WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant-insect flower visitor

  1. Ecological modules and roles of species in heathland plant-insect flower visitor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2009-01-01

    1.  Co-existing plants and flower-visiting animals often form complex interaction networks. A long-standing question in ecology and evolutionary biology is how to detect nonrandom subsets (compartments, blocks, modules) of strongly interacting species within such networks. Here we use a network...... heathland sites in Denmark, separated by ≥ 10 km. Among sites, plant communities were similar, but composition of flower-visiting insect faunas differed. Visitation frequencies of visitor species were recorded as a measure of insect abundance. 3.  Qualitative (presence-absence) interaction networks were...... consisted of 1-6 plant species and 18-54 insect species. Interactions aggregated around one or two hub plant species, which were largely identical at the three study sites. 5.  Insect species were categorized in taxonomic groups, mostly at the level of orders. When weighted by visitation frequency, each...

  2. Flower color polymorphism in Iris lutescens (Iridaceae): biochemical analyses in light of plant-insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Conchou, Lucie; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Cazals, Guillaume; Schatz, Bertrand; Imbert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We describe a flower color polymorphism in Iris lutescens, a species widespread in the Northern part of the Mediterranean basin. We studied the biochemical basis of the difference between purple and yellow flowers, and explored the ecological and evolutionary consequences of such difference, in particular visual discrimination by insects, a potential link with scent emitted and the association between color and scent. Anthocyanins were found to be present in much greater concentrations in purple flowers than in yellow ones, but the anthocyanin composition did not differ between color morphs. Likewise, no quantitative difference in anthocyanin content was found between vegetative tissues of the two morphs. Floral anthocyanins were dominated by delphinidin 3-O-(p-coumaroylrutinoside)-5-O-glucoside (also called delphanin) and its aliphatic derivatives. Small amounts of delphinidin 3-O-(p-caffeoylrutinoside)-5-O-glucoside and its aliphatic derivatives were also characterized. Based on a description of bumblebees' (one of the main pollinators of I. lutescens) color perception, purple and yellow flowers of I. lutescens could be visually discriminated as blue and blue-green, respectively, and likely by a wide variety of other insects. The overall chemical composition of the scent produced was not significantly different between morphs, being dominated by terpenoids, mainly myrcene, (E)-β-ocimene and limonene. A slight color-scent correlation was nevertheless detected, consistent with the shared biosynthetic origin of both pigments and volatile compounds. Therefore in this species, the difference in the amounts of pigments responsible for flower color difference seems to be the major difference between the two morphs. Pollinators are probably the main selective agent driving the evolution of flower color polymorphism in I. lutescens, which represents a suitable species for investigating how such polymorphism is maintained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. Flower visitors and pollination in the Oriental (Indomalayan) Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Richard T

    2004-08-01

    Current knowledge of flower visitors and pollination in the Oriental Region is summarised. Much less is known about pollination than seed dispersal and the coverage of habitats and taxa in the region is very uneven. The available evidence suggests that pollination in lowland forests is dominated by highly social bees (mainly Trigona and Apis species), with beetles probably the next most important group, followed by other bees and flies. In comparison with the better-studied Neotropics, large solitary bees, moths, Lepidoptera and vertebrates are relatively less important. These differences are greatest in the canopy of the lowland dipterocarp forests of Southeast Asia, where they probably reflect the unique temporal pattern of floral resource availability resulting from 'general flowering' at supra-annual intervals. Apis bees (but not Trigona species) are also important in most montane, subtropical and non-forest habitats. Apart from the figs (Ficus spp.), there are few well-documented examples of plant species visited by a single potential pollinator and most plant-pollinator relationships in the region appear to be relatively generalised. The small sizes of most pollinators and the absence of direct human exploitation probably make pollination mutualisms less vulnerable to failure as a result of human impacts than dispersal mutualisms, but more subtle impacts, as a result of altered gene flows, are likely to be widespread. On current evidence, pollination systems in the Oriental Region do not require any specific conservation action, but this review reinforces arguments for making the preservation (or restoration) of habitat connectivity the major focus of Oriental conservation.

  4. Reproductive biology, hybridization, and flower visitors of rare Sclerocactus taxa in Utah's Uintah Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mating system and flower visitors of two threatened species of Sclerocactus (Cactaceae) were studied in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah, an area undergoing rapid energy development. We found that both S. wetlandicus and S. brevispinus, as well as a third presumptive taxon (undescribed) which w...

  5. Moderation is best: effects of grazing intensity on plant--flower visitor networks in Mediterranean communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro, Amparo; Tscheulin, Thomas; Devalez, Jelle; Nakas, Georgios; Stefanaki, Anastasia; Hanlidou, Effie; Petanidou, Theodora

    2016-04-01

    The structure of pollination networks is an important indicator of ecosystem stability and functioning. Livestock grazing is a frequent land use practice that directly affects the abundance and diversity of flowers and pollinators and, therefore, may indirectly affect the structure of pollination networks. We studied how grazing intensity affected the structure of plant-flower visitor networks along a wide range of grazing intensities by sheep and goats, using data from 11 Mediterranean plant-flower visitor communities from Lesvos Island, Greece. We hypothesized that intermediate grazing might result in higher diversity as predicted by the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis, which could in turn confer more stability to the networks. Indeed, we found that networks at intermediate grazing intensities were larger, more generalized, more modular, and contained more diverse and even interactions. Despite general responses at the network level, the number of interactions and selectiveness of particular flower visitor and plant taxa in the networks responded differently to grazing intensity, presumably as a consequence of variation in the abundance of different taxa with grazing. Our results highlight the benefit of maintaining moderate levels of livestock grazing by sheep and goats to preserve the complexity and biodiversity of the rich Mediterranean communities, which have a long history of grazing by these domestic animals.

  6. How do plant communities and flower visitors relate? A case study of semi-natural xerothermic grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Chmura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the relationships between the species composition of flower visitors and plants in the semi-natural xerothermic grasslands in southern and central Poland. Thirty 10 × 10 m permanent plots were laid out in total, mainly in nature reserves. The vegetation units studied were classified according to the Braun-Blanquet system; these were phytocoenoses of the Festuco-Brometea classes Inuletum ensifoliae, Adonido-Brachypodietum pinnati and the transitional plant community. Entomological research was performed using the Pollard method within the same plots. A particular site was visited only once and different sites were studied between April and August 2008. We applied, among others, co-correspondence-analysis Co-CA, detrended correspondence analysis (DCA and redundancy analysis (RDA to investigate the co-occurrence patterns of plants and flower visitors and their biotopic requirements. We found that the species composition of flower visitors cannot be predicted by floristic composition when the duration of the study is restricted to one day (but under similar weather conditions; however, there is a positive relationship between the species richness of insects and plants and a positive relationship between the number of plant species and the abundance of flower visitors. The Ellenberg moisture index and the cover of meadow species significantly explained the species composition of insects. The three various vegetation units and five dominant xerothermic species, i.e. Adonis vernalis, Anemone sylvestris, Inula ensifolia, Linum hirsutum and Carlina onopordifolia that were studied across time differed in the species richness of insects. Our results demonstrate that possible patterns in the species composition and the assembly rules of flower visitors are not apparent when the Pollard method is applied. Based on the data obtained using this method, the flower visiting assemblages seem not to be driven by competition and they primarily

  7. Stability of modularity and structural keystone species in temporal cumulative plant- flower-visitor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2012-01-01

    all flowering plants and flower-visiting insect species throughout the flowering season at three dry heathland sites in Denmark. For each site, we constructed cumulative networks every 0.5 months, resulting in series of 10–12 networks per site. Numbers of interactions, and plant and insect species...... around one or two hubs. These hub species encompassed a small number of plant species, many of which acted as hubs at several study sites and throughout most of their flowering season. Thus, these plants become of key importance in maintaining the structure of their pollination network. We conclude...

  8. Comparative Study in Seed Yield and Flowers Attractivity to Bee Visitors Between Nigella Sativa L. and Nigella Damascena L. (Ranunculaceae Grown Under Semiarid Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alqudah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out during the growing season 2005 at the campus of Jordan University of Science and Technology (32°22” N, 35°49” E, Jordan. Two different Nigella species were used in this experiment; Nigella sativa L. and Nigella damascena L. This study was aimed to identify the bee visitors of Nigella species and the pollination requirements of Nigella flowers grown under semiarid conditions. The results showed that flowers of both Nigella species were visited by seven different bee visitors. However, flowers of N. damascena were more attractive to bees than N. sativa flowers. N. damascena produced on average significantly higher plant, more number of branches per plant, more seed yield, total seed weight and higher number of capsules per plant. On the other hand, N. sativa produced its flowers and matured nearly two weeks earlier than N. damascena. There is no interaction between Nigella species and pollination treatments for all yield parameter. N. damascena was higher in number of ovaries, seeds per capsules, seed set percentage, seeds per plant and total seed weight than N. sativa under treatments conditions. Also, flowers of both Nigella species under open treatment produced higher yield compared to other pollination treatments.

  9. Comparative Study in Seed Yield and Flowers Attractivity to Bee Visitors Between Nigella Sativa L. and Nigella Damascena L. (Ranunculaceae Grown Under Semiarid Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alqudah

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out during the growing season 2005 at the campus of Jordan University of Science and Technology (32°22” N, 35°49” E, Jordan. Two different Nigella species were used in this experiment; Nigella sativa L. and Nigella damascena L. This study was aimed to identify the bee visitors of Nigella species and the pollination requirements of Nigella flowers grown under semiarid conditions. The results showed that flowers of both Nigella species were visited by seven different bee visitors. However, flowers of N. damascena were more attractive to bees than N. sativa flowers. N. damascena produced on average significantly higher plant, more number of branches per plant, more seed yield, total seed weight and higher number of capsules per plant. On the other hand, N. sativa produced its flowers and matured nearly two weeks earlier than N. damascena. There is no interaction between Nigella species and pollination treatments for all yield parameter. N. damascena was higher in number of ovaries, seeds per capsules, seed set percentage, seeds per plant and total seed weight than N. sativa under treatments conditions. Also, flowers of both Nigella species under open treatment produced higher yield compared to other pollination treatments.

  10. FENOLOGÍA FLORAL Y VISITANTES FLORALES EN Drimys granadensis L.f. (WINTERACEAE Floral Phenology And Flower Visitors In Drimys granadensis L.f. (Winteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XAVIER MARQUINEZ

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo fue caracterizar las fases fenológicas florales y determinar los visitantes florales en una población natural de Drimys granadensis (nombre común: canelo; Winteraceae ubicada en Altos de Yerbabuena ( 2.850 m , cerros orientales de la Sabana de Bogotá, (Colombia. El desarrollo fenológico floral duró 9,5 días cuando la floración ocurrió en época soleada, 12,5 días en época lluviosa y 16 días cuando se excluyeron a los visitantes florales mediante embolsado. Se realizaron observaciones del recurso utilizado, fase fenólogica de la flor visitada y cargas polínicas en los visitante florales, los cuales correspondieron a seis órdenes, 21 familias y 29 morfoespecies de insectos. Cuatro especies de coleópteros y dos de dípteros fueron considerados posibles polinizadores por su abundancia y carga de polen. Los resultados obtenidos se discuten en relación con aquellos reportados en otras especies del género Drimys y de la familia Winteraceae.The purpose of this research was to characterize the flowering phenological phases and to determine the flower visitors in a natural population of Drimys granadensis (common name: canelo; Winteraceae in Altos de Yerbabuena, eastern mountains of Sabana de Bogotá ( Colombia . Floral phenology development lasted 9.5 days when flowering occurred under sunny conditions, 12.5 days under rainy conditions and 16 days when flower visitors were excluded using cloth bags. It was done observations related with the resources used, the phenological phases of visited flowers and the pollen load on the flower visitors. Visitors corresponded with 29 morphospecies, 6 orders y 21 families of insects. Four species of coleoptera and two species of diptera were considered as possible pollinators taking in account abundance and pollen load. The results are analyzed in relation with those reported for other species in the genus Drimys and in the family Winteraceae.

  11. Topology of Plant - Flower-Visitor Networks in a Tropical Mountain Forest: Insights on the Role of Altitudinal and Temporal Variation.

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    Sandra Cuartas-Hernández

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors determining the spatial and temporal variation of ecological networks is fundamental to the knowledge of their dynamics and functioning. In this study, we evaluate the effect of elevation and time on the structure of plant-flower-visitor networks in a Colombian mountain forest. We examine the level of generalization of plant and animal species and the identity of interactions in 44 bipartite matrices obtained from eight altitudinal levels, from 2200 to 2900 m during eight consecutive months. The contribution of altitude and time to the overall variation in the number of plant (P and pollinator (A species, network size (M, number of interactions (I, connectance (C, and nestedness was evaluated. In general, networks were small, showed high connectance values and non-nested patterns of organization. Variation in P, M, I and C was better accounted by time than elevation, seemingly related to temporal variation in precipitation. Most plant and insect species were specialists and the identity of links showed a high turnover over months and at every 100 m elevation. The partition of the whole system into smaller network units allowed us to detect small-scale patterns of interaction that contrasted with patterns commonly described in cumulative networks. The specialized but erratic pattern of network organization observed in this tropical mountain suggests that high connectance coupled with opportunistic attachment may confer robustness to plant-flower-visitor networks occurring at small spatial and temporal units.

  12. Topology of Plant - Flower-Visitor Networks in a Tropical Mountain Forest: Insights on the Role of Altitudinal and Temporal Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuartas-Hernández, Sandra; Medel, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors determining the spatial and temporal variation of ecological networks is fundamental to the knowledge of their dynamics and functioning. In this study, we evaluate the effect of elevation and time on the structure of plant-flower-visitor networks in a Colombian mountain forest. We examine the level of generalization of plant and animal species and the identity of interactions in 44 bipartite matrices obtained from eight altitudinal levels, from 2200 to 2900 m during eight consecutive months. The contribution of altitude and time to the overall variation in the number of plant (P) and pollinator (A) species, network size (M), number of interactions (I), connectance (C), and nestedness was evaluated. In general, networks were small, showed high connectance values and non-nested patterns of organization. Variation in P, M, I and C was better accounted by time than elevation, seemingly related to temporal variation in precipitation. Most plant and insect species were specialists and the identity of links showed a high turnover over months and at every 100 m elevation. The partition of the whole system into smaller network units allowed us to detect small-scale patterns of interaction that contrasted with patterns commonly described in cumulative networks. The specialized but erratic pattern of network organization observed in this tropical mountain suggests that high connectance coupled with opportunistic attachment may confer robustness to plant-flower-visitor networks occurring at small spatial and temporal units.

  13. The role of native flower visitors in pollinating Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill., naturalized in Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Verde, Gabriella; La Mantia, Tommaso

    2011-09-01

    The role of insects in pollination and consequently in fruit set and quality was assessed in two commercial orchards of the cactus pear, Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill., in Agrigento Province, Sicily. In 1997, insects visiting flowers were sampled during May-June (the first bloom) and July (the second bloom, induced by the "scozzolatura" practise). More than 50 insect species belonging to 10 orders were collected in May-June, while only five species of Hymenoptera Apoidea were collected in July. The quality of fruits arising from the second bloom showed that Hymenoptera alone were able to guarantee effective pollination. To verify the role of insects in pollination in 1996 (during only the second bloom), and in 1997 and 2009 (during both blooms), 60 single flowers were marked during each bloom; 30 of them covered with paper sleeves (which prevented natural pollination), while the others were not covered. After withering, fruits produced by marked flowers were analyzed in laboratory: in all years and blooms, the total number of seeds, the number of developed seeds, and the weight and the percentage of pulp were significantly lower for covered flowers than for non-covered flowers. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that native insects effectively carry out the pollination of cactus pear flowers.

  14. A snake in paradise: Dusturbance of plant reproduction following extirpation of bird flower-visitors on Guam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanne Skovgaard; Dupont, Yoko; Olesen, Jens Mogens

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of an alien top predator, the brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis), has resulted in severe losses of native vertebrate populations in Guam. Among these are important pollinators and seed dispersers. This study is a first attempt to document cascading effects on vertebrate......-pollinated native plant species in Guam. We investigated flower visitation, seed set and germination in two native plants, the mangrove tree Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and the forest tree Erythrina variegata var. orientalis. Both species are bird-pollinated. Studies were conducted on two Mariana islands, Guam (with high...... density of snakes) and Saipan (with nearly no snakes). Visitation rates by birds were high on Saipan, but zero on Guam. Insects and lizards visited flowers to a low extent on both islands. Only lizards were potential effective pollinators. Seed set of both species were significantly higher on Saipan...

  15. Bees visitors of three species of Clusia (Clusiaceae flowers in Central Amazonia Abelhas visitantes de flores de três espécies de Clusia (Clusiacea na Amazônia Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Kaminski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on bees visitors to three species of Clusia (Clusiaceae flowers in the Reserva Adolpho Ducke, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil were made during three two-week periods. The three species of Clusia, namely C. grandiflora, C. panapanari and C. insignis, presented variations regarding the species of bee visitors. A total of 23 bee species visited the three species of Clusia. The Euglossini and Meliponinae bees were the most frequent visitors of the Clusia flowers. Bee collecting behavior of floral resources is described.Durante seis semanas foram realizadas observações das abelhas visitantes de flores de três espécies de Clusia (Clusiaceae, na Reserva Florestal Adolpho Ducke, em Manaus. As três espécies de Clusia: C. grandiflora Splitg., C. panapanari (Aubl. e C. insignis Mart. apresentaram diferenças com relação às visitas de espécies de abelhas, tendo sido visitadas por 23 espécies. Abelhas Euglossini e Meliponinae foram os visitantes mais freqüentes em flores de Clusia. O comportamento de coleta de recursos florais é descrito.

  16. Common tachinid flies of China(Insecta: Diptera)as flower visitors and pollinators%中国常见的访花传粉寄蝇(昆虫纲:双翅目)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣丽; 范宏烨; 王强; 崔乐; 张春田

    2012-01-01

    访花传粉是显花植物和动物(主要是昆虫、鸟类和蝙蝠)协同进化的结果,已知显花植物85%是由昆虫传媒授粉的.双翅目寄蝇科是一类重要的访花传粉昆虫,突颜寄蝇亚科和寄蝇族等成虫最常见于各类显花植物上.报告了我国常见的访花传粉寄蝇科4亚科18族54属119种物种名录,它们在农林牧业生产、植物保护、害虫生物控制及维护生态系统平衡稳定中意义重大,但还没有被认识和利用.%The flower visitors and pollinators are good examples of co-evolution as the results of biological interactions between animals (mainly insects, birds and bats) and flower plants ( = phanerogams). It is known that 85% flower plants are pollinated by the insects. The adults of Tachinidae (Insecta, Diptera) such as Phasiinae and Tachinini are important insects of flower visitors and pollinators and are seen commonly on different kinds of flowers and may function as pollinators for a wide diversity of plant taxa, but their importance in this respect has been largely unexplored. In this study, a checklist of the common Tachinidae of China as flower visitors and pollinators is reviewed by the observation of tachinid specimens, references, photos and collecting experiences, including 119 tachinid species of 54 genera, 18 tribes of 4 subfamilies. These tachinid flies play a significant role as natural enemies in the production of agriculture, forestry and animal husbandry on grasslands, plant protection, biological control of pests and the stability of terrestrial ecological communities. But they have not been fully unterstood and used.

  17. The Fossil Record of Plant-Insect Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labandeira, Conrad C.; Currano, Ellen D.

    2013-05-01

    Progress toward understanding the dynamics of ancient plant-insect associations has addressed major patterns in the ecology and evolution of herbivory and pollination. This advancement involves development of more analytical ways of describing plant-insect associational patterns in time and space and an assessment of the role that the environment and internal biological processes have in their control. Current issues include the deep origins of terrestrial herbivory, the spread of herbivory across late Paleozoic landscapes, recoveries from sudden major crises, reaction to and accommodation of protracted environmental perturbations, and the nature of herbivory and pollination before the appearance of angiosperms during the mid-Mesozoic. These and other exploratory research themes provide a more complete account of a great nexus of ecological activity that has been wedged between the two most diverse organismic groups on land for the past 410 million years.

  18. Evaluating insect-microbiomes at the plant-insect interface.

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    Casteel, Clare L; Hansen, Allison K

    2014-07-01

    Plants recognize biotic challengers and respond with the appropriate defense by utilizing phytohormone signaling and crosstalk. Despite this, microbes and insects have evolved mechanisms that compromise the plant surveillance system and specific defenses, thus ensuring successful colonization. In nature, plants do not experience insect herbivores and microbes in isolation, but in combination. Over time, relationships have developed between insects and microbes, varying on a continuum from no-relationship to obligate relationships that are required for both organisms to survive. While many reviews have examined plant-insect and plant-microbe interactions and the mechanisms of plant defense, few have considered the interface where microbes and insects may overlap, and synergies may develop. In this review, we critically evaluate the requirements for insect-associated microbes to develop synergistic relationships with their hosts, and we mechanistically discuss how some of these insect-associated microbes can target or modify host plant defenses. Finally, by using bioinformatics and the recent literature, we review evidence for synergies in insect-microbe relationships at the interface of plant-insect defenses. Insect-associated microbes can influence host-plant detection and/or signaling through phytohormone synthesis, conserved microbial patterns, and effectors, however, microbes associated with insects must be maintained in the environment and located in opportunistic positions.

  19. Context-dependency of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant-insect interactions in an agroecosystem

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    Nicholas A Barber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with a variety of other community members that have the potential to indirectly influence each other through a shared host plant. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are generally considered plant mutualists because of their generally positive effects on plant nutrient status and growth. AMF may also have important indirect effects on plants by altering interactions with other community members. By influencing plant traits, AMF can modify aboveground interactions with both mutualists, such as pollinators, and antagonists, such as herbivores. Because herbivory and pollination can dramatically influence plant fitness, comprehensive assessment of plant-AMF interactions should include these indirect effects. To determine how AMF affect plant-insect interactions, we grew Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae under five AMF inoculum treatments and control. We measured plant growth, floral production, flower size, and foliar nutrient content of half the plants, and transferred the other half to a field setting to measure pollinator and herbivore preference of wild insects. Mycorrhizal treatment had no effect on plant biomass or floral traits but significantly affected leaf nutrients, pollinator behavior, and herbivore attack. Although total pollinator visitation did not vary with AMF treatment, pollinators exhibited taxon-specific responses, with honey bees, bumble bees, and Lepidoptera all responding differently to AMF treatments. Flower number and size were unaffected by treatments, suggesting that differences in pollinator preference were driven by other floral traits. Mycorrhizae influenced leaf K and Na, but these differences in leaf nutrients did not correspond to variation in herbivore attack. Overall, we found that AMF indirectly influence both antagonistic and mutualistic insects, but impacts depend on the identity of both the fungal partner and the interacting insect, underscoring the context dependency of plant-AMF interactions.

  20. Visitor Registration System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Visitor Registration System (VRS) streamlines visitor check-in and check-out process for expediting visitors into USAID. The system captures visitor information...

