mensurar as impressões plantares e os dados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Os valores dos índices de Valenti e Volpon diminuiram quando a órtese foi utilizada. A diferença entre os índices com ou sem órtese diminuiu gradualmente com a progressão etária. CONCLUSÕES: É possível quantificar o teste de Jack pelwas impressões plantares pelo método de Valenti e Volpon. A variação do seu formato apresentou tendência a ser menor a partir dos 4 anos. O teste de Jack perdeu gradativamente a capacidade de modificar a impressão plantar com a idade, diminuindo sua acuidade como parâmetro de bom prognóstico na formação do arco longitudinal medial. Nível de Evidência: Nível IV, estudo descritivo observacional.OBJECTIVE: To assess the plantar impressions obtained in children during the Jack test, with the aim of quantifying and analyzing their variability in the critical period for plantar foot arch formation. METHOD: A hundred and twenty feet from 60 healthy White children, recruited in an outpatient pediatric clinic, were examined. Our sample included 35 boys and 25 girls, ranging from 2 to 5 years. The Jack test was simulated using a 45o wedge-shaped orthosis applied to the hallux. Bilateral plantar impressions were acquired in the alternate single-foot standing position using a pedigraph. Two plantar impressions were

  13. Reliability of Baropodometry on the Evaluation of Plantar Load Distribution: A Transversal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumfeld, Daniel; Baumfeld, Tiago; da Rocha, Romário Lopes; Macedo, Benjamim; Raduan, Fernando; Zambelli, Roberto; Alves Silva, Thiago Alexandre; Nery, Caio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . Baropodometry is used to measure the load distribution on feet during rest and walking. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in plantar foot pressures distribution due to period of working and due to stretching exercises of the posterior muscular chain. Methods . In this transversal study, all participants were submitted to baropodometric evaluation at two different times: before and after the working period and before and after stretching the muscles of the posterior chain. Results . We analyzed a total of 54 feet of 27 participants. After the working period, there was an average increase in the forefoot pressure of 0.16 Kgf/cm 2 and an average decrease in the hindfoot pressure of 0.17 Kgf/cm 2 . After stretching the posterior muscular chain, the average increase in the forefoot pressure was 0.56 Kgf/cm 2 and the hindfoot average pressure decrease was 0.56 Kgf/cm 2 . These changes were not statistically significant. Discussion . It was reported that the strength of the Achilles tendon generates greater forefoot load transferred from the hindfoot. In our study, no significant variation in the distribution of plantar pressure was observed. It can be inferred that baropodometry was a reliable instrument to determine the plantar pressure, regardless of the tension of the posterior chain muscles.

  14. Risk factors for plantar foot ulcer recurrence in neuropathic diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijman, Roelof; de Haart, Mirjam; Arts, Mark L. J.; Wever, Daniel; Verlouw, Anke J. W. E.; Nollet, Frans; Bus, Sicco A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrence of plantar foot ulcers is a common and major problem in diabetes but not well understood. Foot biomechanics and patient behavior may be important. The aim was to identify risk factors for ulcer recurrence and to establish targets for ulcer prevention. As part of a footwear trial, 171

  15. Plantar lipomatosis, unusual facies, and developmental delay : Confirmation of Pierpont syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudesluijs, GG; Hordijk, R; Boon, M; Sijens, PE; Hennekam, RCM

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, Pierpont et al. reported on two unrelated boys with plantar lipomatosis, unusual facial phenotype, and developmental delay as a possible new MR/MCA syndrome. Here we report on a 2-year-old boy with similar manifestations: axial hypotonia in the first few months, prolonged feeding problems,

  16. Criterion-related validity of the foot health status questionnaire regarding strength and plantar pressure measurements in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I; Galan-Mercant, Alejandro; Martín-Borras, Maria Carmen; González-Sánchez, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Criterion-related validity of a self-administered questionnaire listed as gold standard requires objective testing. The aim of this study was to analyze the Foot Health Status Questionnaire (FHSQ) using functional variable measures (dynamic plantar pressure and foot strength). A total of 22 elderly healthy participants (13 women and 9 men) were screened by interview and physical examination for foot or gait abnormalities. Foot strength, footprint pressure, and foot health status were measured. All the items of the FHSQ show significant correlation with functional variables, but general foot health shows the highest correlation with the 4 physical variables related to plantar pressure (R2 = 0.741), followed by foot pain (R2 = 0.652). A set of different, directly measured physical variables related to foot strength and plantar pressure significantly correlate with the FHSQ dimensions. Cross-sectional trial.

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV/AIDS: Part I | Dlova | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders occur universally during the course of HIV infection. Cutaneous manifestations of HIV are very diverse. The course and clinical presentation of HIV in individuals who have access to highly ...

  18. Physiotherapy for plantar fasciitis: a UK-wide survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Rob; Palmer, Shea

    2017-06-01

    To identify how United Kingdom (UK) physiotherapists currently diagnose, assess and manage plantar fasciitis in routine practice. Online questionnaire survey. Practising physiotherapists across the UK who treat patients with plantar fasciitis. Physiotherapists were approached via 'interactive Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP)' online networks and an email database of clinical educators in South West England. An online questionnaire was developed by reviewing similar existing physiotherapy surveys and consultation with experienced musculoskeletal researchers/clinicians. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. 285 physiotherapists responded, with 257 complete survey responses. Pain on palpation and early morning pain were the most common diagnostic criteria, with some physiotherapists using no formal test criteria. Advice (237/257, 92%), plantar fasciitis pathology education (207/257, 81%) and general stretching exercises (189/257, 74%) were most routinely used. Prefabricated orthotics, custom made orthotics and night splints were seldom always used. For the manual therapy approach, the most frequently used modalities were massage, myofascial release, specific soft tissue mobilisations and myofascial trigger point therapy. Commonly used outcome measures were pain assessment, functional tests and range of movement. Physiotherapists appeared to follow most of the established diagnostic criteria for PF, but have not followed established outcome measure guidelines. Advice as well as education with an emphasis on self-management including calf/hamstring stretching was the most commonly reported treatment approach. There was uncertainty whether this approach accurately reflected clinical practice used throughout the UK, owing to potential response bias/unknown response rate and the low number of patients with PF treated by the respondents. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relação entre o ângulo quadriciptal (ÂQ e a distribuição da pressão plantar em jogadores de futebol Relationship between quadriceps angle (Q and plantar pressure distribution in football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael G. Braz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar possível associação entre ângulo quadriciptal (ÂQ e distribuição de pressão plantar em jogadores de futebol, comparando-os com indivíduos não praticantes da modalidade. MÉTODOS: Cento e vinte e um participantes do sexo masculino foram selecionados: 50 jogadores de futebol (JF e 71 sujeitos para o grupo controle (GC. Avaliaram-se concomitantemente o ÂQ, por meio do Software para Avaliação Postural (SAPO, e a pressão plantar, pela plataforma F-Scan/F-Mat System. Para verificar correlação entre o ÂQ e os valores de picos de pressão em quatro segmentos do pé (antepé medial e lateral, médio-pé e retropé, utilizou-se o Coeficiente de Pearson (r para análises paramétricas. O teste t independente foi empregado para comparar isoladamente essas mesmas variáveis entre os grupos. A normalidade dos dados foi verificada pelos valores de skewness, adotando nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: Encontrou-se correlação negativa e fraca (r=-0,32 somente entre ÂQ e médio-pé direito. Os grupos diferiram quanto ao ÂQ bilateralmente, sendo que o grupo JF teve média de 11,36º, e GC, de 13,80º à direita e de 11,03º contra 13,96º à esquerda, respectivamente. Em relação à pressão plantar, o JF teve maior média de força nas faces laterais do antepé direito (0,77 contra 0,63 kg/cm² e esquerdo (0,65 e 0,54 kg/cm², enquanto o GC apresentou maior pico de pressão no médio-pé esquerdo (JF: 0,37 e GC: 0,46 kg/cm². CONCLUSÕES: Não houve relação entre os valores de ÂQ na distribuição da pressão plantar nos jogadores de futebol. Os atletas apresentaram, porém, ÂQ diminuído e maiores picos de pressão nas faces laterais de ambos os pés, o que sugere alinhamento em varo dos joelhos e distribuição supinada das bases plantares.OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is an association between the Q-angle (Q and the distribution of plantar pressure in football players, and to compare the

  20. Foot Plantar Pressure Estimation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Xidias , Elias; Koutkalaki , Zoi; Papagiannis , Panagiotis; Papanikos , Paraskevas; Azariadis , Philip

    2015-01-01

    Part 1: Smart Products; International audience; In this paper, we present a novel approach to estimate the maximum pressure over the foot plantar surface exerted by a two-layer shoe sole for three distinct phases of the gait cycle. The proposed method is based on Artificial Neural Networks and can be utilized for the determination of the comfort that is related to the sole construction. Input parameters to the proposed neural network are the material properties and the thicknesses of the sole...

  1. Differences Between Men and Women in Balance and Tremor in Relation to Plantar Fascia Laxity During the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haneul; Petrofsky, Jerrold

    2018-03-01

      Although much attention has been paid to the effect of estrogen on the knee ligaments, little has been done to examine the ligaments in the foot, such as the plantar fascia, and how they may be altered during the menstrual cycle.   To (1) examine sex differences in plantar fascia thickness and laxity and postural sway and (2) identify any menstrual cycle effects on plantar fascia laxity, postural sway, and neuromuscular tremor between menstruation and the ovulation phase.   Case-control study.   Research laboratory.   Fifteen healthy women (age = 25.9 ± 1.8 years) and 15 healthy men (age = 27.3 ± 2.0 years) volunteered to participate in this study.   We asked participants to perform 8 balance tasks on a force platform while we assessed postural sway and tremor.   Plantar fascia length and thickness unloaded and loaded with body weight were measured via ultrasound. Postural sway and tremor were measured using a force platform.   Plantar fascia length and thickness with pressure were greater in ovulating women compared with men ( P women during menstruation and men. Postural sway and tremor were greater at ovulation than during menstruation ( P men had less sway than ovulating women on the 3 most difficult balance tasks ( P women. Postural sway and tremor in men were the same as in women during menstruation. These findings support the need to be aware of the effect of sex hormones on balance to prevent lower extremity injuries during sport activities.

  2. Sonoelastography of Plantar Fascia: Reproducibility and Pattern Description in Healthy Subjects and Symptomatic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Díaz, José; Martínez-Payá, Jacinto J; del Baño-Aledo, María Elena; de Groot-Ferrando, Ana; Botía-Castillo, Paloma; Fernández-Rodríguez, David

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the work reported here was to describe the sonoelastographic appearance of the plantar fascia of healthy volunteers and patients with fasciitis. Twenty-three healthy subjects and 21 patients with plantar fasciitis were examined using B-mode and real-time sonoelastography (RTSR) scanning. B-Mode examination included fascia thickness and echotexture. Echogenicity and echovariation of the color histogram were analyzed. Fasciae were classified into type 1, blue (more elastic); type 2, blue/green (intermediate); or type 3, green (less elastic). RTSE revealed 72.7% of fasciae as type 2, with no significant association with fasciitis (χ(2) = 3.6, df = 2, p = 0.17). Quantitative analysis of the color histogram revealed a significantly greater intensity of green (mean = 77.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 71.9-83.6) and blue (mean = 74.2, 95% CI = 69.7-78.8) in healthy subjects. Echovariation of the color red was 33.4% higher in the fasciitis group than in the healthy group (95% CI = 16.7-50.1). Sonoelastography with quantitative analysis of echovariation can be a useful tool for evaluation of plantar fascia pathology. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Are repeated single-limb heel raises and manual muscle testing associated with peak plantar-flexor force in people with inclusion body myositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Shrader, Joseph A; Davenport, Todd E; Joe, Galen; Rakocevic, Goran; McElroy, Beverly; Dalakas, Marinos

    2014-04-01

    Repeated heel raises have been proposed as a method of ankle plantar-flexor strength testing that circumvents the limitations of manual muscle testing (MMT). The study objective was to examine the relationships among ankle plantar-flexion isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), repeated single-limb heel raises (SLHRs), and MMT in people with myositis. This was a cross-sectional study with a between-group design. The ability to complete 1 SLHR determined group assignment (SLHR group, n=24; no-SLHR group, n=19). Forty-three participants with myositis (13 women; median age=64.9 years) participated. Outcome measures included MVC, predicted MVC, Kendall MMT, and Daniels-Worthingham MMT. The Kendall MMT was unable to detect significant ankle plantar-flexor weakness established by quantitative methods and was unable to discriminate between participants who could and those who could not perform the SLHR task. Ankle plantar-flexion MVC was not associated with the number of heel-raise repetitions in the SLHR group (pseudo R(2)=.13). No significant relationship was observed between MVC values and MMT grades in the SLHR and no-SLHR groups. However, a moderate relationship between MVC values and MMT grades was evident in a combined-group analysis (ρ=.50-.67). The lower half of both MMT grading scales was not represented in the study despite the profound weakness of the participants. Both Kendall MMT and Daniels-Worthingham MMT had limited utility in the assessment of ankle plantar-flexor strength. Repeated SLHRs should not be used as a proxy measure of ankle plantar-flexion MVC in people with myositis.

