WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant-pathogenic bacterium erwinia

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an Endophytic Bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with Antimicrobial Activity for the Plant Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an Endophytic Bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with Antimicrobial Activity for the Plant Pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism. PMID:21317323

  3. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis BSn5, an endophytic bacterium of Amorphophallus konjac with antimicrobial activity for the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yun; Zhu, Yiguang; Wang, Pengxia; Zhu, Lei; Zheng, Jinshui; Li, Rong; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2011-04-01

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis strain BSn5, isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli tissue and showing strong inhibitory activity to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, which causes Amorphophallus soft rot disease and affects the industry development of this organism.

  4. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection and identification of plant pathogenic bacteria (in particular for Erwinia amylovora and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokoskova, Blanka; Janse, Jaap D

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the most commonly used serological diagnostic technique. A number of different ELISA formats can be used for the detection of bacterial plant pathogens and in particular Erwinia amylovora and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora strain ATCC 49946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora causes the economically important disease fire blight that affects rosaceous plants, especially pear and apple. Here we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of strain ATCC 49946. The analysis of the sequence and its comparison with sequenced genomes of closely related...

  6. Phenotypic variation in the plant pathogenic bacterium Acidovorax citrulli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Kumar Shrestha

    Full Text Available Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic

  7. Dickeya dadantii, a plant pathogenic bacterium producing Cyt-like entomotoxins, causes septicemia in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Costechareyre

    Full Text Available Dickeya dadantii (syn. Erwinia chrysanthemi is a plant pathogenic bacteria that harbours a cluster of four horizontally-transferred, insect-specific toxin genes. It was recently shown to be capable of causing an acute infection in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Insecta: Hemiptera. The infection route of the pathogen, and the role and in vivo expression pattern of these toxins, remain unknown. Using bacterial numeration and immunolocalization, we investigated the kinetics and the pattern of infection of this phytopathogenic bacterium within its insect host. We compared infection by the wild-type strain and by the Cyt toxin-deficient mutant. D. dadantii was found to form dense clusters in many luminal parts of the aphid intestinal tract, including the stomach, from which it invaded internal tissues as early as day 1 post-infection. Septicemia occurred soon after, with the fat body being the main infected tissue, together with numerous early infections of the embryonic chains showing embryonic gut and fat body as the target organs. Generalized septicemia led to insect death when the bacterial load reached about 10(8 cfu. Some individual aphids regularly escaped infection, indicating an effective partial immune response to this bacteria. Cyt-defective mutants killed insects more slowly but were capable of localisation in any type of tissue. Cyt toxin expression appeared to be restricted to the digestive tract where it probably assisted in crossing over the first cell barrier and, thus, accelerating bacterial diffusion into the aphid haemocel. Finally, the presence of bacteria on the surface of leaves hosting infected aphids indicated that the insects could be vectors of the bacteria.

  8. Characterization of a cfr-Carrying Plasmid from Porcine Escherichia coli That Closely Resembles Plasmid pEA3 from the Plant Pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongmin; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yang; Lei, Lei; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2015-11-02

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in two porcine Escherichia coli isolates, one harboring it on the conjugative 33,885-bp plasmid pFSEC-01, the other harboring it in the chromosomal DNA. Sequence analysis of pFSEC-01 revealed that a 6,769-bp fragment containing the cfr gene bracketed by two IS26 elements was inserted into a plasmid closely related to pEA3 from the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, suggesting that pFSEC-01 may be transferred between different bacterial genera of both animal and plant origin.

  9. Sexual transmission of a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between conspecific insect vectors during mating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae. The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB, one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4% during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees.

  10. The genome of Erwinia tasmaniensis strain Et1/99, a non-pathogenic bacterium in the genus Erwinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kube, Michael; Migdoll, Alexander Michael; Müller, Ines; Kuhl, Heiner; Beck, Alfred; Reinhardt, Richard; Geider, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    The complete genome of the bacterium Erwinia tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 consisting of a 3.9 Mb circular chromosome and five plasmids was sequenced. Strain Et1/99 represents an epiphytic plant bacterium related to Erwinia amylovora and E. pyrifoliae, which are responsible for the important plant diseases fire blight and Asian pear shoot blight, respectively. Strain Et1/99 is a non-pathogenic bacterium and is thought to compete with these and other bacteria when occupying the same habitat during initial colonization. Genome analysis revealed tools for colonization, cellular communication and defence modulation, as well as genes coding for the synthesis of levan and a not detected capsular exopolysaccharide. Strain Et1/99 may secrete indole-3-acetic acid to increase availability of nutrients provided on plant surfaces. These nutrients are subsequently accessed and metabolized. Secretion systems include the hypersensitive response type III pathway present in many pathogens. Differences or missing parts within the virulence-related factors distinguish strain Et1/99 from pathogens such as Pectobacterium atrosepticum and the related Erwinia spp. Strain Et1/99 completely lacks the sorbitol operon, which may also affect its inability to invade fire blight host plants. Erwinia amylovora in contrast depends for virulence on utilization of sorbitol, the dominant carbohydrate in rosaceous plants. The presence of other virulence-associated factors in strain Et1/99 indicates the ancestral genomic background of many plant-associated bacteria.

  11. Genomics of iron acquisition in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora: insights in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore desferrioxamine E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-10-01

    Genomics has clarified the biosynthetic pathway for desferrioxamine E critical for iron acquisition in the enterobacterial fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Evidence for each of the individual steps and the role of desferrioxamine E biosynthesis in pathogen virulence and cell protection from host defenses is presented. Using comparative genomics, it can be concluded that desferrioxamine biosynthesis is ancestral within the genera Erwinia and Pantoea.

  12. The use of fluorescent probes to assess viability of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Breeuwer, P.; Abee, T.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Determination of the viability of bacteria by the conventional plating technique is a time-consuming process. Methods based on enzyme activity or membrane integrity are much faster and may be good alternatives. Assessment of the viability of suspensions of the plant pathogenic bacterium Clavibacter

  13. Host-extract induced changes in the secretome of the plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinen, Laura; Nissinen, Riitta; Riipi, Tero; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Pirhonen, Minna

    2007-10-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacterium that causes rotting in potato stems and tubers. The secreted proteins of this pathogen were analyzed with proteomics from culture supernatant of cells grown in minimal medium supplemented with host extracts. More than 40 proteins were identified, among them known virulence determinants, such as pectic enzymes, metalloprotease, and virulence protein Svx, along with flagella proteins, GroEL and cyclophilin-type chaperones and several hypothetical proteins or proteins with unknown function. Some of the identified proteins may be involved in utilization of nutrients or transport of minerals. Northern and real-time RT-PCR analyses suggested that most of the proteins upregulated by plant extract were transcriptionally regulated. Among the identified proteins were VgrG and four homologs of hemolysin-coregulated proteins (Hcps). A mutant strain lacking one of the hcp genes was not affected in virulence, while a bacterial strain overexpressing the same gene was shown to have increased virulence, which suggests that these proteins may be new virulence determinants of P. atrosepticum. Comparison of the secretomes of wild type cells and hrcC mutant defective in Type III secretion suggested that the production of the identified proteins was independent of functional Type III secretion system.

  14. Blocking the Transmission of a Noncirculative Vector-Borne Plant Pathogenic Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labroussaa, Fabien; Zeilinger, Adam R; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2016-07-01

    The successful control of insect-borne plant pathogens is often difficult to achieve due to the ecologically complex interactions among pathogens, vectors, and host plants. Disease management often relies on pesticides and other approaches that have limited long-term sustainability. To add a new tool to control vector-borne diseases, we attempted to block the transmission of a bacterial insect-transmitted pathogen, the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, by disrupting bacteria-insect vector interactions. X. fastidiosa is known to attach to and colonize the cuticular surface of the mouthparts of vectors; a set of recombinant peptides was generated and the chemical affinities of these peptides to chitin and related carbohydrates was assayed in vitro. Two candidates, the X. fastidiosa hypothetical protein PD1764 and an N-terminal region of the hemagglutinin-like protein B (HxfB) showed affinity for these substrates. These proteins were provided to vectors via an artificial diet system in which insects acquire X. fastidiosa, followed by an inoculation access period on plants under greenhouse conditions. Both PD1764 and HxfAD1-3 significantly blocked transmission. Furthermore, bacterial populations within insects over a 10-day period demonstrated that these peptides inhibited cell adhesion to vectors but not bacterial multiplication, indicating that the mode of action of these peptides is restricted to limiting cell adhesion to insects, likely via competition for adhesion sites. These results open a new venue in the search for sustainable disease-control strategies that are pathogen specific and may have limited nontarget effects.

  15. Fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) of rosaceous plants. Pathogen virulence and selection and characterization of biological control agents

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrefiga Olamendi, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    El fuego bacteriano, causado por Erwinia amylovora, es una enfermedad muy importante a nivel comercial y económico porque afecta a plantas de la familia de las rosáceas y es especialmente agresiva en manzano (Pyrus malus) y peral (Pyrus communis), así como en plantas ornamentales (Crataegus, Cotoneaster o Pyracantha). Esta enfermedad está distribuida por todo el mundo en zonas climáticas templadas de Amércia del Norte, Nueva Zelanda, Japón, Israel, Turquí y Europa. En España, el fuego bacter...

  16. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae DSM 12163T and comparative genomic insights into plant pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erwinia pyrifoliae is a newly described necrotrophic pathogen, which causes fire blight on Asian (Nashi pear and is geographically restricted to Eastern Asia. Relatively little is known about its genetics compared to the closely related main fire blight pathogen E. amylovora. Results The genome of the type strain of E. pyrifoliae strain DSM 12163T, was sequenced using both 454 and Solexa pyrosequencing and annotated. The genome contains a circular chromosome of 4.026 Mb and four small plasmids. Based on their respective role in virulence in E. amylovora or related organisms, we identified several putative virulence factors, including type III and type VI secretion systems and their effectors, flagellar genes, sorbitol metabolism, iron uptake determinants, and quorum-sensing components. A deletion in the rpoS gene covering the most conserved region of the protein was identified which may contribute to the difference in virulence/host-range compared to E. amylovora. Comparative genomics with the pome fruit epiphyte Erwinia tasmaniensis Et1/99 showed that both species are overall highly similar, although specific differences were identified, for example the presence of some phage gene-containing regions and a high number of putative genomic islands containing transposases in the E. pyrifoliae DSM 12163T genome. Conclusions The E. pyrifoliae genome is an important addition to the published genome of E. tasmaniensis and the unfinished genome of E. amylovora providing a foundation for re-sequencing additional strains that may shed light on the evolution of the host-range and virulence/pathogenicity of this important group of plant-associated bacteria.

  17. Characterisation of the stbD/E toxin-antitoxin system of pEP36, a plasmid of the plant pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Hailer, Barbara; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Rozhon, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    pEP36 is a plasmid ubiquitously present in Erwinia pyrifoliae, a pathogen which causes black stem blight of Asian pear. pEP36 is highly stable in its host, even in the absence of selective pressure. The plasmid is closely related to pEA29, which is widespread in E. amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight of apple and pear trees. Here we report that pEP36 possesses a functional hybrid toxin-antitoxin module, stbD/E(pEP36), with the toxin showing homology to the RelE/ParE proteins and the antidote belonging to the Phd/YefM antitoxin family. Bacteria expressing the StbE(pEP36) toxin arrest cell growth and enter a viable but non-culturable stage. However, they maintain their typical cell length and do not show filamentation. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that StbE(pEP36) acts as a global inhibitor of protein synthesis while it does not interfere with DNA and RNA synthesis. The StbD(pEP36) antitoxin is capable of neutralising StbE(pEP36) toxicity. Additional experiments show that the stbD/E(pEP36) module can stabilise plasmids at least 20-fold. Thus the toxin-antitoxin system may contribute to the remarkable stability of pEP36.

  18. Microbial conversion of tomato by a plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum: a plant-microbial approach to control pathogenic Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kang, Sun Chul; Lee, Soon-Gu; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to produce bioconverted products by microbial fermentation of tomato using a plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum and to evaluate their in vitro antimycotic effect against pathogenic Candida species. The bioconverted products (500 microg/disc) provoked promising antimycotic effects against pathogenic isolates of Candida species as shown by the diameters of zones of inhibition (9 +/- 0.6 to 14 +/- 0.4 mm), along with their respective minimum inhibitory and minimum fungicidal concentration values, which increased from 250 to 1000 and 250 to 2000 microg/mL, respectively. With the viable counts of the tested fungal pathogens, exposure of the bioconverted products revealed a remarkable antimycotic effect. In addition, the morphology of a clinical isolate of C. glabrata KBN06P00368, visualized by scanning electron microscopy, showed a severe detrimental effect produced by the bioconverted products at the minimum inhibitory concentration (250 microg/mL). The bioconverted products significantly inhibited the in vitro growth of all the tested clinical and pathogenic laboratory isolates of Candida species. This study confirmed the potent antimycotic efficacy of the bioconverted products of tomato, hence justifying the therapeutic uses of bioconverted products in pharmaceutical preparations as an alternative approach to support the antifungal activity of conventional antimycotics.

  19. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  20. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Tran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  1. Analysis of the genome-wide variations among multiple strains of the plant pathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative, xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is responsible for causing economically important diseases in grapevine, citrus and many other plant species. Despite its economic impact, relatively little is known about the genomic variations among strains isolated from different hosts and their influence on the population genetics of this pathogen. With the availability of genome sequence information for four strains, it is now possible to perform genome-wide analyses to identify and categorize such DNA variations and to understand their influence on strain functional divergence. Results There are 1,579 genes and 194 non-coding homologous sequences present in the genomes of all four strains, representing a 76. 2% conservation of the sequenced genome. About 60% of the X. fastidiosa unique sequences exist as tandem gene clusters of 6 or more genes. Multiple alignments identified 12,754 SNPs and 14,449 INDELs in the 1528 common genes and 20,779 SNPs and 10,075 INDELs in the 194 non-coding sequences. The average SNP frequency was 1.08 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA and the average INDEL frequency was 2.06 × 10-2 per base pair of DNA. On an average, 60.33% of the SNPs were synonymous type while 39.67% were non-synonymous type. The mutation frequency, primarily in the form of external INDELs was the main type of sequence variation. The relative similarity between the strains was discussed according to the INDEL and SNP differences. The number of genes unique to each strain were 60 (9a5c, 54 (Dixon, 83 (Ann1 and 9 (Temecula-1. A sub-set of the strain specific genes showed significant differences in terms of their codon usage and GC composition from the native genes suggesting their xenologous origin. Tandem repeat analysis of the genomic sequences of the four strains identified associations of repeat sequences with hypothetical and phage related functions. Conclusion INDELs and strain specific genes

  2. 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola', a coevolved symbiotic bacterium of the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, Caterina; Firrao, Giuseppe; Mazzon, Luca; Squartini, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2005-07-01

    The taxonomic identity of the hereditary prokaryotic symbiont of the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) was investigated. In order to avoid superficial microbial contaminants and loosely associated saprophytic biota, flies were surface-sterilized at the larval stage and reared under aseptic conditions until adult emergence. B. oleae flies originating from different geographical locations and collected at different times of the year were tested. Bacterial isolation was undertaken from the cephalic oesophageal bulb, which is known to be a specific site of accumulation for the hosted microsymbionts in the adult insect. Despite evidence of multiplication cycles taking place within the insect, attempts at cultivation of the isolated bacteria ex situ were not productive at any stage, leading to the choice of unculturable status definition. PCR amplification and nucleotide sequencing of the entire 16S rRNA gene consistently yielded a single sequence that displayed marked similarity with enterobacterial lineages, with closest matches (97%) to Erwinia persicina and Erwinia rhapontici. The novel taxon differs from common intestinal bacterial species of fruit flies and from instances of culturable bacteria previously described in B. oleae raised without sterility precautions, which we also observed as minority occupants or occasional contaminants. The symbiont's identity is also distinct from Pseudomonas savastanoi. In all observations, the numerically dominant inhabitant of the olive fly oesophageal organ was the same unculturable organism, whose presence at later stages was also regularly observed in the midgut. A novel species is proposed, by virtue of its unique properties, under the designation 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola'.

  3. Erwinia tasmaniensis sp. nov., a non-phytopathogenic bacterium from apple and pear trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geider, Klaus; Auling, Georg; Du, Zhiqiang; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Jock, Susanne; Völksch, Beate

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from flowers and bark of apple and pear trees at three places in Australia. In Victoria, Tasmania and Queensland, strains with white colonies on nutrient agar were screened for dome-shaped colony morphology on agar with sucrose and were found to be closely related by several criteria. The isolates were not pathogenic on apples or pears. They were characterized by a polyphasic approach including microbiological and API assays as well as fatty acid methyl ester analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and DNA sequencing. For molecular classification, the 16S rRNA cistron and the conserved genes gpd and recA of these bacteria were investigated. Together with other taxonomic criteria, the results of these studies indicate that the bacteria belong to a novel separate species, which we propose to name Erwinia tasmaniensis sp. nov., with the type strain Et1/99(T) (=DSM 17950(T)=NCPPB 4357(T)). From DNA-DNA hybridization kinetics, microbiological characteristics and nucleotide sequence analyses, this species is related to pathogenic Erwinia species, but also to the epiphytic species Erwinia billingiae.

  4. Cloning, purification, crystallization and 1.57 Å resolution X-ray data analysis of AmsI, the tyrosine phosphatase controlling amylovoran biosynthesis in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, Stefano; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele

    2014-12-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is a destructive pathogen of plants belonging to the Rosaceae family. Amongst its pathogenicity factors, E. amylovora produces the exopolysaccharide amylovoran, which contributes to the occlusion of plant vessels, causing wilting of shoots and eventually resulting in plant death. Amylovoran biosynthesis requires the presence of 12 genes (from amsA to amsL) clustered in the ams region of the E. amylovora genome. They mostly encode glycosyl transferases (AmsG, AmsB, AmsD, AmsE, AmsJ and AmsK), proteins involved in amylovoran translocation and assembly (AmsH, AmsL and AmsC), and also a tyrosine kinase (AmsA) and a tyrosine phosphatase (AmsI), which are both involved in the regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis. The low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase AmsI was overexpressed as a His6-tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.57 Å in space group P3121.

  5. Type III-Dependent Translocation of HrpB2 by a Nonpathogenic hpaABC Mutant of the Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, Felix; Schulz, Steve; Hausner, Jens; Marillonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria employs a type III secretion (T3S) system to translocate effector proteins into plant cells. The T3S apparatus spans both bacterial membranes and is associated with an extracellular pilus and a channel-like translocon in the host plasma membrane. T3S is controlled by the switch protein HpaC, which suppresses secretion and translocation of the predicted inner rod protein HrpB2 and promotes secretion of translocon and effector proteins. We previously reported that HrpB2 interacts with HpaC and the cytoplasmic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU (C. Lorenz, S. Schulz, T. Wolsch, O. Rossier, U. Bonas, and D. Büttner, PLoS Pathog 4:e1000094, 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000094). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the control of HrpB2 secretion are not yet understood. Here, we located a T3S and translocation signal in the N-terminal 40 amino acids of HrpB2. The results of complementation experiments with HrpB2 deletion derivatives revealed that the T3S signal of HrpB2 is essential for protein function. Furthermore, interaction studies showed that the N-terminal region of HrpB2 interacts with the cytoplasmic domain of HrcU, suggesting that the T3S signal of HrpB2 contributes to substrate docking. Translocation of HrpB2 is suppressed not only by HpaC but also by the T3S chaperone HpaB and its secreted regulator, HpaA. Deletion of hpaA, hpaB, and hpaC leads to a loss of pathogenicity but allows the translocation of fusion proteins between the HrpB2 T3S signal and effector proteins into leaves of host and non-host plants. IMPORTANCE The T3S system of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria is essential for pathogenicity and delivers effector proteins into plant cells. T3S depends on HrpB2, which is a component of the predicted periplasmic inner rod structure of the secretion apparatus. HrpB2 is secreted during the early stages of the

  6. Isolation and characterization of aniline degradation slightly halophilic bacterium, Erwinia sp. Strain HSA 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Jin, Zexin; Yu, Binbin

    2010-07-20

    The isolated strain HSA6 is classified as Erwinia amylovora based on 16S rDNA sequence and the morphological and physiological properties. Strain HSA6 is the first reported E. amylovora in pure culture growing with aniline as sole electron donor and carbon source. The suitable pH for strain HSA6 is wide (from 5 to 11). Strain HSA6 is slightly halophilic with growth occurring at 0-10% (v/v) NaCl, and the suitable NaCl concentration for strain HSA6 is from 0% to 6%. The number of bacteria appeared to decrease with an increase in aniline concentration. The number of bacteria appeared to be constant as the wastewater concentration increased from 0% to 20%. However, the number of cells decreased with an increase in wastewater concentration from 30% to 50% and grew very slowly at 50%. The degradation rate of aniline was 100% at 0.5% aniline concentration after 24 h culture. The degradation rate of aniline was found to descend as the concentration of aniline increased from 0.5% to 3% and rose as the culture time increased. Strain HSA6 contains a plasmid with molecular weight higher than 42 kDA. Plasmid curing test and quantitative degradation test showed that strain requires the plasmid for aniline degradation. The gene cluster degrading aniline was determined in the plasmid by PCR amplification.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Japanese erwinia strain ejp617, a bacterial shoot blight pathogen of pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Duck Hwan; Thapa, Shree Prasad; Choi, Beom-Soon; Kim, Won-Sik; Hur, Jang Hyun; Cho, Jun Mo; Lim, Jong-Sung; Choi, Ik-Young; Lim, Chun Keun

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Erwinia strain Ejp617 is a plant pathogen that causes bacterial shoot blight of pear in Japan. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain Ejp617 isolated from Nashi pears in Japan to provide further valuable insight among related Erwinia species.

  8. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  9. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  10. Comparative genomics of Japanese Erwinia pyrifoliae strain Ejp617 with closely related erwinias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Shree P; Park, Duck H; Kim, Won S; Choi, Beom S; Lim, Jong S; Choi, Ik Y; Hur, Jang H; Lim, Chun K

    2013-02-01

    Japanese Erwinia pyrifoliae strains cause bacterial shoot blight of pear (BSBP) in Japan. The genetics of Japanese Erwinia remains largely unknown relative to the abundant genomic information available for other Erwinia strains. We compared the genome of Japanese and Korean E. pyrifoliae strains along with those of E. amylovora and E. tasmaniensis. Comparisons with the Korean E. pyrifoliae strain revealed numerous gene insertions/deletions, rearrangements, and inversions in the central regions of the chromosomes. Approximately 80% (2843) of coding DNA sequences (CDSs) are shared by these two genomes which represent about three-quarters of the genome, and there are about 20% unique CDSs. Comparative analysis with closely related erwinias showed that 1942 (more than 50%) core open reading frames (ORF) are shared by all these strains. In addition to two type III secretion systems (hrp/dsp and inv/spa), the genome of Ejp617 encodes numerous virulence factors, including a type VI secretion system, an exopolysaccharide synthesis cluster, and another protein secretion system present in plant pathogenic Erwinia strains. The availability of whole genome sequence should provide a resource to further improve the understanding of pathogenesis in Japanese E. pyrifoliae Ejp617 and to facilitate evolutionary studies among the species of the genus Erwinia.

  11. Erwinia chrysanthemi: pectolytic bacterium causing soft rot outbreaks of arracacha in Brazil Erwinia chrysanthemi: bactéria pectolítica envolvida na "mela" da mandioquinha-salsa no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Paulo Henz

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objetive of this work was to identify the pectolytic bacteria associated with soft rot of arracacha roots in Brazil. From 1998 to 2001, 227 isolates of Erwinia spp. were obtained from arracacha roots and identified by biochemical and physiological tests (pectolytic activity, lecithinase, a-methyl glucoside, phosphatase, erythromycin sensivity, growth at 37ºC. Of these isolates, 89.9% were identified as E. chrysanthemi (Ech, 9.7% as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc and 0.5% as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica. The identity of seventeen out of twenty representative isolates of Ech and Ecc was confirmed by PCR (primers '149f', 'L1r', 'ADE1', 'ADE2'.O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar as bactérias pectolíticas envolvidas na podridão-mole de raízes de mandioquinha-salsa no Brasil. De 1998 a 2001, 227 isolados de Erwinia spp. foram obtidos de raízes de mandioquinha-salsa e identificados por testes bioquímicos e fisiológicos (atividade pectolítica, lecitinase, a-methyl glucosídeo, fosfatase, sensibilidade à eritromicina, crescimento a 37ºC. Destes isolados, 89,9% foram identificados como E. chrysanthemi (Ech, 9,7% como E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc e somente 0,5% como E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica. A identidade de 20 isolados representativos de Ech e Ecc foi confirmada por PCR (primers '149f', 'L1r', 'ADE1', 'ADE2', com exceção de dois isolados de Ech e um de Ecc.

  12. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ordax

    Full Text Available Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae, one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle.

  13. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E; Santander, Ricardo D; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G; López, María M; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle.

  14. CLONIG AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NEW ICE NUCLEATION ACTIVEGENE FROM ICE NUCLEATION ACTIVE BACTERIUM ERWINIA ANANAS 110%冰核细菌(Erwinia ananas 110)冰核基因克隆和序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐朝荣; 孙福在; 赵廷昌; 李瑞峰

    2002-01-01

    从作者自行分离的冰核细菌(Erwinia ananas110)中克隆到我国第1个细菌冰核基因,并完成其序列测定和分析.所克隆基因编码区全长3921bp,编码1306aa,氨基酸序列明显分为3个区即N-端(161aa)、C-端(41aa)的单一序列区和中部的高度重复序列R区(1104aa),以16氨基酸为重复单元的R区占整个编码序列的84.5%.序列分析表明我们所克隆的基因为一个新冰核基因,将其命名为iceA,该基因已在GenBank上登录,登录号为:AF387802.

  15. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  16. Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi is used with other chemotherapy medications to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL; a type of cancer ... of allergic reactions to medications similar to asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi such as (asparaginase [Elspar] or pegaspargase [Oncaspar]). ...

  17. Evolutionary insights from Erwinia amylovora genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion

    2011-08-20

    Evolutionary genomics is coming into focus with the recent availability of complete sequences for many bacterial species. A hypothesis on the evolution of virulence factors in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, was generated using comparative genomics with the genomes E. amylovora, Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia tasmaniensis. Putative virulence factors were mapped to the proposed genealogy of the genus Erwinia that is based on phylogenetic and genomic data. Ancestral origin of several virulence factors was identified, including levan biosynthesis, sorbitol metabolism, three T3SS and two T6SS. Other factors appeared to have been acquired after divergence of pathogenic species, including a second flagellar gene and two glycosyltransferases involved in amylovoran biosynthesis. E. amylovora singletons include 3 unique T3SS effectors that may explain differential virulence/host ranges. E. amylovora also has a unique T1SS export system, and a unique third T6SS gene cluster. Genetic analysis revealed signatures of foreign DNA suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is responsible for some of these differential features between the three species.

  18. The alternative sigma factor HrpL negatively modulates the flagellar system in the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora under hrp-inducing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesbron, Sophie; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Tharaud, Michel; Barny, Marie-Anne; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2006-04-01

    In this work we present evidence of an opposite regulation in the phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora between the virulence-associated Type III secretion system (TTSS) and the flagellar system. Using loss-of-function mutants we show that motility enhanced the virulence of wild-type bacteria relative to a nonmotile mutant when sprayed on apple seedlings with unwounded leaves. Then we demonstrated through analyses of motility, flagellin export and visualization of flagellar filament that HrpL, the positive key regulator of the TTSS, also down-regulates the flagellar system. Such a dual regulation mediated by an alternative sigma factor of the TTSS appears to be a level of regulation between virulence and motility not yet described among Proteobacteria.

  19. Expression of Exogenous Gene in Bacterium Erwinia uredovora%外源基因在噬夏孢欧文氏菌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪靖超; 赵驰; 王波; 杨宏; 李荣贵

    2005-01-01

    用CaCl2法制备噬夏孢欧文氏菌(Erwinia uredovora)感受态细胞,热激处理可使质粒pACYC184转入噬夏孢欧文氏菌细胞,转化率为656 cfu/μg DNA,转入的质粒可以在细胞中稳定存在,并随着细胞分裂而复制,质粒上的氯霉素抗性基因在其启动子的控制下能够高效表达,氯霉素乙酰转移酶可达噬夏孢欧文氏菌菌体总蛋白的30.26%.噬夏孢欧文氏菌可以作为一种新的原核表达系统.

  20. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important for the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread.

  1. Ecological niche of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Fodor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease ecology is a new approach to the understanding of the spread and dynamics of pathogens in natural and man-made environments. Defining and describing the ecological niche of the pathogens is one of the major tasks for ecological theory, as well as for practitioners preoccupied with the control and forecasting of established and emerging diseases. Niche theory has been periodically revised, not including in an explicit way the pathogens. However, many progresses have been achieved in niche modeling of disease spread, but few attempts were made to construct a theoretical frame for the ecological niche of pathogens. The paper is a review of the knowledge accumulated during last decades in the niche theory of pathogens and proposes an ecological approach in research. It quest for new control methods in what concerns forest plant pathogens, with a special emphasis on fungi like organisms of the genus Phytophthora. Species of Phytophthora are the most successful plant pathogens of the moment, affecting forest and agricultural systems worldwide, many of them being invasive alien organisms in many ecosystems. The hyperspace of their ecological niche is defined by hosts, environment and human interference, as main axes. To select most important variables within the hyperspace, is important the understanding of the complex role of pathogens in the ecosystems as well as for control programs. Biotic relationships within ecosystem of host-pathogen couple are depicted by ecological network and specific metrics attached to this. The star shaped network is characterized by few high degree nodes, by short path lengths and relatively low connectivity, premises for a rapid disturbance spread. 

  2. Pathogenicity and infection strategies of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in Rosaceae: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Valcke, R

    2013-05-01

    Plants are host to a large amount of pathogenic bacteria. Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is an important disease in Rosaceae. Pathogenicity of E. amylovora is greatly influenced by the production of exopolysaccharides, such as amylovoran, and the use of the type III secretion system, which enables bacteria to penetrate host tissue and cause disease. When infection takes place, plants have to rely on the ability of each cell to recognize the pathogen and the signals emanating from the infection site in order to generate several defence mechanisms. These mechanisms consist of physical barriers and the production of antimicrobial components, both in a preformed and an inducible manner. Inducible defence responses are activated upon the recognition of elicitor molecules by plant cell receptors, either derived from invading micro-organisms or from pathogen-induced degradation of plant tissue. This recognition event triggers a signal transduction cascade, leading to a range of defence responses [reactive oxygen species (ROS), plant hormones, secondary metabolites, …] and redeployment of cellular energy in a fast, efficient and multiresponsive manner, which prevents further pathogen ingress. This review highlights the research that has been performed during recent years regarding this specific plant-pathogen interaction between Erwinia amylovora and Rosaceae, with a special emphasis on the pathogenicity and the infection strategy of E. amylovora and the possible defence mechanisms of the plant against this disease.

  3. Erwinia amylovora novel plasmid pEI70: complete sequence, biogeography, and role in aggressiveness in the fire blight phytopathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Llop

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics of several strains of Erwinia amylovora, a plant pathogenic bacterium causal agent of fire blight disease, revealed that its diversity is primarily attributable to the flexible genome comprised of plasmids. We recently identified and sequenced in full a novel 65.8 kb plasmid, called pEI70. Annotation revealed a lack of known virulence-related genes, but found evidence for a unique integrative conjugative element related to that of other plant and human pathogens. Comparative analyses using BLASTN showed that pEI70 is almost entirely included in plasmid pEB102 from E. billingiae, an epiphytic Erwinia of pome fruits, with sequence identities superior to 98%. A duplex PCR assay was developed to survey the prevalence of plasmid pEI70 and also that of pEA29, which had previously been described in several E. amylovora strains. Plasmid pEI70 was found widely dispersed across Europe with frequencies of 5-92%, but it was absent in E. amylovora analyzed populations from outside of Europe. Restriction analysis and hybridization demonstrated that this plasmid was identical in at least 13 strains. Curing E. amylovora strains of pEI70 reduced their aggressiveness on pear, and introducing pEI70 into low-aggressiveness strains lacking this plasmid increased symptoms development in this host. Discovery of this novel plasmid offers new insights into the biogeography, evolution and virulence determinants in E. amylovora.

  4. Erwinia amylovora novel plasmid pEI70: complete sequence, biogeography, and role in aggressiveness in the fire blight phytopathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Pablo; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Smits, Theo H M; Dreo, Tanja; Barbé, Silvia; Pulawska, Joanna; Bultreys, Alain; Blom, Jochen; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio; López, María M

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of several strains of Erwinia amylovora, a plant pathogenic bacterium causal agent of fire blight disease, revealed that its diversity is primarily attributable to the flexible genome comprised of plasmids. We recently identified and sequenced in full a novel 65.8 kb plasmid, called pEI70. Annotation revealed a lack of known virulence-related genes, but found evidence for a unique integrative conjugative element related to that of other plant and human pathogens. Comparative analyses using BLASTN showed that pEI70 is almost entirely included in plasmid pEB102 from E. billingiae, an epiphytic Erwinia of pome fruits, with sequence identities superior to 98%. A duplex PCR assay was developed to survey the prevalence of plasmid pEI70 and also that of pEA29, which had previously been described in several E. amylovora strains. Plasmid pEI70 was found widely dispersed across Europe with frequencies of 5-92%, but it was absent in E. amylovora analyzed populations from outside of Europe. Restriction analysis and hybridization demonstrated that this plasmid was identical in at least 13 strains. Curing E. amylovora strains of pEI70 reduced their aggressiveness on pear, and introducing pEI70 into low-aggressiveness strains lacking this plasmid increased symptoms development in this host. Discovery of this novel plasmid offers new insights into the biogeography, evolution and virulence determinants in E. amylovora.

  5. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection.

  6. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) in bacteria has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovo...

  7. Isolation and Identification of L-asparaginase producing Erwinia strains which isolated from Potato Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arastoo Badoei-Dalfard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: L-Asparaginase can be effectively used for the treatment of lymphoblastic leukemia. The rapid growth of cancer cells are needed for L-asparagine abundant storage. L-asparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine into L-aspartic acid and ammonia. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the L-asparaginase producing Erwinia strains from the potato farms of Jiroft. Materials and methods: Pectolytic Erwinia species isolated from crumbling potato in M9 medium. The desired L-asparaginase producing bacteria were isolated based on the color changes. Biochemical-microbial and the plant pathogenicity tests of these strains were also investigated with potato and geranium. The L-asparaginase production and molecular detection of these Erwinia strains were also investigated. Results: In this study, L-asparaginase producing Erwinia was isolated on the CVP and M9 mediums. The inoculation of Erwinia strains on the potato and geranium plants showed that Er8 and Er11 species have the ability to cause plant pathogenicity. Results showed that the maximum pathogenicity of Er8 and Er11 was observed after 48 and 15 h of inoculation in potato and geranium plants, respectively. 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses exhibited that Er8 and Er11 strains were similar to Erwinia chrysanthemi with 98% homology. Discussion and conclusion: Because of several applications of the Erwinia L-asparaginase in various fields, isolated Erwinia and their L-asparaginase can be suitable for applied utilization.

  8. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eGijzen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  9. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  10. Bacterieziekte Erwinia groeiend probleem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Het grootste probleem van Nederlandse pootgoedtelers is tegenwoordig de bacterieziekte Erwinia. Het is een sluipmoordenaar waar nog geen bestrijdingsmiddelen tegen bestaan. Maar onderzoekers komen steeds meer over de bacterie te weten.

  11. Suppression of soil-borne plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agtmaal, van M.

    2015-01-01

    Soil borne plant pathogens considerably reduce crop yields worldwide and are difficult to control due to their ”masked” occurrence  in the heterogeneous soil environment. This hampers the efficacy of chemical - and microbiological control agents.   Outbreaks of crop diseas

  12. EPCOT, NASA and plant pathogens in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R

    1996-01-01

    Cooperative work between NASA and Walt Disney World's EPCOT Land Pavilion is described. Joint efforts include research about allelopathy in multi-species plant cropping in CELSS, LEDs as light sources in hydroponic systems, and the growth of plant pathogens in space.

  13. Hypersensitive response and acyl-homoserine lactone production of the fire blight antagonists Erwinia tasmaniensis and Erwinia billingiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Jock, Susanne; Du, Zhiqiang; Geider, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    Fire blight caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora can be controlled by antagonistic microorganisms. We characterized epiphytic bacteria isolated from healthy apple and pear trees in Australia, named Erwinia tasmaniensis, and the epiphytic bacterium Erwinia billingiae from England for physiological properties, interaction with plants and interference with growth of E. amylovora. They reduced symptom formation by the fire blight pathogen on immature pears and the colonization of apple flowers. In contrast to E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis strains induced a hypersensitive response in tobacco leaves and synthesized levan in the presence of sucrose. With consensus primers deduced from lsc as well as hrpL, hrcC and hrcR of the hrp region of E. amylovora and of related bacteria, these genes were successfully amplified from E. tasmaniensis DNA and alignment of the encoded proteins to other Erwinia species supported a role for environmental fitness of the epiphytic bacterium. Unlike E. tasmaniensis, the epiphytic bacterium E. billingiae produced an acyl-homoserine lactone for bacterial cell-to-cell communication. Their competition with the growth of E. amylovora may be involved in controlling fire blight.

  14. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  16. Paleogene radiation of a plant pathogenic mushroom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P A Coetzee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global movement and speciation of fungal plant pathogens is important, especially because of the economic losses they cause and the ease with which they are able to spread across large areas. Understanding the biogeography and origin of these plant pathogens can provide insights regarding their dispersal and current day distribution. We tested the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin of the plant pathogenic mushroom genus Armillaria and the currently accepted premise that vicariance accounts for the extant distribution of the species. METHODS: The phylogeny of a selection of Armillaria species was reconstructed based on Maximum Parsimony (MP, Maximum Likelihood (ML and Bayesian Inference (BI. A timeline was then placed on the divergence of lineages using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock approach. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analyses of sequenced data for three combined nuclear regions provided strong support for three major geographically defined clades: Holarctic, South American-Australasian and African. Molecular dating placed the initial radiation of the genus at 54 million years ago within the Early Paleogene, postdating the tectonic break-up of Gondwana. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution of extant Armillaria species is the result of ancient long-distance dispersal rather than vicariance due to continental drift. As these finding are contrary to most prior vicariance hypotheses for fungi, our results highlight the important role of long-distance dispersal in the radiation of fungal pathogens from the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. Examining phylogenetic relationships of Erwinia and Pantoea species using whole genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yucheng; Qiu, Sai

    2015-11-01

    The genera Erwinia and Pantoea contain species that are devastating plant pathogens, non-pathogen epiphytes, and opportunistic human pathogens. However, some controversies persist in the taxonomic classification of these two closely related genera. The phylogenomic analysis of these two genera was investigated via a comprehensive analysis of 25 Erwinia genomes and 23 Pantoea genomes. Single-copy orthologs could be extracted from the Erwinia/Pantoea core-genome to reconstruct the Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny. This tree has strong bootstrap support for almost all branches. We also estimated the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH) and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between each genome; strains from the same species showed ANI values ≥96% and isDDH values >70%. These data confirm that whole genome sequence data provides a powerful tool to resolve the complex taxonomic questions of Erwinia/Pantoea, e.g. Pantoea agglomerans 299R was not clustered into a single group with other P. agglomerans strains, and the ANI values and isDDH values between them were Erwinia/Pantoea phylogeny.

  18. Halogenated furanones from the red alga, Delisea pulchra, inhibit carbapenem antibiotic synthesis and exoenzyme virulence factor production in the phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manefield, M.; Welch, M.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    The plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora regulates expression of virulence factors and antibiotic production via an N-3- oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) dependent quorum sensing mechanism. The marine alga Delisea pulchra produces halogenated furanones known to antagonise 3-oxo-C6-HSL...

  19. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  20. Effects of rainfall acidification on plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, D. S.; Cowling, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The chemical nature of the aqueous microenvironment at the infection court is a potentially significant factor in the successful dissemination, establishment, and survival of plant pathogenic microorganisms. Acidic rainfall has a potential for influencing not only the pathogen, but also the host organism, and the host-pathogen complex. Although host-pathogen interactions add a degree of complexity to the study of abiotic environmental stress of plants, it is our hope, through the use of a combination of general concepts, theoretical postulations, and experimental data, to describe the potential role that rainfall acidity may play in the often subtle balance between populations of plants and populations of plant pathogens. The direct effects of acidic precipitation on vegetation are becoming increasingly better understood. The indirect consequences of both acute and chronic exposure of vegetation to acidic precipitation are very complex, however. Their effect is variable in time, and involves a variety of potential interactions which are only partially understood.

  1. Monitoring of Erwinia amylovora in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Radunović

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of Erwinia amylovora in Montenegro, conducted from 2012 to 2014, indicated that the bacterium was widespread in the northern, continental part of the country, where the most important fruit-growing regions are situated. The presence of the bacterium was confirmed on quince, pear, apple, medlar and hawthorn. Pathogenic, cultural and biochemical characteristics of E. amylovora strains sampled from pome fruit species and indigenous flora in Montenegro had been studied previously. In the present study, serological tests were used for identification of E. amylovora strains originating from pome fruit trees and indigenous plants. Monitoring of E. amylovora and collection of samples with symptoms of bacterial fire blight from different hosts and locations were performed in Montenegro from 2012 to 2014. Isolation of the bacterium on nutrient medium produced a large number of isolates, whose pathogenicity was confirmed on immature pear fruits. Twenty-seven strains of the bacterium, originating from three pome fruit species (quince, pear and apple and one indigenous species (hawthorn were selected for serological analyses. Two applied serological methods, ELISA and IF test, enabled rapid detection of the bacterium and simultaneous examination of a large number of samples over a short period of time. Serological analyses showed high homogeneity in antigenic structure of the studied E. amylovora strains sampled from quince, pear, apple and hawthorn from nine locations in Montenegro.

  2. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Silvia; Tabima, Javier F; Mideros, Maria F; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Matute, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    The process of speciation, by definition, involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed that speciation in pathogens is heavily influenced by host-pathogen dynamics and that traits that mediate such interactions (e.g., host mobility, reproductive mode of the pathogen, complexity of the life cycle, and host specificity) must lead to reproductive isolation and ultimately affect speciation rates. In this review, we summarize the main evolutionary processes that lead to speciation of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and provide an outline of how speciation can be studied rigorously, including novel genetic/genomic developments.

  3. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  4. Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal Stewart

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or ‘phytosensors’, by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different

  5. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Casillo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core, wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants. The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

  6. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M.; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. PMID:28273861

  7. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-03-04

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

  8. Cloud Activation Characteristics of Airborne Erwinia carotovora Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franc, Gary D.; Demott, Paul J.

    1998-10-01

    Several strains of plant pathogenic bacteria, Erwinia carotovora carotovora and E. carotovora atroseptica, were observed to be active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The CCN supersaturation spectra of bacterial aerosols were measured in the laboratory and compared to the activity of ammonium sulfate. Approximately 25%-30% of the aerosolized bacterial cells activated droplets at 1% water supersaturation compared to 80% activation of the ammonium sulfate aerosol. Physical and numerical simulations of cloud droplet activation and growth on bacteria were also performed. Both simulations predict that aerosolized bacteria will be incorporated into cloud droplets during cloud formation. Results strongly support the hypothesis that significant numbers of the tested bacterial strains are actively involved in atmospheric cloud formation and precipitation processes following natural aerosolization and vertical transport to cloud levels.

  9. 'Preventie belangrijkste troef tegen Erwinia'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.

    2012-01-01

    De bollenteelt en -handel ondervindt aanzienlijke schade van de bacterieziekte Erwinia. Onderzoek wijst uit dat preventie het belangrijkste wapen is. Mogelijk bieden ook stofjes die de afweer van planten verbeteren een oplossing.

  10. Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis MB73/2, a Soil Isolate Inhibiting the Growth of Plant Pathogens Dickeya spp. and Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Dorota M; Iwanicki, Adam; Ossowicki, Adam; Obuchowski, Michal; Jafra, Sylwia

    2013-05-16

    Bacillus subilis MB73/2 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated in Poland from a meadow soil sample. When tested in vitro, the strain shows strong antagonism toward plant pathogens-the soft rot-causing bacteria Dickeya spp. and the crown rot fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the genome sequence of MB73/2.

  11. Bacterial leaf rot of Aloe vera L., caused byErwinia chrysanthemi biovar 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, de P.C.A.; Verhoeven, J.T.W.; Danse, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    A severe attack of the bacteriumErwinia chrysantemi biovar 3 on the succulentAloe vera on the Carribean island of Aruba is described. Biochemical and pathological characteristics of strains are presented, including results of successful inoculation experiments onAloe vera. This is the first report

  12. Bacterial leaf rot of Aloe vera L., caused byErwinia chrysanthemi biovar 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, de P.C.A.; Verhoeven, J.T.W.; Danse, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    A severe attack of the bacteriumErwinia chrysantemi biovar 3 on the succulentAloe vera on the Carribean island of Aruba is described. Biochemical and pathological characteristics of strains are presented, including results of successful inoculation experiments onAloe vera. This is the first report o

  13. Harpins, multifunctional proteins secreted by gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Seon; Kim, Wooki; Lee, Chanhui; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2013-10-01

    Harpins are glycine-rich and heat-stable proteins that are secreted through type III secretion system in gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria. Many studies show that these proteins are mostly targeted to the extracellular space of plant tissues, unlike bacterial effector proteins that act inside the plant cells. Over the two decades since the first harpin of pathogen origin, HrpN of Erwinia amylovora, was reported in 1992 as a cell-free elicitor of hypersensitive response (HR), diverse functional aspects of harpins have been determined. Some harpins were shown to have virulence activity, probably because of their involvement in the translocation of effector proteins into plant cytoplasm. Based on this function, harpins are now considered to be translocators. Their abilities of pore formation in the artificial membrane, binding to lipid components, and oligomerization are consistent with this idea. When harpins are applied to plants directly or expressed in plant cells, these proteins trigger diverse beneficial responses such as induction of defense responses against diverse pathogens and insects and enhancement of plant growth. Therefore, in this review, we will summarize the functions of harpins as virulence factors (or translocators) of bacterial pathogens, elicitors of HR and immune responses, and plant growth enhancers.

  14. Fe2+ chelator proferrorosamine A: a gene cluster of Erwinia rhapontici P45 involved in its synthesis and its impact on growth of Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Yannick; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Bieri, Marco; Kamber, Tim; Piel, Jörn; Pelludat, Cosima

    2016-02-01

    Proferrorosamine A (proFRA) is an iron (Fe2+) chelator produced by the opportunistic plant pathogen Erwinia rhapontici P45. To identify genes involved in proFRA synthesis, transposon mutagenesis was performed. The identified 9.3 kb gene cluster, comprising seven genes, designated rosA-rosG, encodes proteins that are involved in proFRA synthesis. Based on gene homologies, a biosynthetic pathway model for proFRA is proposed. To obtain a better understanding of the effect of proFRA on non-proFRA producing bacteria, E. rhapontici P45 was co-cultured with Erwinia amylovora CFBP1430, a fire-blight-causing plant pathogen. E. rhapontici P45, but not corresponding proFRA-negative mutants, led to a pink coloration of E. amylovora CFBP1430 colonies on King's B agar, indicating accumulation of the proFRA-iron complex ferrorosamine, and growth inhibition in vitro. By saturating proFRA-containing extracts with Fe2+, the inhibitory effect was neutralized, suggesting that the iron-chelating capability of proFRA is responsible for the growth inhibition of E. amylovora CFBP1430.

  15. The olive fly endosymbiont, "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola," switches from an intracellular existence to an extracellular existence during host insect development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Anne M; Hearn, David J; Bronstein, Judith L; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2009-11-01

    As polyphagous, holometabolous insects, tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) provide a unique habitat for endosymbiotic bacteria, especially those microbes associated with the digestive system. Here we examine the endosymbiont of the olive fly [Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)], a tephritid of great economic importance. "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola" was found in the digestive systems of all life stages of wild olive flies from the southwestern United States. PCR and microscopy demonstrated that "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" resided intracellularly in the gastric ceca of the larval midgut but extracellularly in the lumen of the foregut and ovipositor diverticulum of adult flies. "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" is one of the few nonpathogenic endosymbionts that transitions between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles during specific stages of the host's life cycle. Another unique feature of the olive fly endosymbiont is that unlike obligate endosymbionts of monophagous insects, "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" has a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of closely related plant-pathogenic and free-living bacteria. These two characteristics of "Ca. Erwinia dacicola," the ability to transition between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles and a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of free-living relatives, may facilitate survival in a changing environment during the development of a polyphagous, holometabolous host. We propose that insect-bacterial symbioses should be classified based on the environment that the host provides to the endosymbiont (the endosymbiont environment).

  16. Relationships of plant pathogenic enterobacteria based on partial atpD, carA, and recA as individual and concatenated nucleotide and peptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Park, D-C

    2007-07-01

    Relationships of the genera in the Enterobacteriaceae containing plant pathogenic species: Brenneria, Dickeya, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Pantoea, Pectobacterium, and Samsonia, were investigated by comparison of their nucleotide and peptide sequences of atpD, carA, recA, and the concatenated sequences. Erwinia spp. and Pantoea spp., with Pectobacterium cypripedii, formed a group distinct from other pathogenic taxa. Pectobacterium, Brenneria, Dickeya, and Samsonia formed a contiguous clade. Samsonia was usually concurrent with Pectobacterium. Most Brenneria were also close to Pectobacterium, suggesting that these three taxa might be better represented as a single genus. Brenneria quercina was not closely associated with other members of this genus and may represent a separate genus. The sequences representing Dickeya were distinct, further supporting the generic status of the taxon. Plant pathogenic Enterobacter spp. display such sequence variability that few definite conclusions as to their specific placement could be made. These data highlight the difficulty of drawing reliable and robust taxonomic conclusions based on comparative analysis of sequence data without some independent criterion to calibrate a scale for diversity.

  17. Phylogenetic position and virulence apparatus of the pear flower necrosis pathogen Erwinia piriflorinigrans CFBP 5888T as assessed by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; López, María M; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2013-10-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a necrotrophic pathogen of pear reported from Spain that destroys flowers but does not progress further into the host. We sequenced the complete genome of the type strain CFBP 5888(T) clarifying its phylogenetic position within the genus Erwinia, and indicating a position between its closest relative, the epiphyte Erwinia tasmaniensis and other plant pathogenic Erwinia spp. (i.e., the fire blight pathogen E. amylovora and the Asian pear pathogen E. pyrifoliae). Common features are the type III and type VI secretion systems, amylovoran biosynthesis and desferrioxamine production. The E. piriflorinigrans genome also provided the first evidence for production of the siderophore chrysobactin within the genus Erwinia sensu stricto, which up to now was mostly associated with phytopathogenic, soft-rot Dickeya and Pectobacterium species. Plasmid pEPIR37, reported in this strain, is closely related to small plasmids found in the fire blight pathogen E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae. The genome of E. piriflorinigrans also gives detailed insights in evolutionary genomics of pathoadapted Erwinia.

  18. Evolution and genome architecture in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Mareike; Stukenbrock, Eva H

    2017-08-07

    The fungal kingdom comprises some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Sequencing the genomes of fungal pathogens has shown a remarkable variability in genome size and architecture. Population genomic data enable us to understand the mechanisms and the history of changes in genome size and adaptive evolution in plant pathogens. Although transposable elements predominantly have negative effects on their host, fungal pathogens provide prominent examples of advantageous associations between rapidly evolving transposable elements and virulence genes that cause variation in virulence phenotypes. By providing homogeneous environments at large regional scales, managed ecosystems, such as modern agriculture, can be conducive for the rapid evolution and dispersal of pathogens. In this Review, we summarize key examples from fungal plant pathogen genomics and discuss evolutionary processes in pathogenic fungi in the context of molecular evolution, population genomics and agriculture.

  19. Toetsen om Erwinia in bloembollen aan te tonen : onderzoek Erwinia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Hollinger, T.C.; Kampen, van D.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van P.J.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Binnen het Erwiniaproject is een aantal toetsen ontwikkeld en zijn andere nog in ontwikkeling. Deze toetsen moeten liefst ook latent aanwezige Erwiniastammen kunnen aantonen. Dit lukt door monsters in een voedingsbodem voor Erwinia te brengen en na kweek deze bacteriën aan te tonen met serologische

  20. Genome of the Actinomycete Plant Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus Suggests Recent Niche Adaptation▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Stephen D.; Corton, Craig; Brown, Susan E.; Barron, Andrew; Clark, Louise; Doggett, Jon; Harris, Barbara; Ormond, Doug; Quail, Michael A.; May, Georgiana; Francis, David; Knudson, Dennis; Parkhill, Julian; Ishimaru, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is a plant-pathogenic bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial ring rot, a devastating agricultural disease under strict quarantine control and zero tolerance in the seed potato industry. This organism appears to be largely restricted to an endophytic lifestyle, proliferating within plant tissues and unable to persist in the absence of plant material. Analysis of the genome sequence of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and comparison with the genome sequences of related plant pathogens revealed a dramatic recent evolutionary history. The genome contains 106 insertion sequence elements, which appear to have been active in extensive rearrangement of the chromosome compared to that of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. There are 110 pseudogenes with overrepresentation in functions associated with carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and pathogenicity. Genome comparisons also indicated that there is substantial gene content diversity within the species, probably due to differential gene acquisition and loss. These genomic features and evolutionary dating suggest that there was recent adaptation for life in a restricted niche where nutrient diversity and perhaps competition are low, correlated with a reduced ability to exploit previously occupied complex niches outside the plant. Toleration of factors such as multiplication and integration of insertion sequence elements, genome rearrangements, and functional disruption of many genes and operons seems to indicate that there has been general relaxation of selective pressure on a large proportion of the genome. PMID:18192393

  1. Genome of the actinomycete plant pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus suggests recent niche adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Stephen D; Corton, Craig; Brown, Susan E; Barron, Andrew; Clark, Louise; Doggett, Jon; Harris, Barbara; Ormond, Doug; Quail, Michael A; May, Georgiana; Francis, David; Knudson, Dennis; Parkhill, Julian; Ishimaru, Carol A

    2008-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus is a plant-pathogenic bacterium and the causative agent of bacterial ring rot, a devastating agricultural disease under strict quarantine control and zero tolerance in the seed potato industry. This organism appears to be largely restricted to an endophytic lifestyle, proliferating within plant tissues and unable to persist in the absence of plant material. Analysis of the genome sequence of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and comparison with the genome sequences of related plant pathogens revealed a dramatic recent evolutionary history. The genome contains 106 insertion sequence elements, which appear to have been active in extensive rearrangement of the chromosome compared to that of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. There are 110 pseudogenes with overrepresentation in functions associated with carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and pathogenicity. Genome comparisons also indicated that there is substantial gene content diversity within the species, probably due to differential gene acquisition and loss. These genomic features and evolutionary dating suggest that there was recent adaptation for life in a restricted niche where nutrient diversity and perhaps competition are low, correlated with a reduced ability to exploit previously occupied complex niches outside the plant. Toleration of factors such as multiplication and integration of insertion sequence elements, genome rearrangements, and functional disruption of many genes and operons seems to indicate that there has been general relaxation of selective pressure on a large proportion of the genome.

  2. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZy

  3. Splash : the dispersal of fungal plant pathogens in rain events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pielaat, A.