  1. Abelhas (Hymenoptera: Apoidea visitantes das flores de urucum em Vitória da Conquista, BA Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea visitors of the annatto flowers in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Jorge Cavalcante Costa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O urucum é um arbusto da família Bixaceae, utilizado na fabricação de corantes naturais para a indústria alimentícia e cosmética. No Brasil, somente nos últimos 15 anos, houve maior interesse pelo cultivo, pois se tornou uma alternativa agrícola promissora. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo identificar as abelhas visitantes das flores do urucuzeiro em Vitória da Conquista, BA. O trabalho foi conduzido no campo experimental da UESB, em uma lavoura do tipo cultivado Peruana Paulista. A coleta das abelhas visitantes foi feita na época principal de floração do urucueiro: março/abril, das 6h às 18h. Foram coletadas 3019 abelhas de 22 espécies, com predominância na visitação das 8h às 14h em relação ao número de indivíduos e número de espécies capturadas. As espécies mais freqüentes foram: Trigona spinipes (Fabricius, Apis mellifera L., Schwarziana quadripunctata (Lepeletier e Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille. Espécies de maior porte, como Xylocopa frontalis (Olivier, Bombus morio (Swederus e Eulaema nigrita Lepeletier, consideradas como eficientes na polinização da cultura do urucum, não foram abundantes neste estudo.Annatto is a shrub from Bixaceae family, which natural pigment (annatto is widely used in food and cosmetic industries. In Brazil, the interest for this crop started in the last fifteen years, once it became a promising agricultural alternative. This study was aimed at identifing visitor bees of annatto flowers at the agriculture region of Vitória da Conquista (BA. The research was carried out in the experimental field of UESB, in an experimental plot planted with the cv. Peruana Paulista. The visitor bees were collected during the main blooming period: March/April, between 6:00h and 18:00h. A total of 3,019 bees from 22 species was collected, with higher visitation during the period from 8:00 to 14:00h, regarding the number of individuals and species. The species most frequent were Trigona spinipes

  2. Ecological turmoil in evolutionary dynamics of plant-insect interactions: defense to offence.

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    Mishra, Manasi; Lomate, Purushottam R; Joshi, Rakesh S; Punekar, Sachin A; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-10-01

    Available history manifests contemporary diversity that exists in plant-insect interactions. A radical thinking is necessary for developing strategies that can co-opt natural insect-plant mutualism, ecology and environmental safety for crop protection since current agricultural practices can reduce species richness and evenness. The global environmental changes, such as increased temperature, CO₂ and ozone levels, biological invasions, land-use change and habitat fragmentation together play a significant role in re-shaping the plant-insect multi-trophic interactions. Diverse natural products need to be studied and explored for their biological functions as insect pest control agents. In order to assure the success of an integrated pest management strategy, human activities need to be harmonized to minimize the global climate changes. Plant-insect interaction is one of the most primitive and co-evolved associations, often influenced by surrounding changes. In this review, we account the persistence and evolution of plant-insect interactions, with particular focus on the effect of climate change and human interference on these interactions. Plants and insects have been maintaining their existence through a mutual service-resource relationship while defending themselves. We provide a comprehensive catalog of various defense strategies employed by the plants and/or insects. Furthermore, several important factors such as accelerated diversification, imbalance in the mutualism, and chemical arms race between plants and insects as indirect consequences of human practices are highlighted. Inappropriate implementation of several modern agricultural practices has resulted in (i) endangered mutualisms, (ii) pest status and resistance in insects and (iii) ecological instability. Moreover, altered environmental conditions eventually triggered the resetting of plant-insect interactions. Hence, multitrophic approaches that can harmonize human activities and minimize their

  3. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-12-21

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought.

  4. Invasive plants, insects, and diseases in the forests of the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander M. Evans

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species, non-native plants, insects, and diseases can devastate forests. They outcompete native species, replace them in the ecosystem, and even drive keystone forest species to functional extinction. Invasives have negative effects on forest hydrology, carbon storage, and nutrient cycling. The damage caused by invasive species exacerbates the other forest...

  5. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-01-01

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought. PMID:26686758

  6. Endophytic fungus-vascular plant-insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, A; Wheatley, W; Popay, A

    2012-06-01

    Insect association with fungi has a long history. Theories dealing with the evolution of insect herbivory indicate that insects used microbes including fungi as their principal food materials before flowering plants evolved. Subtlety and the level of intricacy in the interactions between insects and fungi indicate symbiosis as the predominant ecological pattern. The nature of the symbiotic interaction that occurs between two organisms (the insect and the fungus), may be either mutualistic or parasitic, or between these two extremes. However, the triangular relationship involving three organisms, viz., an insect, a fungus, and a vascular plant is a relationship that is more complicated than what can be described as either mutualism or parasitism, and may represent facets of both. Recent research has revealed such a complex relationship in the vertically transmitted type-I endophytes living within agriculturally important grasses and the pestiferous insects that attack them. The intricacy of the association depends on the endophytic fungus-grass association and the insect present. Secondary compounds produced in the endophytic fungus-grass association can provide grasses with resistance to herbivores resulting in mutualistic relationship between the fungus and the plant that has negative consequences for herbivorous insects. The horizontally transmitted nongrass type-II endophytes are far less well studied and as such their ecological roles are not fully understood. This forum article explores the intricacy of dependence in such complex triangular relationships drawing from well-established examples from the fungi that live as endophytes in vascular plants and how they impact on the biology and evolution of free-living as well as concealed (e.g., gall-inducing, gall-inhabiting) insects. Recent developments with the inoculation of strains of type-I fungal endophytes into grasses and their commercialization are discussed, along with the possible roles the endophytic

  7. Long distance root-shoot signalling in plant-insect community interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Roxina; Erb, Matthias; Kaplan, Ian

    2013-03-01

    Plants mediate interactions between insects, including leaf- and root-feeders; yet the underlying mechanisms and connection with ecological theory remain unresolved. In this review, based on novel insights into long-distance (i.e., leaf-leaf, root-shoot) defence signalling, we explore the role of phytohormones in driving broad-scale patterns of aboveground-belowground interactions that can be extrapolated to general plant-insect relationships. We propose that the outcome of intra-feeding guild interactions is generally negative due to induction of similar phytohormonal pathways, whereas between-guild interactions are often positive due to negative signal crosstalk. However, not all outcomes could be explained by feeding guild; we argue that future studies should target ecologically representative plant-insect systems, distinguish subguilds, and include plant growth hormones to improve our understanding of plant-mediated interactions.

  8. CERN fellows and visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Penney, R. W.

    1963-01-01

    This article describes the Fellowship and Visitor Programme as it is at present, detailing the various headings under which the visitors come and indicating the methods by which they are chosen. The way in which their work is integrated into the general scientific activity of CERN is discussed briefly.

  9. Flowering biology, nectar production and insect visits in Cucurbita pepo L. flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dmitruk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1998-2000 studies on length and abundance of flowering and on nectar productivity of zucchini and marrow (Cucurbita pepo L. were carried out in Lublin area. Flowers visitors were also monitored. Flowering of plants lasted from the end of June till the end of September. The mean number of flowers per plant of zucchini reached: 31 (male flowers and 26 (female flowers, and for marrow 226 and 22, respectively. Flowers lived, on average, for 5 hours. Female flowers of marrow secreted the highest amount of nectar - 1.354 g per 10 flowers, on average. Sugar content in nectar was 21.84%-27.31%. The mean total amount of sugars secreted by 10 flowers of Cucurbita pepo L. was 21.5-304.3 mg. Pollinators were mainly bumblebees and honey bees.

  10. Plant-insect interactions under bacterial influence: ecological implications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Akiko; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Plants and insects have been co-existing for more than 400 million years, leading to intimate and complex relationships. Throughout their own evolutionary history, plants and insects have also established intricate and very diverse relationships with microbial associates. Studies in recent years have revealed plant- or insect-associated microbes to be instrumental in plant-insect interactions, with important implications for plant defences and plant utilization by insects. Microbial communities associated with plants are rich in diversity, and their structure greatly differs between below- and above-ground levels. Microbial communities associated with insect herbivores generally present a lower diversity and can reside in different body parts of their hosts including bacteriocytes, haemolymph, gut, and salivary glands. Acquisition of microbial communities by vertical or horizontal transmission and possible genetic exchanges through lateral transfer could strongly impact on the host insect or plant fitness by conferring adaptations to new habitats. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and molecular tools have dramatically enhanced opportunities to characterize the microbial diversity associated with plants and insects and have unveiled some of the mechanisms by which symbionts modulate plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on the diversity and ecological consequences of bacterial communities associated with plants and herbivorous insects. We also highlight the known mechanisms by which these microbes interfere with plant-insect interactions. Revealing such mechanisms in model systems under controlled environments but also in more natural ecological settings will help us to understand the evolution of complex multitrophic interactions in which plants, herbivorous insects, and micro-organisms are inserted.

  11. Pollination of Adenocalymma bracteatum (Bignoniaceae): floral biology and visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Soares, Stela; Polatto, Leandro P; Dutra, João C S; Torezan-Silingardi, Helena M

    2010-01-01

    Adenocalymma bracteatum is a shrub of dense foliage and yellow flowers, easily found on grasslands areas in Central Brazil. The aim of this study was to determine the reproductive biology and the flower visitors of A. bracteatum in a pasture area nearby Ivinhema city, MS (Brazil). The flowering peak occurs in winter. The flower reflects ultraviolet light. Anthesis begins at 6:30h, and pollen and nectar are the resources to visitors. We captured 1,038 floral visitors. The bees Apis mellifera (L.), Trigona sp., Trigona spinipes (Fabricius), (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) and the ant Cephalotes sp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were the main visitors. The reproductive tests indicate that A. bracteatum is self compatible, justifying its expansion in altered environments; however, the largest reproductive success was dependant on cross-pollination and self-pollination, evidencing the pollinators importance. Adenocalymma bracteatum presents melittophilous syndrome and bumblebees were the main pollinators in the area. The correlations observed between the climatic variables and the main pollinator species were low or medium.

  12. Biotransfer of heavy metals along a soil-plant-insect-chicken food chain:Field study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Ping; ZOU Huiling; SHU Wensheng

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the accumulation and transfer of Pb,Zn,Cu,and Cd along a soil-plant-insect-chicken food chain at contaminated sites.The study site nearing the Pb/Zn mine had been contaminated by heavy metals severely.Cadmium and Pb concentrations steadily declined with increasing trophic level (p0.05).The concentrations of heavy metals were the highest in chicken muscle,with lower values in liver and blood.Bioaccumulation of Pb was observed in the chicken livers.The eliminations of Pb,Zn,Cu,and Cd via insect and chicken feces avoid metal bioaccumulation in insect and chicken body.These results suggest that the accumulation of heavy metals in specific animal organ of tissues could not be neglected,although transfer of metals to chicken from plant and insect is limited.

  13. Is floral morphology a good predictor of floral visitors to Antirrhineae (snapdragons and relatives)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, B; Gómez, J M; Vargas, P

    2017-07-01

    The association between plants and flower visitors has been historically proposed as a main factor driving the evolutionary change of both flower and pollinator phenotypes. The considerable diversity in floral morphology within the tribe Antirrhineae has been traditionally related to pollinator types. We used empirical data on the flower visitors from 59 Antirrhineae taxa from the literature and our own field surveys, which provide an opportunity to test whether flower phenotypes are reliable predictors of visitors and pollinator niches. The degree of adjustment between eight key floral traits and actual visitors was explored by testing the predictive value of inferred pollinator syndromes (i.e. suites of floral traits that characterise groups of plant species related to pollination). Actual visitors and inferred pollinator niches (categorisation of visitors' association using a modularity algorithm) were also explored using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). The bee pollinator niche is correctly classified for flowers with dull corolla colour, without nectar guides, as the most important predictor. Both predictive value and statistical classification prove useful in classifying Antirrhineae taxa and the bee pollinator niche, mostly as a consequence of the high proportion of genera and taxa with occluded corollas primarily visited by bees. Our predictive approach rendered a high Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of floral traits in the diagnosis of visitors/pollinator niches. In particular, a high PPV was found for bees as both visitors and forming pollinator niches. In addition, LDA showed that four pollinator niches are well defined based on floral traits. The large number of species visited by bees irrespective of pollinator syndromes leads us to hypothesise their generalist pollinator role, despite the phenotypically specialised flowers of Antirrhineae. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Effects of climate change on plant-insect interactions and prospects for resistance breeding using genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritchard, J.; Broekgaarden, C.; Vosman, B.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the components (elevated CO2, temperature and drought) of climate change and their direct and indirect effects on plant-insect interactions. The genetic resources (such as wild relatives and traditional, locally adapted landraces) important for increasing pest/disease resistan

  15. Effects of climate change on plant-insect interactions and prospects for resistance breeding using genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pritchard, J.; Broekgaarden, C.; Vosman, B.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the components (elevated CO2, temperature and drought) of climate change and their direct and indirect effects on plant-insect interactions. The genetic resources (such as wild relatives and traditional, locally adapted landraces) important for increasing pest/disease

  16. Bees, birds and yellow flowers: pollinator-dependent convergent evolution of UV patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiorek, S; Junker, R R; Alves-Dos-Santos, I; Melo, G A R; Amaral-Neto, L P; Sazima, M; Wolowski, M; Freitas, L; Lunau, K

    2016-01-01

    Colour is one of the most obvious advertisements of flowers, and occurs in a huge diversity among the angiosperms. Flower colour is responsible for attraction from a distance, whereas contrasting colour patterns within flowers aid orientation of flower visitors after approaching the flowers. Due to the striking differences in colour vision systems and neural processing across animal taxa, flower colours evoke specific behavioural responses by different flower visitors. We tested whether and how yellow flowers differ in their spectral reflectance depending on the main pollinator. We focused on bees and birds and examined whether the presence or absence of the widespread UV reflectance pattern of yellow flowers predicts the main pollinator. Most bee-pollinated flowers displayed a pattern with UV-absorbing centres and UV-reflecting peripheries, whereas the majority of bird-pollinated flowers are entirely UV- absorbing. In choice experiments we found that bees did not show consistent preferences for any colour or pattern types. However, all tested bee species made their first antennal contact preferably at the UV-absorbing area of the artificial flower, irrespective of its spatial position within the flower. The appearance of UV patterns within flowers is the main difference in spectral reflectance between yellow bee- and bird-pollinated flowers, and affects the foraging behaviour of flower visitors. The results support the hypothesis that flower colours and the visual capabilities of their efficient pollinators are adapted to each other.

  17. Flower Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Benítez, Mariana; Corvera-Poiré, Adriana; Chaos Cador, Álvaro; de Folter, Stefan; Gamboa de Buen, Alicia; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; García-Ponce, Berenice; Jaimes-Miranda, Fabiola; Pérez-Ruiz, Rigoberto V.; Piñeyro-Nelson, Alma; Sánchez-Corrales, Yara E.

    2010-01-01

    Flowers are the most complex structures of plants. Studies of Arabidopsis thaliana, which has typical eudicot flowers, have been fundamental in advancing the structural and molecular understanding of flower development. The main processes and stages of Arabidopsis flower development are summarized to provide a framework in which to interpret the detailed molecular genetic studies of genes assigned functions during flower development and is extended to recent genomics studies uncovering the ke...

  18. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  19. Visitor combination and traversal control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.M.W.

    2001-01-01

    The emph{Visitor design pattern allows the encapsulation of polymorphic behavior outside the class hierarchy on which it operates. A common application of emph{Visitor is the encapsulation of tree traversals. Unfortunately, visitors resist composition and allow little traversal control. To remove t

  20. 长白山高山草甸植物-传粉昆虫相互作用网络可视化及格局分析%Visulization and Pattern Analysis of Plant-Insect Pollinator Interaction Networks in Subalpine Meadow in Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彦林; 孟庆繁; 高文韬

    2012-01-01

    With Pajek, a program for analysis and visualization of large networks, topologies of plant-insect pollinator interaction networks were constructed at the different taxa levels, and the change in patterns of interaction networks was studied. The results showed that patterns were different at the different taxa levels. The frequency distributions of species degree for insect pollinators and flowering plants were right-skewed at the species level. The insect pollinators and flowering plants with more than 1 links accounted for high proportion, with only a few species higher links, and the mean species degree for plants was higher than that of insect pollinator in plant-insect pollinator interaction networks in subalpine meadows. There was obvious lack of super generalized species indicating that phenological or morphologic mismatching between plant and insect pollinator forbad links between them. The frequency distributions of species degree for insect pollinators at the order level were different from that at the species level, however, generalized insect orders were also dominant. It is thus clear that studies on network patterns at the different levels would contribute to uncovering organization mechanism of pollination networks, and understanding that conservation on keystone insect pollinators or flowering plants with higher links is vital to maintain pollination system in subalpine meadows in Changbai Mountain.

  1. Regulating plant/insect interactions using CO2 enrichment in model ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinski, B.; Schmidt, J. M.; Watts, B.; Taylor, J.; Bates, S.; Dixon, M. A.; Staines, H.

    1999-01-01

    The greenhouse environment is a challenging artificial ecosystem in which it is possible to study selected plant/insect interaction in a controlled environment. Due to a combination of ``direct'' and ``indirect'' effects of CO2 enrichment on plant photosynthesis and plant development, canopy productivity is generally increased. In this paper, we discuss the effects of daytime and nighttime CO2 enrichment protocols on gas exchange of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L, cv Cubico) grown in controlled environments. In addition, we present the effects of thrips, a common insect pest, on the photosynthetic and respiratory activity of these plant canopies. Carbon dioxide has diverse effects on the physiology and mortality of insects. However, our data indicate that thrips and whiteflies, at least, are not killed ``directly'' by CO2 levels used to enhance photosynthesis and plant growth. Together the data suggest that the insect population is affected ``indirectly'' by CO2 and that the primary effect of CO2 is via its effects on plant metabolism.

  2. Evolutionary Ecology of Multitrophic Interactions between Plants, Insect Herbivores and Entomopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Ikkei

    2017-06-01

    Plants play an important role in the interactions between insect herbivores and their pathogens. Since the seminal review by Cory and Hoover (2006) on plant-mediated effects on insect-pathogen interactions, considerable progress has been made in understanding the complexity of these tritrophic interactions. Increasing interest in the areas of nutritional and ecological immunology over the last decade have revealed that plant primary and secondary metabolites can influence the outcomes of insect-pathogen interactions by altering insect immune functioning and physical barriers to pathogen entry. Some insects use plant secondary chemicals and nutrients to prevent infections (prophylactic medication) and medicate to limit the severity of infections (therapeutic medication). Recent findings suggest that there may be selectable plant traits that enhance entomopathogen efficacy, suggesting that entomopathogens could potentially impose selection pressure on plant traits that improve both pathogen and plant fitness. Moreover, plants in nature are inhabited by diverse communities of microbes, in addition to entomopathogens, some of which can trigger immune responses in insect herbivores. Plants are also shared by numerous other herbivorous arthropods with different modes of feeding that can trigger different defensive responses in plants. Some insect symbionts and gut microbes can degrade ingested defensive phytochemicals and be orally secreted onto wounded plant tissue during herbivory to alter plant defenses. Since non-entomopathogenic microbes and other arthropods are likely to influence the outcomes of plant-insect-entomopathogen interactions, I discuss a need to consider these multitrophic interactions within the greater web of species interactions.

  3. Potential pollinators and robbers: a study of the floral visitors of Heliconia angusta (Heliconiaceae and their behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensen, Isabell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Floral syndromes are traditionally thought to be associated with particular pollinator groups. Ornithophilous flowers tend to have traits that facilitate bird pollination such as having long, narrow, tubular corollas, often vivid coloration and diluted, sucrose-rich nectar. However, recent studies have shown that flowers attract a broader spectrum of visitors than might be expected. Furthermore, the classification of floral visitors as ‘robbers’ or ‘pollinators’ often is not as simple as it seems, as pollinators can at times act as robbers and vice versa. We studied the species composition, behaviour and ecology of floral visitors, including potential pollinators and robbers, of Heliconia angusta (Heliconiaceae, an endemic understorey herb of the Atlantic Rainforest of Brazil. In addition, the impact of the plant inflorescence attractiveness and of weather and light conditions on visitor abundance and frequency was investigated. Flower visitors were found to be scarce with a total of only 151 visits being observed during 120 h of field observations. A stingless bee species (Trigona sp. appeared to be the most abundant visitor to the ornithophilous flowers of H. angusta, along with four different species of hummingbirds and two species of butterflies. We consider Trigona sp. rather as pollen robber, but which still has the potential to be a secondary pollinator, whereas the hummingbirds were the principle legitimate visitors. Most flower visitors were recorded between 9.00 am and 1.00 pm with a higher number visiting under semi-shaded conditions than in full shade. Hummingbird numbers increased with flower abundance while the other visitor group numbers were not affected.

  4. Visitor satisfaction at the museum: Italian versus foreign visitor

    OpenAIRE

    Brida, Juan Gabriel; Disegna, Marta; Vachkova, Tsvetina

    2013-01-01

    Trying to understand what comprises and influences visitor satisfaction is one of the most relevant areas of research for the tourism sector. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors influence overall satisfaction with visitors to the museum, with particular interest in national origin, feelings, and motivations. The research is based on 1,038 questionnaires collected from June to December 2011 among the visitors of the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeo-logy (ÖTZI) in Bolzano, Northern ...

  5. Cytokinin-induced phenotypes in plant-insect interactions: learning from the bacterial world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, David; Glevarec, Gaëlle

    2014-07-01

    Recently, a renewed interest in cytokinins (CKs) has allowed the characterization of these phytohormones as key regulatory molecules in plant biotic interactions. They have been proved to be instrumental in microbe- and insect-mediated plant phenotypes that can be either beneficial or detrimental for the host-plant. In parallel, insect endosymbiotic bacteria have emerged as key players in plant-insect interactions mediating directly or indirectly fundamental aspects of insect nutrition, such as insect feeding efficiency or the ability to manipulate plant physiology to overcome food nutritional imbalances. However, mechanisms that regulate CK production and the role played by insects and their endosymbionts remain largely unknown. Against this backdrop, studies on plant-associated bacteria have revealed fascinating and complex molecular mechanisms that lead to the production of bacterial CKs and the modulation of plant-borne CKs which ultimately result in profound metabolic and morphological plant modifications. This review highlights major strategies used by plant-associated bacteria that impact the CK homeostasis of their host-plant, to raise parallels with strategies used by phytophagous insects and to discuss the possible role played by endosymbiotic bacteria in these CK-mediated plant phenotypes. We hypothesize that insects employ a CK-mix production strategy that manipulates the phytohormonal balance of their host-plant and overtakes plant gene expression causing a metabolic and morphological habitat modification. In addition, insect endosymbiotic bacteria may prove to be instrumental in these manipulations through the production of bacterial CKs, including specific forms that challenge the CK-degrading capacity of the plant (thus ensuring persistent effects) and the CK-mediated plant defenses.