  4. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  5. Cutaneous findings in five cases of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh B Vaishnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Cutaneous lesions in malaria are rarely reported and include urticaria, angioedema, petechiae, purpura, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Here, five malaria cases associated with cutaneous lesions have been described. Out of the five cases of malaria, two were associated with urticaria and angioedema, one case was associated with urticaria, and other two were associated with reticulated blotchy erythema with petechiae. Most of the cutaneous lesions in malaria were nonspecific and reflected the different immunopathological mechanism in malarial infection.

  6. Dynamic plantar pressure distribution, strength capacity and postural control after Lisfranc fracture-dislocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Walther, Markus; Yilmaz, Tayfun

    2017-01-01

    of life. 17 consecutive patients suffering from a Lisfranc fracture dislocation were registered, underwent open reduction and internal fixation and were followed-up for 50.5±25.7months (Mean±SDM). Biomechanical analysis of muscle strength capacities, postural control and plantar pressure distribution......Substantial progress has been made in the operative treatment of Lisfranc fractures, however, the prognosis remains poor. We hypothesized that Lisfranc injuries change the postural control and muscle strength of the lower limb. Both are suggested to correlate with the clinical outcome and quality...... correlated well with clinical outcome. Altered postural control was evident by a significant reduction in unilateral stance time, from which we calculated a strong correlation between stance time and the isokinetic strength measurement. Plantar pressure measurements revealed a significant reduction in peak...

  7. Reliability of in-Shoe Plantar Pressure Measurements in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Gaj; Novak, Primoz

    2009-01-01

    Plantar pressures measurement is a frequently used method in rehabilitation and related research. Metric characteristics of the F-Scan system have been assessed from different standpoints and in different patients, but not its reliability in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, our objective was to assess reliability of the F-Scan plantar…

  8. EFFECT OF KINESIO TAPING IN ADJUNCT TO CONVENTIONAL THERAPY IN REDUCING PAIN AND IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL ABILITY IN INDIVIDUALS WITH PLANTAR FASCIITIS A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tulasi Ratna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of foot. The pain and discomfort associated with this condition has a dramatic impact on physical mobility and function. Treatment of this condition is usually conservative; however, review of literature revealed no clinical studies demonstrating the efficacy of any targeted treatment for this condition. Methods: This was a prospective study which included 60 subjects with plantar fasciitis, who were randomly divided into two groups. Subjects in group I received ultrasound and exercise therapy while subjects in group II received kinesio tape in addition to ultrasound and exercise therapy. Patients were evaluated at the beginning of the study and at the end of three weeks using VAS (visual analogue scale for pain intensity, PFPS (plantar fasciitis pain / disability scale for functional ability and ultra sonography for any change in the caliber of plantar fascia. Results: A statistically significant difference in improvement was noted within the groups and between the groups in terms of visual analogue scale and plantar fasciitis pain /disability scale score (p0.05. Conclusion: Kinesio taping can be used as an adjunct to conventional therapy in clinical application for greater improvement in pain levels and functional ability in patients with plantar fasciitis.

  9. [Lack of correlation between plantar arthrosis of the first metatarsal joint and sesamoids and pain in patients after hallux valgus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas, C; Escribano, R J; Alfonso, M

    2012-01-01

    To determine the relationship between osteoarthritis in the plantar region of the first metatarsophalangeal joint of the foot and patient pain after hallux valgus surgery. A total of 28 patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery were examined. The patients were examined for pain in the plantar region of the metatarsophalangeal joint (sesamoid bones area), by looking into their medical records and by means of palpation during the physical exam. X-rays were taken to look for metatarsophalangeal arthritis, and PASA and sesamoid displacement were measured. During the surgical procedure, the metatarsal head was macroscopically assessed for arthritis according to the ICRS Score. Of the 28 patients, 18 had no pain, 7 had mild pain (VAS 1-3) and 3 had moderate pain (VAS 4-6). Macroscopically, all the patients had some degree of plantar osteoarthritis. Only 5 patients had radiological signs of metatarsophalangeal arthritis. There was no correlation (P=.44) between pain and plantar osteoarthritis. There was a mild but non-significant correlation between PASA and osteoarthritis (P=.06). There was a weak but significant correlation between patient age and arthritis (P=.04). Osteoarthritis in the plantar aspect of the first metatarsal head does not correlate with patient symptoms or with pain intensity in patients undergoing hallux valgus surgery. Copyright © 2011 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Plantar pressure cartography reconstruction from 3 sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ghaida, Hussein; Mottet, Serge; Goujon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Foot problem diagnosis is often made by using pressure mapping systems, unfortunately located and used in the laboratories. In the context of e-health and telemedicine for home monitoring of patients having foot problems, our focus is to present an acceptable system for daily use. We developed an ambulatory instrumented insole using 3 pressures sensors to visualize plantar pressure cartographies. We show that a standard insole with fixed sensor position could be used for different foot sizes. The results show an average error measured at each pixel of 0.01 daN, with a standard deviation of 0.005 daN.

  11. Acitretin for the management of generalized cutaneous lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirnia, Aria; Cohen, Philip R

    2014-09-16

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory disease that affects the skin, the oral mucosa, or both. Generalized cutaneous lichen planus may pose a therapeutic challenge for clinicians if the condition persists or flares after topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. Acitretin, a systemic retinoid, can be considered a potential second-line treatment for patients with generalized cutaneous lichen planus. Herein, we describe a postmenopausal woman with generalized cutaneous lichen planus who was successfully treated with acitretin. A 58-year-old woman presented with generalized cutaneous lichen planus involving her upper and lower extremities as well as her lower back. After failing corticosteroid therapy, she was started on acitretin 20 mg/day, which was later increased to 30 mg/day. To review the literature on the use of acitretin in cutaneous lichen planus, we used the PubMed search engine and searched for the terms "acitretin" and "cutaneous lichen planus." Our patient had complete resolution of pruritus within one week of initiating acitretin 20 mg/day. After an increase in dose to 30 mg/day, the cutaneous lesions completely resolved over a 3-month period. There was no recurrence of disease as acitretin was tapered and discontinued. Generalized cutaneous lichen planus may pose a therapeutic challenge for the symptomatic relief of skin lesions. Topical and systemic corticosteroids are first-line treatments. In patients who fail corticosteroids, relapse after corticosteroid therapy, or have contraindications to corticosteroids, acitretin may be considered a potential second-line therapy.

  12. Stresses in the plantar region for long- and short-range throws in women basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Massimiliano; Ciuti, Carla

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess plantar pressure pattern modifications caused by short- and long-distance shots in women basketball players. To this end, 24 experienced national- and regional-level basketball players performed 3 trials of 4 technical gestures (free throw, jump stop shot, three-point shot and lay-up) barefoot on a pressure platform placed in fixed positions on the court. Raw data were processed to calculate location and magnitude of pressure peaks in three sub-regions (forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot), and the increase ratio was calculated relative to plantar pressure measured during a static bipedal and unipedal upright stance. The results showed significant increases (ptraining and rehabilitation protocols.

  13. The cutaneous radiation syndrome: diagnosis and treatment; Le syndrome d'irradiation cutane, diagnostic et traitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, R.U.; Steinert, M.; Gottlober, P. [Ulm Univ., Dept. of Dermatology (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    Accidental exposure to ionising radiation may occur during such catastrophic events as the Chernobyl accident in 1986 or for days and weeks as in Goiania in 1987 and in the military camp during the training of soldiers in Lilo/Georgia in 1997 as well as in medical institutions. The cutaneous symptoms after radiation exposure are based on a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. They follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, manifestation, chronic stage, late stage and they are referred to as Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome. The time course depends on several factors such as the applied radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, the extent of contamination and absorption and volume of the skin. For diagnostics of the cutaneous radiation syndrome the following procedures are used: 7.5 MHz to 20 MHz-B-scan-sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy and histology. Based on the results of experimental and clinical research of the last years pharmacotherapy of the cutaneous radiation syndrome includes topic or systemic application of corticosteroids, gamma-interferon, pentoxifylline and vitamin E and superoxide dismutase. The treatment depends on the stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease in most patients an interdisciplinary treatment in specialized centres is necessary. Dermatologists are asked to perform in most cases life-long therapy and follow-up of the patients. (author)

  14. The Symmetry in the Selected Plantar Pressure Distribution Parameters of the Elderly Subject With Lower Limb Discrepancy (LLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghad Memar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: lower leg discrepancy is a common problem which causes the changes in the plantar pressure distribution pattern during gait. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to study the symmetry in the various plantar pressure distribution parameters in the elderly subject with leg discrepancy. Methods & Materials: Twenty-one elderly from Esfehan with leg discrepancy (1.5 to 3 cm participated in this study. Plantar pressure distribution and other related parameters were measured in the five discrete steps for each limb by “emed 2” platforms. Three successful steps from five were selected and averaged, and the plantar areas were divided into 11 marks. For each mark peak force (BW%, peak pressure (Kpa, contact area, contact time, pressure time integral and force time integral were calculated. Descriptive statistics (mean and SD to report the plantar pressure pattern, dependent sample t- test for comparison pressure data between long and short limb (P≤0.05 and symmetry index (SI% for the symmetrical status in the selected plantar pressure data of the elderly subject with LLD were used. Results: The consequence of dependent t-test showed that regardless of contact area in the forefoot region and 3th, 4th and 5th toes, there were no significant differences between long and short limb. Symmetry index (SI% also revealed that the contact time in the short limbs heel was less than long limb and peak force and peak pressure in the short limb was less in mid foot region and was greater in forefoot region than long limb. Conclusion: Given The Result Of This Study Showed That In The Short Limb, Initial Contact Time And Weight Acceptance Was Reduced, Which Cause The Increase Of The Pressure In The Forefoot And Also Which Causes The Increase Of Stress Fracture Risk In The Metatarsal Region. Therefore, It Is Suggested That LLD Subject Use Orthotic Or Shoes That Can Increase Their Heel Height And Balancing The Contact Time In The Short Limb To Resolve

  15. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks.

  16. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvoyiannis, Miltiadis; Khromachou, Tamim; Byers, Norman; Hargreaves, James; Murray, Henry W

    2014-09-01

    In the United States, autochthonous cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by infection with Leishmania mexicana has been reported from Texas and Oklahoma. Here, we describe a child with 2 new features: cutaneous infection acquired outside of the south-central United States (in North Dakota) and infection caused by Leishmania donovani species complex. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Prevalence of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran; an Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazirianzadeh B.* PhD,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a prevalent parasitological disease with diverse clinical manifestations in Iran. Therefore, the present retrospective study carried out to describe the demographic features of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir, Iran. Materials & Methods This descriptive study was performed on 136 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients whose data were recorded in the Ramshir health center during 2006-9. Demographic information of patients including age, sex, habitat and sites of lesions, month and years of incidence were recorded. The data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software. Findings Totally 79 patients (58.1% resided in urban areas and the born to 9 years (49.3% was recognized as the most infected age group. Hands (41.2% had the highest rates of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions followed by face (36.0% and foot (22.8%. The maximum number of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions was reported in March. Conclusion As cutaneous leishmaniasis in Ramshir seemed to be an endemic rural type, the appropriate preventing measures regarding to the rural cutaneous leishmaniasis should be considered to decrease incidence of the disease in the region.

  19. Spatiotemporal and plantar pressure patterns of 1000 healthy individuals aged 3-101 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Marnee J; Baldwin, Jennifer N; Ferreira, Paulo; Simic, Milena; Vanicek, Natalie; Wojciechowski, Elizabeth; Mudge, Anita; Burns, Joshua

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normative reference values for spatiotemporal and plantar pressure parameters, and to investigate the influence of demographic, anthropometric and physical characteristics. In 1000 healthy males and females aged 3-101 years, spatiotemporal and plantar pressure data were collected barefoot with the Zeno™ walkway and Emed ® platform. Correlograms were developed to visualise the relationships between widely reported spatiotemporal and pressure variables with demographic (age, gender), anthropometric (height, mass, waist circumference) and physical characteristics (ankle strength, ankle range of motion, vibration perception) in children aged 3-9 years, adolescents aged 10-19 years, adults aged 20-59 years and older adults aged over 60 years. A comprehensive catalogue of 31 spatiotemporal and pressure variables were generated from 1000 healthy individuals. The key findings were that gait velocity was stable during adolescence and adulthood, while children and older adults walked at a comparable slower speed. Peak pressures increased during childhood to older adulthood. Children demonstrated highest peak pressures beneath the rearfoot whilst adolescents, adults and older adults demonstrated highest pressures at the forefoot. Main factors influencing spatiotemporal and pressure parameters were: increased age, height, body mass and waist circumference, as well as ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength. This study has established whole of life normative reference values of widely used spatiotemporal and plantar pressure parameters, and revealed changes to be expected across the lifespan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary Cutaneous Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are the lungs, central nervous system (CNS), and sinuses, however, the rare cutaneous infection is usually associated with immunodeficiency. Primary cutaneous infection, especially in immunocompetent patients, is extremely rare, but an increase in prevalence has been noted in the last. 20 years. The predisposing factors ...