    2000-01-01

    Models were developed to study splash dispersal of fungal plant pathogens in space and time. The models incorporate the main mechanisms involved in splash dispersal, that is 1. A raindrop hits the thin water film on the crop surface containing spores and spores are dispersed in the splashing rain dr

  4. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, D.M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; McSpadden Gardener, B.B.; Thomashow, L.S.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and i

  5. Diaporthe: a genus of endophytic, saprobic and plant pathogenic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, R.R.; Glienke, C.; Videira, S.I.R.; Lombard, L.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Diaporthe (Phomopsis) species have often been reported as plant pathogens, non-pathogenic endophytes or saprobes, commonly isolated from a wide range of hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to resolve the taxonomy and phylogeny of a large collection of Diaporthe species occurring on diver

  6. Improving ITS sequence data for identification of plant pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Henrik Nilsson; Kevin D. Hyde; Julia Pawłowska; Martin Ryberg; Leho Tedersoo; Anders Bjørnsgard Aas; Siti A. Alias; Artur Alves; Cajsa Lisa Anderson; Alexandre Antonelli; A. Elizabeth Arnold; Barbara Bahnmann; Mohammad Bahram; Johan Bengtsson-Palme; Anna Berlin; Sara Branco; Putarak Chomnunti; Asha Dissanayake; Rein Drenkhan; Hanna Friberg; Tobias Guldberg Frøslev; Bettina Halwachs; Martin Hartmann; Beatrice Henricot; Ruvishika Jayawardena; Ari Jumpponen; Håvard Kauserud; Sonja Koskela; Tomasz Kulik; Kare Liimatainen; Björn D. Lindahl; Daniel Lindner; Jian-Kui Liu; Sajeewa Maharachchikumbura; Dimuthu Manamgoda; Svante Martinsson; Maria Alice Neves; Tuula Niskanen; Stephan Nylinder; Olinto Liparini Pereira; Danilo Batista Pinho; Teresita M. Porter; Valentin Queloz; Taavi Riit; Marisol Sánchez-García; Filipe de Sousa; Emil Stefańczyk; Mariusz Tadych; Susumu Takamatsu; Qing Tian; Dhanushka Udayanga; Martin Unterseher; Zheng Wang; Saowanee Wikee; Jiye Yan; Ellen Larsson; Karl-Henrik Larsson; Urmas Kõljalg; Kessy Abarenkov

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi are a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes with substantial impacts on natural ecosystems and human endeavours. These taxa often have complex and poorly understood life cycles, lack observable, discriminatory morphological characters, and may not be amenable to in vitro culturing. As a result, species identification is frequently difficult...

  7. Prevalence of Candidatus Erwinia dacicola in wild and laboratory olive fruit fly populations and across developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Anne M; Hearn, David J; Burrack, Hannah J; Rempoulakis, Polychronis; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2012-04-01

    The microbiome of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin), a worldwide pest of olives (Olea europaea L.), has been examined for >100 yr as part of efforts to identify bacteria that are plant pathogens vectored by the fly or are beneficial endosymbionts essential for the fly's survival and thus targets for possible biological control. Because tephritid fruit flies feed on free-living bacteria in their environment, distinguishing between the transient, acquired bacteria of their diet and persistent, resident bacteria that are vertically transmitted endosymbionts is difficult. Several culture-dependent and -independent studies have identified a diversity of species in the olive fruit fly microbiome, but they have not distinguished the roles of the microbes. Candidatus Erwinia dacicola, has been proposed to be a coevolved endosymbiont of the olive fruit fly; however, this was based on limited samples from two Italian populations. Our study shows that C. Erwinia dacicola was present in all New and Old World populations and in the majority of individuals of all life stages sampled in 2 yr. Olive fruit flies reared on olives in the laboratory had frequencies of C. Erwinia dacicola similar to that of wild populations; however, flies reared on artificial diets containing antibiotics in the laboratory rarely had the endosymbiont. The relative abundance of C. Erwinia dacicola varied across development stages, being most abundant in ovipositing females and larvae. This uniform presence of C. Erwini dacicola suggests that it is a persistent, resident endosymbiont of the olive fruit fly.

  8. Effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Yazawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2015-04-15

    Alkyl parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products. However, the mode of action of these chemicals has not been assessed thoroughly. In this study, we determined the effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi. All the fungi tested, were susceptible to parabens. The effect of linear alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi was related to the length of the alkyl chain. In addition, the antifungal activity was correlated with the paraben-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. The antifungal activity of linear alkyl parabens likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain, especially mitochondrial complex II. Additionally, we determined that some alkyl parabens inhibit Alternaria brassicicola infection of cabbage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface survival and internalization of salmonella through natural cracks on developing cantaloupe fruits, alone or in the presence of the melon wilt pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Gautam

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of foodborne illness attributed to the consumption of Salmonella-tainted cantaloupe have occurred repeatedly, but understanding of the ecology of Salmonella on cantaloupe fruit surfaces is limited. We investigated the interactions between Salmonella enterica Poona, the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia tracheiphila, and cantaloupe fruit. Fruit surfaces were inoculated at the natural cracking stage by spreading S. enterica and E. tracheiphila, 20 µl at 107 cfu/ml, independently or together, over a 2×2 cm rind area containing a crack. Microbial and microscopic analyses were performed at 0, 9 and 24 days post inoculation (DPI. Even at 24 DPI (fruit maturity S. enterica was detected on 14% and 40% of the fruit inoculated with S. enterica alone and the two-pathogen mixture, respectively. However, the population of S. enterica declined gradually after initial inoculation. E. tracheiphila, inoculated alone or together with Salmonella, caused watersoaked lesions on cantaloupe fruit; but we could not conclude in this study that S. enterica survival on the fruit surface was enhanced by the presence of those lesions. Of fruit inoculated with E. tracheiphila alone and sampled at 24 DPI, 61% had watersoaked lesions on the surface. In nearly half of those symptomatic fruits the watersoaking extended into the sub-rind mesocarp, and E. tracheiphila was recovered from that tissue in 50% of the symptomatic fruit. In this work, E. tracheiphila internalized through natural cracks on developing fruits. S. enterica was never detected in the fruit interior (ca. 2-3 mm below rind surface under the limited conditions of our experiments, but the possibility that it, or other human pathogens that contaminate fresh produce, might also do so should be investigated under a wider range of conditions and produce types.

  10. Surface survival and internalization of salmonella through natural cracks on developing cantaloupe fruits, alone or in the presence of the melon wilt pathogen Erwinia tracheiphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Dhiraj; Dobhal, Shefali; Payton, Mark E; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Ma, Li Maria

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness attributed to the consumption of Salmonella-tainted cantaloupe have occurred repeatedly, but understanding of the ecology of Salmonella on cantaloupe fruit surfaces is limited. We investigated the interactions between Salmonella enterica Poona, the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia tracheiphila, and cantaloupe fruit. Fruit surfaces were inoculated at the natural cracking stage by spreading S. enterica and E. tracheiphila, 20 µl at 107 cfu/ml, independently or together, over a 2×2 cm rind area containing a crack. Microbial and microscopic analyses were performed at 0, 9 and 24 days post inoculation (DPI). Even at 24 DPI (fruit maturity) S. enterica was detected on 14% and 40% of the fruit inoculated with S. enterica alone and the two-pathogen mixture, respectively. However, the population of S. enterica declined gradually after initial inoculation. E. tracheiphila, inoculated alone or together with Salmonella, caused watersoaked lesions on cantaloupe fruit; but we could not conclude in this study that S. enterica survival on the fruit surface was enhanced by the presence of those lesions. Of fruit inoculated with E. tracheiphila alone and sampled at 24 DPI, 61% had watersoaked lesions on the surface. In nearly half of those symptomatic fruits the watersoaking extended into the sub-rind mesocarp, and E. tracheiphila was recovered from that tissue in 50% of the symptomatic fruit. In this work, E. tracheiphila internalized through natural cracks on developing fruits. S. enterica was never detected in the fruit interior (ca. 2-3 mm below rind surface) under the limited conditions of our experiments, but the possibility that it, or other human pathogens that contaminate fresh produce, might also do so should be investigated under a wider range of conditions and produce types.

  11. The biotechnological use and potential of plant pathogenic smut fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrügge, Michael; Kellner, Ronny; Schipper, Kerstin

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogens of the family Ustilaginaceae parasitise mainly on grasses and cause smut disease. Among the best characterised members of this family are the covered smut fungus Ustilago hordei colonising barley and oat as well as the head smut Sporisorium reilianum and the corn smut Ustilago maydis, both infecting maize. Over the past years, U. maydis in particular has matured into a model system for diverse topics like plant-pathogen interaction, cellular transport processes or DNA repair. Consequently, a broad set of genetic, molecular and system biological methods has been established. This set currently serves as a strong foundation to improve existing and establish novel biotechnological applications. Here, we review four promising aspects covering different fields of applied science: (1) synthesis of secondary metabolites produced at fermenter level. (2) Lipases and other hydrolytic enzymes with potential roles in biocatalytic processes. (3) Degradation of ligno-cellulosic plant materials for biomass conversion. (4) Protein expression based on unconventional secretion, a novel approach inspired by basic research on mRNA transport. Thus, plant pathogenic Ustilaginaceae offer a great potential for future biotechnological applications by combining basic research and applied science.

  12. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions.

  13. Epigenetic regulation of development and pathogenesis in fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Akanksha; Jeon, Junhyun

    2017-08-01

    Evidently, epigenetics is at forefront in explaining the mechanisms underlying the success of human pathogens and in the identification of pathogen-induced modifications within host plants. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting the role of epigenetics in the modulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. In this review, we attempt to highlight and discuss the role of epigenetics in the regulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal phytopathogens using Magnaporthe oryzae, a devastating fungal plant pathogen, as a model system. With the perspective of wide application in the understanding of the development, pathogenesis and control of other fungal pathogens, we attempt to provide a synthesized view of the epigenetic studies conducted on M. oryzae to date. First, we discuss the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications in M. oryzae and their impact on fungal development and pathogenicity. Second, we highlight the unexplored epigenetic mechanisms and areas of research that should be considered in the near future to construct a holistic view of epigenetic functioning in M. oryzae and other fungal plant pathogens. Importantly, the development of a complete understanding of the modulation of epigenetic regulation in fungal pathogens can help in the identification of target points to combat fungal pathogenesis. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Uncovering plant-pathogen crosstalk through apoplastic proteomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand eDelaunois

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens have evolved by developing different strategies to infect their host, which in turn have elaborated immune responses to counter the pathogen invasion. The apoplast, including the cell wall and extracellular space outside the plasma membrane, is one of the first compartments where pathogen-host interaction occurs. The plant cell wall is composed of a complex network of polysaccharides polymers and glycoproteins and serves as a natural physical barrier against pathogen invasion. The apoplastic fluid, circulating through the cell wall and intercellular spaces, provides a means for delivering molecules and facilitating intercellular communications. Some plant-pathogen interactions lead to plant cell wall degradation allowing pathogens to penetrate into the cells. In turn, the plant immune system recognizes microbial- or damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs or DAMPs and initiates a set of basal immune responses, including the strengthening of the plant cell wall. The establishment of defense requires the regulation of a wide variety of proteins that are involved at different levels, from receptor perception of the pathogen via signaling mechanisms to the strengthening of the cell wall or degradation of the pathogen itself. A fine regulation of apoplastic proteins is therefore essential for rapid and effective pathogen perception and for maintaining cell wall integrity. This review aims to provide insight into analyses using proteomic approaches of the apoplast to highlight the modulation of the apoplastic protein patterns during pathogen infection and to unravel the key players involved in plant-pathogen interaction.

  15. Horizontal gene acquisitions, mobile element proliferation, and genome decay in the host-restricted plant pathogen erwinia tracheiphila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern industrial agriculture depends on high-density cultivation of genetically similar crop plants, creating favorable conditions for the emergence of novel pathogens with increased fitness in managed compared with ecologically intact settings. Here, we present the genome sequence of six strains o...

  16. High quality permanent draft genome sequence of Phaseolibacter flectens ATCC 12775(T), a plant pathogen of French bean pods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Izhaki, Ido; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, Tbk; Huntemann, Marcel; Pillay, Manoj; Markowitz, Victor; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Halpern, Malka

    2016-01-01

    Phaseolibacter flectens strain ATCC 12775(T) (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 63:268-273, 2013) is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. Ph. flectens is as a plant-pathogenic bacterium on pods of French bean and was first identified by Johnson (1956) as Pseudomonas flectens. After its phylogenetic position was reexamined, Pseudomonas flectens was transferred to the family Enterobacteriaceae as Phaseolibacter flectens gen. nov., comb. nov. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The DNA GC content is 44.34 mol%. The chromosome length is 2,748,442 bp. It encodes 2,437 proteins and 89 RNA genes. Ph. flectens genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes study.

  17. Overleving van Erwinia in water : waakzaamheid geboden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Houtenbos, R.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2008-01-01

    PPO en Plant Research International hebben al eerder de rotbacterie Erwinia onderzocht, omdat Erwinia een vochtminnende bacterie is, is besmetting via water, ook vanuit de lucht een reëel gevaar. Omdat water op veel manieren op bollenbedrijven toegepast wordt is onderzocht hoe lang deze rotveroorzak

  18. Assessment of the relevance of the antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine from Pantoea agglomerans biological control strains against bacterial plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Ulrike F; Reiher, Katharina; Spiteller, Dieter; Wensing, Annette; Völksch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 (Pa48b) is a promising biocontrol strain against economically important bacterial pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora. Strain Pa48b produces the broad-spectrum antibiotic 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine (APV) in a temperature-dependent manner. An APV-negative mutant still suppressed the E. amylovora population and fire blight disease symptoms in apple blossom experiments under greenhouse conditions, but was inferior to the Pa48b wild-type indicating the influence of APV in the antagonism. In plant experiments with the soybean pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea both, Pa48b and the APV-negative mutant, successfully suppressed the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the P. agglomerans strain Pa48b is an efficient biocontrol organism against plant pathogens, and we prove its ability for fast colonization of plant surfaces over a wide temperature range. PMID:23233458

  19. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS BY MEANS OF PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ravlić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is the use of live beneficial organisms and products of their metabolism in the pests control. Plant pathogens can be used for weed control in three different ways: as classical, conservation and augmentative (inoculative and inundated biological control. Inundated biological control involves the use of bioherbicides (mycoherbicides or artificial breeding of pathogens and application in specific stages of crops and weeds. Biological control of weeds can be used where chemical herbicides are not allowed, if resistant weed species are present or in the integrated pest management against weeds with reduced herbicides doses and other non-chemical measures, but it has certain limitations and disadvantages.

  20. A common origin of rickettsiae and certain plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburg, W G; Woese, C R; Dobson, M E; Weiss, E

    1985-11-01

    On the basis of ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons, the rickettsia Rochalimaea quintana has been found to be a member of subgroup 2 of the alpha subdivision of the so-called purple bacteria, which is one of about ten major eubacterial divisions. Within subgroup alpha-2, R. quintana is specifically related to the agrobacteria and rhizobacteria, organisms that also have close associations with eukaryotic cells. This genealogical grouping of the rickettsiae with certain plant pathogens and intracellular symbionts suggests a possible evolution of the rickettsiae from plant-associated bacteria.

  1. Dickeya solani sp. nov., a pectinolytic plant pathogenic bacterium isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Nijhuis, E.H.; Kowalewska, M.J.; Saddler, G.S.; Parkinson, N.; Elphinstone, J.G.; Pritchard, L.; Toth, I.K.; Lojkowska, E.; Potrykus, M.; Waleron, M.; Vos, de P.; Cleenwerck, I.; Pirhonen, M.; Garlant, L.; Hélias, V.; Pothier, J.F.; Pflüger, V.; Duffy, B.; Tsror, L.; Manulis, S.

    2014-01-01

    Pectinolytic bacteria were recently isolated from diseased potato plants exhibiting blackleg and slow wilt symptoms found in a number of European countries and Israel. These Gram-negative, motile, rods were identified as belonging to the genus Dickeya, previously the Pectobacterium chrysanthemi comp

  2. A plant pathogenic bacterium exploits the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolic pathway of its insect vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Nehela, Yasser; Hijaz, Faraj; Vincent, Christopher I

    2017-06-08

    Huanglongbing in citrus is caused by a phloem-limited, uncultivable, gram-negative α-proteobacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). CLas is transmitted by the phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. In this study, we investigated the metabolomic and respiration rates changes in D. citri upon infection with CLas using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas exchange analysis. The level of glycine, L-serine, L-threonine, and gamma-amino butyric acid were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, while L-proline, L-aspartic acid, and L-pyroglutamic acid were lower in CLas-infected D. citri compared with the control. Citric acid was increased in CLas-infected D. citri, whereas malic and succinic acids were reduced. Interestingly, most of the reduced metabolites such as malate, succinate, aspartate, and L-proline are required for the growth of CLas. The increase in citric acid, serine, and glycine indicated that CLas induced glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) in its vector. In agreement with the GC-MS results, the gene expression results also indicated that glycolysis and TCA were induced in CLas-infected D. citri and this was accompanied with an increases in respiration rate. Phosphoric acid and most of the sugar alcohols were higher in CLas-infected D. citri, indicating a response to the biotic stress or cell damage. Only slight increases in the levels of few sugars were observed in CLas-infected D. citri, which indicated that sugars are tightly regulated by D. citri. Our results indicated that CLas induces nutrient and energetic stress in its host insect. This study may provide some insights into the mechanism of colonization of CLas in its vector.

  3. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  4. Erwinia amylovora expresses fast and simultaneously hrp/dsp virulence genes during flower infection on apple trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Pester

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24-48 h post inoculation (hpi. This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4 in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight

  5. A sequential statistical approach towards an optimized production of a broad spectrum bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed; Marey, Heba S

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken) was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1) production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v), incubation time (62 hrs), and agitation speed (207 rpm)) in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470 AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora). BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1-13) and temperature (45-80 °C). A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium), the plant pathogen (E. amylovora), and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua) was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri). Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries.

  6. A Sequential Statistical Approach towards an Optimized Production of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin Substance from a Soil Bacterium Bacillus sp. YAS 1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira M. Embaby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides, display potential applications in agriculture, medicine, and industry. The present study highlights integral statistical optimization and partial characterization of a bacteriocin substance from a soil bacterium taxonomically affiliated as Bacillus sp. YAS 1 after biochemical and molecular identifications. A sequential statistical approach (Plackett-Burman and Box-Behnken was employed to optimize bacteriocin (BAC YAS 1 production. Using optimal levels of three key determinants (yeast extract (0.48% (w/v, incubation time (62 hrs, and agitation speed (207 rpm in peptone yeast beef based production medium resulted in 1.6-fold enhancement in BAC YAS 1 level (470 AU/mL arbitrary units against Erwinia amylovora. BAC YAS 1 showed activity over a wide range of pH (1–13 and temperature (45–80°C. A wide spectrum antimicrobial activity of BAC YAS 1 against the human pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Campylobacter jejuni, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterococcus sp., Proteus sp., Klebsiella sp., and Salmonella typhimurium, the plant pathogen (E. amylovora, and the food spoiler (Listeria innocua was demonstrated. On top and above, BAC YAS 1 showed no antimicrobial activity towards lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. casei, L. lactis, and L. reuteri. Promising characteristics of BAC YAS 1 prompt its commercialization for efficient utilization in several industries.

  7. High-throughput screening of Erwinia chrysanthemi pectin methylesterase variants using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Sørensen, Iben; Derkx, Patrick;

    2009-01-01

    Pectin methylesterases (PMEs) catalyse the removal of methyl esters from the homogalacturonan (HG) backbone domain of pectin, a ubiquitous polysaccharide in plant cell walls. The degree of methyl esterification (DE) impacts upon the functional properties of HG within cell walls and plants produce...... numerous PMEs that act upon HG in muro. Many microbial plant pathogens also produce PMEs, the activity of which renders HG more susceptible to cleavage by pectin lyase and polygalacturonase enzymes and hence aids cell wall degradation. We have developed a novel microarray-based approach to investigate...... the activity of a series of variant enzymes based on the PME from the important pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi. A library of 99 E. chrysanthemi PME mutants was created in which seven amino acids were altered by various different substitutions. Each mutant PME was incubated with a highly methyl esterified lime...

  8. Erwinia berokkent pootgoedsector vele miljoenen schade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.; Breukers, A.

    2008-01-01

    De besmetting met Erwinia ontwikkelt zich de laatste jaren tot een serieus probleem in de pootgoedsector. Voor telers ontstaat inkomensderving door lagere opbrengstprijzen en onbruikbare pootgoedvoorraden. Handelshuizen lijden schade door margedaling en reclameringen. Een aantasting van het imago va

  9. Molecular Keys to the Janthinobacterium and Duganella spp. Interaction with the Plant Pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederike S. Haack

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Janthinobacterium and Duganella are well-known for their antifungal effects. Surprisingly, almost nothing is known on molecular aspects involved in the close bacterium-fungus interaction. To better understand this interaction, we established the genomes of eleven Janthinobacterium and Duganella isolates in combination with phylogenetic and functional analyses of all publicly available genomes. Thereby, we identified a core and pan genome of 1,058 and 23,628 genes. All strains encoded secondary metabolite gene clusters and chitinases, both possibly involved in fungal growth suppression. All but one strain carried a single gene cluster involved in the biosynthesis of alpha-hydroxyketone-like autoinducer molecules, designated JAI-1. Genome wide RNA-seq studies employing the background of two isolates and the corresponding JAI-1 deficient strains identified a set of 45 QS-regulated genes in both isolates. Most regulated genes are characterized by a conserved sequence motif within the promoter region. Among the most strongly regulated genes were secondary metabolite and type VI secretion system gene clusters. Most intriguing, co-incubation studies of J. sp. HH102 or its corresponding JAI-1 synthase deletion mutant with the plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum provided first evidence of a QS-dependent interaction with this pathogen.

  10. Is Erwinia te beheersen? Een literatuurstudie over rotproblemen in diverse gewassen om met deze kennis Erwinia in bolgewassen beter te kunnen aanpakken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Wolf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Het meeste onderzoek aan Erwinia-bacteriën is uitgevoerd bij aardappel. In dit gewas worden drie ziekteverwekkende Erwinia-soorten gevonden: Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca), Erwinia chrysanthemi (Echr) en Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc). Eca speelt in gematigde klimaatsgebiede

  11. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors.

  12. Tobraviruses--plant pathogens and tools for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    The tobraviruses, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV), Pea early-browning virus (PEBV) and Pepper ringspot virus (PepRSV), are positive-strand RNA viruses with rod-shaped virus particles that are transmitted between plants by trichodorid nematodes. As a group, these viruses infect many plant species, with TRV having the widest host range. Recent studies have begun to dissect the interaction of TRV with potato, currently the most commercially important crop disease caused by any of the tobraviruses. As well as being successful plant pathogens, these viruses have become widely used as vectors for expression in plants of nonviral proteins or, more frequently, as initiators of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Precisely why tobraviruses should be so effective as VIGS vectors is not known; however, molecular studies of the mode of action of the tobravirus silencing suppressor protein are shedding some light on this process.

  13. Innovative tools for detection of plant pathogenic viruses and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María M; Bertolini, Edson; Olmos, Antonio; Caruso, Paola; Gorris, María Teresa; Llop, Pablo; Penyalver, Ramón; Cambra, Mariano

    2003-12-01

    Detection of harmful viruses and bacteria in plant material, vectors or natural reservoirs is essential to ensure safe and sustainable agriculture. The techniques available have evolved significantly in the last few years to achieve rapid and reliable detection of pathogens, extraction of the target from the sample being important for optimising detection. For viruses, sample preparation has been simplified by imprinting or squashing plant material or insect vectors onto membranes. To improve the sensitivity of techniques for bacterial detection, a prior enrichment step in liquid or solid medium is advised. Serological and molecular techniques are currently the most appropriate when high numbers of samples need to be analysed. Specific monoclonal and/or recombinant antibodies are available for many plant pathogens and have contributed to the specificity of serological detection. Molecular detection can be optimised through the automatic purification of nucleic acids from pathogens by columns or robotics. New variants of PCR, such as simple or multiplex nested PCR in a single closed tube, co-operative-PCR and real-time monitoring of amplicons or quantitative PCR, allow high sensitivity in the detection of one or several pathogens in a single assay. The latest development in the analysis of nucleic acids is micro-array technology, but it requires generic DNA/RNA extraction and pre-amplification methods to increase detection sensitivity. The advances in research that will result from the sequencing of many plant pathogen genomes, especially now in the era of proteomics, represent a new source of information for the future development of sensitive and specific detection techniques for these microorganisms.

  14. Changing fitness of a necrotrophic plant pathogen under increasing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabburg, Rosalie; Obanor, Friday; Aitken, Elizabeth; Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2015-08-01

    Warmer temperatures associated with climate change are expected to have a direct impact on plant pathogens, challenging crops and altering plant disease profiles in the future. In this study, we have investigated the effect of increasing temperature on the pathogenic fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum, an important necrotrophic plant pathogen associated with crown rot disease of wheat in Australia. Eleven wheat lines with different levels of crown rot resistance were artificially inoculated with F. pseudograminearum and maintained at four diurnal temperatures 15/15°C, 20/15°C, 25/15°C and 28/15°C in a controlled glasshouse. To quantify the success of F. pseudograminearum three fitness measures, these being disease severity, pathogen biomass in stem base and flag leaf node, and deoxynivalenol (DON) in stem base and flag leaf node of mature plants were used. F. pseudograminearum showed superior overall fitness at 15/15°C, and this was reduced with increasing temperature. Pathogen fitness was significantly influenced by the level of crown rot resistance of wheat lines, but the influence of line declined with increasing temperature. Lines that exhibited superior crown rot resistance in the field were generally associated with reduced overall pathogen fitness. However, the relative performance of the wheat lines was dependent on the measure of pathogen fitness, and lines that were associated with one reduced measure of pathogen fitness did not always reduce another. There was a strong correlation between DON in stem base tissue and disease severity, but length of browning was not a good predictor of Fusarium biomass in the stem base. We report that a combination of host resistance and rising temperature will reduce pathogen fitness under increasing temperature, but further studies combining the effect of rising CO2 are essential for more realistic assessments. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plant-pathogen interactions: what microarray tells about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodha, T D; Basak, J

    2012-01-01

    Plant defense responses are mediated by elementary regulatory proteins that affect expression of thousands of genes. Over the last decade, microarray technology has played a key role in deciphering the underlying networks of gene regulation in plants that lead to a wide variety of defence responses. Microarray is an important tool to quantify and profile the expression of thousands of genes simultaneously, with two main aims: (1) gene discovery and (2) global expression profiling. Several microarray technologies are currently in use; most include a glass slide platform with spotted cDNA or oligonucleotides. Till date, microarray technology has been used in the identification of regulatory genes, end-point defence genes, to understand the signal transduction processes underlying disease resistance and its intimate links to other physiological pathways. Microarray technology can be used for in-depth, simultaneous profiling of host/pathogen genes as the disease progresses from infection to resistance/susceptibility at different developmental stages of the host, which can be done in different environments, for clearer understanding of the processes involved. A thorough knowledge of plant disease resistance using successful combination of microarray and other high throughput techniques, as well as biochemical, genetic, and cell biological experiments is needed for practical application to secure and stabilize yield of many crop plants. This review starts with a brief introduction to microarray technology, followed by the basics of plant-pathogen interaction, the use of DNA microarrays over the last decade to unravel the mysteries of plant-pathogen interaction, and ends with the future prospects of this technology.

  16. Identification of diverse mycoviruses through metatranscriptomics characterization of the viromes of five major fungal plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of plant pathogenic fungi by mycoviruses can attenuate their virulence on plants and vigor in culture. In this study, we described the viromes of 275 isolates of five widely dispersed plant pathogenic fungal species (Colletotrichum truncatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Phomopsis longicolla, ...

  17. Insights into Cross-Kingdom Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan W.B. Kirzinger

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant and human pathogens have evolved disease factors to successfully exploit their respective hosts. Phytopathogens utilize specific determinants that help to breach reinforced cell walls and manipulate plant physiology to facilitate the disease process, while human pathogens use determinants for exploiting mammalian physiology and overcoming highly developed adaptive immune responses. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of seemingly dedicated human pathogens to cause plant disease, and specialized plant pathogens to cause human disease. Such microbes represent interesting systems for studying the evolution of cross-kingdom pathogenicity, and the benefits and tradeoffs of exploiting multiple hosts with drastically different morphologies and physiologies. This review will explore cross-kingdom pathogenicity, where plants and humans are common hosts. We illustrate that while cross-kingdom pathogenicity appears to be maintained, the directionality of host association (plant to human, or human to plant is difficult to determine. Cross-kingdom human pathogens, and their potential plant reservoirs, have important implications for the emergence of infectious diseases.

  18. Evolution of filamentous plant pathogens: gene exchange across eukaryotic kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Dacks, Joel B; Jenkinson, Joanna M; Thornton, Christopher R; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2006-09-19

    Filamentous fungi and oomycetes are eukaryotic microorganisms that grow by producing networks of thread-like hyphae, which secrete enzymes to break down complex nutrients, such as wood and plant material, and recover the resulting simple sugars and amino acids by osmotrophy. These organisms are extremely similar in both appearance and lifestyle and include some of the most economically important plant pathogens . However, the morphological similarity of fungi and oomycetes is misleading because they represent some of the most distantly related eukaryote evolutionary groupings, and their shared osmotrophic growth habit is interpreted as being the result of convergent evolution . The fungi branch with the animals, whereas the oomycetes branch with photosynthetic algae as part of the Chromalveolata . In this report, we provide strong phylogenetic evidence that multiple horizontal gene transfers (HGT) have occurred from filamentous ascomycete fungi to the distantly related oomycetes. We also present evidence that a subset of the associated gene families was initially the product of prokaryote-to-fungi HGT. The predicted functions of the gene products associated with fungi-to-oomycete HGT suggest that this process has played a significant role in the evolution of the osmotrophic, filamentous lifestyle on two separate branches of the eukaryote tree.

  19. Microbial populations responsible for specific soil suppressiveness to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David M; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Gardener, Brian B McSpadden; Thomashow, Linda S

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural soils suppressive to soilborne plant pathogens occur worldwide, and for several of these soils the biological basis of suppressiveness has been described. Two classical types of suppressiveness are known. General suppression owes its activity to the total microbial biomass in soil and is not transferable between soils. Specific suppression owes its activity to the effects of individual or select groups of microorganisms and is transferable. The microbial basis of specific suppression to four diseases, Fusarium wilts, potato scab, apple replant disease, and take-all, is discussed. One of the best-described examples occurs in take-all decline soils. In Washington State, take-all decline results from the buildup of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. that produce the antifungal metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. Producers of this metabolite may have a broader role in disease-suppressive soils worldwide. By coupling molecular technologies with traditional approaches used in plant pathology and microbiology, it is possible to dissect the microbial composition and complex interactions in suppressive soils.

  20. Carbohydrate-related enzymes of important Phytophthora plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Henk; Coutinho, Pedro M; Henrissat, Bernard; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) form particularly interesting targets to study in plant pathogens. Despite the fact that many CAZymes are pathogenicity factors, oomycete CAZymes have received significantly less attention than effectors in the literature. Here we present an analysis of the CAZymes present in the Phytophthora infestans, Ph. ramorum, Ph. sojae and Pythium ultimum genomes compared to growth of these species on a range of different carbon sources. Growth on these carbon sources indicates that the size of enzyme families involved in degradation of cell-wall related substrates like cellulose, xylan and pectin is not always a good predictor of growth on these substrates. While a capacity to degrade xylan and cellulose exists the products are not fully saccharified and used as a carbon source. The Phytophthora genomes encode larger CAZyme sets when compared to Py. ultimum, and encode putative cutinases, GH12 xyloglucanases and GH10 xylanases that are missing in the Py. ultimum genome. Phytophthora spp. also encode a larger number of enzyme families and genes involved in pectin degradation. No loss or gain of complete enzyme families was found between the Phytophthora genomes, but there are some marked differences in the size of some enzyme families.

  1. Endocytosis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, U; Steinberg, G

    2005-10-01

    Filamentous fungi are an important group of tip-growing organisms, which include numerous plant pathogens such as Magnaporthe grisea and Ustilago maydis. Despite their ecological and economical relevance, we are just beginning to unravel the importance of endocytosis in filamentous fungi. Most evidence for endocytosis in filamentous fungi is based on the use of endocytic tracer dyes that are taken up into the cell and delivered to the vacuole. Moreover, genomewide screening for candidate genes in Neurospora crassa and U. maydis confirmed the presence of most components of the endocytic machinery, indicating that endocytosis participates in filamentous growth. Indeed, it was shown that in U. maydis early endosomes cluster at sites of growth, where they support morphogenesis and polar growth, most likely via endosome-based membrane recycling. In humans, such recycling processes to the plasma membrane involve small GTPases such as Rab4. A homologue of this protein is encoded in the genome of U. maydis but is absent from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that Rab4-mediated recycling is important for filamentous growth. Furthermore, human Rab4 regulates traffic of early endosomes along microtubules, and a similar microtubule-based transport is described for U. maydis. These observations suggest that Rab4-like GTPases might regulate endosome- and microtubule-based recycling during tip growth of filamentous fungi.

  2. The influence of plant extracts on growth of Erwinia amylovora - the causal agent of fire blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Krupiński

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol and water extracts obtained on Soxhlet apparatus from various organs and parts (leaves, flowers, shoots, onion, bark, fruit of 30 herbal and woody plants species were tested for growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora using agar diffusion method. Active extracts were found in 23 plant species but in 13 ofthem it was found for the first time. The highest diameter of growth inhibition zone of this bacterium was caused by extracts from Aloe arborescens, Juglans regia, Rhus typhina, Salvia offici nalis and Satureja hortensis. In almost all cases ethanol appeared to be a better solvent of active plant substances against E.amylovora than water.

  3. Bacteria of the genus Erwinia found in the spermatheca of the laurel psyllid Trioza alacris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchini, Daniela; Ciolfi, Silvia; Gottardo, Marco; Marri, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Psylloidea are economically important insects causing serious damage to plants by direct feeding and/or vectoring bacterial pathogens. Results reported here indicate the presence of extracellular bacteria in the spermatheca of egg-laying Trioza alacris females. One phylotype, sharing 99 % identity with the non-phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia tasmaniensis, was identified regardless of methods applied or insect sampling year and location. This is the first study, achieved by ultrastructural, cultural, and 16S rRNA gene-based analysis, of an insect spermatheca microbiota.

  4. Carbohydrate and ethane release with Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum--induced necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, L David; Hunter, William J

    2008-02-01

    Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum, also known as E. betavasculorum and Pectobacterium betavasculorum, is a soil bacterium that has the capacity to cause root rot necrosis of sugarbeets. The qualitatively different pathogenicity exhibited by the virulent E. carotovora strain and two avirulent strains, a Citrobacter sp. and an Enterobacter cloacae, was examined using digital analysis of photographic evidence of necrosis as well as for carbohydrate, ethane, and ethylene release compared with uninoculated potato tuber slices. Visual scoring of necrosis was superior to digital analysis of photographs. The release of carbohydrates and ethane from potato tuber slices inoculated with the soft rot necrosis-causing Erwinia was significantly greater than that of potato tuber slices that had not been inoculated or that had been inoculated with the nonpathogenic E. cloacae and Citrobacter sp. strains. Interestingly, ethylene production from potato slices left uninoculated or inoculated with the nonpathogenic Citrobacter strain was 5- to 10-fold higher than with potato slices inoculated with the pathogenic Erwinia strain. These findings suggest that (1) carbohydrate release might be a useful measure of the degree of pathogenesis, or relative virulence; and that (2) bacterial suppression of ethylene formation may be a critical step in root rot disease formation.

  5. Migrate or evolve: options for plant pathogens under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sukumar

    2013-07-01

    Findings on climate change influence on plant pathogens are often inconsistent and context dependent. Knowledge of pathogens affecting agricultural crops and natural plant communities remains fragmented along disciplinary lines. By broadening the perspective beyond agriculture, this review integrates cross-disciplinary knowledge to show that at scales relevant to climate change, accelerated evolution and changing geographic distribution will be the main implications for pathogens. New races may evolve rapidly under elevated temperature and CO2 , as evolutionary forces act on massive pathogen populations boosted by a combination of increased fecundity and infection cycles under favourable microclimate within enlarged canopy. Changing geographic distribution will bring together diverse lineages/genotypes that do not share common ecological niche, potentially increasing pathogen diversity. However, the uncertainty of model predictions and a lack of synthesis of fragmented knowledge remain as major deficiencies in knowledge. The review contends that the failure to consider scale and human intervention through new technology are major sources of uncertainty. Recognizing that improved biophysical models alone will not reduce uncertainty, it proposes a generic framework to increase focus and outlines ways to integrate biophysical elements and technology change with human intervention scenarios to minimize uncertainty. To synthesize knowledge of pathogen biology and life history, the review borrows the concept of 'fitness' from population biology as a comprehensive measure of pathogen strengths and vulnerabilities, and explores the implications of pathogen mode of nutrition to fitness and its interactions with plants suffering chronic abiotic stress under climate change. Current and future disease management options can then be judged for their ability to impair pathogenic and saprophytic fitness. The review pinpoints improving confidence in model prediction by minimizing

  6. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly eDzhavakhiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or chemosensitization. Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of A. alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of F. sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  7. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly; Shcherbakova, Larisa; Semina, Yulia; Zhemchuzhina, Natalia; Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or "chemosensitization." Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin) combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole) applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole) combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of Alternaria alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of Fusarium sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  8. Export of the HR eliciting protein, Harpin(Es), of the maize pathogen Erwinia stewartii is species-specific but is independent of the growth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Musharaf; Alam, Syed Sartaj; Alam, Shah; Usman, Amjad; Coplin, David L

    2007-01-01

    The extra-cellular export of the HR-eliciting protein, Harpin(Es) of the maize pathogen Erwinia stewartii was studied to find out if the protein needs any species-specific signal for its export and to determine if the export of the protein to the medium is affected in any way by the growth temperature. Based upon the experimental evidence, it was proved that the protein (i.e., Harpin(Es)) does require its own export system (species-specific) to get out of the bacterial cell and can not be exported by the export system of even the very closely related bacterium, Erwinia amylovora. It was also found that the export of Harpin(Es) is, unlike the case of Harpin(Ea) (HR-eliciting protein of Erwinia amylovora), independent of the growth temperature.

  9. Trefkans detectie Erwinia in pootgoed toegenomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Binnen het Deltaplan Erwinia is een methode ontwikkeld die met grotere zekerheid de aanwezigheid van de Erwinia’s, Pectobacterium en Dickeya, in pootgoed kan aantonen. De verbeterde methode maakt gebruik gemaakt van uitschotknollen die op de sorteerband uitgeselecteerd zijn en een toets waarbij de g

  10. Deltaplan Erwinia hielp piepers en bollen vooruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, A.; Doorn, van J.

    2013-01-01

    Vier jaar lang werkte de bloembollensector samen met de aardappelsector aan de gezamenlijke bacterieziekte Erwinia. In beide sectoren was al het nodige voorwerk gedaan. Op 12 december 2012 werd het project afgesloten. Met de hoop op toch nog enige vorm van voortzetting.

  11. Ziek en Zeer : Erwinia chrysanthemi in Amaryllidaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, P.

    2011-01-01

    In dit artikel een verslag van het onderzoek naar de gevoeligheid van narcissen voor de bacterie Erwinia chrysanthemi (tegenwoordig Dickeya dadantii). Uit een infectieproef is gebleken dat deze bacterie tijdens een reguliere bollenteelt in Lisse niet in staat was om narcisbollen aan te tasten. Toch

  12. Recent developments in pathogen detection arrays: implications for fungal plant pathogens and use in practica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, B.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The failure to adequately identify plant pathogens from culture-based morphological techniques has led to the development of culture-independent molecular approaches. Increasingly, diagnostic laboratories are pursuing fast routine methods that provide reliable identification, sensitive detection, an

  13. Lifestyles of the effector-rich: genome-enabled characterization of bacterial plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequencing of bacterial plant pathogens is providing transformative insights into the complex network of molecular plant-microbe interactions mediated by extracellular effectors during pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens sequenced to completion are phylogenetically diverse and vary significant...

  14. The Brucella suis Genome Reveals Fundamental Similarities between Animal and Plant Pathogens and Symbionts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ian T. Paulsen; Rekha Seshadri; Karen E. Nelson; Jonathan A. Eisen; John F. Heidelberg; Timothy D. Read; Robert J. Dodson; Lowell Umayam; Lauren M. Brinkac; Maureen J. Beanan; Sean C. Daugherty; Robert T. Deboy; A. Scott Durkin; James F. Kolonay; Ramana Madupu; William C. Nelson; Bola Ayodeji; Margaret Kraul; Jyoti Shetty; Joel Malek; Susan E. van Aken; Steven Riedmuller; Herve Tettelin; Steven R. Gill; Owen White; Steven L. Salzberg; David L. Hoover; Luther E. Lindler; Shirley M. Halling; Stephen M. Boyle; Claire M. Fraser

    2002-01-01

    .... Extensive gene synteny between B. suis chromosome 1 and the genome of the plant symbiont Mesorhizobium loti emphasizes the similarity between this animal pathogen and plant pathogens and symbionts...

  15. New Erwinia-like organism causing cervical lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Yop; Lee, Mi Young; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2008-09-01

    The first case of cervical lymphadenitis due to infection by a new Erwinia-like organism is reported. The organism was identified initially as Pantoea sp. by a Vitek 2-based assessment but was finally identified as a member of the genus Erwinia by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolate displayed 98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of E. tasmaniensis and showed phenotypic characteristics that were different from other Erwinia species.

  16. The hexA gene of Erwinia carotovora encodes a LysR homologue and regulates motility and the expression of multiple virulence determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S J; Shih, Y L; Bentley, S D; Salmond, G P

    1998-05-01

    We have identified a gene important for the regulation of exoenzyme virulence factor synthesis in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (Ecc) and virulence and motility in Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica (Eca). This gene, hexA (hyperproduction of exoenzymes), is a close relative of the Erwinia chrysanthemi (Echr) gene pecT and encodes a member of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators. hexA mutants in both Ecc and Eca produce abnormally high levels of the exoenzyme virulence factors pectate lyase, cellulase and protease. In addition, Eca hexA mutants show increased expression of the fliA and fliC genes and hypermotility. Consistent with a role as a global regulator, expression of hexA from even a low-copy plasmid can suppress exoenzyme production in Ecc and Eca and motility in Eca. Production of the quorum-sensing pheromone OHHL in Ecc hexA is higher throughout the growth curve compared with the wild-type strain. Overexpression of Ecc hexA also caused widespread effects in several strains of the opportunistic human pathogen, Serratia. Low-copy hexA expression resulted in repression of exoenzyme, pigment and antibiotic production and repression of the spreading phenotype. Finally, mutations in hexA were shown to increase Ecc or Eca virulence in planta.

  17. Cyclic Di-GMP modulates the disease progression of Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Adam C; Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W; Waters, Christopher M

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a nearly ubiquitous intracellular signal molecule known to regulate various cellular processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence. The intracellular concentration of c-di-GMP is inversely governed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, which synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP, respectively. The role of c-di-GMP in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora has not been studied previously. Here we demonstrate that three of the five predicted DGC genes in E. amylovora (edc genes, for Erwinia diguanylate cyclase), edcA, edcC, and edcE, are active diguanylate cyclases. We show that c-di-GMP positively regulates the secretion of the main exopolysaccharide in E. amylovora, amylovoran, leading to increased biofilm formation, and negatively regulates flagellar swimming motility. Although amylovoran secretion and biofilm formation are important for the colonization of plant xylem tissues and the development of systemic infections, deletion of the two biofilm-promoting DGCs increased tissue necrosis in an immature-pear infection assay and an apple shoot infection model, suggesting that c-di-GMP negatively regulates virulence. In addition, c-di-GMP inhibited the expression of hrpA, a gene encoding the major structural component of the type III secretion pilus. Our results are the first to describe a role for c-di-GMP in E. amylovora and suggest that downregulation of motility and type III secretion by c-di-GMP during infection plays a key role in the coordination of pathogenesis.

  18. N-acetylcysteine in agriculture, a novel use for an old molecule: focus on controlling the plant-pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia S Muranaka

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC. The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC, a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS. The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer. HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria.

  19. N-acetylcysteine in agriculture, a novel use for an old molecule: focus on controlling the plant-pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Lígia S; Giorgiano, Thais E; Takita, Marco A; Forim, Moacir R; Silva, Luis F C; Coletta-Filho, Helvécio D; Machado, Marcos A; de Souza, Alessandra A

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen bacterium that causes diseases in many different crops. In citrus, it causes Citrus Variegated Chlorosis (CVC). The mechanism of pathogenicity of this bacterium is associated with its capacity to colonize and form a biofilm in the xylem vessels of host plants, and there is not yet any method to directly reduce populations of this pathogen in the field. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine analogue used mainly to treat human diseases, on X. fastidiosa in different experimental conditions. Concentrations of NAC over 1 mg/mL reduced bacterial adhesion to glass surfaces, biofilm formation and the amount of exopolysaccharides (EPS). The minimal inhibitory concentration of NAC was 6 mg/mL. NAC was supplied to X. fastidiosa-infected plants in hydroponics, fertigation, and adsorbed to organic fertilizer (NAC-Fertilizer). HPLC analysis indicated that plants absorbed NAC at concentrations of 0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL but not at 6 mg/mL. Sweet orange plants with CVC symptoms treated with NAC (0.48 and 2.4 mg/mL) in hydroponics showed clear symptom remission and reduction in bacterial population, as analyzed by quantitative PCR and bacterial isolation. Experiments using fertigation and NAC-Fertilizer were done to simulate a condition closer to that normally is used in the field. For both, significant symptom remission and a reduced bacterial growth rate were observed. Using NAC-Fertilizer the lag for resurgence of symptoms on leaves after interruption of the treatment increased to around eight months. This is the first report of the anti-bacterial effect of NAC against a phytopathogenic bacterium. The results obtained in this work together with the characteristics of this molecule indicate that the use of NAC in agriculture might be a new and sustainable strategy for controlling plant pathogenic bacteria.

  20. [Isolation of endophytic antagonistic bacterium from Amorphophallus konjac and research on its antibacterial metabolite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Chen, Lin; Chai, Xin-Li; Yu, Zi-Niu; Sun, Ming

    2007-12-01

    An endophytic antagonistic bacterium was isolated from Amorphophallus konjac calli. In order to identify this bacterium, 16S rDNA was amplified and partially sequenced. Sequence comparison showed that this sequence has the highest similarity to that in Bacillus subtilis, with 99.0% identities. That demonstrated this bacterium belongs to Bacillus subtili , named BSn5. The extracted extracellular protein from strain BSn5 had antibacterial activity against Erwinia carotovora subp. carotovora, which was unstable after heated, sensitive to proteinase K and resistant to trypsin. There was only a 31.6kDa protein component as by SDS-PAGE detection. Nondenaturing polyacrylaminde gel was used to purify this protein. The purified 31.6kDa protein exhibited inhibitory activity against Erwinia carotovora subp. carotovora. This protein is different from all known metabolites from Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that it may be a novel antibacterial protein.

  1. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and their secretion in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2014-01-01

    Approximately a tenth of all described fungal species can cause diseases in plants. A common feature of this process is the necessity to pass through the plant cell wall, an important barrier against pathogen attack. To this end, fungi possess a diverse array of secreted enzymes to depolymerize the main structural polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. Recent advances in genomic and systems-level studies have begun to unravel this diversity and have pinpointed cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) families that are specifically present or enhanced in plant-pathogenic fungi. In this review, we discuss differences between the CWDE arsenal of plant-pathogenic and non-plant-pathogenic fungi, highlight the importance of individual enzyme families for pathogenesis, illustrate the secretory pathway that transports CWDEs out of the fungal cell, and report the transcriptional regulation of expression of CWDE genes in both saprophytic and phytopathogenic fungi.

  2. [Antimicrobial activities of ant Ponericin W1 against plant pathogens in vitro and the disease resistance in its transgenic Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Fang; Sun, Peng-Wei; Tang, Ding-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a broad antimicrobial spectrum. The application of AMPs from non-plant organisms attracts considerable attention in plant disease resistance engineering. Ponericin W1, isolated from the venom of ant (Pachycondyla goeldii), shows antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae); however, it is not clear whether Ponericin W1 is effective against plant pathogens. The results of this study indicated synthesized Ponericin W1 inhibited mycelial growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea, as well as hyphal growth and spore production of Fusarium graminearum. Besides, Ponericin W1 exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. After codon optimization, Ponericin W1 gene was constructed into plant expression vector, and transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana by floral dip method. The Ponericin W1 was located in intercellular space of the transgenic plants as expected. Compared with the wild-type plants, there were ungerminated spores and less hyphal, conidia on the leaves of transgenic plants after innoculation with the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum. After innoculation with the pathogenic bac-terium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the baceria in the leaves of transgenic plants was significantly less than the wild-type plants, indicating that the transgenic plants displayed enhanced disease resistance to pathogens. These results demonstrate a potential use of Ponericin W1 in genetic engineering for broad-spectrum plant disease resistance.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas identifies sRNAs with putative virulence functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Cornelius; Findeiß, Sven; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Kuhfuß, Juliane; Hoffmann, Steve; Vogel, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F.; Bonas, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) is an important model to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the interaction with the host. To gain insight into the transcriptome of the Xcv strain 85–10, we took a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach. Using a novel method to automatically generate comprehensive transcription start site (TSS) maps we report 1421 putative TSSs in the Xcv genome. Genes in Xcv exhibit a poorly conserved −10 promoter element and no consensus Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Moreover, 14% of all mRNAs are leaderless and 13% of them have unusually long 5′-UTRs. Northern blot analyses confirmed 16 intergenic small RNAs and seven cis-encoded antisense RNAs in Xcv. Expression of eight intergenic transcripts was controlled by HrpG and HrpX, key regulators of the Xcv type III secretion system. More detailed characterization identified sX12 as a small RNA that controls virulence of Xcv by affecting the interaction of the pathogen and its host plants. The transcriptional landscape of Xcv is unexpectedly complex, featuring abundant antisense transcripts, alternative TSSs and clade-specific small RNAs. PMID:22080557

  4. The impact of plant-pathogen studies on medicinal drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Christian; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Kaiser, Markus

    2012-04-21

    The pharmaceutical industry is reliant on a constant supply of new chemical entities and molecular targets for disease intervention. In this tutorial review, we want to illustrate that basic research studies on the biological function of natural products involved in plant-pathogen interactions can serve as an inspiring source for the identification of new bioactive entities as well as of strategies on how to achieve small molecule manipulation of biological systems. An application of findings from plant-pathogen interaction studies might therefore display a significant impact on drug discovery. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  5. Evaluation of Susceptibility of Different Pear Hybrid Populations to Fire Blight (Erwinia amylovora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin EVRENOSOĞLU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fire blight disease caused by pathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is the serious disease of pear, and there is not a certain chemical management against this disease except antibiotic-type compounds such as streptomycin. It is very important to improve new fire blight resistant cultivars in case of integrated disease management. With this purpose, different crosses have been made between Pyrus communis varieties that have good fruit characteristics and resistant cultigens. Besides, self and open pollination treatments have been carried out in maternal plants. The disease resistance level of the hybrids obtained from these combinations was determined by artificial inoculations by Erwinia amylovora in greenhouse conditions. A total of 3284 hybrids were inoculated, and 2631 of them survived and were distributed to different susceptibility classes. 19.88% of the inoculated hybrids was killed by Erwinia amylovora. Total distribution of the hybrids to susceptibility classes was as 6.18% in class “A- slightly susceptible”, 3.11% in class “B- less susceptible”, 8.89% in class “C- mid-susceptible”, 20.28% in class “D- susceptible”, and 61.54% in class “E- very susceptible”. Majority of class “A- slightly susceptible” hybrids were obtained from ‘Magness’ x ‘Ankara’ combination. ‘Kieffer’ x ‘Santa Maria’, ‘Kieffer’ open pollination, ‘Magness’ x ‘Akça’, ‘Magness’ x ‘Kieffer’, ‘Magness’ x ‘Santa Maria’, ‘Mustafa Bey’ x ‘Moonglow’ treatments displayed good results with respect to “A- slightly susceptible” character. It is very important to evaluate these hybrid pear populations through different fruit and tree characteristics in the future.

  6. Characterization of a new ViI-like Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage phiEa2809.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagonenko, Alexander L; Sadovskaya, Olga; Valentovich, Leonid N; Evtushenkov, Anatoly N

    2015-04-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria causing fire blight disease in many Rosaceae species. A novel E. amylovora bacteriophage, phiEa2809, was isolated from symptomless apple leaf sample collected in Belarus. This phage was also able to infect Pantoea agglomerans strains. The genome of phiEa2809 is a double-stranded linear DNA 162,160 bp in length, including 145 ORFs and one tRNA gene. The phiEa2809 genomic sequence is similar to the genomes of the Serratia plymutica phage MAM1, Shigella phage AG-3, Dickeya phage vB DsoM LIMEstone1 and Salmonella phage ViI and lacks similarity to described E. amylovora phage genomes. Based on virion morphology (an icosahedral head, long contractile tail) and genome structure, phiEa2809 was classified as a member of Myoviridae, ViI-like bacteriophages group. PhiEa2809 is the firstly characterized ViI-like bacteriophage able to lyse E. amylovora.

  7. Biomolecular characterization of the levansucrase of Erwinia amylovora, a promising biocatalyst for the synthesis of fructooligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Lorenzo; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Malnoy, Mickael; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Benini, Stefano

    2013-12-18

    Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogen that affects Rosaceae, such as apple and pear. In E. amylovora the fructans, produced by the action of a levansucrase (EaLsc), play a role in virulence and biofilm formation. Fructans are bioactive compounds, displaying health-promoting properties in their own right. Their use as food and feed supplements is increasing. In this study, we investigated the biomolecular properties of EaLsc using HPAEC-PAD, MALDI-TOF MS, and spectrophotometric assays. The enzyme, which was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli in high yield, was shown to produce mainly fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) with a degree of polymerization between 3 and 6. The kinetic properties of EaLsc were similar to those of other phylogenetically related Gram-negative bacteria, but the good yield of FOSs, the product spectrum, and the straightforward production of the enzyme suggest that EaLsc is an interesting biocatalyst for future studies aimed at producing tailor-made fructans.

  8. Differential lysine acetylation profiles of Erwinia amylovora strains revealed by proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Wang, Dongping; Zamdborg, Leonid; Kelleher, Neil L; Huber, Steven C; Zhao, Youfu

    2013-02-21

    Protein lysine acetylation (LysAc) has recently been demonstrated to be widespread in E. coli and Salmonella, and to broadly regulate bacterial physiology and metabolism. However, LysAc in plant pathogenic bacteria is largely unknown. Here we first report the lysine acetylome of Erwinia amylovora, an enterobacterium causing serious fire blight disease of apples and pears. Immunoblots using generic anti-lysine acetylation antibodies demonstrated that growth conditions strongly affected the LysAc profiles in E. amylovora. Differential LysAc profiles were also observed for two E. amylovora strains, known to have differential virulence in plants, indicating translational modification of proteins may be important in determining virulence of bacterial strains. Proteomic analysis of LysAc in two E. amylovora strains identified 141 LysAc sites in 96 proteins that function in a wide range of biological pathways. Consistent with previous reports, 44% of the proteins are involved in metabolic processes, including central metabolism, lipopolysaccharide, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, several proteins involved in E. amylovora virulence, including exopolysaccharide amylovoran biosynthesis- and type III secretion-associated proteins, were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that LysAc may play a major role in bacterial virulence. Comparative analysis of LysAc sites in E. amylovora and E. coli further revealed the sequence and structural commonality for LysAc in the two organisms. Collectively, these results reinforce the notion that LysAc of proteins is widespread in bacterial metabolism and virulence.

  9. Insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis silences Erwinia carotovora virulence by a new form of microbial antagonism, signal interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Hu; Zhang, Xi-Fen; Xu, Jin-Ling; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2004-02-01

    It is commonly known that bacteria may produce antibiotics to interfere with the normal biological functions of their competitors in order to gain competitive advantages. Here we report that Bacillus thuringiensis suppressed the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence of plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora through a new form of microbial antagonism, signal interference. E. carotovora produces and responds to acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing signals to regulate antibiotic production and expression of virulence genes, whereas B. thuringiensis strains possess AHL-lactonase, which is a potent AHL-degrading enzyme. B. thuringiensis did not seem to interfere with the normal growth of E. carotovora; rather, it abolished the accumulation of AHL signal when they were cocultured. In planta, B. thuringiensis significantly decreased the incidence of E. carotovora infection and symptom development of potato soft rot caused by the pathogen. The biocontrol efficiency is correlated with the ability of bacterial strains to produce AHL-lactonase. While all the seven AHL-lactonase-producing B. thuringiensis strains provided significant protection against E. carotovora infection, Bacillus fusiformis and Escherichia coli strains that do not process AHL-degradation enzyme showed little effect in biocontrol. Mutation of aiiA, the gene encoding AHL-lactonase in B. thuringiensis, resulted in a substantial decrease in biocontrol efficacy. These results suggest that signal interference mechanisms existing in natural ecosystems could be explored as a new version of antagonism for prevention of bacterial infections.