  6. Public tolerance to defoliation and flower distortion in a public horticulture garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadof, Clifford S; Sclar, D Casey

    2002-04-01

    Surveys of visitor and grower perception of live potted plant quality were conducted in various locations in a large public display garden. Canna lily, Canna x generalis L.H.Bailey, was used to examine effects of defoliation by Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman, on public perception. Chrysanthemums, Chrysanthemum x morifolium Ramat., were used to identify visitor and grower tolerance to flower distortion caused by western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), on single and multiple flowered plants. On average, the maximum amount of defoliation or flower distortion tolerated by any respondent was low (< or = 10% for canna and < or = 25% for chrysanthemum). The level of acceptable injury was influenced by factors intrinsic to both the respondents and the plants themselves. Tolerance to injury was negatively associated with the risk aversion of the respondents. Visitors were less tolerant of injury on plants they considered for purchase than those that they would view at the garden. Similarly, grower tolerance was lower than that of visitors because producing substandard plants could put their professional reputation at risk. Factors that distracted visitor attention (e.g., presence of flowers and higher levels of background injury) increased their tolerance to plant injury. Visitors tolerated greater levels of flower distortion on multiple flowering chrysanthemum than on those with single flowers. We suggest that tolerance to insect pests can be increased by designing plantings that distract viewers from injured plant parts.

  7. Scaffolding Visitors' Learning through Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joyce; Yoon, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In museum literature, labels have been found to increase visitor learning and contribute to greater cognitive gains. In this study, we seek to understand how various labels support the visitors' learning experience, and specifically in regards to conceptual and cognitive learning. We investigated the increasing use of three types of labels (visual…

  8. Small Island Visitor Attractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haven Allahar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a process framework for developing and managing visitor attractions (VA in small island developing states with Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island state in the Caribbean, as the case study. An extensive literature review was conducted, supported by field observations, individual depth interviews, and small and large focus group meetings. The process framework identified four sets of processes: national policy formulation and legislation; inventory, classification, evaluation, and ranking of VA; general operations management involving project management activities; and site specific activities of development, operations, and maintenance. The value of the framework lies in the fact that no similar framework applicable to small islands was covered in the literature and validation was obtained from a panel of experts and a cross section of tourism stakeholders in Tobago.

  9. A Matter of Contrast: Yellow Flower Colour Constrains Style Length in Crocus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Lunau

    Full Text Available Most flowers display distinct colour patterns comprising two different areas. The peripheral large-area component of floral colour patterns attracts flower visitors from some distance and the central small-area component guides flower visitors towards landing sites. Whereas the peripheral colour is largely variable among species, the central colour, produced mostly by anthers and pollen or pollen mimicking floral guides, is predominantly yellow and UV-absorbing. This holds also for yellow flowers that regularly display a UV bull's eye pattern. Here we show that yellow-flowering Crocus species are a noticeable exception, since yellow-flowering Crocus species-being entirely UV-absorbing-exhibit low colour contrast between yellow reproductive organs and yellow tepals. The elongated yellow or orange-yellow style of Crocus flowers is a stamen-mimicking structure promoting cross-pollination by facilitating flower visitors' contact with the apical stigma before the flower visitors are touching the anthers. Since Crocus species possess either yellow, violet or white tepals, the colour contrast between the stamen-mimicking style and the tepals varies among species. In this study comprising 106 Crocus species, it was tested whether the style length of Crocus flowers is dependent on the corolla colour. The results show that members of the genus Crocus with yellow tepals have evolved independently up to twelve times in the genus Crocus and that yellow-flowering Crocus species possess shorter styles as compared to violet- and white-flowering ones. The manipulation of flower visitors by anther-mimicking elongated styles in Crocus flowers is discussed.

  10. A Matter of Contrast: Yellow Flower Colour Constrains Style Length in Crocus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Klaus; Konzmann, Sabine; Bossems, Jessica; Harpke, Doerte

    2016-01-01

    Most flowers display distinct colour patterns comprising two different areas. The peripheral large-area component of floral colour patterns attracts flower visitors from some distance and the central small-area component guides flower visitors towards landing sites. Whereas the peripheral colour is largely variable among species, the central colour, produced mostly by anthers and pollen or pollen mimicking floral guides, is predominantly yellow and UV-absorbing. This holds also for yellow flowers that regularly display a UV bull's eye pattern. Here we show that yellow-flowering Crocus species are a noticeable exception, since yellow-flowering Crocus species-being entirely UV-absorbing-exhibit low colour contrast between yellow reproductive organs and yellow tepals. The elongated yellow or orange-yellow style of Crocus flowers is a stamen-mimicking structure promoting cross-pollination by facilitating flower visitors' contact with the apical stigma before the flower visitors are touching the anthers. Since Crocus species possess either yellow, violet or white tepals, the colour contrast between the stamen-mimicking style and the tepals varies among species. In this study comprising 106 Crocus species, it was tested whether the style length of Crocus flowers is dependent on the corolla colour. The results show that members of the genus Crocus with yellow tepals have evolved independently up to twelve times in the genus Crocus and that yellow-flowering Crocus species possess shorter styles as compared to violet- and white-flowering ones. The manipulation of flower visitors by anther-mimicking elongated styles in Crocus flowers is discussed.

  11. Lotus Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    The lotus flower is a traditional subject for Chinese painters. Men of letters and painters depict it because although it grows from mud its blossoms are clean and charming, hence it has always been used to euphemize a man who keeps his noble mind even in unfavorable situations Young painter Xing Xiaolin features the lotus flowers again and

  12. Self - congruity Influence on Tourist Behavior: Repeat Visitors versus Non - Visitors and First - Time Visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithat Üner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the role of prior experience on the impact of actual self and ideal self-congruity on tourists’ intention to visit Turkey for leisure purposes. The study draws from an empirical study with 648 subjects conducted in cooperation with the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Results suggest that the effect of actual self-congruity on intention to visit differs according to different levels of tourist experience. While self-congruity has a positive effect on intenti on to visit for the non-visitors and first-time visitors --implying that the relationship between self-congruity and intention does not vary between non-visitors and first-time visitors --this effect loses its significance for repeat visitors. These findings partially support the previous proposed moderating role of prior experience on the impact of self congruity on intention to visit a destination and expand the discussion on this topic raising new questions

  13. Visitor satisfaction at the museum: Italian versus foreign visitors

    OpenAIRE

    Brida, J.G.; Disegna, Marta; Vachkova, T.

    2013-01-01

    Trying to understand what comprises and influences visitor satisfaction is one of the most relevant areas of research for the tourism sector. The aim of this study is to analyze which factors influence overall satisfaction with the visit at the museum, with particular interest in origin, feelings, and motivations. The research is based on 1038 questionnaires collected from June to December 2011 among the visitors of the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology (ÖTZI) in Bolzano, Northern Italy. Lo...

  14. Generalization versus Specialization in Pollination Systems: Visitors, Thieves, and Pollinators of Hypoestes aristata (Acanthaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padyšáková, Eliška; Bartoš, Michael; Tropek, Robert; Janeček, Štěpán

    2013-01-01

    Many recent studies have suggested that the majority of animal-pollinated plants have a higher diversity of pollinators than that expected according to their pollination syndrome. This broad generalization, often based on pollination web data, has been challenged by the fact that some floral visitors recorded in pollination webs are ineffective pollinators. To contribute to this debate, and to obtain a contrast between visitors and pollinators, we studied insect and bird visitors to virgin flowers of Hypoestes aristata in the Bamenda Highlands, Cameroon. We observed the flowers and their visitors for 2-h periods and measured the seed production as a metric of reproductive success. We determined the effects of individual visitors using 2 statistical models, single-visit data that were gathered for more frequent visitor species, and frequency data. This approach enabled us to determine the positive as well as neutral or negative impact of visitors on H. aristata’s reproductive success. We found that (i) this plant is not generalized but rather specialized; although we recorded 15 morphotaxa of visitors, only 3 large bee species seemed to be important pollinators; (ii) the carpenter bee Xylocopa cf. inconstans was both the most frequent and the most effective pollinator; (iii) the honey bee Apis mellifera acted as a nectar thief with apparent negative effects on the plant reproduction; and (iv) the close relationship between H. aristata and carpenter bees was in agreement with the large-bee pollination syndrome of this plant. Our results highlight the need for studies detecting the roles of individual visitors. We showed that such an approach is necessary to evaluate the pollination syndrome hypothesis and create relevant evolutionary and ecological hypotheses. PMID:23593135

  15. Generalization versus specialization in pollination systems: visitors, thieves, and pollinators of Hypoestes aristata (Acanthaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padyšáková, Eliška; Bartoš, Michael; Tropek, Robert; Janeček, Stěpán

    2013-01-01

    Many recent studies have suggested that the majority of animal-pollinated plants have a higher diversity of pollinators than that expected according to their pollination syndrome. This broad generalization, often based on pollination web data, has been challenged by the fact that some floral visitors recorded in pollination webs are ineffective pollinators. To contribute to this debate, and to obtain a contrast between visitors and pollinators, we studied insect and bird visitors to virgin flowers of Hypoestes aristata in the Bamenda Highlands, Cameroon. We observed the flowers and their visitors for 2-h periods and measured the seed production as a metric of reproductive success. We determined the effects of individual visitors using 2 statistical models, single-visit data that were gathered for more frequent visitor species, and frequency data. This approach enabled us to determine the positive as well as neutral or negative impact of visitors on H. aristata's reproductive success. We found that (i) this plant is not generalized but rather specialized; although we recorded 15 morphotaxa of visitors, only 3 large bee species seemed to be important pollinators; (ii) the carpenter bee Xylocopa cf. inconstans was both the most frequent and the most effective pollinator; (iii) the honey bee Apis mellifera acted as a nectar thief with apparent negative effects on the plant reproduction; and (iv) the close relationship between H. aristata and carpenter bees was in agreement with the large-bee pollination syndrome of this plant. Our results highlight the need for studies detecting the roles of individual visitors. We showed that such an approach is necessary to evaluate the pollination syndrome hypothesis and create relevant evolutionary and ecological hypotheses.

  16. Attract Visitors to Your Site

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    To be a success, a website has to attract-and keep--visitors. This Mini Missing Manual shows you how to attract new and return visitors and use the power of keywords and Web search engines to rise up in the rankings of search results. You'll also learn how to use a powerful-and free--service that tracks visitor activity on your site so you know which of your Web pages they love, and-just as important--which pages don't work for them. Using this information, you can fine-tune your site to keep the visitors coming. This Mini Missing Manual is excerpted from Creating a Web Site: The Missing Man

  17. Flowers & Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the topics and teaching strategies employed in an Issues in Biology course. Discusses flowers, plant breeding, potatoes and tomatoes, the chocolate tree, weeds, Arabidopis, gene transfers, and plant genes/human genes. Contains 22 references. (JRH)

  18. Flowers & Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the topics and teaching strategies employed in an Issues in Biology course. Discusses flowers, plant breeding, potatoes and tomatoes, the chocolate tree, weeds, Arabidopis, gene transfers, and plant genes/human genes. Contains 22 references. (JRH)

  19. Floral visitors of Ananas comosus in Ghana: A preliminary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kwapong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ananas comosus var comosus (L. Merr. is the third most important tropical fruit in the world production and the leading foreign exchange earner among fresh fruits exported from Ghana. A survey was conducted in pineapple farms in the Central region of Ghana to identify floral visitors and their activities on the flowers. Nectar concentration and energetics and effect of floral visitors on fruit production were determined. Fourteen species of butterflies and one ant species were the main insect floral visitors as well as four species of sunbirds. The mean nectar concentration was 23.3% (± 0.39, SE and pollination limitation did not significantly affect fruit yield (weight: p = 0.285; length: p = 0.056; width: p= 0.268. The study showed that butterflies, ants and sunbirds are the main floral visitors on A. comosus. However their visits did not results in pollination and fruit production was not affected in any way by floral visitation. Still, it was found that A. comosus provides an important nectar resource for its foragers. Even if pollination is not crucial in pineapple cultivation, it is still essential in pineapple breeding programs to promote genetic diversity and conservation.

  20. 22 CFR 41.62 - Exchange visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Students and Exchange Visitors § 41.62 Exchange visitors. (a) J-1 classification. An alien is classifiable as an exchange visitor if qualified under the provisions of INA 101(a) (15... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exchange visitors. 41.62 Section 41.62 Foreign...

  1. Diversity and pollination value of insects visiting the flowers of a rare buckwheat (Eriogonum pelinophilum: Polygonaceae in disturbed and “natural” areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griswold, T. L.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We compared flower-visitors of the endangered plant Eriogonum pelinophilum, at relatively undisturbed and highly disturbed sites. We found no difference between sites in flower visitation rate or species richness of flower-visitors; species diversity of flower-visitors was higher at disturbed than at undisturbed sites but there was no difference in equitability. We found significant differences in total E. pelinophilum pollen carried on the body among 14 abundant bee species; eight abundant wasp species; and 12 abundant fly species. Both bee and wasp species carried significantly more pollen on the ventral compared to dorsal segments of the body; pollen on the body of fly species was more equally distributed across body surfaces. Total pollen carried on flower-visitor bodies was significantly related to visitor length, suggesting that larger visitors were more effective pollinators. Total Pollination Value, a measure combining both visitor abundance and body pollen was greater at the disturbed site than the undisturbed site, further suggesting that pollination in fragments of this rare species is not a major concern. We conclude that the high diversity of insect flower-visitors and the generalized nature of E. pelinophilum flowers make a special management programme to conserve pollinators unnecessary. Conservation of this buckwheat is best achieved by simple habitat preservation, together with a program to enlist private citizens to include buckwheat plants in their backyard gardens.

  2. Non-additive effects of genotypic diversity increase floral abundance and abundance of floral visitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Genung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1 plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2 plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  3. Robustness of plant-insect herbivore interaction networks to climate change in a fragmented temperate forest landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähner, K W; Zweig, K A; Leal, I R; Wirth, R

    2017-02-10

    Forest fragmentation and climate change are among the most severe and pervasive forms of human impact. Yet, their combined effects on plant-insect herbivore interaction networks, essential components of forest ecosystems with respect to biodiversity and functioning, are still poorly investigated, particularly in temperate forests. We addressed this issue by analysing plant-insect herbivore networks (PIHNs) from understories of three managed beech forest habitats: small forest fragments (2.2-145 ha), forest edges and forest interior areas within three continuous control forests (1050-5600 ha) in an old hyper-fragmented forest landscape in SW Germany. We assessed the impact of forest fragmentation, particularly edge effects, on PIHNs and the resulting differences in robustness against climate change by habitat-wise comparison of network topology and biologically realistic extinction cascades of networks following scores of vulnerability to climate change for the food plant species involved. Both the topological network metrics (complexity, nestedness, trophic niche redundancy) and robustness to climate change strongly increased in forest edges and fragments as opposed to the managed forest interior. The nature of the changes indicates that human impacts modify network structure mainly via host plant availability to insect herbivores. Improved robustness of PIHNs in forest edges/small fragments to climate-driven extinction cascades was attributable to an overall higher thermotolerance across plant communities, along with positive effects of network structure. The impoverishment of PIHNs in managed forest interiors and the suggested loss of insect diversity from climate-induced co-extinction highlight the need for further research efforts focusing on adequate silvicultural and conservation approaches.

  4. More items on visitors' menu

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Visitors to CERN will now be able to appreciate first-hand the sheer scale of the computing challenge associated with the LHC, during guided visits to the Computing Centre. Two more of CERN's experimental facilities have recently been added to the itineraries offered to the public by the Visits Service. The general public will now be able to see the COMPASS experiment and CERN's Computing Centre. Over the past few years, there has been an increasing demand for visits. Last year, 25 000 visitors came to see sites at CERN. 'Visitors to CERN are impressed by the sheer scale of the experiments, interested to find out how they work and amazed at how they are often located underground,' says Dominique Bertola, Head of the CERN Visits Service. COMPASS is the first fixed-target experiment available for viewing to the general public. The linear structure of the detector makes it an ideal exhibit for the visitors, because it permits them to see the different stages of the experiment and intuitively appreciate how it ...

  5. Seney National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Services Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Visitor Services Plan covers background information, objectives, strategies and goals of the Visitor Services program at Seney NWR for the next 15 years. It...

  6. Early Spring Nectar and Pollen and Insect Visitor Behavior in Two Corydalis Species (Papaveraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisow Bożena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study, conducted in 2008 and 2012 - 2013, evaluated the flowering pattern (seasonal and diurnal, the abundance of flowering, nectar, and pollen yield, and insect visitor activity for Corydalis solida (L. Clairv. and C. cava Schweig. et Koerte. The populations occur in the ground layer of a deciduous forest (Fagetalia ordo, Querco-Fagetea class in a natural gorge within the current area of the UMCS Botanical Garden in Lublin, Poland (51° 16’ N, 22° 30’ E. The phenology of Corydalis species showed distinct year-to-year plasticity (e.g., blooming period in March - April or in April - May; duration 18 - 42 days. The most intensive flower opening was noted in the early morning hours (85 - 90% of daily openings occurred between 6.00 and 10.00 h, GMT +2 h. The average sugar yield was similar at 4.6 kg/ha (C. cava and 5.2 kg/ha (C. solida, but the average pollen production differed and reached 2.1 kg/ha (C. cava and 4.1 kg/ha (C. solida. The flower-visitor interaction in Corydalis species involved both biological (early pattern of diurnal flowering, protandry, pollen presentation at the moment of anthesis and morphological (nectar hidden in deep spur features. Apis mellifera foragers predominated on both Corydalis species (mean of total visitors, 68.0% to C. solida; 62.5% to C. cava and foraged mainly for pollen (82% of foragers, while bumblebee queens (mean of total visitors, 32.0% to C. solida; 37.5% to C. cava collected mainly nectar (68.0% of foragers.

  7. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false International visitors. 62.28 Section 62.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific... programs are designed to enable the international visitors to better understand American culture...

  8. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government visitors. 62.29 Section 62.29 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific... designed to enable government visitors to better understand American culture and society, and to...

  9. Building program understanding tools using visitor combinators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deursen, A. van; Visser, J.M.W.

    2002-01-01

    Program understanding tools manipulate program representations, such as abstract syntax trees, control-flow graphs, or data-flow graphs. This paper deals with the use of visitor combinators to conduct such manipulations. Visitor combinators are an extension of the well-known visitor design

  10. Pollination Services of Mango Flower Pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, A Nurul; Salmah, M R Che; Hassan, A Abu; Hamdan, A; Razak, M N Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Measuring wild pollinator services in agricultural production is very important in the context of sustainable management. In this study, we estimated the contribution of native pollinators to mango fruit set production of two mango cultivars Mangifera indica (L). cv. 'Sala' and 'Chok Anan'. Visitation rates of pollinators on mango flowers and number of pollen grains adhering to their bodies determined pollinator efficiency for reproductive success of the crop. Chok Anan failed to produce any fruit set in the absence of pollinators. In natural condition, we found that Sala produced 4.8% fruit set per hermaphrodite flower while Chok Anan produced 3.1% per flower. Hand pollination tremendously increased fruit set of naturally pollinated flower for Sala (>100%), but only 33% for Chok Anan. Pollinator contribution to mango fruit set was estimated at 53% of total fruit set production. Our results highlighted the importance of insect pollinations in mango production. Large size flies Eristalinus spp. and Chrysomya spp. were found to be effective pollen carriers and visited more mango flowers compared with other flower visitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  11. Accumulation of cadmium and copper by female Oxya chinensis(Orthopera: Acridoidea) in soil-plant-insect system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    One purpose of this research is to present accumulation of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) by female Oxya chinensis (Orthopera: Acridoidea) in a simulated soil-plant-insect ecosystem treated with Cd. Fourth-instar nymphs of O. chinensis had been fed on wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings contaminated with Cd and Cu for one month. In the ecosystem, the Cd concentration in wheat seedlings rose greatly with the increasing of Cd in the soil, but the Cu concentration in wheat seedlings was not found elevated. There was a highly significant difference(P<0.05) in Cd concentrations of wheat seedlings and not any significant difference(P>0.05) in Cu concentrations of wheat seedlings. The Cd and Cu concentration in different body part-head, thorax, abdomen, and hind femur, varied under different Cd concentrations in soil. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the four parts of Cd and Cu accumulations with all treatments. The order of Cd accumulation was thorax >abdomen >head >hind femur and the Cu was abdomen > thorax >head > hind femur. The results indicated that Cd and Cu were accumulated from the soil to grasshoppers through the plant; that is to say, Cd and Cu in environment could be transported to animal or human via food chain.

  12. Jasmonate response decay and defense metabolite accumulation contributes to age-regulated dynamics of plant insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ying-Bo; Liu, Yao-Qian; Chen, Dian-Yang; Chen, Fang-Yan; Fang, Xin; Hong, Gao-Jie; Wang, Ling-Jian; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2017-01-01

    Immunity deteriorates with age in animals but comparatively little is known about the temporal regulation of plant resistance to herbivores. The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of plant insect defense. Here, we show that the JA response decays progressively in Arabidopsis. We show that this decay is regulated by the miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE9 (SPL9) group of proteins, which can interact with JA ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, including JAZ3. As SPL9 levels gradually increase, JAZ3 accumulates and the JA response is attenuated. We provide evidence that this pathway contributes to insect resistance in young plants. Interestingly however, despite the decay in JA response, older plants are still comparatively more resistant to both the lepidopteran generalist Helicoverpa armigera and the specialist Plutella xylostella, along with increased accumulation of glucosinolates. We propose a model whereby constitutive accumulation of defense compounds plays a role in compensating for age-related JA-response attenuation during plant maturation. PMID:28067238

  13. FLORAL VISITORS IN SALVIA RHOMBIFOLIA RUIZ & PAVON (LAMIACEAE IN LIMA, PERU: A BEE-POLLINATED SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianka Cairampoma

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the mechanisms, rates and agents involved in pollination and subsequent reproduction of Salvia rhombifolia. It characterized its floral visitors by recorded their visit frequency, also wemeasured its reproductive success by the percentage of seed production. Four bee species, one dipterous species and two hummingbird species were seen visiting flowers. Due hummingbirds were not actively carry pollen during their visits, they were classified as opportunistic; on the other hand, three bee species were principal pollinators because they carry and actively transfer pollen among S. rhombifolia flowers.

  14. Flowering of Areca catechu in Bogor Botanic Gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Yudaputra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Areca catechu is a species of palms that widely distributed in Indonesia. This palm has unique characteristics and important roles of a tropical forest ecosystem. Indonesian local tribes used seed of this palm for traditionaly medicinal purposes. Information regarding of flowering of A.catechu is valuabe to support a genetic improvement program. Currently, the flowering information about this palm is still lack, thereby study that related with flowering of A. catechu is important to be conducted. This study aimed to provide information about the flowering of A.catechu species. The observation was started with randomly selection of three individuals A. catechu from the Moluccas island. There were 3 main observations which done in this study, included the observation of flowering phases period, morphological changes of each phases, and the micro-climate factors. Flowering A. catechu was categorized into 4 phases, including initiation, bud towards anthesis, anthesis and young fruit to maturity. Each of flowering phases have a different time. The flowering phases were not directly influenced by micro-climate factors. Trigona laeviceps was the most dominant insect visitor and wind was an abiotic factors that influenced the flowering of A. catechu.