  1. The First Korean Case of Cutaneous Lung Tissue Heterotopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ga Won; Han, Seong Woo; Jung, Ji Mi; Kang, Mi Seon

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia is a very rare disorder where mature lung tissues develop in the skin. This is only the second known report of cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia, with the first by Singer et al. in 1998. A newborn infant had a hemangioma-like, freely movable mass connected to the anterior aspect of the sternal manubrium. Pathologic findings showed mature lung tissues with bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli through the dermis and subcutis, and it was diagnosed as cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia. Cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia is hypervascular, so grossly it looks like a hemangioma. It can be differentiated from pulmonary sequestration, teratoma, bronchogenic cyst, and branchial cleft cyst by histology and the location of the mass. We describe the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings of a cutaneous lung tissue heterotopia, the first reported in Korea. PMID:20808688

  2. The effect of medial arch support over the plantar pressure and triceps surae muscle strength after prolonged standing

    OpenAIRE

    Hindun Saadah; Deswaty Furqonita; Angela Tulaar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The activity with prolonged standing position is one of the causes of abnormalities in the lower leg and foot. The aim of this study is to discover the effect of medial arch support over the distribution of plantar pressure when standing and walking.Methods: This was an experimental study with pre- and post-design the strength of triceps surae muscle after prolonged standing, was also evaluated in an experimental study with pre- and post-design. Variables of plantar pressure measu...

  3. Froude number fractions to increase walking pattern dynamic similarities: application to plantar pressure study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, P; Bisiaux, M; Lafortune, M A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if using similar walking velocities obtained from fractions of the Froude number (N(Fr)) and leg length can lead to kinematic and kinetic similarities and lower variability. Fifteen male subjects walked on a treadmill at 0.83 (VS(1)) and 1.16ms(-1) (VS(2)) and then at two similar velocities (V(Sim27) and V(Sim37)) determined from two fractions of the N(Fr) (0.27 and 0.37) so that the average group velocity remained unchanged in both conditions (VS(1)=V (Sim27)andVS(2)=V (Sim37)). N(Fr) can theoretically be used to determine walking velocities proportional to leg lengths and to establish dynamic similarities between subjects. This study represents the first attempt at using this approach to examine plantar pressure. The ankle and knee joint angles were studied in the sagittal plane and the plantar pressure distribution was assessed with an in-shoe measurement device. The similarity ratios were computed from anthropometric parameters and plantar pressure peaks. Dynamically similar conditions caused a 25% reduction in leg joint angles variation and a 10% significant decrease in dimensionless pressure peak variability on average of five footprint locations. It also lead to heel and under-midfoot pressure peaks proportional to body mass and to an increase in the number of under-forefoot plantar pressure peaks proportional to body mass and/or leg length. The use of walking velocities derived from N(Fr) allows kinematic and plantar pressure similarities between subjects to be observed and leads to a lower inter-subject variability. In-shoe pressure measurements have proven to be valuable for the understanding of lower extremity function. Set walking velocities used for clinical assessment mask the effects of body size and individual gait mechanics. The anthropometric scaling of walking velocities (fraction of N(Fr)) should improve identification of unique walking strategies and pathological foot functions.

  4. Healthy Older Adults Have Insufficient Hip Range of Motion and Plantar Flexor Strength to Walk Like Healthy Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Dennis Earl; Madigan, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Limited plantar flexor strength and hip extension range of motion (ROM) in older adults are believed to underlie common age-related differences in gait. However, no studies of age-related differences in gait have quantified the percentage of strength and ROM used during gait. We examined peak hip angles, hip torques and plantar flexor torques, and corresponding estimates of functional capacity utilized (FCU), which we define as the percentage of available strength or joint R...

  5. Monochloroacetic acid application is an effective alternative to cryotherapy for common and plantar warts in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Sjoerd C; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Egberts, Paulette F; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; de Waal, Margot W M; Assendelft, Willem J J; Eekhof, Just A H

    2015-05-01

    Cryotherapy and salicylic acid (SA) often fail as treatments for skin warts. We examined the effectiveness of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for patients with common or plantar warts. Consecutive patients aged 4 years and older with one or more newly diagnosed common or plantar warts were recruited in 53 Dutch general practices. We randomly allocated eligible patients to 13-week treatment protocols of office-applied MCA versus liquid nitrogen cryotherapy every 2 weeks for patients with common warts (n=188), and MCA versus cryotherapy combined with daily SA self-application for patients with plantar warts (n=227). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients whose warts were all cured at 13 weeks. In the common wart group, cure rates were 40/92 (43%, 95% confidence interval 34-54) for MCA and 50/93 (54%, 44-64) for cryotherapy (risk difference (RD) -10%, -25-4.0, P=0.16). In the plantar wart group, cure rates were 49/106 (46%, 37-56) for MCA and 45/115 (39%, 31-48) for cryotherapy combined with SA (RD 7.1, 5.9-20, P=0.29). For common warts, MCA is an effective alternative to cryotherapy to avoid pain during the treatment, although pain after the treatment is similar. For plantar warts, office-applied MCA may be preferred over cryotherapy combined with SA, on the basis of comparable effectiveness, less treatment pain, and less treatment burden.

  6. The short-term effects of plantar vibration on balance disorder after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soofia Naghdi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Balance disorders are common in patients following stroke. There are a number of physiotherapy modalities to treat balance impairments, one of which is vibration. The effects of vibration on balance disorders after stroke have not been investigated. This case report demonstrates the short-term effects of plantar vibration on the balance impairment of a patient with stroke. Case presentation: A 72-years-old man with right hemiplegia resulted from stroke was admitted for vibration therapy after not responding to standard rehabilitation interventions. He complained of balance problems despite walking independently. Main studied outcomes were timed up and go test and posturography. Foot sensation, ankle plantar flexor spasticity, and the passive range of ankle dorsiflexion were assessed, as well. Vibration with a frequency of 100 Hz was introduced to the sole of the affected foot for 5 minutes. After intervention, all tests were improved compared to the baselines. Conclusion: This case showed that the vibration was effective for improving balance disorder after stroke.

  7. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  8. Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Heiat

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually, more than 14 million people are reported to be infected with Leishmaniasis all over the world. In Iran, this disease is seen in the form of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, of which the cutaneous form is more wide spread. In recent years, cutaneous leishmaniaisis is diagnosed by PCR utilizing specific primers in order to amplify different parasite genes including ribosomal RNA genes, kinetoplast DNA or tandem repeating sequences. The aim of this research was to detect early stage cutaneous leishmaniasis using Multiplex-PCR technique. Methods: In this study, 67 samples were prepared from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. DNA was extracted with phenolchloroform. Each specimen was analyzed using two different pairs of PCR primers. The sensitivity of each PCR was optimized on pure Leishmania DNA prior to use for diagnosis. Two standard parasites L. major and L. tropica were used as positive control. Results: DNA amplification fragments were two 115 bp and 683 bp for AB and UL primers, respectively. The sensitivity of two primers was not equal for detection of L. major and L. tropica. The sensivity of PCR with AB primer was 35 cells, while that for UL primer was 40 cells. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that PCR is a sensitive diagnostic assay for cutaneous leishmaniasis and could be employed as the new standard for routine diagnosis when species identification is not required. However, the ability to identify species is especially important in prognosis of the disease and in deciding appropriate therapy, especially in regions where more than one type of species and disease are seen by clinicians.

  9. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Turki, H.; Abdelmoula, M.; Frikha, M.; Daoud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  10. Effect of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 on cutaneous arterial sympathetic nerve activity, cutaneous blood flow and transepidermal water loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Y; Kaneda, H; Fujisaki, Y; Fuyuki, R; Nakakita, Y; Shigyo, T; Nagai, K

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the effects of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 (HK-SBC8803) on the standard physiological markers of skin health of cutaneous arterial sympathetic nerve activity (CASNA), cutaneous blood flow and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and to determine whether SBC8803 targets serotonin 5-HT3 receptors in rats. A set of three experiments were conducted to examine the effects of SBC8803 on CASNA, cutaneous blood flow and TEWL using Wistar and hairless rats. Two additional experiments further attempted to determine whether HK-SBC8803 was targeting the serotonin 5-HT3 receptors by pretreatment with the 5-HT3 antagonist granisetron. Administration of HK-SBC8803 in the first three experiments caused marked inhibition of CASNA and significant elevation of cutaneous blood flow under urethane anaesthesia as well as significant decrease in TEWL on the dorsal skin of conscious hairless rats. Pretreatment with granisetron decreased the effects of HK-SBC8803 on CASNA and cutaneous blood flow. These findings suggest that HK-SBC8803 reduces CASNA, increases cutaneous blood flow and decreases TEWL and that 5-HT3 receptors may be involved in CASNA and cutaneous blood flow responses. HK-SBC8803 could be a useful substance in the treatment/prevention of skin problems, specifically chapped or dry skin. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Multi-segment foot kinematics and ground reaction forces during gait of individuals with plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ryan; Rodrigues, Pedro A; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-08-22

    Clinically, plantar fasciitis (PF) is believed to be a result and/or prolonged by overpronation and excessive loading, but there is little biomechanical data to support this assertion. The purpose of this study was to determine the differences between healthy individuals and those with PF in (1) rearfoot motion, (2) medial forefoot motion, (3) first metatarsal phalangeal joint (FMPJ) motion, and (4) ground reaction forces (GRF). We recruited healthy (n=22) and chronic PF individuals (n=22, symptomatic over three months) of similar age, height, weight, and foot shape (p>0.05). Retro-reflective skin markers were fixed according to a multi-segment foot and shank model. Ground reaction forces and three dimensional kinematics of the shank, rearfoot, medial forefoot, and hallux segment were captured as individuals walked at 1.35 ms(-1). Despite similarities in foot anthropometrics, when compared to healthy individuals, individuals with PF exhibited significantly (pfoot kinematics and kinetics. Consistent with the theoretical injury mechanisms of PF, we found these individuals to have greater total rearfoot eversion and peak FMPJ dorsiflexion, which may put undue loads on the plantar fascia. Meanwhile, increased medial forefoot plantar flexion at initial contact and decreased propulsive GRF are suggestive of compensatory responses, perhaps to manage pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface effects on in-shoe plantar pressure and tibial impact during running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Fu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: There may not be an inevitable relationship between the surface and the lower-limb impact in runners. It is, however, still noteworthy that the effects of different treadmill surfaces should be considered in the interpretation of plantar pressure performance and translation of such results to overground running.

  13. Nonremovable, windowed, fiberglass cast boot in the treatment of diabetic plantar ulcers: efficacy, safety, and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha Van, Georges; Siney, Hubert; Hartmann-Heurtier, Agnes; Jacqueminet, Sophie; Greau, Françoise; Grimaldi, André

    2003-10-01

    To compare the efficacy, safety, and compliance of a nonremovable fiberglass cast boot and off-loading shoes in the treatment of diabetic plantar ulcers. Patients (n = 93) with noninfected, nonischemic plantar ulcers were included in this prospective nonrandomized study. Treatment used a nonremovable fiberglass cast boot for longer standing and deeper ulcers (n = 42) and a half shoe or heel-relief shoe for other ulcers (n = 51). We evaluated off-loading therapy, compliance, and complications in both groups. The healing rate was significantly higher with the cast boot than with the off-loading shoe (81 vs. 70%, P = 0.017), with healing times of 68.6 +/- 35.1 vs. 134.2 +/- 133.0 days, respectively, and hazard ratio 1.68 (95% CI 1.04-2.70); complete compliance with treatment was 98 vs. 10% (P = 0.001), respectively. Secondary osteomyelitis developed in 3 patients in the cast boot group and 13 patients in the off-loading shoe group (P = 0.026). A nonremovable fiberglass cast boot was effective in healing diabetic plantar ulcers and in decreasing the risk of secondary osteomyelitis. The cast boot forced compliance with off-loading, thus promoting healing.

  14. Multiple Cutaneous Metastases as Initial Presentation in Advanced Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Nambiar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin metastases from advanced colorectal cancer are relatively rare and occur most often when the cancer is advanced, following the spread to other organs. Cutaneous metastases occur in about 3% of advanced colorectal cancers. We present an extremely rare case of a 68-year-old woman with advanced ascending colon adenocarcinoma that presented with multiple rapidly progressing painless cutaneous metastatic lesions with no other distant metastases. Of all the tumors, breast cancer most commonly spreads as cutaneous metastasis is followed by lung, colorectal, renal, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cutaneous metastases can present in a variety of clinical manifestations, such as a rapidly growing painless dermal or subcutaneous nodule with intact overlying epidermis or as ulcers. In cases where the cutaneous deposit is isolated, as in visceral metastasis, there is a role for radical management such as wide local excision and reconstruction. In our patient, since she had multiple cutaneous metastases she began treatment with palliative systemic combination chemotherapy.