  10. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor

  11. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium Pantoea agglomerans (synonyms: Enterobacter agglomerans, Erwinia herbicola) is known both as an epiphytic microbe developing on the surface of plants and as an endophytic organism living inside the plants. The bacterium occurs also abundantly in plant and animal products, in the body of arthropods and other animals, in water, soil, dust and air, and occasionally in humans. From the human viewpoint, the role of this organism is ambiguous, both deleterious and beneficial: on one side it causes disorders in people exposed to inhalation of organic dusts and diseases of crops, and on the other side it produces substances effective in the treatment of cancer and other diseases of humans and animals, suppresses the development of various plant pathogens, promotes plant growth, and appears as a potentially efficient biofertilizer and bioremediator. P. agglomerans was identified as a predominant bacterium on cotton plant grown all over the world, usually as an epiphyte, rarely as pathogen. It is particularly numerous on cotton bract after senescence. During processing of cotton in mills, bacteria and their products are released with cotton dust into air and are inhaled by workers, causing respiratory and general disorders, usually defined as byssinosis. The most adverse substance is endotoxin, a heteropolymer macromolecule present in the outermost part of the cell wall, consisting of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a major constituent, phospholipids and protein. The numerous experiments carried out in last quarter of XXth century on laboratory animals and human volunteers supported a convincing evidence that the inhaled endotoxin produced by P. agglomerans causes numerous pathologic effects similar to those elicited by cotton dust, such as influx of free lung cells into airways and activation of alveolar macrophages which secrete mediators (prostaglandins, platelet-activating factor, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor) that cause

  12. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant ...

  13. A domain-centric analysis of oomycete plant pathogen genomes reveals unique protein organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidl, M.F.; Ackerveken, van den G.; Govers, F.; Snel, B.

    2011-01-01

    Oomycetes comprise a diverse group of organisms that morphologically resemble fungi but belong to the stramenopile lineage within the supergroup of chromalveolates. Recent studies have shown that plant pathogenic oomycetes have expanded gene families that are possibly linked to their pathogenic life

  14. Fluorescence techniques to detect and to assess viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause major economic losses in commercial crop production worldwide every year. The current methods used to detect and to assess the viability of bacterial pathogens and to test seed lots or plants for contamination are usually based on plate assays or on serological techni

  15. Meiosis Drives Extraordinary Genome Plasticity in the Haploid Fungal Plant Pathogen Mycosphaerella Graminicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiosis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola results in eight ascospores due to a mitotic division following the two meiotic divisions. The transient diploid phase allows for recombination among homologous chromosomes. However, some chromosomes of M. graminicola lack homologs an...

  16. The ascomycete Verticillium longisporum is a hybrid and a plant pathogen with an expanded host range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Inderbitzin

    Full Text Available Hybridization plays a central role in plant evolution, but its overall importance in fungi is unknown. New plant pathogens are thought to arise by hybridization between formerly separated fungal species. Evolution of hybrid plant pathogens from non-pathogenic ancestors in the fungal-like protist Phytophthora has been demonstrated, but in fungi, the most important group of plant pathogens, there are few well-characterized examples of hybrids. We focused our attention on the hybrid and plant pathogen Verticillium longisporum, the causal agent of the Verticillium wilt disease in crucifer crops. In order to address questions related to the evolutionary origin of V. longisporum, we used phylogenetic analyses of seven nuclear loci and a dataset of 203 isolates of V. longisporum, V. dahliae and related species. We confirmed that V. longisporum was diploid, and originated three different times, involving four different lineages and three different parental species. All hybrids shared a common parent, species A1, that hybridized respectively with species D1, V. dahliae lineage D2 and V. dahliae lineage D3, to give rise to three different lineages of V. longisporum. Species A1 and species D1 constituted as yet unknown taxa. Verticillium longisporum likely originated recently, as each V. longisporum lineage was genetically homogenous, and comprised species A1 alleles that were identical across lineages.

  17. Commonalities and differences of T3SSs in rhizobia and plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria and rhizobia infect higher plants albeit the interactions with their hosts are principally distinct and lead to completely different phenotypic outcomes, either pathogenic or mutualistic, respectively. Bacterial protein delivery to plant host plays an essential role in determining the phenotypic outcome of plant-bacteria interactions. The involvement of type III secretion systems (T3SSs) in mediating animal- and plant-pathogen interactions was discovered in the mid-80's and is now recognized as a multiprotein nanomachine dedicated to trans-kingdom movement of effector proteins. The discovery of T3SS in bacteria with symbiotic lifestyles broadened its role beyond virulence. In most T3SS-positive bacterial pathogens, virulence is largely dependent on functional T3SSs, while in rhizobia the system is dispensable for nodulation and can affect positively or negatively the mutualistic associations with their hosts. This review focuses on recent comparative genome analyses in plant pathogens and rhizobia that uncovered similarities and variations among T3SSs in their genetic organization, regulatory networks and type III secreted proteins and discusses the evolutionary adaptations of T3SSs and type III secreted proteins that might account for the distinguishable phenotypes and host range characteristics of plant pathogens and symbionts.

  18. Advances on plant-pathogen interactions from molecular toward systems biology perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Rémi; Dubiella, Ullrich; Barbacci, Adelin; Genin, Stéphane; Raffaele, Sylvain; Roby, Dominique

    2016-11-21

    In the past 2 decades, progress in molecular analyses of the plant immune system has revealed key elements of a complex response network. Current paradigms depict the interaction of pathogen-secreted molecules with host target molecules leading to the activation of multiple plant response pathways. Further research will be required to fully understand how these responses are integrated in space and time, and exploit this knowledge in agriculture. In this review, we highlight systems biology as a promising approach to reveal properties of molecular plant-pathogen interactions and predict the outcome of such interactions. We first illustrate a few key concepts in plant immunity with a network and systems biology perspective. Next, we present some basic principles of systems biology and show how they allow integrating multiomics data and predict cell phenotypes. We identify challenges for systems biology of plant-pathogen interactions, including the reconstruction of multiscale mechanistic models and the connection of host and pathogen models. Finally, we outline studies on resistance durability through the robustness of immune system networks, the identification of trade-offs between immunity and growth and in silico plant-pathogen co-evolution as exciting perspectives in the field. We conclude that the development of sophisticated models of plant diseases incorporating plant, pathogen and climate properties represent a major challenge for agriculture in the future.

  19. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  20. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens through the luminex magplex bead system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; Raaij, van H.M.G.; Weerdt, de M.; Bergervoet, J.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a versatile multiplex method for both the serological and molecular detection of plant pathogens. The Luminex MagPlex bead system uses small paramagnetic microspheres (“beads”), either coated with specific antibodies or oligonucleotides, which capture respectively viruses and/or bac

  1. Redefining common endophytes and plant pathogens in Neofabraea, Pezicula, and related genera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Chen; Verkley, Gerard J.M.; Sun, Guangyu; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Crous, Pedro W.

    2016-01-01

    Species in Neofabraea, Pezicula, and related genera have been reported as saprobes, plant pathogens or endophytes from a wide range of hosts. The asexual morphs of Neofabraea and Pezicula had been placed in Cryptosporiopsis, now a synonym of Pezicula, while Neofabraea was also linked to Phlyctema. B

  2. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  3. Development of recombinant antibody technology for application in plant pathogen diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the applicability of the novel phage display technique to select plant-pathogen-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from combinatorial antibody libraries. The retrieved MAbs are so specific that they can be used as diagnostic tools in sensitive immunoassays for the

  4. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  5. Development of recombinant antibody technology for application in plant pathogen diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the applicability of the novel phage display technique to select plant-pathogen-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from combinatorial antibody libraries. The retrieved MAbs are so specific that they can be used as diagnostic tools in sensitive immunoassays for the detection

  6. Analysis of outer membrane vesicle associated proteins isolated from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehaus Karsten

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs are released from the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria. These extracellular compartments are known to transport compounds involved in cell-cell signalling as well as virulence associated proteins, e.g. the cytolysine from enterotoxic E. coli. Results We have demonstrated that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc releases OMVs into the culture supernatant during growth. A proteome study identified 31 different proteins that associate with the OMV fraction of which half are virulence-associated. A comparison with the most abundant outer membrane (OM proteins revealed that some proteins are enriched in the OMV fraction. This may be connected to differences in the LPS composition between the OMVs and the OM. Furthermore, a comparison of the OMV proteomes from two different culture media indicated that the culture conditions have an impact on the protein composition. Interestingly, the proteins that are common to both culture conditions are mainly involved in virulence. Conclusion Outer membrane vesicles released from the OM of Xcc contain membrane- and virulence-associated proteins. Future experiments will prove whether these structures can serve as "vehicles" for the transport of virulence factors into the host membrane.

  7. Analysis of outer membrane vesicle associated proteins isolated from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Vorhölter, Frank-Jörg; Niehaus, Karsten; Watt, Steven A

    2008-06-02

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released from the outer membrane of many Gram-negative bacteria. These extracellular compartments are known to transport compounds involved in cell-cell signalling as well as virulence associated proteins, e.g. the cytolysine from enterotoxic E. coli. We have demonstrated that Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) releases OMVs into the culture supernatant during growth. A proteome study identified 31 different proteins that associate with the OMV fraction of which half are virulence-associated. A comparison with the most abundant outer membrane (OM) proteins revealed that some proteins are enriched in the OMV fraction. This may be connected to differences in the LPS composition between the OMVs and the OM. Furthermore, a comparison of the OMV proteomes from two different culture media indicated that the culture conditions have an impact on the protein composition. Interestingly, the proteins that are common to both culture conditions are mainly involved in virulence. Outer membrane vesicles released from the OM of Xcc contain membrane- and virulence-associated proteins. Future experiments will prove whether these structures can serve as "vehicles" for the transport of virulence factors into the host membrane.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora CFBP 1430 and comparison to other Erwinia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2010-04-01

    Fire blight, caused by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants that has global economic importance for apple and pear production and trade. The complete genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 was sequenced, annotated, and compared with the genomes of other Erwinia spp. Several singleton and shared features of the E. amylovora CFBP 1430 genome were identified that offer a first view into evolutionary aspects within the genus Erwinia. Comparative genomics identified or clarified virulence and fitness determinants and secretion systems. Novel insights revealed in the genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 hold potential for exploitation to improve the design of more effective fire blight control strategies.

  9. Halogenated furanones from the red alga, Delisea pulchra, inhibit carbapenem antibiotic synthesis and exoenzyme virulence factor production in the phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manefield, M.; Welch, M.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    The plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora regulates expression of virulence factors and antibiotic production via an N-3- oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL) dependent quorum sensing mechanism. The marine alga Delisea pulchra produces halogenated furanones known to antagonise 3-oxo-C6-HSL...... activity. We have tested the effects of a halogenated furanone on the production of carbapenem, cellulase and protease in E. carotovora. Despite differences in the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbapenem and exoenzyme production each was inhibited by the algal metabolite. We present evidence...... to suggest that the furanone dependent inhibition of carbapenem production is a result of the disruption of the 3-oxo-C6-HSL dependent expression of the carABCDEFGH operon....

  10. Comparative Genomics of Erwinia amylovora and Related Erwinia Species—What do We Learn?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youfu Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease of apples and pears, is one of the most important plant bacterial pathogens with worldwide economic significance. Recent reports on the complete or draft genome sequences of four species in the genus Erwinia, including E. amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. tasmaniensis, and E. billingiae, have provided us near complete genetic information about this pathogen and its closely-related species. This review describes in silico subtractive hybridization-based comparative genomic analyses of eight genomes currently available, and highlights what we have learned from these comparative analyses, as well as genetic and functional genomic studies. Sequence analyses reinforce the assumption that E. amylovora is a relatively homogeneous species and support the current classification scheme of E. amylovora and its related species. The potential evolutionary origin of these Erwinia species is also proposed. The current understanding of the pathogen, its virulence mechanism and host specificity from genome sequencing data is summarized. Future research directions are also suggested.

  11. Isolation and characterization of soil Streptomyces species as potential biological control agents against fungal plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed

    2014-05-01

    The use of antagonist microorganisms against fungal plant pathogens is an attractive and ecologically alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Streptomyces are beneficial soil bacteria and potential candidates for biocontrol agents. This study reports the isolation, characterization and antagonist activity of soil streptomycetes from the Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve, a Natural protected area in Campeche, Mexico. The results showed morphological, physiological and biochemical characterization of six actinomycetes and their inhibitory activity against Curvularia sp., Aspergillus niger, Helminthosporium sp. and Fusarium sp. One isolate, identified as Streptomyces sp. CACIS-1.16CA showed the potential to inhibit additional pathogens as Alternaria sp., Phytophthora capsici, Colletotrichum sp. and Rhizoctonia sp. with percentages ranging from 47 to 90 %. This study identified a streptomycete strain with a broad antagonist activity that could be used for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi.

  12. Antifungal Substances from Streptomyces sp. A3265 Antagonistic to Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Nguyen; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we identified a Streptomyces sp., A3265, as exhibiting potent antifungal activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, including Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Rhizoctonia solani. This strain also exhibited a biocontrolling effect against ginseng root rot and damping-off disease, common diseases of ginseng and other crops. In this study, we isolated two antifungal substances responsible for this biocontrolling effect via Diaion HP-20 and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, medium pressure liquid chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. These compounds were identified as guanidylfungin A and methyl guanidylfungin A by spectroscopic methods. These compounds exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against various plant pathogenic fungi as well as against bacteria.

  13. Eliminação da produção de bacteriocinas em Erwinia e Pseudomonas fitopatogênicas Elimination of bacteriocin production in the phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia and Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.R. de Biagi

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Duas linhagens de bactérias fitopatogênicas do gênero Pseudomonas e duas do gênero Erwinia produtoras de bacteriocinas, foram submetidas a diferentes tratamentos visando estimar a estabilidade desse caráter. Houve eliminação da produção de bacteriocinas após tratamento com duas concentrações de brometo de etídio e a porcentagem de eliminação variou com o hospedeiro e com a concentração da droga. Não houve eliminação em temperaturas elevadas e também a preservação da linhagem por três anos em laboratório não causou perda do caráter. A eliminação da produção de bacteriocinas com brometo de etídio sugere que os genes envolvidos tenham localização plasmidiana.Four strains, two from each of the plant pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas and Erwinia, all producing bacteriocins, were submitted to different treatments in order to evaluate the persistance of bacteriocin production. After ethidium bromide treatment elimination of the bacteriocin production was achieved and the percentage of loss varied with the host strain and drug concentration. Elimination was not detected after treatment with high temperatures, above the normal ones. Also preservation of the strains for three years, in laboratory, did not cause elimination of the character. The curing of bacteriocin production after ethidium bromide treatment suggests that the involved genes are located in plasmids.

  14. Antibiosis functions during interactions of Trichoderma afroharzianum and Trichoderma gamsii with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjian; Harvey, Paul R; Stummer, Belinda E; Warren, Rosemary A; Zhang, Guangzhi; Guo, Kai; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2015-09-01

    Trichoderma afroharzianum is one of the best characterized Trichoderma species, and strains have been utilized as plant disease suppressive inoculants. In contrast, Trichoderma gamsii has only recently been described, and there is limited knowledge of its disease suppressive efficacies. Comparative studies of changes in gene expression during interactions of these species with their target plant pathogens will provide fundamental information on pathogen antibiosis functions. In the present study, we used complementary DNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) analysis to investigate changes in transcript profiling of T. afroharzianum strain LTR-2 and T. gamsii strain Tk7a during in vitro interactions with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium irregulare. Considerable differences were resolved in the overall expression profiles of strains LTR-2 and Tk7a when challenged with either plant pathogen. In strain LTR-2, previously reported mycoparasitism-related genes such as chitinase, polyketide synthase, and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase were found to be differentially expressed. This was not so for strain Tk7a, with the only previously reported antibiosis-associated genes being small secreted cysteine-rich proteins. Although only one differentially expressed gene was common to both strains LTR-2 and Tk7a, numerous genes reportedly associated with pathogen antibiosis processes were differentially expressed in both strains, including degradative enzymes and membrane transport proteins. A number of novel potential antibiosis-related transcripts were found from strains LTR-2 and Tk7a and remain to be identified. The expression kinetics of 20 Trichoderma (10 from strain LTR-2, 10 from strain Tk7a) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) at pre- and post-mycelia contact stages of Trichoderma-prey interactions, thereby confirming differential gene expression. Collectively, this research

  15. Long-Term Storage of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria in Sterile Distilled Water

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola S. Iacobellis; DeVay, James E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was made to determine the effectiveness of the preservation of plant-pathogenic bacteria in sterile distilled water. After 20 or 24 years of storage in distilled water, a very high percentage (90 to 92%) of the isolates of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas spp. were still alive. Moreover, 12 of 13 viable (after 24 years) isolates of P. syringae subsp. syringae maintained their ability to produce syringomycin and were pathogenic to bean seedlings. The water-stored cells of t...

  16. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  17. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Chandrashekar; Sharanaiah, Umesha; Shivamallu, Chandan

    2012-03-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens. Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomoans axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria, which can infect vegetables, cause severe yield loss. PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA. The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far, only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi. Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials. In this study, we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria. The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids. We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum, 44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and 20 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA, we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels. Species-specific patterns were obtained for bacteria R. solanacearum, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and X. oryzae pv. oryzae. The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  18. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandrashekar Srinivasa; Umesha Sharanaiah; Chandan Shivamallu

    2012-01-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens.Ralstonia solanacearum,Xanthomoans axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and Xanthomonas oryzae pv.oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria,which can infect vegetables,cause severe yield loss.PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA.The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far,only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi.Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials.In this study,we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria.The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel.SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids.We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum,44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and 20 isolates of X.oryzae pv.oryzae.With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA,we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels.Speciesspecific patterns were obtained for bacteria R.solanacearum,X.axonopodis pv.vesicatoria,and X.oryzae pv.oryzae.The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  19. Antifungal compounds from turmeric and nutmeg with activity against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mohamed M; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Wedge, David E; Tarawneh, Amer H; Cutler, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The antifungal activity of twenty-two common spices was evaluated against plant pathogens using direct-bioautography coupled Colletotrichum bioassays. Turmeric, nutmeg, ginger, clove, oregano, cinnamon, anise, fennel, basil, black cumin, and black pepper showed antifungal activity against the plant pathogens Colletotrichum acutatum, Colletotrichum fragariae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Among the active extracts, turmeric and nutmeg were the most active and were chosen for further investigation. The bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of three compounds from turmeric (1-3) and three compounds from nutmeg (4-6). Their chemical structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis including HR-MS, 1D, and 2D NMR as curcumin (1), demethoxycurcumin (2) and bisdemethoxy-curcumin (3), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ(8')-4,7-dihydroxy-3,3',5'-trimethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (4), erythro-(7R,8R)-Δ8'-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetra-methoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (5), and 5-hydroxy-eugenol (6). The isolated compounds were subsequently evaluated using a 96-well microbioassay against plant pathogens. At 30 μM, compounds 2 and 3 possessed the most antifungal activity against Phomopsis obscurans and Phomopsis viticola, respectively.

  20. Molecular inversion probe: a new tool for highly specific detection of plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yih Lau

    Full Text Available Highly specific detection methods, capable of reliably identifying plant pathogens are crucial in plant disease management strategies to reduce losses in agriculture by preventing the spread of diseases. We describe a novel molecular inversion probe (MIP assay that can be potentially developed into a robust multiplex platform to detect and identify plant pathogens. A MIP has been designed for the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans and the proof of concept for the efficiency of this technology is provided. We demonstrate that this methodology can detect as little as 2.5 ng of pathogen DNA and is highly specific, being able to accurately differentiate Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans from other fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea and even pathogens of the same species such as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici. The MIP assay was able to detect the presence of the pathogen in infected Arabidopsis thaliana plants as soon as the tissues contained minimal amounts of pathogen. MIP methods are intrinsically highly multiplexable and future development of specific MIPs could lead to the establishment of a diagnostic method that could potentially screen infected plants for hundreds of pathogens in a single assay.

  1. The fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora requires the rpoN gene for pathogenicity in apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Sinn, Judith P; Pfeufer, Emily E; Halbrendt, Noemi O; McNellis, Timothy W

    2013-10-01

    RpoN is a σ(54) factor regulating essential virulence gene expression in several plant pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In this study, we found that mutation of rpoN in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora caused a nonpathogenic phenotype. The E. amylovora rpoN Tn5 transposon mutant rpoN1250::Tn5 did not cause fire blight disease symptoms on shoots of mature apple trees. In detached immature apple fruits, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to cause fire blight disease symptoms and grew to population levels 12 orders of magnitude lower than the wild-type. In addition, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into nonhost tobacco plant leaves, and rpoN1250::Tn5 cells failed to express HrpN protein when grown in hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing liquid medium. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type rpoN gene complemented all the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant phenotypes tested. The rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant was prototrophic on minimal solid and liquid media, indicating that the rpoN1250::Tn5 nonpathogenic phenotype was not caused by a defect in basic metabolism or growth. This study provides clear genetic evidence that rpoN is an essential virulence gene of E. amylovora, suggesting that rpoN has the same function in E. amylovora as in P. syringae and Pe. carotovorum.

  2. Erwinia amylovora CRISPR elements provide new tools for evaluating strain diversity and for microbial source tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Gayle C; Sundin, George W

    2012-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) comprise a family of short DNA repeat sequences that are separated by non repetitive spacer sequences and, in combination with a suite of Cas proteins, are thought to function as an adaptive immune system against invading DNA. The number of CRISPR arrays in a bacterial chromosome is variable, and the content of each array can differ in both repeat number and in the presence or absence of specific spacers. We utilized a comparative sequence analysis of CRISPR arrays of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora to uncover previously unknown genetic diversity in this species. A total of 85 E. amylovora strains varying in geographic isolation (North America, Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East), host range, plasmid content, and streptomycin sensitivity/resistance were evaluated for CRISPR array number and spacer variability. From these strains, 588 unique spacers were identified in the three CRISPR arrays present in E. amylovora, and these arrays could be categorized into 20, 17, and 2 patterns types, respectively. Analysis of the relatedness of spacer content differentiated most apple and pear strains isolated in the eastern U.S. from western U.S. strains. In addition, we identified North American strains that shared CRISPR genotypes with strains isolated on other continents. E. amylovora strains from Rubus and Indian hawthorn contained mostly unique spacers compared to apple and pear strains, while strains from loquat shared 79% of spacers with apple and pear strains. Approximately 23% of the spacers matched known sequences, with 16% targeting plasmids and 5% targeting bacteriophage. The plasmid pEU30, isolated in E. amylovora strains from the western U.S., was targeted by 55 spacers. Lastly, we used spacer patterns and content to determine that streptomycin-resistant strains of E. amylovora from Michigan were low in diversity and matched corresponding streptomycin-sensitive strains from the

  3. Erwinia amylovora CRISPR elements provide new tools for evaluating strain diversity and for microbial source tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle C McGhee

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs comprise a family of short DNA repeat sequences that are separated by non repetitive spacer sequences and, in combination with a suite of Cas proteins, are thought to function as an adaptive immune system against invading DNA. The number of CRISPR arrays in a bacterial chromosome is variable, and the content of each array can differ in both repeat number and in the presence or absence of specific spacers. We utilized a comparative sequence analysis of CRISPR arrays of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora to uncover previously unknown genetic diversity in this species. A total of 85 E. amylovora strains varying in geographic isolation (North America, Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East, host range, plasmid content, and streptomycin sensitivity/resistance were evaluated for CRISPR array number and spacer variability. From these strains, 588 unique spacers were identified in the three CRISPR arrays present in E. amylovora, and these arrays could be categorized into 20, 17, and 2 patterns types, respectively. Analysis of the relatedness of spacer content differentiated most apple and pear strains isolated in the eastern U.S. from western U.S. strains. In addition, we identified North American strains that shared CRISPR genotypes with strains isolated on other continents. E. amylovora strains from Rubus and Indian hawthorn contained mostly unique spacers compared to apple and pear strains, while strains from loquat shared 79% of spacers with apple and pear strains. Approximately 23% of the spacers matched known sequences, with 16% targeting plasmids and 5% targeting bacteriophage. The plasmid pEU30, isolated in E. amylovora strains from the western U.S., was targeted by 55 spacers. Lastly, we used spacer patterns and content to determine that streptomycin-resistant strains of E. amylovora from Michigan were low in diversity and matched corresponding streptomycin-sensitive strains

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL TRICHODERMA ISOLATES FOR POTENTIAL BIOCONTROL OF PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Matei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Various fungal strains belonging to genus Trichoderma act as biological control agents for soil born plant pathogens. Two new strains of Trichoderma harzianum (T.h. and Trichoderma viride (T.v. were isolated from forest soils in Ilfov county and their morphological aspects, enzymatic and antagonistic activity were examined. Current chemical fungicides had constantly, in time, less influence on pathogens due to their diversity, adaptability and increasing resistance.The paper present the morphological characterization of two strains of Trichoderma isolated from forest soils. Growth rate was higher in strain T.v.SP456 (0,675mm/h than in strain T.h.P8 (0,505mm/h when fungi were grown on Czapek culture medium.Morphological description is completed with photographs of colonies in Petri plates and microscopical aspects of fungal structures belonging to Trichoderma strains SP456 and P8.Comparative aspects concerning the level of main enzymes released by T.h. isolate P8 and T.v.SP456 in liquid culture media showed differences as a function of genetic structure of each fungal isolate. The optimum culture media for inducing peroxidase, polyphenol-oxidase, β-1,3-glucanase activity in T.v.SP456 isolate was Czapek and PDA for phenil-alanin-ammonium-oxidase and chitinase. T.v.SP456 was more efficient than T.h.P8 concerning enzymes activity.The interaction between Trichoderma fungal strains SP456 and P8 and strawberry plant pathogen strains, three belonging to Botrytis cinerea (S1, P1, P2 and one to Phytophtora spp. were examined, also. Both Trichoderma strains act as mycoparasites for plant pathogens. The inhibition percent of radial growth was higher for T.v.SP456 when compared with T.h.P8 for almost all pathogenic isolates.

  5. Genome sequence of the plant pathogen and biotechnology agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodner, B; Hinkle, G; Gattung, S; Miller, N; Blanchard, M; Qurollo, B; Goldman, B S; Cao, Y; Askenazi, M; Halling, C; Mullin, L; Houmiel, K; Gordon, J; Vaudin, M; Iartchouk, O; Epp, A; Liu, F; Wollam, C; Allinger, M; Doughty, D; Scott, C; Lappas, C; Markelz, B; Flanagan, C; Crowell, C; Gurson, J; Lomo, C; Sear, C; Strub, G; Cielo, C; Slater, S

    2001-12-14

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen capable of transferring a defined segment of DNA to a host plant, generating a gall tumor. Replacing the transferred tumor-inducing genes with exogenous DNA allows the introduction of any desired gene into the plant. Thus, A. tumefaciens has been critical for the development of modern plant genetics and agricultural biotechnology. Here we describe the genome of A. tumefaciens strain C58, which has an unusual structure consisting of one circular and one linear chromosome. We discuss genome architecture and evolution and additional genes potentially involved in virulence and metabolic parasitism of host plants.

  6. Multiplex detection of plant pathogens through the Luminex MagPlex bead system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlugt, René A A; van Raaij, Henry; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Bergervoet, Jan H W

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a versatile multiplex method for both the serological and molecular detection of plant pathogens. The Luminex MagPlex bead system uses small paramagnetic microspheres ("beads"), either coated with specific antibodies or oligonucleotides, which capture respectively viruses and/or bacteria or PCR products obtained from their genetic material. The Luminex MagPlex bead system allows true multiplex detection of up to 500 targets in a single sample on a routine basis. The liquid suspension nature of the method significantly improves (1) assay speed, (2) detection limits and (3) dynamic range. It can also considerably reduce labor and consumables costs.

  7. Deciphering plant-pathogen communication: fresh perspectives for molecular resistance breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Parker, Jane E

    2003-04-01

    Activation of local and systemic plant defences in response to pathogen attack involves dramatic cellular reprogramming. Over the past 10 years many novel genes, proteins and molecules have been discovered as a result of investigating plant-pathogen interactions. Most attempts to harness this knowledge to engineer improved disease resistance in crops have failed. Although gene efficacy in transgenic plants has often been good, commercial exploitation has not been possible because of the detrimental effects on plant growth, development and crop yield. Biotechnology approaches have now shifted emphasis towards marker-assisted breeding and the construction of vectors containing highly regulated transgenes that confer resistance in several distinct ways.

  8. Comparative genomics of 12 strains of Erwinia amylovora identifies a pan-genome with a large conserved core.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Mann

    Full Text Available The plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora can be divided into two host-specific groupings; strains infecting a broad range of hosts within the Rosaceae subfamily Spiraeoideae (e.g., Malus, Pyrus, Crataegus, Sorbus and strains infecting Rubus (raspberries and blackberries. Comparative genomic analysis of 12 strains representing distinct populations (e.g., geographic, temporal, host origin of E. amylovora was used to describe the pan-genome of this major pathogen. The pan-genome contains 5751 coding sequences and is highly conserved relative to other phytopathogenic bacteria comprising on average 89% conserved, core genes. The chromosomes of Spiraeoideae-infecting strains were highly homogeneous, while greater genetic diversity was observed between Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains (and among individual Rubus-infecting strains, the majority of which was attributed to variable genomic islands. Based on genomic distance scores and phylogenetic analysis, the Rubus-infecting strain ATCC BAA-2158 was genetically more closely related to the Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora than it was to the other Rubus-infecting strains. Analysis of the accessory genomes of Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains has identified putative host-specific determinants including variation in the effector protein HopX1(Ea and a putative secondary metabolite pathway only present in Rubus-infecting strains.

  9. Comparative genomics of 12 strains of Erwinia amylovora identifies a pan-genome with a large conserved core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rachel A; Smits, Theo H M; Bühlmann, Andreas; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Plummer, Kim M; Beer, Steven V; Luck, Joanne; Duffy, Brion; Rodoni, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    The plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora can be divided into two host-specific groupings; strains infecting a broad range of hosts within the Rosaceae subfamily Spiraeoideae (e.g., Malus, Pyrus, Crataegus, Sorbus) and strains infecting Rubus (raspberries and blackberries). Comparative genomic analysis of 12 strains representing distinct populations (e.g., geographic, temporal, host origin) of E. amylovora was used to describe the pan-genome of this major pathogen. The pan-genome contains 5751 coding sequences and is highly conserved relative to other phytopathogenic bacteria comprising on average 89% conserved, core genes. The chromosomes of Spiraeoideae-infecting strains were highly homogeneous, while greater genetic diversity was observed between Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains (and among individual Rubus-infecting strains), the majority of which was attributed to variable genomic islands. Based on genomic distance scores and phylogenetic analysis, the Rubus-infecting strain ATCC BAA-2158 was genetically more closely related to the Spiraeoideae-infecting strains of E. amylovora than it was to the other Rubus-infecting strains. Analysis of the accessory genomes of Spiraeoideae- and Rubus-infecting strains has identified putative host-specific determinants including variation in the effector protein HopX1(Ea) and a putative secondary metabolite pathway only present in Rubus-infecting strains.

  10. Characterization of the small RNA transcriptome in plant-microbe (Brassica/Erwinia) interactions by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuan Bao

    2014-02-01

    Non-coding, small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in a wide spectrum of organisms ranging from bacteria to humans; however, the role and mechanisms of these sRNA in plant immunity is largely unknown. To determine possible roles of sRNA in plant-pathogen interaction, we carried out a high-throughput sRNA sequencing of Brassica campestris using non-infected plants and plants infected with Erwinia carotovora. Consistent with our hypothesis that distinct classes of host sRNAs alerts their expression levels in response to infection, we found that: (1) host 28-nt sRNAs were strongly increased under pathogen infection; and (2) a group of host sRNAs homologous to the pathogen genome also accumulated at significantly higher level. Our data thus suggest several distinct classes of the host sRNAs may enhance their function by up-regulation of their expression/stability in response to bacterial pathogen challenges.

  11. Quorum sensing-controlled Evr regulates a conserved cryptic pigment biosynthetic cluster and a novel phenomycin-like locus in the plant pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Neil R; Commander, Paul M B; Salmond, George P C

    2010-07-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum SCRI193 is a phytopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, we have identified a novel cryptic pigment biosynthetic locus in P. carotovorum SCRI193 which we have called the Pectobacterium orange pigment (pop) cluster. The pop cluster is flanked by two tRNA genes and contains genes that encode non-ribosomal peptide synthases and polyketide synthase and produces a negatively charged polar orange pigment. Orange pigment production is activated when an adjacent transcriptional activator sharing sequence similarity with the Erwinia virulence regulator (Evr) is overexpressed. Evr was shown to positively activate its own transcription and that of the pigment biosynthetic genes and an unlinked locus encoding a phenomycin homologue. In addition, the expression of Evr and orange pigment production was shown to be regulated by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-HSL (OHHL) quorum sensing and have a virulence phenotype in potato. Finally, by comparative genomics and Southern blotting we demonstrate that this pigment biosynthetic cluster is present in multiple P. carotovorum spp., Pectobacterium brasiliensis 1692 and a truncated version of the cluster is present in Pectobacterium atrosepticum. The conserved nature of this cluster in P. carotovorum and P. brasiliensis suggests that the pop cluster has an important function in these broad-host-range soft rotting bacteria, which is no longer required in the narrow-host-range P. atrosepticum SCRI1043.

  12. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen interactions. [Lycopersicon esculentum; Phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, D.C.; Weinstein, L.H.; Mancini, J.F.; van Lueken, P.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments in fumigation chambers with tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were performed to assess the effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen (fungal and bacterial) interactions. Hydrogen fluoride was found to alter the plant-pathogen interaction, although the kind and consistency of effect caused by HF depended upon the host, pathogen, and several other factors. A reduction in powdery mildew probably indicates that HF was affecting the infectivity of the pathogen itself because reduction in disease was proportional to the length of the exposure period, infection was continuous during the exposure period, and the pathogen itself was epiphytic. The effect of fluoride on bean rust may have been due to accumulated fluoride in the leaf having a direct or indirect effect on the pathogen because both pre- and post-inoculation exposures to HF were effective and additive. Other evidence for an indirect effect of fluoride was found in halo-blight where stem collapse was affected but foliar symptoms were not, and the site affected was spatially removed from the site of fluoride accumulation. Effects on early blight of tomato also indicated an effect of fluoride in the leaf.

  13. SCREENING OF FLUORESCENT RHIZOBACTERIA FOR THE BIOCONTROL OF SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANELISE DIAS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol of soilborne plant pathogens represents a promising approach from the environ- mental and practical points of view. Fluorescent pseudomonad rhizobacteria are well known by their antagonis- tic capacity towards several plant pathogens due to a diversity of antimicrobial metabolites they produce. This study was conceived to select and characterize rhizobacteria having antagonistic potential towards the patho- genic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. A total of 94 bacterial strains isolated from the rhizospheres of four vegetable species under organic cultivation were evaluated. Twenty-two strains which predominate in lettuce and rudbeckia rhizospheres showed identical biochemical profiles to Pseudomonas fluo- rescens, while in kale and parsley rhizospheres identical profiles to Pseudomonas putida (subgroups A and B strains prevailed. Two types of antagonism were verified in vitro and defined as competition and inhibition of mycelial growth. Sixty percent of the evaluated strains showed antagonistic potential and, among those, 24 strains expressed antagonism to both target fungi, with P. fluorescens being the most representative bacterial species. This work clearly identified a number of strains with potential for use as plant growth-promoting and biocontrol of the two soilborne fungal pathogens in vegetable crops production systems.

  14. Identification of Plant-Pathogenic Fungi Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Combined with Chemometric Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI A-li; WANG Yi-kai; ZHU Fa-di; SHI Yan-xia; XIE Xue-wen; LI Bao-ju

    2016-01-01

    Identification of plant-pathogenic fungi is time-consuming due to cultivation and microscopic exami-nation and can be influenced by the interpretation of the micro-morphological characters observed.The present investigation aimed to create a simple but sophisticated method for the identification of plant-pathogenic fungi by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)spectroscopy.In this study,FTIR-attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy was used in combination with chemometric analysis for identification of important pathogenic fun-gi of horticultural plants.Mixtures of mycelia and spores from 27 fungal strains belonging to nine different families were collected from liquid PD or solid PDA media cultures and subj ected to FTIR-ATR spectroscopy measurements.The FTIR-ATR spectra ranging from 4 000 to 400 cm-1 were obtained.To classify the FTIR-ATR spectra,cluster analysis was compared with canonical vitiate analysis (CVA)in the spectral regions of 3 050~2 800 and 1 800~900 cm-1 .Results showed that the identification accuracies achieved 97.53% and 9 9.1 8% for the cluster analysis and CVA analysis,respectively,demonstrating the high potential of this tech-nique for fungal strain identification.

  15. The Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies: molecular investigation of gram-positive bacterial plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies are actinomycete plant pathogens residing mainly in the xylem vessels that infect economically important host plants. In the Clavibacter subspecies michiganensis and sepedonicus, infecting tomato and potato, respectively, essential factors for disease induction are plasmid encoded and loss of the virulence plasmids converts these biotrophic pathogens into endophytes. The genes responsible for successful colonization of the host plant, including evasion/suppression of plant defense reactions, are chromosomally encoded. Several serine proteases seem to be involved in colonization. They are secreted by Clavibacter, but their targets remain unknown. A type 3 secretion system (T3SS) translocating effectors into the plant cells is absent in these gram-positive pathogens. With the development of the modern 'omics technologies for RNA and proteins based on the known genome sequences, a new phase in the investigation of the mechanisms of plant pathogenicity has begun to allow the genome-wide investigation of the Clavibacter-host interaction. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  16. Plant pathogen-induced volatiles attract parasitoids to increase parasitism of an insect vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eMartini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between plant pathogens and arthropods have been predominantly studied through the prism of herbivorous arthropods. Currently, little is known about the effect of plant pathogens on the third trophic level. This question is particularly interesting in cases where pathogens manipulate host phenotype to increase vector attraction and presumably increase their own proliferation. Indeed, a predator or a parasitoid of a vector may take advantage of this manipulated phenotype to increase its foraging performance. We explored the case of a bacterial pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las, which modifies the odors released by its host plant (citrus trees to attract its vector, the psyllid Diaphorina citri. We found that the specialist parasitoid of D. citri, Tamarixia radiata, was attracted more toward Las-infected than uninfected plants. We demonstrated that this attractiveness was due to the release of methyl salicylate. Parasitization of D. citri nymphs on Las-infected plants was higher than on uninfected controls. Also, parasitization was higher on uninfected plants baited with methyl salicylate than on non-baited controls. This is the first report of a parasitoid ‘eavesdropping’ on a plant volatile induced by bacterial pathogen infection, which also increases effectiveness of host seeking behavior of its herbivorous vector.

  17. Hijacking of the host SCF ubiquitin ligase machinery by plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei eMagori

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein ubiquitin ligase complex mediates polyubiquitination of proteins targeted for degradation, thereby controlling a plethora of biological processes in eukaryotic cells. Although this ubiquitination machinery is found and functional only in eukaryotes, many non-eukaryotic pathogens also encode F-box proteins, the critical subunits of the SCF complex. Increasing evidence indicates that such non-eukaryotic F-box proteins play an essential role in subverting or exploiting the host ubiquitin/proteasome system for efficient pathogen infection. A recent bioinformatic analysis has identified more than 70 F-box proteins in 22 different bacterial species, suggesting that use of pathogen-encoded F-box effectors in the host cell may be a widespread infection strategy. In this review, we focus on plant pathogen-encoded F-box effectors, such as VirF of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, GALAs of Ralstonia solanacearum, and P0 of Poleroviruses, and discuss the molecular mechanism by which plant pathogens use these factors to manipulate the host cell for their own benefit.

  18. Antifungal activity of diketopiperazines and stilbenes against plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Nishanth; Nambisan, Bala

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate antifungal activity of a stilbene and diketopiperazine compounds against plant pathogenic fungi, including Phytophthora capsici, P. colocasiae, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Minimal inhibition concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of stilbenes and diketopiperazines for each fungus were determined using microplate method. Best activity was recorded by stilbenes against P. capsici and P. colocasiae. All four test compounds were effective in inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of test fungi. Stilbenes were more effective than diketopiperazines in inhibiting mycelial growth and inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of P. capsici and P. colocasiae. Rupture of released zoospores induced by stilbenes was reduced by addition of 100 mM glucose. The effects of stilbenes on mycelial growth and zoospore release, but not zoospore rupture, were reduced largely when pH value was above 7. In addition, stilbenes were investigated for its antifungal stability against Phytophthora sp. The results showed that stilbenes maintained strong fungistatic activity over a wide pH range (pH 4–9) and temperature range (70–120 °C). The compound stilbenes exhibited strong and stable broad-spectrum antifungal activity, and had a significant fungicidal effect on fungal cells. Results from prebiocontrol evaluations performed to date are probably useful in the search for alternative approaches to controlling serious plant pathogens.

  19. Indole-3-acetic acid in plant-pathogen interactions: a key molecule for in planta bacterial virulence and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Decorosi, Francesca; Biancalani, Carola; Ortenzi, Maria Vittoria; Macconi, Sofia; Giovannetti, Luciana; Viti, Carlo; Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Bramanti, Emilia; Tegli, Stefania

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi, the causal agent of olive and oleander knot disease, uses the so-called "indole-3-acetamide pathway" to convert tryptophan to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) via a two-step pathway catalyzed by enzymes encoded by the genes in the iaaM/iaaH operon. Moreover, pathovar nerii of P. savastanoi is able to conjugate IAA to lysine to generate the less biologically active compound IAA-Lys via the enzyme IAA-lysine synthase encoded by the iaaL gene. Interestingly, iaaL is now known to be widespread in many Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, even in the absence of the iaaM and iaaH genes for IAA biosynthesis. Here, two knockout mutants, ΔiaaL and ΔiaaM, of strain Psn23 of P. savastanoi pv. nerii were produced. Pathogenicity tests using the host plant Nerium oleander showed that ΔiaaL and ΔiaaM were hypervirulent and hypovirulent, respectively and these features appeared to be related to their differential production of free IAA. Using the Phenotype Microarray approach, the chemical sensitivity of these mutants was shown to be comparable to that of wild-type Psn23. The main exception was 8 hydroxyquinoline, a toxic compound that is naturally present in plant exudates and is used as a biocide, which severely impaired the growth of ΔiaaL and ΔiaaM, as well as growth of the non-pathogenic mutant ΔhrpA, which lacks a functional Type Three Secretion System (TTSS). According to bioinformatics analysis of the Psn23 genome, a gene encoding a putative Multidrug and Toxic compound Extrusion (MATE) transporter, was found upstream of iaaL. Similarly to iaaL and iaaM, its expression appeared to be TTSS-dependent. Moreover, auxin-responsive elements were identified for the first time in the modular promoters of both the iaaL gene and the iaaM/iaaH operon of P. savastanoi, suggesting their IAA-inducible transcription. Gene expression analysis of several genes related to TTSS, IAA metabolism and drug resistance confirmed the presence of a

  20. Mutational analysis of a predicted double β-propeller domain of the DspA/E effector of Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamer, Sabrina; Gaubert, Stéphane; Boureau, Tristan; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2013-05-01

    The bacterium Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, an invasive disease that threatens apple trees, pear trees and other plants of the Rosaceae family. Erwinia amylovora pathogenicity relies on a type III secretion system and on a single effector DspA/E. This effector belongs to the widespread AvrE family of effectors whose biological function is unknown. In this manuscript, we performed a bioinformatic analysis of DspA/E- and AvrE-related effectors. Motif search identified nuclear localization signals, peroxisome targeting signals, endoplasmic reticulum membrane retention signals and leucine zipper motifs, but none of these motifs were present in all the AvrE-related effectors analysed. Protein threading analysis, however, predicted a conserved double β-propeller domain in the N-terminal part of all the analysed effector sequences. We then performed a random pentapeptide mutagenesis of DspA/E, which led to the characterization of 13 new altered proteins with a five amino acids insertion. Eight harboured the insertion inside the predicted β-propeller domain and six of these eight insertions impaired DspA/E stability or function. Conversely, the two remaining insertions generated proteins that were functional and abundantly secreted in the supernatant suggesting that these two insertions stabilized the protein.

  1. The Differences among Pear Genotypes to Fire Blight (Erwinia amylovora Attack, Based on Observations of Natural Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana F. SESTRAS

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most damaging diseases of pear in the world. In Cluj-Napoca area, situated in central Transylvania, Romania, fire blight was observed first in 1994, very late comparative with the other countries from occidental Europe. The response of the pear cultivars and species from National Pear Collection from Cluj-Napoca to fire blight attack, assessed in natural conditions of infection, range on a large scale of variability, which denotes a strong influence of the genotype in expression of resistance or sensitivity to disease. From all genotypes, about 20.5% have not presented symptoms of attack, among them being the following: 'Blanquet precoce', 'Klementinka', 'Severianka', 'Beurre Bachelier', 'Kieffer Seedling', 'Er Shi Shinge', 'Beurre Amanlis', 'Bristol Cross', 'Beurre Liegel', 'Beurre Lucon', 'Grand Champion', 'Magness', 'Mericourt' etc. and several ancient autochthonous cultivars ('Pere malaiete', 'De zahar de Bihor', 'Cu miez rosu', 'Clopotele', 'Garoafa mare', 'Craiese', 'Para de apa'. Also, there were identified several species of Pyrus with no attack, as P. pollveria, P. common pear, P. lindlezi, P. malifolia, P. persica, P. ussuriensis, P. variolosa. The remarked genotypes could be potential sources for further breeding programmes and increase the number of genotypes available for breeding new pear cultivars resistant to Erwinia attack.

  2. Virulence Factors of Erwinia amylovora: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué, Núria; Miñana-Galbis, David; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2015-06-05

    Erwinia amylovora, a Gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of host species within Rosaceae and a major global threat to commercial apple and pear production. Among the limited number of control options currently available, prophylactic application of antibiotics during the bloom period appears the most effective. Pathogen cells enter plants through the nectarthodes of flowers and other natural openings, such as wounds, and are capable of rapid movement within plants and the establishment of systemic infections. Many virulence determinants of E. amylovora have been characterized, including the Type III secretion system (T3SS), the exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran, biofilm formation, and motility. To successfully establish an infection, E. amylovora uses a complex regulatory network to sense the relevant environmental signals and coordinate the expression of early and late stage virulence factors involving two component signal transduction systems, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and quorum sensing. The LPS biosynthetic gene cluster is one of the relatively few genetic differences observed between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting genotypes of E. amylovora. Other differential factors, such as the presence and composition of an integrative conjugative element associated with the Hrp T3SS (hrp genes encoding the T3SS apparatus), have been recently described. In the present review, we present the recent findings on virulence factors research, focusing on their role in bacterial pathogenesis and indicating other virulence factors that deserve future research to characterize them.

  3. Microbiological examination of Erwinia amylovora exopolysaccharide ooze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Suzanne; Zeng, Quan; Outwater, Cory; Sundin, George W

    2017-01-03

    Fire blight, caused by the pathogen Erwinia amylovora (Burrill) Winslow et al, is the most devastating bacterial disease of pome fruits in North America and worldwide. The primary method of dispersal for E. amylovora is through ooze, a mass of exopolysaccharides and bacterial cells that is exuded as droplets from infected host tissue. During the 2013 and 2014 field seasons, 317 ooze droplets were collected from field-inoculated apple trees. Populations of E. amylovora in ooze droplets were 108 colony forming units per microliter on average (cfu/µl). Ooze droplets harboring larger (> 108 cfu/µl) cell populations were typically smaller in total volume and had darker coloring, such as orange, red, or dark red hues. Examination of apple host tissue at the site of emergence of ooze droplets using scanning electron microscopy revealed that ooze was not exuding through natural openings; instead, it was found on erumpent mounds and small (10 µm) tears in tissue. These observations suggested that E. amylovora-induced wounds in tissue provided the exit holes for ooze extrusion from the host. Analyses of E. amylovora populations in ooze droplets and within the stems from which ooze droplets emerged indicated that approximately 9% of the total bacterial population from infected stems is diverted to ooze. Gene expression analyses indicated that E. amylovora cells in stem sections located above ooze droplets and in ooze droplets were actively expressing critical pathogenicity genes such as hrpL, dspE, and amsK. Thus, our study identified ooze as a source of large, concentrated populations of E. amylovora that emerged from the host by rupturing host tissue. As the cells in ooze droplets are expressing genes required for pathogenesis, they are already primed for infection should they be dispersed from ooze to new infection courts.

  4. Virulence Factors of Erwinia amylovora: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Piqué

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora, a Gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of host species within Rosaceae and a major global threat to commercial apple and pear production. Among the limited number of control options currently available, prophylactic application of antibiotics during the bloom period appears the most effective. Pathogen cells enter plants through the nectarthodes of flowers and other natural openings, such as wounds, and are capable of rapid movement within plants and the establishment of systemic infections. Many virulence determinants of E. amylovora have been characterized, including the Type III secretion system (T3SS, the exopolysaccharide (EPS amylovoran, biofilm formation, and motility. To successfully establish an infection, E. amylovora uses a complex regulatory network to sense the relevant environmental signals and coordinate the expression of early and late stage virulence factors involving two component signal transduction systems, bis-(3′-5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP and quorum sensing. The LPS biosynthetic gene cluster is one of the relatively few genetic differences observed between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting genotypes of E. amylovora. Other differential factors, such as the presence and composition of an integrative conjugative element associated with the Hrp T3SS (hrp genes encoding the T3SS apparatus, have been recently described. In the present review, we present the recent findings on virulence factors research, focusing on their role in bacterial pathogenesis and indicating other virulence factors that deserve future research to characterize them.

  5. Frontiers for research on the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria: fundamentals for sustainability: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Barny, Marie-Anne; Berge, Odile; Kinkel, Linda L; Lacroix, Christelle

    2017-02-01

    Methods to ensure the health of crops owe their efficacy to the extent to which we understand the ecology and biology of environmental microorganisms and the conditions under which their interactions with plants lead to losses in crop quality or yield. However, in the pursuit of this knowledge, notions of the ecology of plant-pathogenic microorganisms have been reduced to a plant-centric and agro-centric focus. With increasing global change, i.e. changes that encompass not only climate, but also biodiversity, the geographical distribution of biomes, human demographic and socio-economic adaptations and land use, new plant health problems will emerge via a range of processes influenced by these changes. Hence, knowledge of the ecology of plant pathogens will play an increasingly important role in the anticipation and response to disease emergence. Here, we present our opinion on the major challenges facing the study of the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria. We argue that the discovery of markedly novel insights into the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria is most likely to happen within a framework of more extensive scales of space, time and biotic interactions than those that currently guide much of the research on these bacteria. This will set a context that is more propitious for the discovery of unsuspected drivers of the survival and diversification of plant-pathogenic bacteria and of the factors most critical for disease emergence, and will set the foundation for new approaches to the sustainable management of plant health. We describe the contextual background of, justification for and specific research questions with regard to the following challenges: Development of terminology to describe plant-bacterial relationships in terms of bacterial fitness. Definition of the full scope of the environments in which plant-pathogenic bacteria reside or survive. Delineation of pertinent phylogenetic contours of plant-pathogenic bacteria and naming of strains

  6. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of olive solutions from stored Alpeorujo against plant pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Eduardo; Romero, Concepcion; de Los Santos, Berta; de Castro, Antonio; Garcia, Aranzazu; Romero, Fernando; Brenes, Manuel

    2011-07-13

    The aim of this work was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial effects that wastewaters from alpeorujo oil extraction have against phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi. Alpeorujo was stored for 6 months and then processed to extract its oil, pomace, and a new liquid waste (OWSA), which was characterized by its content in phenolic compounds. OWSA at 20% decreased bu >4 log the population of Erwinia spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Clavibacter spp. viable cells in test tubes, whereas OWSA at 50% in agar medium was necessary to inhibit mycelial growth of most fungi. It was found that the bactericidal effect was due to the joint action of low molecular mass phenolic compounds, although neither hydroxytyrosol, its glucosides, hydroxytyrosol glycol, nor a glutaraldehyde-like compound individually explained this bioactivity. Hence, OWSA constitutes a promising natural solution to fight plant phytopathogenic bacteria and fungi.

  8. Erwinia tracheiphila colonization of cantaloupe fruits through flower inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaloupe (Cucumis melo var. cantalupensis) is a nutritious fresh fruit. Bacterial wilt, caused by Erwinia tracheiphila, is the most devastating cantaloupe disease globally. The pathogen is transmitted in nature by xylem-feeding spotted and striped cucumber beetles; other modes of infection have ...

  9. Hyacintentelers stemmen in met aanpak Erwinia en fonds onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, A.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Twee stevige onderwerpen telde de agenda van de jaarvergadering van de KAVB-productgroep Hyacint. Het voorstel om werkbollen te gaan toetsen op Erwinia kreeg bijval, en ook het plan om een fonds te vormen waaruit hyacintenonderzoek wordt betaald werd met instemming begroet.

  10. Fysische, chemische en biologische bestrijding van pectinolytische Erwinia's

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Doorn, van J.

    2006-01-01

    Rotveroorzakende bacteriën, met name pectinolytische Erwinia spp., zijn verantwoordelijk voor veel schade in de diverse gewassen, vooral in de teelt van aardappelen en de bloembolgewassen hyacint, zantedeschia en iris. In deze literatuurstudie worden de beschikbare gegevens nog eens nader bekeken va

  11. Hyacintentelers stemmen in met aanpak Erwinia en fonds onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, A.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Twee stevige onderwerpen telde de agenda van de jaarvergadering van de KAVB-productgroep Hyacint. Het voorstel om werkbollen te gaan toetsen op Erwinia kreeg bijval, en ook het plan om een fonds te vormen waaruit hyacintenonderzoek wordt betaald werd met instemming begroet.

  12. Fysische, chemische en biologische bestrijding van pectinolytische Erwinia's

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Doorn, van J.

    2006-01-01

    Rotveroorzakende bacteriën, met name pectinolytische Erwinia spp., zijn verantwoordelijk voor veel schade in de diverse gewassen, vooral in de teelt van aardappelen en de bloembolgewassen hyacint, zantedeschia en iris. In deze literatuurstudie worden de beschikbare gegevens nog eens nader bekeken va

  13. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of EaLsc, a levansucrase from Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is a destructive pathogen of Rosaceae. During infection, E. amylovora produces the exopolysaccharide levan, which contributes to the occlusion of plant vessels, causing the wilting of shoots. Levan is a fructose polymer that is synthesized by multifunctional enzymes called levansucrases. The levansucrase from E. amylovora (EaLsc) was heterologously expressed as a GST-fusion protein in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized after tag removal. The protein crystallized in space group P21212. X-ray diffraction data were acquired to 2.77 Å resolution. The structure of the enzyme was solved by molecular replacement. The asymmetric unit contains eight enzyme molecules, giving a solvent content of 58.74% and a Matthews coefficient of 2.98 Å(3) Da(-1).

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis M75, a biocontrol agent against fungal plant pathogens, isolated from cotton waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Sang Yeob; Weon, Hang-Yeon; Sang, Mee Kyung; Song, Jaekyeong

    2017-01-10

    Bacillus species have been widely used as biological control agents in agricultural fields due to their ability to suppress plant pathogens. Bacillus velezensis M75 was isolated from cotton waste used for mushroom cultivation in Korea, and was found to be antagonistic to fungal plant pathogens. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the M75 strain, which has a 4,007,450-bp single circular chromosome with 3921 genes and a G+C content of 46.60%. The genome contained operons encoding various non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Our results will provide a better understanding of the genome of B. velezensis strains for their application as biocontrol agents against fungal plant pathogens in agricultural fields.