  15. Effects of visitor numbers on captive European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) and impacts on visitor experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, Eleanor E; Goodenough, Anne E

    2017-02-21

    Visitors to zoological collections can have substantial effects on captive animals that vary according to species, enclosure design, visitor proximity, and husbandry methods. One particularly intense form of visitor interaction occurs in immersive exhibits such as walk-through enclosures. Such enclosures are increasingly common but effects on animal behavior are currently understudied. Here, the behavior of captive European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) is studied in relation to visitor numbers in a walk-through enclosure. We also quantify the correlation between squirrel encounters and visitor experience. Interaction with humans increased significantly as the number of visitors inside the enclosure increased. The number of children present significantly increased locomotion and decreased eating, possibly due to disturbance and squirrels moving away from busy areas. By contrast, the number of adults significantly increased eating and decreased inactivity due to squirrels approaching visitors. The positive reinforcement training used by the keepers (offering food rewards to the squirrels for coming to them to allow routine medical checks) meant that squirrels associated adults with food opportunities. Squirrel encounter rate (number of squirrels seen by each group of visitors) was significantly affected by the number of adults and visitor duration (positive relationships) and noise as perceived by visitors (negative relationship). Encounter rate was positively correlated with overall visitor experience. Our results indicate that visitors affect behavior but this effect is influenced by husbandry methods. It is vital that visitors, especially children, minimize noise, and move slowly in the enclosure, both for the sake of the animals and their own experience.

  16. Minimizing Visitor Impacts to Protected Lands: An Examination of Site Management and Visitor Education Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Melissa Lynn

    2004-01-01

    This thesis contains two studies that explore different methods of visitor management in recreation. The management strategies studied here are both relatively indirect approaches intended to minimize the environmental and social impacts that visitors cause in protected areas. The Annapolis Rocks study focuses on visitors' evaluations of a site management strategy that shifted camping from a flat, open area to constructed side-hill campsites. A visitor questionnaire was administered before...

  17. 77 FR 65166 - Information Collection; Request for Comment; Visitor Permit and Visitor Registration Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    ... Visitor Registration Card AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for comment. SUMMARY: In... information collection, 0596-0019 (Visitor Permit and Visitor Registration Card). DATES: Comments must be... should be addressed to Wilderness Program Manager; USDA Forest Service, Wilderness and Wild and...

  18. Structure and Stability of Cocoa Flowers and Their Response to Pollination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi Frimpong-Anin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the position of staminodes around the style of cocoa flowers and the stability of cocoa flowers relative to pollination and seasonality. Cocoa flowers were categorized into converging, ≤1.20 mm; parallel, 1.21–2.40 mm, and splay ≥2.41 mm, depending on the distance between the staminode and style. Some flowers were hand pollinated while others were not and were excluded from insect visitors. Proportions of flowers of converging (56.0%, parallel (37.5%, and splay (6.5% remained similar along the vertical plane of cocoa trees. Although pollination rates of flowers with splay staminodes were the lowest, the overall pollination success of cocoa trees was not significantly affected because of the small proportion of splay flowers.The stability of the cocoa flowers depended on both the season and pollination. During the dry season, unpollinated flowers of cocoa trees showed a flower-stability ratio of 72% on the second day, while the flower-stability ratio was 94% in the wet season. Pollinated (senescent flowers had a stability ratio of 95% after 5 days during the wet season, but all pollinated flowers dropped after 5 days in the dry season, indicating that seasonal factors, such as water stress, can have dramatic effects on cocoa yields.

  19. Survey of Visitors to Bornholm 1996

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartl, Ann; Rassing, Charlotte

    The overall objective was to provide a comprehensive description of visitors to Bornholm that was in keeping with the standard analysis of destination surveys.......The overall objective was to provide a comprehensive description of visitors to Bornholm that was in keeping with the standard analysis of destination surveys....

  20. Information seeking behaviour of online museum visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette

    two research projects on online museum visitors. The first case study will illustrate the information seeking and searching characteristics of online museum visitors at the National Museum of Military History in Copenhagen. Participants in this case study are characterised as special interest museum...

  1. Flowering patterns of long-lived Heliconia inflorescences: implications for visiting and resident nectarivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, David S

    1984-10-01

    Flowering patterns of four Heliconia (Heliconiaceae) species in Trinidad, West Indies were examined for their predictability and availability to the nectarivores that rely on Heliconia floral nectar. Principal flower visitors are trapling hermit hummingbirds; inflorescences are inhabited by nectarivorous hummingbird flower mites that move between inflorescences by riding in the hummingbirds' nares. Heliconia inflorescences flower for 40-200 days, providing long-term sources of copious nectar (30-60 μl per flower), but each Heliconia flower lasts only a single day. As an inflorescence ages the interval increases between open flowers within a bract; wet-season inflorescences produce open flowers more slowly than dry-season conspecifics.Estimated daily energy expenditures for hermit hummingbirds demonstrate that slow production of short-lived open flowers plus low inflorescence density preclude territorial defense of Heliconia by the hermits. Heliconia flowering patterns are viewed as a means of (i) regulating reproductive investment by the plants through staggered flower production over long periods of time, and (ii) maintaining outcrossing by necessitating a traplining visitation pattern by its hummingbird pollinators. I suggest that Heliconia exhibit a two-tiered pollination system by using hermit hummingbirds primarily for outcrossing and using hummingbird flower mites primarily for self-pollination.

  2. Three-Stage Dynamic Games of Government-Park-Visitor in Visitor Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The government-park-visitor three-stage multiplayers dynamic game G(S1m,S2n,S3k,RG,R,U is established to solve the significant problem regarding the investment in the visitor education. The game reveals that the visitor education intervention should form a positive interaction mechanism of government leading, tourism enterprise implementing, and tourist participating. The visitor education system in the tourism market has not been established at the initial stage. Stakeholders are hesitant to invest resources to push the establishment of visitor education system. The government should set up an induction fund which can encourage the parks and tourism companies to invest money on visitor education. When visitor education system develops to a certain stage with the help of government induction fund, it can run autonomously without the external factors. And the win-win-win situation of the government, parks, and visitors is obtained when the Nash equilibrium state of the game is reached. Furthermore, the game also reveals that visitor education mainly includes the behavior intervention and knowledge services which are important for the park’s visitor education.

  3. Analysis of the CMS visitors feedback Poster

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    CMS welcomed over 5500 visitors underground during the 2013 CERN Open Days and more than 4500 during the Neighbourhood Days of 2014 on the occasion of CERN’s 60th anniversary. During the latter event, visitors gave their feedback on the visit experience by answering three questions: • In one sentence, what will you tell your friends about what you saw today? • What fact or story that you heard today impressed you the most? • Describe the CMS detector in three words. This poster will show the analysis of the answers given by visitors.

  4. Analysis of the CMS visitors feedback Poster

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    CMS welcomed over 5500 visitors underground during the 2013 CERN Open Days and more than 4500 during the Neighbourhood Days of 2014 on the occasion of CERN’s 60th anniversary. During the latter event, visitors gave their feedback on the visit experience by answering three questions: • In one sentence, what will you tell your friends about what you saw today? • What fact or story that you heard today impressed you the most? • Describe the CMS detector in three words. This poster will show the analysis of the answers given by visitors.

  5. Establishment of in vitro soybean aphids, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae): a tool to facilitate studies of aphid symbionts, plant-insect interactions and insecticide efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunadi, Andika; Bansal, Raman; Finer, John J; Michel, Andy

    2017-06-01

    Studies on plant-insect interactions of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Matsumura), can be influenced by environmental fluctuations, status of the host plant and variability in microbial populations. Maintenance of aphids on in vitro-grown plants minimizes environmental fluctuations, provides uniform host materials and permits the selective elimination of aphid-associated microbes for more standardized controls in aphid research. Aphids were reared on sterile, in vitro-grown soybean seedlings germinated on plant tissue culture media amended with a mixture of antimicrobials. For initiation and maintenance of in vitro aphid colonies, single aphids were inoculated onto single in vitro seedlings. After three rounds of transfer of 'clean' aphids to fresh in vitro seedlings, contamination was no longer observed, and aphids performed equally well when compared with those reared on detached leaves. The addition of the insecticides thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole to the culture medium confirmed uptake and caused significant mortality to the in vitro aphids. The use of the antimicrobial mixture removed the associated bacteria Arsenophonus but retained Buchnera and Wolbachia within the in vitro aphids. The in vitro aphid system is a novel and highly useful tool to understand insecticidal efficacy and expand our knowledge of tritrophic interactions among plants, insects and symbionts. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Diversity and pollination value of insects visiting the flowers of a rare buckwheat (Eriogonum pelinophilum: Polygonaceae) in disturbed and "natural" areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared flower-visitors of the endangered plant Eriogonum pelinophilum, at a largely undistributed (UN) and a smaller, highly disturbed and fragmented site (DI). We found no difference between the DI site and the UN site in: 1) flower visitation rate, or 2) species richness of E. pelinophilum f...

  7. Official Zhang Flower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Tucked away at the highest elevation of any city in the world, Lhasa is filled with flowers bathed in warm sunlight. Whether in Barkor Street or in snaking alleys, one finds flowers in full bloom. They include the famous Gal-sang flower, azaleas, to be found in the mountains, Rho-diola which is used as a medicinal herb, and a kind of flower known as High Commissioner Zhang.

  8. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  9. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge visitor survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The US Fish and Wildlife Service and the US Geological Survey are conducting this survey to learn more about refuge visitors in order to improve the management of...

  10. Stennis Visitors Center and Administrative Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This aerial view shows the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center and main Administrative complex. The Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing and for commercial remote sensing.

  11. 22 CFR Appendix B to Part 62 - Exchange Visitor Program Services, Exchange-Visitor Program Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exchange Visitor Program Services, Exchange-Visitor Program Application B Appendix B to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY... information on program. IF TRAINING PROGRAM, identify appropriate fields: 01—Arts & Culture;...

  12. Visitors or visits? An examination of zoo visitor numbers using the case study of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Usually cited in reference to the potential reach of zoo education, one of the popular figures for global zoo visitation is that 600 million people visit zoos annually. However, this number needs clarification on two fronts. First, there are many zoo visitors who are not included in the calculation because they visited a zoo that was not included in the count. Second, it does not take into consideration the people visit either the same or different zoos more than once annually. Using data collected from several sources, including zoo visitors themselves, this article focuses on one country--Australia--that contributes 15.6 million to the visitation total, and contends that the correct number of unique annual zoo visitors to Australian zoos is likely to be between 8 and 10 million. However, rather than suggesting an overemphasis on the potential of zoos for educating visitors, having regular repeat visitors represents a distinct advantage for zoos, allowing for progressive education opportunities.

  13. Records on floral biology and visitors of Jacquemontia montana (Moric. Meisn. (Convolvulaceae in Mucugê, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FO. Silva

    Full Text Available We present the first records on pollination biology of Jacquemontia montana (Moric. Meisn. (Convolvulaceae, a widespread climber in the Chapada Diamantina. Our objectives were to (1 characterise flower morphology and biology of J. montana; (2 sample flower visitors and (3 make inferences about potential pollinators, based on foraging behaviour. Observations and sampling were performed on two patches from 8:00 AM to 3:30 PM, May 15th to 16th, 2007. The corolla is bowl shaped, pentamerous, gamopetalous, actinomorphic, and yellow, with a mean diameter of 22.43 ± 1.81 mm, the depth being variable during flower phases. Stigma receptivity lasted from 8:00 AM-3:30 PM and pollen viability from 9:00 AM-3:30 PM Pollen. showed great decline in number but not in viability during anthesis. Nectarivorous (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera and herbivorous (Orthoptera insects were found on the flowers. Both male and female bees (Dialictus spp., Robertson 1902 were the most frequent flower visitor. The bees' behaviour, and time spent on flowers, varied according to the resource gathered (i.e., pollen or nectar. The Dialictus species are likely to be the main pollinator of J. montana, considering the frequency, contact with reproductive parts, and carrying only J. montana pollen spread over the ventral part of the thorax, abdomen and legs. Although not quantified, nectar may still be available in the afternoon, considering the behaviour of bees on flowers during this time. Pollen:ovule ration that was1.200:4, suggests facultative xenogamy.

  14. Conspecific flowers of Sinapis arvensis are stronger competitors for pollinators than those of the invasive weed Bunias orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochkirch, Axel; Mertes, Tamara; Rautenberg, Julia

    2012-03-01

    Biological invasions can affect the structure and function of ecosystems and threaten native plant species. Since most weeds rely on mutualistic relationships in their new environment, they may act as new competitors for pollinators. Pollinator competition is likely to be density dependent, but it is often difficult to disentangle competition caused by flower quality from effects caused by flower quantity. In order to test the effects of the presence and number of flowers of the invasive weed Bunias orientalis on the insect visitation rates in a native species (Sinapis arvensis), we performed two replacement experiments using plants with standardised flower numbers. The visitation rates in S. arvensis were significantly higher than in B. orientalis and the number of insect visits dropped significantly with increasing density of S. arvensis flowers. These results suggest that intraspecific competition among flowers of S. arvensis is stronger than the competitive effect of alien flowers. As flowers of B. orientalis do not seem to distract visitors from S. arvensis, it is unlikely that pollinator competition between these two plant species plays a crucial role. However, it cannot be excluded that mass blossom stands of B. orientalis may distract flower visitors from nativespecies.

  15. Conspecific flowers of Sinapis arvensis are stronger competitors for pollinators than those of the invasive weed Bunias orientalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochkirch, Axel; Mertes, Tamara; Rautenberg, Julia

    2012-03-01

    Biological invasions can affect the structure and function of ecosystems and threaten native plant species. Since most weeds rely on mutualistic relationships in their new environment, they may act as new competitors for pollinators. Pollinator competition is likely to be density dependent, but it is often difficult to disentangle competition caused by flower quality from effects caused by flower quantity. In order to test the effects of the presence and number of flowers of the invasive weed Bunias orientalis on the insect visitation rates in a native species ( Sinapis arvensis), we performed two replacement experiments using plants with standardised flower numbers. The visitation rates in S. arvensis were significantly higher than in B. orientalis and the number of insect visits dropped significantly with increasing density of S. arvensis flowers. These results suggest that intraspecific competition among flowers of S. arvensis is stronger than the competitive effect of alien flowers. As flowers of B. orientalis do not seem to distract visitors from S. arvensis, it is unlikely that pollinator competition between these two plant species plays a crucial role. However, it cannot be excluded that mass blossom stands of B. orientalis may distract flower visitors from native species.

  16. Effects of elevated CO 2 on flowering phenology and nectar production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Andreas; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter

    Effects of elevated CO 2 on flowering phenology and nectar production were studied in five important nectar plants of calcareous grasslands, i.e. Lotus corniculatus, Trifolium pratense, Betonica officinalis, Scabiosa columbaria and Centaurea jacea. Glasshouse experiments showed that flowering probability was significantly enhanced in C. jacea. B. officinalis flowered carlier and L. corniculatus produced more flowers under elevated CO 2. In contrast, the number of flowers decreased in T. pratense. The amount of nectar produced per flower was not affected in the investigated legumes ( T. pratense, L. corniculatus), but was significantly reduced in the other forbs. Elevated CO 2 did not significantly affect nectar sugar concentration and sugar composition. However, S. columbaria and C. jacea produced significantly less total sugar per flower under elevated CO 2. The nectar amino acid concentration remained unaffected in all investigated plant species whereas the total of amino acids produced per flower was significantly reduced in all non-legumes. In addition, the amino acid composition changed significantly in all investigated species except for C. jacea. The observed effects are unexpected and are a potential threat to flower visitors such as most butterflies which have no alternative food resources except nectar. Changes in nectar production due to elevated CO 2 could also generally have detrimental effects on the interactions of flowers and their pollinators.

  17. A large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease at a flower show, the Netherlands, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Boer, Jeroen W; Yzerman, Ed P F; Schellekens, Joop; Lettinga, Kamilla D; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Van Steenbergen, Jim E; Bosman, Arnold; Van den Hof, Susan; Van Vliet, Hans A; Peeters, Marcel F; Van Ketel, Ruud J; Speelman, Peter; Kool, Jacob L; Conyn-Van Spaendonck, Marina A E

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease affected many visitors to a flower show in the Netherlands. To identify the source of the outbreak, we performed an environmental investigation, as well as a case-control study among visitors and a serologic cohort study among exhibitors to measure exposure to possible sources. Of 77,061 visitors, 188 became ill (133 confirmed and 55 probable cases), for an attack rate of 0.23% for visitors and 0.61% for exhibitors. Two whirlpool spas in halls 3 and 4 of the exhibition and a sprinkler in hall 8 were culture positive for Legionella pneumophila. One of three genotypes found in both whirlpool spas was identical to the isolates from 28 of 29 culture-positive patients. Persons who paused at the whirlpool spa in hall 3 were at increased risk for becoming ill. This study illustrates that whirlpool spas may be an important health hazard if disinfection fails.

  18. Survey of Visitors to Bornholm 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartl, Ann; Rassing, Charlotte

    In July 1995 the Research Centre of Bornholm (now: Centre for Regional and Tourism Research) began conducting a survey among visitors to Bornholm. The survey is being conducted in order to assess the nature of tourism demand in peripheral areas, using Bornholm as a case example for the purposes...... of destination surveys. Because the survey has been conducted for six and a half year (since July 1995) the data can also disclose trends in visitor patterns. The passenger survey carried out by the Centre for Regional and Tourism Research is, to our knowledge, the largest of its kind carried out in Denmark....

  19. Survey of Visitors to Bornholm 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartl, Ann

    In July 1995 the Research Centre of Bornholm (now: Centre for Regional and Tourism Research) began conducting a survey among visitors to Bornholm. The survey was conducted in order to assess the nature of tourism demand in peripheral areas, using Bornholm as a case example for the purposes...... of destination surveys. Because the survey has been conducted for seven and a half year altogether, the data can also disclose trends in visitor patterns. The passenger survey carried out by the Centre for Regional and Tourism Research is, to our knowledge, the largest of its kind carried out in Denmark....

  20. Birds in an Australian Rainforest: Their Attraction for Visitors and Visitor's Ecological Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Wilson, Clevo

    2004-01-01

    Lamington National Park in Queensland, Australia is noted for its rainforest and is part of the World Heritage listed property but prior to this work, no systematic study has been done of the importance of birds to its visitors. This study is based on data from survey forms handed to visitors at an important site in the park and completed by visitors following their visit. It yielded 622 useable responses. These enabled us to establish the comparative importance of birds as an attraction to t...

  1. Hidden floral adaptation to nocturnal moths in an apparently bee-pollinated flower, Adenophora triphylla var. japonica (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, D; Ohashi, K

    2017-09-01

    The discrepancy between observed flower visitors and those predicted based on floral phenotype has often cast doubt on the pollination syndrome concept. Here we show that this paradox may be alleviated by gaining better knowledge of the contributions of different flower visitors to pollination and the effects of floral traits that cannot be readily perceived by humans in Adenophora triphylla var. japonica. The blue, bell-shaped and pendant flowers of A. triphylla appear to fit a bee pollination syndrome. In contrast to this expectation, recent studies show that these flowers are frequented by nocturnal moths. We compared the flower visitor fauna, their visitation frequency and their relative contributions to seed set between day and night in two field populations of A. triphylla in Japan. We also determined the floral traits associated with temporal changes in the visitor assemblage, i.e. the timing of anthesis, the timing of changes in the sexual phase and the diel pattern of nectar production. While A. triphylla flowers were visited by both diurnal and nocturnal insects, the results from pollination experiments demonstrate that their primary pollinators are nocturnal settling-moths. Moreover, the flowers opened just after sunset, changed from staminate to pistillate phase in successive evenings and produced nectar only during the night, which all conform to the activity of nocturnal/crepuscular moths. Our study illustrates that the tradition of stereotyping the pollinators of a flower based on its appearance can be misleading and that it should be improved with empirical evidence of pollination performance and sufficient trait matching. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. A 1235711 Petalled Flower

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-01

    This article contains very simple mathematics and a lot ofcreativity. Here, we will sketch a 3-dimensional flower-likestructure, not using complicated equations but geometric ideasinstead. The speciality of 1235711 will be mentioned. At firstwe will study a general situation in 3-dimensional space $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$ and then we will take up the flower as an example of the generalcase.

  3. How do exhibition visitors describe aesthetic qualities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation, visitors to an art and design exhibition have used an interactive computer program to express the qualities they consider important for an art or design object (artefact). They have then used the program with their individually selected qualities to assess the artefacts. In...

  4. 76 FR 33993 - Exchange Visitor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... due to this employment and accordingly, such students will be deemed to be in valid J-1 Exchange... Part 62 RIN 1400-ZA20 Exchange Visitor Program AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of... Libyan students. This action is necessary to mitigate the adverse impact upon these students due to...

  5. A close-up on laboratory visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Inside the Big Black Box" is a European survey of responses by visitors to five laboratories, including CERN. Its findings will be presented at a two-day meeting to be held at CERN on 29 and 30 March. Can the visits programme of a research laboratory, such as a particle physics laboratory, satisfy the public's curiosity? What are the impressions of visitors to such laboratories? "Inside the Big Black Box" (IN3B), a study sponsored by the European Commission, provides the answers to these previously unanswered questions. The results of this survey, conducted among 4000 visitors to five laboratories (CERN in Switzerland, LNGS in Italy, Demokritos in Greece and DESY and Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany), will be presented at a meeting hosted by CERN on 29 and 30 March. The detailed programme and a registration form for those wishing to attend can be found at: http://www.cern.ch/info/IN3B. Visitors to the DESY laboratory inside the hall of the TESLA (Tera Electr...

  6. A new visitor centre for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    At the inauguration of the new CMS visitor centre. The CMS experiment inaugurated a new visitor centre at its Cessy site on 14 June. This will allow the thousands of people who come to CERN each year to follow the construction of one the Laboratory's flagship experiments first-hand. CERN receives over 20,000 visitors each year. Until recently, many of them were taken on a guided tour of one of the LEP experiments. With the closure of LEP, however, trips underground are no longer possible, and the Visits' Service has put in place a number of other itineraries (Bulletin 46/2000). Since the CMS detector will be almost entirely constructed in a surface hall, it is now taking a big share of the limelight. The CMS visitor centre has been built on a platform overlooking CMS construction. It contains a set of clear descriptive posters describing the experiment, along with a video projection showing animations and movies about CMS construction. In the coming weeks, a display of CMS detector elements will be added, as...

  7. POTENTIAL POLLINATORS AND FLORAL VISITORS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    2013-05-06

    May 6, 2013 ... shallow to moderately shallow sandy clay loam. Ferric Luvisols based on ... visitor in the field, it was collected using white net trap for identification. .... be due to the presence of settlements and waste disposal pits near to this ...

  8. Foreign Visitors Perception about China's Food & Hotel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马天星

    2013-01-01

    One questionnaire is conducted in order to find some consumer perceptions and consumer behaviors of foreign visitors. The questionnaire contains three main parts and tests consumer perceptions and consumer behaviors in four related aspects. The suggestions given to businessmen in the end are just for reference.

  9. Visitors speak openly on the Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On Open Day, CERN was filled with visitors from around Europe—and beyond—who toured the LHC detector sites and visited a multitude of experimental halls and workshops across the Meyrin and Prevessin sites, the vast majority in buildings normally closed to the public.