  15. A Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus-Like Eruption Induced by Hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Daniel A; Mosser-Goldfarb, Joy L

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxyurea is a medication with many well-described cutaneous side effects, notably the dermatomyositis-like eruption known as hydroxyurea dermopathy. Although systemic lupus erythematosus has been reported with hydroxyurea use, cutaneous lupus has not. We report a novel case of chronic cutaneous lupus induced by hydroxyurea and propose that this is a side effect that is distinct from hydroxyurea dermopathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vishwas; Seykora, John T

    2017-09-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignant neoplasm of the skin characterized by an aberrant proliferation of keratinocytes. Cutaneous SCC is the second most common malignancy globally, and usually arises in the chronically sun-damaged skin of elderly white individuals. From a pathologist's perspective, it is important to differentiate cSCC from the benign and reactive squamoproliferative lesions and identify the high-risk features associated with aggressive tumor behavior. In this article, we provide an up-to-date overview of cSCC along with its precursor lesions and important histologic variants, with a particular emphasis on the histopathologic features and molecular pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of Foot Plantar Center of Pressure Trajectories with Low-Cost Instrumented Insoles Using an Individual-Specific Nonlinear Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyao Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Postural control is a complex skill based on the interaction of dynamic sensorimotor processes, and can be challenging for people with deficits in sensory functions. The foot plantar center of pressure (COP has often been used for quantitative assessment of postural control. Previously, the foot plantar COP was mainly measured by force plates or complicated and expensive insole-based measurement systems. Although some low-cost instrumented insoles have been developed, their ability to accurately estimate the foot plantar COP trajectory was not robust. In this study, a novel individual-specific nonlinear model was proposed to estimate the foot plantar COP trajectories with an instrumented insole based on low-cost force sensitive resistors (FSRs. The model coefficients were determined by a least square error approximation algorithm. Model validation was carried out by comparing the estimated COP data with the reference data in a variety of postural control assessment tasks. We also compared our data with the COP trajectories estimated by the previously well accepted weighted mean approach. Comparing with the reference measurements, the average root mean square errors of the COP trajectories of both feet were 2.23 mm (±0.64 (left foot and 2.72 mm (±0.83 (right foot along the medial–lateral direction, and 9.17 mm (±1.98 (left foot and 11.19 mm (±2.98 (right foot along the anterior–posterior direction. The results are superior to those reported in previous relevant studies, and demonstrate that our proposed approach can be used for accurate foot plantar COP trajectory estimation. This study could provide an inexpensive solution to fall risk assessment in home settings or community healthcare center for the elderly. It has the potential to help prevent future falls in the elderly.

  18. Estimation of Foot Plantar Center of Pressure Trajectories with Low-Cost Instrumented Insoles Using an Individual-Specific Nonlinear Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinyao; Zhao, Jun; Peng, Dongsheng; Sun, Zhenglong; Qu, Xingda

    2018-02-01

    Postural control is a complex skill based on the interaction of dynamic sensorimotor processes, and can be challenging for people with deficits in sensory functions. The foot plantar center of pressure (COP) has often been used for quantitative assessment of postural control. Previously, the foot plantar COP was mainly measured by force plates or complicated and expensive insole-based measurement systems. Although some low-cost instrumented insoles have been developed, their ability to accurately estimate the foot plantar COP trajectory was not robust. In this study, a novel individual-specific nonlinear model was proposed to estimate the foot plantar COP trajectories with an instrumented insole based on low-cost force sensitive resistors (FSRs). The model coefficients were determined by a least square error approximation algorithm. Model validation was carried out by comparing the estimated COP data with the reference data in a variety of postural control assessment tasks. We also compared our data with the COP trajectories estimated by the previously well accepted weighted mean approach. Comparing with the reference measurements, the average root mean square errors of the COP trajectories of both feet were 2.23 mm (±0.64) (left foot) and 2.72 mm (±0.83) (right foot) along the medial-lateral direction, and 9.17 mm (±1.98) (left foot) and 11.19 mm (±2.98) (right foot) along the anterior-posterior direction. The results are superior to those reported in previous relevant studies, and demonstrate that our proposed approach can be used for accurate foot plantar COP trajectory estimation. This study could provide an inexpensive solution to fall risk assessment in home settings or community healthcare center for the elderly. It has the potential to help prevent future falls in the elderly.

  19. Unusual Manifestation of Cutaneous Sarcoidosis: A Case Report of Morpheaform Sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Attiyeh Vasaghi; Amir Kalafi

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is multi organ disease with cutaneous manifestation in 20%-35% patients. Cutaneous sarcoidosis has variable manifestations that make it difficult to diagnose. So clinical, histopathologic and laboratory evaluation is needed for diagnosis. Most of cutaneous lesions presents as nodul, maculopapule and plaque. Morpheaform lesion is a rare presentation of cutaneous sarcoidosis. This case had multiple indurated scaly plaques resemble morphea with granulomatous pattern in histopathologi...

  20. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  1. Comparação da pressão plantar e dos sintomas osteomusculares por meio do uso de palmilhas customizadas e pré-fabricadas no ambiente de trabalho Comparison of plantar pressure and musculoskeletal symptoms with the use of custom and prefabricated insoles in the work environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane S. Almeida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Comparar os efeitos do uso de dois tipos de palmilhas, customizadas e pré-fabricadas, sobre a descarga plantar de peso e o comportamento de sintomas osteomusculares em trabalhadoras de linha de montagem. MÉTODOS: Ensaio randomizado com 27 mulheres que trabalhavam em postura ortostática estática, com média de idade de 30,3±7,09 e massa de 64,85±13,65 e que apresentavam sintomas osteomusculares. Inicialmente, aplicou-se o Questionário Nórdico de Sintomas Osteomusculares e coletaram-se as pressões plantares pelo sistema de baropodometria computadorizada (FootWork. Posteriormente, a casuística foi dividida em grupo controle (GC, que utilizou palmilha pré-fabricada e grupo intervenção (GI, que usou palmilha customizada de etilvinilacetato (EVA durante oito semanas. Dados baropodométricos foram novamente coletados assim como a reaplicação do questionário. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatística significante na comparação entre grupos e dados baropodométricos. Notou-se, entretanto, mudança de comportamento nas variáveis de descarga em cada momento avaliado, assim como o aumento para as variáveis de média pressão de descarga e pressão plantar máxima (pOBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of the use of custom and prefabricated insoles on the behavior of plantar weight load and musculoskeletal symptoms in assembly line workers. METHODS: A randomized trial was carried out with 27 women who worked in a static standing position and had musculoskeletal symptoms. The mean age was 30.3±7.09 years and the weight 64.85±13.65 Kg. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was administered, and plantar pressure was determined using a computerized baropodometric system (FootWork. The sample was then divided into control group, which wore pre-fabricated insoles, and intervention group, which wore ethylvinylacetate insoles for eight weeks. Baropodometric data were collected and the questionnaire was administered once again

  2. Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant.

  3. Plantar pressure with and without custom insoles in patients with common foot complaints.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, N.M.; Louwerens, J.W.; Nienhuis, B.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Keijsers, N.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with foot complaints receive customized insoles, the choice for an insole design can vary largely among foot experts. To investigate the variety of insole designs used in daily practice, the insole design and its effect on plantar pressure distribution were

  4. Footwear and offloading interventions to prevent and heal foot ulcers and reduce plantar pressure in patients with diabetes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, S A; van Deursen, R W; Armstrong, D G; Lewis, J E A; Caravaggi, C F; Cavanagh, P R

    2016-01-01

    Footwear and offloading techniques are commonly used in clinical practice for preventing and healing of foot ulcers in persons with diabetes. The goal of this systematic review is to assess the medical scientific literature on this topic to better inform clinical practice about effective treatment. We searched the medical scientific literature indexed in PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database for original research studies published since 1 May 2006 related to four groups of interventions: (1) casting; (2) footwear; (3) surgical offloading; and (4) other offloading interventions. Primary outcomes were ulcer prevention, ulcer healing, and pressure reduction. We reviewed both controlled and non-controlled studies. Controlled studies were assessed for methodological quality, and extracted key data was presented in evidence and risk of bias tables. Uncontrolled studies were assessed and summarized on a narrative basis. Outcomes are presented and discussed in conjunction with data from our previous systematic review covering the literature from before 1 May 2006. We included two systematic reviews and meta-analyses, 32 randomized controlled trials, 15 other controlled studies, and another 127 non-controlled studies. Several randomized controlled trials with low risk of bias show the efficacy of therapeutic footwear that demonstrates to relief plantar pressure and is worn by the patient, in the prevention of plantar foot ulcer recurrence. Two meta-analyses show non-removable offloading to be more effective than removable offloading for healing plantar neuropathic forefoot ulcers. Due to the limited number of controlled studies, clear evidence on the efficacy of surgical offloading and felted foam is not yet available. Interestingly, surgical offloading seems more effective in preventing than in healing ulcers. A number of controlled and uncontrolled studies show that plantar pressure can be reduced by several conservative and surgical approaches. Sufficient

  5. Devastating posttraumatic primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucorales are saprophytic fungi causing mucormycosis, which is a life threatening infection manifested as rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and disseminated forms. The cutaneous form is further divided into primary and secondary forms. The major risk factors include uncontrolled diabetes mellitus with or without ketoacidosis, other forms of metabolic acidosis, and trauma. We report here a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus oryzae, in a diabetic after a road traffic accident.

  6. Cutaneous sarcoidosis: clinicopathologic study of 76 patients from Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Rim; Kurban, Mazen; Kibbi, Abdul-Ghani; Abbas, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The skin is involved in 25% of cases. Studies on cutaneous sarcoidosis from our region are lacking. This study was conducted to describe clinical and histopathologic findings in all patients diagnosed with cutaneous sarcoidosis at the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1992 and 2010 and to compare findings with those published in the literature. Clinical charts of patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis were retrospectively reviewed. Extracutaneous lesions were classified by organ involvement. Treatment was documented. Pathology specimens were reviewed. Cutaneous sarcoidosis was diagnosed in 76 Lebanese patients, 79% of whom were women. Mean age at diagnosis was 48 years. A total of 29% of patients had systemic disease that was commonly associated with lupus pernio lesions and subcutaneous sarcoidosis. The most common cutaneous lesions were sarcoidal plaques. The histopathologic features in our series did not differ from those described in the literature, except for the documented presence of a grenz zone. Interestingly, 23% of biopsy specimens contained perineural granulomas, raising the possibility of tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid leprosy. Foreign bodies were detected in 10% of cases (all had systemic involvement), supporting the opinion that sarcoidosis and granulomatous foreign body reaction are not mutually exclusive. The clinical and histopathologic features of cutaneous sarcoidosis patients in the present series are generally comparable with those published in the literature, with minor differences. Clinically, the most commonly seen lesion was plaque. Microscopically, cutaneous sarcoidosis may exhibit a grenz zone and may show perineural inflammation and foreign bodies. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. The Analysis of Plantar Pressure Data Based on Multimodel Method in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency during Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The movement information of the human body can be recorded in the plantar pressure data, and the analysis of plantar pressure data can be used to judge whether the human body motion function is normal or not. A two-meter footscan® system was used to collect the plantar pressure data, and the kinetic and dynamic gait characteristics were extracted. According to the different description of gait characteristics, a set of models was established according to various people to present the movement of lower limbs. By the introduction of algorithm in machine learning, the FCM clustering algorithm is used to cluster the sample set and create a set of models, and then the SVM algorithm was used to identify the new samples, so as to complete the normal and abnormal motion function identification. The multimodel presented in this paper was carried out into the analysis of the anterior cruciate ligament deficiency. This method demonstrated being effective and can provide auxiliary analysis for clinical diagnosis.

  8. Cutaneous sarcoidosis: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Suparna M, Joshi Shivani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a Greek word (Sarco means flesh and Eido means type or like. Cutaneous sarcoidosis occurs in up to one third of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. This disease is characterised by the presence of non – caseating epitheloid cell granulomas in the skin. Cutaneous sarcoidosis presents as a diagnostic challenge to the dermatopathologists due to its varied presentations and almost identical histologic pictures. Hence, exclusion of infectious causes and compatibility with clinical and radiologic picture serve as significant criteria to come up to a diagnosis. Sometimes; skin lesions are the first manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. This is not a contagious or allergic disease. There is a risk of development of systemic manifestations at a later date; for which a close follow up is a must. We are presenting a case of cutaneous sarcoidosis, which later on progress to sarcoidosis with systemic manifestations.