  15. Forest species diversity reduces disease risk in a generalist plant pathogen invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sarah E.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Rizzo, David M.; Meentemeyer, Ross K.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that biodiversity loss can increase disease transmission, yet our understanding of the 'diversity-disease hypothesis' for generalist pathogens in natural ecosystems is limited. We used a landscape epidemiological approach to examine two scenarios regarding diversity effects on the emerging plant pathogen Phytophthora ramorum across a broad, heterogeneous ecoregion: (1) an amplification effect exists where disease risk is greater in areas with higher plant diversity due to the pathogen's wide host range, or (2) a dilution effect where risk is reduced with increasing diversity due to lower competency of alternative hosts. We found evidence for pathogen dilution, whereby disease risk was lower in sites with higher species diversity, after accounting for potentially confounding effects of host density and landscape heterogeneity. Our results suggest that although nearly all plants in the ecosystem are hosts, alternative hosts may dilute disease transmission by competent hosts, thereby buffering forest health from infectious disease.

  16. Reverse engineering gene regulatory networks related to quorum sensing in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuang; Husmeier, Dirk; Dondelinger, Frank; Mayer, Claus D; Liu, Hui; Prichard, Leighton; Salmond, George P C; Toth, Ian K; Birch, Paul R J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the project reported in the present chapter was the reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks related to quorum sensing in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum from micorarray gene expression profiles, obtained from the wild-type and eight knockout strains. To this end, we have applied various recent methods from multivariate statistics and machine learning: graphical Gaussian models, sparse Bayesian regression, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), Bayesian networks, and nested effects models. We have investigated the degree of similarity between the predictions obtained with the different approaches, and we have assessed the consistency of the reconstructed networks in terms of global topological network properties, based on the node degree distribution. The chapter concludes with a biological evaluation of the predicted network structures.

  17. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Papadakis

    Full Text Available A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics.

  18. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Skandalis, Nicholas; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics.

  19. Bergamotane Sesquiterpenes with Alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, You-Min; Fang, Cheng-An; Yao, Feng-Qi; Yu, Yuan; Shen, Ying; Hou, Zhuo-Ni; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Shan, Wei-Guang; Zhan, Zha-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Two new bergamotane sesquiterpene lactones, named expansolides C and D (1 and 2), together with two known compounds expansolides A and B (3 and 4), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus Penicillium expansum ACCC37275. The structures of the new compounds were established by detailed analyses of the spectroscopic data, especially 1D-, 2D-NMR, and HR-ESI-MS. In an in vitro bioassay, the epimeric mixture of expansolides C and D (1 and 2) (in a ratio of 2:1 at the temprature of the bioassay) exhibited more potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (IC50 =0.50 ± 0.02 mm) as compared with the positive control acarbose (IC50 = 1.90 ± 0.05 mm). To the best of our knowledge, it was the first report on the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of bergamotane sesquiterpenes.

  20. RIPEN FRUITS OF INDIAN GINSENG: PHYTO-CHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL EXAMINATION AGAINST HUMAN AND PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Singariya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ripen fruit extracts of Withania somniferawere evaluated against medically importantbacteria viz.Proteusmerabilis, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Agerobacterium tumefaciens(plant pathogenandone fungi Aspergillus niger.The dried and powdered ripen fruits were successively extracted with a seriesof non polar to polar solvents using soxhlet assembly. The antimicrobial assay was done by both discdiffusion and broth dilution methods. Glacial acetic acid extract of W. somniferashow highest activityagainst A. tumefaciens(plant pathogen and water extract againstK. pnemoniaeto varying degrees in theterms of high inhibition zone and activity index. A. tumefacienswas the most susceptible organism incompare to the other organism. Gentamycin and Ketoconazole, the standard antibacterial and antifungalused was effective against the bacteria and fungi. The extract of W. somniferaalso significantly (P>0.005inhibited the bacterial and fungal growth. The inhibitory effect is very identical in magnitude andcomparable with that of standard antibiotics used.

  1. Babaco (Vasconcellea heilbornii var. pentagona Badillo. Major plant pathogens and control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Rolando Robles-Carrión

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out with the aim of documenting the importance of Babaco for the Andean region, its main plant pathogens, and possible control strategies and integrated management, emphasizing the MVB. Was performed a systematic review of scientific papers published in prestigious journals and thesis diplomas, masters and doctorates from various universities. As a criterion for inclusion-exclusion studies were taken into account in the genus Vasconcellea. Ecuador has 15 of the 21 described species, of which more than half are located in the province of Loja. Vascular Wilt Babaco (MVB is caused by a complex of Fusarium fungi that interact with the plant. There are no integrated management strategies for Vascular Wilt Babaco scientifically proven.

  2. DNA Barcoding for Efficient Species- and Pathovar-Level Identification of the Quarantine Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qian; Zhao, Wenjun; Lu, Songyu; Zhu, Shuifang; Li, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Genus Xanthomonas comprises many economically important plant pathogens that affect a wide range of hosts. Indeed, fourteen Xanthomonas species/pathovars have been regarded as official quarantine bacteria for imports in China. To date, however, a rapid and accurate method capable of identifying all of the quarantine species/pathovars has yet to be developed. In this study, we therefore evaluated the capacity of DNA barcoding as a digital identification method for discriminating quarantine species/pathovars of Xanthomonas. For these analyses, 327 isolates, representing 45 Xanthomonas species/pathovars, as well as five additional species/pathovars from GenBank (50 species/pathovars total), were utilized to test the efficacy of four DNA barcode candidate genes (16S rRNA gene, cpn60, gyrB, and avrBs2). Of these candidate genes, cpn60 displayed the highest rate of PCR amplification and sequencing success. The tree-building (Neighbor-joining), ‘best close match’, and barcode gap methods were subsequently employed to assess the species- and pathovar-level resolution of each gene. Notably, all isolates of each quarantine species/pathovars formed a monophyletic group in the neighbor-joining tree constructed using the cpn60 sequences. Moreover, cpn60 also demonstrated the most satisfactory results in both barcoding gap analysis and the ‘best close match’ test. Thus, compared with the other markers tested, cpn60 proved to be a powerful DNA barcode, providing a reliable and effective means for the species- and pathovar-level identification of the quarantine plant pathogen Xanthomonas. PMID:27861494

  3. Proteomic profile of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici in response to the fungicide pyrimorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Miao, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhiwen; Bulone, Vincent; Liu, Xili

    2015-09-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide from the carboxylic acid amide (CAA) family used to control plant-pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora capsici. The proteomic response of P. capsici to pyrimorph was investigated using the iTRAQ technology to determine the target site of the fungicide and potential biomarker candidates of drug efficacy. A total of 1336 unique proteins were identified from the mycelium of wild-type P. capsici isolate (Hd3) and two pyrimorph-resistant mutants (R3-1 and R3-2) grown in the presence or absence of pyrimorph. Comparative analysis revealed that the three P. capsici isolates Hd3, R3-1, and R3-2 produced 163, 77, and 13 unique proteins, respectively, which exhibited altered levels of abundance in response to the pyrimorph treatment. Further investigations, using Cluster of Orthologous Groups of Proteins (COG) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified 35 proteins related to the mode of action of pyrimorph against P. capsici and 62 proteins involved in the stress response of P. capsici to pyrimorph. Many of the proteins with altered expression were associated with glucose and energy metabolism. Biochemical analysis using d-[U-(14) C]glucose verified the proteomics data, suggesting that the major mode of action of pyrimorph in P. capsici is the inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis. These results also illustrate that proteomics approaches are useful tools for determining the pathways targeted by novel fungicides as well as for evaluating the tolerance of plant pathogens to environmental challenges, such as the presence of fungicides.

  4. Biodiversity in agricultural soils, sustainable plant production and control of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Reinecke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens Soils are very heterogeneous substrates providing an environmental matrix with varying spatial and temporal gradients of pH, organic carbon, particle size distribution and moisture content. Chemical, physical as well as biological factors are operational and soil includes a vast variety of soil-dwelling invertebrates and microbes that interact with each other and the environment to influence plant productivity directly and indirectly. A review of recent literature on the role of soil biodiversity highlights the important role of soil invertebrates, notably earthworms, in influencing soil characteristics and soil borne plant pathogens. Earthworms are widely recognized as having critical functions in soil in regulating key processes that impact favourably on plant productivity and simultaneously eliminating or reducing soil borne diseases. The aim of this review is firstly to contribute towards a clarification of the role of soil biodiversity in general and to focus specifically on that of earthworms and their role in influencing plant pathogens and parasites. Evidence is provided that their activities can support plant productivity and suppress pathogens. Once the nature and extent of their role is better known and they are confirmed to support plant productivity to the extent that many soil biologists believe, the next logical step is to utilize knowledge of their ecology to create and manage favourable environmental conditions to ensure their survival and activity in agricultural soils. Agricultural management practices that favour soil organisms are also reviewed. Implementing these will make the services of soil biota available to improve and sustain agro-ecosystems. This requires a better understanding of the preferences and tolerance ranges of these organisms and their interactions before we can apply methodologies in general to manipulate environmental conditions to maximise the benefits that they may offer.

  5. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Leufen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei. Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of

  6. Role of soil, crop debris, and a plant pathogen in Salmonella enterica contamination of tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeri D Barak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the U.S., tomatoes have become the most implicated vehicle for produce-associated Salmonellosis with 12 outbreaks since 1998. Although unconfirmed, trace backs suggest pre-harvest contamination with Salmonella enterica. Routes of tomato crop contamination by S. enterica in the absence of direct artificial inoculation have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work examined the role of contaminated soil, the potential for crop debris to act as inoculum from one crop to the next, and any interaction between the seedbourne plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and S. enterica on tomato plants. Our results show S. enterica can survive for up to six weeks in fallow soil with the ability to contaminate tomato plants. We found S. enterica can contaminate a subsequent crop via crop debris; however a fallow period between crop incorporation and subsequent seeding can affect contamination patterns. Throughout these studies, populations of S. enterica declined over time and there was no bacterial growth in either the phyllosphere or rhizoplane. The presence of X. campestris pv. vesicatoria on co-colonized tomato plants had no effect on the incidence of S. enterica tomato phyllosphere contamination. However, growth of S. enterica in the tomato phyllosphere occurred on co-colonized plants in the absence of plant disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. enterica contaminated soil can lead to contamination of the tomato phyllosphere. A six week lag period between soil contamination and tomato seeding did not deter subsequent crop contamination. In the absence of plant disease, presence of the bacterial plant pathogen, X. campestris pv. vesicatoria was beneficial to S. enterica allowing multiplication of the human pathogen population. Any event leading to soil contamination with S. enterica could pose a public health risk with subsequent tomato production, especially in areas prone to bacterial spot disease.

  7. Multilocus phylogeny and MALDI-TOF analysis of the plant pathogenic species Alternaria dauci and relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Sophie; Madrid, Hugo; Gerrits Van Den Ende, Bert; Andersen, Birgitte; Marinach-Patrice, Carine; Mazier, Dominique; De Hoog, G Sybren

    2013-01-01

    The genus Alternaria includes numerous phytopathogenic species, many of which are economically relevant. Traditionally, identification has been based on morphology, but is often hampered by the tendency of some strains to become sterile in culture and by the existence of species-complexes of morphologically similar taxa. This study aimed to assess if strains of four closely-related plant pathogens, i.e., accurately Alternaria dauci (ten strains), Alternaria porri (six), Alternaria solani (ten), and Alternaria tomatophila (ten) could be identified using multilocus phylogenetic analysis and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) profiling of proteins. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on three loci, i.e., the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rRNA, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) and Alternaria major antigen (Alt a 1) genes. Phylogenetic trees based on ITS sequences did not differentiate strains of A. solani, A. tomatophila, and A. porri, but these three species formed a clade separate from strains of A. dauci. The resolution improved in trees based on gpd and Alt a 1, which distinguished strains of the four species as separate clades. However, none provided significant bootstrap support for all four species, which could only be achieved when results for the three loci were combined. MALDI-TOF-based dendrograms showed three major clusters. The first comprised all A. dauci strains, the second included five strains of A. porri and one of A. solani, and the third included all strains of A. tomatophila, as well as all but one strain of A. solani, and one strain of A. porri. Thus, this study shows the usefulness of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a promising tool for identification of these four species of Alternaria which are closely-related plant pathogens. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  9. The Production, Purification and Properties of the Biopolymer Levan Produced by the Bacterium Erwinia Herbicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    is produced by several bacteria, including Brwjnja herbicola. Streptococcus salivarius . Pseudomonas prunicola. Bacillus subtilis. and Actinomvcetes...ranging from 1 to 20 million daltons, for levan from Streptococcus salivarius and Erwlnla 22 herblcola. Viscosity, light scattering, and...sedimentation methods give values for levan Streptococcus salivarius from 18 to 100 million daltons.20,25,26,27 Liquid Chromatographie analysis of the

  10. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen.

  11. Phylogeography and population structure of the biologically invasive phytopathogen Erwinia amylovora inferred using minisatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühlmann, Andreas; Dreo, Tanja; Rezzonico, Fabio; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Ravnikar, Maja; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2014-07-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a major disease of pome fruit trees worldwide, and is regulated as a quarantine organism in many countries. While some diversity of isolates has been observed, molecular epidemiology of this bacterium is hindered by a lack of simple molecular typing techniques with sufficiently high resolution. We report a molecular typing system of E. amylovora based on variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis. Repeats in the E. amylovora genome were identified with comparative genomic tools, and VNTR markers were developed and validated. A Multiple-Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) was applied to E. amylovora isolates from bacterial collections representing global and regional distribution of the pathogen. Based on six repeats, MLVA allowed the distinction of 227 haplotypes among a collection of 833 isolates of worldwide origin. Three geographically separated groups were recognized among global isolates using Bayesian clustering methods. Analysis of regional outbreaks confirmed presence of diverse haplotypes but also high representation of certain haplotypes during outbreaks. MLVA analysis is a practical method for epidemiological studies of E. amylovora, identifying previously unresolved population structure within outbreaks. Knowledge of such structure can increase our understanding on how plant diseases emerge and spread over a given geographical region.

  12. Exopolysaccharides favor the survival of Erwinia amylovora under copper stress through different strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordax, Mónica; Marco-Noales, Ester; López, María M; Biosca, Elena G

    2010-09-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants very difficult to control. We demonstrated that copper, employed to control plant diseases, induces the "viable-but-nonculturable" (VBNC) state in E. amylovora. Moreover, it was previously reported that copper increases production of its main exopolysaccharide (EPS), amylovoran. In this work, the copper-complexing ability of amylovoran and levan, other major EPS of E. amylovora, was demonstrated. Following this, EPS-deficient mutants were used to determine the role of these EPSs in survival of this bacterium in AB mineral medium with copper, compared to their wild type strain and AB without copper. Total, viable and culturable counts of all strains were monitored for six months. With copper, a larger fraction of the viable population of EPS mutants entered into the VBNC state, and earlier than their wild type strain, showing the contribution of both EPSs to long-term survival in a culturable state. Further, we demonstrated that both EPSs can be used as carbon source by E. amylovora under deprivation conditions. Overall, these previously unreported functions of amylovoran and levan provide survival advantages for E. amylovora, which could contribute to its enhanced persistence in nature.

  13. Identification and characterization of Nip, necrosis-inducing virulence protein of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinen, Laura; Tshuikina, Marina; Mäe, Andres; Pirhonen, Minna

    2004-12-01

    Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora is a gram-negative bacterium that causes soft rot disease of many cultivated crops. When a collection of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates was analyzed on a Southern blot using the harpin-encoding gene hrpN as probe, several harpinless isolates were found. Regulation of virulence determinants in one of these, strain SCC3193, has been characterized extensively. It is fully virulent on potato and in Arabidopsis thaliana. An RpoS (SigmaS) mutant of SCC3193, producing elevated levels of secreted proteins, was found to cause lesions resembling the hypersensitive response when infiltrated into tobacco leaf tissue. This phenotype was evident only when bacterial cells had been cultivated on solid minimal medium at low pH and temperature. The protein causing'the cell death was purified and sequenced, and the corresponding gene was cloned. The deduced sequence of the necrosis-inducing protein (Nip) showed homology to necrosis- and ethylene-inducing elicitors of fungi and oomycetes. A mutant strain of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora lacking the nip gene showed reduced virulence in potato tuber assay but was unaffected in virulence in potato stem or on other tested host plants.

  14. Stepwise screening of microorganisms for commercial use in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Biological Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Postma, J.; Nicot, P.; Ruocco, M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new biocontrol products against plant diseases requires screening of high numbers of candidate antagonists. Antagonists for commercial use have to fulfill many different requirements. Besides being active against the specific targeted plant pathogens they must be safe and cost-eff

  15. The application of flow cytometry and fluorescent probe technology for detection and assessment of viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods to detect and assess the viability of plant pathogenic bacteria are usually based on plating assays or serological techniques. Plating assays provide information about the number of viable cells, expressed as colony-forming units, but are time-consuming and laborious.

  16. A nylon membrane bag assay for determination of the effect of chemicals on soilborne plant pathogens in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new nylon membrane bag assay was developed that can rapidly and effectively determine the impact of chemicals added to soil on soilborne plant pathogens for which there are no selective media or for which a selective medium is expensive or difficult to prepare. This assay consists of placing patho...

  17. Approaches to understanding the impact of life-history features on plant-pathogen co-evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy J. Burdon; Peter H. Thrall; Adnane Nemri

    2012-01-01

    Natural plant-pathogen associations are complex interactions in which the interplay of environment, host, and pathogen factors results in spatially heterogeneous ecological and epidemiological dynamics. The evolutionary patterns that result from the interaction of these factors are still relatively poorly understood. Recently, integration of the appropriate spatial and...

  18. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacter...

  19. Monitoring streams and stormwater ponds for early detection of oomycete plant pathogens in western Washington, a citizen science project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne Elliott; Lucy Rollins; Gary Chastagner

    2017-01-01

    Sudden Oak Death (SOD) is the common name for a disease caused by Phytophthora ramorum (oomycetes), an invasive plant pathogen of regulatory concern. The nursery, timber, forest specialty product, and Christmas tree industries in Washington are at risk because of the spread of P. ramorum within nurseries and from nurseries into...

  20. The application of flow cytometry and fluorescent probe technology for detection and assessment of viability of plant pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chitarra, L.G.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional methods to detect and assess the viability of plant pathogenic bacteria are usually based on plating assays or serological techniques. Plating assays provide information about the number of viable cells, expressed as colony-forming units, but are time-consuming and laborious. Serologica

  1. Characterization of the rcsB gene from Erwinia amylovora and its influence on exoploysaccharide synthesis and virulence of the fire blight pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereswill, S; Geider, K

    1997-02-01

    RcsB belongs to a family of positive regulators of exopolysaccharide synthesis in various enterobacteria. The rcsB gene of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora was cloned by PCR amplification with consensus primers, and its role in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis was investigated. Its overexpression from high-copy-number plasmids stimulated the synthesis of the acidic EPS amylovoran and suppressed expression of the levan-forming enzyme levansucrase. Inactivation of rcsB by site-directed mutagenesis created mutants that were deficient in amylovoran synthesis and avirulent on host plants. In addition, a cosmid which complemented rcsB mutants was selected from a genomic library. The spontaneous E. amylovora mutant E8 has a similar phenotype and was complemented by the cloned rcsB gene. The rcsB region of strain E8 was also amplified by PCR, and the mutation was characterized as a nine-nucleotide deletion at the start of the rcsB gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the E. amylovora rcsB region and the predicted amino acid sequence of RcsB revealed extensive homology to rcsB and the encoded protein of other bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Erwinia stewartii. In all three organisms, rcsB is localized adjacent to the rcsC gene, which is transcribed in the opposite direction of rcsB. The E. amylovora rcsB gene has now been shown to strongly affect the formation of disease symptoms of a plant pathogen.

  2. Molecular Weight and Aggregation of Erwinia Gum in Aqueous Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Erwinia(E) gum is composed of glucose, fucose, galactose and glucuronic acid. The weight-average molecular weights Mw, number-average molecular weights Mn and intrinsic viscosities[η] of the four fractions and the unfractionated E gum in aqueous solutions at desired temperatures were studied by light scattering, membrane osmometry, size exclusion chromatography(SEC) and viscometry. The experimental results prove that E gum formed aggregates in the aqueous solution at 25 ℃ and the aggregates were broken gradually with increasing temperature. The dissociation of the aggregates of E gum in the aqueous solution started at 36 ℃, and was completed at around 90 ℃. The [η] values of E gum and its fractions are much higher than those of the conventional polymers with the similar molecular weights, and decrease with increasing NaCl concentration.

  3. Erwinia carotovora elicitors and Botrytis cinerea activate defense responses in Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentancor Marcel

    2007-10-01

    . cinerea induce this type of cell death in vascular plants, our results suggest that E.c. carotovora CFSCC1 containing HrpN and B. cinerea could also induce this type of cell death in Physcomitrella. Our studies thus establish Physcomitrella as an experimental host for investigation of plant-pathogen interactions and B. cinerea and elicitors of E.c. carotovora as promising tools for understanding the mechanisms involved in defense responses and in pathogen-mediated cell death in this simple land plant.

  4. Characterization of the RcsC sensor kinase from Erwinia amylovora and other Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu

    2011-06-01

    RcsC is a hybrid sensor kinase which contains a sensor domain, a histidine kinase domain, and a receiver domain. We have previously demonstrated that, although the Erwinia amylovora rcsC mutant produces more amylovoran than the wild-type (WT) strain in vitro, the mutant remains nonpathogenic on both immature pear fruit and apple plants. In this study, we have comparatively characterized the Erwinia RcsC and its homologs from various enterobacteria. Results demonstrate that expression of the Erwinia rcsC gene suppresses amylovoran production in various amylovoran overproducing WT and mutant strains, thus suggesting the presence of a net phosphatase activity of Erwinia RcsC. Findings have also demonstrated that rcsC homologs from other enterobacteria could not rescue amylovoran production of the Erwinia rcsC mutant in vitro. However, virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant is partially restored by rcsC homologs from Pantoea stewartii, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica but not from Escherichia coli on apple shoots. Domain-swapping experiments have indicated that replacement of the E. coli RcsC sensor domain by those of Erwinia and Yersinia spp. partially restores virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant, whereas chimeric constructs containing the sensor domain of E. coli RcsC could not rescue virulence of the Erwinia rcsC mutant on apple. Interestingly, only chimeric constructs containing the histidine kinase and receiver domains of Erwinia RcsC are fully capable of rescuing amylovoran production. These results suggest that the sensor domain of RcsC may be important in regulating bacterial virulence, whereas the activity of the histidine kinase and receiver domains of Erwinia RcsC may be essential for amylovoran production in vitro.

  5. Efficacy of potato seeds disinfection products to control Erwinia spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, B; Garcia, N; Boels, G

    2008-01-01

    Erwinia spp. provokes soft rot on potato tubers during storage. No disinfection products are available on the market in the European Union to control these bacteria. We tested 3 products presented as good candidates to cure potato tubers from bacterial diseases. First, Anthium 500 (Du Pont de Nemours) a product based on chlorine dioxyde, then Phostrol (Nufarm) with phosphoric acid as a.i. and finally Solucuivre (Proval), a copper based product. We firstly managed disinfection trials: high Erwinia contaminated potato seed samples were treated by immersion and were then incubated, we observed the percentage of tubers rotting. Secondly, we managed protection trials: protected healthy tubers were incubated during 23 days in contact with rotting tubers. We evaluated weight loss after symptoms development. No tested product was effective to control Erwinia spp. on seed tubers in our trials conditions. Furthermore, we observed more rot development after Phostrol and Solucuivre application. We suppose that the product couldn't reach the latent bacteria and weakened the tubers. No protection effect was observed.

  6. Analysis of microsatellite markers in the genome of the plant pathogen Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Melissa C; Wilken, P Markus; Coetzee, Martin P A; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato represents a complex of cryptic and commonly plant pathogenic species that are morphologically similar. Species in this complex have been described using morphological characteristics, intersterility tests and phylogenetics. Microsatellite markers have been useful to study the population structure and origin of some species in the complex. In this study we sequenced the genome of C. fimbriata. This provided an opportunity to mine the genome for microsatellites, to develop new microsatellite markers, and map previously developed markers onto the genome. Over 6000 microsatellites were identified in the genome and their abundance and distribution was determined. Ceratocystis fimbriata has a medium level of microsatellite density and slightly smaller genome when compared with other fungi for which similar microsatellite analyses have been performed. This is the first report of a microsatellite analysis conducted on a genome sequence of a fungal species in the order Microascales. Forty-seven microsatellite markers have been published for population genetic studies, of which 35 could be mapped onto the C. fimbriata genome sequence. We developed an additional ten microsatellite markers within putative genes to differentiate between species in the C. fimbriata s.l. complex. These markers were used to distinguish between 12 species in the complex.

  7. Characterization and inhibitory activity of chitosan on hyphae growth and morphology of Botrytis cinerea plant pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Silva Junior

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Low and high molecular weight chitosan were tested in different concentrations and growth times with the aim to evaluate the inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea, a very important plant pathogen. Tested chitosans were characterized by vibratory spectroscopy and elementary analyzes to determine the deacetylation degree. In addiction molar mass was estimated by viscosity measuring. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized for antimicrobial activity observation. Results showed that both chitosans markedly inhibited fungal growth, which was effected by incubation time and chitosan concentration. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that chitosan induced changes in surface morphology. The present study show that chitosan is capable of inhibit the growth and cause serious damage to the cell structure of the B. cinerea, as well as have the ability to form an impervious layer around the cell. Therefore, chitosan could be considered as a potential alternative for synthetic fungicides.Industrial relevance. Ultrastructural analysis showed that chitosan is capable of causing serious damage to the cell structure of the B. cinerea, as well as have the ability to form an impervious layer around the cell. Chitosan could inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro and consequently may be considered as a potential alternative in replacement of synthetic fungicides.Keywords. biopolymer; chitosan; antifungal activity; fungal morphology; electron microscopy

  8. Antifungal activity against plant pathogens of metabolites from the endophytic fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Radwan, Mohamed M; Taráwneh, Amer H; Gao, Jiangtao; Wedge, David E; Rosa, Luiz H; Cutler, Horace G; Cutler, Stephen J

    2013-05-15

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen.) de Vries extracts led to the isolation of four compounds, including cladosporin, 1; isocladosporin, 2; 5'-hydroxyasperentin, 3; and cladosporin-8-methyl ether, 4. An additional compound, 5',6-diacetylcladosporin, 5, was synthesized by acetylation of compound 3. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Phomopsis viticola was the most sensitive fungus to the tested compounds. At 30 μM, compound 1 exhibited 92.7, 90.1, 95.4, and 79.9% growth inhibition against Colletotrichum acutatum , Colletotrichum fragariae , Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , and P. viticola, respectively. Compound 2 showed 50.4, 60.2, and 83.0% growth inhibition at 30 μM against Co. fragariae, Co. gloeosporioides, and P. viticola, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 were isolated for the first time from Cl. cladosporioides. Moreover, the identification of essential structural features of the cladosporin nuclei has also been evaluated. These structures provide new templates for the potential treatment and management of plant diseases.

  9. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 108 or 109 CFU/liter for bacteria or 104 or 105 zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  10. The twin arginine protein transport pathway exports multiple virulence proteins in the plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhumita V; Mann, Stefan G; Antelmann, Haike; Widdick, David A; Fyans, Joanna K; Chandra, Govind; Hutchings, Matthew I; Toth, Ian; Hecker, Michael; Loria, Rosemary; Palmer, Tracy

    2010-07-01

    Summary Streptomyces scabies is one of a group of organisms that causes the economically important disease potato scab. Analysis of the S. scabies genome sequence indicates that it is likely to secrete many proteins via the twin arginine protein transport (Tat) pathway, including several proteins whose coding sequences may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer and share a common ancestor with proteins in other plant pathogens. Inactivation of the S. scabies Tat pathway resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes including slower growth rate and increased permeability of the cell envelope. Comparison of the extracellular proteome of the wild type and DeltatatC strains identified 73 predicted secretory proteins that were present in reduced amounts in the tatC mutant strain, and 47 Tat substrates were verified using a Tat reporter assay. The DeltatatC strain was almost completely avirulent on Arabidopsis seedlings and was delayed in attaching to the root tip relative to the wild-type strain. Genes encoding 14 candidate Tat substrates were individually inactivated, and seven of these mutants were reduced in virulence compared with the wild-type strain. We conclude that the Tat pathway secretes multiple proteins that are required for full virulence.

  11. Antifungal Activities of Extracts from Selected Lebanese Wild Plants against Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abou-Jawdah

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of nine plant species growing wild in Lebanon were tested for their efficacy against seven plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Penicillium sp., Cladosporium sp., Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, Rhizoctonia solani and Sphaerotheca cucurbitae. Extracts of three of the plants, Origanum syriacum, Micromeria nervosa and Plumbago maritima, showed the highest levels of in vitro activity against spore germination and mycelial growth of the fungi tested. Inula viscosa showed high activity against spore germination but only moderate activity against mycelial growth. The other five plant species tested Calamintha origanifolia, Micromeria juliana, Ruta sp., Sideritis pullulans and Urginea maritima showed only moderate to low activity against these fungi. Preventive sprays with extracts of O. syriacum, M. nervosa, P. maritima and I. viscosa, applied at concentrations ranging between 4 and 8% to squash and cucumber seedlings, gave efficient protection against gray mold caused by B. cinerea and powdery mildew caused by S. cucurbitae. However, these extracts did not control green mold of citrus fruits caused by Penicillium sp. Thin layer chromatography revealed three inhibitory bands in extracts of O. syriacum, two in I. viscosa and only one in each of the other plants tested: M. nervosa, P. maritima, C. origanifolia and Ruta sp.

  12. Synthesis and in vitro antifungal efficacy of oleoyl-chitosan nanoparticles against plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ke; Shen, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Xiao; Ju, Xiuyun; Miao, Xiangmin; Tian, Jun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Peng, Xue; Jiang, Jihong; Qin, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    An antifungal dispersion system was prepared by oleoyl-chitosan (O-chitosan) nanoparticles, and the antifungal activity against several plant pathogenic fungi was investigated. Under scanning electron microscopy, the nanoparticles formulation appeared to be uniform with almost spherical shape. The particle size of nanoparticles was around 296.962 nm. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that nanoparticles could be well distributed in potato dextrose agar medium. Mycelium growth experiment demonstrated that Nigrospora sphaerica, Botryosphaeria dothidea, Nigrospora oryzae and Alternaria tenuissima were chitosan-sensitive, while Gibberella zeae and Fusarium culmorum were chitosan-resistant. The antifungal index was increased as the concentration of nanoparticles increased for chitosan-sensitive fungi. Fatty acid analyses revealed that plasma membranes of chitosan-sensitive fungi were shown to have lower levels of unsaturated fatty acid than chitosan-resistant fungi. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS gene sequences indicated that two chitosan-resistant fungi had a near phylogenetic relationship. Results showed that O-chitosan nanoparticles could be a useful alternative for controlling pathogenic fungi in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajam, B; Rajam, M V

    1996-02-01

    Polyamine (PA) biosynthesis inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) and bis-(cyclohexylammonium) sulphate (BCHA) have been tested for their effects on colony diameters at different intervals after inoculation of four plant pathogenic fungi (Helminthosporium oryzae, Curvularia lunata, Pythium aphanidermatum and Colletotrichum capsici). All these inhibitors, except DFMA had strongly retarded the growth of four fungi in a dose- and species-dependent fashion, and H. oryzae and C. lunata were found to be most sensitive to the effects of PA inhibitors. P. aphanidermatum and C. capsici were relatively insensitive and required rather high concentrations of inhibitors to get greater inhibition of mycelial growth, except DFMA which had stimulatory effect on the growth of these two fungi. However DFMA had greatly suppressed the growth of H. oryzae and C. lunata. The effect was generally more pronounced with MGBG than with DFMO and BCHA, and 1 mM Put completely prevented the inhibitory effects of 1 and 5 mM DFMO. Analysis of free and conjugated PAs in two sensitive fungi (H. oryzae and C. lunata) revealed that Put was present in highest concentrations followed by Spd and Spm and their levels were greatly reduced by DFMO application, and such inhibitions were totally reversed by exogenously supplied Put; in fact, PA titers were considerably increased by 1 mM Put alone and in combination with 1 mM DFMO. These results suggest that PA inhibitors, particularly DFMO and MGBG may be useful as target-specific fungicides in plants.

  14. Tracking the Subtle Mutations Driving Host Sensing by the Plant Pathogen Streptomyces scabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Samuel; Francis, Isolde M.; Deflandre, Benoit; Loria, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of genetic material conferring the arsenal necessary for host virulence is a prerequisite on the path to becoming a plant pathogen. More subtle mutations are also required for the perception of cues signifying the presence of the target host and optimal conditions for colonization. The decision to activate the pathogenic lifestyle is not “taken lightly” and involves efficient systems monitoring environmental conditions. But how can a pathogen trigger the expression of virulence genes in a timely manner if the main signal inducing its pathogenic behavior originates from cellulose, the most abundant polysaccharide on earth? This situation is encountered by Streptomyces scabies, which is responsible for common scab disease on tuber and root crops. We propose here a series of hypotheses of how S. scabies could optimally distinguish whether cello-oligosaccharides originate from decomposing lignocellulose (nutrient sources, saprophyte) or, instead, emanate from living and expanding plant tissue (virulence signals, pathogen) and accordingly adapt its physiological response. PMID:28261670

  15. Regulation of primary plant metabolism during plant-pathogen interactions and its contribution to plant defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemencia M Rojas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants are constantly exposed to microorganisms in the environment and, as a result, have evolved intricate mechanisms to recognize and defend themselves against potential pathogens. One of these responses is the downregulation of photosynthesis and other processes associated with primary metabolism that are essential for plant growth. It has been suggested that the energy saved by downregulation of primary metabolism is diverted and used for defense responses. However, several studies have shown that upregulation of primary metabolism also occurs during plant-pathogen interactions. We propose that upregulation of primary metabolism modulates signal transduction cascades that lead to plant defense responses. In support of this thought, we here compile evidence from the literature to show that upon exposure to pathogens or elicitors, plants induce several genes associated with primary metabolic pathways, such as those involved in the synthesis or degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. In addition, genetic studies have confirmed the involvement of these metabolic pathways in plant defense responses. This review provides a new perspective highlighting the relevance of primary metabolism in regulating plant defense against pathogens with the hope to stimulate further research in this area.

  16. Lusus naturae:climate and invasions of plant pathogens modify agricultural and forest lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ragazzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The ecological and economic sustainability of agricultural and forest systems of many advanced and underdeveloped Countries are strongly threatened by the increasing introduction of exotic plant pathogens. This article provides an overview of the main causes behind these invasions. Some important diseases caused by non native phytopathogens, whose arrival in the past century had a disastrous impact on the environment and economy of vast rural areas of our Country are reported. Some dangerous, emerging pathogens, which are literally destroying whole territories in various parts of the Planet, with severe damage to agricultural crops, landscape, economy and local tourism are also reported. Action strategies to prevent immigration of unwanted pathogens, and mitigation strategies, aimed at the development of various measures to mitigate the negative effects of plant parasites already established in the territory are then discussed. Finally, it is highlighted how such a far-reaching problem can be properly tackled only with the active contribution of governments, institutions responsible for plant health monitoring (warning services, research, and agricultural, tourism and transport operators.

  17. Novel insights into mannitol metabolism in the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulermo, Thierry; Rascle, Christine; Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Gout, Elisabeth; Bligny, Richard; Cotton, Pascale

    2010-03-29

    In order to redefine the mannitol pathway in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea, we used a targeted deletion strategy of genes encoding two proteins of mannitol metabolism, BcMTDH (B. cinerea mannitol dehydrogenase) and BcMPD (B. cinerea mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase). Mobilization of mannitol and quantification of Bcmpd and Bcmtdh gene transcripts during development and osmotic stress confirmed a role for mannitol as a temporary and disposable carbon storage compound. In order to study metabolic fluxes, we followed conversion of labelled hexoses in wild-type and DeltaBcmpd and DeltaBcmtdh mutant strains by in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Our results revealed that glucose and fructose were metabolized via the BcMPD and BcMTDH pathways respectively. The existence of a novel mannitol phosphorylation pathway was also suggested by the NMR investigations. This last finding definitively challenged the existence of the originally postulated mannitol cycle in favour of two simultaneously expressed pathways. Finally, physiological and biochemical studies conducted on double deletion mutants (DeltaBcmpdDeltaBcmtdh) showed that mannitol was still produced despite a complete alteration of both mannitol biosynthesis pathways. This strongly suggests that one or several additional undescribed pathways could participate in mannitol metabolism in B. cinerea.

  18. UV light inactivation of human and plant pathogens in unfiltered surface irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 10(8) or 10(9) CFU/liter for bacteria or 10(4) or 10(5) zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively.

  19. The rising threat of fungicide resistance in plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of site-specific fungicides almost 50 years ago has revolutionized chemical plant protection, providing highly efficient, low toxicity compounds for control of fungal diseases. However, it was soon discovered that plant pathogenic fungi can adapt to fungicide treatments by mutations leading to resistance and loss of fungicide efficacy. The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea, a major cause of pre- and post-harvest losses in fruit and vegetable production, is notorious as a 'high risk' organism for rapid resistance development. In this review, the mechanisms and the history of fungicide resistance in Botrytis are outlined. The introduction of new fungicide classes for grey mould control was always followed by the appearance of resistance in field populations. In addition to target site resistance, B. cinerea has also developed a resistance mechanism based on drug efflux transport. Excessive spraying programmes have resulted in the selection of multiresistant strains in several countries, in particular in strawberry fields. The rapid erosion of fungicide activity against these strains represents a major challenge for the future of fungicides against Botrytis. To maintain adequate protection of intensive cultures against grey mould, strict implementation of resistance management measures are required as well as alternative strategies with non-chemical products.

  20. Fungal life-styles and ecosystem dynamics: biological aspects of plant pathogens, plant endophytes and saprophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Redman, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses various biochemical, genetic, ecological, and evolutionary aspects of fungi that express either symbiotic or saprophytic life-styles. An enormous pool of potential pathogens exists in both agricultural and natural ecosystems, and virtually all plant species are susceptible to one or more fungal pathogens. Fungal pathogens have the potential to impact on the genetic structure of populations of individual plant species, the composition of plant communities and the process of plant succession. Endophytic fungi exist for at least part of their life cycles within the tissues of a plant host. This group of fungi is distinguished from plant pathogens because they do not elicit significant disease symptoms. However, endophytes do maintain the genetic and biochemical mechanisms required for infection and colonization of plant hosts. Fungi that obtain chemical nutrients from dead organic matter are known as saprophytes and are critical to the dynamics and resilience of ecosystems. There are two modes of saprophytic growth: one in which biomolecules that are amenable to transport across cell walls and membranes are directly absorbed, and another in which fungi must actively convert complex biopolymers into subunit forms amenable to transportation into cells. Regardless of life-style, fungi employ similar biochemical mechanisms for the acquisition and conversion of nutrients into complex biomolecules that are necessary for vegetative growth, production and dissemination of progeny, organismal competition, and survival during periods of nutrient deprivation or environmental inclemency.

  1. Sentinel trees as a tool to forecast invasions of alien plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaMaria Vettraino

    Full Text Available Recent disease outbreaks caused by alien invasive pathogens into European forests posed a serious threat to forest sustainability with relevant environmental and economic effects. Many of the alien tree pathogens recently introduced into Europe were not previously included on any quarantine lists, thus they were not subject to phytosanitary inspections. The identification and description of alien fungi potentially pathogenic to native European flora before their introduction in Europe, is a paramount need in order to limit the risk of invasion and the impact to forest ecosystems. To determine the potential invasive fungi, a sentinel trees plot was established in Fuyang, China, using healthy seedlings of European tree species including Quercus petreae, Q. suber, and Q. ilex. The fungal assemblage associated with symptomatic specimens was studied using the tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS 1. Taxa with probable Asiatic origin were identified and included plant pathogenic genera. These results indicate that sentinel plants may be a strategic tool to improve the prevention of bioinvasions.

  2. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rodrigo; Garbeva, Paolina; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2013-09-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protective microbial shield and to overcome the innate plant defense mechanisms in order to cause disease. A third group of microorganisms that can be found in the rhizosphere are the true and opportunistic human pathogenic bacteria, which can be carried on or in plant tissue and may cause disease when introduced into debilitated humans. Although the importance of the rhizosphere microbiome for plant growth has been widely recognized, for the vast majority of rhizosphere microorganisms no knowledge exists. To enhance plant growth and health, it is essential to know which microorganism is present in the rhizosphere microbiome and what they are doing. Here, we review the main functions of rhizosphere microorganisms and how they impact on health and disease. We discuss the mechanisms involved in the multitrophic interactions and chemical dialogues that occur in the rhizosphere. Finally, we highlight several strategies to redirect or reshape the rhizosphere microbiome in favor of microorganisms that are beneficial to plant growth and health. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biological and genetic factors regulating natural competence in a bacterial plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Stephanie H; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2014-01-01

    For naturally competent bacteria, spatially structured growth can provide an environment for enhanced horizontal gene transfer through transformation and recombination. DNA is often present in the extracellular environment, such as in the extracellular matrix of biofilms, and the lysis of a single cell can result in high local DNA concentrations. Xylella fastidiosa is a naturally competent plant pathogen that typically lives in a surface-attached state, yet previous work characterizing the competence of this organism was conducted with planktonic cells in liquid environments. Here, we show that transformation and recombination efficiencies are two to three orders of magnitude higher for cells grown on solid compared with liquid media, with maximum recombination efficiencies of about 10(-3). Cells were highly competent throughout their exponential growth phase, with no significant change in recombination efficiencies until population growth rates began to slow. Mutations in type IV pili, competency-related, and cell-cell signalling genes significantly impacted the ability of X. fastidiosa to acquire and incorporate DNA. Because X. fastidiosa is highly competent when growing in a surface-attached state, as it does within its insect vectors and host plants, recombination of naturally transformed DNA could be a significant route by which horizontal gene transfer occurs in natural environments.

  4. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis between the Fungal Plant Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum Using RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dan; Xu, Liangsheng; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    The fungal plant pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum are morphologically similar, but differ considerably in host range. In an effort to elucidate mechanisms of the host range difference, transcriptomes of the 2 species at vegetative growth stage were compared to gain further insight into commonality and uniqueness in gene expression and pathogenic mechanisms of the 2 closely related pathogens. A total of 23133 and 21043 unique transcripts were obtained from S. sclerotiorum and S. trifoliorum, respectively. Approximately 43% of the transcripts were genes with known functions for both species. Among 1411 orthologous contigs, about 10% (147) were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. trifoliorum than in S. sclerotiorum, and about 12% (173) of the orthologs were more highly (>3-fold) expressed in S. sclerotiorum than in S. trifoliorum. The expression levels of genes on the supercontig 30 have the highest correlation coefficient value between the 2 species. Twenty-seven contigs were found to be new and unique for S. trifoliorum. Additionally, differences in expressed genes involved in pathogenesis like oxalate biosynthesis and endopolygalacturonases were detected between the 2 species. The analyses of the transcriptomes not only discovered similarities and uniqueness in gene expression between the 2 closely related species, providing additional information for annotation the S. sclerotiorum genome, but also provided foundation for comparing the transcriptomes with host-infecting transcriptomes.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil A Trantas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor and P. mediterranea (Pmed, are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for commercially significant chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of a type III secretion system and of known type III effectors from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes.

  6. Heterokaryon incompatibility is suppressed following conidial anastomosis tube fusion in a fungal plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Francine H; Souza, Elaine A; Shoji, Jun-Ya; Connolly, Lanelle; Freitag, Michael; Read, Nick D; Roca, M Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that horizontal gene/chromosome transfer and parasexual recombination following hyphal fusion between different strains may contribute to the emergence of wide genetic variability in plant pathogenic and other fungi. However, the significance of vegetative (heterokaryon) incompatibility responses, which commonly result in cell death, in preventing these processes is not known. In this study, we have assessed this issue following different types of hyphal fusion during colony initiation and in the mature colony. We used vegetatively compatible and incompatible strains of the common bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in which nuclei were labelled with either a green or red fluorescent protein in order to microscopically monitor the fates of nuclei and heterokaryotic cells following hyphal fusion. As opposed to fusion of hyphae in mature colonies that resulted in cell death within 3 h, fusions by conidial anastomosis tubes (CAT) between two incompatible strains during colony initiation did not induce the vegetative incompatibility response. Instead, fused conidia and germlings survived and formed heterokaryotic colonies that in turn produced uninucleate conidia that germinated to form colonies with phenotypic features different to those of either parental strain. Our results demonstrate that the vegetative incompatibility response is suppressed during colony initiation in C. lindemuthianum. Thus, CAT fusion may allow asexual fungi to increase their genetic diversity, and to acquire new pathogenic traits.

  7. Heterokaryon incompatibility is suppressed following conidial anastomosis tube fusion in a fungal plant pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine H Ishikawa

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that horizontal gene/chromosome transfer and parasexual recombination following hyphal fusion between different strains may contribute to the emergence of wide genetic variability in plant pathogenic and other fungi. However, the significance of vegetative (heterokaryon incompatibility responses, which commonly result in cell death, in preventing these processes is not known. In this study, we have assessed this issue following different types of hyphal fusion during colony initiation and in the mature colony. We used vegetatively compatible and incompatible strains of the common bean pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in which nuclei were labelled with either a green or red fluorescent protein in order to microscopically monitor the fates of nuclei and heterokaryotic cells following hyphal fusion. As opposed to fusion of hyphae in mature colonies that resulted in cell death within 3 h, fusions by conidial anastomosis tubes (CAT between two incompatible strains during colony initiation did not induce the vegetative incompatibility response. Instead, fused conidia and germlings survived and formed heterokaryotic colonies that in turn produced uninucleate conidia that germinated to form colonies with phenotypic features different to those of either parental strain. Our results demonstrate that the vegetative incompatibility response is suppressed during colony initiation in C. lindemuthianum. Thus, CAT fusion may allow asexual fungi to increase their genetic diversity, and to acquire new pathogenic traits.

  8. Host Resistance and Temperature-Dependent Evolution of Aggressiveness in the Plant Pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengping Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how habitat heterogeneity may affect the evolution of plant pathogens is essential to effectively predict new epidemiological landscapes and manage genetic diversity under changing global climatic conditions. In this study, we explore the effects of habitat heterogeneity, as determined by variation in host resistance and local temperature, on the evolution of Zymoseptoria tritici by comparing the aggressiveness development of five Z. tritici populations originated from different parts of the world on two wheat cultivars varying in resistance to the pathogen. Our results show that host resistance plays an important role in the evolution of Z. tritici. The pathogen was under weak, constraining selection on a host with quantitative resistance but under a stronger, directional selection on a susceptible host. This difference is consistent with theoretical expectations that suggest that quantitative resistance may slow down the evolution of pathogens and therefore be more durable. Our results also show that local temperature interacts with host resistance in influencing the evolution of the pathogen. When infecting a susceptible host, aggressiveness development of Z. tritici was negatively correlated to temperatures of the original collection sites, suggesting a trade-off between the pathogen’s abilities of adapting to higher temperature and causing disease and global warming may have a negative effect on the evolution of pathogens. The finding that no such relationship was detected when the pathogen infected the partially resistant cultivars indicates the evolution of pathogens in quantitatively resistant hosts is less influenced by environments than in susceptible hosts.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bactrocera oleae Symbiont “Candidatus Erwinia dacicola”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Frances; Gioti, Anastasia; Starns, David; Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Vontas, John

    2016-01-01

    “Candidatus Erwinia dacicola” is a Gammaproteobacterium that forms a symbiotic association with the agricultural pest Bactrocera oleae. Here, we present a 2.1-Mb draft hybrid genome assembly for “Ca. Erwinia dacicola” generated from single-cell and metagenomic data. PMID:27634990

  10. Goed om uitgangsmateriaal op Erwinia te testen (interview met Jan van der Wolf)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, A.; Bovenkamp, van den G.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Bloembollen en aardappelen. Ze hebben in ieder geval één ziekte gemeen: bacterierot, veroorzaakt door Erwinia. In beide teelten zorgen deze bacterieziekten voor veel schade. In het Deltaplan Erwinia werken de bloembollen- en aardappelwereld samen op onderzoeksgebied. In twee artikelen staat de vraag

  11. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehlohonolo Benedict Qhanya

    Full Text Available Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s, heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence. Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea, Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala, revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea to 14 (M. osmundae. Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  12. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Matowane, Godfrey; Chen, Wanping; Sun, Yuxin; Letsimo, Elizabeth Mpholoseng; Parvez, Mohammad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  13. Potential for Combined Biocontrol Activity against Fungal Fish and Plant Pathogens by Bacterial Isolates from a Model Aquaponic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Sirakov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in aquaponics is disease control. One possible solution for this is biological control with organisms exerting inhibitory effects on fish and plant pathogens. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of isolating microorganisms that exert an inhibitory effect on both plant and fish pathogens from an established aquaponic system. We obtained 924 isolates on selective King’s B agar and 101 isolates on MRS agar from different compartments of a model aquaponic system and tested them for antagonism against the plant pathogen Pythium ultimum and fish pathogen Saprolegnia parasitica. Overall, 42 isolates were able to inhibit both fungi. Although not yet tested in vivo, these findings open new options for the implementation of biological control of diseases in aquaponics, where plants and fish are cultivated in the same water recirculating system.

  14. Specific and Sensitive Isothermal Electrochemical Biosensor for Plant Pathogen DNA Detection with Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles as Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Han Yih; Wu, Haoqi; Wee, Eugene J. H.; Trau, Matt; Wang, Yuling; Botella, Jose R.

    2017-01-01

    Developing quick and sensitive molecular diagnostics for plant pathogen detection is challenging. Herein, a nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor was developed for rapid and sensitive detection of plant pathogen DNA on disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes. This 60 min assay relied on the rapid isothermal amplification of target pathogen DNA sequences by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) followed by gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical assessment with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Our method was 10,000 times more sensitive than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/gel electrophoresis and could readily identify P. syringae infected plant samples even before the disease symptoms were visible. On the basis of the speed, sensitivity, simplicity and portability of the approach, we believe the method has potential as a rapid disease management solution for applications in agriculture diagnostics.

  15. Insights on the susceptibility of plant pathogenic fungi to phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its chemical derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Gerardo; Masi, Marco; Raio, Aida; Andolfi, Anna; Zoina, Astolfo; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 produced two phenazine compounds as main secondary metabolites. These metabolites were identified as phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and 2-hydroxyphenazine (2-OH P). In this study, the spectrum of the activity of PCA and 2-OH P was evaluated against a group of crop and forestal plant pathogenic fungi by an agar plate bioassay. PCA was active against most of the tested plant pathogens, while 2-OH P slightly inhibited a few fungal species. Furthermore, four semisynthesised derivatives of PCA (phenazine-1-carboxymethyl, phenazine-1-carboxamide, phenazine-1-hydroxymethyl and phenazine-1-acetoxymethyl) were assayed for their antifungal activity against 11 phytopathogenic species. Results showed that the carboxyl group is a structural feature important for the antifungal activity of PCA. Since the activity of phenazine-1-carboxymethyl and phenazine-1-carboxamide, the two more lipophilic and reversible PCA derivatives remained substantially unaltered compared with PCA.

  16. Inhibitory effect of Xenorhabdus nematophila TB on plant pathogens Phytophthora capsici and Botrytis cinerea in vitro and in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiangling; Zhang, Manrang; Tang, Qian; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2014-03-06

    Entomopathogenic bacteria Xenorhabdus spp. produce secondary metabolites with potential antimicrobial activity for use in agricultural productions. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of X. nematophila TB culture on plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora capsici. The cell-free filtrate of TB culture showed strong inhibitory effects (>90%) on mycelial growth of both pathogens. The methanol-extracted bioactive compounds (methanol extract) of TB culture also had strong inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and spore germinations of both pathogens. The methanol extract (1000 μg/mL) and cell-free filtrate both showed strong therapeutic and protective effects (>70%) on grey mold both in detached tomato fruits and plants, and leaf scorch in pepper plants. This study demonstrates X. nematophila TB produces antimicrobial metabolites of strong activity on plant pathogens, with great potential for controlling tomato grey mold and pepper leaf scorch and being used in integrated disease control to reduce chemical application.

  17. Proteome Analysis of the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Monilinia laxa Showing Host Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olja Bregar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brown rot fungus Monilinia laxa (Aderh. & Ruhl. Honey is an important plant pathogen in stone and pome fruits in Europe. We applied a proteomic approach in a study of M. laxa isolates obtained from apples and apricots in order to show the host specifity of the isolates and to analyse differentially expressed proteins in terms of host specifity, fungal pathogenicity and identification of candidate proteins for diagnostic marker development. Extracted mycelium proteins were separated by 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE and visualized by Coomassie staining in a non-linear pH range of 3–11 and Mr of 14–116 kDa. We set up a 2-DE reference map of M. laxa, resolving up to 800 protein spots, and used it for image analysis. The average technical coefficient of variance (13 % demonstrated a high reproducibility of protein extraction and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE PAGE, and the average biological coefficient of variance (23 % enabled differential proteomic analysis of the isolates. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component analysis discriminated isolates from two different hosts, providing new data that support the existence of a M. laxa specialized form f. sp. mali, which infects only apples. A total of 50 differentially expressed proteins were further analyzed by LC-MS/MS, yielding 41 positive identifications. The identified mycelial proteins were functionally classified into 6 groups: amino acid and protein metabolism, energy production, carbohydrate metabolism, stress response, fatty acid metabolism and other proteins. Some proteins expressed only in apple isolates have been described as virulence factors in other fungi. The acetolactate synthase was almost 11-fold more abundant in apple-specific isolates than in apricot isolates and it might be implicated in M. laxa host specificity. Ten proteins identified only in apple isolates are potential candidates for the development of M. laxa host-specific diagnostic markers.

  18. Cytochrome b gene structure and consequences for resistance to Qo inhibitor fungicides in plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Valeria; Palermo, Simona; Sierotzki, Helge; Garibaldi, Angelo; Gisi, Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    The cytochrome b (cyt b) gene structure was characterized for different agronomically important plant pathogens, such as Puccinia recondita f sp tritici (Erikss) CO Johnston, P graminis f sp tritici Erikss and Hennings, P striiformis f sp tritici Erikss, P coronata f sp avenae P Syd & Syd, P hordei GH Otth, P recondita f sp secalis Roberge, P sorghi Schwein, P horiana Henn, Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers) Unger, Phakopsora pachyrhizi Syd & P Syd, Hemileia vastatrix Berk & Broome, Alternaria solani Sorauer, A alternata (Fr) Keissl and Plasmopara viticola (Berk & Curt) Berlese & de Toni. The sequenced fragment included the two hot spot regions in which mutations conferring resistance to QoI fungicides may occur. The cyt b gene structure of these pathogens was compared with that of other species from public databases, including the strobilurin-producing fungus Mycena galopoda (Pers) P Kumm, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyer ex Hansen, Venturia inaequalis (Cooke) Winter and Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet. In all rust species, as well as in A solani, resistance to QoI fungicides caused by the mutation G143A has never been reported. A type I intron was observed directly after the codon for glycine at position 143 in these species. This intron was absent in pathogens such as A alternata, Blumeria graminis (DC) Speer, Pyricularia grisea Sacc, Mycosphaerella graminicola (Fuckel) J Schröt, M fijiensis, V inaequalis and P viticola, in which resistance to QoI fungicides has occurred and the glycine is replaced by alanine at position 143 in the resistant genotype. The present authors predict that a nucleotide substitution in codon 143 would prevent splicing of the intron, leading to a deficient cytochrome b, which is lethal. As a consequence, the evolution of resistance to QoI fungicides based on G143A is not likely to evolve in pathogens carrying an intron directly after this codon.

  19. Tools to kill: genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Haque, Md Samiul; Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Emdad, Emdadul Mannan; Halim, Abdul; Hossen, Quazi Md Mosaddeque; Hossain, Md Zakir; Ahmed, Borhan; Rahim, Sifatur; Rahman, Md Sharifur; Alam, Md Monjurul; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Saito, Jennifer A; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-09-19

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs) of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE) are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  20. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numrin Thaitrong

    Full Text Available Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac, watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation.