  10. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Visitor Access Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an interim (five year) visitor access plan designed to provide for the safety of visitors to the Rocky Mountain Arsenal during its remediation and transition...

  11. Designing museum exhibits that facilitate visitor reflection and discussion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Andersen, Hanne Møller; King, Heather

    2016-01-01

    personal reflection but also prompted discussion. Participation, defined as including both physical interaction with exhibits, and dialogic interaction between visitors, facilitated the sharing of ideas and feelings between visitors. Exhibits with elements of curiosity and challenge were found to attract...

  12. Visitors' perceptions of environmental impacts of the 2010 FIFA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visitors' perceptions of environmental impacts of the 2010 FIFA World Cup: Comparisons ... The visitors comprised both domestic and foreign tourists. ... Many of the negative adverse impacts associated with the events included high levels of ...

  13. Designing museum exhibits that facilitate visitor reflection and discussion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Andersen, Hanne Møller; King, Heather

    2016-01-01

    personal reflection but also prompted discussion. Participation, defined as including both physical interaction with exhibits, and dialogic interaction between visitors, facilitated the sharing of ideas and feelings between visitors. Exhibits with elements of curiosity and challenge were found to attract...... pupils’ attention but also worked well with other design principles to engage the pupils in sustained reflection and discussion. While other contextual factors remain significant in determining visitor responses, this paper argues that the use of design principles can help create visitor experiences...

  14. Visitor-based Attribute Grammars with Side Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824208; Dijkstra, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/109730356; Swierstra, S.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069184364

    2011-01-01

    The visitor design pattern is often applied to program traversal algorithms over Abstract Syntax Trees (ASTs). It defines a visitor, an object with a visit method that is executed for each node in the AST. These visitors have the advantage that the order of traversal is explicitly under control of t

  15. Exploring effectiveness of safety information for workplace visitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, L.; Boustras, G.

    2016-01-01

    Providing safety information to visitors is an important task of each employer, but there is little evidence on what instructions are most effective. This study explores the effectiveness of visitor instructions that are currently in use, by identifying what objectives of visitor instruction are con

  16. Diel Variation in Flower Scent Reveals Poor Consistency of Diurnal and Nocturnal Pollination Syndromes in Sileneae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Benítez, Samuel; Dötterl, Stefan; Giménez-Benavides, Luis

    2015-12-01

    The composition of flower scent and the timing of emission are crucial for chemical communication between plants and their pollinators; hence, they are key traits for the characterization of pollination syndromes. In many plants, however, plants are assigned to a syndrome based on inexpensive to measure flower traits, such as color, time of flower opening, and shape. We compared day and night scents from 31 Sileneae species and tested for quantitative and semi-quantitative differences in scent among species classified a priori as diurnal or nocturnal. As most Sileneae species are not only visited by either diurnal or nocturnal animals as predicted by their syndrome, we hypothesized that, even if flower scent were preferentially emitted during the day or at night, most species also would emit some scents during the opposing periods of the day. This phenomenon would contribute to the generalized assemblage of flower visitors usually observed in Sileneae species. We found that diel variations of scent often were not congruent with the syndrome definition, but could partially be explained by taxonomy and sampling times. Most species emitted compounds with attractive potential to insects during both the night and day. Our results highlight the current opinion that syndromes are not watertight compartments evolved to exclude some flower visitors. Thus, important information may be lost when scents are collected either during day- or night-time, depending on the a priori classification of the species as diurnal or nocturnal.

  17. Wild bees preferentially visit Rudbeckia flower heads with exaggerated ultraviolet absorbing floral guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Horth

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on the results of an experimental study that assessed the visitation frequency of wild bees to conspecific flowers with different sized floral guides. UV absorbent floral guides are ubiquitous in Angiosperms, yet surprisingly little is known about conspecific variation in these guides and very few studies have evaluated pollinator response to UV guide manipulation. This is true despite our rich understanding about learning and color preferences in bees. Historical dogma indicates that flower color serves as an important long-range visual signal allowing pollinators to detect the flowers, while floral guides function as close-range signals that direct pollinators to a reward. We initiated the work presented here by first assessing the population level variation in UV absorbent floral guides for conspecific flowers. We assessed two species, Rudbeckia hirta and R. fulgida. We then used several petal cut-and-paste experiments to test whether UV floral guides can also function to attract visitors. We manipulated floral guide size and evaluated visitation frequency. In all experiments, pollinator visitation rates were clearly associated with floral guide size. Diminished floral guides recruited relatively few insect visitors. Exaggerated floral guides recruited more visitors than smaller or average sized guides. Thus, UV floral guides play an important role in pollinator recruitment and in determining the relative attractiveness of conspecific flower heads. Consideration of floral guides is therefore important when evaluating the overall conspicuousness of flower heads relative to background coloration. This work raises the issue of whether floral guides serve as honest indicators of reward, since guide size varies in nature for conspecific flowers at the same developmental stage and since preferences for larger guides were found. To our knowledge, these are the first cut-and-paste experiments conducted to examine whether UV absorbent

  18. Flowering dynamics and pollinator visitation of oilseed echium (Echium plantagineum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie A Eberle

    Full Text Available Echium (Echium plantagineum L. is an alternative oilseed crop in summer-wet temperate regions that provides floral resources to pollinators. Its seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as stearidonic acid, which is desired highly by the cosmetic industry. Seeds were sown in field plots over three years in western Minnesota in spring (early-sown or early summer (late-sown, and flower abundance, pollinator visitation, and seed yields were studied. Initial flowering commenced 41 to 55 d after sowing, and anthesis duration (first flowering to harvest was 34 to 70 d. Late sowing dates delayed anthesis, but increased the intensity of visitation by pollinators. Cumulative flower densities ranged from 1 to 4.5 billion ha-1. Flowers attracted numerous honey bees (Apis mellifera L., as many as 35 per minute of observation, which represented about 50% of all insect visitors. Early-sown echium produced seed yields up to 750 kg ha-1, which were 2-29 times higher than those of late-sown echium. Early sowing of echium in Minnesota provides abundant floral resources for pollinators for up to two months and simultaneously produces seed yields whose profits rival those of corn (Zea mays L..

  19. Apomixis does not affect visitation to flowers of Melastomataceae, but pollen sterility does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, F R; Varassin, I G; Goldenberg, R

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis is an asexual seed reproduction mechanism thorough which embryos are originated from material tissues inside the ovules, without precedent fertilisation. It allows plants to colonise new habitats, even in places where flower visitors are scarce or where plants are isolate. Apomixis seems to be related to pollen sterility and, in species with flowers that offer pollen as a reward for pollinators, the amount or quality of the pollen offered by these species may influence the amount of the visits and specific composition of the visitors. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied breeding systems of 16 species of Melastomataceae and their flower visitors, evaluating composition and abundance of the visits to apomictic and sexual species. Apomictic plants with no viable pollen or with pollen with low viability did not receive visits from pollinators, and consequently probably produce strictly apomictic fruits. On the other hand, apomictic and sexual plants with high pollen viability do receive visits; in this case, apomictic plants may produce fruits and seeds through both sexual and apomictic methods. The species composition of insects visiting Melastomataceae with high pollen viability was similar, regardless of whether the plants were apomictic or not. It seems that pollen viability levels are important to determine visits to the flowers irrespective of breeding system.

  20. Early Parent-infant Interactions; Are Health Visitors' Observations Reliable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ingeborg Hedegaard; Simonsen, Marianne; Trillingsgaard, Tea

    2014-01-01

    visitors working in the area. The study population consisted of 121 health visitors, 36 had a standardized parenting program education (certified Marte Meo therapists) and 85 had no standardized parenting program education. Measures: A self-reported questionnaire assessing intention, self...... to the Infant CARE-Index. Health visitors individually reviewed each video twice august 2013. Data analyzed in STATA estimating frequencies, associations and comparing answers from the two groups of health visitors. Both groups had high intentions and self-efficacy according to working with parent...... with improved outcomes for parental and infant health. Keywords Parent-infant interaction, health visitor, observation skills, Infant CARE-Index, Marte Meo method....

  1. 植物抗虫基因工程研究进展%Study on Plant Insect-resistant Genetic Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锐; 郭三堆

    2001-01-01

    The recent proceeding in plant insect resistanc e genetic engineering i s reviewed here. Two kinds of anti-insect genes contribute greatly to the procee d, one is the Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein (Bt-toxins) ge nes, which are named the first generation insecticidal genes; the other is chole sterol oxidase genes and vegatative insecticidal protein (Vip) genes, cholestero l oxidases and Vips are as powerful as Bt-toxins, so their genes are named the s econd generation insecticidal genes. In addition, resolving ways of potential pr oblems of plant anti-insect genetic engineering will be analysed and discussed.%从植物抗虫基因工程的研究历史出发,论述了第一代抗虫基因、第二代抗虫基因,重点介绍了B.t.杀虫晶体蛋白基因、胆固醇氧化酶基因和营养杀虫蛋白基因,并对植物抗虫基因工程中所遇到的问题和解决办法进行了探讨。

  2. Hibiscus and Wild Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    Woodcut artist Zheng Shuang convinces the audience through her display of poetic emotion Benefiting from training in watercoior paintings early in life, strict literary sketch training as well, as 10 years study at the Central Academy of Fine Aris, Zheng has mare than 30 years teaching experience at the Ouangzhou Academy of Fine Aris "I"m a roadside grass, a wild flower," Zheng Shuang describes herself She said she often talks to nature-the mountains, the trees, the flowers and the

  3. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  4. Variation patterns of pollen production in palm flowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Elodie; Barfod, Anders; Albert, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    in polyandrous species ranges from 8-9 to several hundreds. It is often heard that the more stamens are produced, the more pollen is produced, particularly in the case of the so-called “pollen flowers”, i.e. flowers in which pollen is the main food resource for floral visitors. However, the correlation between...... pollen production and stamen number has never been so far investigated. The diversity in stamen number observed among palms species and genera provides an ideal case study to test for such a correlation, taking into account phylogenetic constraints. Based on a survey of flowers from 82 species...... representative of the various palm tribes and compared it to stamen number, we show that pollen production in palms ranges from hundreds to millions grains. There is a relationship between stamen number and pollen production in our sampling, particularly in Coryphoideae and Arecoideae where there is a tendency...

  5. Autonomous self-pollination and insect visitors in partially and fully mycoheterotrophic species of Cymbidium (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the reproductive ecology of mycoheterotrophic plants, but the existing literature hypothesizes that they adopt a self-pollinating strategy. Although growing evidence indicates that some rewarding mycoheterotrophic plants depend (at least partially) on an insect-mediated pollination system, it remains unclear whether some mycoheterotrophic plants can attract pollinators without nectar or other rewards. Moreover, in a broader evolutionary/ecological context, the question of whether the evolution of mycoheterotrophy induces a shift in pollination pattern is still unknown. Here I present a comparative investigation into the breeding system of two fully mycoheterotrophic orchids, Cymbidium macrorhizon and C. aberrans, and their closest extant relative, the mixotrophic C. lancifolium. Pollination experiments were conducted to determine the breeding system of these plants. In addition, flower visitors that might contribute to pollination were recorded. Flowers at different maturity stages were examined to investigate mechanisms enabling or limiting self-fertilization. While nectarless flowers of C. lancifolium and C. macrorhizon can successfully attract potential pollinator honeybees, all three Cymbidium possess an effective self-pollination system in which the rostellum that physically separates the stigma and pollinia is absent. Because mixotrophic and mycoheterotrophic Cymbidium occupy low-light niches, pollinator foraging would be negatively influenced by low-light intensity. In partial and fully mycoheterotrophic Cymbidium, autogamy would likely be favoured as a reproductive assurance to compensate for pollinator limitation due to their lack of nectar and pollinators' hostile habitat preferences.

  6. The Myths behind Flower Names

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白杰

    2014-01-01

    The Greek term for flower is Chloris. It is derived from the name of the Chloris, the goddess of vegetation, in Greek mythology, reasonably so, if we consider the great number of mythological tales linked to flowers of the Greek flowers. The use of flowers was widespread in Greece from time immemorial, since flowers are so important to us from the moment we are born. Flowers play an important role in mythology. As they morph from bud to bloom to faded and wilted petals, they assume various meanings linked to youth, life and death. They are associated with goddesses and legends, and are often attributed with certain powers and symbolism.

  7. Flower Morphology, Pollination Biology and Mating System of the Complex Flower of Vigna caracalla (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Angela Virginia; Alemán, Maria Mercedes; Fleming, Trinidad Figueroa

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Vigna caracalla has the most complex flower among asymmetrical Papilionoideae. The objective of this study was to understand the relationships among floral characteristics, specialization, mating system and the role of floral visitors under different ecological contexts. Methods Five populations were studied in north-western Argentina, from 700 to 1570 m a.s.l. Anthesis, colour and odour patterns, stigmatic receptivity, visitors and pollination mechanism were examined and mating-system experiments were performed. Key Results The petals are highly modified and the keel shows 3·75–5·25 revolutions. The sense of asymmetry was always left-handed. Hand-crosses showed that V. caracalla is self-compatible, but depends on pollinators to set seeds. Hand-crossed fruits were more successful than hand-selfed ones, with the exception of the site at the highest elevation. Bombus morio (queens and workers), Centris bicolor, Eufriesea mariana and Xylocopa eximia trigger the pollination mechanism (a ‘brush type’). The greatest level of self-compatibility and autonomous self-pollination were found at the highest elevation, together with the lowest reproductive success and number of pollinators (B. morio workers only). Conclusions Self-fertilization may have evolved in the peripheral population at the highest site of V. caracalla because of the benefits of reproductive assurance under reduced pollinator diversity. PMID:18587133

  8. Festival Spaces and the Visitor Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A festival implies a special use of space for both the organiser and the visitor.\\ud On the practical level of events management, it is a series of temporary per -\\ud formance venues presenting special organisational problems. For the festivalgoers,\\ud it is a space set apart to which they come seeking an extraordinary\\ud experience. This experience can have an emotional and symbolic significance,\\ud which they then come to associate with the place itself.\\ud For this reason, festivals and sp...

  9. Birds - Their importance to visitors to an Australian Rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Tisdell, Clement A.; Wilson, Clevo

    2004-01-01

    Lamington National Park in Queensland, Australia is noted for its rainforest and is part of Australia’s fourteen World Heritage listed properties but no systematic study has been done of the importance of birds to its visitors. This study rectifies this situation. It is based on data from survey forms handed to visitors at an important site in this park and completed by visitors following their visit. This yielded 622 useable replies. These enabled us to establish the comparative importance o...

  10. Daffodil flower delay senescence in cut Iris flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Sinz, A.; Tomassen, M.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Visible symptoms of tepal senescence in cut Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) flowers were delayed by placing one cut daffodil flower (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, cv. Carlton) in the same vase. Addition of mucilage, exuded by daffodil stems, to the vase water had the same effect as the flowering daf

  11. Visitor Intake Processing Re-write Management Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The data store houses detail information pertaining to visitors' wait times, visits, calls, and other customer relationship information relating to VIPR and CHIP....

  12. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. The survey was conducted on 53 refuges across the National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System) to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. A total of 14,832 visitors agreed to participate in the survey between July 2010 and November 2011. In all, 10,233 visitors completed the survey for a 71% response rate. This report provides a summary of visitor and trip characteristics; visitor opinions about refuges and their offerings; and visitor opinions about alternative transportation and climate change, two Refuge System topics of interest. The Refuge System, established in 1903 and managed by the Service, is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. These combined results are based on surveying at 53 participating

  13. Visual and odour cues: plant responses to pollination and herbivory affect the behaviour of flower visitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Barbosa, D.; Sun, P.; Hakman, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Dicke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants evolved strategies to attract pollinators that are essential for reproduction. However, plant defence against herbivores may trade off with pollinator attraction. Here, we investigated the role of inducible plant secondary metabolites in such a trade-off. Our objective was to reveal the mecha

  14. Orchid flowers: evolution and molecular development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Frederiksen, Signe Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR......MADS-box genes, ABS model, Orchid flower evolution, Gene expression in orchid flowers, in situ PCR...

  15. Flower-Visiting Butterflies Avoid Predatory Stimuli and Larger Resident Butterflies: Testing in a Butterfly Pavilion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, Yuya; Tanaka, Yosuke; Farkhary, Sayed Ibrahim; Kurachi, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    The flower-visiting behaviors of pollinator species are affected not only by flower traits but also by cues of predators and resident pollinators. There is extensive research into the effects of predator cues and resident pollinators on the flower-visiting behaviors of bee pollinators. However, there is relatively little research into their effects on butterfly pollinators probably because of the difficulty in observing a large number of butterfly pollination events. We conducted a dual choice experiment using artificial flowers under semi-natural conditions in the butterfly pavilion at Tama Zoological Park to examine the effects of the presence of a dead mantis and resident butterflies have on the flower-visiting behavior of several butterfly species. From 173 hours of recorded video, we observed 3235 visitations by 16 butterfly species. Statistical analysis showed that (1) butterflies avoided visiting flowers occupied by a dead mantis, (2) butterflies avoided resident butterflies that were larger than the visitor, and (3) butterflies showed greater avoidance of a predator when the predator was present together with the resident butterfly than when the predator was located on the opposite flower of the resident. Finally, we discuss the similarities and differences in behavioral responses of butterfly pollinators and bees.

  16. Shades of red: bird-pollinated flowers target the specific colour discrimination abilities of avian vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Mani; Dyer, Adrian G; Boyd-Gerny, Skye; Wong, Bob B M; Burd, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Colour signals are a major cue in putative pollination syndromes. There is evidence that the reflectance spectra of many flowers target the distinctive visual discrimination abilities of hymenopteran insects, but far less is known about bird-pollinated flowers. Birds are hypothesized to exert different selective pressures on floral colour compared with hymenopterans because of differences in their visual systems. We measured the floral reflectance spectra of 206 Australian angiosperm species whose floral visitors are known from direct observation rather than inferred from floral characteristics. We quantified the match between these spectra and the hue discrimination abilities of hymenopteran and avian vision, and analysed these metrics in a phylogenetically informed comparison of flowers in different pollination groups. We show that bird-visited flowers and insect-visited flowers differ significantly from each other in the chromatic cues they provide, and that the differences are concentrated near wavelengths of optimal colour discrimination by whichever class of pollinator visits the flowers. Our results indicate that angiosperms have evolved the spectral signals most likely to reinforce their pollinators' floral constancy (the tendency of individual pollinators to visit flowers of the same species) in communities of similarly coloured floral competitors.

  17. Differences in pollination success between local and foreign flower color phenotypes: a translocation experiment with Gentiana lutea (Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier A. Guitián

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The adaptive maintenance of flower color variation is frequently attributed to pollinators partly because they preferentially visit certain flower phenotypes. We tested whether Gentiana lutea—which shows a flower color variation (from orange to yellow in the Cantabrian Mountains range (north of Spain—is locally adapted to the pollinator community. Methods We transplanted orange-flowering individuals to a population with yellow-flowering individuals and vice versa, in order to assess whether there is a pollination advantage in the local morph by comparing its visitation rate with the foreign morph. Results Our reciprocal transplant experiment did not show clear local morph advantage in overall visitation rate: local orange flowers received more visits than foreign yellow flowers in the orange population, while both local and foreign flowers received the same visits in the yellow population; thus, there is no evidence of local adaptation in Gentiana lutea to the pollinator assemblage. However, some floral visitor groups (such as Bombus pratorum, B. soroensis ancaricus and B. lapidarius decipiens consistently preferred the local morph to the foreign morph whereas others (such as Bombus terrestris consistently preferred the foreign morph. Discussion We concluded that there is no evidence of local adaptation to the pollinator community in each of the two G. lutea populations studied. The consequences for local adaptation to pollinator on G. lutea flower color would depend on the variation along the Cantabrian Mountains range in morph frequency and pollinator community composition.

  18. Selecting Landscape Plants: Flowering Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Relf, Diane; Appleton, Bonnie Lee, 1948-2012

    2009-01-01

    This publication helps the reader to select wisely among the many species and varieties of flowering trees available. The following are considerations that should be taken into account when choosing flowering trees for the home landscape: selections factors, environmental responses, availability and adaptability, and flowering tree descriptions.

  19. Do Zoo Visitors Come to Learn? An Internationally Comparative, Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Zoo visitors go to see animals, but are they there to learn? This mixed-methods study examines visitor learning from both zoos' and visitors' perspectives using qualitative and quantitative data. Five hundred and forty zoo visitor interviews from nine case studies provide insight into visitor intentions, which indicate that the majority of…

  20. Do Zoo Visitors Come to Learn? An Internationally Comparative, Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Zoo visitors go to see animals, but are they there to learn? This mixed-methods study examines visitor learning from both zoos' and visitors' perspectives using qualitative and quantitative data. Five hundred and forty zoo visitor interviews from nine case studies provide insight into visitor intentions, which indicate that the majority of…

  1. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  2. 49 CFR 37.127 - Complementary paratransit service for visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complementary paratransit service for visitors. 37... FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.127 Complementary paratransit service for visitors. (a) Each public entity required to provide...

  3. Visitors' perceptions of tourism development in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinyang Deng; Maureen Young Bender

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that tourists' destination choices are increasingly influenced by perceptions of sustainability but research into tourists' insights and sensitivities about sustainability is lacking. This study examines how visitors to West Virginia perceive tourism development in the state. Findings indicate that visitors' perceptions are...

  4. 75 FR 23196 - Exchange Visitor Program-Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Part 62 RIN 1400-AC56 Exchange Visitor Program--Secondary School Students AGENCY: Department of State... exchange program. These regulations govern Department designated exchange visitor programs under which... address the need for greater clarity in current existing regulatory language. The Department's...

  5. High Arctic flowering phenology and plant-pollinator interactions in response to delayed snow melt and simulated warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Mark A. K.; Baggesen, Nanna; Cooper, Elisabeth J.

    2016-11-01

    The projected alterations to climate in the High Arctic are likely to result in changes to the short growing season, particularly with varying predicted effects on winter snowfall, the timing of summer snowmelt and air temperatures. These changes are likely to affect the phenology of interacting species in a variety of ways, but few studies have investigated the effects of combined climate drivers on plant-pollinator interactions in the High Arctic. In this study, we alter the timing of flowering phenology using a field manipulation experiment in which snow depth is increased using snow fences and temperatures are enhanced by open-top chambers (OTCs). We used this experiment to quantify the combined effects of treatments on the flowering phenology of six dominant plant species (Dryas octopetala, Cassiope tetragona, Bistorta vivipara, Saxifraga oppositifolia, Stellaria crassipes and Pedicularis hirsuita), and to simulate differing responses to climate between plants and pollinators in a subset of plots. Flowers were counted regularly throughout the growing season of 2015, and insect visitors were caught on flowers during standardised observation sessions. As expected, deep snow plots had delayed snow melt timing and this in turn delayed the first and peak flowering dates of the plants and shortened the prefloration period overall. The OTCs counteracted the delay in first and peak flowering to some extent. There was no effect of treatment on length of flowering season, although for all variables there were species-specific responses. The insect flower-visitor community was species poor, and although evidence of disruption to phenological overlaps was not found, the results do highlight the vulnerability of the plant-pollinator network in this system with differing phenological shifts between insects and plants and reduced visitation rates to flowers in plots with deep snow.