  9. Hálux valgo e pés planos: as forças plantares são iguais? Hallux valgus and flat feet: are plantar forces equal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Cristina Martinez Teodoro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho teve como objetivo estimar as forças plantares nos dedos dos pés de mulheres com hálux valgo e/ou pés planos. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de um estudo transversal envolvendo mulheres com hálux valgo e/ou pés planos confirmado através de análise radiográfica. Mediram-se as forças plantares, utilizando plataformas de forças. Coletaram-se estas forças com as mulheres descalças e em posição ereta, por três medidas sendo obtida uma média. Os dados foram adquiridos através da ponte amplificadora Spider 8 da HBM e analisados através do programa Catman®. Obtiveram-se as medidas de forças dos dedos de ambos os pés e as médias foram comparadas pelo teste t de Student segundo a presença de hálux valgo e pés planos; a associação entre essas deformidades foi estimada pelo teste exato de Fischer bicaudal, a significância estatística adotada foi alfa = 5%. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídas no estudo, vinte mulheres com presença ou não de hálux valgo. As forças médias encontradas mostraram-se maiores no 5º dedo em relação ao 1º dedo de ambos os pés (pOBJECTIVE: to measure the plantar forces above the toes of women with hallux valgus and/or flat feet. METHODS: This study involved women with hallux valgus and/or flat feet confirmed by X-ray images. The plantar forces were measured utilizing force plates. Force was measured three times, which were taken with the women on barefoot and at upright position, recording the average for the three measurements. Data were acquired from Spider 8 system (HBM and analyzed by using a Catman® software. The measurements for both feet's toes force were reported and the averages were compared by the Student's t-test according to the presence of hallux valgus and flat feet; the association between these deformities was estimated by using the two-tailed Fischer's exact test, the statistical significance adopted was alpha = 5%. RESULTS: For this study, 20 women with or without hallux

  10. Incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Zedek, Daniel; Sayed, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both rare congenital conditions that most commonly occur on the scalp and may appear clinically and histologically similar. A subtype of aplasia cutis congenita, membranous aplasia cutis congenita, and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both proposed to result from neural tube closure errors. However, neither non-membranous nor membranous aplasia cutis congenita are known to occur together with cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in the same lesion. We report the incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia within a lesion of aplasia cutis congenita. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cutaneous angiosarcoma in a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Raman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by photosensitivity, cutaneous pigmentary changes, premature skin ageing and development of various cutaneous and internal malignancies at an early age as a result of a defect in nucleotide excision repair following ultraviolet light exposure. Cutaneous angiosarcomas are aggressive neoplasms that are rarely associated with XP. In this communication, we report the case of a 40-year-old male patient with XP who developed an angiosarcoma of the face and discuss the implications of this association in view of recent developments in this field.

  12. Reduction of peak plantar pressure in people with diabetes-related peripheral neuropathy: an evaluation of the DH Pressure Relief Shoe™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspovic Anita

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Offloading plantar pressure is a key strategy for the prevention or healing of neuropathic plantar ulcers in diabetes. Non-removable walking casts, such as total contact casts, are currently considered the gold-standard for offloading this type of wound. However, alternative methods for offloading that are more cost effective and easier to use are continually being sought. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of the DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ to offload high pressure areas under the neuropathic foot in diabetes. Methods A within-subjects, repeated measures design was used. Sixteen participants with diabetic peripheral neuropathy were recruited and three footwear conditions were evaluated in a randomised order: a canvas shoe (the control, the participants’ own standard shoe, and the DH Pressure Relief Shoe™. The primary outcome was peak plantar pressure, measured using the pedar-X® mobile in-shoe system between the three conditions. Results Data analysis was conducted on 14 out of the 16 participants because two participants could not complete data collection. The mean peak pressure values in kPa (±SD for each condition were: control shoe 315.9 (±140.7, participants’ standard shoe 273.0 (±127.1 and DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ 155.4 (±89.9. There was a statistically significant difference in peak plantar pressure between the DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ compared to both the control shoe (p = 0.002 and participants’ standard shoe (p = 0.001. The DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ decreased plantar pressures by 51% compared to the control shoe and by 43% compared to participants’ standard shoe. Importantly, for a couple of study participants, the DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ appeared unsuitable for day-to-day wearing. Conclusions The DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ reduced plantar pressures more than the other two shoe conditions. The DH Pressure Relief Shoe™ may be a useful alternative to current offloading

  13. Differential Activation of Medullary Vagal Nuclei Caused by Stimulation of Different Esophageal Mechanoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ivan M.; Medda, Bidyut K.; Shaker, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal mechanorecptors, i.e. muscular slowly adapting tension receptors and mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, mediate different sets of reflexes. The aim of this study was to determine the medullary vagal nuclei involved in the reflex responses to activation of these receptors. Thirty-three cats were anesthetized with alpha-chloralose and the esophagus was stimulated by slow balloon or rapid air distension. The physiological effects of the stimuli (N=4) were identified by recording responses from the pharyngeal, laryngeal, and hyoid muscles, esophagus, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The effects on the medullary vagal nuclei of the stimuli: slow distension (N=10), rapid distension (N=9), and in control animals (N=10) were identified using the immunohistochemical analysis of c-fos. The experimental groups were stimulated 3 times per minute for 3 hours. After the experiment, the brains were removed and processed for c-fos immunoreactivity or thioinin. We found that slow balloon distension activated the esophago-UES contractile reflex and esophago LES relaxation response, and rapid air injection activated the belch and its component reflexes. Slow balloon distension activated the NTSce, NTSdl, NTSvl, DMNc, DMNr and NAr; and rapid air injection primarily activated AP, NTScd, NTSim, NTSis, NTSdm, NTSvl, NAc and NAr. We concluded that different sets of medullary vagal nuclei mediate different reflexes of the esophagus activated from different sets of mechanoreceptors. The NTScd is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the mucosal rapidly adapting touch receptors, and the NTSce is the primary NTS subnucleus mediating reflexes from the muscular slowly adapting tension receptors. The AP may be involved in mediation of belching. PMID:20971087

  14. The effect of different depths of medial heel skive on plantar pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonanno Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot orthoses are often used to treat lower limb injuries associated with excessive pronation. There are many orthotic modifications available for this purpose, with one being the medial heel skive. However, empirical evidence for the mechanical effects of the medial heel skive modification is limited. This study aimed to evaluate the effect that different depths of medial heel skive have on plantar pressures. Methods Thirty healthy adults (mean age 24 years, range 18–46 with a flat-arched or pronated foot posture and no current foot pain or deformity participated in this study. Using the in-shoe pedar-X® system, plantar pressure data were collected for the rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot while participants walked along an 8 metre walkway wearing a standardised shoe. Experimental conditions included a customised foot orthosis with the following 4 orthotic modifications: (i no medial heel skive, (ii a 2 mm medial heel skive, (iii a 4 mm medial heel skive and (iv a 6 mm medial heel skive. Results Compared to the foot orthosis with no medial heel skive, statistically significant increases in peak pressure were observed at the medial rearfoot – there was a 15% increase (p = 0.001 with the 4 mm skive and a 29% increase (p  Conclusions This study found that a medial heel skive of 4 mm or 6 mm increases peak pressure under the medial rearfoot in asymptomatic adults with a flat-arched or pronated foot posture. Plantar pressures at the midfoot and forefoot were not altered by a medial heel skive of 2, 4 or 6 mm. These findings provide some evidence for the effects of the medial heel skive orthotic modification.

  15. Unusual Manifestation of Cutaneous Sarcoidosis: A Case Report of Morpheaform Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiyeh Vasaghi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is multi organ disease with cutaneous manifestation in 20%-35% patients. Cutaneous sarcoidosis has variable manifestations that make it difficult to diagnose. So clinical, histopathologic and laboratory evaluation is needed for diagnosis. Most of cutaneous lesions presents as nodul, maculopapule and plaque. Morpheaform lesion is a rare presentation of cutaneous sarcoidosis. This case had multiple indurated scaly plaques resemble morphea with granulomatous pattern in histopathologic examination. The patient responded to prednisolone in addition to hydroxychloroquine.

  16. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  17. Modern radiation therapy for primary cutaneous lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment......, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational...... meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era....

  18. Use of platelet rich plasma to treat plantar fasciitis: design of a multi centre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peerbooms Joost C

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If conservative treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis fails, often a corticosteroid injection is given. Corticosteroid injection gives temporarily pain reduction, but no healing. Blood platelets initiate the natural healing rate. GPS® gives an eightfold concentrate platelets of patients own blood. Injection of these platelets in the attachment of the fascia to the os calcis might induce a healing rate. Methods and design A randomized controlled multi centre trial will be performed. The study population consists of 120 patients of 18 years and older. Patients with chronic plantar fasciitis will be allocated randomly to have a steroid injection or an autologous platelet concentrate injections. Data will be collected before the procedure, 4,8,12,26 weeks and 1 year after the procedure. The main outcome measures of this study are pain and function measured with questionnaires. Conclusion Recent literature show positive effects for the treatment of tendinosis with autologous platelet injections. The forthcoming trial will compare treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis with a steroid injection versus an autologous platelet injection. Our results will be published as soon as they become available. Trial Registration Trial registration number: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00758641.

  19. The effect of moderate running on foot posture index and plantar pressure distribution in male recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Martínez, Elena; Martínez-Nova, Alfonso; Gómez-Martín, Beatriz; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Fernández-Seguín, Lourdes María

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue due to running has been shown to contribute to changes in plantar pressure distribution. However, little is known about changes in foot posture after running. We sought to compare the foot posture index before and after moderate exercise and to relate any changes to plantar pressure patterns. A baropodometric evaluation was made, using the FootScan platform (RSscan International, Olen, Belgium), of 30 men who were regular runners and their foot posture was examined using the Foot Posture Index before and after a 60-min continuous run at a moderate pace (3.3 m/sec). Foot posture showed a tendency toward pronation after the 60-min run, gaining 2 points in the foot posture index. The total support and medial heel contact areas increased, as did pressures under the second metatarsal head and medial heel. Continuous running at a moderate speed (3.3 m/sec) induced changes in heel strike related to enhanced pronation posture, indicative of greater stress on that zone after physical activity. This observation may help us understand the functioning of the foot, prevent injuries, and design effective plantar orthoses in sport.

  20. Laterality and Plantar Pressure Distribution During Gait in Healthy Children: Comment on Mayolas Pi, Arrese, Aparicio, and Masià (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, Yury

    2016-08-01

    In a recent paper, Mayolas Pi, Arrese, Aparicio, and Masià reported the absence of significant bilateral differences between legs in the average plantar pressure during walking in six- to seven-year-old children. However, the authors demonstrated bilateral differences in the distribution of plantar pressure during walking independent of foot preference in three tests: kicking a ball with precision, balancing on one foot, and jumping on one foot. From the results, Mayolas Pi et al. proposed that this asymmetric pattern of plantar pressure distribution is not caused by laterality. This paper suggests that the selected age range of participants and methods of diagnosing of laterality and data analysis could have significant effects on the results. Indeed, according to the literature, laterality in humans is a multidimensional trait with poor stabilization and conformity between different dimensions in preschool and younger school children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Effects of Wearing Different Personal Equipment on Force Distribution at the Plantar Surface of the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The wearing of personal equipment can cause specific changes in muscle activity and posture. In the present study, we investigated the influence of differences in equipment related weight loading and load distribution on plantar pressure. In addition, we studied functional effects of wearing different equipment with a particular focus on relevant changes in foot shape. Methods. Static and dynamic pedobarography were performed on 31 male soldiers carrying increasing weights consisting of different items of equipment. Results. The pressure acting on the plantar surface of the foot increased with higher loading, both under static and dynamic conditions (p < 0.05. We observed an increase in the contact area (p < 0.05 and an influence of load distribution through different ways to carry the rifle. Conclusions. The wearing of heavier weights leads to an increase in plantar pressure and contact area. This may be caused by flattening of the transverse and longitudinal arches. The effects are more evident in subjects with flat feet deformities which seem to flatten at an earlier load condition with a greater amount compared to subjects with normal arches. Improving load distribution should be a main goal in the development of military equipment in order to prevent injuries or functional disorders of the lower extremity.

  2. dermatology cutaneous manifestations of hiv/aids: part i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-01

    Nov 1, 2004 ... Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection can lead to a variety of clinical cutaneous manifestations. These cutaneous disorders ... 1. Correlation between mean CD4 cell count and incidences of specific skin disorders in patients with HIV infection. Fig. 2. Morbilliform rash of acute seroconversion illness.

  3. Primary cutaneous smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittler, Julia; Martires, Kathryn; Terushkin, Vitaly; Brinster, Nooshin; Ramsay, David

    2016-12-15

    HTLV-1 is a virus that is endemic in southwesternJapan and the Caribbean and has been implicatedin the development of ATLL. ATLL, which is anuncommon malignant condition of peripheralT-lymphocytes, is characterized by four clinicalsubtypes, which include acute, lymphomatous,chronic, and smoldering types, that are based onLDH levels, calcium levels, and extent of organinvolvement. We present a 52-year- old woman withpruritic patches with scale on the buttocks and withtender, hyperpigmented macules and papules oftwo-years duration. Histopathologic examinationwas suggestive of mycosis fungoides, laboratoryresults showed HTLV-I and II, and the patient wasdiagnosed with primary cutaneous ATLL. We reviewthe literature on HTLV-1 and ATLL and specifically theprognosis of cutaneous ATLL. The literature suggeststhat a diagnosis of ATLL should be considered amongpatients of Caribbean origin or other endemicareas with skin lesions that suggest a cutaneousT-cell lymphoma, with clinicopathologic features ofmycosis fungoides. Differentiation between ATLLand cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is imperative as theyhave different prognoses and treatment approaches.