  1. Quorum sensing coordinates brute force and stealth modes of infection in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS in vitro controls production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs and other virulence factors in the soft rotting enterobacterial plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba. Here, we demonstrate the genome-wide regulatory role of QS in vivo during the Pba-potato interaction, using a Pba-specific microarray. We show that 26% of the Pba genome exhibited differential transcription in a QS (expI- mutant, compared to the wild-type, suggesting that QS may make a greater contribution to pathogenesis than previously thought. We identify novel components of the QS regulon, including the Type I and II secretion systems, which are involved in the secretion of PCWDEs; a novel Type VI secretion system (T6SS and its predicted substrates Hcp and VgrG; more than 70 known or putative regulators, some of which have been demonstrated to control pathogenesis and, remarkably, the Type III secretion system and associated effector proteins, and coronafacoyl-amide conjugates, both of which play roles in the manipulation of plant defences. We show that the T6SS and a novel potential regulator, VirS, are required for full virulence in Pba, and propose a model placing QS at the apex of a regulatory hierarchy controlling the later stages of disease progression in Pba. Our findings indicate that QS is a master regulator of phytopathogenesis, controlling multiple other regulators that, in turn, co-ordinately regulate genes associated with manipulation of host defences in concert with the destructive arsenal of PCWDEs that manifest the soft rot disease phenotype.

  2. NEW PHYTOTRON FOR STUDYING THE EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lodovica Gullino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in its recent fourth assessment report predicts that, because of higher concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, until 2100 the global mean temperature would rise between 0.6 and 4°C, in combination with changes in precipitation and an increased frequency of extreme weather events. Despite this trend, the extent and mechanisms through which elevated CO2 affects plant diseases remain uncertain. Increases in CO2 and temperatures are also expected to induce complex effects on plant pathogens. Although re- 10 search on the effects of climate change continues to be limited, new tools are permitting to study the effects of climate variables on infection rates in the case of some pathosystems. The shortage of critical epidemiological data on individual plant diseases needs to be addressed using experimental approaches. A useful tool for such types of studies is represented by phytotrons. Hereby, a new phytotron typology, built with the specific aim of studying the effect of climate change on plant disease, is described. Beginning from a general plant overview, key mechanical and electrical systems are described (i.e. air temperature and relative humidity control, lighting and CO2 control system etc. as environmental parameters and operation cycle are summarized. In particular both parameters which could be set and monitored and those measured and stored are reported. After a suitable testing period, several operation cycles were performed in order to assess the control system’s stability and to optimize the management of all systems involved and the first experimental trials were carried out. The effect of three different simulated climatic conditions: 450 ppm of CO2 with standard temperature (ranging from 18 to 24°C or 18 to 26°C, elevated CO2 (800 ppm with standard temperature and elevated CO2 (800 ppm with elevated temperature (4°C higher than standard on the development of grape

  3. Hydrogen cyanide in the rhizosphere: not suppressing plant pathogens, but rather regulating availability of phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Rijavec

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria produce chemical compounds with different benefits for the plant. Among them, HCN is recognized as a biocontrol agent, based on its ascribed toxicity against plant pathogens. Based on several past studies questioning the validity of this hypothesis, we have re-addressed the issue by designing a new set of in vitro experiments, to test if HCN-producing rhizobacteria could inhibit the growth of phytopathogens. The level of HCN produced by the rhizobacteria in vitro does not correlate with the observed biocontrol effects, thus disproving the biocontrol hypothesis. We developed a new concept, in which HCN does not act as a biocontrol agent, but rather is involved in geochemical processes in the substrate (e.g. chelation of metals, indirectly increasing the availability of phosphate. Since this scenario can be important for the pioneer plants living in oligotrophic alpine environments, we inoculated HCN producing bacteria into sterile mineral sand together with germinating plants and showed that the growth of the pioneer plant French sorrel was increased on granite-based substrate. No such effect could be observed for maize, where plantlets depend on the nutrients stored in the endosperm. To support our concept, we used KCN and mineral sand and showed that mineral mobilization and phosphate release could be caused by cyanide in vitro. We propose that in oligotrophic alpine environments, and possibly elsewhere, the main contribution of HCN is in the sequestration of metals and the consequential indirect increase of nutrient availability, which is beneficial for the rhizobacteria and their plant hosts.

  4. Microarray comparative genomic hybridisation analysis incorporating genomic organisation, and application to enterobacterial plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighton Pritchard

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Microarray comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH provides an estimate of the relative abundance of genomic DNA (gDNA taken from comparator and reference organisms by hybridisation to a microarray containing probes that represent sequences from the reference organism. The experimental method is used in a number of biological applications, including the detection of human chromosomal aberrations, and in comparative genomic analysis of bacterial strains, but optimisation of the analysis is desirable in each problem domain.We present a method for analysis of bacterial aCGH data that encodes spatial information from the reference genome in a hidden Markov model. This technique is the first such method to be validated in comparisons of sequenced bacteria that diverge at the strain and at the genus level: Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba1043 and Dickeya dadantii 3937 (Dda3937; and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 and L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363. In all cases our method is found to outperform common and widely used aCGH analysis methods that do not incorporate spatial information. This analysis is applied to comparisons between commercially important plant pathogenic soft-rotting enterobacteria (SRE Pba1043, P. atrosepticum SCRI1039, P. carotovorum 193, and Dda3937.Our analysis indicates that it should not be assumed that hybridisation strength is a reliable proxy for sequence identity in aCGH experiments, and robustly extends the applicability of aCGH to bacterial comparisons at the genus level. Our results in the SRE further provide evidence for a dynamic, plastic 'accessory' genome, revealing major genomic islands encoding gene products that provide insight into, and may play a direct role in determining, variation amongst the SRE in terms of their environmental survival, host range and aetiology, such as phytotoxin synthesis, multidrug resistance, and nitrogen fixation.

  5. Quorum sensing coordinates brute force and stealth modes of infection in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Pritchard, Leighton; Hedley, Peter E; Ravensdale, Michael; Humphris, Sonia; Burr, Tom; Takle, Gunnhild; Brurberg, May-Bente; Birch, Paul R J; Salmond, George P C; Toth, Ian K

    2008-06-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) in vitro controls production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) and other virulence factors in the soft rotting enterobacterial plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba). Here, we demonstrate the genome-wide regulatory role of QS in vivo during the Pba-potato interaction, using a Pba-specific microarray. We show that 26% of the Pba genome exhibited differential transcription in a QS (expI-) mutant, compared to the wild-type, suggesting that QS may make a greater contribution to pathogenesis than previously thought. We identify novel components of the QS regulon, including the Type I and II secretion systems, which are involved in the secretion of PCWDEs; a novel Type VI secretion system (T6SS) and its predicted substrates Hcp and VgrG; more than 70 known or putative regulators, some of which have been demonstrated to control pathogenesis and, remarkably, the Type III secretion system and associated effector proteins, and coronafacoyl-amide conjugates, both of which play roles in the manipulation of plant defences. We show that the T6SS and a novel potential regulator, VirS, are required for full virulence in Pba, and propose a model placing QS at the apex of a regulatory hierarchy controlling the later stages of disease progression in Pba. Our findings indicate that QS is a master regulator of phytopathogenesis, controlling multiple other regulators that, in turn, co-ordinately regulate genes associated with manipulation of host defences in concert with the destructive arsenal of PCWDEs that manifest the soft rot disease phenotype.

  6. Tools to kill: Genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. Results We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. Conclusions The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  7. Molecular characterization of a novel hypovirus from the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Hailong; Chen, Xiaoguang; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2015-07-01

    A novel mycovirus, termed Fusarium graminearum Hypovirus 2 (FgHV2/JS16), isolated from a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium graminearum strain JS16, was molecularly and biologically characterized. The genome of FgHV2/JS16 is 12,800 nucleotides (nts) long, excluding the poly (A) tail. This genome has only one large putative open reading frame, which encodes a polyprotein containing three normal functional domains, papain-like protease, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RNA helicase, and a novel domain with homologous bacterial SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) chromosome segregation proteins. A defective RNA segment that is 4553-nts long, excluding the poly (A) tail, was also detected in strain JS16. The polyprotein shared significant aa identities with Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV1) (16.8%) and CHV2 (16.2%). Phylogenetic analyses based on multiple alignments of the polyprotein clearly divided the members of Hypoviridae into two major groups, suggesting that FgHV2/JS16 was a novel hypovirus of a newly proposed genus-Alphahypovirus-composed of the members of Group 1, including CHV1, CHV2, FgHV1 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirus 2. FgHV2/JS16 was shown to be associated with hypovirulence phenotypes according to comparisons of the biological properties shared between FgHV2/JS16-infected and FgHV2/JS16-free isogenic strains. Furthermore, we demonstrated that FgHV2/JS16 infection activated the RNA interference pathway in Fusarium graminearum by relative quantitative real time RT-PCR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Clarke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction.

  9. Insect-plant-pathogen interactions as shaped by future climate: effects on biology, distribution and implications for agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Dáder, Beatriz; Vassiliadis, Simone; Fereres, Alberto

    2017-08-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is the main anthropogenic gas which has drastically increased since the industrial revolution, and current concentrations are projected to double by the end of this century. As a consequence, elevated CO2 is expected to alter the earths' climate, increase global temperatures and change weather patterns. This is likely to have both direct and indirect impacts on plants, insect pests, plant pathogens and their distribution, and is therefore problematic for the security of future food production. This review summarises the latest findings and highlights current knowledge gaps regarding the influence of climate change on insect, plant and pathogen interactions with an emphasis on agriculture and food production. Direct effects of climate change, including increased CO2 concentration, temperature, patterns of rainfall and severe weather events that impact insects (namely vectors of plant pathogens) are discussed. Elevated CO2 and temperature, together with plant pathogen infection, can considerably change plant biochemistry and therefore plant defence responses. This can have substantial consequences on insect fecundity, feeding rates, survival, population size, and dispersal. Generally, changes in host plant quality due to elevated CO2 (e.g., carbon to nitrogen ratios in C3 plants) negatively affect insect pests. However, compensatory feeding, increased population size and distribution have also been reported for some agricultural insect pests. This underlines the importance of additional research on more targeted, individual insect-plant scenarios at specific locations to fully understand the impact of a changing climate on insect-plant-pathogen interactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Dispersal of human and plant pathogens biofilms via nitric oxide donors at 4 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Durie, Ian A; Henríquez, Tania; Satkute, Aiste; Matuszewska, Marta; Prado, Raphael Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide donors capable of manipulating nitric oxide-mediated signaling in bacteria could induce dispersal of biofilms. Encased in extracellular polymeric substances, human and plant pathogens within biofilms are significantly more resistant to sanitizers. This is particularly a problem in refrigerated environments where food is processed. In an exercise aimed to study the potential of nitric oxide donors as biofilm dispersal in refrigerated conditions, we compared the ability of different nitric oxide donors (SNAP, NO-aspirin and Noc-5) to dislodge biofilms formed by foodborne, human and plant pathogens treated at 4 °C. The donors SNAP and Noc-5 were efficient in dispersing biofilms formed by Salmonella enterica, pathogenic Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua. The biomasses were decreased up to 30 % when compared with the untreated controls. When the plant pathogens Pectobacterium sp. and Xanthomonas sp. were tested the dispersion was mainly limited to Pectobacterium carotovorum biofilms, decreasing up to 15 % after exposure to molsidomine. Finally, the association of selected nitric oxide donors with sanitizers (DiQuat, H2O2, peracetic acid and PhenoTek II) was effective in dispersing biofilms. The best dispersal was achieved by pre-treating P. carotovorum with molsidomine and then peracetic acid. The synergistic effect was estimated up to ~35 % in dispersal when compared with peracetic acid alone. The association of nitric oxide donors with sanitizers could provide a foundation for an improved sanitization procedure for cleaning refrigerate environments.

  11. Plant pathogens but not antagonists change in soil fungal communities across a land abandonment gradient in a Mediterranean landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, L.; Lacatena, F.; Varlese, R.; Nocerino, S.; Cristinzio, G.; Russo, D.

    2017-01-01

    We assessed whether the presence and abundance of plant pathogens and antagonists change in soil fungal communities along a land abandonment gradient. The study was carried out in the Cilento area (Southern Italy) at a site with three different habitats found along a land abandonment gradient: agricultural land, Mediterranean shrubland and woodland. For all microbiological substrates the colony forming units were about 3.1 × 106 g-1 soil for agricultural land and about 1.1 × 106 g-1 soil for Mediterranean shrubland and woodland. We found the following genera in all habitats: Cladosporium, Mortierella, Penicillium and Trichoderma. In agricultural land, the significantly most abundant fungus genera were Aspergillus, Fusarium, Cylindrocarpon and Nectria; in Mediterranean shrubland, Rhizopus and Trichoderma; and in woodland, Bionectria, Mortierella, Cladosporium, Diplodia, Paecilomyces, Penicillium and Trichoderma. We found a total of 8, 8 and 9 species of fungal antagonist, and 16, 6 and 6 species of fungal plant pathogens in agricultural land, Mediterranean shrubland and woodland respectively. Fungal plant pathogens decreased significantly over a land abandonment gradient, while we no found significant differences among fungal antagonists in the three habitats. We conclude that a decrease in the number of fungal pathogen species occurs when formerly cultivated areas are abandoned. On the other hand, fungal antagonists seem not to be affected by this process.

  12. The tail-associated depolymerase of Erwinia amylovora phage L1 mediates host cell adsorption and enzymatic capsule removal, which can enhance infection by other phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Yannick; Fieseler, Lars; Klumpp, Jochen; Eugster, Marcel R; Zurfluh, Katrin; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    The depolymerase enzyme (DpoL1) encoded by the T7-like phage L1 efficiently degrades amylovoran, an important virulence factor and major component of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) of its host, the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Mass spectrometry analysis of hydrolysed EPS revealed that DpoL1 cleaves the galactose-containing backbone of amylovoran. The enzyme is most active at pH 6 and 50°C, and features a modular architecture. Removal of 180 N-terminal amino acids was shown not to affect enzyme activity. The C-terminus harbours the hydrolase activity, while the N-terminal domain links the enzyme to the phage particle. Electron microscopy demonstrated that DpoL1-specific antibodies cross-link phage particles at their tails, either lateral or frontal, and immunogold staining confirmed that DpoL1 is located at the tail spikes. Exposure of high-level EPS-producing Er. amylovora strain CFBP1430 to recombinant DpoL1 dramatically increased sensitivity to the Dpo-negative phage Y2, which was not the case for EPS-negative mutants or low-level EPS-producing Er. amylovora. Our findings indicate that enhanced phage susceptibility is based on enzymatic removal of the EPS capsule, normally a physical barrier to Y2 infection, and that use of DpoL1 together with the broad host range, virulent phage Y2 represents an attractive combination for biocontrol of fire blight.

  13. The Erwinia amylovora PhoPQ system is involved in resistance to antimicrobial peptide and suppresses gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakka, Sridevi; Qi, Mingsheng; Zhao, Youfu

    2010-10-20

    The PhoPQ system is a pleiotropic two-component signal transduction system that controls many pathogenic properties in several mammalian and plant pathogens. Three different cues have been demonstrated to activate the PhoPQ system including a mild acidic pH, antimicrobial peptides, and low Mg(2+). In this study, our results showed that phoPQ mutants were more resistant to strong acidic conditions (pH 4.5 or 5) than that of the wild-type (WT) strain, suggesting that this system in Erwinia amylovora may negatively regulate acid resistance gene expression. Furthermore, the PhoPQ system negatively regulated gene expression of two novel type III secretion systems in E. amylovora. These results are in contrast to those reported for the PhoPQ system in Salmonella and Xanthomonas, where it positively regulates type III secretion system and acid resistance. In addition, survival of phoPQ mutants was about 10-fold lower than that of WT when treated with cecropin A at pH 5.5, suggesting that the PhoPQ system renders the pathogen more resistant to cecropin A.

  14. Erwinia uzenensis sp. nov., a novel pathogen that affects European pear trees (Pyrus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Takayuki; Mizuno, Akifumi; Tsukamoto, Takanori; Shimizu, Yoshiaki; Saito, Norihiko; Sato, Shigeyoshi; Kikuchi, Shigemi; Uzuki, Tsuneyasu; Azegami, Koji; Sawada, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    Bacteria were isolated from black lesions on shoots of European pear trees (Pyrus communis L.) in an orchard in Japan. Previous characterization of this novel pathogen by phenotypic and genotypic methods suggested that it should belong to the genus Erwinia but might not correspond to either Erwinia amylovora or Erwinia pyrifoliae. Here, phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB, and rpoD gene sequences indicated that it could not be assigned to any recognized species of the genus Erwinia. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed that the bacterial strains represented a novel species. The DNA G+C contents, the fatty acid profile and phenotypic characteristics resembled those previously reported for members of the genus Erwinia. On the basis of these and previous results, the pathogen represents a novel species of the genus Erwinia, for which the name Erwinia uzenensis sp. nov. (type strain: YPPS 951(T) = LMG 25843(T) = NCPPB 4475(T)) is proposed.

  15. Whole genome shotgun sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28, a biocontrol entophytic bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shumei; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Cao, Xu; Hu, Jihua; Liu, Yushuai; Chen, Jingyu; Sha, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium that is capable of inhibition of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. The strain has the potential to be developed into a biocontrol agent for use in agriculture. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain. The genome size of B. amyloliquefaciens TF28 is 3,987,635?bp which consists of 3754 protein-coding genes, 65 tandem repeat sequences, 47 minisatellite DNA, 2 microsatellite DNA, 63 tRNA, 7rRNA, 6 s...

  16. Whole genome shotgun sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28, a biocontrol entophytic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumei; Jiang, Wei; Li, Jing; Meng, Liqiang; Cao, Xu; Hu, Jihua; Liu, Yushuai; Chen, Jingyu; Sha, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TF28 is a biocontrol endophytic bacterium that is capable of inhibition of a broad range of plant pathogenic fungi. The strain has the potential to be developed into a biocontrol agent for use in agriculture. Here we report the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain. The genome size of B. amyloliquefaciens TF28 is 3,987,635 bp which consists of 3754 protein-coding genes, 65 tandem repeat sequences, 47 minisatellite DNA, 2 microsatellite DNA, 63 tRNA, 7rRNA, 6 sRNA, 3 prophage and CRISPR domains.

  17. Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov., a Bacterial Isolate Associated with a Chinese Cricket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available A bacterial isolate (SCU-B244T was obtained in China from crickets (Teleogryllus occipitalis living in cropland deserted for approximately 10 years. The isolated bacteria were Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-negative rods. A preliminary analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain belongs to either the genus Erwinia or Pantoea. Analysis of multilocus sequence typing based on concatenated partial atpD, gyrB and infB gene sequences and physiological and biochemical characteristics indicated that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia, as member of a new species as it was distinct from other known Erwinia species. Further analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed SCU-B244T to have 94.71% identity to the closest species of that genus, Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T, which is below the threshold of 97% used to discriminate bacterial species. DNA-DNA hybridization results (5.78±2.52% between SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T confirmed that SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T represent different species combined with average nucleotide identity values which range from 72.42% to 74.41. The DNA G+C content of SCU-B244T was 55.32 mol%, which also differs from that of Erwinia oleae (54.7 to 54.9 mol%. The polyphasic taxonomic approach used here confirmed that the strain belongs to the Erwinia group and represents a novel species. The name Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov. is proposed for this novel taxon, for which the type strain is SCU-B244T (= CGMCC 1.12772T = DSM 28222T = KCTC 42022T.

  18. Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov., a Bacterial Isolate Associated with a Chinese Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Luo, Jin; Li, Wei; Long, Xiu-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Zeng, Zhi-Gang; Tian, Yong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A bacterial isolate (SCU-B244T) was obtained in China from crickets (Teleogryllus occipitalis) living in cropland deserted for approximately 10 years. The isolated bacteria were Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-negative rods. A preliminary analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain belongs to either the genus Erwinia or Pantoea. Analysis of multilocus sequence typing based on concatenated partial atpD, gyrB and infB gene sequences and physiological and biochemical characteristics indicated that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia, as member of a new species as it was distinct from other known Erwinia species. Further analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed SCU-B244T to have 94.71% identity to the closest species of that genus, Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T), which is below the threshold of 97% used to discriminate bacterial species. DNA-DNA hybridization results (5.78±2.52%) between SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T) confirmed that SCU-B244T and Erwinia oleae (DSM 23398T) represent different species combined with average nucleotide identity values which range from 72.42% to 74.41. The DNA G+C content of SCU-B244T was 55.32 mol%, which also differs from that of Erwinia oleae (54.7 to 54.9 mol%). The polyphasic taxonomic approach used here confirmed that the strain belongs to the Erwinia group and represents a novel species. The name Erwinia teleogrylli sp. nov. is proposed for this novel taxon, for which the type strain is SCU-B244T (= CGMCC 1.12772T = DSM 28222T = KCTC 42022T).

  19. Genome analysis of medicinal Ganoderma spp. with plant-pathogenic and saprotrophic life-styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kües, Ursula; Nelson, David R; Liu, Chang; Yu, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Li, Jianqin; Wang, Xin-Cun; Sun, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a fungal genus belonging to the Ganodermataceae family and Polyporales order. Plant-pathogenic species in this genus can cause severe diseases (stem, butt, and root rot) in economically important trees and perennial crops, especially in tropical countries. Ganoderma species are white rot fungi and have ecological importance in the breakdown of woody plants for nutrient mobilization. They possess effective machineries of lignocellulose-decomposing enzymes useful for bioenergy production and bioremediation. In addition, the genus contains many important species that produce pharmacologically active compounds used in health food and medicine. With the rapid adoption of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, whole genome sequencing and systematic transcriptome analyses become affordable approaches to identify an organism's genes. In the last few years, numerous projects have been initiated to identify the genetic contents of several Ganoderma species, particularly in different strains of Ganoderma lucidum. In November 2013, eleven whole genome sequencing projects for Ganoderma species were registered in international databases, three of which were already completed with genomes being assembled to high quality. In addition to the nuclear genome, two mitochondrial genomes for Ganoderma species have also been reported. Complementing genome analysis, four transcriptome studies on various developmental stages of Ganoderma species have been performed. Information obtained from these studies has laid the foundation for the identification of genes involved in biological pathways that are critical for understanding the biology of Ganoderma, such as the mechanism of pathogenesis, the biosynthesis of active components, life cycle and cellular development, etc. With abundant genetic information becoming available, a few centralized resources have been established to disseminate the knowledge and integrate relevant data to support comparative genomic analyses of

  20. Phylogenomics and molecular signatures for species from the plant pathogen-containing order xanthomonadales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Sohail Naushad

    Full Text Available The species from the order Xanthomonadales, which harbors many important plant pathogens and some human pathogens, are currently distinguished primarily on the basis of their branching in the 16S rRNA tree. No molecular or biochemical characteristic is known that is specific for these bacteria. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses were conducted on 26 sequenced Xanthomonadales genomes to delineate their branching order and to identify molecular signatures consisting of conserved signature indels (CSIs in protein sequences that are specific for these bacteria. In a phylogenetic tree based upon sequences for 28 proteins, Xanthomonadales species formed a strongly supported clade with Rhodanobacter sp. 2APBS1 as its deepest branch. Comparative analyses of protein sequences have identified 13 CSIs in widely distributed proteins such as GlnRS, TypA, MscL, LysRS, LipA, Tgt, LpxA, TolQ, ParE, PolA and TyrB that are unique to all species/strains from this order, but not found in any other bacteria. Fifteen additional CSIs in proteins (viz. CoxD, DnaE, PolA, SucA, AsnB, RecA, PyrG, LigA, MutS and TrmD are uniquely shared by different Xanthomonadales except Rhodanobacter and in a few cases by Pseudoxanthomonas species, providing further support for the deep branching of these two genera. Five other CSIs are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and 1-3 species from the orders Chromatiales, Methylococcales and Cardiobacteriales suggesting that these deep branching orders of Gammaproteobacteria might be specifically related. Lastly, 7 CSIs in ValRS, CarB, PyrE, GlyS, RnhB, MinD and X001065 are commonly shared by Xanthomonadales and a limited number of Beta- or Gamma-proteobacteria. Our analysis indicates that these CSIs have likely originated independently and they are not due to lateral gene transfers. The Xanthomonadales-specific CSIs reported here provide novel molecular markers for the identification of these important plant and human pathogens and also as

  1. Epigenetic control of effector gene expression in the plant pathogenic fungus Leptosphaeria maculans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Soyer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of small secreted proteins (SSPs acting as effectors that modulate host immunity to facilitate infection. SSP-encoding genes are often located in particular genomic environments and show waves of concerted expression at diverse stages of plant infection. To date, little is known about the regulation of their expression. The genome of the Ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans comprises alternating gene-rich GC-isochores and gene-poor AT-isochores. The AT-isochores harbor mosaics of transposable elements, encompassing one-third of the genome, and are enriched in putative effector genes that present similar expression patterns, namely no expression or low-level expression during axenic cultures compared to strong induction of expression during primary infection of oilseed rape (Brassica napus. Here, we investigated the involvement of one specific histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 methylation (H3K9me3, in epigenetic regulation of concerted effector gene expression in L. maculans. For this purpose, we silenced the expression of two key players in heterochromatin assembly and maintenance, HP1 and DIM-5 by RNAi. By using HP1-GFP as a heterochromatin marker, we observed that almost no chromatin condensation is visible in strains in which LmDIM5 was silenced by RNAi. By whole genome oligoarrays we observed overexpression of 369 or 390 genes, respectively, in the silenced-LmHP1 and -LmDIM5 transformants during growth in axenic culture, clearly favouring expression of SSP-encoding genes within AT-isochores. The ectopic integration of four effector genes in GC-isochores led to their overexpression during growth in axenic culture. These data strongly suggest that epigenetic control, mediated by HP1 and DIM-5, represses the expression of at least part of the effector genes located in AT-isochores during growth in axenic culture. Our hypothesis is that changes of lifestyle and a switch toward pathogenesis lift chromatin

  2. Biocontrol of the toxigenic plant pathogen Fusarium culmorum by soil fauna in an agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Wolfarth, Friederike; Schrader, Stefan; Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Weinert, Joachim; Brunotte, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    L. terrestris revealed a considerable potential as an effective biocontrol agent contributing to a sustainable control of a Fusarium plant pathogen in wheat straw, thus reducing the infection risk for specific plant diseases in arable fields.

  3. The linear chromosome of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasma 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdoll Alexander M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted, uncultivable bacterial plant pathogens that cause diseases in hundreds of economically important plants. They represent a monophyletic group within the class Mollicutes (trivial name mycoplasmas and are characterized by a small genome with a low GC content, and the lack of a firm cell wall. All mycoplasmas, including strains of 'Candidatus (Ca. Phytoplasma asteris' and 'Ca. P. australiense', examined so far have circular chromosomes, as is the case for almost all walled bacteria. Results Our work has shown that 'Ca. Phytoplasma mali', the causative agent of apple proliferation disease, has a linear chromosome. Linear chromosomes were also identified in the closely related provisional species 'Ca. P. pyri' and 'Ca. P. prunorum'. The chromosome of 'Ca. P. mali' strain AT is 601,943 bp in size and has a GC content of 21.4%. The chromosome is further characterized by large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends. Analysis of the protein-coding genes revealed that glycolysis, the major energy-yielding pathway supposed for 'Ca. P. asteris', is incomplete in 'Ca. P. mali'. Due to the apparent lack of other metabolic pathways present in mycoplasmas, it is proposed that maltose and malate are utilized as carbon and energy sources. However, complete ATP-yielding pathways were not identified. 'Ca. P. mali' also differs from 'Ca. P. asteris' by a smaller genome, a lower GC content, a lower number of paralogous genes, fewer insertions of potential mobile DNA elements, and a strongly reduced number of ABC transporters for amino acids. In contrast, 'Ca. P. mali' has an extended set of genes for homologous recombination, excision repair and SOS response than 'Ca. P. asteris'. Conclusion The small linear chromosome with large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends, the extremely low GC content and the limited metabolic capabilities reflect unique features of 'Ca

  4. Endohyphal bacterium enhances production of indole-3-acetic acid by a foliar fungal endophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michele T; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions.

  5. The genomes of the fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum reveal adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles but also signatures of common ancestry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, P.J.G.M.; van der Burgt, A.; Ökmen, B.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Abd-Elsalam, K.A.; Aerts, A.L.; Bahkali, A.H.; Beenen, H.G.; Chettri, P.; Cox, M.P.; Datema, E.; de Vries, R.P.; Dhillon, B.; Ganley, A.R.; Griffiths, S.A.; Guo, Y.; Hamelin, R.C.; Henrissat, B.; Kabir, M.S.; Jashni, M.K.; Kema, G.; Klaubauf, S.; Lapidus, A.; Levasseur, A.; Lindquist, E.; Mehrabi, R.; Ohm, R.A.; Owen, T.J.; Salamov, A.; Schwelm, A.; Schijlen, E.; Sun, H.; van den Burg, H.A.; van Ham, R.C.H.J.; Zhang, S.; Goodwin, S.B.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Collemare, J.; Bradshaw, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close

  6. Erwinia amylovora type three-secreted proteins trigger cell death and defense responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrave, A; Fagard, M; Perino, C; Brisset, M N; Gaubert, S; Laroche, S; Patrit, O; Barny, M-A

    2008-08-01

    Erwinia amylovora is the bacterium responsible for fire blight, a necrotic disease affecting plants of the rosaceous family. E. amylovora pathogenicity requires a functional type three secretion system (T3SS). We show here that E. amylovora triggers a T3SS-dependent cell death on Arabidopsis thaliana. The plants respond by inducing T3SS-dependent defense responses, including salicylic acid (SA)-independent callose deposition, activation of the SA defense pathway, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and part of the jasmonic acid/ethylene defense pathway. Several of these reactions are similar to what is observed in host plants. We show that the cell death triggered by E. amylovora on A. thaliana could not be simply explained by the recognition of AvrRpt2 ea by the resistance gene product RPS2. We then analyzed the role of type three-secreted proteins (T3SPs) DspA/E, HrpN, and HrpW in the induction of cell death and defense reactions in A. thaliana following infection with the corresponding E. amylovora mutant strains. HrpN and DspA/E were found to play an important role in the induction of cell death, activation of defense pathways, and ROS accumulation. None of the T3SPs tested played a major role in the induction of SA-independent callose deposition. The relative importance of T3SPs in A. thaliana is correlated with their relative importance in the disease process on host plants, indicating that A. thaliana can be used as a model to study their role.

  7. High-quality complete genome sequence of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005, a plant pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi M. Rakhashiya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is a Gram positive bacterium, isolated from infected leaf of Mangifera indica L. in Rajkot (22.30°N, 70.78°E, Gujarat, India. The genome sequencing of Microbacterium sp. SUBG005 is having type I secretion system genes of pathogenicity as well as heavy metal resistance unique genes. The genome size is 7.01 Mb with G + C content of 64.80% and contains rRNA sequences. Genome sequencing analysis provides information about the microbe role in host–pathogen interaction. The whole genome sequencing has been deposited in DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number JNNT00000000.

  8. Differentiation of Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae strains with single nucleotide polymorphisms and by synthesis of dihydrophenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, I; Geider, K

    2012-07-01

    Fire blight has spread from North America to New Zealand, Europe, and the Mediterranean region. We were able to differentiate strains from various origins with a novel PCR method. Three Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Erwinia amylovora genome were characteristic of isolates from North America and could distinguish them from isolates from other parts of the world. They were derived from the galE, acrB, and hrpA genes of strains Ea273 and Ea1/79. These genes were analyzed by conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) with differential primer annealing temperatures. North-American E. amylovora strains were further differentiated according to their production of L: -2,5-dihydrophenylalanine (DHP) as tested by growth inhibition of the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis. E. amylovora fruit tree (Maloideae) and raspberry (rubus) strains were also differentiated by Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism analysis. Strains from the related species Erwinia pyrifoliae isolated in Korea and Japan were all DHP positive, but were differentiated from each other by SNPs in the galE gene. Differential PCR is a rapid and simple method to distinguish E. amylovora as well as E. pyrifoliae strains according to their geographical origin.

  9. A gene cluster for amylovoran synthesis in Erwinia amylovora: characterization and relationship to cps genes in Erwinia stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, F; Coplin, D L; Geider, K

    1993-05-01

    A large ams gene cluster required for production of the acidic extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran by the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora was cloned. Tn5 mutagenesis and gene replacement were used to construct chromosomal ams mutants. Five complementation groups, essential for amylovoran synthesis and virulence in E. amylovora, were identified and designated ams A-E. The ams gene cluster is about 7 kb in size and functionally equivalent to the cps gene cluster involved in EPS synthesis by the related pathogen Erwinia stewartii. Mucoidy and virulence were restored to E. stewartii mutants in four cps complementation groups by the cloned E. amylovora ams genes. Conversely, the E. stewartii cps gene cluster was able to complement mutations in E. amylovora ams genes. Correspondence was found between the amsA-E complementation groups and the cpsB-D region, but the arrangement of the genes appears to be different. EPS production and virulence were also restored to E. amylovora amsE and E. stewartii cpsD mutants by clones containing the Rhizobium meliloti exo A gene.

  10. 植物病原物的群体遗传学%Population genetics of plant pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝雯; 詹家绥

    2012-01-01

    Comparing to natural ecosystems, the evolution of plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems is generally faster due to high-density monocultures, large-scale application of agrochemicals, and international trade in agricultural products. Knowledge of the population genetics and evolutionary biology of plant pathogens is necessary to understand disease epidemiology, effectively breed and use resistant cultivars, and control plant diseases. In this article, we outlined the aims of population genetic studies in plant pathogens, discuss contributions of five evolutionary forces (I.e., mutation, gene flow, recombination, random genetic drift, and natural selection) to origin, maintenance, and distribution of genetic variation in time and space, and gave an overview of current research status in this field.%品种单一化、生产密集型和一年多茬的现代农业特点导致病原物呈现出进化速度加快、致病力增强及流行风险增大趋势.深入研究病原物群体遗传学对认识病害的流行、有效选育和使用抗性品种乃至控制病害具有重要意义.文章阐述了植物病原物群体遗传学的研究目标和内容、突变、基因迁移、基因重组、随机遗传漂变和自然选择5大遗传机制在植物病原物进化过程中的作用,以及目前植物病原物群体遗传学研究的现状.

  11. Proteomic study of three component interactions:plant, pathogens and antagonistic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marra R; Turrà D; Scala F; Lorito M; Ambrosino P; Scala V; Romano C; Vinale F; Ferraioli S; Ruocco M; Carbone V; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ The molecular factors involved in the three-way interaction between plant, pathogenic fungi and antagonistic/biocontrol fungi, such as Trichoderma,are still poorly understood, even if they represent a matter of interest for improving crop management and developing new strategies for plant diseases control. The aim of this work is to investigate the components involved in this interaction and, for this purpose, a proteomic approach was used. 2-D maps of the protein extracts from the single components in various interactions between plants (potato, bean,tobacco or tomato), pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani or Pythium ultimum) and biocontrol fungi ( Trichoderma atroviride strain P1 or Trichoderma harzianum strain T22) were obtained. The protcome of each partner was collected separately and extracted by acetone precipitation in presence of trichloroacetic acid and a reducing agent (DTT). The extracted proteins were separated by isoelectrofocusing (IEF), using IPG (Immobilized pH gradient) strips, followed by SDS-PAGE. In order to improve resolution the separations were performed both on wide than narrow pH range and on different gel lengths. Differential spots were noted in the proteome of the three-way interaction when compared to each single component. These were further characterized by mass spectrometry and in silico analysis with the aim of identifying and cloning the relative genes. During the in vitro interaction of T. harzianum strain T22 with tomato and the culture filtrate or cell walls of pathogens,the spot number was higher than in the presence of pathogen biomass. In terms of Trichoderma differential proteins displayed on 2D gels, the most important changes were obtained in the presence of P. ultimum . During the in vivo interaction with tomato, the antagonist proteome changed much more in presence of soilborne fungi R. solani and P. ultimum than with the foliar fungus B. cinerea, both in terms of total and increased or novel spots In

  12. Repression of fungal plant pathogens and fungal-related contaminants: Selected ecosystem services by soil fauna communities in agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Wolfarth, Friederike; Schrader, Stefan; Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Brunotte, Joachim; Weinert, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    In agroecosystems soil-borne fungal plant diseases are major yield-limiting factors which are difficult to control. Fungal plant pathogens, like Fusarium species, survive as a saprophyte in infected tissue like crop residues and endanger the health of the following crop by increasing the infection risk for specific plant diseases. In infected plant organs, these pathogens are able to produce mycotoxins. Mycotoxins like deoxynivalenol (DON) persist during storage, are heat resistant and of major concern for human and animal health after consumption of contaminated food and feed, respectively. Among fungivorous soil organisms, there are representatives of the soil fauna which are obviously antagonistic to a Fusarium infection and the contamination with mycotoxins. Specific members of the soil macro-, meso-, and microfauna provide a wide range of ecosystem services including the stimulation of decomposition processes which may result in the regulation of plant pathogens and the degradation of environmental contaminants. Investigations under laboratory conditions and in field were conducted to assess the functional linkage between soil faunal communities and plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium culmorum). The aim was to examine if Fusarium biomass and the content of its mycotoxin DON decrease substantially in the presence of soil fauna (earthworms: Lumbricus terrestris, collembolans: Folsomia candida and nematodes: Aphelenchoides saprophilus) in a commercial cropping system managed with conservation tillage located in Northern Germany. The results of our investigations pointed out that the degradation performance of the introduced soil fauna must be considered as an important contribution to the biodegradation of fungal plant diseases and fungal-related contaminants. Different size classes within functional groups and the traits of keystone species appear to be significant for soil function and the provision of ecosystem services as in particular L. terrestris revealed to

  13. The Legitimate Name of a Fungal Plant Pathogen and the Ethics of Publication in the Era of Traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Paolo; Visentin, Ivan; Valentino, Danila; Tamietti, Giacomo; Cardinale, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    When more scientists describe independently the same species under different valid Latin names, a case of synonymy occurs. In such a case, the international nomenclature rules stipulate that the first name to appear on a peer-reviewed publication has priority over the others. Based on a recent episode involving priority determination between two competing names of the same fungal plant pathogen, this letter wishes to open a discussion on the ethics of scientific publications and points out the necessity of a correct management of the information provided through personal communications, whose traceability would prevent their fraudulent or accidental manipulation.

  14. Regulatory genes and environmental regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora

    Science.gov (United States)

    The requirement of the exopolysaccharide amylovoran for Erwinia amylovora pathogenesis is well documented. However, regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis has not been comprehensively studied. We have previously reported that amylovoran production is strain-dependent in E. amylovora isolates. We have...

  15. Genetics of Erwinia resistance in Zantedeschia: impact of plastome-genome incompatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    Soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora ( Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum ) is the most important disease of Zantedeschia spp. Cultivation measures can protect the crop partially, but a combination with resistant cultivars could result in better control. Resistant

  16. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  17. Erwinia iniecta sp. nov., isolated from Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Tony; Luna, Emily; Portier, Perrine; Fischer-Le Saux, Marion; Lapitan, Nora; Tisserat, Ned A; Leach, Jan E

    2015-10-01

    Short, Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from crushed bodies of Russian wheat aphid [Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov)] and artificial diets after Russian wheat aphid feeding. Based on multilocus sequence analysis involving the 16S rRNA, atpD, infB, gyrB and rpoB genes, these bacterial isolates constitute a novel clade in the genus Erwinia, and were most closely related to Erwinia toletana. Representative distinct strains within this clade were used for comparisons with related species of Erwinia. Phenotypic comparisons using four distinct strains and average nucleotide identity (ANI) measurements using two distinct draft genomes revealed that these strains form a novel species within the genus Erwinia. The name Erwinia iniecta sp. nov. is proposed, and strain B120T ( = CFBP 8182T = NCCB 100485T) was designated the type strain. Erwinia iniecta sp. nov. was not pathogenic to plants. However, virulence to the Russian wheat aphid was observed.

  18. Erwinia oleae sp. nov., isolated from olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Chiaraluce; Hosni, Taha; Vandemeulebroecke, Katrien; Brady, Carrie; De Vos, Paul; Buonaurio, Roberto; Cleenwerck, Ilse

    2011-11-01

    Three endophytic bacterial isolates were obtained in Italy from olive knots caused by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi. Phenotypic tests in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a phylogenetic position for these isolates in the genera Erwinia or Pantoea, and revealed two other strains with highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences (>99 %), CECT 5262 and CECT 5264, obtained in Spain from olive knots. Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting of the five strains from olive knots with BOX, ERIC and REP primers revealed three groups of profiles that were highly similar to each other. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) based on concatenated partial atpD, gyrB, infB and rpoB gene sequences indicated that the strains constituted a single novel species in the genus Erwinia. The strains showed general phenotypic characteristics typical of the genus Erwinia and whole genome DNA-DNA hybridization data confirmed that they represented a single novel species of the genus Erwinia. The strains showed DNA G+C contents ranging from 54.7 to 54.9 mol%. They could be discriminated from phylogenetically related species of the genus Erwinia by their ability to utilize potassium gluconate, l-rhamnose and d-arabitol, but not glycerol, inositol or d-sorbitol. The name Erwinia oleae sp. nov. (type strain DAPP-PG 531(T)= LMG 25322(T) = DSM 23398(T)) is proposed for this novel taxon.

  19. Autoinducer-2 of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora and other plant-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Geider, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Autoinducers are important for cellular communication of bacteria. The luxS gene has a central role in the synthesis of autoinducer-2 (AI-2). The gene was identified in a shotgun library of Erwinia amylovora and primers designed for PCR amplification from bacterial DNA. Supernatants of several Erwinia amylovora strains were assayed for AI-2 activity with a Vibrio harveyi mutant and were positive. Many other plant-associated bacteria also showed AI-2 activity such as Erwinia pyrifoliae and Erwinia tasmaniensis. The luxS genes of several bacteria were cloned, sequenced, and complemented Escherichia coli strain DH5alpha and a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, both defective in luxS, for synthesis of AI-2. Assays to detect AI-2 activity in culture supernatants of several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars failed, which may indicate the absence of AI-2 or synthesis of another type. Several reporter strains did not detect synthesis of an acyl homoserine lactone (AHL, AI-1) by Erwinia amylovora, but confirmed AHL-synthesis for Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica and Pantoea stewartii.

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Plant Pathogenic Fungus Myrothecium roridum and Identification of Genes Associated with Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Myrothecium roridum is a plant pathogenic fungus that infects different crops and decreases the yield of economical crops, including soybean, cotton, corn, pepper, and tomato. Until now, the pathogenic mechanism of M. roridum has remained unclear. Different types of trichothecene mycotoxins were isolated from M. roridum, and trichothecene was considered as a plant pathogenic factor of M. roridum. In this study, the transcriptome of M. roridum in different incubation durations was sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000. A total of 35,485 transcripts and 25,996 unigenes for M. roridum were obtained from 8.0 Gb clean reads. The protein–protein network of the M. roridum transcriptome indicated that the mitogen-activated protein kinases signal pathway also played an important role in the pathogenicity of M. roridum. The genes related to trichothecene biosynthesis were annotated. The expression levels of these genes were also predicted and validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Tri5 gene encoding trichodiene synthase was cloned and expressed, and the purified trichodiene synthase was able to catalyze farnesyl pyrophosphate into different kinds of sesquiterpenoids.Tri4 and Tri11 genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their corresponding enzymatic properties were characterized. The phylogenetic tree of trichodiene synthase showed a great discrepancy between the trichodiene synthase from M. roridum and other species. Our study on the genes related to trichothecene biosynthesis establishes a foundation for the M. roridum hazard prevention, thus improving the yields of economical crops.

  1. A novel high-affinity sucrose transporter is required for virulence of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Wahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic fungi cause massive yield losses and affect both quality and safety of food and feed produced from infected plants. The main objective of plant pathogenic fungi is to get access to the organic carbon sources of their carbon-autotrophic hosts. However, the chemical nature of the carbon source(s and the mode of uptake are largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporter (Srt1 from the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis and its characterization as a fungal virulence factor. Srt1 has an unusually high substrate affinity, is absolutely sucrose specific, and allows the direct utilization of sucrose at the plant/fungal interface without extracellular hydrolysis and, thus, without the production of extracellular monosaccharides known to elicit plant immune responses. srt1 is expressed exclusively during infection, and its deletion strongly reduces fungal virulence. This emphasizes the central role of this protein both for efficient carbon supply and for avoidance of apoplastic signals potentially recognized by the host.

  2. Natural selection on coding and noncoding DNA sequences is associated with virulence genes in a plant pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Gabriel E; Sanz-Martín, José M; Anisimova, Maria; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2014-09-04

    Natural selection leaves imprints on DNA, offering the opportunity to identify functionally important regions of the genome. Identifying the genomic regions affected by natural selection within pathogens can aid in the pursuit of effective strategies to control diseases. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide patterns of selection acting on different classes of sequences in a worldwide sample of eight strains of the model plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. We found evidence of selective sweeps, balancing selection, and positive selection affecting both protein-coding and noncoding DNA of pathogenicity-related sequences. Genes encoding putative effector proteins and secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes show evidence of positive selection acting on the coding sequence, consistent with an Arms Race model of evolution. The 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of genes coding for effector proteins and genes upregulated during infection show an excess of high-frequency polymorphisms likely the consequence of balancing selection and consistent with the Red Queen hypothesis of evolution acting on these putative regulatory sequences. Based on the findings of this work, we propose that even though adaptive substitutions on coding sequences are important for proteins that interact directly with the host, polymorphisms in the regulatory sequences may confer flexibility of gene expression in the virulence processes of this important plant pathogen. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Lutein, a Natural Carotenoid, Induces α-1,3-Glucan Accumulation on the Cell Wall Surface of Fungal Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junnosuke Otaka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available α-1,3-Glucan, a component of the fungal cell wall, is a refractory polysaccharide for most plants. Previously, we showed that various fungal plant pathogens masked their cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan to evade plant immunity. This surface accumulation of α-1,3-glucan was infection specific, suggesting that plant factors might induce its production in fungi. Through immunofluorescence observations of fungal cell walls, we found that carrot (Daucus carota extract induced the accumulation of α-1,3-glucan on germlings in Colletotrichum fioriniae, a polyphagous fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in various dicot plants. Bioassay-guided fractionation of carrot leaf extract successfully identified two active substances that caused α-1,3-glucan accumulation in this fungus: lutein, a carotenoid widely distributed in plants, and stigmasterol, a plant-specific membrane component. Lutein, which had a greater effect on C. fioriniae, also induced α-1,3-glucan accumulation in other Colletotrichum species and in the phylogenetically distant rice pathogen Cochliobolus miyabeanus, but not in the rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae belonging to the same phylogenetic subclass as Colletotrichum. Our results suggested that fungal plant pathogens reorganize their cell wall components in response to specific plant-derived compounds, which these pathogens may encounter during infection.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Plant-Pathogenic Streptomyces Species Associated with Common Scab-Infected Potato Tubers in Newfoundland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyans, Joanna K; Bown, Luke; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-02-01

    Potato common scab (CS) is an economically important crop disease that is caused by several members of the genus Streptomyces. In this study, we characterized the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS-infected potato tubers harvested in Newfoundland, Canada. A total of 17 pathogenic Streptomyces isolates were recovered from potato scab lesions, of which eight were determined to be most similar to the known CS pathogen S. europaeiscabiei. All eight S. europaeiscabiei isolates were found to produce the thaxtomin A phytotoxin and to harbor the nec1 virulence gene, and most also carry the putative virulence gene tomA. The remaining isolates appear to be novel pathogenic species that do not produce thaxtomin A, and only two of these isolates were determined to harbor the nec1 or tomA genes. Of the non-thaxtomin-producing isolates, strain 11-1-2 was shown to exhibit a severe pathogenic phenotype against different plant hosts and to produce a novel, secreted phytotoxic substance. This is the first report documenting the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS disease in Newfoundland. Furthermore, our findings provide further evidence that phytotoxins other than thaxtomin A may also contribute to the development of CS by Streptomyces spp.

  5. Taxonomic similarity, more than contact opportunity, explains novel plant-pathogen associations between native and alien taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufford, Jennifer L; Hulme, Philip E; Sikes, Benjamin A; Cooper, Jerry A; Johnston, Peter R; Duncan, Richard P

    2016-11-01

    Novel associations between plants and pathogens can have serious impacts on managed and natural ecosystems world-wide. The introduction of alien plants increases the potential for biogeographically novel plant-pathogen associations to arise when pathogens are transmitted from native to alien plant species and vice versa. We quantified biogeographically novel associations recorded in New Zealand over the last 150 yr between plant pathogens (fungi, oomycetes and plasmodiophorids) and vascular plants. We examined the extent to which taxonomic similarity, pathogen traits, contact opportunity and sampling effort could explain the number of novel associates for host and pathogen species. Novel associations were common; approximately one-third of surveyed plants and pathogens were recorded with at least one biogeographically novel associate. Native plants had more alien pathogens than vice versa. Taxonomic similarity between the native and alien flora and the total number of recorded associations (a measure of sampling effort) best explained the number of novel associates among species. The frequency of novel associations and the importance of sampling effort as an explanatory variable emphasize the need for effective monitoring and risk assessment tools to mitigate the potential environmental and economic impact of novel pathogen associations.

  6. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time RT-PCR expression studies in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toth Ian K

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time RT-PCR has become a powerful technique to monitor low-abundance mRNA expression and is a useful tool when examining bacterial gene expression inside infected host tissues. However, correct evaluation of data requires accurate and reliable normalisation against internal standards. Thus, the identification of reference genes whose expression does not change during the course of the experiment is of paramount importance. Here, we present a study where manipulation of cultural growth conditions and in planta experiments have been used to validate the expression stability of reference gene candidates for the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Results Of twelve reference gene candidates tested, four proved to be stably expressed both in six different cultural growth conditions and in planta. Two of these genes (recA and ffh, encoding recombinase A and signal recognition particle protein, respectively, proved to be the most stable set of reference genes under the experimental conditions used. In addition, genes proC and gyrA, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase and DNA gyrase, respectively, also displayed relatively stable mRNA expression levels. Conclusion Based on these results, we suggest recA and ffh as suitable candidates for accurate normalisation of real-time RT-PCR data for experiments investigating the plant pathogen P. atrosepticum and potentially other related pathogens.

  7. Horizontal gene acquisition of Liberibacter plant pathogens from a bacteriome-confined endosymbiont of their psyllid vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Nakabachi

    Full Text Available he Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is a notorious agricultural pest that transmits the phloem-inhabiting alphaproteobacterial 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' and allied plant pathogens, which cause the devastating citrus disease called Huanglongbing or greening disease. D. citri harbors two distinct bacterial mutualists in the symbiotic organ called bacteriome: the betaproteobacterium 'Candidatus Profftella armatura' in the syncytial cytoplasm at the center of the bacteriome, and the gammaproteobacterium 'Candidatus Carsonella ruddii' in uninucleate bacteriocytes. Here we report that a putative amino acid transporter LysE of Profftella forms a highly supported clade with proteins of L. asiaticus, L. americanus, and L. solanacearum. L. crescens, the most basal Liberibacter lineage currently known, lacked the corresponding gene. The Profftella-Liberibacter subclade of LysE formed a clade with proteins from betaproteobacteria of the order Burkholderiales, to which Profftella belongs. This phylogenetic pattern favors the hypothesis that the Liberibacter lineage acquired the gene from the Profftella lineage via horizontal gene transfer (HGT after L. crescens diverged from other Liberibacter lineages. K A/K S analyses further supported the hypothesis that the genes encoded in the Liberibacter genomes are functional. These findings highlight the possible evolutionary importance of HGT between plant pathogens and their insect vector's symbionts that are confined in the symbiotic organ and seemingly sequestered from external microbial populations.

  8. Immobilization of glucosyltransferase from Erwinia sp. using two different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contesini, Fabiano Jares; Ibarguren, Carolina; Grosso, Carlos Raimundo Ferreira; Carvalho, Patrícia de Oliveira; Sato, Hélia Harumi

    2012-04-15

    Two different techniques of glucosyltransferase immobilization were studied for the conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose. The optimum conditions for immobilization of Erwinia sp. glucosyltransferase onto Celite 545, determined using response surface methodology, was pH 4.0 and 170 U of glucosyltransferase/g of Celite 545. Using this conditions more than 60% conversion of sucrose into isomaltulose can be obtained. The immobilization of glucosyltransferase was also studied by its entrapment in microcapsules of low-methoxyl pectin and fat (butter and oleic acid). The non-lyophilized microcapsules of pectin, containing the enzyme and fat, showed higher glucosyltransferase activity, compared with lyophilized microcapsules containing enzyme plus fat, and also lyophilized microcapsules containing enzyme without fat addition. The non-lyophilized microcapsules of pectin containing the glucosyltransferase and fat, converted 30% of sucrose into isomaltulose in the first batch. However the conversion decreased to 5% at the 10th batch, indicating inactivation of the enzyme.

  9. Diversity and natural functions of antibiotics produced by beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Jos M; Mazzola, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Soil- and plant-associated environments harbor numerous bacteria that produce antibiotic metabolites with specific or broad-spectrum activities against coexisting microorganisms. The function and ecological importance of antibiotics have long been assumed to yield a survival advantage to the producing bacteria in the highly competitive but resource-limited soil environments through direct suppression. Although specific antibiotics may enhance producer persistence when challenged by competitors or predators in soil habitats, at subinhibitory concentrations antibiotics exhibit a diversity of other roles in the life history of the producing bacteria. Many processes modulated by antibiotics may be inherently critical to the producing bacterium, such as the acquisition of substrates or initiation of developmental changes that will ensure survival under stressful conditions. Antibiotics may also have roles in more complex interactions, including in virulence on host plants or in shaping the outcomes of multitrophic interactions. The innate functions of antibiotics to producing bacteria in their native ecosystem are just beginning to emerge, but current knowledge already reveals a breadth of activities well beyond the historical perspective of antibiotics as weaponry in microbial conflicts.

  10. Complete genome sequences of three Erwinia amylovora phages isolated in north america and a bacteriophage induced from an Erwinia tasmaniensis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, I; Kube, M; Reinhardt, R; Jelkmann, W; Geider, K

    2011-02-01

    Fire blight, a plant disease of economic importance caused by Erwinia amylovora, may be controlled by the application of bacteriophages. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences and the annotation of three E. amylovora-specific phages isolated in North America and genomic information about a bacteriophage induced by mitomycin C treatment of an Erwinia tasmaniensis strain that is antagonistic for E. amylovora. The American phages resemble two already-described viral genomes, whereas the E. tasmaniensis phage displays a singular genomic sequence in BLAST searches.

  11. Transcriptomic responses of the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae and its symbiont Candidatus Erwinia dacicola to olive feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidi, Nena; Gioti, Anastasia; Wybouw, Nicky; Dermauw, Wannes; Ben-Yosef, Michael; Yuval, Boaz; Jurkevich, Edouard; Kampouraki, Anastasia; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Vontas, John

    2017-02-01

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the most destructive pest of olive orchards worldwide. The monophagous larva has the unique capability of feeding on olive mesocarp, coping with high levels of phenolic compounds and utilizing non-hydrolyzed proteins present, particularly in the unripe, green olives. On the molecular level, the interaction between B. oleae and olives has not been investigated as yet. Nevertheless, it has been associated with the gut obligate symbiotic bacterium Candidatus Erwinia dacicola. Here, we used a B.oleae microarray to analyze the gene expression of larvae during their development in artificial diet, unripe (green) and ripe (black) olives. The expression profiles of Ca. E. dacicola were analyzed in parallel, using the Illumina platform. Several genes were found overexpressed in the olive fly larvae when feeding in green olives. Among these, a number of genes encoding detoxification and digestive enzymes, indicating a potential association with the ability of B. oleae to cope with green olives. In addition, a number of biological processes seem to be activated in Ca. E. dacicola during the development of larvae in olives, with the most notable being the activation of amino-acid metabolism.