  6. Child neglect identification: The health visitor's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akehurst, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Child neglect is a significant public health issue, with impact often persisting into adulthood. However, neglect is not easily identifiable and may go undetected for many years. This library-based literature review critically analyses the research to uncover effective practices to aid neglect identification. The literature identifies that professionals may observe particular risk factors in a child's life that make neglect more probable. Additionally, children who suffer neglect, and parents who neglect their children, may display signs that practitioners can be alert to. However, a number of barriers exist that make identification difficult. The literature highlights that health visitors have a significant role to play in identifying neglect. Final conclusions relate to the need for professional supervision, use of assessment tools and frameworks, multi-agency training, and timely interventions to safeguard children.

  7. Chemical control of flowering time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionescu, Irina Alexandra; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Sánchez Pérez, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    the transition to flowering as well as flower opening. Increased emphasis on research within this area has the potential to counteract the negative effects of global warming on flowering time, especially in perennial crop plants. Perennial crops have a requirement for winter chill, but winters become...... increasingly warm in temperate regions. This has dramatic effects on crop yield. Different strategies are therefore being developed to engineer flowering time to match local growing conditions. The majority of these efforts are within plant breeding, which benefits from a substantial amount of knowledge...... on the genetic aspects of flowering time regulation in annuals, but less so in perennials. An alternative to plant breeding approaches is to engineer flowering time chemically via the external application of flower-inducing compounds. This review discusses a variety of exogenously applied compounds used in fruit...

  8. The influence of environmental enrichment on Chinese visitor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Gareth; Henzi, Peter; Higgins, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Welfare improvements for nonhuman animals should aim to satisfy the needs of visitors as well as those of the animals. Little research has been conducted, however, and existing work is confined to zoos in developed countries. This article reports the behavioral responses of Chinese visitors to environmental enrichment improvements in a zoo enclosure. Visit, viewing, and stopping behaviors significantly increased at the transformed exhibit, indicating that it provoked greater visitor interest. Furthermore, increased intragroup behaviors suggested that the exhibit probably motivated visitors to interact socially. The positive impact of the exhibit changes supports the enrichment efforts taking place in zoos around the world. The changes also provide encouragement for zoos in developing countries such as China because greater visitor interest provides a strong argument and an incentive for improving welfare standards.

  9. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act (IPPCTPA). 41.57 Section 41.57... AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural...

  10. Flower consumption lures investment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiSesheng

    2003-01-01

    In the Netherlands the annual fresh flower consumption is 150 items per person, in France it is 80, in the US it is 30, in Japan the money involved amounts to US$11 billion, but in urban China, this is less than I0. Globally when per capita GDP in a country or region goes up to US$6,000, flower consumption will go up too. As per capita GDP in Shanghai isgoing from US$5,000 to US$7,500, the municipal government should include the construction of floral markets as part of its infrastructural development, just as the construction of urban forests, urban parks, urban greenery, and urban environmental investment. The fostering of local floral markets also require joint efforts from the society at large in terms of finance.

  11. Butterfly Longing for Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    "BUTTERFLY Longs for Flowers" (Die Lian Hua)was the name of a melody famous in the TangDynasty (618-907). It was later used as the nameof tunes to which poems were composed. As thename suggests, butteffies and flowers attract anddepend on each other; a natural occurrence andyet full of worldly beauty. The Yu couple havebeen researching customs and dance for a longtime, over the course of which they have collectedcountless materials that have allowed theaficionados to appreciate and conclude on theiruse. Based on their findings they create folkdances and perform them on stage. Their love,pursuit and understanding of the art displays timeand again the beauty of a butterfly longing forflowers.

  12. How flowers catch raindrops

    CERN Document Server

    Amador, Guillermo; Hu, David

    2011-01-01

    Several species of plants have raindrop-sized flowers that catch raindrops opportunistically in order to spread their 0.3-mm seeds distances of over 1 m. In the following fluid dynamics video, we show examples of these plants and some of the high speed videography used to visualize the splash dynamics responsible for raindrop-driven seed dispersal. Experiments were conducted on shape mimics of the plants' fruit bodies, fabricated using a 3D printer. Particular attention was paid to optimizing flower geometries and drop impact parameters to propel seeds the farthest distance. We find off-center impacts are the most effective for dispersing seeds. Such impacts amplify the raindrop's speed, encapsulate seeds within drops, and direct the seed trajectory at angles optimal for long-distance dispersal.

  13. Let the flowers grow…

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The Environmental part of CERN Safety policy is represented by a flower whose petals are the various domains of its application. The Environment Services section within the Occupational Health and Safety and Environmental Protection Unit is in charge of monitoring the impact of the Laboratory on the environment. You are called on to make every effort to reduce this impact as much as reasonably achievable. Read why and how…   A physics Laboratory occupying a territory of the size of a small village, with sites scattered across an even larger area, has a considerable potential impact on the environment. Energy and water consumption, waste management... these are all aspects of the same problem or, in the representation, petals of the same flower. Each one should be carefully studied and dealt with. The nine members of the Environment Services section deal with matters that concern these and other aspects of the CERN's policy for the protection of the environment. “...

  14. Buzz in Paris: flower production and plant-pollinator interactions in plants from contrasted urban and rural origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaegher, James; Nadot, Sophie; Dajoz, Isabelle; Colas, Bruno

    2017-09-23

    Urbanisation, associated with habitat fragmentation, affects pollinator communities and insect foraging behaviour. These biotic changes are likely to select for modified traits in insect-pollinated plants from urban populations compared to rural populations. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an experiment involving four plant species commonly found in both urban and rural landscapes of the Île-de-France region (France): Cymbalaria muralis, Geranium robertianum, Geum urbanum and Prunella vulgaris. The four species were grown in four urban and four rural experimental sites in 2015. For each species and each experimental site, plants were grown from seeds collected in five urban and five rural locations. During flowering, we observed flower production and insect-flower interactions during 14 weeks and tested for the effects of experimental site location and plant origin on flower production and on the number of floral visits. The study species had various flower morphology and hence were visited by different floral visitors. The effect of experimental sites and seed origin also varied among study species. We found that (1) insect visits on P. vulgaris were more frequent in rural than in urban sites; (2) for C. muralis, the slope relating the number of pollinator visits to the number of flowers per individual was steeper in urban versus rural sites, suggesting a greater benefit in allocating resources to flower production in urban conditions; (3) as a likely consequence, C. muralis tended to produce more flowers in plants from urban versus rural origin.

  15. Learning in two butterfly species when using flowers of the tropical milkweed Asclepias curassavica: No benefits for pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Bruna de Cássia Menezes; Rodríguez-Gironés, Miguel Angel; Rodrigues, Daniela

    2017-08-08

    The ability of insect visitors to learn to manipulate complex flowers has important consequences for foraging efficiency and plant fitness. We investigated learning by two butterfly species, Danaus erippus and Heliconius erato, as they foraged on the complex flowers of Asclepias curassavica, as well as the consequences for pollination. To examine learning with respect to flower manipulation, butterflies were individually tested during four consecutive days under insectary conditions. At the end of each test, we recorded the number of pollinaria attached to the body of each butterfly and scored visited flowers for numbers of removed and inserted pollinia. We also conducted a field study to survey D. erippus and H. erato visiting flowers of A. curassavica, as well as to record numbers of pollinaria attached to the butterflies' bodies, and surveyed A. curassavica plants in the field to inspect flowers for pollinium removal and insertion. Learning improves the ability of both butterfly species to avoid the nonrewarding flower parts and to locate nectar more efficiently. There were no experience effects, for either species, on the numbers of removed and inserted pollinia. Heliconius erato removed and inserted more pollinia than D. erippus. For both butterfly species, pollinium removal was higher than pollinium insertion. This study is the first to show that Danaus and Heliconius butterflies can learn to manipulate complex flowers, but this learning ability does not confer benefits to pollination in A. curassavica. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  16. Nurse-patient/visitor communication in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Constance; Fielden, Nina M; Meyer, Kate H; Albert, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patients and visitors need to be encouraged to express their needs and be provided with enough relevant information so that treatment and recovery from illness are optimized. In the emergency department, it is important for nurses to create an environment of trust, respect, and acceptance. Using a survey design, a convenience sample of nurses and patients/visitors described patient/visitor communication needs and determined if needs were met during the ED encounter. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Mantel Haenszel chi(2) tests were used to determine associations between patient-rated importance of nurse communication needs and nursing communication performance. Sixty-four nurses and 123 patients/visitors completed a communication needs survey. More than 80% of patients answered "excellent" or "very good" to 6 of the top 10 important communication needs. Patient and nurse importance differed significantly on only 2 communication needs: calm voice and social status (nurses rated these needs of higher importance than patients; P = .01, P = .006). Patient-ranked importance was positively associated with patient opinion of how well needs were met in 6 of 19 patient/visitor communication needs; that is, not making assumptions about social status (P = .0006), offering reassurance to calm fears (P = .004), and teaching about primary medical concerns/conditions (P = .01). Nurse and patient/visitor perceptions of important communication are similar. Educating nurses about patient/visitor communication needs is the first step in enhancing how well nurses meet those needs.

  17. Plant traits, environmental factors, and pollinator visitation in winter-flowering Helleborus foetidus (Ranunculaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lafuente, Alfonso M; Guitián, Javier; Medrano, Mónica; Herrera, Carlos M; Rey, Pedro J; Cerdá, Xim

    2005-10-01

    This study examined the effect of plant traits and environmental factors on pollinator visitation in the winter-flowering Helleborus foetidus (Ranunculaceae) in three distant regions in the Iberian Peninsula. Geographical variation in floral visitor assemblage, plant traits and environmental factors were analysed during the flowering season. Differences were found in all plant traits measured (number of open flowers, flower size, number of stamens per flower, and number of nectaries) both within and among regions, and differences among regions in all the environmental factors considered (air temperature, exposure to sunlight, canopy cover, and distance to the nearest neighbour). Differences were also found among regions in the probability that plants would be visited by pollinators. The results show that, although floral display (i.e. number of open flowers on a plant on a given day) consistently explained among-plant differences in visitation rate in all regions, visitation rate was not significantly affected by any other biological or environmental variable. In Helleborus foetidus, then, 'how' the plant is would seem to be more important than 'where' is it.

  18. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    that when designing for user interaction and participation, museums must carefully consider the complexities of user participation with new technologies. If the design and conceptual frame becomes too complex, it can actually limit the intended visitor experience with the museum subject matter. By combining...... insights from communication and design theory with conceptual models for scaffolding the museum visitor experience, this paper uses a Danish digital museum case called the WALL created by the Museum of Copenhagen to consider the special implications of designing technology for museum visitor interaction...

  19. Complex pollination of a tropical Asian rainforest canopy tree by flower-feeding thrips and thrips-feeding predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Sen; Tani, Naoki; Ng, Kevin Kit Siong; Lee, Soon Leong; Muhammad, Norwati; Okuda, Toshinori; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    In tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia, a highly fecund thrips (Thrips spp.) responds rapidly to the mass flowering at multiple-year intervals characteristic of certain species such as the canopy tree studied here, Shorea acuminata, by feeding on flower resources. However, past DNA analyses of pollen adherent to thrips bodies revealed that the thrips promoted a very high level of self-pollination. Here, we identified the pollinator that contributes to cross-pollination and discuss ways that the pollination system has adapted to mass flowering. By comparing the patterns of floral visitation and levels of genetic diversity in adherent pollen loads among floral visitors, we evaluated the contribution of each flower visitor to pollination. The big-eyed bug, Geocoris sp., a major thrips predator, was an inadvertent pollinator, and importantly contributed to cross-pollination. The total outcross pollen adhering to thrips was approximately 30% that on the big-eyed bugs. Similarly, 63% of alleles examined in S. acuminata seeds and seedlings occurred in pollen adhering to big-eyed bugs; about 30% was shared with pollen from thrips. During mass flowering, big-eyed bugs likely travel among flowering S. acuminata trees, attracted by the abundant thrips. Floral visitation patterns of big-eyed bugs vs. other insects suggest that these bugs can maintain their population size between flowering by preying upon another thrips (Haplothrips sp.) that inhabits stipules of S. acuminata throughout the year and quickly respond to mass flowering. Thus, thrips and big-eyed bugs are essential components in the pollination of S. acuminata. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  20. Beetle pollination and flowering rhythm of Annona coriacea Mart. (Annonaceae) in Brazilian cerrado: Behavioral features of its principal pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marilza Silva; Silva, Ricardo José; Paulino-Neto, Hipólito Ferreira; Pereira, Mônica Josene Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    The conservation and sustainable management of Annona coriacea requires knowledge of its floral and reproductive biology, and of its main pollinators and their life cycles. In this work, we analyzed these aspects in detail. Floral biology was assessed by observing flowers from the beginning of anthesis to senescence. The visiting hours and behavior of floral visitors in the floral chamber were recorded, as were the sites of oviposition. Excavations were undertaken around specimens of A. coriacea to determine the location of immature pollinators. Anthesis was nocturnal, starting at sunset, and lasted for 52-56 h. The flowers were bisexual, protogynous and emitted a strong scent similar to the plant´s own ripe fruit. There was pronounced synchrony among all floral events (the period and duration of stigmatic receptivity, release of odor, pollen release and drooping flowers) in different individuals, but no synchrony in the same individuals. All of the flowers monitored were visited by beetle species of the genera Cyclocephala and Arriguttia. Beetles arrived at the flowers with their bodies covered in pollen and these pollen grains were transferred to the stigmata while foraging on nutritious tissues at the base of the petals. With dehiscence of the stamens and retention within the floral chamber, the bodies of the floral visitors were again covered with pollen which they carried to newly opened flowers, thus promoting the cycle of pollination. After leaving the flowers, female beetles often excavated holes in the soil to lay eggs. Larvae were found between the leaf litter and the first layer of soil under specimens of A. coriacea. Cyclocephala beetles were the main pollinators of A. coriacea, but Arriguttia brevissima was also considered a pollinator and is the first species of this genus to be observed in Annonaceae flowers. Annona coriacea was found to be self-compatible with a low reproductive efficiency in the area studied. The results of this investigation

  1. Entomofauna visitante de Belamcanda chinensis (L. DC (Iridaceae durante o período de floração Flowering entomofauna Belamcanda chinensis (L. DC. (Iridaceae during flowering time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Jesus Vitali

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the reproductive biology of B. chinensis (L. DC. (Iridaceae was realized comprising floral biology and breeding systems. The floral biology studies included analyses of nectar production, occurence of osmophores, corolla pigments, ultraviolet reflexion and absortion patterns, viability of pollen, pollinators and flower visitors. The breeding systems were studied taking into account the results of manual pollinators tests. B. chinensis is self-compatible bul cross-pollination is more frequent. The effective pollinators are Plebeia droryana (Friese, 1906 (45,7%, Trigona spinipes (Fabricius, 1793 (27,3%, Tetragonisca angustula (Latreille, 1811 (9,3%. Others insects visitors are considered nectar and pollen thieves. The flowering begins generally in January and February. The complete reproductive cicle, as here considered, begining with floral bud production ending with development of mature fruits, lasts January to June. Seed dispersion is ornitocoric.

  2. Occupational allergy caused by flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N W; Vermeulen, A M; Gerth van Wijk, R; de Groot, H

    1998-02-01

    We describe 14 consecutive patients with complaints due to the handling of flowers. The symptoms varied from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma to urticaria. Most patients had professions in the flower industry. Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with home-made pollen extracts from 17 different flowers known to be the most commonly grown and sold in The Netherlands RAST against mugwort, chrysanthemum, and solidago was performed. The diagnosis of atopy against flowers was based on work-related symptoms due to the handling of flowers, positive SPT with flower extracts, and positive RAST. The concordance between SPT and case history was 74%, and that between SPT and RAST was 77% Extensive cross-sensitization was seen to pollen of several members of the Compositae family (e.g., Matricaria, chrysanthemum, solidago) and to pollen of the Amaryllidaceae family (Alstroemeria and Narcissus). Homemade flower extracts can be used to confirm IgE-mediated flower allergy. Mugwort can be used as a screening test for possible flower allergy. For most patients, the allergy led to a change of profession.

  3. The Staunch Beauty of Flowers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    MANY women like to collect dried flowers. Unable to bear the sight of beautiful blossoms withering, they press them between the leaves of books. As time passes, the original fresh flowers turn into thin pale-colored specimens, but a careful viewer will notice that they have taken on a new grace—just like Ren Jie herself; though no longer young, she has managed to create beauty out of her later life. Ren Jie’s love of flowers dates back to her childhood, when she started to collect flower specimens. As she grew up, she learned how to paint; later, she

  4. Flower Development and Photoperiodic Control of Flowering in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Chao; QU Li-jun; GAO Yong-ming; SHI Ying-yao

    2013-01-01

    Floral transition,which is referred to as a plant's transition from vegetative stage to reproductive stage,is considered to be a critical developmental switch in higher plants,for a timely flowering is a major factor of reproductive success.Endogenous and environmental cues,such as photoperiod,light quality,plant hormones concentrations and temperature,provide information to the plants whether the environment is favorable for flowering.These cues promote,or prevent,flowering through a complex genetic network,mediated by a careful orchestration of temporal and spatial gene expression.One of such cues is photoperiod.Rice (Oryza sativa L.) serves as a powerful model species for the understanding of flowering in higher plants,including flower development and photoperiodic control of flowering.In this review,we overviewed and discussed the flower development and its model.We also overviewed the photoperiodic pathways in rice flowering control,and summarized the pathways at molecular level.

  5. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on...

  6. VDOT Chincoteague Visitor Transportation Study Final Presentation December 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To assess transportation impacts, travel patterns, and mobility needs of visitors to Chincoteague and Assateague Islands during the peak tourist season. Chincoteague...

  7. Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Services Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Merritt Island NWR Visitor Services Plan outlines long term and short term goals for six wildlife dependent public use activities and programs that are...

  8. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Surveys that were conducted on 53 refuges across the Refuge System. The report is part of USGS Data...

  9. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual Refuge Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on National...

  10. Improving customer generation by analysing website visitor behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ramlall, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation describes the creation of a new integrated Information Technology (IT) system that assisted in the collection of data about the behaviour of website visitors as well as sales and marketing data for those visitors who turned into customers. A key contribution to knowledge was the creation of a method to predict the outcome of visits to a website from visitors’ browsing behaviour. A new Online Tracking Module (OTM) was created that monitored visitors’ behaviour while they brow...

  11. Dark destinations – Visitor reflections from a holocaust memorial site

    OpenAIRE

    Liyanage, Sherry; Coca-Stefaniak, Andres; Powell, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Abstract\\ud \\ud Purpose – Dark tourism and, more specifically, visitor experiences at Nazi concentration camp memorials are emerging fields of research in tourism studies and destination management. This paper builds on this growing body of knowledge and focuses on the World War II Nazi concentration camp at Dachau in Germany to explore the psychological impact of the site on its visitors as well as critical self-reflection processes triggered by this experience.\\ud \\ud Design/methodology/app...

  12. Weather and Tourism: Thermal Comfort and Zoological Park Visitor Attendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Perkins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weather events have the potential to greatly impact business operations and profitability, especially in outdoor-oriented economic sectors such as Tourism, Recreation, and Leisure (TRL. Although a substantive body of work focuses on the macroscale impacts of climate change, less is known about how daily weather events influence attendance decisions, particularly relating to the physiological thermal comfort levels of each visitor. To address this imbalance, this paper focuses on ambient thermal environments and visitor behavior at the Phoenix and Atlanta zoos. Daily visitor attendances at each zoo from September 2001 to June 2011, were paired with the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET to help measure the thermal conditions most likely experienced by zoo visitors. PET was calculated using hourly atmospheric variables of temperature, humidity, wind speed, and cloud cover from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at each zoological park location and then classified based on thermal comfort categories established by the American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE. The major findings suggested that in both Phoenix and Atlanta, optimal thermal regimes for peak attendance occurred within “slightly warm” and “warm” PET-based thermal categories. Additionally, visitors seemed to be averse to the most commonly occurring thermal extreme since visitors appeared to avoid the zoo on excessively hot days in Phoenix and excessively cold days in Atlanta. Finally, changes in the daily weather impacted visitor attendance as both zoos experienced peak attendance on days with dynamic changes in the thermal regimes and depressed attendances on days with stagnant thermal regimes. Building a better understanding of how weather events impact visitor demand can help improve our assessments of the potential impacts future climate change may have on tourism.

  13. What is the best?: simple versus visitor restricted rest period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvius-Byron, Stephanie A; Florimonte, Christine; Panganiban, Elizabeth G; Ulmer, Janice Fitzgerald

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a highly structured planned rest protocol that includes visitor and healthcare personnel restrictions with a simple planned rest period that encourages patients to rest during a designated time without restriction of visitors and healthcare personnel. Many hospitals acute care have begun to restrict visitors and nonessential health team interventions during specific times despite the lack of experimentally designed studies. Using a convenience sample of 52 intermediate care unit patients, a randomized experimental design study compared a highly structured planned rest protocol with restriction of visitors/healthcare personnel to a simple planned rest period without restrictions. The primary outcome variable was the patient's perceived quality of rest after a 2-hour rest period. Intermediate care patients' perception of rest and sleep during a designated rest period was similar whether elaborate rest strategies were used, including visitor and healthcare personnel restrictions, or if it was only suggested they rest and the door to their room closed. The restriction of visitors and healthcare personnel during a 2-hour rest period did not improve the patient's perception of rest or how long it took them to go to sleep.

  14. Stop and Paint the Flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art lesson where students used watercolors to paint a flower bouquet arranged in a vase. Explains that the students viewed examples of flower bouquets by artists such as Vincent van Gogh and Odilon Redon. Discusses, in detail, the process of creating the artworks. (CMK)

  15. Flowers free from the environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijl, van der L.

    1958-01-01

    At the jubilee of Professor Lam it seems suitable to contribute a paper on the flower as a functional unit, though it is in the form of a kind of book-review. Lam himself wrote on the more fundamental connections between flowering and lower plants and on the basal morphological elements of the

  16. Dominus for cut flower production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumigation with methyl bromide was the principal method of soilborne pest control in cut flower production. Many cut flower growers in Florida have ceased production, but those that remain are restricted in the fumigants that they are able to utilize due to proximity to potable water sources and oc...

  17. Teaching Flowers: A Photo Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Federico

    2017-01-01

    "Teaching Flowers" reflects on humanity's deep connections to horticulture by gathering varied thoughts from seminal writers in the field. In addition, this visual article draws attention to labor issues within the U.S. floral industry by documenting the author's exploration of flowers as social sculpture in New York City.