  4. Pressure-reduction and preservation in custom-made footwear of patients with diabetes and a history of plantar ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaijman, R; Arts, M L J; Haspels, R; Busch-Westbroek, T E; Nollet, F; Bus, S A

    2012-12-01

    To assess the value of using in-shoe plantar pressure analysis to improve and preserve the offloading properties of custom-made footwear in patients with diabetes. Dynamic in-shoe plantar pressures were measured in new custom-made footwear of 117 patients with diabetes, neuropathy, and a healed plantar foot ulcer. In 85 of these patients, high peak pressure locations (peak pressure > 200 kPa) were targeted for pressure reduction (goal: > 25% relief or below an absolute level of 200 kPa) by modifying the footwear. After each of a maximum three rounds of modifications, pressures were measured. In a subgroup of 32 patients, pressures were measured and, if needed, footwear was modified at 3-monthly visits for 1 year. Pressures were compared with those measured in 32 control patients who had no footwear modifications based on pressure analysis. At the previous ulcer location and the highest and second highest pressure locations, peak pressures were significantly reduced by 23%, 21% and 15%, respectively, after modification of footwear. These lowered pressures were maintained or further reduced over time and were significantly lower, by 24-28%, compared with pressures in the control group. The offloading capacity of custom-made footwear for high-risk patients can be effectively improved and preserved using in-shoe plantar pressure analysis as guidance tool for footwear modification. This provides a useful approach to obtain better offloading footwear that may reduce the risk for pressure-related diabetic foot ulcers. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  5. Influencia do indice de massa corporal no equilibrio e na configuracao plantar em obesos adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chiao Yi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A obesidade é uma doença crônica degenerativa multifatorial que pode levar a alterações do sistema musculoesquelético, como mudança do centro de gravidade e sobrecarga mecânica sobre os membros inferiores. OBJETIVOS: Correlacionar o índice de massa corporal (IMC com o equilíbrio corporal e verificar associação entre o IMC e a configuração plantar. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 30 obesos, de ambos os gêneros, com IMC maior ou igual a 30 Kg/m². Inicialmente, os voluntários foram submetidos às avaliações de medidas antropométricas a fim de calcular o valor do IMC. Em seguida, foram submetidos ao teste de equilíbrio corporal estático Balance Error Scoring System (BESS e a plantigrafia para a identificação da impressão plantar. Por meio do método de Viladot, os voluntários foram classificados em grupos: pé plano (GPP, pé cavo (GPC e pé neutro (GPN. A correlação entre as variáveis IMC e BESS foi calculada por meio do coeficiente de correlação linear de Pearson e associação entre o IMC e a configuração plantar foi realizada por meio da análise de variância (Anova. Para todas as análises, nível de significância considerado foi p < 0,05. RESULTADOS: Os valores da correlação entre o IMC e o BESS foram r = - 0,1 e p = 0,59. Os valores da associação do IMC entre GPN - GPP; GPN - GPC; GPP - GPC foram respectivamente: p = 0,76; p = 0,001; p = 0,07. CONCLUSÃO: O índice de massa corporal de adultos obesos não influencia o equilíbrio corporal, porém influencia na configuração plantar.

  6. The thermoregulation of healthy individuals, overweight-obese, and diabetic from the plantar skin thermogram: a clue to predict the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renero-C, Francisco-J

    2017-01-01

    Background : Thermoregulation is a complex autonomic process to keep or to dissipate heat in the human body. Methods : In this work, by means of the thermogram of the plantar skin, the thermoregulation of healthy individuals, overweight-obese, and diabetic is discussed. Results : The thermograms of the plantar skin, for the healthy individuals, are: (1) symmetrical, the temperature distribution of the right foot being a mirror image of that of the left foot ; (2) the thermograms of women, on average, are 3°C colder than those of the men; and (3) the temperature distributions decrease distally from the medial longitudinal arch. The plantar skin thermograms of overweight-obese individuals show: (1) increased average temperature of both feet and for both genders; (2) no symmetry between the left and right feet thermograms; and (3) the temperature distribution is still decreasing from the medial longitudinal arch to the periphery of the foot. However, the standard deviation, for each averaged temperature of the angiosomes, shows greater uncertainty. Most thermograms of diabetic individuals show temperature increase on the plantar skin, and are mostly symmetric between left and right feet. Conclusions: An asymmetric thermogram of the plantar skin of diabetic individuals, where one foot is hotter than the other, may mean that the coldest foot is losing the capacity to communicate properly with the central nervous system and/or that vasoconstriction/vasodilatation is having problems in regulating the passing of blood through the vessels. Thus, the asymmetric thermograms of diabetic patients, and particularly those coldest regions of foot are of interest, because of the reduction of the local autonomic sensing and the lack of achieving properly the passing of the blood.

  7. Effectiveness and prognostic factors of radiotherapy for painful plantar heel spurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, O.; Bosch, E.; Gott, C.; Adamietz, I.A.; Stueckle, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the effectiveness (pain relief rate and long-term results) and prognostic factors of RT for plantar heel pain have been investigated. Patients and methods: From January 2000 to October 2000, 62 patients (73 heels) with painful plantar heel spurs and a minimum pain history of 3 months were treated and evaluated in a prospective study. Mean age was 54 years (range 28-84 years). All patients were treated with a total dose of 5 Gy in seven fractions (= one series), given twice a week at a single-dose sequence of 0.25-0.25-0.5-1.0-1.0-1.0-1-0. Gy (10-MV photons, source-skin distance [SSD] 100 cm, direct portal, field size 12 x 17 cm). The mean duration of heel pain before RT was 26 weeks (= 6.5 months; range 3-120 months). By means of a visual analog scale (VAS) the patients had to self-assess the quantity of their heel pain once before, three times during and four times after RT at a long-term median follow-up of 28 and 40 months. Additionally, the patients had to assess their mechanical heel stress extent during RT. Effectiveness was estimated according to the patients' judgment of pain reduction. The results confirm the high efficacy of RT in painful plantar spur and add new aspects to formerly published data concerning the time course of changes in heel pain reduction. Pain relief can be expected during and shortly after RT. In addition, the initial success can be transformed into effective long-term results >2 years after RT; however, further improvement is not to be expected. As a new prognostic factor, the reduction of mechanical heel stress during RT may ameliorate the short-term results, whereas short heel pain history improves the long-term results. Especially for older patients, RT should be taken into consideration as primary treatment. (orig.)

  8. Plantar loading changes with alterations in foot strike patterns during a single session in habitual rear foot strike female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernozek, Thomas W; Vannatta, Charles N; Gheidi, Naghmeh; Kraus, Sydnie; Aminaka, Naoko

    2016-03-01

    Characterize plantar loading parameters when habitually rear foot strike (RFS) runners change their pattern to a non-rear foot strike (NRFS). Experimental. University biomechanics laboratory. Twenty three healthy female runners (Age: 22.17 ± 1.64 yrs; Height: 168.91 ± 5.46 cm; Mass: 64.29 ± 7.11 kg). Plantar loading was measured using an in-sole pressure sensor while running down a 20-m runway restricted to a range of 3.52-3.89 m/s under two conditions, using the runner's typical RFS, and an adapted NRFS pattern. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance was performed to detect differences in loading between these two conditions. Force and pressure variables were greater in the forefoot and phalanx in NRFS and greater in the heel and mid foot in RFS pattern, but the total force imposed upon the whole foot and contact time remained similar between conditions. Total peak pressure was higher and contact area was lower during NRFS running. The primary finding of this investigation is that there are distinctly different plantar loads when changing from a RFS to NRFS during running. So, during a transition from RFS to a NRFS pattern; a period of acclimation should be considered to allow for adaptations to these novel loads incurred on plantar regions of the foot. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The cutaneous radiation syndrome: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, R.U.; Steinert, M.; Gottlober, P.

    2001-01-01

    Accidental exposure to ionising radiation may occur during such catastrophic events as the Chernobyl accident in 1986 or for days and weeks as in Goiania in 1987 and in the military camp during the training of soldiers in Lilo/Georgia in 1997 as well as in medical institutions. The cutaneous symptoms after radiation exposure are based on a combination of inflammatory processes and alteration of cellular proliferation as a result of a specific pattern of transcriptionally activated pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. They follow a time course consisting of prodromal erythema, manifestation, chronic stage, late stage and they are referred to as Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome. The time course depends on several factors such as the applied radiation dose, radiation quality, individual radiation sensitivity, the extent of contamination and absorption and volume of the skin. For diagnostics of the cutaneous radiation syndrome the following procedures are used: 7.5 MHz to 20 MHz-B-scan-sonography, thermography, capillary microscopy, profilometry, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, bone scintigraphy and histology. Based on the results of experimental and clinical research of the last years pharmacotherapy of the cutaneous radiation syndrome includes topic or systemic application of corticosteroids, gamma-interferon, pentoxifylline and vitamin E and superoxide dismutase. The treatment depends on the stage of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. Due to the complexity of the clinical manifestations of radiation disease in most patients an interdisciplinary treatment in specialized centres is necessary. Dermatologists are asked to perform in most cases life-long therapy and follow-up of the patients. (author)

  10. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  11. Ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ting Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is a rare gastrointestinal tumor. Additionally, cutaneous metastasis from such an internal malignancy is also uncommon. We reported the case of a 55-year-old man afflicted with ampullary carcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. The patient did not undergo the standard Whipple procedure but received chemotherapy due to apparent left neck lymph node metastasis noted by initial PET/CT imaging. The skin metastasis presented as a left neck infiltrating purpuric lesion, which was confirmed by skin biopsy approximately one year after the patient's disease was first diagnosed. Thereafter, the patient received further chemotherapy pursuant to his course of medical management. Skin metastasis usually represents a poor patient prognosis. In these cases, treatment of cutaneous metastasis typically includes systemic chemotherapy and local management such as radiation therapy or tumor excision. And when choosing a chemotherapy regimen for the ampullary cancer, the histological subtypes (intestinal or pancreatobiliary should be comprehensively considered. In our review of the literature, the intestinal type seems to have less distant lymph node metastasis, advanced local invasion, as well as recurrence than pancreatobiliary type of ampullary cancer.

  12. A True Human Tail in a Neonate; Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh K. Pillai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A true human tail is a benign vestigial caudal cutaneous structure composed of adipose, connective tissue, muscle, vessels, nerves and mechanoreceptors. A true human tail can be distinguished from a pseudotail as the latter is commonly associated with underlying spinal dysraphism, which requires specialised management. True human tails are very rare, with fewer than 40 cases reported to date. We report a healthy one-day-old male newborn who was referred to the Bharath Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala, India, in 2014 with a cutaneous appendage arising from the lumbosacral region. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine ruled out spinal dysraphism. The appendage was removed by simple surgical excision. Clinicians should emphasise use of ‘true tail’ and ‘pseudotail’ as specific disparate terms as the clinical, radiological and histological findings of these conditions differ significantly, along with management strategies and outcomes.

  13. Physiological basis of tingling paresthesia evoked by hydroxy-α-sanshool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennertz, Richard C; Tsunozaki, Makoto; Bautista, Diana M; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxy-α-sanshool, the active ingredient in plants of the prickly ash plant family, induces robust tingling paresthesia by activating a subset of somatosensory neurons. However, the subtypes and physiological function of sanshool-sensitive neurons remain unknown. Here we use the ex vivo skin-nerve preparation to examine the pattern and intensity with which the sensory terminals of cutaneous neurons respond to hydroxy-α-sanshool. We found that sanshool excites virtually all D-hair afferents, a distinct subset of ultra-sensitive light touch receptors in the skin, and targets novel populations of Aβ and C-fiber nerve afferents. Thus, sanshool provides a novel pharmacological tool for discriminating functional subtypes of cutaneous mechanoreceptors. The identification of sanshool-sensitive fibers represents an essential first step in identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tingling paresthesia that accompanies peripheral neuropathy and injury. PMID:20335471

  14. Physiological basis of tingling paresthesia evoked by hydroxy-alpha-sanshool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennertz, Richard C; Tsunozaki, Makoto; Bautista, Diana M; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2010-03-24

    Hydroxy-alpha-sanshool, the active ingredient in plants of the prickly ash plant family, induces robust tingling paresthesia by activating a subset of somatosensory neurons. However, the subtypes and physiological function of sanshool-sensitive neurons remain unknown. Here we use the ex vivo skin-nerve preparation to examine the pattern and intensity with which the sensory terminals of cutaneous neurons respond to hydroxy-alpha-sanshool. We found that sanshool excites virtually all D-hair afferents, a distinct subset of ultrasensitive light-touch receptors in the skin and targets novel populations of Abeta and C fiber nerve afferents. Thus, sanshool provides a novel pharmacological tool for discriminating functional subtypes of cutaneous mechanoreceptors. The identification of sanshool-sensitive fibers represents an essential first step in identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tingling paresthesia that accompanies peripheral neuropathy and injury.

  15. Sonographic measurements of the achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad are reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Finn E; Jensen, Signe; Stallknecht, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine intra- and interobserver reliability and precision of sonographic (US) scanning in measuring thickness of the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad in patients with heel pain. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients referred with heel pain were included. Two...