  12. Effect of a waaL mutation on lipopolysaccharide composition, oxidative stress survival, and virulence in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew C; McGhee, Gayle C; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2009-02-01

    Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight, is an enterobacterial pathogen of Rosaceous plants including apple and pear. We have been studying the response of E. amylovora to oxidative stress because, during infection, the bacterium elicits an oxidative burst response in host plants. During the screening of a transposon mutant library for hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, we identified a mutant carrying an insertion in waaL, a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, that was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than the parental wild-type strain. We also confirmed that a waaL mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with the wild-type strain. The E. amylovora waaL mutant was also reduced in virulence, showed a decrease in twitching motility, and was more sensitive to polymyxin B than the wild type. Each of these phenotypes was complemented by the cloned waaL gene. Our results highlight the importance of the lipopolysaccharide layer to virulence in E. amylovora and the unexpected finding of an additional function of lipopolysaccharide in protection from oxidative stress in E. amylovora and P. aeruginosa.

  13. Role of electron transport chain of chloroplasts in oxidative burst of interaction between Erwinia amylovora and host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Hamid; Ghahremani, Zahra; Erfaninia, Kobra; Mehrabi, Rahim

    2015-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a necrogenic bacterium, causing the fire blight disease on many rosaceous plants. Triggering oxidative burst by E. amylovora is a key response by which host plants try to restrain pathogen spread. Electron transport chain (ETC) of chloroplasts is known as an inducible source of reactive oxygen species generation in various stresses. This research was performed to assess the role of this ETC in E. amylovora-host interaction using several inhibitors of this chain in susceptible and resistant apple and pear genotypes. All ETC inhibitors delayed appearance of disease necrosis, but the effects of methyl viologen, glutaraldehyde, and DCMU were more significant. In the absence of inhibitors, resistant genotypes showed an earlier and severe H2O2 generation and early suppression of redox dependent, psbA gene. The effects of inhibitors were corresponding to the redox potential of ETC inhibitory sites. In addition, delayed necrosis appearance was associated with the decreased disease severity and delayed H2O2 generation. These results provide evidences for the involvement of this ETC in host oxidative burst and suggest that chloroplast ETC has significant role in E. amylovora-host interaction.

  14. Eop1 from a Rubus strain of Erwinia amylovora functions as a host-range limiting factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, J E; Bonasera, J M; Kim, J F; Oh, C-S; Beer, S V

    2011-08-01

    Strains of Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium causing the disease fire blight of rosaceous plants, are separated into two groups based on host range: Spiraeoideae and Rubus strains. Spiraeoideae strains have wide host ranges, infecting plants in many rosaceous genera, including apple and pear. In the field, Rubus strains infect the genus Rubus exclusively, which includes raspberry and blackberry. Based on comparisons of limited sequence data from a Rubus and a Spiraeoideae strain, the gene eop1 was identified as unusually divergent, and it was selected as a possible host specificity factor. To test this, eop1 genes from a Rubus strain and a Spiraeoideae strain were cloned and mutated. Expression of the Rubus-strain eop1 reduced the virulence of E. amylovora in immature pear fruit and in apple shoots. Sequencing the orfA-eop1 regions of several strains of E. amylovora confirmed that forms of eop1 are conserved among strains with similar host ranges. This work provides evidence that eop1 from a Rubus-specific strain can function as a determinant of host specificity in E. amylovora.

  15. Transcriptomic responses of the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae and its symbiont Candidatus Erwinia dacicola to olive feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidi, Nena; Gioti, Anastasia; Wybouw, Nicky; Dermauw, Wannes; Ben-Yosef, Michael; Yuval, Boaz; Jurkevich, Edouard; Kampouraki, Anastasia; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Vontas, John

    2017-01-01

    The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the most destructive pest of olive orchards worldwide. The monophagous larva has the unique capability of feeding on olive mesocarp, coping with high levels of phenolic compounds and utilizing non-hydrolyzed proteins present, particularly in the unripe, green olives. On the molecular level, the interaction between B. oleae and olives has not been investigated as yet. Nevertheless, it has been associated with the gut obligate symbiotic bacterium Candidatus Erwinia dacicola. Here, we used a B.oleae microarray to analyze the gene expression of larvae during their development in artificial diet, unripe (green) and ripe (black) olives. The expression profiles of Ca. E. dacicola were analyzed in parallel, using the Illumina platform. Several genes were found overexpressed in the olive fly larvae when feeding in green olives. Among these, a number of genes encoding detoxification and digestive enzymes, indicating a potential association with the ability of B. oleae to cope with green olives. In addition, a number of biological processes seem to be activated in Ca. E. dacicola during the development of larvae in olives, with the most notable being the activation of amino-acid metabolism. PMID:28225009

  16. The phytoalexin-inducible multidrug efflux pump AcrAB contributes to virulence in the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burse, Antje; Weingart, Helge; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2004-01-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight on members of the family Rosaceae, with economic importance on apple and pear. During pathogenesis, the bacterium is exposed to a variety of plant-borne antimicrobial compounds. In plants of Rosaceae, many constitutively synthesized isoflavonoids affecting microorganisms were identified. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters which mediate resistance toward structurally unrelated compounds might confer tolerance to these phytoalexins. To prove this hypothesis, we cloned the acrAB locus from E. amylovora encoding a resistance nodulation division-type transport system. In Escherichia coli, AcrAB of E. amylovora conferred resistance to hydrophobic and amphiphilic toxins. An acrB-deficient E. amylovora mutant was impaired in virulence on apple rootstock MM 106. Furthermore, it was susceptible toward extracts of leaves of MM 106 as well as to the apple phytoalexins phloretin, naringenin, quercetin, and (+)-catechin. The expression of acrAB was determined using the promoterless reporter gene egfp. The acrAB operon was up-regulated in vitro by the addition of phloretin and naringenin. The promoter activity of acrR, encoding a regulatory protein involved in acrAB expression, was increased by naringenin. In planta, an induction of acrAB was proved by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the AcrAB transport system plays an important role as a protein complex required for virulence of E. amylovora in resistance toward apple phytoalexins and that it is required for successful colonization of a host plant.

  17. HecA, a member of a class of adhesins produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria, contributes to the attachment, aggregation, epidermal cell killing, and virulence phenotypes of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16 on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Clemencia M; Ham, Jong Hyun; Deng, Wen-Ling; Doyle, Jeff J; Collmer, Alan

    2002-10-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is representative of a broad class of bacterial pathogens that are capable of inducing necrosis in plants. The E. chrysanthemi EC16 hecA gene predicts a 3,850-aa member of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin family of adhesins. A hecATn7 mutant was reduced in virulence on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings after inoculation without wounding. Epifluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy observations of hecA and wild-type cells expressing the green fluorescent protein revealed that the mutant is reduced in its ability to attach and then form aggregates on leaves and to cause an aggregate-associated killing of epidermal cells. Cell killing also depended on production of the major pectate lyase isozymes and the type II, but not the type III, secretion pathway in E. chrysanthemi. HecA homologs were found in bacterial pathogens of plants and animals and appear to be unique to pathogens and universal in necrogenic plant pathogens. Phylogenetic comparison of the conserved two-partner secretion domains in the proteins and the 16S rRNA sequences in respective bacteria revealed the two datasets to be fundamentally incongruent, suggesting horizontal acquisition of these genes. Furthermore, hecA and its two homologs in Yersinia pestis had a G+C content that was 10% higher than that of their genomes and similar to that of plant pathogenic Ralstonia, Xylella, and Pseudomonas spp. Our data suggest that filamentous hemagglutinin-like adhesins are broadly important virulence factors in both plant and animal pathogens.

  18. Crystal Structure of the FAD-Containing Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase from the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Tondo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the structure of ferredoxin-NADP(H reductase, FPR, from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, responsible for citrus canker, at a resolution of 1.5 Å. This structure reveals differences in the mobility of specific loops when compared to other FPRs, probably unrelated to the hydride transfer process, which contributes to explaining the structural and functional divergence between the subclass I FPRs. Interactions of the C-terminus of the enzyme with the phosphoadenosine of the cofactor FAD limit its mobility, thus affecting the entrance of nicotinamide into the active site. This structure opens the possibility of rationally designing drugs against the X. axonopodis pv. citri phytopathogen.

  19. Antifungal Activity of a Synthetic Cationic Peptide against the Plant Pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and Three Fusarium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric T; Evans, Kervin O; Dowd, Patrick F

    2015-09-01

    A small cationic peptide (JH8944) was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 μg/ml, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 μg/ml of JH8944. Most conidia of Fusarium graminearum were killed within 6 hours of treatment with 50 μg/ml of JH8944. Germinating F. graminearum conidia required 238 μg/ml of JH8944 for 90% growth inhibition. The peptide did not cause any damage to tissues surrounding maize leaf punctures when tested at a higher concentration of 250 μg/ml even after 3 days. Liposomes consisting of phosphatidylglycerol were susceptible to leakage after treatment with 25 and 50 μg/ml of JH8944. These experiments suggest this peptide destroys fungal membrane integrity and could be utilized for control of crop fungal pathogens.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of Eichhornia-mediated copper oxide nanoparticles and assessing their antifungal activity against plant pathogens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P VANATHI; P RAJIV; RAJESHWARI SIVARAJ

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report the biosynthesis and characterization of copper oxide nanoparticles from an aquatic noxious weed, Eichhornia crassipes by green chemistry approach. The aim of this work is to synthesize copper oxide nanoparticles by simple, cost-effective and ecofriendly method as an alternative to other available techniques. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were characterized by UV–visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analyses. The synthesized particles were highly stable, spherical in shape with an average diameter of $28\\pm 4$ nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were then explored to antifungal activity against plant pathogens. Highest zone of inhibition were observed in 100 $\\mu$g ml$^{−1}$ of Eichhornia-mediated copper oxide nanoparticle against Fusarium culmorum and Aspergillus niger. This Eichhornia-mediated copper oxide nanoparticles wereproved to be good antifungal agents against plant fungal pathogens.

  1. Phosphorus limitation enhances biofilm formation of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens through the PhoR-PhoB regulatory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danhorn, T.; Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2004-01-01

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens forms architecturally complex biofilms on inert surfaces. Adherence of A. tumefaciens C58 was significantly enhanced under phosphate limitation compared to phosphate-replete conditions, despite slower overall growth under low-phosphate conditions...... biofilms revealed that phosphate limitation increased both the overall attached biomass and the surface coverage, whereas the maximum thickness of the biofilm was not affected. Functions encoded on the two large plasmids of A. tumefaciens C58, pTiC58 and pAtC58, were not required for the observed phosphate......-borne copies of the genes, suggesting that this regulatory system might be essential. Expression of the A. tumefaciens phoB gene from a tightly regulated inducible promoter, however, correlated with the amount of biofilm under both phosphate-limiting and nonlimiting conditions, demonstrating that components...

  2. GyrB sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS as identification tools for plant pathogenic Clavibacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaluga, Joanna; Heylen, Kim; Van Hoorde, Koenraad; Hoste, Bart; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; De Vos, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The bacterial genus Clavibacter has only one species, Clavibacter michiganensis, containing five subspecies. All five are plant pathogens, among which three are recognized as quarantine pests (mentioned on the EPPO A2 list). Prevention of their introduction and epidemic outbreaks requires a reliable and accurate identification. Currently, identification of these bacteria is time consuming and often problematic, mainly because of cross-reactions with other plant-associated bacteria in immunological tests and false-negative results in PCR detection methods. Furthermore, distinguishing closely related subspecies is not straightforward. This study aimed at evaluating the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and a fragment of the gyrB sequence for the reliable and fast identification of the Clavibacter subspecies. Amplification and sequencing of gyrB using a single primer set had sufficient resolution and specificity to identify each subspecies based on both sequence similarities in cluster analyses and specific signatures within the sequences. All five subspecies also generated distinct and reproducible MALDI-TOF MS profiles, with unique and specific ion peaks for each subspecies, which could be used as biomarkers for identification. Results from both methods were in agreement and were able to distinguish the five Clavibacter subspecies from each other and from representatives of closely related Rathayibacter, Leifsonia or Curtobacterium species. Our study suggests that proteomic analysis using MALDI-TOF MS and gyrB sequence are powerful diagnostic tools for the accurate identification of Clavibacter plant pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of a passive bioreactor to reduce water-borne plant pathogens, nitrate, and sulfate in greenhouse effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Dorais, Martine; Alsanius, Beatrix W; Zagury, Gérald J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of passive bioreactors to reduce water-borne plant pathogens (Pythium ultimum and Fusarium oxysporum) and nutrient load (NO(-) 3 and SO(2-) 4) in greenhouse effluent. Sterilized and unsterilized passive bioreactors filled with a reactive mixture of organic carbon material were used in three replicates. After a startup period of 2 (sterilized) or 5 (unsterilized) weeks, the bioreactor units received for 14 weeks a reconstituted commercial greenhouse effluent composed of 500 mg L(-1) SO(2-) 4 and 300 mg L(-1) NO(-) 3 and were inoculated three times with P. ultimum and F. oxysporum (10(6) CFU mL(-1)). Efficacy in removing water-borne plant pathogens and nitrate reached 99.9% for both the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors. However, efficacy in reducing the SO(2-) 4 load sharply decreased from 89% to 29% after 2 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment for the unsterilized bioreactors. Although SO(2-) 4 removal efficacy for the sterilized bioreactors did not recover after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment, the unsterilized bioreactor nearly reached a similar level of SO(2-) 4 removal after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment compared with affluent loaded only with SO(2-) 4, where no competition for the carbohydrate source occurred between the denitrification process and sulfate-reducing bacteria activity. Performance differences between the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors clearly show the predominant importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consequently, when sulfate-reducing bacteria reach their optimal activity, passive bioreactors may constitute a cheap, low-maintenance method of treating greenhouse effluent to recycle wastewater and eliminate nutrient runoff, which has important environmental impacts.

  4. Detection of soft rot Erwinia spp. on seed potatoes: conductimetry versus dilution plating, PCR and serological assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, B.A.; Appels, M.; Boer, de S.H.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Bulk, van den R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Automated conductance measurements in polypectate medium were used for the detection of pathogenic soft rot Erwinia spp. in potato peel extracts. The detection threshold for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) in inoculated peel extracts was ca. 104 colony forming units (cfu) ml-1 when sampl

  5. Erwinia gerundensis sp. nov., a cosmopolitan epiphyte originally isolated from pome fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Smits, Theo H M; Born, Yannick; Blom, Jochen; Frey, Jürg E; Goesmann, Alexander; Cleenwerck, Ilse; de Vos, Paul; Bonaterra, Anna; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio

    2016-01-26

    A survey to obtain potential antagonists of pome fruit tree diseases yielded two yellow epiphytic bacterial isolates morphologically similar to Pantoea agglomerans, but showing no biocontrol activity. Whole-Cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and analysis of 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences suggested the possibility of a new species with a phylogenetic position in either Pantoea or Erwinia. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) placed the two strains in the genus Erwinia and supported their classification as a novel species. The strains showed general phenotypic characteristics typical of this genus and results of DNA-DNA hybridizations confirmed that they represent a single novel species. Both strains showed a DNA G+C content, as determined by HPLC, of 54.5 mol% and could be discriminated from phylogenetically related species of the genus Erwinia by their ability to utilize potassium gluconate, potassium 2-ketogluconate, D-maltose, D-melibiose and D-raffinose. Whole-genome sequencing of strain EM595T revealed the presence of a chromosomal carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster similar to those found in Cronobacter and Pantoea spp. that explains the pigmentation of the strain, which is atypical for the genus Erwinia. Additional strains belonging to the same species were recovered from different plant hosts in three different continents, revealing the cosmopolitan nature of this epiphyte. The name Erwinia gerundensis sp. nov. is proposed, with EM595T (= LMG 28990T; = CCOS 903T) as the designated type strain.

  6. Identification of Erwinia species isolated from apples and pears by differential PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, I; Geider, K

    2012-04-01

    Many pathogenic and epiphytic bacteria isolated from apples and pears belong to the genus Erwinia; these include the species E. amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. persicina, E. rhapontici and E. tasmaniensis. Identification and classification of freshly isolated bacterial species often requires tedious taxonomic procedures. To facilitate routine identification of Erwinia species, we have developed a PCR method based on species-specific oligonucleotides (SSOs) from the sequences of the housekeeping genes recA and gpd. Using species-specific primers that we report here, differentiation was done with conventional PCR (cPCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) applying two consecutive primer annealing temperatures. The specificity of the primers depends on terminal Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that are characteristic for the target species. These PCR assays enabled us to distinguish eight Erwinia species, as well as to identify new Erwinia isolates from plant surfaces. When performed with mixed bacterial cultures, they only detected a single target species. This method is a novel approach to classify strains within the genus Erwinia by PCR and it can be used to confirm other diagnostic data, especially when specific PCR detection methods are not already available. The method may be applied to classify species within other bacterial genera.

  7. AraC/XylS family stress response regulators Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, Daniel; Schweizer, Gabriel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional regulators of the AraC/XylS family have been associated with multidrug resistance, organic solvent tolerance, oxidative stress, and virulence in clinically relevant enterobacteria. In the present study, we identified four homologous AraC/XylS regulators, Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA, from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora Ea1189. Previous studies have shown that the regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS from Escherichia coli mediate multiple-antibiotic resistance, primarily by upregulating the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. However, none of the four AraC/XylS regulators from E. amylovora was able to induce a multidrug resistance phenotype in the plant pathogen. Overexpression of rob led to a 2-fold increased expression of the acrA gene. However, the rob-overexpressing strain showed increased resistance to only a limited number of antibiotics. Furthermore, Rob was able to induce tolerance to organic solvents in E. amylovora by mechanisms other than efflux. We demonstrated that SoxS from E. amylovora is involved in superoxide resistance. A soxS-deficient mutant of Ea1189 was not able to grow on agar plates supplemented with the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. Furthermore, expression of soxS was induced by redox cycling agents. We identified two novel members of the AraC/XylS family in E. amylovora. PliA was highly upregulated during the early infection phase in apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. Multiple compounds were able to induce the expression of pliA, including apple leaf extracts, phenolic compounds, redox cycling agents, heavy metals, and decanoate. OpiA was shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic and alkaline pH stress responses.

  8. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF ERWINIA GUM IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na Zhang; Mei Zhang; Jing-hua Chen; Hideki Iijima; Hiromichi Tsuchiya

    1999-01-01

    Erwinia (E) gum, an extracellular polysaccharide, is composed of fucose, galatose, glucose and glucuronic acid. Its viscosity behavior was investigated by a low-shear-rate multiball viscometer and a rotational viscometer. Its weight-average molecular weight Mw and intrinsic viscosity [η] in 0.2 mol/L NaCl aqueous solution were measured by light scattering method at 35℃ and viscometry at 25℃ and found to be 1.06 × 106 g/mol and 1050 mL/g, respectively, and its aggregates in aqueous solution were proved by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). These results indicated that E gum in water has exceedingly high viscosity and exhibits Binham fluid behavior, owing to its aggregation. The viscosity of E gum decreased with increasing temperature, and the turning point appeared at 38℃ for dilute solution and 80℃ for concentrated solution suggesting that the aggregates of E gum in water started to disaggregate under these temperatures. In addition, the aggregates can be disrupted by adding either acid or base. The experimental results indicated that the E gum is a good thickening agent, and its fluid behavior is similar to xanthan.

  9. Host exopolysaccharide quantity and composition impact Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2013-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteriophages (phages) belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families demonstrated a preference for either high-exopolysaccharide-producing (HEP) or low-exopolysaccharide-producing (LEP) bacterial hosts when grown on artificial medium without or with sugar supplementation. Myoviridae phages produced clear plaques on LEP hosts and turbid plaques on HEP hosts. The reverse preference was demonstrated by most Podoviridae phages, where clear plaques were seen on HEP hosts. Efficiency of plating (EOP) was determined by comparing phage growth on the original isolation host to the that on the LEP or HEP host. Nine of 10 Myoviridae phages showed highest EOPs on LEP hosts, and 8 of 11 Podoviridae phages had highest EOPs on HEP hosts. Increasing the production of EPS on sugar-supplemented medium or decreasing production by knocking out the synthesis of amylovoran or levan, the two EPSs produced by E. amylovora, indicated that these components play crucial roles in phage infection. Amylovoran was virtually essential for proliferation of most Podoviridae phages when phage population growth was compared to the wild type. Decreased levan production resulted in a significant reduction of progeny from phages in the Myoviridae family. Thus, Podoviridae phages are adapted to hosts that produce high levels of exopolysaccharides and are dependent on host-produced amylovoran for pathogenesis. Myoviridae phages are adapted to hosts that produce lower levels of exopolysaccharides and host-produced levan.

  10. Differential Colonization Dynamics of Cucurbit Hosts by Erwinia tracheiphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrisman, Cláudio M; Deblais, Loïc; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Miller, Sally A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial wilt is one of the most destructive diseases of cucurbits in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. Although the disease has been studied since 1900, host colonization dynamics remain unclear. Cucumis- and Cucurbita-derived strains exhibit host preference for the cucurbit genus from which they were isolated. We constructed a bioluminescent strain of Erwinia tracheiphila (TedCu10-BL#9) and colonization of different cucurbit hosts was monitored. At the second-true-leaf stage, Cucumis melo plants were inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 via wounded leaves, stems, and roots. Daily monitoring of colonization showed bioluminescent bacteria in the inoculated leaf and petiole beginning 1 day postinoculation (DPI). The bacteria spread to roots via the stem by 2 DPI, reached the plant extremities 4 DPI, and the plant wilted 6 DPI. However, Cucurbita plants inoculated with TedCu10-BL#9 did not wilt, even at 35 DPI. Bioluminescent bacteria were detected 6 DPI in the main stem of squash and pumpkin plants, which harbored approximately 10(4) and 10(1) CFU/g, respectively, of TedCu10-BL#9 without symptoms. Although significantly less systemic plant colonization was observed in nonpreferred host Cucurbita plants compared with preferred hosts, the mechanism of tolerance of Cucurbita plants to E. tracheiphila strains from Cucumis remains unknown.

  11. Tasmancin and lysogenic bacteriophages induced from Erwinia tasmaniensis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Lurz, Rudi; Geider, Klaus

    2012-07-25

    Mitomycin C treatment of Erwinia tasmaniensis strains from Australia induced prophages and the expression of bacteriocins. The bacteriocin named tasmancin inhibited E. tasmaniensis strains from South Africa and Germany. A gene cluster with a klebicin-related operon and an immunity protein was detected on plasmid pET46 from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99. PCR reactions using primers directed to this region produced signals for several strains originating from Australia, but not for strains isolated in South Africa and Germany. The latter isolates lacked plasmid pET46. Bacteriophages were induced from E. tasmaniensis strains Et88 and Et14/99, both isolates from South-Eastern Australia. These phages formed plaques on several other strains from this region, as well as on E. tasmaniensis strains from South Africa and Germany. Sequencing revealed similarity of phages ϕEt88 and ϕEt14, which shared the host range on E. tasmaniensis strains. Bacteriophages and tasmancin may interfere with the viability of several related E. tasmaniensis strains in the environment of carrier strains.

  12. Practical benefits of knowing the enemy: Modern molecular tools for diagnosing the etiology of bacterial diseases and understanding the taxonomy and diversity of plant pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the identity of bacterial plant pathogens is essential to strategic and sustainable disease management. However, such identifications are linked to bacterial taxonomy, a complicated and changing discipline that depends on methods and information that often are not used by those who are diagn...

  13. Cloning and functional characterization of BcatrA, a gene encoding an ABC transporter of the plant pathogenic fungus Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbo, Del G.; Ruocco, M.; Schoonbeek, H.; Scala, F.; Pane, C.; Vinale, F.; Waard, de M.A.

    2008-01-01

    BcatrA was cloned from the plant pathogenic fungus Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea) and sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that BcatrA encodes a protein composed of 1562 amino acid residues displaying high similarity with various fungal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters having the

  14. Erwinia piriflorinigrans sp. nov., a novel pathogen that causes necrosis of pear blossoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, María M; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo; Ferrer, Sergi; Christen, Richard; Gardan, Louis

    2011-03-01

    Eight Erwinia strains, isolated from necrotic pear blossoms in València, Spain, were compared with reference strains of Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae, both of which are pathogenic to species of pear tree, and to other species of the family Enterobacteriaceae using a polyphasic approach. Phenotypic analyses clustered the novel isolates into one phenon, distinct from other species of the genus Erwinia, showing that the novel isolates constituted a homogeneous phenotypic group. Rep-PCR profiles, PCR products obtained with different pairs of primers and plasmid contents determined by restriction analysis showed differences between the novel strains and reference strains of E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, gpd and recA gene sequences showed that the eight novel strains could not be assigned to any recognized species. On the basis of DNA-DNA hybridization studies, the novel isolates constituted a single group with relatedness values of 87-100  % to the designated type strain of the group, CFBP 5888(T). Depending on the method used, strain CFBP 5888(T) showed DNA-DNA relatedness values of between 22.7 and 50  % to strains of the closely related species E. amylovora and E. tasmaniensis. The DNA G+C contents of two of the novel strains, CFBP 5888(T) and CFBP 5883, were 51.1 and 50.5 mol%, respectively. On the basis of these and previous results, the novel isolates represent a novel species of the genus Erwinia, for which the name Erwinia piriflorinigrans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CFBP 5888(T) (=CECT 7348(T)).

  15. Functional assembly of the foreign carotenoid lycopene into the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, achieved by replacement of the native 3-step phytoene desaturase with its 4-step counterpart from Erwinia herbicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Asua, Guillermo; Cogdell, Richard J; Hunter, C Neil

    2002-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms synthesize a diverse range of carotenoids. These pigments are important for the assembly, function and stability of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, and they are used to quench harmful radicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was used as a model system to explore the origin of carotenoid diversity. Replacing the native 3-step phytoene desaturase (CrtI) with the 4-step enzyme from Erwinia herbicola results in significant flux down the spirilloxanthin pathway for the first time in Rb. sphaeroides. In Rb. sphaeroides, the completion of four desaturations to lycopene by the Erwinia CrtI appears to require the absence of CrtC and, in a crtC background, even the native 3-step enzyme can synthesize a significant amount (13%) of lycopene, in addition to the expected neurosporene. We suggest that the CrtC hydroxylase can intervene in the sequence of reactions catalyzed by phytoene desaturase. We investigated the properties of the lycopene-synthesizing strain of Rb. sphaeroides. In the LH2 light-harvesting complex, lycopene transfers absorbed light energy to the bacteriochlorophylls with an efficiency of 54%, which compares favourably with other LH2 complexes that contain carotenoids with 11 conjugated double bonds. Thus, lycopene can join the assembly pathway for photosynthetic complexes in Rb. sphaeroides, and can perform its role as an energy donor to bacteriochlorophylls.

  16. Emergence of a New Population of Rathayibacter toxicus: An Ecologically Complex, Geographically Isolated Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arif

    Full Text Available Rathayibacter toxicus is a gram-positive bacterium that infects the floral parts of several Poaceae species in Australia. Bacterial ooze is often produced on the surface of infected plants and bacterial galls are produced in place of seed. R. toxicus is a regulated plant pathogen in the U.S. yet reliable detection and diagnostic tools are lacking. To better understand this geographically-isolated plant pathogen, genetic variation as a function of geographic location, host species, and date of isolation was determined for isolates collected over a forty-year period. Discriminant analyses of recently collected and archived isolates using Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR identified three populations of R. toxicus; RT-I and RT-II from South Australia and RT-III from Western Australia. Population RT-I, detected in 2013 and 2014 from the Yorke Peninsula in South Australia, is a newly emerged population of R. toxicus not previously reported. Commonly used housekeeping genes failed to discriminate among the R. toxicus isolates. However, strategically selected and genome-dispersed MLST genes representing an array of cellular functions from chromosome replication, antibiotic resistance and biosynthetic pathways to bacterial acquired immunity were discriminative. Genetic variation among isolates within the RT-I population was less than the within-population variation for the previously reported RT-II and RT-III populations. The lower relative genetic variation within the RT-I population and its absence from sampling over the past 40 years suggest its recent emergence. RT-I was the dominant population on the Yorke Peninsula during the 2013-2014 sampling period perhaps indicating a competitive advantage over the previously detected RT-II population. The potential for introduction of this bacterial plant pathogen into new geographic areas provide a rationale for understanding the ecological and evolutionary

  17. Conventional and real-time PCRs for detection of Erwinia piriflorinigrans allow its distinction from the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbé, Silvia; Bertolini, Edson; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo; López, María M

    2014-04-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a new pathogenic species of the bacterial genus Erwinia that has been described recently in Spain. Accurate detection and identification of E. piriflorinigrans are challenging because its symptoms on pear blossoms are similar to those caused by Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Moreover, these two species share phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Two specific and sensitive conventional and real-time PCR protocols were developed to identify and detect E. piriflorinigrans and to differentiate it from E. amylovora and other species of this genus. These protocols were based on sequences from plasmid pEPIR37, which is present in all strains of E. piriflorinigrans analyzed. After the stability of the plasmid was demonstrated, the specificities of the protocols were confirmed by the amplification of all E. piriflorinigrans strains tested, whereas 304 closely related pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia strains and microbiota from pear trees were not amplified. In sensitivity assays, 10(3) cells/ml extract were detected in spiked plant material by conventional or real-time PCR, and 10(2) cells/ml were detected in DNA extracted from spiked plant material by real-time PCR. The protocols developed here succeeded in detecting E. piriflorinigrans in 102 out of 564 symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected pear samples (flowers, cortex stem tissue, leaves, shoots, and fruitlets), in necrotic Pyracantha sp. blossoms, and in necrotic pear and apple tissues infected with both E. amylovora and E. piriflorinigrans. Therefore, these new tools can be used in epidemiological studies that will enhance our understanding of the life cycle of E. piriflorinigrans in different hosts and plant tissues and its interaction with E. amylovora.

  18. Development of a Duplex PCR for Identification of Erwinia amylovora%步双重PCR法检测梨火疫病原细菌(Erwinia amylovora)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许景升; 徐进; 冯洁

    2008-01-01

    @@ 由梨火疫病原细菌(Erwinia amylovom)导致的火疫病(fire blight)是梨、苹果及其它蔷薇科植物上的毁灭性病害,我国将其定为对外一类检疫性有害生物.该病随种苗、果实及包装材料传播.

  19. A reliable and inexpensive method of nucleic acid extraction for the PCR-based detection of diverse plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Mock, R; Huang, Q; Abad, J; Hartung, J; Kinard, G

    2008-12-01

    A reliable extraction method is described for the preparation of total nucleic acids from at least ten plant genera for subsequent detection of plant pathogens by PCR-based techniques. The method combined a modified CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) extraction protocol with a semi-automatic homogenizer (FastPrep) instrument) for rapid sample processing and low potential of cross contamination. The method was applied to sample preparation for PCR-based detection of 28 different RNA and DNA viruses, six viroids, two phytoplasmas and two bacterial pathogens from a range of infected host plants including sweet potato, small fruits and fruit trees. The procedure is cost-effective and the qualities of the nucleic acid preparations are comparable to those prepared by commonly used commercial kits. The efficiency of the procedure permits processing of numerous samples and the use of a single nucleic acid preparation for testing both RNA and DNA genomes by PCR, making this an appealing method for testing multiple pathogens in certification and quarantine programs.

  20. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones in Diverse Pectobacterium and Dickeya Plant Pathogens: Diversity, Abundance, and Involvement in Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Alexandre; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Barbey, Corinne; Farmer, Christine; Hélias, Valérie; Burini, Jean-François; Faure, Denis; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Soft-rot bacteria Pectobacterium and Dickeya use N-acyl homoserine lactones (NAHSLs) as diffusible signals for coordinating quorum sensing communication. The production of NAHSLs was investigated in a set of reference strains and recently-collected isolates, which belong to six species and share the ability to infect the potato host plant. All the pathogens produced different NAHSLs, among which the 3-oxo-hexanoyl- and the 3-oxo-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactones represent at least 90% of total produced NAHSL-amounts. The level of NAHSLs varied from 0.6 to 2 pg/cfu. The involvement of NAHSLs in tuber maceration was investigated by electroporating a quorum quenching vector in each of the bacterial pathogen strains. All the NAHSL-lactonase expressing strains produced a lower amount of NAHSLs as compared to those harboring the empty vector. Moreover, all except Dickeya dadantii 3937 induced a lower level of symptoms in potato tuber assay. Noticeably, aggressiveness appeared to be independent of both nature and amount of produced signals. This work highlights that quorum sensing similarly contributed to virulence in most of the tested Pectobacterium and Dickeya, even the strains had been isolated recently or during the past decades. Thus, these key regulatory-molecules appear as credible targets for developing anti-virulence strategies against these plant pathogens. PMID:22737020

  1. Application of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles for the Control of Land Snail Eobania vermiculata and Some Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land snail Eobania vermiculata is an important crop pest causing considerable damage in agriculture. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the possibilities of using silver nanoparticles (AgNPs to control the land snail. The AgNPs have been synthesized biologically using white radish (Raphanus sativus var. aegyptiacus. The biosynthesis was regularly monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction spectra revealed peaks of crystalline nature of AgNPs and the transmission electron micrographs further confirmed the size of the synthesized nanoparticles ranging from 6 to 38 nm. The exposure of the snails and soil matrix to AgNPs in a laboratory experiment reduced the activity and the viability of the land snail (20% of AgNPs treated snails died as well as the frequency of fungal population in the surrounding soil. Moreover histology and ultrastructure alterations have been found in both kidney and the digestive gland of AgNPs treated land snails. The synergistic effect of synthesized AgNPs as antifungal was evaluated and clearly revealed that AgNPs can be effectively used against various plant pathogenic fungi. The present study results may open a new avenue to use the snail as bioindicator organism of environmental pollution.

  2. Impact on Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Formation of Pseudomonas Strains Used as Inoculants for Biocontrol of Soil-Borne Fungal Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barea, J. M.; Andrade, G.; Bianciotto, V.; Dowling, D.; Lohrke, S.; Bonfante, P.; O’Gara, F.; Azcon-Aguilar, C.

    1998-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, a key component of agroecosystems, was assayed as a rhizosphere biosensor for evaluation of the impact of certain antifungal Pseudomonas inoculants used to control soil-borne plant pathogens. The following three Pseudomonas strains were tested: wild-type strain F113, which produces the antifungal compound 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG); strain F113G22, a DAPG-negative mutant of F113; and strain F113(pCU203), a DAPG overproducer. Wild-type strain F113 and mutant strain F113G22 stimulated both mycelial development from Glomus mosseae spores germinating in soil and tomato root colonization. Strain F113(pCU203) did not adversely affect G. mosseae performance. Mycelial development, but not spore germination, is sensitive to 10 μM DAPG, a concentration that might be present in the rhizosphere. The results of scanning electron and confocal microscopy demonstrated that strain F113 and its derivatives adhered to G. mosseae spores independent of the ability to produce DAPG. PMID:9603857

  3. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Simon

    Full Text Available Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed.

  4. Antifungal Activity of a Synthetic Cationic Peptide against the Plant Pathogens Colletotrichum graminicola and Three Fusarium Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T. Johnson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A small cationic peptide (JH8944 was tested for activity against a number of pathogens of agricultural crops. JH8944 inhibited conidium growth in most of the tested plant pathogens with a dose of 50 μg/ml, although one isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was inhibited at 5 μg/ml of JH8944. Most conidia of Fusarium graminearum were killed within 6 hours of treatment with 50 μg/ml of JH8944. Germinating F. graminearum conidia required 238 μg/ml of JH8944 for 90% growth inhibition. The peptide did not cause any damage to tissues surrounding maize leaf punctures when tested at a higher concentration of 250 μg/ml even after 3 days. Liposomes consisting of phosphatidylglycerol were susceptible to leakage after treatment with 25 and 50 μg/ml of JH8944. These experiments suggest this peptide destroys fungal membrane integrity and could be utilized for control of crop fungal pathogens.

  5. Hexose transporters of a hemibiotrophic plant pathogen: functional variations and regulatory differences at different stages of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, Ulrike; Münch, Steffen; Deising, Holger B; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-06-10

    Plant pathogenic fungi use a wide range of different strategies to gain access to the carbon sources of their host plants. The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola (teleomorph Glomerella graminicola) colonizes its host plants, and, after a short biotrophic phase, switches to destructive, necrotrophic development. Here we present the identification of five hexose transporter genes from C. graminicola, CgHXT1 to CgHXT5, the functional characterization of the encoded proteins, and detailed expression studies for these genes during vegetative and pathogenic development. Whereas CgHXT4 is expressed under all conditions analyzed, transcript abundances of CgHXT1 and CgHXT3 are transiently up-regulated during the biotrophic phase, and CgHXT2 and CgHXT5 are expressed exclusively during necrotrophic development. Analyses of the encoded proteins characterized CgHXT5 as a low-affinity/high-capacity hexose transporter with a narrow substrate specificity for glucose and mannose. In contrast, CgHXT1 to CgHXT3 are high affinity/low capacity transporters that also accept other substrates, including fructose, galactose, or xylose. CgHXT4, the largest of the identified proteins, has only little transport activity and may function as a sugar sensor. Phylogenetic studies revealed hexose transporters closely related to the five CgHXT proteins also in other pathogenic fungi suggesting conserved functions of these proteins during fungal pathogenesis.

  6. Plant-Pathogen Interaction, Circadian Rhythm, and Hormone-Related Gene Expression Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia fortunei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Fan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches’ broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance.

  7. Membrane topology of conserved components of the type III secretion system from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Carolin; Robin, Guillaume P; Bonas, Ulla; Koebnik, Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Type III secretion (T3S) systems play key roles in the assembly of flagella and the translocation of bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. Eleven proteins which are conserved among gram-negative plant and animal pathogenic bacteria have been proposed to build up the basal structure of the T3S system, which spans both inner and outer bacterial membranes. We studied six conserved proteins, termed Hrc, predicted to reside in the inner membrane of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The membrane topology of HrcD, HrcR, HrcS, HrcT, HrcU and HrcV was studied by translational fusions to a dual alkaline phosphatase-beta-galactosidase reporter protein. Two proteins, HrcU and HrcV, were found to have the same membrane topology as the Yersinia homologues YscU and YscV. For HrcR, the membrane topology differed from the model for the homologue from Yersinia, YscR. For our data on three other protein families, exemplified by HrcD, HrcS and HrcT, we derived the first topology models. Our results provide what is believed to be the first complete model of the inner membrane topology of any bacterial T3S system and will aid in elucidating the architecture of T3S systems by ultrastructural analysis.

  8. Plant-pathogen interaction, circadian rhythm, and hormone-related gene expression provide indicators of phytoplasma infection in Paulownia fortunei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-12-12

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches' broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance.

  9. Genome-wide identification of transcriptional start sites in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie J Filiatrault

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has provided valuable insights into global gene expression in a wide variety of organisms. Using a modified RNA-Seq approach and Illumina's high-throughput sequencing technology, we globally identified 5'-ends of transcripts for the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000. A substantial fraction of 5'-ends obtained by this method were consistent with results obtained using global RNA-Seq and 5'RACE. As expected, many 5'-ends were positioned a short distance upstream of annotated genes. We also captured 5'-ends within intergenic regions, providing evidence for the expression of un-annotated genes and non-coding RNAs, and detected numerous examples of antisense transcription, suggesting additional levels of complexity in gene regulation in DC3000. Importantly, targeted searches for sequence patterns in the vicinity of 5'-ends revealed over 1200 putative promoters and other regulatory motifs, establishing a broad foundation for future investigations of regulation at the genomic and single gene levels.

  10. An STE12 gene identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices restores infectivity of a hemibiotrophic plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollot, Marie; Wong Sak Hoi, Joanne; van Tuinen, Diederik; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Dumas, Bernard; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Seddas, Pascale M A

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms of root penetration by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are unknown and investigations are hampered by the lack of transformation systems for these unculturable obligate biotrophs. Early steps of host infection by hemibiotrophic fungal phytopathogens, sharing common features with those of AM fungal colonization, depend on the transcription factor STE12. Using degenerated primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we isolated the full-length cDNA of an STE12-like gene, GintSTE, from Glomus intraradices and profiled GintSTE expression by real-time and in situ RT-PCR. GintSTE activity and function were investigated by heterologous complementation of a yeast ste12Delta mutant and a Colletotrichum lindemuthianum clste12Delta mutant. * Sequence data indicate that GintSTE is similar to STE12 from hemibiotrophic plant pathogens, especially Colletotrichum spp. Introduction of GintSTE into a noninvasive mutant of C. lindemuthianum restored fungal infectivity of plant tissues. GintSTE expression was specifically localized in extraradicular fungal structures and was up-regulated when G. intraradices penetrated roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula as compared with an incompatible mutant. Results suggest a possible role for GintSTE in early steps of root penetration by AM fungi, and that pathogenic and symbiotic fungi may share common regulatory mechanisms for invasion of plant tissues.

  11. Erwinia amylovora affects the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway in mature leaves of Pyrus communis cv. Conférence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Treutter, D; Valcke, R

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids, which are synthesized by the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway, not only contribute to fruit colour and photoprotection, they also may provide antimicrobial and structural components during interaction with micro-organisms. A possible response of this pathway was assessed in both mature and immature leaves of shoots of 2-year-old pear trees cv. Conférence, which were inoculated with the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora strain SGB 225/12, were mock-inoculated or were left untreated. The phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway was analysed by histological studies, by gene expression using RT-qPCR and by HPLC analyses of the metabolites at different time intervals after infection. Transcription patterns of two key genes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and chalcone synthase (CHS) related to the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway showed differences between control, mock-inoculated and E. amylovora-inoculated mature leaves, with the strongest reaction 48 h after inoculation. The impact of E. amylovora was also visualised in histological sections, and confirmed by HPLC, as epicatechin -which is produced via ANR- augmented 72 h after inoculation in infected leaf tissue. Besides the effect of treatments, ontogenesis-related differences were found as well. The increase of certain key genes, the rise in epicatechin and the visualisation in several histological sections in this study suggest a non-negligible impact on the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway in Pyrus communis due to inoculation with E. amylovora. In this study, we propose a potential role of this pathway in defence mechanisms, providing a detailed analysis of the response of this system attributable to inoculation with E. amylovora.

  12. Evaluation of a PCR kit for the detection of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica on potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frechon, D.; Exbrayat, P.; Helias, V.; Hyman, L.J.; Jouan, B.; Llop, P.; Lopez, M.M.; Payet, N.; Perombelon, M.C.M.; Toth, I.K.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Bertheau, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A PCR-based kit, Probelia(TM), for the detection of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) on potatoes was evaluated at five laboratories in four countries. The kit is based on DNA-specific PCR amplification followed by detection of amplicons by hybridization to a peroxidase-labelled DNA probe

  13. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a focus on Erwinia asparaginase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Rob; Hunger, Stephen P; Boos, Joachim; Rizzari, Carmelo; Silverman, Lewis; Baruchel, Andre; Goekbuget, Nicola; Schrappe, Martin; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2010-01-01

    Asparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive asparaginase treatment improves clinical outcomes in childhood ALL. Three asparaginase preparations are available; the native asparaginase derived from Escherichia coli (E. coli-asparaginase), a pegylated form of this enzyme (PEG-asparaginase) and a product isolated from Erwinia chrysanthemi, i.e. Erwinia asparaginase. Clinical hypersensitivity reactions and silent inactivation due to antibodies against E.coli-asparaginase, lead to inactivation of E-Coli asparaginase in up to 60% of cases. Current treatment protocols include E. coli-asparaginase or PEG-asparaginase for first-line treatment of ALL. Typically, patients exhibiting sensitivity to one formulation of asparaginase are switched to another product to ensure they receive the most efficacious treatment regimen possible. Erwinia asparaginase is used as a second- or third-line treatment in European and US protocols. Despite the universal inclusion of asparaginase in such treatment protocols, there is much debate regarding the optimal formulation and dosage of these agents. This manuscript provides an overview of available evidence to make recommendations for optimal use of Erwinia asparaginase in the treatment of ALL. PMID:20824725

  14. Morphological and biochemical characterization of Erwinia amylovora-induced hypersensitive cell death in apple leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Sobiczewski, P.; Michalczuk, L.; Wegrzynowicz-Lesiak, E.; Mikicinski, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    In attached apple leaves, spot-inoculated with Erwinia amylovora, the phenotypic appearance of the hypersensitive response (HR) and the participation of ethylene, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) (a plant caspase-1-like protease) were analysed. The HR in both the

  15. Plasmid content of Erwinia amylovora in orchards in Washington and Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the plasmid content of a collection of 305 isolates of Erwinia amylovora from Washington and Oregon in the Pacific Northwest of the United States with PCR assays and RFLP. Nearly all isolates of E. amylovora carried plasmid pEA29, which is not found in other species of bacteria, but 4% ...

  16. Plasmid Content of Isolates of Erwinia amylovora from Orchards in Washington and Oregon in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington (WA) and Oregon (OR) represent a major pome fruit production region of the United States, and streptomycin-resistant isolates of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora are common in orchards in this region. We examined the plasmid content of a collection of more than 200 isolates of ...

  17. Antibiosis by Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 against Erwinia amylovora on apple blossom stigmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea agglomerans E325, the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight control, was previously shown in vitro to produce a unique alkaline- and phosphate-sensitive antibiotic specific to Erwinia amylovora. Antibiosis was evaluated as a mode of antagonism on blossom stigmas using two...

  18. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  19. Using functional genomics to identify molecular markers for fire blight resistance (Erwinia amylovora) in apple (Malus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of apple (Malus), pear (Pyrus) and some woody ornamentals in the rose family (Rosaceae). The goal of this project is to use a functional genomics approach to develop tools to breed fire blight resistant apples. Six hundred fifty...

  20. Eerste jaar Erwinia-project legt topje van de ijsberg bloot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velvis, H.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Over de herkomst van de Erwinia bacterie heerst nog altijd veel onduidelijkheid. Daarom is een onderzoek naar deze bacterie gestart. In vier jaar tijd worden diverse aardappelrassen onderzocht in de verschillende stadia van teelt en opslag. Op deze manier hoopt men te achterhalen waar de herkomst va

  1. The presence and survival of soft rot (Erwinia) in flower bulb production systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Vreeburg, P.J.M.; Leeuwen, van P.J.; Dees, R.H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Soft rot is causing increasing damage in the flower bulb industry. Bulbous ornamentals such as Hyacinthus, Dahlia, Iris, Muscari, Freesia and Zantedeschia can be infected. Soft rot in flower bulbs is mainly caused by Dickeya spp. (Dickeya spp.) and Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Pectobacteriu

  2. Antibiosis and acidification by Panoea agglomerans strain E325 may contribute to suppression of Erwinia amylovora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325, a commercially-available antagonist for fire blight of apple and pear, was originally selected through broad screening based on suppression of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas, but specific mechanisms were unknown. Bacterial modification of pH was evaluated as a p...

  3. [Erwinia amylovora--the fire blight pathogen of trees in Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovleva, L M; Moroz, S N; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E; Gvozdiak, R I; Patyka, V F

    2014-01-01

    Niduses of fire blight of fruit and ornamental trees have been found in the Kyiv and Vinnitsa regions of Ukraine. Pathogen Erwinia amylovora was isolated between April and October. The pathogen was often accompanied by bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Artificial infection with a mixture of bacteria E. amylovora and P. syringae pv. syringae accelerates and enhances the disease process in the laboratory.

  4. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously reported the characterization of an orphan gene ybjN from Escherichia coli. In this study, we attempted to understand the role of amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved homolog of E. coli ybjN. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in the amyR knockout mutant is ...

  5. Genome-wide identification of genes regulated by the Rcs Phosphorelay system in Erwinia amylovora

    Science.gov (United States)

    The exopolysaccharide amylovoran is one of the major pathgenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight of apples and pears. We have previously demonstrated that the RcsBCD phosphorelay system is essential for virulence by controlling amylovoran biosynthesis. We have also fou...

  6. Draft genome sequence of Erwinia tracheiphila, an economically important bacterial pathogen of cucurbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia tracheiphila is one of the most economically important pathogen of cucumbers, melons, squashes, pumpkins, and gourds, in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States, yet the molecular pathology remains uninvestigated. Here we report the first draft genome sequence of an E. tracheiphila str...

  7. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a focus on Erwinia asparaginase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Rob; Hunger, Stephen P; Boos, Joachim; Rizzari, Carmelo; Silverman, Lewis; Baruchel, Andre; Goekbuget, Nicola; Schrappe, Martin; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2011-01-15

    Asparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult treatment protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive asparaginase treatment improves clinical outcomes in childhood ALL. Three asparaginase preparations are available: the native asparaginase derived from Escherichia coli (E. coli asparaginase), a pegylated form of this enzyme (PEG-asparaginase), and a product isolated from Erwinia chrysanthemi, ie, Erwinia asparaginase. Clinical hypersensitivity reactions and silent inactivation due to antibodies against E. coli asparaginase, lead to inactivation of E. coli asparaginase in up to 60% of cases. Current treatment protocols include E. coli asparaginase or PEG-asparaginase for first-line treatment of ALL. Typically, patients exhibiting sensitivity to one formulation of asparaginase are switched to another to ensure they receive the most efficacious treatment regimen possible. Erwinia asparaginase is used as a second- or third-line treatment in European and US protocols. Despite the universal inclusion of asparaginase in such treatment protocols, debate on the optimal formulation and dosage of these agents continues. This article provides an overview of available evidence for optimal use of Erwinia asparaginase in the treatment of ALL.

  8. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eLlop

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available New pathogenic bacteria species belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia pyrifoliae, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc. show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e. among E. amylovora strains and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with nonpathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them.

  9. Genetic islands in pome fruit pathogenic and non-pathogenic Erwinia species and related plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    New pathogenic bacteria belonging to the genus Erwinia associated with pome fruit trees (Erwinia, E. piriflorinigrans, E. uzenensis) have been increasingly described in the last years, and comparative analyses have found that all these species share several genetic characteristics. Studies at different level (whole genome comparison, virulence genes, plasmid content, etc.) show a high intraspecies homogeneity (i.e., among E. amylovora strains) and also abundant similarities appear between the different Erwinia species: presence of plasmids of similar size in the pathogenic species; high similarity in several genes associated with exopolysaccharide production and hence, with virulence, as well as in some other genes, in the chromosomes. Many genetic similarities have been observed also among some of the plasmids (and genomes) from the pathogenic species and E. tasmaniensis or E. billingiae, two epiphytic species on the same hosts. The amount of genetic material shared in this genus varies from individual genes to clusters, genomic islands and genetic material that even may constitute a whole plasmid. Recent research on evolution of erwinias point out the horizontal transfer acquisition of some genomic islands that were subsequently lost in some species and several pathogenic traits that are still present. How this common material has been obtained and is efficiently maintained in different species belonging to the same genus sharing a common ecological niche provides an idea of the origin and evolution of the pathogenic Erwinia and the interaction with non-pathogenic species present in the same niche, and the role of the genes that are conserved in all of them.

  10. Plant pathogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  11. Plant pathogen resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  12. Horizontal transfer of a subtilisin gene from plants into an ancestor of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Colletotrichum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicio Danilo Armijos Jaramillo

    Full Text Available The genus Colletotrichum contains a large number of phytopathogenic fungi that produce enormous economic losses around the world. The effect of horizontal gene transfer (HGT has not been studied yet in these organisms. Inter-Kingdom HGT into fungal genomes has been reported in the past but knowledge about the HGT between plants and fungi is particularly limited. We describe a gene in the genome of several species of the genus Colletotrichum with a strong resemblance to subtilisins typically found in plant genomes. Subtilisins are an important group of serine proteases, widely distributed in all of the kingdoms of life. Our hypothesis is that the gene was acquired by Colletotrichum spp. through (HGT from plants to a Colletotrichum ancestor. We provide evidence to support this hypothesis in the form of phylogenetic analyses as well as a characterization of the similarity of the subtilisin at the primary, secondary and tertiary structural levels. The remarkable level of structural conservation of Colletotrichum plant-like subtilisin (CPLS with plant subtilisins and the differences with the rest of Colletotrichum subtilisins suggests the possibility of molecular mimicry. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HGT event would have occurred approximately 150-155 million years ago, after the divergence of the Colletotrichum lineage from other fungi. Gene expression analysis shows that the gene is modulated during the infection of maize by C. graminicola suggesting that it has a role in plant disease. Furthermore, the upregulation of the CPLS coincides with the downregulation of several plant genes encoding subtilisins. Based on the known roles of subtilisins in plant pathogenic fungi and the gene expression pattern that we observed, we postulate that the CPLSs have an important role in plant infection.

  13. Two isocitrate dehydrogenases from a plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004. Bioinformatic analysis, enzymatic characterization, and implication in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changqi; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wencai; Su, Ruirui; Ge, Yadong; Zhu, Youming; Zhu, Guoping

    2016-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key enzyme in the tricarboxylate (TCA) cycle, which may play an important role in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Here, two structurally different IDHs from a plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004 (XccIDH1 and XccIDH2) were characterized in detail. The recombinant XccIDH1 forms homodimer in solution, while the recombinant XccIDH2 is a typical monomer. Phylogenetic analysis showed that XccIDH1 belongs to the type I IDH subfamily and XccIDH2 groups into the monomeric IDH clade. Kinetic characterization demonstrated that XccIDH1's specificity towards NAD(+) was 110-fold greater than NADP(+) , while XccIDH2's specificity towards NADP(+) was 353-fold greater than NAD(+) . The putative coenzyme discriminating amino acids (Asp268, Ile269 and Ala275 for XccIDH1, and Lys589, His590 and Arg601 for XccIDH2) were studied by site-directed mutagenesis. The coenzyme specificities of the two mutants, mXccIDH1 and mXccIDH2, were completely reversed from NAD(+) to NADP(+) , and NADP(+) to NAD(+) , respectively. Furthermore, Ser80 of XccIDH1, and Lys256 and Tyr421 of XccIDH2, were the determinants for the substrate binding. The detailed biochemical properties, such as optimal pH and temperature, thermostability, and metal ion effects, of XccIDH1 and XccIDH2 were further investigated. The possibility of taking the two IDHs into consideration as the targets for drug development to control the plant diseases caused by Xcc 8004 were described and discussed thoroughly.

  14. Effect of rare earth application on the growth of Trichoderma spp.and several plant pathogenic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    d'Aquino L; Carboni M; Woo S L; Morgana M; Nardi L; Lorito M

    2004-01-01

    @@ Rare earth elements (REEs) enriched fertilisers are currently used in China for soil and foliar applications to crops, but little is known about the effect of REEs applications on the growth of beneficial and detrimental soilborne microorganisms. The growth of biological control agents Trichoderma atroviride strain P1, Trichoderma harzianum strain A6 and strain T22, plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria alternata, Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was investigated in the presence of REEs. An in vitro assays was used to monitor the effect of different concentration levels of either a mix of REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) nitrates or lanthanum alone in comparison to treatments conducted with potassium nitrate and water. Although all fungi were affected when the REEs mix or lanthanum were present at concentrations higher than 100 mM, the growth inhibition depended mainly upon the combination of compounds, the dose and the fungal species or strains tested. Trichoderma strains and B. cinerea were more sensitive than A.alternata, F. solani, R. solani or at higher concentrations. Differing growth responses of some fungi to treatments with REEs mix vs. lanthanum alone indicated that in given situations the effect of the REEs compounds may be caused by elements other than lanthanum or by element mixtures.Further investigations are in progress to determine the effect of REEs on important interactions in the soil community between beneficial fungi, pathogenic fungi and/or the plant. REEs are naturally present in the environment and in biological systems but accumulation in soil can take place following successive applications. Therefore, it would be useful to achieve a better understanding of the effect of REEs accumulation on the activity of rhizosphere microorganisms given the widespread use in some regions of rare earths as fertilizers and their presence as fertilizer contaminants.