  18. 香格里拉高山植物园银莲花属访花者初步研究%Preliminary Investigation on Visitors of Anemone in Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤晓辛; 黄至欢; 王向平; 张潮

    2012-01-01

    Visitors of three species of Anemone were compared in Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden in this article, and the visitors of A. demissa with different floral colors were observed and compared. The results indicated that A, ruptstris and A. rivutaris have more visitor types than A. demissa. The visiting frequency of different visitors to A. demissa with different flower colors is not significantly different, and floral color and visitor types have no significant effect on visiting frequency. Further study should focus on flower color change in A. demissa, so as to provide conditions for exploiting wild flower resources.%对香格里拉高山植物园3种银莲花属植物的访花者进行比较,并对不同颜色展毛银莲花的访问者进行观察和比较.结果表明,湿地银莲花与草玉梅的访花者种类较多,而展毛银莲花的则相对较少.访问者不同对花色展毛银莲花的访问次数没有明显差异,颜色不同和访问者不同对访问频次没有明显影响.应对展毛银莲花的花色变化进行深入研究,为开发利用野生花卉资源创造条件.

  19. How Do Zoos "Talk" to Their General Visitors? Do Visitors "Listen"? A Mixed Method Investigation of the Communication between Modern Zoos and Their General Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew; Mansfield, Caroline F.

    2014-01-01

    Modern zoos utilise a variety of education tools for communicating with visitors. Previous research has discussed the benefits of providing multiple education communications, yet little research provides an indication of what communications are being employed within zoos today. This research is a two-phased, mixed-methods investigation into the…

  20. Evaluating Education and Science in the KSC Visitor Complex Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2000-01-01

    The continuing development of exhibits at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex is an excellent opportunity for NASA personnel to promote science and provide insight into NASA programs and projects for the approximately 3 million visitors that come to KSC annually. Stated goals for the Visitor Complex, in fact, emphasize science awareness and recommend broadening the appeal of the displays and exhibits for all age groups. To this end, this summer project seeks to evaluate the science content of planned exhibits/displays in relation to these developing opportunities and identify specific areas for enhancement of existing or planned exhibits and displays. To help expand the educational and science content within the developing exhibits at the Visitor Complex, this project was structured to implement the goals of the Visitor Center Director. To accomplish this, the exhibits and displays planned for completion within the year underwent review and evaluation for science content and educational direction. Planning emphasis for the individual displays was directed at combining the elements of effective education with fundamental scientific integrity, within an appealing format.

  1. What blocks health visitors from taking on a leadership role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyett, Erika

    2003-07-01

    Current government documents in the United Kingdom call for all nurses to take on a greater leadership role. This paper critically considers some of the management factors that block one group of specialist nurses (health visitors) from fulfilling their leadership role. Health visitors have a key role to play in meeting the public health targets of local primary care trusts, known as local health improvement plans. But to take on a greater public health role, health visitors need to move away from working independently within separate general practitioner surgeries and to work in teams which share the vision and goals of the primary care trusts. The paper explores different styles of management that promote transformational leadership and relate to practice. It is suggested that use of the Servant-Leader model of management should encourage the empowerment of staff, and through empowerment health visitors should be able to instigate change and become more innovative in their practice. Persistent recruitment and retention problems have resulted in little time being available to focus on the effectiveness of services. The future management of health visitors will be to primarily run the service while supporting staff in accessing and influencing those in power.

  2. Floral visitors and reproductive strategies in five melittophilous species of Bignoniaceae in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriko A. N. Pinto Yanagizawa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the pollination strategies of Bignoniaceae, the floral biology and the floral visitors in five species, three cerrado shrubs (Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC. Bor., Jacaranda decurrens Cham., and Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham., and two lianas from the border of a semideciduous seasonal forest (Arrabidaea samydoides (Cham. Sandw., and Arrabidaea triplinervia H. Baill. were studied in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil. The flowering periods were partially overlapping, especially between species in the same habitat. All the five species were functionally allogamous, melittophilous, nototribic and mainly pollinated by long tongued large bees. Some medium-sized and small pollen-foraging bees were occasional legitimate visitors, whereas others visitors were robbers/thieves. Each species showed a particular set of pollinators. Only two pollinator species were observed in more than one bignon. There was no partition of pollinators even among the species of bignons blooming at the same time at the same habitat.Com objetivo de avaliar as estratégias de polinização de espécies de Bignoniaceae, foram estudados a biologia floral e os visitantes florais de cinco espécies, três arbustivas do cerrado (Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC. Bor., Jacaranda decurrens Cham. e Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. e duas lianas da orla da floresta estacional semidecidual (Arrabidaea samydoides (Cham. Sandw. e Arrabidaea triplinervia H. Baill., na região de Botucatu (22º52'20" S e 48(026'37" W, estado de São Paulo, sudeste do Brasil. Os períodos de florescimento, principalmente entre espécies do mesmo habitat, apresentaram sobreposição parcial. Observou-se que as cinco espécies são alogâmicas funcionais, melitófilas, nototríbicas, polinizadas principalmente por abelhas grandes de língua comprida. Algumas abelhas coletoras de pólen de tamanho médio e pequeno atuaram como polinizadoras ocasionais, enquanto outros visitantes foram pilhadores. Cada

  3. An analysis of visitors' behavior in the Louvre Museum: A study using Bluetooth data

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Yuji; Ratti, Carlo; Girardin, Fabien; Carrascal, Juan Pablo; Blat, Josep; Sinatra, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Museums often suffer from so-called "hyper-congestion", wherein the number of visitors exceeds the capacity of the physical space of the museum. This can potentially deteriorate the quality of visitor's experience disturbed by other visitors' behaviors and presences. Although this situation can be mitigated by managing visitors' flow between spaces, a detailed analysis of the visitor's movement is required to fully realize and apply a proper solution to the problem. This paper analyzes the visitor's sequential movements, the spatial layout, and the relationship between them in large-scale art museums - Louvre Museum - using anonymized data collected through noninvasive Bluetooth sensors. This enables us to unveil some features of visitor's behavior and spatial impact that shed some light on the mechanism of the museum overcrowding. The analysis reveals that the visiting style of short and long stay visitors are not as significantly different as one could expect. Both types of visitors tend to visit a similar ...

  4. Breaking-bud pollination: a new pollination process in partially opened flowers by small bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Futa; Ohsawa, Takeshi A

    2015-09-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions have usually been researched in flowers that have fully opened. However, some pollinators can visit flowers before full opening and contribute to fruit and seed sets. In this paper, we researched the pollination biology of flowers just starting to open in four field experiments. We observed the insect visitors to Lycoris sanguinea var. sanguinea for 3 years at five sites. These observations revealed that only small bees, Lasioglossum japonicum, often entered through tiny spaces between the tepals of 'breaking buds' (i.e. partially opened flowers) and collected pollen. We hypothesized that they can pollinate this species at the breaking-bud stage, when the stigma is located near the anthers. To measure the pollination effect of small bees at the breaking-bud stage, we bagged several breaking buds after small bees had visited them and examined whether these buds were pollinated. In bagging experiments, 30% of the breaking buds set fruit and seeds. Fruit-set ratios of the breaking buds did not differ significantly from those of the fully opened flowers, which had been visited by several insect species. We also counted the pollen grain numbers on the body of L. japonicum and on the anthers of randomly-selected and manipulated flowers. These experiments revealed that all of the captured bees had some pollen of target plants and that L. japonicum collected most of the pollen grains at the breaking-bud stage. Our results showed that the new pollination process, breaking-bud pollination, happened in breaking buds by L. japonicum, although there is no evidence to reveal that this is the most effective pollination method for L. sanguinea var. sanguinea. In principle, this new pollination process can occur in other flowering plants and our results are a major contribution to studies of plant-pollinator interactions.

  5. The Accuracy of Behavioural Data Collected by Visitors in a Zoo Environment: Can Visitors Collect Meaningful Data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer data collection can be valuable for research. However, accuracy of such data is often a cause for concern. If clear, simple methods are used, volunteers can monitor species presence and abundance in a similar manner to professionals, but it is unknown whether volunteers could collect accurate data on animal behaviour. In this study, visitors at a Wetlands Centre were asked to record behavioural data for a group of captive otters by means of a short questionnaire. They were also asked to provide information about themselves to determine whether various factors would influence their ability to collect data. Using a novel analysis technique based on PCA, visitor data were compared to baseline activity budget data collected by a trained biologist to determine whether visitor data were accurate. Although the response rate was high, visitors were unable to collect accurate data. The principal reason was that visitors exceeded the observation time stated in the instructions, rather than being unable to record behaviours accurately. We propose that automated recording stations, such as touchscreen displays, might prevent this as well as other potential problems such as temporal autocorrelation of data and may result in accurate data collection by visiting members of the public.

  6. MAEWEST Expression in Flower Development of Two Petunia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia A. Segatto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in flower morphology may influence the frequency and specificity of animal visitors. In Petunia (Solanaceae, adaptation to different pollinators is one of the factors leading to species diversification within the genus. This study provides evidence that differential expression patterns of MAWEWEST (MAW homologs in different Petunia species may be associated with adaptive changes in floral morphology. The Petunia × hybrida MAW gene belongs to the WOX (WUSCHEL-related homeobox transcription factor family and has been identified as a controller of petal fusion during corolla formation. We analyzed the expression patterns of P. inflata and P. axillaris MAW orthologs (PiMAW and PaMAW, respectively by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, reverse transcription–quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization in different tissues and different developmental stages of flowers in both species. The spatial expression patterns of PiMAW and PaMAW were similar in P. inflata and P. axillaris. Nevertheless, PaMAW expression level in P. axillaris was higher during the late bud development stage as compared to PiMAW in P. inflata. This work represents an expansion of petunia developmental research to wild accessions.

  7. Flowering Friendship Between Two Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Zhengxu

    2015-01-01

    Xi’an of China and Chinju(Jinju)of the Republic of Korea are famous ancient capitals of their respective countries with a long history and culture heritage.It happens that both take the pomegranate flower as their symbol.In 2007,the"Spring of the Pomegranate Flower"—a friendly exchange program with folk cultural and art performances as the main focus

  8. Museum Web Search Behaviour of Special Interest Visitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mette; Ingwersen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative and qualit......There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative...

  9. Tropical Forest Fragmentation Affects Floral Visitors but Not the Structure of Individual-Based Palm-Pollinator Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests

  10. Tropical forest fragmentation affects floral visitors but not the structure of individual-based palm-pollinator networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests.

  11. Floral nectary, nectar production dynamics and chemical composition in five nocturnal Oenothera species (Onagraceae) in relation to floral visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoń, Sebastian; Komoń-Janczara, Elwira; Denisow, Bożena

    2017-08-04

    Main conclusion The floral nectars were sucrose-dominant; however, nectar protein and amino acid contents differed, indicating that composition of nitrogenous compounds may vary considerably even between closely related plant species, irrespectively of nectary structure. Numerous zoophilous plants attract their pollinators by offering floral nectar; an aqueous solution produced by specialized secretory tissues, known as floral nectaries. Although many papers on nectaries and nectar already exist, there has been a little research into the structure of nectaries and/or nectar production and composition in species belonging to the same genus. To redress this imbalance, we sought, in the present paper, to describe the floral nectary, nectar production, and nectar composition in five nocturnal Oenothera species with respect to their floral visitors. The structure of nectaries was similar for all the species investigated, and comprised the epidermis (with nectarostomata), numerous layers of nectary parenchyma, and subsecretory parenchyma. Anthesis for a single flower was short (ca. 10-12 h), and flowers lasted only one night. The release of floral nectar commenced at the bud stage (approx. 4 h before anthesis) and nectar was available to pollinators until petal closure. Nectar concentration was relatively low (ca. 27%) and the nectar was sucrose-dominant, and composed mainly of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The protein content of the nectar was also relatively low (on average, 0.31 µg ml(-1)). Nevertheless, a great variety of amino acids, including both protein and non-protein types, was detected in the nectar profile of the investigated taxa. We noted both diurnal and nocturnal generalist, opportunistic floral insect visitors.

  12. Tropical forest fragmentation affects floral visitors but not the structure of individual-based palm-pollinator networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley Dáttilo

    Full Text Available Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in

  13. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2012--Individual refuge results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Alia M.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 560 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts nearly 45 million visitors annually, including 34.8 million people who observe and photograph wildlife, 9.6 million who hunt and fish, and nearly 675,000 teachers and students who use refuges as outdoor classrooms. Understanding visitor perceptions of refuges and characterizing their experiences on refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The purpose of the survey was to better understand visitor experiences and trip characteristics, to gauge visitors’ levels of satisfaction with existing recreational opportunities, and to garner feedback to inform the design of programs and facilities. The survey results will inform performance, planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs), visitor services, and transportation planning processes. This Data Series consists of 25 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: • Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. • Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results.• Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational

  14. Aspects of reproductive ecology of Clusia valerioi Standl. and Clusia peninsulae Hammel (sp. nov.), two Central American species of Clusiaceae with resin flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwallner, H; Vogel, S; Huber, W; Hammel, B E; Weber, A

    2012-01-01

    Clusia valerioi Standl. and C. peninsulae Hammel, sp. nov. (formally established in the Appendix), two Central American species of Clusiaceae offering resin as a floral reward, were studied in the Piedras Blancas National Park, SW Costa Rica. Basic data on phenology, flower structure, course of anthesis, flower visitors, flower visitation and pollination processes, fruit development and seed dispersal are communicated. Resin collection and pollen release are reported and documented in greater detail. The significance of stingless bees for pollination is confirmed, but honeybees were also observed to visit the flowers and to collect resin. The seeds of C. valerioi, exhibiting a clearly ornithochorous character syndrome, were observed to be eaten and dispersed by four species of the tanager family (Thraupidae) and one species of finch (Fringillidae). Ants were also observed to carry away the seeds. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. The bumblebee Bombus hortorum is the main pollinating visitor to Digitalis purpurea (Common Foxglove in a U.K. population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Broadbent

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialization in plant-pollinator systems represents an important issue for both the ecological understanding and conservation of these systems. We investigated the extent to which the bumblebee Bombus hortorum (Linnaeus is the main potential pollinator of Common Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea L. Twenty D. purpurea patches were selected in North Yorkshire, U.K., ten each in woodland and garden or park habitat. All insects visiting D. purpurea within the patches were recorded over seventy 30-min bouts. The relative frequency of insect visitors to other flowering plant species within 15 m of each patch was also determined. B. hortorum and B. pascuorum were the two most frequent visitors to D. purpurea, accounting for 82 - 92% and 3 -17%, respectively, of all insect visits (n = 1682, depending on habitat. B. hortorum showed a significant preference for visiting D. purpurea relative to its frequency of visits to other available plant species. The relationship of D. purpurea with B. hortorum, which pollinates several plant species with long corollas, therefore represents a potential case of asymmetric specialization, albeit one that may vary spatially. Because D. purpurea reproduction appears dependent on insect pollination, B. hortorum and B. pascuorum may help underpin the viability of D. purpurea populations.

  16. Interaction between Bees and the Tristylous Flowers of Oxalis cytisoides Mart. & Zucc. (Oxalidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Krug

    2012-01-01

    individuals (n=87. Anthesis lasted one day (6:30 AM to 3 PM. No fruit was formed in the autogamy test; thus, pollination was dependent on the visitors. The pollen grain size varied between the stamens and morphs and formed subsets in accordance with the stigma height (long/mid/short. We collected 165 bees from 30 species visiting the flowers. Hypanthium divaricatum was the most abundant bee species (34% and the males were often observed patrolling the flowers in search of females for mating. Analysis of the pollen loads from 34 females showed that 27 carried O. cytisoides pollen. The most frequent bees that carried O. cytisoides pollen grains on their bodies were considered pollinator agents, responsible for transferring pollen grains among the floral morphs.

  17. Tourism package preferences of West Virginia state park visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Gravley; John Dengler; Roy Ramthun; Chad Pierskalla

    2009-01-01

    This study was a preliminary examination of the activity and spending behavior of visitors to Pipestem State Park in West Virginia. This state park is being used as a case study area to determine whether a new fish stocking program accompanied by appropriate marketing activities can increase park visitation by anglers and other sports-oriented people. The research was...

  18. Biodiversity Hotspots and Visitor Flows in Oulanka National Park, Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyon, K.; Cottrell, S.P.; Siikamaki, P.; Marwijk, van R.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oulanka National Park, Finland aims to ensure nature conservation while providing high quality visitor experiences. The growth of outdoor recreation and nature tourism, however, has fueled concern about consequent pressures on the natural resources of the park. This analysis assessed the spatial rel

  19. Interpretation for Disabled Visitors in the National Park System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to help interpretive staff identify programmatic needs of disabled U.S. national park visitors, the booklet suggests reasonable modifications to assure participation. An introductory section reviews legal and policy guidelines, the emergence of the disability movement in America, and components of integrated programing. Guidelines and…

  20. Biodiversity Hotspots and Visitor Flows in Oulanka National Park, Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyon, K.; Cottrell, S.P.; Siikamaki, P.; Marwijk, van R.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oulanka National Park, Finland aims to ensure nature conservation while providing high quality visitor experiences. The growth of outdoor recreation and nature tourism, however, has fueled concern about consequent pressures on the natural resources of the park. This analysis assessed the spatial rel

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  2. Factors Influencing Zoo Visitors' Conservation Attitudes and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanagan, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    Predicts that Zoo Atlanta visitors who had interactive experience with the zoo's elephant demonstration and bio-fact program would be more likely to actively support elephant conservation than those who simply viewed the animals in their exhibit and read graphics. Uses survey instruments including 25 closed-ended questions, petitions, and…

  3. Exploring visitor movement patterns in natural recreational areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.; Bregt, A.K.; Ligtenberg, A.; Wachowicz, M.

    2012-01-01

    GPS technology is widely used to produce detailed data on the movement of people. Analysing massive amounts of GPS data, however, can be cumbersome. We present a novel approach to processing such data to aid interpretation and understanding of the aggregated movement of visitors in natural recreatio

  4. 76 FR 10498 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... finds that educational and cultural exchanges are both the cornerstone of U.S. public diplomacy and an... Cultural exchange program. Accordingly, 22 CFR part 62 is amended as follows: PART 62--EXCHANGE VISITOR... Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT ACT), Pub. L. 107-56, section 416, 115 Stat. 354; and the...

  5. 75 FR 8049 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air... least five calendar days prior to the meeting which is the subject of this notice. Written statements... attend this meeting should contact either person listed below at least five calendar days prior to...

  6. 76 FR 57979 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air... Officer at the address listed below at least five calendar days prior to the meeting which is the subject... at least five calendar days prior to the meeting for information on base entry passes. FOR...

  7. Northern Virginia wineries: understanding visitor motivations for market segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammeral Geide; Laurie Harmon; Robert Baker

    2009-01-01

    The wine industry is a rapidly growing sector of Virginia's economy, yet little research has been done on this topic. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of northern Virginia winery visitors' motivations to help winery operators better focus their marketing efforts. This exploratory research project collected basic information about...

  8. Recreation settings, scenery, and visitor experiences: a research assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2007-01-01

    A core task of recreation research is to understand the relation between settings, scenery, and visitor experiences. This paper uses environmental psychology to describe four conceptual models underlying these relations: inherent/aesthetic, opportunity/goal-directed, symbolic, and expressive. The paper then describes some challenges to applying results to recreation...

  9. Coordination and Human Resource Planning in the Hawaii Visitor Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Commission on Manpower and Full Employment, Honolulu.

    This report was undertaken in response to a request by the Sixth Legislature, which expressed its concern with the lack of coordination and overall human resource planning in the visitor industry and that the findings of the January 6-7, 1970 Travel Industry Congress had not been fully implemented. The State Commission on Manpower and Full…

  10. Health literacy among pharmacy visitors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Health literacy is defined as the ability to obtain, understand and apply information to make appropriate health decisions. Most health literacy research has been performed in the USA. Our objective was to study the prevalence of limited health literacy among adult pharmacy visitors in the

  11. Health literacy among pharmacy visitors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Ellen S.; Philbert, Daphne; Bouvy, Marcel L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Health literacy is defined as the ability to obtain, understand and apply information to make appropriate health decisions. Most health literacy research has been performed in the USA. Our objective was to study the prevalence of limited health literacy among adult pharmacy visitors in the

  12. Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room - A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Manuela

    2017-03-29

    Frequent visitors at the psychiatric emergency room (PER) constitute a small subgroup of patients, yet they are responsible for a disproportionate number of visits and thus claim considerable resources. Their needs are often left unmet and their repetitive visits reflect their dissatisfaction as well as that of PERs' staff. Motivated by these dilemmas, this study systematically reviews the literature about frequent visitors at PER and seeks to answer two questions: What characterizes frequent visitors at PER in the literature? and What characterizes PER in the literature? Based on 29 studies, this paper offers answers to the two questions based on a strength weakness opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis. The results of the review and subsequent analysis of the literature revealed the multiplicity and complexity of frequent visitors' characteristics and how they appear to converge. Commonalities were more difficult to identify in PER characteristics. In some cases, this happened because the characteristics were poorly described or were context specific. As a result, it was not easy to compare the studies on PER. Based on SWOT and the findings of the analysis, the paper proposes new venues of research and suggests how the field of mental health might develop by taking into account its opportunities and threats.

  13. Biodiversity Hotspots and Visitor Flows in Oulanka National Park, Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyon, K.; Cottrell, S.P.; Siikamaki, P.; Marwijk, van R.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oulanka National Park, Finland aims to ensure nature conservation while providing high quality visitor experiences. The growth of outdoor recreation and nature tourism, however, has fueled concern about consequent pressures on the natural resources of the park. This analysis assessed the spatial

  14. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...

  15. Visitor preferences for managing wilderness recreation after wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan N.K. Brown; Randall S. Rosenberger; Jeffrey D. Kline; Troy E. Hall; Mark D. Needham

    2008-01-01

    The 2003 Bear Butte and Booth (B&B) Fires burned much of the Mount Jefferson Wilderness in the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests, Oregon. A question for managers is how best to manage recreation in fire-affected areas in ways that minimize adverse impacts on visitor experiences and the recovering landscape. To help address this question, we used onsite...

  16. Hosting Foreign Visitors in the Classroom: A Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Marjorie; And Others

    A classroom visit by an international visitor is potentially a unique educational experience. Students have an opportunity to: increase awareness of their own values and of their foundation in the sociocultural patterns of their natural family, community, and nation; increase capacity for empathetic interpersonal relations; and become aware of…

  17. Perceived Authenticity of the Visitor Experience in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Anne-Marie; Garma, Romana; Josiassen, Alexander;

    2014-01-01

    . To investigate authenticity in a model with two antecedents and two outcomes, an additional data set was collected. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling. Findings -The results show that perceived authenticity of the museum, the visitor and the materials in the museum are dimensions...

  18. 78 FR 90 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been scheduled...

  19. 78 FR 32241 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency... given that a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been...

  20. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : Interim Plan for Weekend Visitor Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an interim plan for weekend visitors designed to provide for the safety of visitors to the Rocky Mountain Arsenal during its remediation and transition to a...

  1. 77 FR 73974 - Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... quality of visitor experience are anticipated to decline even further. The Forest Service is evaluating... Forest Service Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation Transportation System Alternatives Study AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; request for...