  16. Case Report: Generalized Cutaneous Candidiasis in a Preterm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Generalised cutaneous candidiasis is rare in the neonatal period. When it does occur there is a risk of disseminated disease, particularly in preterm infants. Method A case report of a preterm baby who developed extensive cutaneous candidiasis. Result A 45 day old product of 30 weeks gestation noticed to ...

  17. Cutaneous cancer and xeroderma pigmentosum; Cancer cutane et xeroderma pigmentosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Mnejja, W.; Siala, W.; Daoud, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Sallemi, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Turki, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Dermatologie, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2007-11-15

    The cutaneous cancer at the patients affected by xeroderma pigmentosum is characterized by its multifocal character and its strong radiosensitivity. A premature care and a regular follow-up for life of these patients is indispensable for the detection and the treatment of new hurts. The precautionary measures are also important by the school eviction. (N.C.)

  18. Cutaneous tuberculosis after mesotherapy: report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela, Dora; Puerto, Gloria; Mejía, Graciela; Castro, Claudia; Garzón, María Consuelo; García, Luz Mary; Hernández, Elkin; Ribón, Wellman; Rodríguez, Gerzaín

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis as a result of a needle injection is a rare event; it generally occurs among medical and laboratory personnel and among patients receiving percutaneous treatment. Six patients are presented who developed cutaneous tuberculosis after mesotherapy cosmetic treatment. One to four months after injection of an unknown product as treatment for obesity and cellulites, five women and a man developed papules, nodules and drainage of wax like material at the inoculated sites; this was interpreted clinically as a non tuberculous mycobacterium infection. Skin biopsies were taken for a histopathologic study; the biopsy and exudates were cultured to make a phenotypic identification. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme pattern analyses (PCR-restriction pattern analysis)) procedures were applied to the skin biopsies. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed in the culture and by PRA analysis in the paraffin-embedded biopsies. The patients had never had tuberculosis. Their thoracic X rays were normal and the size of the tuberculin reaction was 17 to 20 mm. Five patients recovered with antituberculosis treatment and the sixth spontaneously healed after the removal of the largest cutaneous module. No satellite adenopathy or recurrences were observed. A previously undescribed mode of acquisition cutaneous tuberculosis was described. This was the second incident of a demonstrated cutaneous tuberculosis following mesotherapy in Colombia. Skin lesions induced by injections must be tested to detect mycobacterias to include M. tuberculosis.

  19. The influence of high-heeled shoes on strain and tension force of the anterior talofibular ligament and plantar fascia during balanced standing and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Hongtao; Luo, Zong-Ping; Zhang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    High-heeled shoes have the capability to alter the strain and tension of ligamentous structures between the foot and ankle, which may result in ankle instability. However, high-heeled shoes can also reduce the strain on plantar fascia, which may be beneficial for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this study, the influence of heel height on strain and tension force applied to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATL) and plantar fascia were investigated. A three-dimensional finite element model of coupled foot-ankle-shoe complex was constructed. Four heel heights were studied in balanced standing: 0 in. (0cm), 1 in. (2.54cm), 2 in. (5.08cm), and 3 in. (7.62cm). A walking analysis was performed using 2-in. (5.08cm) high-heeled shoes. During balanced standing, the tension force on the ATL increased from 14.8N to 97.0N, with a six-fold increase in strain from 0 in. to 3 in. (0-7.62cm). The tension force and the average strain on the plantar fascia decreased from 151.0N (strain: 0.74%) to 59.6N (strain: 0.28%) when the heel height increased from 0 in. to 2 in. (0-5.08cm). When heel height reached 3 in. (7.62cm), the force and average strain increased to 278.3N (strain: 1.33%). The walking simulation showed that the fascia stretched out while the ATL loading decreased during push off. The simulation outcome demonstrated the influence of heel height on ATL alteration and plantar fascia strain, which implies risks for ankle injury and suggests guidance for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intermediate-term results of partial plantar fascia release with microtenotomy using bipolar radiofrequency microtenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Douglas E; Ekroth, Scott R; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common condition, with most patients treated successfully with nonoperative management. Recalcitrant disease has been managed with surgical procedures that vary in design and associated morbidity. The present study sought to determine the intermediate-term results of percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency microtenotomy in recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. The patient medical records were reviewed, and data were gathered for all the patients who met the inclusion criteria. The foot function index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale questionnaires were mailed to the 111 patients. Of the 111 patients, 61 (55.0%) returned their questionnaires and were ultimately included in the present analysis. Of the 61 patients, 44 (72.1%) were female and 17 were (27.9%) male, with an average reported follow-up of 33.3 ± 8.6 (range 16.1 to 46.6) months. The median postoperative VAS score was 0.0 (range 0.0 to 10.0), and the median foot function index score was 3.1 (range 0.0 to 97.1). The patients were subdivided into success and failure groups according to their satisfaction. Of the 61 patients, 51 (83.6%) were satisfied and would recommend the procedure to a friend. The median VAS score in the success group was 0.0 (range 0.0 to 5.0), and the median VAS score in the failure group was 6.0 (range 0.0 to 10.0), a significant difference (p plantar fasciitis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma: clinical and histological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, A; Sassi, S; Fazaa, B; Ben Hassouna, J; Ben Romdhane, K; Kamoun, M R

    2009-02-01

    According to the WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas, primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are now well characterized. We report here a case of primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma in a 51 year-old man in which the diagnosis was made using both histology and immunopathology. The patient had no remarkable medical history, no history of either acute inflammation or insect bite, and presented with a 5 cm solitary asymptomatic erythematous firm, multinodular and infiltrated plaque on the back for 12 months. Histological examination and immunohistochemical study of a cutaneous biopsy provided a differential diagnosis between B cell lymphoma and lymphocytoma cutis. Full body work up revealed no signs of extracutaneous dissemination. The patient underwent surgical excision of the nodule. Histological examination showed a histological and immunophenotyping profile typical of primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma. The lesion was completely excised with clear margins and no recurrence occurred after a 12 month-follow-up period. Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma are low-grade lymphomas that have an indolent course and a high tendency to recur. They should be differentiated from lymphocytoma cutis and from the other types of cutaneous B cell lymphomas that have a different course and prognosis.

  2. [Clinical features of 32 patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Maturana, Donaldo; Amaro, Patricio; Segovia, Laura; Balestrini, Claudia

    2004-02-01

    The skin is a common target of small vessel vasculitis, with a wide assortment of pathological changes. This condition is usually associated to systemic diseases. To report the clinical and pathological features of patients with cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. A retrospective review of 32 patients with a pathological diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitis. Seventy two percent of patients were women. Cutaneous lesions were mainly located in the lower limbs (94%). The most common lesion was palpable purpura (62%). Connective tissue diseases and systemic vasculitis were the most commonly associated systemic diseases. Palpable purpura is the most common manifestation of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis, that is usually associated to connective tissue diseases or systemic vasculitis.

  3. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seven-year-old female spayed Schnauzer was presented with cutaneous ulcerated nodular lesions shortly after the beginning of an immunosuppressive treatment for immune-mediated hemolytic disease. Cytology was performed and a great number of neutrophils and banana-shaped organisms were observed. Biopsy showed a neutrophilic and histiocytic dermatitis and panniculitis with myriads of intralesional bradyzoites cysts and tachyzoites. PCR analysis was positive for Toxoplasma gondii and negative for Neospora caninum. Immunohistochemistry confirmed intralesional T. gondii antigens. This study reports a rare case of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed dog.

  4. WITHDRAWN: Systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Tom; Fish, Reg; Coles, Bernadette; Mason, Malcolm

    2018-02-07

    Systemic therapies for metastatic cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancers, remain disappointing. Few lasting remissions are achieved and the therapeutic aim remains one of palliation.Many agents are used alone or in combination with varying degrees of toxicity and cost. It is unclear whether evidence exists to support these complex regimens over best supportive care / placebo. To review the benefits from the use of systemic therapies in metastatic cutaneous melanoma compared to best supportive care/placebo, and to establish whether a 'standard' therapy exists which is superior to other treatments. Randomised controlled trials were identified from the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR/CENTRAL databases. References, conference proceedings, and Science Citation Index/Scisearch were also used to locate trials. Cancer registries and trialists were also contacted. Randomised controlled trials of adults with histologically proven metastatic cutaneous melanoma in which systemic anti-cancer therapy was compared with placebo or supportive care. Study selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Data extraction forms were used for studies which appeared to meet the selection criteria and, where appropriate, full text articles were retrieved and reviewed independently. No randomised controlled trials were found comparing a systemic therapy with placebo or best supportive care in metastatic cutaneous melanoma. There is no evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials to show superiority of systemic therapy over best supportive care / placebo in the treatment of malignant cutaneous melanoma.Given that patients with metastatic melanoma frequently receive systemic therapy, it is our pragmatic view that a future systematic review could compare any systemic treatment, or combination of treatments, to single agent dacarbazine.

  5. Integrated pressure-force-kinematics measuring system for the characterisation of plantar foot loading during locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, C; Macellari, V; Leardini, A; Benedetti, M G

    2000-03-01

    Plantar pressure, ground reaction force and body-segment kinematics measurements are largely used in gait analysis to characterise normal and abnormal function of the human foot. The combination of all these data together provides a more exhaustive, detailed and accurate view of foot loading during activities than traditional measurement systems alone do. A prototype system is presented that integrates a pressure platform, a force platform and a 3D anatomical tracking system to acquire combined information about foot function and loading. A stereophotogrammetric system and an anatomically based protocol for foot segment kinematics is included in a previously devised piezo-dynamometric system that combines pressure and force measurements. Experimental validation tests are carried out to check for both spatial and time synchronisation. Misalignment of the three systems is found to be within 6.0, 5.0 and 1.5 mm for the stereophotogrammetric system, force platform and pressure platform, respectively. The combination of position and pressure data allows for a more accurate selection of plantar foot subareas on the footprint. Measurements are also taken on five healthy volunteers during level walking to verify the feasibility of the overall experimental protocol. Four main subareas are defined and identified, and the relevant vertical and shear force data are computed. The integrated system is effective when there is a need for loading measurements in specific plantar foot subareas. This is attractive both in clinical assessment and in biomechanics research.

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia in hallux valgus: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, César Calvo; Marín, Alejandro Garrido; Sanz, David Rodríguez; López, Daniel López; López, Patricia Palomo; Morales, Carlos Romero; Corbalán, Irene Sanz

    2016-11-01

    A cross-sectional area (CSA) and thickness reduction of the abductor hallucis (AbH) is shown in subjects with hallux valgus (HV). To date, other soft-tissue structures have not been researched in relation with HV. The aim of this study was to compare the CSA and thickness of the intrinsic plantar muscles and fascia (PF) between feet with and without HV. Therefore, a cross-sectional and case-control study was performed using B-mode with an iU22 Philips ultrasound system and a 5 to 17-MHz transducer. The CSA and thickness were measured for the AbH, flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and flexor hallucis brevis (FHB), and also the thickness for the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions. A convenience sample of 40 feet, 20 with HV and 20 without HV, was recruited from a clinical and research center. A multivariate regression analysis using linear regression was performed to evaluate the ultrasound imaging measurements (α = 0.05). Consequently, statistically significant differences were observed between the groups (P plantar fascia thickness increase in favor of the HV group. On the contrary, the FDB thickness and CSA did not show statistically significant differences (P ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, the CSA and thickness of the AbH and FHB intrinsic plantar muscles are reduced, whereas the thickness of the anterior, middle, and posterior PF portions are increased, in subjects with HV compared with those without HV.

  7. The Effects of Prolotherapy in Recreational Athletes with Plantar Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haydar Apaydın

    2018-03-01

    Results: When pre- and post-treatment values were compared; a statistically significant difference was found between the scores of visual pain scale, foot and ankle outcome score and balance coordination test (p<0.01. Conclusion: According to the results of the research, one can conclude that the application of prolotherapy provides symptomatic and functional improvement in recreational athletes with plantar fasciitis. Prolotherapy application seems to be an alternative treatment method in patients who have not been healed by conservative treatment.

  8. Posttransplantation primary cutaneous CD30 (Ki-1)-positive large-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seçkin, D; Demirhan, B; Oğuz Güleç, T; Arikan, U; Haberal, M

    2001-12-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year-old female renal transplant recipient with primary cutaneous CD30-positive large-cell lymphoma of T-cell origin. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are rarely reported in organ transplant recipients, and we believe they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous neoplastic and infectious diseases affecting this patient group.

  9. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    thosis, and intraepidermal abscesses (Figs 4.23 to 4.26). In the dermis, where the inflammatory infiltrate consists of histiocytes, lymphocytes...intraepidermal abscess . See also Figures 4.39, 4.51, 4.53, and 4.54. x24 Figure 4.26 Higher magnification of intraepidermal abscess in patient described in...patient. J Heart Lung Transplant. 1992;11:820-823. 41. Azadeh B, Samad A, Ardehali S. Histological spectrum of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to

  10. Cálculo do índice do arco plantar de staheli e a prevalência de pés planos: estudo em 100 crianças entre 5 e 9 anos de idade Calculation of staheli's plantar arch index and prevalence of flat feet: a study with 100 children aged 5-9 years

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaldo José Hernandez; Luiz Koichi Kimura; Marcos Henrique Ferreira Laraya; Edimar Fávaro

    2007-01-01

    Os autores avaliam 100 crianças normais da população geral de ambos os sexos entre 5 e 9 anos de idade com o objetivo de verificar e avaliar o chamado índice do arco plantar e a ocorrência de pé plano. A avaliação do pé plano o foi feita através da obtenção da impressão plantar e do cálculo do índice do arco plantar (IP) que estabelece a relação entre a região central e posterior dessa impressão, determinando-se um IP médio e um limite para esse tipo de pé. Concluem que o índice do arco plant...