  15. Effect of essential oil of Origanum rotundifolium on some plant pathogenic bacteria, seed germination and plant growth of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadaşoǧlu, Fatih; Kotan, Recep; Karagöz, Kenan; Dikbaş, Neslihan; Ćakmakçi, Ramazan; Ćakir, Ahmet; Kordali, Şaban; Özer, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine effect of Origanum rotundifolium's essential oil on some plant pathogenic bacterias, seed germination and plant growth of tomato. Xanthomonas axanopodis pv. vesicatoria strain (Xcv-761) and Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. michiganensis strain (Cmm) inoculated to tomato seed. The seeds were tested for germination in vitro and disease severity and some plant growth parameters in vivo. In vitro assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil treatment in seeds inoculated with Xcv-761 and at 62,5 µl/ml essential oil and streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. The least infected cotiledon number was observed at 500 µg/ml streptomycin treatment in seeds inoculated with Cmm. In vivo assay, maximum seed germination was observed at 250 µl/ml essential oil teratment in tomato inoculated with Cmm. Lowest disease severity, is seen in the CMM infected seeds with 250 µl/ml essential oil application these results were statistically significant when compared with pathogen infected seeds. Similarly, in application conducted with XCV-761 infected seed, the lowest disease severity was observed for seeds as a result of 250 µl/ml essential oil application. Also according to the results obtained from essential oil application of CMM infected seeds conducted with 62,5 µl/ml dose; while disease severity was found statistically insignificant compared to 250 µl/ml to essential oil application, ıt was found statistically significant compared to pathogen infected seeds. The results showed that essential oil of O. rotundifolium has a potential for some suppressed plant disease when it is used in appropriate dose.

  16. The general transcriptional repressor Tup1 is required for dimorphism and virulence in a fungal plant pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the life cycle of many fungal pathogens is the transition between yeast-like growth and the formation of filamentous structures, a process known as dimorphism. This morphological shift, typically triggered by multiple environmental signals, is tightly controlled by complex genetic pathways to ensure successful pathogenic development. In animal pathogenic fungi, one of the best known regulators of dimorphism is the general transcriptional repressor, Tup1. However, the role of Tup1 in fungal dimorphism is completely unknown in plant pathogens. Here we show that Tup1 plays a key role in orchestrating the yeast to hypha transition in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. Deletion of the tup1 gene causes a drastic reduction in the mating and filamentation capacity of the fungus, in turn leading to a reduced virulence phenotype. In U. maydis, these processes are controlled by the a and b mating-type loci, whose expression depends on the Prf1 transcription factor. Interestingly, Δtup1 strains show a critical reduction in the expression of prf1 and that of Prf1 target genes at both loci. Moreover, we observed that Tup1 appears to regulate Prf1 activity by controlling the expression of the prf1 transcriptional activators, rop1 and hap2. Additionally, we describe a putative novel prf1 repressor, named Pac2, which seems to be an important target of Tup1 in the control of dimorphism and virulence. Furthermore, we show that Tup1 is required for full pathogenic development since tup1 deletion mutants are unable to complete the sexual cycle. Our findings establish Tup1 as a key factor coordinating dimorphism in the phytopathogen U. maydis and support a conserved role for Tup1 in the control of hypha-specific genes among animal and plant fungal pathogens.

  17. Horizontal transfer of a subtilisin gene from plants into an ancestor of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Colletotrichum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijos Jaramillo, Vinicio Danilo; Vargas, Walter Alberto; Sukno, Serenella Ana; Thon, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The genus Colletotrichum contains a large number of phytopathogenic fungi that produce enormous economic losses around the world. The effect of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has not been studied yet in these organisms. Inter-Kingdom HGT into fungal genomes has been reported in the past but knowledge about the HGT between plants and fungi is particularly limited. We describe a gene in the genome of several species of the genus Colletotrichum with a strong resemblance to subtilisins typically found in plant genomes. Subtilisins are an important group of serine proteases, widely distributed in all of the kingdoms of life. Our hypothesis is that the gene was acquired by Colletotrichum spp. through (HGT) from plants to a Colletotrichum ancestor. We provide evidence to support this hypothesis in the form of phylogenetic analyses as well as a characterization of the similarity of the subtilisin at the primary, secondary and tertiary structural levels. The remarkable level of structural conservation of Colletotrichum plant-like subtilisin (CPLS) with plant subtilisins and the differences with the rest of Colletotrichum subtilisins suggests the possibility of molecular mimicry. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HGT event would have occurred approximately 150-155 million years ago, after the divergence of the Colletotrichum lineage from other fungi. Gene expression analysis shows that the gene is modulated during the infection of maize by C. graminicola suggesting that it has a role in plant disease. Furthermore, the upregulation of the CPLS coincides with the downregulation of several plant genes encoding subtilisins. Based on the known roles of subtilisins in plant pathogenic fungi and the gene expression pattern that we observed, we postulate that the CPLSs have an important role in plant infection.

  18. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide

  19. A synthetic peptide shows retro- and anterograde neuronal transport before disrupting the chemosensation of plant-pathogenic nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Jones, Laura M; Urwin, Peter E; Atkinson, Howard J

    2011-03-07

    Cyst nematodes are a group of plant pathogens each with a defined host range that cause major losses to crops including potato, soybean and sugar beet. The infective mobile stage hatches from dormant eggs and moves a short distance through the soil to plant roots, which it then invades. A novel strategy for control has recently been proposed in which the plant is able to secrete a peptide which disorientates the infective stage and prevents invasion of the pathogen. This study provides indirect evidence to support the mechanism by which one such peptide disrupts chemosensory function in nematodes. The peptide is a disulphide-constrained 7-mer with the amino acid sequence CTTMHPRLC that binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. A fluorescently tagged version of this peptide with both epifluorescent and confocal microscopy was used to demonstrate that retrograde transport occurs from an aqueous environment along bare-ending primary cilia of chemoreceptive sensilla. The peptide is transported to the cell bodies of these neurons and on to a limited number of other neurons to which they connect. It appears to be localised in both neuronal processes and organelles adjacent to nuclei of some neurons suggesting it could be transported through the Golgi apparatus. The peptide takes 2.5 h to reach the neuronal cell bodies. Comparative studies established that similar but less abundant uptake occurs for Caenorhabditis elegans along its well studied dye-filling chemoreceptive neurons. Incubation in peptide solution or root-exudate from transgenic plants that secrete the peptide disrupted normal orientation of infective cyst nematodes to host root diffusate. The peptide probably undergoes transport along the dye-filling non-cholinergic chemoreceptive neurons to their synapses where it is taken up by the interneurons to which they connect. Coordinated responses to chemoreception are disrupted when the sub-set of cholinergic interneurons secrete the peptide at synapses that

  20. Spectrophotometric Screening of Potent Bactericidal Property of Thevetia Peruviana Schum. Leaf and Fruit Rind Extracts on Clinical and Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazneen Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of multi drug resistance in human and plant pathogens, reconsidering the traditional medicines as antibacterial source and presence of promising phytochemicals in leaf and fruit rind of T. peruviana (S (Nazneen et al., 2014 prompted the authors to take up the antibacterial evaluation of different extracts. Antibacterial activity, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of various extracts of T. peruviana (S were measured using methods of National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC spectrophotometric determination of active extracts has found that the MICs of all the active extracts lies between the range of 250 μg to 1250 μg and bactericidal concentration in a range of 500 to 1250 μg. The percentage of inhibition was analysed, where in among all the extracts tested against B. subtilis and E. coli, fruit upper liquid (FUL exhibited highest inhibition percentage of 33.75% and 30.31 % at 500 μg/ml respectively. Similarly, fruit hexane (FH extract has the highest inhibition of 15.60% against B. cereus at 750 μg/ml. The Xanthomonas sp. was susceptible to leaf chloroform (LC with 32.29% of inhibition at 1000 μg/ ml. The activity index and total antimicrobial activity indicates the antibacterial action of extracts. The present investigations have revealed that among the extracts, the fruit rind extracts have most prominent inhibition abilities against tested bacteria, which are validating the use of this plant in traditional system of medicine and this is the first report of exploration of above extracts for their antibacterial activities against B. subtilis, B. cereus, E. coli and Xanthomonas sp.

  1. The Alternaria genomes database: a comprehensive resource for a fungal genus comprised of saprophytes, plant pathogens, and allergenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Ha X; Pryor, Barry; Peever, Tobin; Lawrence, Christopher B

    2015-03-25

    Alternaria is considered one of the most common saprophytic fungal genera on the planet. It is comprised of many species that exhibit a necrotrophic phytopathogenic lifestyle. Several species are clinically associated with allergic respiratory disorders although rarely found to cause invasive infections in humans. Finally, Alternaria spp. are among the most well known producers of diverse fungal secondary metabolites, especially toxins. We have recently sequenced and annotated the genomes of 25 Alternaria spp. including but not limited to many necrotrophic plant pathogens such as A. brassicicola (a pathogen of Brassicaceous crops like cabbage and canola) and A. solani (a major pathogen of Solanaceous plants like potato and tomato), and several saprophytes that cause allergy in human such as A. alternata isolates. These genomes were annotated and compared. Multiple genetic differences were found in the context of plant and human pathogenicity, notably the pro-inflammatory potential of A. alternata. The Alternaria genomes database was built to provide a public platform to access the whole genome sequences, genome annotations, and comparative genomics data of these species. Genome annotation and comparison were performed using a pipeline that integrated multiple computational and comparative genomics tools. Alternaria genome sequences together with their annotation and comparison data were ported to Ensembl database schemas using a self-developed tool (EnsImport). Collectively, data are currently hosted using a customized installation of the Ensembl genome browser platform. Recent efforts in fungal genome sequencing have facilitated the studies of the molecular basis of fungal pathogenicity as a whole system. The Alternaria genomes database provides a comprehensive resource of genomics and comparative data of an important saprophytic and plant/human pathogenic fungal genus. The database will be updated regularly with new genomes when they become available. The

  2. Partial resistance to Erwinia carotovora SUBSP. carotovora and plant vigour among F1 hybrids of Zantedeschia cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, R.C.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The potential of breeding Zantedeschia cultivars for resistance to soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (syn. Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum) was determined. Hybrids of six cultivars (`Back Magic`, Galaxy`, Pink Persuasion`, Sensation`, `Treasure` and `Florex Gold`)

  3. Identification of HR-inducing cDNAs from plant pathogens via a Gateway(®)-compatible binary Potato virus X-expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, H Peter

    2012-01-01

    Identification of pathogen effectors that elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in resistant plant hosts is essential to study disease resistance. In this method, it is described how to generate a cDNA library, how to transfer the library into a binary PVX-expression vector, and finally how to set up a high-throughput screen for HR-inducing cDNAs from plant pathogens.

  4. Autophagy provides nutrients for nonassimilating fungal structures and is necessary for plant colonization but not for infection in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Lone; Droce, Aida; Søndergaard, Teis

    2012-01-01

    The role of autophagy in necrotrophic fungal physiology and infection biology is poorly understood. We have studied autophagy in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum in relation to development of nonassimilating structures and infection. We identified an ATG8 homolog F. graminearum...... a pivotal role for supplying nutrients to nonassimilating structures necessary for growth and is important for plant colonization. This also indicates that autophagy is a central mechanism for fungal adaptation to nonoptimal C/N ratios....

  5. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site.

  6. HopX1 in Erwinia amylovora functions as an avirulence protein in apple and is regulated by HrpL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsanczy, A M; Schneider, D J; DeClerck, G A; Cartinhour, S; Beer, S V

    2012-02-01

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora. This pathogen delivers virulence proteins into host cells utilizing the type III secretion system (T3SS). Expression of the T3SS and of translocated and secreted substrates is activated by the alternative sigma factor HrpL, which recognizes hrp box promoters upstream of regulated genes. A collection of hidden Markov model (HMM) profiles was used to identify putative hrp boxes in the genome sequence of Ea273, a highly virulent strain of E. amylovora. Among potential virulence factors preceded by putative hrp boxes, two genes previously known as Eop3 and Eop2 were characterized. The presence of functionally active hrp boxes upstream of these two genes was confirmed by β-glucuronidase (GUS) assays. Deletion mutants of the latter candidate genes, renamed hopX1(Ea) and hopAK1(Ea), respectively, did not differ in virulence from the wild-type strain when assayed in pear fruit and apple shoots. The hopX1(Ea) deletion mutant of Ea273, complemented with a plasmid overexpressing hopX1(E)(a), suppressed the development of the hypersensitivity response (HR) when inoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana; however, it contributed to HR in Nicotiana tabacum and significantly reduced the progress of disease in apple shoots, suggesting that HopX1(Ea) may act as an avirulence protein in apple shoots.

  7. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  8. Carotenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: In vitro studies of a crt/bch transcription factor from Rhodobacter capsulatus and carotenoid enzymes from Erwinia herbicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, David Allen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    A putative transcription factor in Rhodobactor capsulatus which binds upstream of the crt and bch pigment biosynthesis operons and appears to play a role in the adaptation of the organism from the aerobic to the anaerobic-photosynthetic growth mode was characterized. Chapter 2 describes the identification of this factor through an in vitro mobility shift assay, as well as the determination of its binding properties and sequence specificity. Chapter 3 focuses on the isolation of this factor. Biochemistry of later carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes derived from the non-photosynthetic bacterium, Erwinia herbicola. Chapter 4 describes the separate overexpression and in vitro analysis of two enzymes involved in the main sequence of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, lycopene cyclase and 5-carotene hydroxylase. Chapter 5 examines the overexpression and enzymology of functionally active zeaxanthin glucosyltransferase, an enzyme which carries out a more unusual transformation, converting a carotenoid into its more hydrophilic mono- and diglucoside derivatives. In addition, amino acid homology with other glucosyltransferases suggests a putative binding site for the UDP-activated glucose substrate.

  9. Erwinia mallotivora sp., a new pathogen of papaya (Carica papaya) in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noriha Mat; Bunawan, Hamidun; Redzuan, Rohaiza Ahmad; Jaganath, Indu Bala S

    2010-12-24

    Erwinia mallotivora was isolated from papaya infected with dieback disease showing the typical symptoms of greasy, water-soaked lesions and spots on leaves. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia and was united in a monophyletic group with E. mallotivora DSM 4565 (AJ233414). Earlier studies had indicated that the causal agent for this disease was E. papayae. However, our current studies, through Koch's postulate, have confirmed that papaya dieback disease is caused by E. mallotivora. To our knowledge, this is the first new discovery of E. mallotivora as a causal agent of papaya dieback disease in Peninsular Malaysia. Previous reports have suggested that E. mallotivora causes leaf spot in Mallotus japonicus. However, this research confirms it also to be pathogenic to Carica papaya.

  10. Erwinia mallotivora sp., a New Pathogen of Papaya (Carica papaya in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriha Mat Amin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia mallotivora was isolated from papaya infected with dieback disease showing the typical symptoms of greasy, water-soaked lesions and spots on leaves. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain belonged to the genus Erwinia and was united in a monophyletic group with E. mallotivora DSM 4565 (AJ233414. Earlier studies had indicated that the causal agent for this disease was E. papayae. However, our current studies, through Koch’s postulate, have confirmed that papaya dieback disease is caused by E. mallotivora. To our knowledge, this is the first new discovery of E. mallotivora as a causal agent of papaya dieback disease in Peninsular Malaysia. Previous reports have suggested that E. mallotivora causes leaf spot in Mallotus japonicus. However, this research confirms it also to be pathogenic to Carica papaya.

  11. Erwinia endophytica sp. nov., isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Salazar, Sergio; Cuesta, Maria José; Tejedor, Carmen; Igual, Jose Mariano; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes; Peix, Alvaro

    2015-12-04

    We analysed through a polyphasic taxonomy approach two bacterial strains coded BSTT30T and BSTT40, isolated in the course of a study of endophytic bacteria occurring in stems and roots of potato growing in a soil from Salamanca, Spain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence was identical in both strains and had 98.4% identity with respect to the closest relatives Erwinia tasmaniensis Et1/99T and E. rhapontici ATCC29283T and the following closest related species with 98.2 % similarity were E. billingiae E63T and E. toletana A37T, for which the strains were classified within genus Erwinia. The analysis of housekeeping genes gpd, gyrB and rpoD confirmed their phylogenetic affiliation and showed identities lower than 90% in all cases with respect to the mentioned closest relatives. The respiratory quinone is Q8. The major fatty acids are C16:0, C16:1 7c/ 16:1 6c in summed feature 3 and C18:1 7c/ 18:2 6,9c in summed feature 8. Oxidase negative and catalase positive. Glucose is fermented without gas production. Arginine dihydrolase, urease and indole production are negative. It can grow at 35ºC and at pH 10. The DNA G+C content was 50.1 mol %. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 29% relatedness with respect to the type strains of the four closest related species. Therefore, the combined results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strains BSTT30T and BSTT40 into a novel species of Erwinia, for which the name Erwinia endophytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BSTT30T (=LMG 28457T, CECT 8692T).

  12. Estimation of resistance pear cultivars to Erwinia amylovora using artificial immature pear fruits method

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilović, Veljko; Stanisavljević, Rade; Stošić, Stefan; Stevanović, Miloš; Aleksić, Goran; Stajić, Milica; Dolovac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility of different pear cultivars to Erwinia amaylovora by artificial inoculated immature pear fruits are shown in this article. According obtained results significant differences among cultivars are confirmed and they could be divided in four groups. Most susceptibly cultivars were Santa Marija. Second group includes Williams, Morettini, Carmen, Hardenpont. As most resistant shown to be Magness, Turandot and two local varietyies Karamanka, as well as another unknown local cultivar. ...

  13. Absence of lysogeny in wild populations of Erwinia amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Sjaarda, Calvin P; Ayala, Carlos Juarez; Howcroft, Brittany; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2015-05-01

    Lytic bacteriophages are in development as biological control agents for the prevention of fire blight disease caused by Erwinia amylovora. Temperate phages should be excluded as biologicals since lysogeny produces the dual risks of host resistance to phage attack and the transduction of virulence determinants between bacteria. The extent of lysogeny was estimated in wild populations of E. amylovora and Pantoea agglomerans with real-time polymerase chain reaction primers developed to detect E. amylovora phages belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Pantoea agglomerans, an orchard epiphyte, is easily infected by Erwinia spp. phages, and it serves as a carrier in the development of the phage-mediated biological control agent. Screening of 161 E. amylovora isolates from 16 distinct geographical areas in North America, Europe, North Africa and New Zealand and 82 P. agglomerans isolates from southern Ontario, Canada showed that none possessed prophage. Unstable phage resistant clones or lysogens were produced under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a stable lysogen was recovered from infection of bacterial isolate Ea110R with Podoviridae phage ΦEa35-20. These laboratory observations suggested that while lysogeny is possible in E. amylovora, it is rare or absent in natural populations, and there is a minimal risk associated with lysogenic conversion and transduction by Erwinia spp. phages.

  14. Low genetic diversity among pathogenic strains of Erwinia psidii from Brazil Baixa diversidade genética entre estirpes patogênicas de Erwinia psidii no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. O. Teixeira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia psidii causes bacterial disease of guava in Brazil. Phenotypic and molecular characterization through rep-PCR fingerprinting of 42 strains from different geographical regions showed that E. psidii populations in Brazil have a low level of genetic diversity and suggest that contaminated plant material is the main source for pathogen dissemination in the country.Erwinia psidii é o agente causal da seca-dos-ponteiros ou bacteriose da goiabeira no Brasil. A caracterização fenotípica e molecular através de rep-PCR de 42 estirpes patogênicas de diferentes regiões mostrou que as populações de E. psidii no Brasil têm um baixo nível de diversidade genética e sugere que material de propagação infectado é a principal fonte de disseminação do patógeno para novas áreas no país.

  15. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish potato famine pathogen, P. infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Erica M; Cardenas, Martha E; Myers, Kevin; Forbes, Gregory A; Fry, William E; Restrepo, Silvia; Grünwald, Niklaus J

    2011-01-01

    Emerging plant pathogens have largely been a consequence of the movement of pathogens to new geographic regions. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathogens is hybridization between individuals of different species or subspecies, which may allow rapid evolution and adaptation to new hosts or environments. Hybrid plant pathogens have traditionally been difficult to detect or confirm, but the increasing ease of cloning and sequencing PCR products now makes the identification of species that consistently have genes or alleles with phylogenetically divergent origins relatively straightforward. We investigated the genetic origin of Phytophthora andina, an increasingly common pathogen of Andean crops Solanum betaceum, S. muricatum, S. quitoense, and several wild Solanum spp. It has been hypothesized that P. andina is a hybrid between the potato late blight pathogen P. infestans and another Phytophthora species. We tested this hypothesis by cloning four nuclear loci to obtain haplotypes and using these loci to infer the phylogenetic relationships of P. andina to P. infestans and other related species. Sequencing of cloned PCR products in every case revealed two distinct haplotypes for each locus in P. andina, such that each isolate had one allele derived from a P. infestans parent and a second divergent allele derived from an unknown species that is closely related but distinct from P. infestans, P. mirabilis, and P. ipomoeae. To the best of our knowledge, the unknown parent has not yet been collected. We also observed sequence polymorphism among P. andina isolates at three of the four loci, many of which segregate between previously described P. andina clonal lineages. These results provide strong support that P. andina emerged via hybridization between P. infestans and another unknown Phytophthora species also belonging to Phytophthora clade 1c.

  16. A negative effect of a pathogen on its vector? A plant pathogen increases the vulnerability of its vector to attack by natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Camila F; Long, Elizabeth Y; Finke, Deborah L

    2014-04-01

    Plant pathogens that are dependent on arthropod vectors for transmission from host to host may enhance their own success by promoting vector survival and/or performance. The effect of pathogens on vectors may be direct or indirect, with indirect effects mediated by increases in host quality or reductions in the vulnerability of vectors to natural enemies. We investigated whether the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, a vector of cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV) in wheat, experiences a reduction in rates of attack by the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani when actively harboring the plant pathogen. We manipulated the vector status of aphids (virus carrying or virus free) and evaluated the impact on the rate of attack by wasps. We found that vector status did not influence the survival or fecundity of aphids in the absence of parasitoids. However, virus-carrying aphids experienced higher rates of parasitism and greater overall population suppression by parasitoid wasps than virus-free aphids. Moreover, virus-carrying aphids were accepted as hosts by wasps more often than virus-free aphids, with a greater number of wasps stinging virus-carrying aphids following assessment by antennal palpations than virus-free aphids. Therefore, counter to the prevailing idea that persistent vector-borne pathogens enhance the performance of their vectors, we found that infectious aphids actively carrying a plant pathogen experience greater vulnerability to natural enemies. Our results suggest that parasitoids may contribute to the successful biological control of CYDV by disproportionately impacting virus-carrying vectors, and thus reducing the proportion of vectors in the population that are infectious.

  17. The plant pathogen Phytophthora andina emerged via hybridization of an unknown Phytophthora species and the Irish potato famine pathogen, P. infestans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Goss

    Full Text Available Emerging plant pathogens have largely been a consequence of the movement of pathogens to new geographic regions. Another documented mechanism for the emergence of plant pathogens is hybridization between individuals of different species or subspecies, which may allow rapid evolution and adaptation to new hosts or environments. Hybrid plant pathogens have traditionally been difficult to detect or confirm, but the increasing ease of cloning and sequencing PCR products now makes the identification of species that consistently have genes or alleles with phylogenetically divergent origins relatively straightforward. We investigated the genetic origin of Phytophthora andina, an increasingly common pathogen of Andean crops Solanum betaceum, S. muricatum, S. quitoense, and several wild Solanum spp. It has been hypothesized that P. andina is a hybrid between the potato late blight pathogen P. infestans and another Phytophthora species. We tested this hypothesis by cloning four nuclear loci to obtain haplotypes and using these loci to infer the phylogenetic relationships of P. andina to P. infestans and other related species. Sequencing of cloned PCR products in every case revealed two distinct haplotypes for each locus in P. andina, such that each isolate had one allele derived from a P. infestans parent and a second divergent allele derived from an unknown species that is closely related but distinct from P. infestans, P. mirabilis, and P. ipomoeae. To the best of our knowledge, the unknown parent has not yet been collected. We also observed sequence polymorphism among P. andina isolates at three of the four loci, many of which segregate between previously described P. andina clonal lineages. These results provide strong support that P. andina emerged via hybridization between P. infestans and another unknown Phytophthora species also belonging to Phytophthora clade 1c.

  18. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  19. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  20. Potential Distribution of Alien Invasive Species and Risk Assessment: a Case Study of Erwinia amylovora in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chen; CHEN Juan; HU Bai-shi; JIANG Ying-hua; LIU Feng-quan

    2007-01-01

    Alien invasive species represent a severe risk to biodiversity and economy, as in the case of fire blight (Erwinia amylovora), a bacterial disease that originated in North America, which may be released into new locations by means of fruit trade. On the basis of the knowledge of Erwinia amylovora's biophysical characteristics and environmental data, the geographic information system (GIS) has been applied to determine areas where Erwinia amylovora can potentially invade China. Temperature and precipitation, during the blossoming period, are considered to be two critical factors affecting the Erwinia amylovora's suitable climatic zones. This spatial modeling approach was validated from a case study in Europe, where the occurrence of Erwinia amylovora has been proven. The model prediction agreed with the occurrence of the bacteria recorded in Europe, and the same procedure has been applied to produce a potential establishment area in China's two preferential apple cultivation regions, Bohai Bay region and Huangtu Altiplano region. It has been found that areas belonging to the high-risk category are more or less the main apple producing areas, accounting for their great economic importance in China. This methodology provides an initial baseline for assessment, prevention, and management of alien species that may become invasive under certain environmental conditions. In addition, this modeling approach provides a tool for policy makers to use, in making decisions on management practices where alien species are involved.

  1. EFEKTIFITAS DAYA HAMBAT BAKTERI Streptomyces sp TERHADAP Erwinia sp PENYEBAB PENYAKIT BUSUK REBAH PADA TANAMAN LIDAH BUAYA (Aloe barbadensis Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARMILA TASNIM

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces sp was conducted from December 2010 - June 2011 at the Laboratoryof Microbiology, Biology Department, Math and Science Faculty, UdayanaUniversity Bukit Jimbaran-Bali. Implementation stages of the research consisted ofisolation and testing of the antibiotic activity Streptomyces sp to inhibit growthbacterial pathogens Erwinia sp as a cause of disease in plants fallen foul (Soft rot ofAloe barbadensis Mill.The results of this study have eight isolates of Streptomyces spwith macroscopic and microscopic characters are varied. Furthermore, all isolateswere obtained and then tested against antibiotic activity to inhibit growth the bacteriaErwinia sp. Test results obtained by Streptomyces sp that has the most effective ininhibiting the ability of the bacteria Erwinia sp isolates are Streptomyces sp2for (45%.

  2. Genetic differences between blight-causing Erwinia species with differing host specificities, identified by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Lindsay R; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2006-11-01

    PCR-based subtractive hybridization was used to isolate sequences from Erwinia amylovora strain Ea110, which is pathogenic on apples and pears, that were not present in three closely related strains with differing host specificities: E. amylovora MR1, which is pathogenic only on Rubus spp.; Erwinia pyrifoliae Ep1/96, the causal agent of shoot blight of Asian pears; and Erwinia sp. strain Ejp556, the causal agent of bacterial shoot blight of pear in Japan. In total, six subtractive libraries were constructed and analyzed. Recovered sequences included type III secretion components, hypothetical membrane proteins, and ATP-binding proteins. In addition, we identified an Ea110-specific sequence with homology to a type III secretion apparatus component of the insect endosymbiont Sodalis glossinidius, as well as an Ep1/96-specific sequence with homology to the Yersinia pestis effector protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH.

  3. Transcriptional and Antagonistic Responses of Biocontrol Strain Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11 to the Plant Pathogenic Oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Zhao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lysobacter enzymogenes is a ubiquitous, beneficial, plant-associated bacterium emerging as a novel biological control agent. It has the potential to become a new source of antimicrobial secondary metabolites such as the Heat-Stable Antifungal Factor (HSAF, which is a broad-spectrum antimycotic with a novel mode of action. However, very little information about how L. enzymogenes detects and responds to fungi or oomycetes has been reported. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum and the biocontrol bacterial strain L. enzymogenes OH11 was used to analyze the transcriptional changes in the bacteria that were induced by the oomycetes. Analysis was performed at three time points of the interaction, starting before inhibition zone formation until inhibition zone formation. A L. enzymogenes OH11 DNA microarray was constructed for the analysis. Microarray analysis indicated that a wide range of genes belonging to 14 diverse functions in L. enzymogenes were affected by P. aphanidermatum as critical antagonistic effects occurred. L. enzymogenes detected and responded to the presence of P. aphanidermatum early, but alteration of gene expression typically occurred after inhibition zone formation. The presence of P. aphanidermatum increased the twitching motility and HSAF production in L. enzymogenes. We also performed a contact interaction between L. enzymogenes and P. aphanidermatum, and found that HSAF played a critical role in the interaction. Our experiments demonstrated that L. enzymogenes displayed transcriptional and antagonistic responses to P. aphanidermatum in order to gain advantages in the competition with this oomycete. This study revealed new insights into the interactions between bacteria and oomycete.

  4. Erwinia asparaginase achieves therapeutic activity after pegaspargase allergy: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Wanda L; Asselin, Barbara; Supko, Jeffrey G; Devidas, Meenakshi; Kaiser, Nicole A; Plourde, Paul; Winick, Naomi J; Reaman, Gregory H; Raetz, Elizabeth; Carroll, William L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2013-07-25

    AALL07P2 evaluated whether substitution of Erwinia asparaginase 25000 IU/m(2) for 6 doses given intramuscularly Monday/Wednesday/Friday (M/W/F) to children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and clinical allergy to pegaspargase would provide a 48-hour nadir serum asparaginase activity (NSAA) ≥ 0.10 IU/mL. AALL07P2 enrolled 55 eligible/evaluable patients. NSAA ≥ 0.1 IU/mL was achieved in 38 of 41 patients (92.7%) with acceptable samples 48 hours and in 38 of 43 patients (88.4%) 72 hours after dosing during course 1. Among samples obtained during all courses, 95.8% (252 of 263) of 48-hour samples and 84.5% (125 of 148) of 72-hour samples had NSAA ≥ 0.10-IU/mL. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by fitting the serum asparaginase activity-time course for all 6 doses given during course 1 to a 1-compartment open model with first order absorption. Erwinia asparaginase administered with this schedule achieved therapeutic NSAA at both 48 and 72 hours and was well tolerated with no reports of hemorrhage, thrombosis, or death, and few cases of grade 2 to 3 allergic reaction (n = 6), grade 1 to 3 hyperglycemia (n = 6), or grade 1 pancreatitis (n = 1). Following allergy to pegaspargase, Erwinia asparaginase 25000 IU/m(2) × 6 intramuscularly M/W/F can be substituted for a single dose of pegaspargase.

  5. Biology of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in oligotrophic environments: survival responses and virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Santander, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora es una bacteria fitopatógena de la familia Enterobacteriaceae, responsable del fuego bacteriano de las rosáceas. Los efectos destructivos de este patógeno sobre frutos, flores y prácticamente todos los órganos de las plantas hospedadoras afectadas constituyen una amenaza importante para la producción de pera y manzana, y suponen graves pérdidas económicas anuales en todo el mundo. E. amylovora está clasificada como un organismo de cuarentena en la Unión Europea y en otros pa...

  6. Biology of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in oligotrophic environments: survival responses and virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Santander, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora es una bacteria fitopatógena de la familia Enterobacteriaceae, responsable del fuego bacteriano de las rosáceas. Los efectos destructivos de este patógeno sobre frutos, flores y prácticamente todos los órganos de las plantas hospedadoras afectadas constituyen una amenaza importante para la producción de pera y manzana, y suponen graves pérdidas económicas anuales en todo el mundo. E. amylovora está clasificada como un organismo de cuarentena en la Unión Europea y en otros pa...

  7. Erwinia amylovora – the Causal Agent of Root Collar Necrosis of Apple Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Veljko Gavrilović; Svetlana Milijašević; Biljana Todorović; Svetlana Živković; Nenad Trkulja

    2008-01-01

    A large-scale outbreak of fire blight symptoms caused by Erwinia amylovora was recorded in pome fruit trees during 2007. In addition to fruit necrosis and shoot blight as the typical disease symptoms, dark purple necrosis was observed in the root collar area girdling the trunk just above the ground and thus withering the whole apple tree. Since similar symptoms on apple trees could be caused by E. amylovora or one of several phytopathogenic fungi of the genera Phomopsis and Phytophthora, an i...

  8. Deep Characterization of the Microbiomes of Calophya spp. (Hemiptera: Calophyidae Gall-Inducing Psyllids Reveals the Absence of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria and Three Dominant Endosymbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will A Overholt

    Full Text Available Bacteria associated with sap-feeding insect herbivores include not only symbionts that may increase their hosts' fitness but also harmful plant pathogens. Calophya spp. gall-inducing psyllids (Hemiptera: Calophyidae are being investigated for their potential as biological control agents of the noxious weed, Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolia, in Florida. Although there are no examples of plant pathogen transmission by members of the family Calophyidae, several insects in the superfamily Psylloidea are known to transmit pathogenic bacteria in the genera Candidatus Liberibacter and Candidatus Phytoplasma. To determine whether Calophya spp. harbor potentially harmful plant pathogenic bacteria, we sequenced small subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene amplicons generated from individuals from four Calophya spp. populations: All microbial SSU gene sequences fell into the bacterial domain, with 98-99% belonging to the Proteobacteria. The Calophya microbiomes contained a relatively simple community, with 49-79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% detected, and only 5-8 OTUs with greater than 1% abundance. Candidatus Carsonella showed the highest relative abundance, with OTUs from this candidate genus representing between 51-65% of all recovered sequences. The next most abundant clade observed was an unclassified Enterobacteriacae group closely related to bacteria from the genera Buchnera and Blochmannia that ranged from 20-31% in relative abundance. Wolbachia populations were the third most abundant group and represented 7-27% of the diversity in microbial OTUs. No SSU rRNA gene sequences from putative pathogenic bacteria from the genera Ca. Liberibacter or Ca. Phytoplasma were detected in the microbiomes of the four Calophya populations. The probability that infected psyllids were present in our colonies, but were not sampled, was extremley low (1.39 x 10(-10. As far as we are aware, our study is the first to characterize the microbiome of

  9. Antifungal activity of nettle (Urtica dioica L.), colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), oleander (Nerium oleander L.) and konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) extracts on plants pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, I; Peivastegan, B; Kolahi, M

    2009-01-01

    Anti-mycotic activity of the ethanol extracts from Nettle (Urtica dioica L.), Colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), Konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) and Oleander (Nerium oleander L.) floral parts were screened in vitro against four important plant pathogenic fungi viz.; Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Rizoctonia solani using agar dilution bioassay. Extracts showed antifungal activity against all the tested fungi. Among the plants, Nettle and Colocynth were the most effective against A. alternate and R. solani while Oleander possesses the best inhibition on F. oxysporum and F. solani. Konar was the most effective extract by reducing the growth of Rizoctonia solani than other fungi. These results showed that extracts could be considered suitable alternatives to chemical additives for the control of fungal diseases in plants.

  10. Same ammo, different weapons: enzymatic extracts from two apple genotypes with contrasted susceptibilities to fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) differentially convert phloridzin and phloretin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher, Matthieu; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Guyot, Sylvain; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-11-01

    The necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora responsible for the fire blight disease causes cell death in apple tissues to enrich intercellular spaces with nutrients. Apple leaves contain large amounts of dihydrochalcones (DHCs), including phloridzin and its aglycone phloretin. Previous work showed an important decrease in the constitutive DHCs stock in infected leaves, probably caused by transformation reactions during the infection process. At least two flavonoid transformation pathways have been described so far: deglucosylation and oxidation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether DHCs are differentially converted in two apple genotypes displaying contrasted susceptibilities to the disease. Different analyses were performed: i) enzymatic activity assays in infected leaves, ii) identification/quantification of end-products obtained after in vitro enzymatic reactions with DHCs, iii) evaluation of the bactericidal activity of end-products. The results of the enzymatic assays showed that deglucosylation was dominant over oxidation in the susceptible genotype MM106 while the opposite was observed in the resistant genotype Evereste. These data were confirmed by LC-UV/Vis-MS analysis of in vitro reaction mixtures, especially because higher levels of o-quinoid oxidation products of phloretin were measured by using the enzymatic extracts of Evereste infected leaves. Their presence correlated well with a strong bactericidal activity of the reaction mixtures. Thus, our results suggest that a differential transformation of DHCs occur in apple genotypes with a potential involvement in the establishment of the susceptibility or the resistance to fire blight, through the release of glucose or of highly bactericidal compounds respectively.

  11. Evidence of two lineages of the symbiont 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola' in Italian populations of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Claudia; Mazzon, Luca; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Simonato, Mauro; Squartini, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The close association between the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and bacteria has been known for more than a century. Recently, the presence of a host-specific, hereditary, unculturable symbiotic bacterium, designated 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola', has been described inside the cephalic organ of the fly, called the oesophageal bulb. In the present study, the 16S rRNA gene sequence variability of 'Ca. E. dacicola' was examined within and between 26 Italian olive fly populations sampled across areas where olive trees occur in the wild and areas where cultivated olive trees have been introduced through history. The bacterial contents of the oesophageal bulbs of 314 olive flies were analysed and a minimum of 781 bp of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. The corresponding host fly genotype was assessed by sequencing a 776 bp portion of the mitochondrial genome. Two 'Ca. E. dacicola' haplotypes were found (htA and htB), one being slightly more prevalent than the other (57%). The two haplotypes did not co-exist in the same individuals, as confirmed by cloning. Interestingly, the olive fly populations of the two main Italian islands, Sicily and Sardinia, appeared to be represented exclusively by the htB and htA haplotypes, respectively, while peninsular populations showed both bacterial haplotypes in different proportions. No significant correlation emerged between the two symbiont haplotypes and the 16 host fly haplotypes observed, suggesting evidence for a mixed model of vertical and horizontal transmission of the symbiont during the fly life cycle.

  12. The Genomes of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum Reveal Adaptation to Different Hosts and Lifestyles But Also Signatures of Common Ancestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate; Okmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Beenen, Henriek G.; Chettri, Oranav; Cos, Murray P.; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P.; DHillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R.; Griffiths, Scott A.; Guo, Yanan; Gamelin, Richard C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A.; Owen, Timothy J.; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A.; van Burg, Roeland C. H. J.; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Collemare, Jerome; Bradshaw, Rosie E.

    2012-05-04

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70percent of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2percent in Cfu versus 3.2percent in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation.

  13. The genomes of the fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum reveal adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles but also signatures of common ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Pierre J G M; van der Burgt, Ate; Ökmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A; Aerts, Andrea L; Bahkali, Ali H; Beenen, Henriek G; Chettri, Pranav; Cox, Murray P; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P; Dhillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R; Griffiths, Scott A; Guo, Yanan; Hamelin, Richard C; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A; Owen, Timothy J; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A; van Ham, Roeland C H J; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B; Grigoriev, Igor V; Collemare, Jérôme; Bradshaw, Rosie E

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70% of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2% in Cfu versus 3.2% in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an α-tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation.

  14. Complete sequencing of the bla(NDM-1-positive IncA/C plasmid from Escherichia coli ST38 isolate suggests a possible origin from plant pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Sekizuka

    Full Text Available The complete sequence of the plasmid pNDM-1_Dok01 carrying New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1 was determined by whole genome shotgun sequencing using Escherichia coli strain NDM-1_Dok01 (multilocus sequence typing type: ST38 and the transconjugant E. coli DH10B. The plasmid is an IncA/C incompatibility type composed of 225 predicted coding sequences in 195.5 kb and partially shares a sequence with bla(CMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids such as E. coli AR060302 pAR060302 (166.5 kb and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport pSN254 (176.4 kb. The bla(NDM-1 gene in pNDM-1_Dok01 is terminally flanked by two IS903 elements that are distinct from those of the other characterized NDM-1 plasmids, suggesting that the bla(NDM-1 gene has been broadly transposed, together with various mobile elements, as a cassette gene. The chaperonin groES and groEL genes were identified in the bla(NDM-1-related composite transposon, and phylogenetic analysis and guanine-cytosine content (GC percentage showed similarities to the homologs of plant pathogens such as Pseudoxanthomonas and Xanthomonas spp., implying that plant pathogens are the potential source of the bla(NDM-1 gene. The complete sequence of pNDM-1_Dok01 suggests that the bla(NDM-1 gene was acquired by a novel composite transposon on an extensively disseminated IncA/C plasmid and transferred to the E. coli ST38 isolate.

  15. Complete sequencing of the bla(NDM-1)-positive IncA/C plasmid from Escherichia coli ST38 isolate suggests a possible origin from plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Matsui, Mari; Yamane, Kunikazu; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Ohnishi, Makoto; Hishinuma, Akira; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Kuroda, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The complete sequence of the plasmid pNDM-1_Dok01 carrying New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) was determined by whole genome shotgun sequencing using Escherichia coli strain NDM-1_Dok01 (multilocus sequence typing type: ST38) and the transconjugant E. coli DH10B. The plasmid is an IncA/C incompatibility type composed of 225 predicted coding sequences in 195.5 kb and partially shares a sequence with bla(CMY-2)-positive IncA/C plasmids such as E. coli AR060302 pAR060302 (166.5 kb) and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport pSN254 (176.4 kb). The bla(NDM-1) gene in pNDM-1_Dok01 is terminally flanked by two IS903 elements that are distinct from those of the other characterized NDM-1 plasmids, suggesting that the bla(NDM-1) gene has been broadly transposed, together with various mobile elements, as a cassette gene. The chaperonin groES and groEL genes were identified in the bla(NDM-1)-related composite transposon, and phylogenetic analysis and guanine-cytosine content (GC) percentage showed similarities to the homologs of plant pathogens such as Pseudoxanthomonas and Xanthomonas spp., implying that plant pathogens are the potential source of the bla(NDM-1) gene. The complete sequence of pNDM-1_Dok01 suggests that the bla(NDM-1) gene was acquired by a novel composite transposon on an extensively disseminated IncA/C plasmid and transferred to the E. coli ST38 isolate.

  16. Molecular profiling of the Phytophthora plurivora secretome: a step towards understanding the cross-talk between plant pathogenic oomycetes and their hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Valeria; Farina, Annarita; Fleischmann, Frank; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Di Maro, Antimo; Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiorentino, Antonio; Parente, Augusto; Osswald, Wolfgang; Chambery, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions in plant diseases is of crucial importance to gain insights on different virulence strategies of pathogens and unravel their role in plant immunity. Among plant pathogens, Phytophthora species are eliciting a growing interest for their considerable economical and environmental impact. Plant infection by Phytophthora phytopathogens is a complex process coordinated by a plethora of extracellular signals secreted by both host plants and pathogens. The characterization of the repertoire of effectors secreted by oomycetes has become an active area of research for deciphering molecular mechanisms responsible for host plants colonization and infection. Putative secreted proteins by Phytophthora species have been catalogued by applying high-throughput genome-based strategies and bioinformatic approaches. However, a comprehensive analysis of the effective secretome profile of Phytophthora is still lacking. Here, we report the first large-scale profiling of P. plurivora secretome using a shotgun LC-MS/MS strategy. To gain insight on the molecular signals underlying the cross-talk between plant pathogenic oomycetes and their host plants, we also investigate the quantitative changes of secreted protein following interaction of P. plurivora with the root exudate of Fagus sylvatica which is highly susceptible to the root pathogen. We show that besides known effectors, the expression and/or secretion levels of cell-wall-degrading enzymes were altered following the interaction with the host plant root exudate. In addition, a characterization of the F. sylvatica root exudate was performed by NMR and amino acid analysis, allowing the identification of the main released low-molecular weight components, including organic acids and free amino acids. This study provides important insights for deciphering the extracellular network involved in the highly susceptible P. plurivora-F. sylvatica interaction.

  17. Functional identiifcation of phenazine biosynthesis genes in plant pathogenic bacteriaPseudomonas syringae pv.tomato and Xanthomonas oryzaepv.oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen; XU You-ping; Jean-Pierre Munyampundu; XU Xin; QI Xian-fei; GU Yuan; CAI Xin-zhong

    2016-01-01

    Phenazines are secondary metabolites with broad spectrum antibiotic activity and thus show high potential in biological control of pathogens. In this study, we identiifed phenazine biosynthesis (phz) genes in two genome-completed plant pathogenic bacteriaPseudomonas syringae pv.tomato(Pst) DC3000 andXanthomonas oryzaepv.oryzae(Xoo) PXO99A. Unlike the phz genes in typical phenazine-producing pseudomonads,phz homologs inPst DC3000 andXoo PXO99A consisted of phzC/D/E/F/G andphzC/E1/E2/F/G, respectively, and the both were not organized into an operon. Detection experiments demonstrated that phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) ofPst DC3000 accumulated to 13.4 μg L–1, while that ofXoo PXO99A was almost undetectable. Moreover,Pst DC3000 was resistant to 1 mg mL–1 PCA, whileXoo PXO99A was sensitive to 50 μg mL–1 PCA. Furthermore, mutation ofphzF blocked the PCA production and signiifcantly reduced the pathogenicity ofPst DC3000 in tomato, while the complementary strains restored these phenotypes. These results revealed thatPst DC3000 produces low level of and is resistant to phenazines and thus is unable to be biologicaly controled by phenazines. Additionaly,phz-mediated PCA production is required for ful pathogenicity ofPst DC3000. To our knowledge, this is the ifrst report of PCA production and its function in pathogenicity of a plant pathogenicP. syringaestrain.

  18. Transcriptomic responses of a simplified soil microcosm to a plant pathogen and its biocontrol agent reveal a complex reaction to harsh habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzolli, Michele; Herrero, Noemí; Sterck, Lieven; Lenzi, Luisa; Pellegrini, Alberto; Puopolo, Gerardo; Van de Peer, Yves; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-10-27

    Soil microorganisms are key determinants of soil fertility and plant health. Soil phytopathogenic fungi are one of the most important causes of crop losses worldwide. Microbial biocontrol agents have been extensively studied as alternatives for controlling phytopathogenic soil microorganisms, but molecular interactions between them have mainly been characterised in dual cultures, without taking into account the soil microbial community. We used an RNA sequencing approach to elucidate the molecular interplay of a soil microbial community in response to a plant pathogen and its biocontrol agent, in order to examine the molecular patterns activated by the microorganisms. A simplified soil microcosm containing 11 soil microorganisms was incubated with a plant root pathogen (Armillaria mellea) and its biocontrol agent (Trichoderma atroviride) for 24 h under controlled conditions. More than 46 million paired-end reads were obtained for each replicate and 28,309 differentially expressed genes were identified in total. Pathway analysis revealed complex adaptations of soil microorganisms to the harsh conditions of the soil matrix and to reciprocal microbial competition/cooperation relationships. Both the phytopathogen and its biocontrol agent were specifically recognised by the simplified soil microcosm: defence reaction mechanisms and neutral adaptation processes were activated in response to competitive (T. atroviride) or non-competitive (A. mellea) microorganisms, respectively. Moreover, activation of resistance mechanisms dominated in the simplified soil microcosm in the presence of both A. mellea and T. atroviride. Biocontrol processes of T. atroviride were already activated during incubation in the simplified soil microcosm, possibly to occupy niches in a competitive ecosystem, and they were not further enhanced by the introduction of A. mellea. This work represents an additional step towards understanding molecular interactions between plant pathogens and biocontrol

  19. Conductrimetric detection of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar pisi in pea seeds and soft rot Erwinia spp. on potato tubers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pea bacterial blight and potato blackleg are diseases caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi ( Psp ) and soft rot Erwinia spp., respectively. The primary source of inoculum for these bacteria is contaminated plant propagation material, i.e. pea seeds and potato tubers. One of the best ways to contr

  20. Symbiotic bacteria (Erwinia sp.) in the gut of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) do not affect its ability to transmit tospovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.J.; van de Wetering, F.; van der Hoek, M.M.; Jacobs, G.; Breeuwer, J.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the most harmful plant viruses and one of its most important vectors is the western flower thrips [Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)]. Recently, we reported the close association of Erwinia sp. gut bacteria with this species of

  1. Conductimetric detection of Pseudomonas syringae pathover pisi in pea seeds and soft rot Erwinia spp. on potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, B.

    1996-01-01


    Pea bacterial blight and potato blackleg are diseases caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi ( Psp ) and soft rot Erwinia spp., respectively. The primary source of inoculum for these bacteria is contamina

  2. Identification of genes differentially expressed during interaction of resistant and susceptible apple cultivars (Malus x domestica) with Erwinia amylovora

    Science.gov (United States)

    The necrogenic enterobacterium, Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the fire blight (FB) disease in many Rosaceae species, including apple and pear. During the infection process, the bacteria induce an oxidative stress response with kinetics similar to those induced in an incompatible bacteria-...

  3. Apple (Malus x domestica) transcriptome in response to the compatible pathogen Erwinia amylovora and the incompatible pathogen Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infiltration of Erwinia amylovora (Ea) into host leaves induces an oxidative burst similar to that observed during incompatible reactions associated with Hypersensitive Response (HR). However, the subsequent progressive development of necrosis in apple and other hosts is unlike an incompatible reac...

  4. TRANSGENIC EXPRESSION OF THE ERWINIA AMYLOVORA (FIRE BLIGHT) EFFECTOR PROTEIN EOP1 SUPRESSES HOST BASAL DEFENSE MECHANISMS IN MALUS (APPLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) is the causative agent of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear. Like many other plant and animal bacterial pathogens Ea utilizes a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, effector protei...

  5. Identificatie en beheersing van bacterieziekten in bolgewassen : onderzoek aan Xanthomonas, pseudozwart, Erwinia, Pantoea, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus en Agrobacterium (2002-2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van J.; Hollinger, T.C.; Pham, P.K.P.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterieziekten in bolgewassen kunnen zowel plotseling toeslaan en grote schade veroorzaken (Erwinia), als af en toe de kop opsteken en dan veel schade veroorzaken (Xanhomonas, woekerziek). Verder komen er symptomen in bolgewassen voor, die mogelijk door bacterieziekten worden veroorzaakt, maar waar

  6. Molecular detection of Erwinia psidii in guava plants under greenhouse and field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudênia Ferreira da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Erwinia psidii causes bacterial blight of guava ( Psidium guajava , an important disease of this crop in Brazil. The pathogen affects branches and twigs of guava trees, reducing yield significantly. Bacterial dissemination often occurs through contaminated but asymptomatic propagating plant material. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the use of BIO-PCR and conventional PCR to detect E. psidii in inoculated guava plants grown in a greenhouse and in symptomatic and asymptomatic trees from guava orchards. Erwinia psidii strain IBSBF 1576 was inoculated (107CFU mL-1 into young guava shoots and plant tissue was analysed at 0, 5, 10, and 15 days after inoculation. Symptoms were observed after 5 days and all inoculated shoots were PCR positive at all times, by both BIO-PCR and conventional PCR. Under natural infection conditions, 40 samples were tested by BIO-PCR from each of three guava orchards, 20 showing symptoms and 20 asymptomatic. PCR was positive for 58 out of 60 symptomatic samples (96.7% and for 6.7% of asymptomatic samples, showing that the method can be used to detect the pathogen at early stages of infection. This PCR method may be used as a diagnostic tool to assess bacterial survival, dissemination and disease outbreaks.

  7. Genetics of biosynthesis and structure of the capsular exopolysaccharide from the Asian pear pathogen Erwinia pyrifoliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Sik; Schollmeyer, Martin; Nimtz, Manfred; Wray, Victor; Geider, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Erwinia pyrifoliae is a novel bacterial pathogen, which causes Asian pear blight and is related to Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight. E. pyrifoliae produces exopolysaccharide (EPS) related to amylovoran in its sugar composition and sugar linkages. This was shown by degradation of the EPS with a viral depolymerase, and by methylation analysis and ESI/MS. The structure of the repeating units was confirmed by (1)H-NMR spectra. The EPS of E. pyrifoliae carried side chains, which were mainly terminated by acetyl and pyruvyl residues as found previously for amylovoran. On the other hand, a second side chain with glucose found for up to 65% of the repeating units of amylovoran was completely absent. The nucleotide sequences of five genes of the cps cluster of E. pyrifoliae encoding proteins for EPS synthesis were characterized and displayed a high homology with the corresponding ams genes. Similar functions of the gene products are assumed. As for ams mutants of E. amylovora, a cpsB mutant of E. pyrifoliae did not synthesize EPS and did not produce ooze on slices of immature pears or symptoms on pear seedlings. The cps mutant was complemented for EPS synthesis and virulence on pear slices with a gene cluster of E. amylovora that included amsB.

  8. Preliminary results on the ability of pentatomidae to transfer fire blight Erwinia amylovora under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peusens, G; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Belien, T

    2013-01-01

    With their piercing-sucking mouthparts stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), a major pest in especially organic orchards, create wounds in fruit of pear trees. As Erwinia amylovora (Burrill, Winslow et al.), a wide spread bacterial disease affecting many rosaceous plants including pome fruit trees and hawthorn, enters through openings in flowers, leaves, shoots and fruit, feeding punctures caused by these bugs might be inoculated with Erwinia bacteria. In order to investigate the ability of the bugs Pentotoma rufipes L. and Polomena prasina L. to transmit fire blight, insects were caught in an organically managed orchard without fire blight, brought into contact with artificially inoculated immature pear fruit/slices and transferred to healthy, mechanically wounded pear fruit/slices. After an incubation period potential transmission of bacteria was examined by evaluation of symptom expression (necrosis, ooze production). To assess the presence of bacteria on the exoskeleton of the tested bugs, all bugs were forced to walk on a semiselective nutrient agar medium. In another experiment the viability of Ea on the exoskeleton was tested -after previous contact with ooze- through washing and plating of the wash water. All experiments were conducted under optimal climatological conditions and according to quarantine standards. Results demonstrated the ability of stink bugs to transfer E. amylovora to fruit and the viability of bacteria on stink bugs externally - both under lab conditions.

  9. A prospective study on drug monitoring of PEGasparaginase and Erwinia asparaginase and asparaginase antibodies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wing H; Pieters, Rob; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; te Loo, D Maroeska W M; Bierings, Marc B; van den Bos, Cor; Kollen, Wouter J W; Hop, Wim C J; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Relling, Mary V; Tissing, Wim J E; van der Sluis, Inge M

    2014-03-27

    This study prospectively analyzed the efficacy of very prolonged courses of pegylated Escherichia coli asparaginase (PEGasparaginase) and Erwinia asparaginase in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Patients received 15 PEGasparaginase infusions (2500 IU/m(2) every 2 weeks) in intensification after receiving native E coli asparaginase in induction. In case of allergy to or silent inactivation of PEGasparaginase, Erwinia asparaginase (20 000 IU/m(2) 2-3 times weekly) was given. Eighty-nine patients were enrolled in the PEGasparaginase study. Twenty (22%) of the PEGasparaginase-treated patients developed an allergy; 7 (8%) showed silent inactivation. The PEGasparaginase level was 0 in all allergic patients (grade 1-4). Patients without hypersensitivity to PEGasparaginase had serum mean trough levels of 899 U/L. Fifty-nine patients were included in the Erwinia asparaginase study; 2 (3%) developed an allergy and none silent inactivation. Ninety-six percent had at least 1 trough level ≥100 U/L. The serum asparagine level was not always completely depleted with Erwinia asparaginase in contrast to PEGasparaginase. The presence of asparaginase antibodies was related to allergies and silent inactivation, but with low specificity (64%). Use of native E coli asparaginase in induction leads to high hypersensitivity rates to PEGasparaginase in intensification. Therefore, PEGasparaginase should be used upfront in induction, and we suggest that the dose could be lowered. Switching to Erwinia asparaginase leads to effective asparaginase levels in most patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been added to our ALL-11 protocol to individualize asparaginase therapy.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. Strain TBD182, an Antagonist of the Plant-Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum, Isolated from a Novel Hydroponics System Using Organic Fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yuichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Someya, Nobutaka; Shinohara, Makoto

    2017-03-16

    Rhizobium sp. strain TBD182, isolated from a novel hydroponics system, is an antagonistic bacterium that inhibits the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum but does not eliminate the pathogen. We report the draft genome sequence of TBD182, which may contribute to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of its fungistatic activity. Copyright © 2017 Iida et al.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. Strain TBD182, an Antagonist of the Plant-Pathogenic Fungus Fusarium oxysporum, Isolated from a Novel Hydroponics System Using Organic Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kazuki; Someya, Nobutaka; Shinohara, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhizobium sp. strain TBD182, isolated from a novel hydroponics system, is an antagonistic bacterium that inhibits the mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum but does not eliminate the pathogen. We report the draft genome sequence of TBD182, which may contribute to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of its fungistatic activity. PMID:28302768

  12. Identification of a response regulator involved in surface attachment, cell-cell aggregation, exopolysaccharide production and virulence in the plant pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease of grapevines, possesses several two-component signal transduction systems that allow the bacterium to sense and respond to changes in its environment. Signals are perceived by sensor kinases that autophosphorylate and transfer the phosphate t...

  13. Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis MB73/2, a Soil Isolate Inhibiting the Growth of Plant Pathogens Dickeya spp. and Rhizoctonia solani

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyzanowska, Dorota M.; Iwanicki, Adam; Ossowicki, Adam; Obuchowski, Michał; Jafra, Sylwia

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subilis MB73/2 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated in Poland from a meadow soil sample. When tested in vitro, the strain shows strong antagonism toward plant pathogens—the soft rot-causing bacteria Dickeya spp. and the crown rot fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Here, we present the genome sequence of MB73/2.

  14. Non-conventional possibilities of protection of apple and pear against fire blight (Erwinia amylovora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Sobiczewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Standard program of plant protection against fire blight consists of use of management practices and chemical control method. Recently a new, non-conventional possibilities based on application of biocontrol agents (two biopreparations have been already introduced into practice: Bliteban A506 (Pseudomonas fluorescens and BlossomBless (Pantoea agglomerans, plant extracts active against Erwinia amylovora (AkseBio containing extracts from Thymbra spicata and Biomit Plussz with extracts from various plant species and microelements and resistance inducers (Regalis, Bion and plant extracts are of great interest. Also plant transformation with resistance genes such as: hrpN (harpin, dpo (EPS depolymerase and lytic protein genes (attacin E, cecropin SB-37, T4 lysozyme is a promising perspective.

  15. Localization of transposon insertions in pathogenicity mutants of Erwinia amylovora and their biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemann, P; Geider, K

    1992-05-01

    Transposon Tn5, on a mobilizable ColE1 plasmid, on a Ti plasmid derepressed for bacterial transfer, and on the bacteriophage fd genome, was used to construct pathogenicity mutants of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Eleven nonpathogenic mutants were isolated from 1600 independent mutants screened. These mutants were divided into three types: auxotrophs, exopolysaccharide (EPS)-deficient mutants and a mutant of the dsp phenotype. According to their insertion sites the Tn5 mutants were mapped into several classes. Some of the mutants could be complemented with cosmid clones from a genomic library of the parent strain for EPS production on minimal agar. EPS-deficient mutants and the dsp mutant could complement each other to produce virulence symptoms on pear slices.

  16. Structure of amylovoran, the capsular exopolysaccharide from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimtz, M; Mort, A; Domke, T; Wray, V; Zhang, Y; Qiu, F; Coplin, D; Geider, K

    1996-06-01

    The acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) of Erwinia amylovora, amylovoran, was purified from culture supernatants of bacteria in minimal medium and cleaved chemically either by treatment with trifluoracetic acid or hydrofluoric acid, and enzymatically by digestion with depolymerase from E. amylovora phage phi-Ealh. Structural characterization of the resulting oligosaccharides was performed by a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR [one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D)] spectroscopic techniques. A branched repeating unit with five monosaccharide residues and various substituents was determined: [sequence: see text] The terminal monosaccharide of the side branch, which bears a 4,6-bound pyruvate residue in the R-configuration, was found to be modified with 2-linked (26%), 3-linked (24%), 2-,3-linked (40%) O-acetyl groups, or these were absent (10%). An additional glucose residue is linked to approximately 10% of the core alpha-galactose of the repeating unit.

  17. Simplification of vacuole structure during plant cell death triggered by culture filtrates of Erwinia carotovora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumi Hirakawa; Toshihisa Nomura; Seiichiro Hasezawa; Takumi Higaki

    2015-01-01

    Vacuoles are suggested to play crucial roles in plant defense-related cel death. During programmed cel death, previous live cel imaging studies have observed vacuoles to become simpler in structure and have implicated this simplification as a prelude to the vacuole’s rupture and consequent lysis of the plasma membrane. Here, we examined dynamics of the vacuole in cel cycle-synchronized tobacco BY-2 (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yel ow 2) cel s during cel death induced by application of culture filtrates of Erwinia carotovora. The filtrate induced death in about 90%of the cel s by 24 h. Prior to cel death, vacuole shape simplified and endoplasmic actin filaments disassembled;however, the vacuoles did not rupture until after plasma membrane integrity was lost. Instead of facilitating rupture, the simplification of vacuole structure might play a role in the retrieval of membrane components needed for defense-related cel death.

  18. Reactive oxygen species activity in the interaction of rice with Erwinia chrysanthemi pv. zeae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongguang LIU; Landi HE; Jingyi ZHANG; Yutao WANG; Zhenzhong WANG

    2008-01-01

    Activities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated in the interaction between rice and Erwinia chrysanthemi pv. zeae. Results showed that variety (128) had higher increases in activity compared to those in the susceptible variety (Texian 13) 24 hours after bacteria inoculation. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased in 128 and Texian 13 twenty-four hours after inoculation and then decreased, but the SOD activity in 128 was found to be usually lower than that in Texian 13. The CAT activity in Texian 13 had two peaks at 24 h and 96 h after inoculation, while little change was seen in 128. In conclusion, ROS and its related enzymes could be correlated to rice resistance against E. chrysanthemi pv. zeae.

  19. Ultrastructural alterations of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica caused by treatment with aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaganza, Elian-Simplice; Rioux, Danny; Simard, Marie; Arul, Joseph; Tweddell, Russell J

    2004-11-01

    Aluminum and bisulfite salts inhibit the growth of several fungi and bacteria, and their application effectively controls potato soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora. In an effort to understand their inhibitory action, ultrastructural changes in Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica after exposure (0 to 20 min) to different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 M) of these salts were examined by using transmission electron microscopy. Plasma membrane integrity was evaluated by using the SYTOX Green fluorochrome that penetrates only cells with altered membranes. Bacteria exposed to all aluminum chloride concentrations, especially 0.2 M, exhibited loosening of the cell walls, cell wall rupture, cytoplasmic aggregation, and an absence of extracellular vesicles. Sodium metabisulfite caused mainly a retraction of plasma membrane and cellular voids which were more pronounced with increasing concentration. Bacterial mortality was closely associated with SYTOX stain absorption when bacteria were exposed to either a high concentration (0.2 M) of aluminum chloride or prolonged exposure (20 min) to 0.05 M aluminum chloride or to a pH of 2.5. Bacteria exposed to lower concentrations of aluminum chloride (0.05 and 0.1 M) for 10 min or less, or to metabisulfite at all concentrations, did not exhibit significant stain absorption, suggesting that no membrane damage occurred or it was too weak to allow the penetration of the stain into the cell. While mortality caused by aluminum chloride involves membrane damage and subsequent cytoplasmic aggregation, sulfite exerts its effect intracellularly; it is transported across the membrane by free diffusion of molecular SO2 with little damage to the cellular membrane.

  20. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example.

  1. Erwinia typographi sp. nov., isolated from bark beetle (Ips typographus) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrodenyte-Arbaciauskiene, V; Radziute, S; Stunzenas, V; Būda, V

    2012-04-01

    Gram-negative-staining bacteria that were resistant to monoterpene myrcene (7-methyl-3-methylene-1.6-octadiene, C10H16, at concentrations of up to 10 µl ml(-1) in TSB) were isolated from the gut contents of adult bark beetles Ips typographus (Coleoptera, Scolytidae). The beetles were collected from the bark of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Lithuania. Bark beetles feed on conifers, which produce myrcene among many other defensive compounds. It has been suggested that the micro-organisms present within the beetles' guts could be involved in their resistance towards this plant defensive compound. The most resistant bacterial strains were isolated and characterized by phenotypic assays as well as fatty acid analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) based on the rpoB, atpD and infB genes and DNA-DNA hybridization. Biochemical characterization indicated that the bacteria belonged to the family Enterobacteriaceae. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and MLSA of the novel strains revealed that they belonged to the genus Erwinia, but represented a novel species. The dominant cellular fatty acids were C16:0 and C17:0 cyclo. The DNA G+C content was 49.1 mol%. The results obtained in this study indicated that these bacteria from the bark beetle gut represented a novel species, for which the name Erwinia typographi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain DSM 22678T (=Y1T=LMG 25347T).

  2. Identification of volatile compounds produced by the bacterium Burkholderia tropica that inhibit the growth of fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Tinoco, Raunel; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Caballero-Mellado, Jesus; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    It has been documented that bacteria from the Burkholderia genera produce different kinds of compounds that inhibit plant pathogens, however in Burkholderia tropica, an endophytic diazotrophic and phosphate-solubilizing bacterium isolated from a wide diversity of plants, the capacity to produce antifungal compounds has not been evaluated. In order to expand our knowledge about Burkholderia tropica as a potential biological control agent, we analyzed 15 different strains of this bacterium to evaluate their capacities to inhibit the growth of four phytopathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolffsi. Diverse analytical techniques, including plant root protection and dish plate growth assays and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy showed that the fungal growth inhibition was intimately associated with the volatile compounds produced by B. tropica and, in particular, two bacterial strains (MTo293 and TTe203) exhibited the highest radial mycelial growth inhibition. Morphological changes associated with these compounds, such as disruption of fungal hyphae, were identified by using photomicrographic analysis. By using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique, 18 volatile compounds involved in the growth inhibition mechanism were identified, including α-pinene and limonene. In addition, we found a high proportion of bacterial strains that produced siderophores during growth with different carbon sources, such as alanine and glutamic acid; however, their roles in the antagonism mechanism remain unclear. PMID:23680857

  3. Cellulose production, activated by cyclic di-GMP through BcsA and BcsZ, is a virulence factor and an essential determinant of the three-dimensional architectures of biofilms formed by Erwinia amylovora Ea1189.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-10-18

    Bacterial biofilms are multicellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix mainly composed of exopolysaccharides (EPSs), protein and nucleic acids, which determines the architecture of the biofilm. Erwinia amylovora Ea1189 forms a biofilm inside the xylem of its host, which results in vessel plugging and water transport impairment. The production of the EPSs amylovoran and levan is critical for the formation of a mature biofilm. In addition, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been reported to positively regulate amylovoran biosynthesis and biofilm formation in E. amylovora Ea1189. In this study, we demonstrate that cellulose is synthesized by E. amylovora Ea1189 and is a major modulator of the three-dimensional characteristics of biofilms formed by this bacterium, and also contributes to virulence during systemic host invasion. In addition, we demonstrate that the activation of cellulose biosynthesis in E. amylovora is a c-di-GMP-dependent process, through allosteric binding to the cellulose catalytic subunit BcsA. We also report that the endoglucanase BcsZ is a key player in c-di-GMP activation of cellulose biosynthesis. Our results provide evidence of the complex composition of the extracellular matrix produced by E. amylovora and the implications of cellulose biosynthesis in shaping the architecture of the biofilm and in the expression of one of the main virulence phenotypes of this pathogen.

  4. Piper nigrum Leaf and Stem Assisted Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Its Antibacterial Activity Against Agricultural Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulkumar, Kanniah; Gnanajobitha, Gnanadhas; Vanaja, Mahendran; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam; Malarkodi, Chelladurai; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Annadurai, Gurusamy

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of biological materials in synthesis of nanoparticles is one of the hottest topics in modern nanoscience and nanotechnology. In the present investigation, the silver nanoparticles were synthesized by using the leaf and stem extract of Piper nigrum. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The observation of the peak at 460 nm in the UV-vis spectra for leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles reveals the reduction of silver metal ions into silver nanoparticles. Further, XRD analysis has been carried out to confirm the crystalline nature of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The TEM images show that the leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles were within the size of about 7–50 nm and 9–30 nm, respectively. The FTIR analysis was performed to identify the possible functional groups involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Further, the antibacterial activity of the green-synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined against agricultural plant pathogens. The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles is a beneficial application in the field of agricultural nanotechnology. PMID:24558336

  5. Periodicity in host availability does not account for evolutionary branching as observed in many plant pathogens: an application to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, F; Gilligan, C A; Bailey, D J; van den Bosch, F

    2010-11-01

    Periodicity in host availability is common in agricultural systems. Although it is known to have profound effects on plant pathogen abundance, the evolutionary consequences of periodicity for the pathogen population have not previously been analyzed. An epidemiological model incorporating periodic absence of the host crop is combined with the theory of adaptive dynamics to determine whether or not seasonality in host presence plays a role in the occurrence of evolutionary branching, leading to coexisting yet genetically distinct pathogen phenotypes. The study is motivated and illustrated by the specific example of take-all disease of wheat, caused by the pathogen Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, for which two coexisting but genetically distinct types and a trade-off related to seasonality in host presence have been identified. Numerical simulations are used to show that a trade-off between the pathogen transmission rate and the survival of the pathogen between cropping seasons cannot account for the evolutionary branching observed in many pathogens. Model elaborations show that this conclusion holds for a broad range of putative mechanisms. Although the analysis is motivated and illustrated by the specific example of take-all of wheat, the results apply to a broad range of pathogens.

  6. Growth under visible light increases conidia and mucilage production and tolerance to UV-B radiation in the plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Henrique D; Massola, Nelson S; Flint, Stephan D; Silva, Geraldo J; Bachmann, Luciano; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L

    2015-01-01

    Light conditions can influence fungal development. Some spectral wavebands can induce conidial production, whereas others can kill the conidia, reducing the population size and limiting dispersal. The plant pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum causes anthracnose in several crops. During the asexual stage on the host plant, Colletototrichum produces acervuli with abundant mucilage-embedded conidia. These conidia are responsible for fungal dispersal and host infection. This study examined the effect of visible light during C. acutatum growth on the production of conidia and mucilage and also on the UV tolerance of these conidia. Conidial tolerance to an environmentally realistic UV irradiance was determined both in conidia surrounded by mucilage on sporulating colonies and in conidial suspension. Exposures to visible light during fungal growth increased production of conidia and mucilage as well as conidial tolerance to UV. Colonies exposed to light produced 1.7 times more conidia than colonies grown in continuous darkness. The UV tolerances of conidia produced under light were at least two times higher than conidia produced in the dark. Conidia embedded in the mucilage on sporulating colonies were more tolerant of UV than conidia in suspension that were washed free of mucilage. Conidial tolerance to UV radiation varied among five selected isolates. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Functional analysis of the conserved transcriptional regulator CfWor1 in Cladosporium fulvum reveals diverse roles in the virulence of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okmen, Bilal; Collemare, Jérôme; Griffiths, Scott; van der Burgt, Ate; Cox, Russell; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2014-04-01

    Fungal Wor1-like proteins are conserved transcriptional regulators that are reported to regulate the virulence of several plant pathogenic fungi by affecting the expression of virulence genes. Here, we report the functional analysis of CfWor1, the homologue of Wor1 in Cladosporium fulvum. Δcfwor1 mutants produce sclerotium-like structures and rough hyphae, which are covered with a black extracellular matrix. These mutants do not sporulate and are no longer virulent on tomato. A CE.CfWor1 transformant that constitutively expresses CfWor1 produces fewer spores with altered morphology and is also reduced in virulence. RNA-seq and RT-qrtPCR analyses suggest that reduced virulence of Δcfwor1 mutants is due to global downregulation of transcription, translation and mitochondrial respiratory chain. The reduced virulence of the CE.CfWor1 transformant is likely due to downregulation of effector genes. Complementation of a non-virulent Δfosge1 (Wor1-homologue) mutant of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici with CfWor1 restored expression of the SIX effector genes in this fungus, but not its virulence. Chimeric proteins of CfWor1/FoSge1 also only partially restored defects of the Δfosge1 mutant, suggesting that these transcriptional regulators have functionally diverged. Altogether, our results suggest that CfWor1 primarily regulates development of C. fulvum, which indirectly affects the expression of a subset of virulence genes.

  8. Practical benefits of knowing the enemy: modern molecular tools for diagnosing the etiology of bacterial diseases and understanding the taxonomy and diversity of plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Carolee T; Koike, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the identity of bacterial plant pathogens is essential to strategic and sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. This knowledge is critical for growers, diagnosticians, extension agents, and others dealing with crops. However, such identifications are linked to bacterial taxonomy, a complicated and changing discipline that depends on methods and information that are often not used by those who are diagnosing field problems. Modern molecular tools for fingerprinting and sequencing allow for pathogen identification in the absence of distinguishing or conveniently tested phenotypic characteristics. These methods are also useful in studying the etiology and epidemiology of phytopathogenic bacteria from epidemics, as was done in numerous studies conducted in California's Salinas Valley. Multilocus and whole-genome sequence analyses are becoming the cornerstones of studies of microbial diversity and bacterial taxonomy. Whole-genome sequence analysis needs to become adequately accessible, automated, and affordable in order to be used routinely for identification and epidemiology. The power of molecular tools in accurately identifying bacterial pathogenesis is therefore of value to the farmer, diagnostician, phytobacteriologist, and taxonomist.

  9. Recent range expansion and agricultural landscape heterogeneity have only minimal effect on the spatial genetic structure of the plant pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieux, A; De Lapeyre De Bellaire, L; Zapater, M-F; Ravigne, V; Carlier, J

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how geographical and environmental features affect genetic variation at both the population and individual levels is crucial in biology, especially in the case of pathogens. However, distinguishing between these factors and the effects of historical range expansion on spatial genetic structure remains challenging. In the present study, we investigated the case of Mycosphaerella fijiensis-a plant pathogenic fungus that has recently colonized an agricultural landscape characterized by the presence of potential barriers to gene flow, including several commercial plantations in which disease control practises such as the use of fungicides are applied frequently, and low host density areas. We first genotyped 300 isolates sampled at a global scale on untreated plants in two dimensions over a 50 × 80-km area. Using two different clustering algorithms, no genetic structure was detected in the studied area, suggesting expansion of large populations and/or no influence of potential barriers. Second, we investigated the potential effect of disease control practises on M. fijiensis diversity by comparing populations sampled in commercial vs food-crop plantations. At this local scale, we detected significantly higher allelic richness inside commercial plantations compared with the surrounding food-crop plantation populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that 99% of the total genetic variance occurred within populations. We discuss the suggestion that high population size and/or high migration rate between populations might be responsible for the absence of any effect of disease control practises on genetic diversity and differentiation.

  10. Development of new polymorphic microsatellite markers for three closely related plant-pathogenic Phytophthora species using 454-pyrosequencing and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoebel, Corine N; Jung, Esther; Prospero, Simone

    2013-10-01

    Phytophthora spp. (oomycetes) are causal agents of devastating diseases on a high number of crops, ornamentals, and native plants worldwide. Neutral molecular markers are increasingly being used to investigate the genetic population structure and possible pathways of spread of different plant pathogens, including Phytophthora spp. In this study, polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for three species of the former Phytophthora citricola species complex-namely, P. multivora, P. plurivora, and P. pini (P. citricola I)-using the 454-pyrosequencing technique. In total, 35 polymorphic microsatellite loci were found and further characterized: 11 for P. plurivora, 16 for P. multivora, and 8 for P. pini. Microsatellites with dinucleotide motifs repeated 6 to 10 times were the most common for all three species. On average, 65 alleles per species and 5.3 alleles per locus were detected. Most loci were characterized by a low observed heterozygosity, which might be due to the homothallic mating system of the three Phytophthora spp. targeted. Cross amplification of the newly developed markers was tested on 17 Phytophthora spp. belonging to five different internal transcribed spacer clades. Transferability success was generally low and decreased with increasing genetic distance from the species to the three target species. A set of four loci was selected to easily discriminate P. plurivora, P. multivora, and P. pini on the basis of presence or absence of a polymerase chain reaction amplicon on an agarose gel.

  11. A simple method for normalization of DNA extraction to improve the quantitative detection of soil-borne plant pathogenic oomycetes by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Ishiguro, Y; Kageyama, K; Zhu, Z

    2015-08-01

    Most of the current research into the quantification of soil-borne pathogenic oomycetes lacks determination of DNA extraction efficiency, probably leading to an incorrect estimation of DNA quantity. In this study, we developed a convenient method by using a 100 bp artificially synthesized DNA sequence derived from the mitochondrion NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene of Thunnus thynnus as a control to determine the DNA extraction efficiency. The control DNA was added to soils and then co-extracted along with soil genomic DNA. DNA extraction efficiency was determined by the control DNA. Two different DNA extraction methods were compared and evaluated using different types of soils, and the commercial kit was proved to give more consistent results. We used the control DNA combined with real-time PCR to quantify the oomycete DNAs from 12 naturally infested soils. Detectable target DNA concentrations were three to five times higher after normalization. Our tests also showed that the extraction efficiencies varied on a sample-to-sample basis and were DNA control for the normalization of DNA extraction by real-time PCR. By combining two different efficient soil DNA extraction methods, the developed quantification method dramatically improved the results. This study also proves that the developed normalization method is necessary and useful for the accurate quantification of soil-borne plant pathogenic oomycetes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Plant-Pathogen Interaction-Related MicroRNAs and Their Targets Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Fan

    Full Text Available Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB caused by a phytoplasma, has caused extensive losses in the yields of paulownia timber and resulted in significant economic losses. However, the molecular mechanisms in Paulownia that underlie the phytoplasma stress are poorly characterized. In this study, we use an Illumina platform to sequence four small RNA libraries and four degradome sequencing libraries derived from healthy, PaWB-infected, and PaWB-infected 15 mg·L-1 and 30 mg·L-1 methyl methane sulfonate (MMS-treated plants. In total, 125 conserved and 118 novel microRNAs (miRNAs were identified and 33 miRNAs responsive to PaWB disease were discovered. Furthermore, 166 target genes for 18 PaWB disease-related miRNAs were obtained, and found to be involved in plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormone signal transduction metabolic pathways. Eleven miRNAs and target genes responsive to PaWB disease were examined by a quantitative real-time PCR approach. Our findings will contribute to studies on miRNAs and their targets in Paulownia, and provide new insights to further understand plant-phytoplasma interactions.

  13. Three genes for metabolism of the phytoalexin maackiain in the plant pathogen Nectria haematococca: Meiotic instability and relationship to a new gene for pisatin demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, V.P.W.; Vanetten, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Some isolates of the plant-pathogenic fungus Nectria haematococca mating population (MP) VI metabolize maackiain and medicarpin, two antimicrobial compounds (phytoalexins) synthesized by chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The enzymatic modifications by the fungus convert the phytoalexins to less toxic derivatives, and this detoxification has been proposed to be important for pathogenesis on chickpea. In the present study, loci controlling maackiain metabolism (Mak genes) were identified by crosses among isolates of N. haematococca MP VI that differed in their ability to metabolize the phytoalexin. Strains carrying Mak1 or Mak2 converted maackiain to 1a-hydroxymaackiain, while those with Mak3 converted it to 6a-hydroxymaackiain. Mak1 and Mak2 were unusual in that they often failed to be inherited by progeny. Mak1 was closely linked to Pda6, a new member in a family of genes in N. haematococca MP VI that encode enzymes for detoxification of pisatin, the phytoalexin synthesized by garden pea. Like Mak1, Pda6 was also transmitted irregularly to progeny. Although the unusual meiotic behaviors of some Mak genes complicate genetic analysis, identification of these genes should afford a more thorough evaluation of the role of phytoalexin detoxification in the pathogenesis of N. haematococca MP VI on chickpea.

  14. Plant-Pathogen Interaction-Related MicroRNAs and Their Targets Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqiang; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Tong; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Wang, Yuanlong; Cao, Lin; Wang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) caused by a phytoplasma, has caused extensive losses in the yields of paulownia timber and resulted in significant economic losses. However, the molecular mechanisms in Paulownia that underlie the phytoplasma stress are poorly characterized. In this study, we use an Illumina platform to sequence four small RNA libraries and four degradome sequencing libraries derived from healthy, PaWB-infected, and PaWB-infected 15 mg·L-1 and 30 mg·L-1 methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-treated plants. In total, 125 conserved and 118 novel microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified and 33 miRNAs responsive to PaWB disease were discovered. Furthermore, 166 target genes for 18 PaWB disease-related miRNAs were obtained, and found to be involved in plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormone signal transduction metabolic pathways. Eleven miRNAs and target genes responsive to PaWB disease were examined by a quantitative real-time PCR approach. Our findings will contribute to studies on miRNAs and their targets in Paulownia, and provide new insights to further understand plant-phytoplasma interactions.

  15. Genome-wide profiling of DNA methylation provides insights into epigenetic regulation of fungal development in a plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Junhyun; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Gir-Won; Park, Sook-Young; Huh, Aram; Dean, Ralph A; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-02-24

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification that regulates development of plants and mammals. To investigate the roles of DNA methylation in fungal development, we profiled genome-wide methylation patterns at single-nucleotide resolution during vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection-related morphogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that DNA methylation occurs in and around genes as well as transposable elements and undergoes global reprogramming during fungal development. Such reprogramming of DNA methylation suggests that it may have acquired new roles other than controlling the proliferation of TEs. Genetic analysis of DNA methyltransferase deletion mutants also indicated that proper reprogramming in methylomes is required for asexual reproduction in the fungus. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis showed that DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing of transposable elements and transcript abundance of genes in context-dependent manner, reinforcing the role of DNA methylation as a genome defense mechanism. This comprehensive approach suggests that DNA methylation in fungi can be a dynamic epigenetic entity contributing to fungal development and genome defense. Furthermore, our DNA methylomes provide a foundation for future studies exploring this key epigenetic modification in fungal development and pathogenesis.

  16. Piper nigrum leaf and stem assisted green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and evaluation of its antibacterial activity against agricultural plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulkumar, Kanniah; Gnanajobitha, Gnanadhas; Vanaja, Mahendran; Rajeshkumar, Shanmugam; Malarkodi, Chelladurai; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Annadurai, Gurusamy

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of biological materials in synthesis of nanoparticles is one of the hottest topics in modern nanoscience and nanotechnology. In the present investigation, the silver nanoparticles were synthesized by using the leaf and stem extract of Piper nigrum. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The observation of the peak at 460 nm in the UV-vis spectra for leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles reveals the reduction of silver metal ions into silver nanoparticles. Further, XRD analysis has been carried out to confirm the crystalline nature of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The TEM images show that the leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles were within the size of about 7-50 nm and 9-30 nm, respectively. The FTIR analysis was performed to identify the possible functional groups involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Further, the antibacterial activity of the green-synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined against agricultural plant pathogens. The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles is a beneficial application in the field of agricultural nanotechnology.

  17. Piper nigrum Leaf and Stem Assisted Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Its Antibacterial Activity Against Agricultural Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanniah Paulkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of biological materials in synthesis of nanoparticles is one of the hottest topics in modern nanoscience and nanotechnology. In the present investigation, the silver nanoparticles were synthesized by using the leaf and stem extract of Piper nigrum. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. The observation of the peak at 460 nm in the UV-vis spectra for leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles reveals the reduction of silver metal ions into silver nanoparticles. Further, XRD analysis has been carried out to confirm the crystalline nature of the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The TEM images show that the leaf- and stem-synthesized silver nanoparticles were within the size of about 7–50 nm and 9–30 nm, respectively. The FTIR analysis was performed to identify the possible functional groups involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Further, the antibacterial activity of the green-synthesized silver nanoparticles was examined against agricultural plant pathogens. The antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles is a beneficial application in the field of agricultural nanotechnology.

  18. Identification of Genetic Variation between Obligate Plant Pathogens Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli Using RNA Sequencing and Genotyping-By-Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly F Summers

    Full Text Available RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS were used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP identification from two economically important obligate plant pathogens, Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli. Twenty isolates of P. cubensis and 19 isolates of P. humuli were genotyped using RNA-seq and GBS. Principle components analysis (PCA of each data set showed genetic separation between the two species. Additionally, results supported previous findings that P. cubensis isolates from squash are genetically distinct from cucumber and cantaloupe isolates. A PCA-based procedure was used to identify SNPs correlated with the separation of the two species, with 994 and 4,231 PCA-correlated SNPs found within the RNA-seq and GBS data, respectively. The corresponding unigenes (n = 800 containing these potential species-specific SNPs were then annotated and 135 putative pathogenicity genes, including 3 effectors, were identified. The characterization of genes containing SNPs differentiating these two closely related downy mildew species may contribute to the development of improved detection and diagnosis strategies and improve our understanding of host specificity pathways.

  19. 菊欧文氏菌分子检测技术的研究%Molecular detection of Erwinia chrysanthemi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹏; 黄国明; 刘勇; 崔铁军

    2007-01-01

    蝴蝶兰细菌性软腐病对蝴蝶兰的生长危害严重,Erwinia chrysanthemi(菊欧文氏菌)、Erwinia carotovora subsp.carotovora(胡萝卜软腐欧文氏菌胡萝卜软腐亚种)是引起蝴蝶兰软腐病的主要病原细菌,其中E. chrysanthemi被列入我国三类检疫性有害生物.本文对菊欧文氏菌分子检测技术进行了研究,设计出针对该病原细菌的特异性引物,应用实时荧光PCR方法检测样品中存在的菊欧文氏菌,检测灵敏度达到102 cfu/mL.

  20. Prevalence of Erwinia soft rot affecting cut foliage, Dracaena sanderiana ornamental industry and solution towards its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayalvily, Thio Desiya; Jegathambigai, V; Karunarathne, M D S D; Svinningen, Arne; Mikunthan, G

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out under net house conditions at Green Farms Ltd, Marawila to determine the occurrence and severity of Erwinia soft rot disease in Dracaena sanderiana plants and to formulate the possible control measures. Field experiment was carried out to manage the soft rot disease in D. sanderiana plants. Three different soil treatments with vermicompost, cow dung and poultry manure were tested to manage the disease and plots without application were kept as control. Percent disease incidence, disease reduction and growth parameters were recorded and data were statistically analyzed. Higher percentage of disease reduction was observed in vermicompost (80%) treated plots than those with cow dung (60%) and poultry manure treated. Sprinkler application of water was found favorable to spread soft rot disease and watering through horse pope had lessened the disease incidence significantly. Moreover plant height, shoot and root biomass, number of leaves per plant, leaf length and leaf width were significantly high in vermicompost media. Weeding, removal of diseased leaves and plants, and avoiding sprinkler irrigation were helpful to reduce the disease spread from plant to plant. Vermicompost is the best substrate for suppression of the disease and promoting the growth of plant. Among the different water management practices tested to reduce the disease severity of Erwinia soft rot disease in D. sanderiana plants, water irrigated through the horse pipe was effective compare to sprinkler application. In-vitro experiment conducted to manage the Erwinia soft rot disease by using bio-agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens was found effective to reduce the growth of Erwinia under in-vitro conditions.

  1. Biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine in Erwinia amylovora plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sébastien; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Litomska, Agnieszka; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-09-27

    Sulfur for fire: The molecular basis for the biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG) was unveiled in Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight. Bioinformatics, heterologous pathway reconstitution in E. coli, and mutational analyses indicate that the protein YcfA mediates guanine thionation in analogy to 2-thiouridylase. Assays in planta and in cell cultures reveal for the first time a crucial role of 6TG in fire blight pathogenesis.

  2. Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of Erwinia spp. associated with pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr.] and papaya (Carica papaya L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Kogeethavani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Erwinia species are well-known pathogens of economic importance in Malaysia causing serious damage to high-value fruit crops that include pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr.] and papaya (Carica papaya L..The 16S rRNA sequence using eubacteria fD1 and rP2 primers, identified two bacteria species; Dickeya zeae from pineapple heart rot, and Erwinia mallotivora from papaya dieback. Phylogenetic analysis based on the neighbor-joining method indicated that all the bacterial isolates clustered in their own taxa and formed monophyletic clades. From the pathogenicity test, all isolates of D. zeae and E. mallotivora showed pathogenic reactions on their respective host plants. Genetic variability of these isolates was assessed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR fingerprinting. The results indicated interspecies, and intraspecies variation in both species’ isolates. There were more polymorphic bands shown by rep-PCR fingerprints than enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC and BOX- PCRs, however both species’ isolates produced distinguishable banding patterns. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA cluster analysis indicated that all Dickeya and Erwinia isolates from the same species were grouped in the same main cluster. Similarity among the isolates ranged from 77 to 99%. Sequencing of 16S rRNA using eubacteria fD1 and rP2 primers, and rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed diversity among Dickeya and Erwinia isolates. But this method appears to be reliable for discriminating isolates from pineapple heart rot and papaya dieback.

  3. Identification and genetics of 6-thioguanine secreted by Erwinia species and its interference with the growth of other bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensing, A; Gernold, M; Jock, S; Jansen, R; Geider, K

    2014-04-01

    We identified a compound in culture supernatants of Erwinia species, such as Erwinia amylovora, E. pyrifoliae, E. billingiae, E. tasmaniensis, E. persicina and E. rhapontici absorbing at 340 nm, which was associated before with the yellow pigment produced by E. amylovora on media containing copper ions. The compound was purified from E. tasmaniensis strain Et1/99 supernatants by chromatography on Dowex-1 and Dowex-50 columns and identified by HPLC/MS and NMR analysis as 6-thioguanine (6TG). Its signal at 167 Da matched with the expected molecular mass. By random mutagenesis with miniTn5, we obtained mutants defective in the genes for pyrimidine and purine metabolism. A specific gene cluster with ycf genes described by us before, absent in the corresponding region of Escherichia coli, was identified in the genome sequence of three Erwinia species and named tgs region for thioguanine synthesis. Clones of the tgs gene cluster promoted 6TG synthesis and secretion in E. coli, when the bacteria were grown in minimal medium supplemented with amino acids. 6TG was bacteriostatic for E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium strains, with cell growth resumed after prolonged incubation. Similar results were obtained with P. agglomerans strains. Bacteria from the genus Pectobacterium were barely and Rahnella or Gibbsiella species were not inhibited by 6TG. Adenine and guanine relieved the toxic effect of 6TG on E. coli. Non-producing strains were fully virulent on host plants. 6TG synthesis may help erwinias to interfere with growth of some microorganisms in the environment.

  4. Duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction reveals competition between Erwinia amylovora and E. pyrifoliae on pear blossoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Susan M; Kim, Won-Sik; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2008-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora and E. pyrifoliae are the causative agents of fire blight and Asian pear blight, respectively. The pathogens are closely related, with overlapping host ranges. Data are unavailable on the current distribution of E. pyrifoliae and on the interaction between the two species when they are present together on the same host. In this study, a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed to monitor the population dynamics of E. amylovora and E. pyrifoliae on the surface of Bartlett pear blossoms. Bacterial cells washed from blossoms were used directly as the PCR template without DNA extraction. Primers and a probe based on the E. amylovora levansucrase gene detected all E. amylovora strains. All E. pyrifoliae strains, including the Japanese Erwinia strains previously described as E. amylovora, were detected with a primer and probe combination based on the E. pyrifoliae hrpW gene. Disease development and severity were not significantly different in blossoms inoculated with individual Erwinia species or with a mixture of the two species. However, E. amylovora grew to greater population sizes than did E. pyrifoliae in both single species inoculations and in mixtures, suggesting that E. amylovora has a greater competitive fitness on Bartlett pear blossoms than E. pyrifoliae.

  5. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  6. Genes of the de novo and salvage biosynthesis pathways of vitamin B6 are regulated under oxidative stress in the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil eSamsatly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available B6 is recognized as an important cofactor required for numerous metabolic enzymes, and has been shown to act as an antioxidant and play a role in stress responses. It can be synthesized through two different routes: salvage and de novo pathways. However, little is known about the possible function of the vitamin B6 pathways in the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Using genome walking, the de novo biosynthetic pathway genes; RsolPDX1 and RsolPDX2 and the salvage biosynthetic pathway gene, RsolPLR were sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three genes had high degree of similarity to other fungal PDX1, PDX2, and PLR proteins and are closely related to other R. solani anastomosis groups. We also examined their regulation when subjected to ROS stress inducers, the superoxide generator paraquat, or H2O2, and compared it to the well-known antioxidant genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST. The genes were differentially regulated with substantial transcript levels as high as 33 fold depending on the gene and type of stress reflecting that differences in the type of damage induced by ROS. Exogenous addition of the vitamers PN or PLP in culture medium significantly induced the transcription of the vitamin B6 de novo encoding genes as early as 0.5 hour post treatment (HPT. On the other hand, transcription of RsolPLR was vitamer-specific; a down regulation upon supplementation of PN and upregualtion with PLP. Our results suggest that accumulation of ROS in R. solani mycelia was linked to transcriptional regulation of the three genes and R. solani vitamin B6 biosynthesis machinery could be implicated similar to catalases and GST as an antioxidant stress protector against oxidative stress.

  7. Mandipropamid targets the cellulose synthase-like PiCesA3 to inhibit cell wall biosynthesis in the oomycete plant pathogen, Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Mathias; Boehler, Martine; Randall, Eva; Young, Vanessa; Csukai, Michael; Kraus, Sabrina; Moulin, Florence; Scalliet, Gabriel; Avrova, Anna O; Whisson, Stephen C; Fonne-Pfister, Raymonde

    2010-03-01

    Oomycete plant pathogens cause a wide variety of economically and environmentally important plant diseases. Mandipropamid (MPD) is a carboxylic acid amide (CAA) effective against downy mildews, such as Plasmopara viticola on grapes and potato late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans. Historically, the identification of the mode of action of oomycete-specific control agents has been problematic. Here, we describe how a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques has been utilized to identify the molecular target of MPD in P. infestans. Phytophthora infestans germinating cysts treated with MPD produced swelling symptoms typical of cell wall synthesis inhibitors, and these effects were reversible after washing with H(2)O. Uptake studies with (14)C-labelled MPD showed that this oomycete control agent acts on the cell wall and does not enter the cell. Furthermore, (14)C glucose incorporation into cellulose was perturbed in the presence of MPD which, taken together, suggests that the inhibition of cellulose synthesis is the primary effect of MPD. Laboratory mutants, insensitive to MPD, were raised by ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutagenesis, and gene sequence analysis of cellulose synthase genes in these mutants revealed two point mutations in the PiCesA3 gene, known to be involved in cellulose synthesis. Both mutations in the PiCesA3 gene result in a change to the same amino acid (glycine-1105) in the protein. The transformation and expression of a mutated PiCesA3 allele was carried out in a sensitive wild-type isolate to demonstrate that the mutations in PiCesA3 were responsible for the MPD insensitivity phenotype.

  8. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria Utilize Biofilm Growth-associated Repressor (BigR), a Novel Winged-helix Redox Switch, to Control Hydrogen Sulfide Detoxification under Hypoxia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Barbosa, Rosicler L.; Soprano, Adriana S.; Campos, Bruna M.; de Souza, Tiago A.; Tonoli, Celisa C. C.; Leme, Adriana F. P.; Murakami, Mario T.; Benedetti, Celso E.

    2011-01-01

    Winged-helix transcriptional factors play important roles in the control of gene expression in many organisms. In the plant pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the winged-helix protein BigR, a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, regulates transcription of the bigR operon involved in bacterial biofilm growth. Previous studies showed that BigR represses transcription of its own operon through the occupation of the RNA polymerase-binding site; however, the signals that modulate its activity and the biological function of its operon are still poorly understood. Here we show that although BigR is a homodimer similar to metal sensors, it functions as a novel redox switch that derepresses transcription upon oxidation. Crystal structures of reduced and oxidized BigR reveal that formation of a disulfide bridge involving two critical cysteines induces conformational changes in the dimer that remarkably alter the topography of the winged-helix DNA-binding interface, precluding DNA binding. This structural mechanism of DNA association-dissociation is novel among winged-helix factors. Moreover, we demonstrate that the bigR operon is required for hydrogen sulfide detoxification through the action of a sulfur dioxygenase (Blh) and sulfite exporter. As hydrogen sulfide strongly inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, it must be eliminated to allow aerobic growth under low oxygen tension, an environmental condition found in bacterial biofilms, xylem vessels, and root tissues. Accordingly, we show that the bigR operon is critical to sustain bacterial growth under hypoxia. These results suggest that BigR integrates the transcriptional regulation of a sulfur oxidation pathway to an oxidative signal through a thiol-based redox switch. PMID:21632538

  9. Cooperative Reinforcement of Ionic Liquid and Reactive Solvent on Enzymatic Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester as an In Vitro Inhibitor of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that lipases in ionic liquids (ILs possess higher enzyme activity, stability and selectivity; however, reaction equilibrium is always limited by product inhibition, and the product is difficult to separate from non-volatile ILs using distillation. To solve this problem, using trialkylphosphine oxide (TOPO as a complexing agent, a novel biphase of reactive solvent and IL was firstly reported for caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE production from methyl caffeate (MC and 2-phenylethanol (PE catalyzed by lipase via transesterification. The effects of the reaction parameters and their action mechanism were investigated, and the inhibition of CAPE against bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum was firstly measured. The MC conversion of 98.83% ± 0.76% and CAPE yield of 96.29% ± 0.07% were obtained by response surface methodology in the 25 g/L TOPO-cyclohexane/[Bmim][Tf2N] (1:1, v/v; the complex stoichiometry calculation and FTIR spectrum confirmed that the reversible hydrogen-bond complexation between TOPO and caffeates significantly enhances the cooperative effect of two phases on the lipase-catalyzed reaction. The temperature was reduced by 14 °C; the MC concentration increased by 3.33-fold; the ratio of catalyst to donor decreased by 4.5-fold; and Km decreased 1.08-fold. The EC50 of CAPE against R. solanacearum was 0.17–0.75 mg/mL, suggesting that CAPE is a potential in vitro inhibitor of plant pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Screening of plant pathogenic fungi by ginsenoside compound K production%人参皂苷compound K转化菌株的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元超; 王英平; 闫梅霞; 孙成贺; 郑培和

    2011-01-01

    目的:筛选具有人参皂苷转化能力的真菌菌株,用于生产稀有人参皂苷compound K.方法:通过液态发酵,以三七茎叶总皂苷为底物,采用TLC和HPLC-ELSD检测转化产物,从12株植物病原真菌中筛选能够转化产生人参皂苷compoundK的最佳菌株.结果:获得一株高效人参皂苷转化真菌,可以转化产生人参皂苷compound K,该菌株为镰刀属真菌串珠镰孢Fusarium moniliforme.结论:串珠镰孢对三七茎叶总皂苷具有较高的转化效率,有望用于生产制备compound K等低含量高活性的稀有人参皂苷.%Objective:To screen a new strain which can transform panaxadiol saponins into the rare ginsenoside compound K.Method:The total saponins in stems and leaves of Panax notoginseng was used as a substrate in the liquid state fermentation process.and the results were detected by TCL and HPLC-ELSD to screen a strain from twelve plant pathogenic fungi which can produce ginsenoside compound K.Result:Fusarium moniliforme was found to transform the total saponins to ginsenoside compound K efficiently in the all twelve fungal strains.In the fermentation process, ginsenoside Rb1 was transformed almost completely,and the content of ginsenoside Rd was decreasing evidently.Conclusion:F.moniliforme is selected as a new high-yield strain.It is expected to be used to produce the high activity infrequent ginsenoside compound K and to improve the content of active principles in medicinal plants.

  11. Genetic structure and population dynamics of a heteroecious plant pathogen Melampsora larici-epitea in short-rotation coppice willow plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayon, Carlos; Pei, Ming H; Ruiz, Carmen; Hunter, Tom; Karp, Angela; Tubby, Ian

    2009-07-01

    Complex life strategies are common among plant pathogens belonging to rust fungi (Uredinales). The heteroecious willow rust Melampsora larici-epitea produces five spore stages and alternates on larch (Larix). To shed light on the epidemiology of this pathogen, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) were used to determine the genetic diversity and genetic structure of rust samples collected from coppice willow (Salix) plantations at three UK sites (LA, CA and MC) over three sampling dates (September 2000, July 2001 and September 2001). Of the total of 819 isolates, 465 were unique AFLP phenotypes and there was a shift in genotype diversity between the two seasons (0.67 in 2000 and 0.87-0.89 in 2001). No phenotypes were common between the two seasons within a site, suggesting that the rust did not overwinter as an asexual stage within plantations. A temporal analysis detected large amounts of genetic drift (F(S) = 0.15-0.26) between the two seasons and very small effective population sizes (N(e) = 2-3) within sites. These results all point to a new colonization of the plantations by the rust in the second season (2001). The F(ST)-analogue values were Phi(CT) = 0.121, Weir and Cockerham's theta = 0.086 and the Bayesian estimate theta(B) = 0.087-0.096. The results suggest that the sources of inoculum were somewhat localized and the same sources were mainly responsible for disease epidemics in LA and CA over the two seasons. The relatively low F(ST)-values among sites (0.055-0.13) suggest the existence of significant gene flow among the three sampled sites.

  12. Inhibition of plant-pathogenic fungi by the barley cystatin Hv-CPI (gene Icy) is not associated with its cysteine-proteinase inhibitory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M; López-Solanilla, E; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, P; Carbonero, P; Díaz, I

    2003-10-01

    The recombinant barley cystatin Hv-CPI inhibited the growth of three phytopathogenic fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum graminicola, and Plectosphaerella cucumerina) and the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma viride. Several mutants of barley cystatin were generated by polymerase chain reaction approaches and both their antifungal and their cysteine-proteinase inhibitory properties investigated. Point mutants R38-->G, Q63-->L, and Q63-->P diminished their capacity for inhibiting papain and cathepsin B, retaining their antifungal properties. However, mutant C68-->G was more active for papain and cathepsin B than the wild type. These results indicate that in addition to the consensus cystatin-reactive site, Q63-V64-V65-A66-G67, the A37-R38-F39-A40-V41 region, common to all cereal cystatins, and the C68 residue are important for barley cystatin activity. On the other hand, the K92-->P mutant is inactive as a fungicide, but still retains measurable inhibitory activity for papain and cathepsin B. Against B. cinerea, the antifungal effect of Hv-CPI and of its derived mutants does not always correlate with their activities as proteinase inhibitors, because the Q63-->P mutant is inactive as a cystatin, while still inhibiting fungal growth, and the K92-->P mutant shows the reciprocal effects. These data indicate that inhibition of plant-pathogenic fungi by barley cystatin is not associated with its cysteine-proteinase inhibitory activity. Moreover, these results are corroborated by the absence of inhibition of intra- and extramycelia-proteinase activities by barley cystatin and by other well-known inhibitors of cysteine-proteinase activity in the fungal zymograms of B. cinerea.

  13. Genes of the de novo and Salvage Biosynthesis Pathways of Vitamin B6 are Regulated under Oxidative Stress in the Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsatly, Jamil; Chamoun, Rony; Gluck-Thaler, Emile; Jabaji, Suha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is recognized as an important cofactor required for numerous metabolic enzymes, and has been shown to act as an antioxidant and play a role in stress responses. It can be synthesized through two different routes: salvage and de novo pathways. However, little is known about the possible function of the vitamin B6 pathways in the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Using genome walking, the de novo biosynthetic pathway genes; RsolPDX1 and RsolPDX2 and the salvage biosynthetic pathway gene, RsolPLR were sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three genes had high degrees of similarity to other fungal PDX1, PDX2, and PLR proteins and are closely related to other R. solani anastomosis groups. We also examined their regulation when subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress inducers, the superoxide generator paraquat, or H2O2, and compared it to the well-known antioxidant genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The genes were differentially regulated with transcript levels as high as 33 fold depending on the gene and type of stress reflecting differences in the type of damage induced by ROS. Exogenous addition of the vitamers PN or PLP in culture medium significantly induced the transcription of the vitamin B6 de novo encoding genes as early as 0.5 hour post treatment (HPT). On the other hand, transcription of RsolPLR was vitamer-specific; a down regulation upon supplementation of PN and upregulation with PLP. Our results suggest that accumulation of ROS in R. solani mycelia is linked to transcriptional regulation of the three genes and implicate the vitamin B6 biosynthesis machinery in R. solani, similar to catalases and GST, as an antioxidant stress protector against oxidative stress. PMID:26779127

  14. Plant-pathogenic oomycetes, Escherichia coli strains, and Salmonella spp. Frequently found in surface water used for irrigation of fruit and vegetable crops in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-08-01

    In the United States, surface water is commonly used to irrigate a variety of produce crops and can harbor pathogens responsible for food-borne illnesses and plant diseases. Understanding when pathogens infest water sources is valuable information for produce growers to improve the food safety and production of these crops. In this study, prevalence data along with regression tree analyses were used to correlate water quality parameters (pH, temperature, turbidity), irrigation site properties (source, the presence of livestock or fowl nearby), and precipitation data to the presence and concentrations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and hymexazol-insensitive (HIS) oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium spp.) in New York State surface waters. A total of 123 samples from 18 sites across New York State were tested for E. coli and Salmonella spp., of which 33% and 43% were positive, respectively. Additionally, 210 samples from 38 sites were tested for HIS oomycetes, and 88% were found to be positive, with 10 species of Phytophthora and 11 species of Pythium being identified from the samples. Regression analysis found no strong correlations between water quality parameters, site factors, or precipitation to the presence or concentration of E. coli in irrigation sources. For Salmonella, precipitation (≤ 0.64 cm) 3 days before sampling was correlated to both presence and the highest counts. Analyses for oomycetes found creeks to have higher average counts than ponds, and higher turbidity levels were associated with higher oomycete counts. Overall, information gathered from this study can be used to better understand the food safety and plant pathogen risks of using surface water for irrigation.

  15. 梨火疫病病原菌(Erwinia amylovora)三型分泌系统的鉴别及Erwinia spp. HrpA的分析%Identification of Type Ⅲ Secration System in Erwinia amylovora and Analyse of HrpA in Erwinia spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱勃; 金谷雷; 怀雁; 谢关林

    2009-01-01

    [目的]明确梨火疫病病原菌(Erwinia amylovora)三型分泌系统(type Ⅲ secretion system,TTSS)的所在区域、相关基因及Erwiaia spp.的HrpA(hypersensitive response and pathogenicity gene A)选择压水平.[方法]利用生物信息学方法,通过BLAST程序对梨火疫病菌基因组的核苷酸数据库进行同源比对,同时对Erwiaia spp.与宿主互作的表面蛋白HrpA进行选择压分析.[结果] TTSS分析结果显示在40 kb大小的毒力岛上有27个TTSS相关基因.通过与看家基因及毒力岛上的致病性相关的重要基因HrpN的比较、选择压分析、多序列比较,发现HrpA基因处于较强的选择压作用下,且HrpA蛋白N端主要受正向选择,C端主要受净化选择.NJ法构建的HrpA系统发育树显示Erwinia spp.形成两个明显的分支,表明HrpA基因可能在种间分化后产生了不同的选择压变化.[结论]梨火疫病病原菌基因组3.14-3.18 Mb为其TTSS分布区域.该病原菌通过TTSS侵染寄主植物,在其病原菌表面有一种类鞭毛结构的TTSS蛋白HrpA,HrpA作为传输者起着将效应分子输送到宿主内部的功能,在进化上受到了较强的选择压影响.

  16. Natural Competence of Xylella fastidiosa Occurs at a High Frequency Inside Microfluidic Chambers Mimicking the Bacterium's Natural Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Prem P.; Lopez, Samantha M.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of emerging diseases in a number of economically important crops. Genetic diversity studies have demonstrated homologous recombination occurring among X. fastidiosa strains, which has been proposed to contribute to host plant shifts. Moreover, experimental evidence confirmed that X. fastidiosa is naturally competent for recombination in vitro. Here, as an approximation of natural habitats (plant xylem vessels and insect mouthparts), recombination was studied in microfluidic chambers (MCs) filled with media amended with grapevine xylem sap. First, different media were screened for recombination in solid agar plates using a pair of X. fastidiosa strains that were previously reported to recombine in coculture. The highest frequency of recombination was obtained with PD3 medium, compared to those with the other two media (X. fastidiosa medium [XFM] and periwinkle wilt [PW] medium) used in previous studies. Dissection of the media components led to the identification of bovine serum albumin as an inhibitor of recombination that was correlated to its previously known effect on inhibition of twitching motility. When recombination was performed in liquid culture, the frequencies were significantly higher under flow conditions (MCs) than under batch conditions (test tubes). The recombination frequencies in MCs and agar plates were not significantly different from each other. Grapevine xylem sap from both susceptible and tolerant varieties allowed high recombination frequency in MCs when mixed with PD3. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa has the ability to be naturally competent in the natural growth environment of liquid flow, and this phenomenon could have implications in X. fastidiosa environmental adaptation. IMPORTANCE Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen that lives inside xylem vessels (where water and nutrients are transported inside the plant) and the mouthparts of insect

  17. Antimicrobial and anti-pathogenic activity of some thioureides derivatives against Erwinia amylovora phytopathogenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Măruţescu, Luminiţa; Niţulescu, Mihai-George; Bucur, Marcela; Diţu, Lia-Mara; Mihăescu, Grigore; Lazăr, Veronica; Sesan, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    A series of N-(1-methyl-1 Hpyrazole-4-carbonyl)-thiourea derivatives were assessed for their in vitro antimicrobial and anti-pathogenic activity against twenty-two strains of Erwinia amylovora isolated from different regions in Romania. The compounds were solubilised in dimethylsulfoxide and screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. The qualitative screening of the susceptibility spectra of various strains to the compounds was performed by adapted diffusion techniques (distribution of the tested compound solution directly on the solid medium previously seeded with the bacterial inoculums). The quantitative assay of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, microg/mL) was based on liquid medium two-fold microdilutions. The subinhibitory concentrations of the tested substances were investigated for their influence on biofilm development on inert substrata. The present study showed that six new thiourea compounds exhibited a low antibacterial activity (MIC values > 500 microg/ml), but the subinhibitory concentrations inhibited the biofilm development on inert substrata. Thus, these results could suggest the usefulness of the tested compounds as control agents for preventing the first stage (colonization) of the infection with the fire blight pathogen.

  18. Cell surface attachment structures contribute to biofilm formation and xylem colonization by Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczan, Jessica M; Lenneman, Bryan R; McGrath, Molly J; Sundin, George W

    2011-10-01

    Biofilm formation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Erwinia amylovora and the systemic invasion of plant hosts. The functional role of the exopolysaccharides amylovoran and levan in pathogenesis and biofilm formation has been evaluated. However, the role of biofilm formation, independent of exopolysaccharide production, in pathogenesis and movement within plants has not been studied previously. Evaluation of the role of attachment in E. amylovora biofilm formation and virulence was examined through the analysis of deletion mutants lacking genes encoding structures postulated to function in attachment to surfaces or in cellular aggregation. The genes and gene clusters studied were selected based on in silico analyses. Microscopic analyses and quantitative assays demonstrated that attachment structures such as fimbriae and pili are involved in the attachment of E. amylovora to surfaces and are necessary for the production of mature biofilms. A time course assay indicated that type I fimbriae function earlier in attachment, while type IV pilus structures appear to function later in attachment. Our results indicate that multiple attachment structures are needed for mature biofilm formation and full virulence and that biofilm formation facilitates entry and is necessary for the buildup of large populations of E. amylovora cells in xylem tissue.

  19. EDS1 contributes to nonhost resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Manon; Degrave, Alexandre; Vedel, Régine; Bitton, Frédérique; Patrit, Oriane; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Barny, Marie-Anne; Fagard, Mathilde

    2012-03-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in rosaceous plants. In nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, E. amylovora triggers necrotic symptoms associated with transient bacterial multiplication, suggesting either that A. thaliana lacks a susceptibility factor or that it actively restricts E. amylovora growth. Inhibiting plant protein synthesis at the time of infection led to an increase in necrosis and bacterial multiplication and reduced callose deposition, indicating that A. thaliana requires active protein synthesis to restrict E. amylovora growth. Analysis of the callose synthase-deficient pmr4-1 mutant indicated that lack of callose deposition alone did not lead to increased sensitivity to E. amylovora. Transcriptome analysis revealed that approximately 20% of the genes induced following E. amylovora infection are related to defense and signaling. Analysis of mutants affected in NDR1 and EDS1, two main components of the defense-gene activation observed, revealed that E. amylovora multiplied ten times more in the eds1-2 mutant than in the wild type but not in the ndr1-1 mutant. Analysis of mutants affected in three WRKY transcription factors showing EDS1-dependent activation identified WRKY46 and WRKY54 as positive regulators and WRKY70 as a negative regulator of defense against E. amylovora. Altogether, we show that EDS1 is a positive regulator of nonhost resistance against E. amylovora in A. thaliana and hypothesize that it controls the production of several effective defenses against E. amylovora through the action of WRKY46 and WRKY54, while WRKY70 acts as a negative regulator.

  20. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.