  11. In-Shoe Plantar Pressures and Ground Reaction Forces during Overweight Adults' Overground Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Marcelo P.; Abreu, Sofia C.; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Because walking is highly recommended for prevention and treatment of obesity and some of its biomechanical aspects are not clearly understood for overweight people, we compared the absolute and normalized ground reaction forces (GRF), plantar pressures, and temporal parameters of normal-weight and overweight participants during…

  12. CRYOSURGERY FOR TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS WARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Bagus Adhi Paramitha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Minor surgery is a general surgical procedure that applied with minimally invasive procedures and short duration, done in a superficial or just the affected tissue.  This technique is normally only requires a local anaesthetic and only has minimal  risk or complications. There are many cases that could be dealt with minor surgery one is veruka. Veruka or known as cutaneous warts is a disease that is often complained in children and adults. Veruka being estimated to occur until over 10% in children and young adults. Largest incident occurred in range of age 12 to 16 years. Veruka occurs more frequently in women than men. The peak incidence occur of age 13 years on women and 14.5 years in males. Salicylic acid and cryosurgery therapy are two of the most frequently performed in the treatment of cutaneous warts. Salicylic acid is therapy  for cutaneous warts who recently had already started replaced by cryosurgery because it is relatively easy to do and faster recovery.  

  13. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Giles T S; Mills, Stuart J; Cowin, Allison J; Smith, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  14. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  15. MUC1 positive cutaneous metastasis with transepidermal elimination from a breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amalia Luna, Maria Emilia Merino, Cecilio G Alberdi, Martin C Abba, Amada Segal-Eiras, Maria Virginia Croce Center of Basic and Applied Immunological Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of La Plata, Argentina Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cutaneous metastases from internal malignancies. Generally, the neoplastic cells are located in the dermis or hypodermis, while a finding of transepidermal elimination on cutaneous metastases is exceptional. In this report we present a patient with perforating cutaneous metastases from breast cancer with mucin 1 expression. Cutaneous, bone, lung, and hepatic lesions were detected two years after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. Keywords: breast cancer, cutaneous metastasis, transepidermal elimination, MUC1

  16. A Review in Detection and Monitoring Gait Disorders Using In-Shoe Plantar Measurement Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bautista, Julian Andres; Huerta-Ruelas, Jorge Adalberto; Chaparro-Cardenas, Silvia Liliana; Hernandez-Zavala, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Gait is an important part of our life, as it affects many daily activities. Special footwear is fundamental to obtain an ergonomic gait and to extract data for analysis. The plantar foot pressure can be employed to detect many kinds of disorders, suggest improvements in treatments, rehabilitation tasks, patient monitoring, development of orthopedic devices, and other applications. In recent years, attention to this topic has grown and is reflected in many works issued in both commercial and academic groups, and has focused on the development of devices for foot plantar pressure measurement with applications in medicine, sports, and research. First works on this subject appeared around 1963 and have continuously evolved with emerging technologies. This paper reviews the reported developments in the field of footwear-embedded sensors for gait measurement, monitoring, diagnosis, and analysis in rehabilitation. Future work is proposed to improve the field of measurement of the footprint with electronic devices.

  17. AVALIAÇÃO DAS PRESSÕES PLANTARES EM DIFERENTES SITUAÇÕES POR BAROPODOMETRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia de Souza Fortaleza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate plantar pressure values obtained in the static, dynamic and during gait in healthy subjects. To this end, we evaluated 43 healthy elderly through a trail running in three situations: static, dynamic and gait. We calculated the mean and standard deviation for variables description and performed univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA to relate the assessment situation. The plantar pressure values obtained were 0.48 ± 0.16 kgf/cm2 for evaluating static, 1.45 ± 0.41 kgf/cm2 for dynamic and 1.48 ± 0.45 for Kgf/cm2 for gait. The results showed an increase in pressure and a significance when compared the pressure in static with the dynamic pressure as well as the static with the march. No differences were found when comparingthe pressures in dynamic and gait. These findings confirm that with this trail running doesn’t have different to the use of the dynamic or gait situation of to get the results.

  18. Effects of surface characteristics on the plantar shape of feet and subjects' perceived sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witana, Channa P; Goonetilleke, Ravindra S; Xiong, Shuping; Au, Emily Y L

    2009-03-01

    Orthotics and other types of shoe inserts are primarily designed to reduce injury and improve comfort. The interaction between the plantar surface of the foot and the load-bearing surface contributes to foot and surface deformations and hence to perceived comfort, discomfort or pain. The plantar shapes of 16 participants' feet were captured when standing on three support surfaces that had different cushioning properties in the mid-foot region. Foot shape deformations were quantified using 3D laser scans. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the participant's perceptions of perceived shape and perceived feeling. The results showed that the structure in the mid-foot could change shape, independent of the rear-foot and forefoot regions. Participants were capable of identifying the shape changes with distinct preferences towards certain shapes. The cushioning properties of the mid-foot materials also have a direct influence on perceived feelings. This research has strong implications for the design and material selection of orthotics, insoles and footwear.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of suture locations of the distal plantar fascia in partial foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Chao; Wang, Li-Zhen; Mo, Zhong-Jun; Chen, Wei; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the rationality of the suture locations of distal plantar fascia (DPF) after foot amputation to avoid the risk factors of re-amputation or plantar fasciitis. The tensile strain of plantar fascia (PF) in the different regions was measured by uni-axial tensile experiment. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model was also developed to simulate tensile behaviour of PF in weight bearing conditions. The model includes 12 bones, ligaments, PF, cartilage and soft tissues. Four suture location models for the DPF were considered: the fourth and fifth DPF were sutured on the third metatarsal, the cuboid, and both the third metatarsal and the cuboid, and one un-sutured model. The peak tensile strain of the first, second and third PF was 0.134, 0.128 and 0.138 based on the mechanical test, respectively. The fourth and fifth DPF sutured at the cuboid and the third metatarsal could offer more favourable outcomes. The peak strain of 4.859 × 10(-2), 2.347 × 10(-2) and 1.364 × 10(-2) in the first, second and third PF showed the least outcomes in stance phase. Also, peak strain and stress of the residual PF reduced to 4.859 × 10(-2) and 1.834 MPa, respectively. The stress region was redistributed on the mid-shaft of the first and third PF and the peak stress of medial cuneiform bone evidently decreased. The fourth and fifth DPF suture at the third metatarsal and cuboid was appropriate for the partial foot. The findings are expected to suggest optimal surgical plan of the DPF suture and guide further therapeutic planning of partial foot patients.

  20. Primary cutaneous malignancies in the Northern Cape Province of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. A total of 4 270 biopsies (13 cutaneous malignancies) were identified. The commonest was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), followed by basal cell carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and basosquamous carcinoma, in descending order. The odds of a white male developing ...

  1. Cutaneous Aspergillosis at the site of ulceration from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Fumiko; Okabe, Tomohiro.

    1979-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman with cutaneous aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus nidulans was observed. The infection developed at the site of ulceration from radiation, which occurred after operation and radiotherapy for breast cancer. In cases of cutaneous aspergillosis, saprophytic lesions can be seen. (Nishio, M.)

  2. Technique Tip: The Use of McGlamry Elevator to Assist Suture Passing in the Dorsal Technique of Plantar Plate Repair With Weil Osteotomy for Lesser Metatarsophalangeal Joint Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Martin; Panti, Juan Paulo

    2015-06-01

    The combination of a dorsal approach to the plantar plate with a Weil's metatarsal osteotomy has been shown to provide an adequate exposure for plantar plate repair. However, soft tissues in a restricted area of the metatarsophalangeal joint could present as a technical difficulty during suture retrieval during repair of the plantar plate. The purpose of this article is to describe the use of the McGlamry elevator for assistance in the retrieval of sutures through the proximal phalanx. Level V: Expert opinion. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome presenting a primary sternal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Carlos A.; Leani, Marcelo J.; Rieu, Juan; Serrano, Santiago O.; Dettano, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    SAPHO syndrome-acronym for synovitis, acne, pustules, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a nosological entity including multiple affections with cutaneous and osteoarticular involvement. We report the case of a 59 years old female patient that consulted due to an acute sternal pain. After some months the patient showed a palm-plantar pustular exanthem, acne and fever. SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed based on a CT, an osseous gammagraphy and a biopsy of cutaneous lesions. The current actual tendency is to consider the SAPHO syndrome as a seronegative arthropathy with a similar pathophysiology to Reiter's syndrome. (author)

  4. Equine cutaneous pythiosis: a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Headley Selwyn Arlington

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous pythiosis is described in four horses in Northern Paraná, Brazil. All animals presented ulcerative, granulomatous, cutaneous lesions that did not invade adjacent muscular tissues. Histopathological evaluations revealed eosinophilic granulomatous reactions associated with intralesional hyphae suggestive of Pythium insidiosum observed at the margins of coagula. P. insidiosum hyphae were visualized by Gomori’s methenamine silver stain.

  5. Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basko-Plluska, Juliana L; Thyssen, Jacob P; Schalock, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    ) following the insertion of intravascular stents, dental implants, cardiac pacemakers, or implanted gynecologic devices. Despite repeated attempts by researchers and clinicians to further understand this difficult area of medicine, the association between metal sensitivity and cutaneous allergic reactions......Cutaneous reactions to metal implants, orthopedic or otherwise, are well documented in the literature. The first case of a dermatitis reaction over a stainless steel fracture plate was described in 1966. Most skin reactions are eczematous and allergic in nature, although urticarial, bullous......, and vasculitic eruptions may occur. Also, more complex immune reactions may develop around the implants, resulting in pain, inflammation, and loosening. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium are the three most common metals that elicit both cutaneous and extracutaneous allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure...

  6. Cutaneous Presentation of Mesothelioma With a Sarcomatoid Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanov, Nikolai; Reddy, Bobby Y; Husain, Sameera; Silvers, David N; Grossman, Marc E; Tsao, Hensin

    2018-05-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare neoplasm of mesodermal origin. Cutaneous involvement of malignant pleural mesothelioma is a very rare entity, with only 11 cases reported in the literature. Here, we describe the case of a 75-year-old man with stage IV epithelioid pleural mesothelioma, presenting with a cutaneous eruption 5 months after initial diagnosis, which revealed sarcomatoid features on skin biopsy. Histological analysis of malignancy progression through immunohistochemical staining of the pleural, lymph node, and skin tissue revealed gradual loss of calretinin and gain of desmin, supporting a transformation from epithelioid to sarcomatoid tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an epithelioid to sarcomatoid transformation of malignant pleural mesothelioma manifesting in a cutaneous presentation.

  7. Stenosing Tenosynovitis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Associated with the Plantar Capsular Accessory Ossicle at the Interphalangeal Joint of the Great Toe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ho Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of stenosing tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with the plantar capsular accessory ossicle at the interphalangeal joint of the great toe, which was confirmed by intraoperative observation and was successfully treated with surgical resection of the ossicle. As the plantar capsular accessory ossicle was not visible radiographically due to the lack of ossification, ultrasonography was helpful for diagnosing this disorder.

  8. The First Year of the AEVD Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñate, Y; Servitje, O; Machan, S; Fernández-de-Misa, R; Estrach, M T; Acebo, E; Mitxelena, J; Ramón, M D; Flórez, A; Blanes, M; Morillo, M; Medina, S; Bassas, J; Zayas, A; Espinosa, P; Pérez, A; Gónzalez-Romero, N; Domínguez, J D; Muniesa, C; López Robles, J; Combalia, A; Yanguas, I; Suh, H; Polo-Rodríguez, I; Bielsa, I; Mateu, A; Ferrer, B; Descalzo, M A; García-Doval, I; Ortiz-Romero, P L

    2018-04-18

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. This article describes the Primary Cutaneous Lymphoma Registry of the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) and reports on the results from the first year. Disease registry for patients with primary cutaneous lymphoma. The participating hospitals prospectively recorded data on diagnosis, treatment, tests, and disease stage for all patients with primary cutaneous lymphoma. A descriptive analysis was performed. In December 2017, the registry contained data on 639 patients (60% male) from 16 university hospitals. The most common diagnoses, in order of frequency, were mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) (348 cases, 55%), primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL) (184 cases, 29%), primary cutaneous CD30 + T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (CD30 + CLPD) (70 cases, 11%), and other types of T-cell lymphoma (37 cases, 5%). In total, 105 (16.5%) of the cases recorded were incident cases. The most common diagnosis in the MF/SS group was classic MF (7