  2. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Araujo, Michel M.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Almeida, Mariana C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: ackoike@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  3. Making Space for Experimentation, Collaboration, and Play: Re-Imagining the Drop-in Visitor Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostov, Merilee

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art education department adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. But what does creativity look like in a gallery experience? What are visitor attitudes toward creativity? This article explores how the drop-in visitor experience was reimagined at the…

  4. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a

  5. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a pol

  6. Serving culturally diverse visitors to forests in California: a resource guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina S. Roberts; Deborah J. Chavez; Benjamin M. Lara; Emilyn A. Sheffield

    2009-01-01

    The national forests of California are experiencing an increase in new visitors yet, in some areas, a continued lack of ethnic diversity persists. In addition, changing demographics has led to a need for keeping up with trends while also being aware of constraints to visitor use. Knowing how to serve culturally diverse visitors in ways that are innovative and inclusive...

  7. 75 FR 65006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2010 Annual Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors. Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. ] DATES: Friday, November 5, 2010 at 1 p...

  8. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of Visitors. Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. DATES: Wednesday, February 16...

  9. 78 FR 59045 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to http://www.regulations.gov...

  10. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a pol

  11. 78 FR 25289 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy Teleconference... Advisory Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board...: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy will meet on Wednesday, May 15, 2013, from 1:30...

  12. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years. PMID:27664957

  13. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-10-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years.

  14. Spring Flowers: Harvest of a Sensitive Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eloise; Levin, Ted

    1978-01-01

    Defining and describing a number of spring flowers, this article includes illustrations and explanations that demonstrate "art and science are born of the same parents". The flowers discussed are skunk cabbage, bellwort, spring beauty, jack-in-the-pulpit, Solomon's seal, wild geranium, showy orchids, moccasin flower, bluets, apple, and Indian…

  15. Notes on collecting flower-visiting insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemstein, S.C.

    1974-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects may play a role in the pollination of the flowers they visit. An important indication for this is the pollen they carry on their body. The transport of pollen does not prove pollination without observations of the behaviour of the insects on the flowers, but at least it offer

  16. Notes on collecting flower-visiting insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemstein, S.C.

    1974-01-01

    Flower-visiting insects may play a role in the pollination of the flowers they visit. An important indication for this is the pollen they carry on their body. The transport of pollen does not prove pollination without observations of the behaviour of the insects on the flowers, but at least it

  17. Flowering time: from photoperiodism to florigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H

    1998-09-24

    An Arabidopsis blue-light receptor, Cry2, has been found to play a critical role in the photoperiodic control of flowering time; and genes have been identified that may control the production of a transmissible flower-inducing signal, which may turn out to be the long-elusive putative flowering hormone 'florigen'.

  18. Flowers and Landscape by Serendipity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Sandi

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art lesson in which students sketch drawings of flowers and use watercolor paper and other materials to paint a landscape. Explains that the students also learn about impressionism in this lesson. Discusses how the students prepare the paper and create their artwork. (CMK)

  19. Beijing’s Flower Markets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Whether you want to keep your green thumb in shape, bring Mother Nature into your apartment, or buy flowers for a special occasion, you will find everything you want and even more in Beijing’s specialized markets. here are some of the most popular and what they offer.

  20. Thrips (Thysanoptera) of coffee flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of thrips (Thysanoptera) associated with coffee flowers was conducted in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. The main objectives were to identify them and to determine whether they were carrying coffee pollen grains. A total of 40 thrips species in 22 genera were identified. The most com...

  1. Visitor schedule management system- an intelligent decision support system

    CERN Document Server

    Nidhra, Srinivas; Ethiraj, Vinay Sudha

    2012-01-01

    Travelling salesman problem is a problem which is of high interest for researchers, industry professionals, and academicians. Visitor or salesman used to face lot of problems with respect to scheduling based on meeting top ranked clients. Even excel sheet made the work tedious. So these flaws propelled us to design an intelligent decision support system. This paper reports the problem definition we tried to address and possible solution to this problem. We even explained the project design and implementation of our visitor schedule management system.. Our system made a major contribution in terms of valuable resources such as time and satisfying high ranked clients efficiently. We used optimization via mathematical programming to solve these issues.

  2. A visitor-focused assessment of new product launch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, G.; Tussyadiah, Iis; Zach, F.

    2010-01-01

    ), which not only asks consumers about their needs and wants but actually involves them in the product design, promotion, and even assessment processes. Informed by the new concept of CDI, this study aims at identifying to what extent visitors as tourism product consumers and co-producers can be involved......Understanding the needs and wants of consumers in the process of new product development has been recognized as an essential aspect of preparing effective marketing strategies for the success of business. The new product development strategy has now moved into Consumer-Driven Innovation (CDI...... in a new product development process and reinvent the products by providing ideas and suggestions with their own creative insights. More specifically, using data collected from a trip diary and an online survey with 273 respondents, this article examines visitor assessment on a newly launched product...

  3. An exploration of visitor motivations: The search for silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Lelaina D.

    2011-12-01

    This research aims to study the relationship between visitor motivations for experiencing solitude, sounds of nature, and quiet and a visitor's soundscape experience. This relationship will improve managers' ability to provide satisfying and diverse experiences for their visitors and "protect" something that is increasingly rare outside of national parks and other protected natural areas; natural sounds and quiet. Chapter 1 focuses on the effect motivation for a quiet setting can have on acceptability of natural or human-caused sound in Muir Woods National Monument. This study used a dose-response methodology where visitors listened to five audio recordings varying in the percentage of time that human-caused sound was louder than natural sound (percent time above). Visitors were then asked to rate the acceptability of each recording. Three sound-related motivations for visiting Muir Woods were examined: "enjoying peace and quiet", "hearing sounds of nature" and "experiencing solitude." Cluster analysis was used to identify discrete groups with similar motivational profiles (i.e., low, moderate and high motivation for quiet). Results indicated that as percent time above natural sound increased, visitor ratings of human-caused sound decreased. Tolerance for human-caused sound also decreased as motivation for quiet increased. Consensus regarding the acceptability of sound was greatest when the percent time above natural sound was lowest (i.e., quietest sounds). Chapter 2 describes a study of the ability of motivations to predict which of three locations a visitor would most likely choose for recreation. Particular focus was given to sound-related motivations. Data for this study were collected at three sites with varying visitation levels within two national parks; Sequoia National Park-backcountry (low visitation), Sequoia National Park-frontcountry (moderate visitation), and Muir Woods National Monument-frontcountry (high visitation). Survey respondents were asked

  4. Hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury of Austrian residents vs. of visitors to Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Walter; Brazinova, Alexandra; Majdan, Marek; Leitgeb, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The goal was to compare epidemiology of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Austrian residents vs. visitors to Austria. Data on all hospital admissions due to TBI (ICD-10 codes S06.0-S06.9; years 2009-2011) was provided by the Austrian Statistical Office. Data on Austrian population and on tourism (visitor numbers, nights spent) was retrieved from www.statistik.at . Age, sex, mechanism of injury, season and mortality was analysed for Austrian residents vs. visitors. Visitors contributed 3.9% to the total population and 9.2% of all TBI cases. Incidence of hospital admissions was 292/100,000/year in Austrian residents and was 727/100,000/year in visitors. Male:female ratio was 1.39:1 in Austrian residents and 1.55:1 in visitors. Austrian cases were older than visitors' cases (mean age 41 vs. 28 years). Austrian cases were distributed evenly over the seasons, while 75% of the visitors' cases happened during winter and spring. The most frequently observed causes of TBI in Austrian residents were private accidents, while sports caused almost half of the visitors' cases. Hospital mortality was lower in visitors than in Austrian residents (0.8 vs. 2.1%). Sports-related TBI of visitors causes a significant workload for Austrian hospitals. Better prevention is warranted.

  5. Reducing visitor noise levels at Muir Woods National Monument using experimental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, David W; Peter, Newman; Manning, Robert E; Fristrup, Kurt M

    2011-03-01

    Noise impacts resources and visitor experience in many protected natural areas, and visitors can be the dominant source of noise. This experimental study tested the efficacy and acceptability of signs asking visitors to be quiet at Muir Woods National Monument, California. Signs declaring a "quiet zone" (at the park's Cathedral Grove) or a "quiet day" (throughout the park) were posted on a randomized schedule that included control days (no signs). Visitor surveys were conducted to measure the cognitive and behavioral responses of visitors to the signs and test the acceptability of these management practices to visitors. Visitors were highly supportive of these management practices and reported that they consciously limited the amount of noise they produced. Sound level measurements showed substantial decreases on days when signs were posted.

  6. Foreign students, visitors and immigration to British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunin, R

    1993-01-01

    "This report has provided a brief outline of business immigration to Canada and to British Columbia from several source countries in the Asian Pacific Rim. The importance of business immigration to Canada in general, and British Columbia in particular, is [examined].... Even with the limited data currently available, this brief study indicates a very high statistical relationship between business immigration and other less formal and less permanent movements of people such as student flows and visitors." excerpt

  7. Hospital visitors as controls in case-control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnar Azevedo S Mendonça

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Selecting controls is one of the most difficult tasks in the design of case-control studies. Hospital controls may be inadequate and random controls drawn from the base population may be unavailable. The aim was to assess the use of hospital visitors as controls in a case-control study on the association of organochlorinated compounds and other risk factors for breast cancer conducted in the main hospital of the "Instituto Nacional de Câncer" -- INCA (National Cancer Institute in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil. METHODS: The study included 177 incident cases and 377 controls recruited among female visitors. Three different models of control group composition were compared: Model 1, with all selected visitors; Model 2, excluding women visiting relatives with breast cancer; and Model 3, excluding all women visiting relatives with any type of cancer. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to test the associations. RESULTS: Age-adjusted OR for breast cancer associated with risk factors other than family history of cancer, except smoking and breast size, were similar in the three models. Regarding family history of all cancers, except for breast cancer, there was a decreased risk in Models 1 and 2, while in Model 3 there was an increased risk, but not statistically significant. Family history of breast cancer was a risk factor in Models 2 and 3, but no association was found in Model 1. In multivariate analysis a significant risk of breast cancer was found when there was a family history of breast cancer in Models 2 and 3 but not in Model 1. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that while investigating risk factors unrelated to family history of cancer, the use of hospital visitors as controls may be a valid and feasible alternative.

  8. Overseas visitor deaths in Australia, 2001 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Wilks, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The health and safety of international visitors remain an important issue for Australia and other tourist destinations. The death of visitors remains an important indicator of safety. The aim of this study was to provide updated figures on deaths of overseas travelers in Australia. Data were sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics concerning deaths of overseas visitors for the years 2001 to 2003. There were 1,068 overseas visitor deaths (701 males, 66%) during the study period 2001 to 2003. Death by natural causes increased with age, while deaths associated with accidents were more frequent among younger age groups. The majority of deaths were from natural causes (782, 73%), particularly ischemic heart diseases (26%). There were a total of 247 accidental deaths (23% of all deaths) with the main causes being transportation accidents (14% of all deaths) and accidental drowning/submersion (5% of all deaths). The countries contributing the most deaths were the UK (247, 23%), New Zealand (108, 10%) Melanesia/Micronesia (95, 9%), and the United States (57, 5%). Australia remains a relatively safe destination for international travelers, at least in terms of fatalities, which appear to be declining. Most deaths of overseas tourists in Australia are due to natural causes with cardiovascular disease being the predominant cause of death in this group. Accidents remain the most common preventable cause of death of travelers, with road and water safety being the major issues. It is important that tourism and travel medicine groups continue to advocate for improved health and safety of international travelers visiting Australia.

  9. Chinese visitors at Australia wineries: Preferences, motivations, and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily (Jintao Ma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available China has become Australia’s most important source market and there are growing number of visitors participated in wine tourism. Using in-depth interviews, the study looked into Chinese tourists’ preferences, motivations and barriers to participate in wineries tours in Australia. The study enriched to literature on wine tourism. It offered practical implications for wineries and destinations to better understand and accommodate Chinese wine tourists’ needs and preferences.

  10. Visitors of two types of museums: A segmentation study

    OpenAIRE

    Brida, J.G.; Disegna, Marta; Scuderi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Market segmentation comprises a wide range of measurement tools that are useful for the sake of supporting marketing and promotional policies also in the sector of cultural economics. This paper aims to contribute to the literature on segmenting cultural visitors by using the Bagged Clustering method, as an alternative and effective strategy to conduct cluster analysis when binary variables are used. The technique is a combination of hierarchical and partitioning methods and presents several ...

  11. Postpartum Mental Health Promotion: Perspectives from Mothers and Home Visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J; Attawar, Dhiwya; Volk, Jennifer S; Cooper, Marion; Quddus, Farzana; McCarthy, Julie-Anne

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study was to examine the implementation of the Towards Flourishing Mental Health Promotion Strategy, a demonstration project designed to promote the mental well-being of parents and their children that was added to an existing public health home visiting program. Structured interviews were conducted with program stakeholders including 13 women receiving home visiting services in the postpartum period and 6 home visitors. Thematic analysis of individual transcripts was conducted and results were compiled according to common themes. The results indicate that women and home visitors perceived the integration of a mental health promotion strategy into an existing public health program as feasible, acceptable and useful. The strategy provides a mechanism for women and home visitors to dialog about mental health and appears to have early positive impacts on the women. Factors that facilitated and impeded the successful implementation of the strategy are described. These results point to promising strategies to reach women early in the postpartum period to support their mental health. They also shed light on the barriers to supporting mental health, indicating the need to address stigma related to mental health and the social determinants of health. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Development of the Virtual Visitor Center at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDunn, Ruth

    1999-11-17

    The Virtual Visitor Center (VVC) web site (www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc) is a ''virtual'' version of the Visitor Center, a mini science museum that opened at SLAC in 1996. The VVC was made public in December 1998. Both centers contribute to SLAC mission regarding education of the next generation and increasing scientific awareness of the public. The site is designed to mimic the real visitor center and allow a larger audience to the information. The intent was to reach the 8th-12th grade audience. Considerable effort was made to organize the content, including color-coding graphical elements for each main topic area. Tables of contents, a search tool, several photo tours, as well as graphical and non-graphical menu bars allow users many methods of navigating the site. The site was developed over almost two years using an estimated .95 FTE, split between a program manager, graphic designer, content provider (theoretical physicist), and a summer intern (high school teacher). As of November 1999, the site consists of 1,147 files, 935 images, 3,080 internal hyperlinks, and 190 external hyperlinks. The site has had over 1 million hits between January and mid-October 1999 and averages about 600 page views each day. Future plans include bringing the web site into compliance with the W3Cs Web Content Accessibility guidelines, thoroughly integrating the glossary terms, continued incorporation of current research at SLAC, and adding more interactivity.

  13. First-time versus repeat visitors at the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinette Kruger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this research is to segment visitors at the Kruger National Park based on the frequency of visitation in order to distinguish between first-time and repeat park visitors.Problem investigated: The Kruger National Park (KNP in South Africa is one of the world’s most renowned wildlife reserves. The KNP is in great demand because it is regarded as anall-inclusive holiday destination that provides tourists with a unique nature and leisure experience. As a result, the park attracts over one million visitors per annum and is one of the top five international tourist destinations in the country. For the KNP to sustain its visitor numbers, park managers should realise that both first-time and repeat visitor groups play a fundamental role in the overall competitiveness and success of the park, and they should strive to achieve a balance between first-time and repeat visitors. Therefore, the park management should know which attributes of the park attract first-time visitors group and which attract repeat visitors.Design and methodology and approach: A research survey was done at various rest camps inthe KNP from 26 December 2010 to 03 January 2011; a total of 436 visitor questionnaires were completed. Two-way frequency tables and chi-square tests as well as analysis of variance and Tukey’s multiple comparisons were used to analyse the data and segment first-time and repeat visitors based on socio-demographics and behavioural characteristics as well as travel motivations.Findings and implications: The results indicated that first-time visitors are long-haul visitors, are younger and pay for fewer people whilst repeat visitors are mainly motivated by escape and plan their trips well in advance. These differences indicate that the KNP should follow a two pronged marketing approach aimed at both visitor markets. This would greatly contribute to the long-term sustainability and competitiveness of the KNP.

  14. Beetle pollination and flowering rhythm of Annona coriacea Mart. (Annonaceae) in Brazilian cerrado: Behavioral features of its principal pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mônica Josene Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    The conservation and sustainable management of Annona coriacea requires knowledge of its floral and reproductive biology, and of its main pollinators and their life cycles. In this work, we analyzed these aspects in detail. Floral biology was assessed by observing flowers from the beginning of anthesis to senescence. The visiting hours and behavior of floral visitors in the floral chamber were recorded, as were the sites of oviposition. Excavations were undertaken around specimens of A. coriacea to determine the location of immature pollinators. Anthesis was nocturnal, starting at sunset, and lasted for 52–56 h. The flowers were bisexual, protogynous and emitted a strong scent similar to the plant´s own ripe fruit. There was pronounced synchrony among all floral events (the period and duration of stigmatic receptivity, release of odor, pollen release and drooping flowers) in different individuals, but no synchrony in the same individuals. All of the flowers monitored were visited by beetle species of the genera Cyclocephala and Arriguttia. Beetles arrived at the flowers with their bodies covered in pollen and these pollen grains were transferred to the stigmata while foraging on nutritious tissues at the base of the petals. With dehiscence of the stamens and retention within the floral chamber, the bodies of the floral visitors were again covered with pollen which they carried to newly opened flowers, thus promoting the cycle of pollination. After leaving the flowers, female beetles often excavated holes in the soil to lay eggs. Larvae were found between the leaf litter and the first layer of soil under specimens of A. coriacea. Cyclocephala beetles were the main pollinators of A. coriacea, but Arriguttia brevissima was also considered a pollinator and is the first species of this genus to be observed in Annonaceae flowers. Annona coriacea was found to be self-compatible with a low reproductive efficiency in the area studied. The results of this investigation

  15. Sampling flower scent for chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashenko, Elena E; Martínez, Jairo René

    2008-06-01

    The analysis of flower volatiles requires special methods for their isolation with enrichment. Living flowers show a continuous change in their volatile profile that depends on intrinsic (genetic) and external (light, temperature, hydric stress) factors. Excised flowers suffer rapid deterioration and loss of volatiles. While industrial isolation methods for flower volatiles are well established, those at the laboratory-scale experience progressive development, in the search for higher sensitivity, reproducibility, and simplicity. This review covers the flower scent sampling methods most commonly employed during the last decade, and includes comments on their strengths and limitations. The strengths of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for in vivo monitoring are emphasized with the examples of monitoring the circadian variation of Brugmansia suaveolens flower scent and of volatile aldehyde detection in flower scent using on-fiber derivatization.

  16. Flowering schedule in a perennial plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrlén, Johan; Raabova, Jana; Dahlgren, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Optimal timing of reproduction within a season may be influenced by several abiotic and biotic factors. These factors sometimes affect different components of fitness, making assessments of net selection difficult. We used estimates of offspring fitness to examine how pre-dispersal seed predation...... influences selection on flowering schedule in an herb with a bimodal flowering pattern, Actaea spicata. Within individuals, seeds from flowers on early terminal inflorescences had a higher germination rate and produced larger seedlings than seeds from flowers on late basal inflorescences. Reproductive value......, estimated using demographic integral projection models and accounting for size-dependent differences in future performance, was two times higher for intact seeds from early flowers than for seeds from late flowers. Fruits from late flowers were, however, much more likely to escape seed predation than fruits...

  17. Pollination syndromes ignored: importance of non-ornithophilous flowers to Neotropical savanna hummingbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Pietro K.; Oliveira, Genilda M.; Ferreira, Carolina; Dalsgaard, Bo; Oliveira, Paulo E.

    2013-11-01

    Generalization prevails in flower-animal interactions, and although animal visitors are not equally effective pollinators, most interactions likely represent an important energy intake for the animal visitor. Hummingbirds are nectar-feeding specialists, and many tropical plants are specialized toward hummingbird-pollination. In spite of this, especially in dry and seasonal tropical habitats, hummingbirds may often rely on non-ornithophilous plants to meet their energy requirements. However, quantitative studies evaluating the relative importance of ornithophilous vs. non-ornithophilous plants for hummingbirds in these areas are scarce. We here studied the availability and use of floral resources by hummingbirds in two different areas of the Cerrado, the seasonal savannas in Central Brazil. Roughly half the hummingbird visited plant species were non-ornithophilous, and these contributed greatly to increase the overall nectar availability. We showed that mean nectar offer, at the transect scale, was the only parameter related to hummingbird visitation frequency, more so than nectar offer at single flowers and at the plant scale, or pollination syndrome. Centrality indices, calculated using hummingbird-plant networks, showed that ornithophilous and non-ornithophilous plants have similar importance for network cohesion. How this foraging behaviour affects reproduction of non-ornithophilous plants remains largely unexplored and is probably case specific, however, we suggest that the additional energy provided by non-ornithophilous plants may facilitate reproduction of truly ornithophilous flowers by attracting and maintaining hummingbirds in the area. This may promote asymmetric hummingbird-plant associations, i.e., pollination depends on floral traits adapted to hummingbird morphology, but hummingbird visitation is determined more by the energetic "reward" than by pollination syndromes.

  18. Recent Advances of Flowering Locus T Gene in Higher Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shuiyuan Cheng; Feng Xu; Xiaofeng Rong; Xiaohua Huang

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of t...

  19. Efikasi Chitosan untuk Memperpanjang Flower Longevity Bunga Anggrek Dendrobium Hibrida dalam Pot (Potted Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I MADE SUKEWIJAYA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effication of Chitosan on Lengthening The Flower Longevity of Potted Orchid ofDendrobium Hybrid. The aim of the current research is to investigate general effects of Chitosantreatment on the flowering of Dendrobium orchid and to find out the optimum concentration of Chitosanin lengthening flower longevity of potted orchid of Dendrobium hybrid. Results of the research showedthat Chitosan application significantly affected variables of the number of flower per-plant, the length ofindividual flower, period of time to get full blooming, and the flower longevity. The best results for thoseof variables was achieved with Chitosan concentration of 0.15%.

  20. Flower colour adaptation in a mimetic orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ethan; Anderson, Bruce; Johnson, Steven D

    2012-06-22

    Although the tremendous variability in floral colour among angiosperms is often attributed to divergent selection by pollinators, it is usually difficult to preclude the possibility that floral colour shifts were driven by non-pollinator processes. Here, we examine the adaptive significance of flower colour in Disa ferruginea, a non-rewarding orchid that is thought to attract its butterfly pollinator by mimicking the flowers of sympatric nectar-producing species. Disa ferruginea has red flowers in the western part of its range and orange flowers in the eastern part--a colour shift that we hypothesized to be the outcome of selection for resemblance to different local nectar-producing plants. Using reciprocal translocations of red and orange phenotypes as well as arrays of artificial flowers, we found that the butterfly Aeropetes tulbaghia, the only pollinator of the orchid, preferred both the red phenotype and red artificial flowers in the west where its main nectar plant also has red flowers, and both the orange phenotype and orange artificial flowers in the east, where its main nectar plant has orange flowers. This phenotype by environment interaction demonstrates that the flower colour shift in D. ferruginea is adaptive and driven by local colour preference in its pollinator.

  1. Street Choice Logit Model for Visitors in Shopping Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Kawada

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose two models for predicting people’s activity. The first model is the pedestrian distribution prediction (or postdiction model by multiple regression analysis using space syntax indices of urban fabric and people distribution data obtained from a field survey. The second model is a street choice model for visitors using multinomial logit model. We performed a questionnaire survey on the field to investigate the strolling routes of 46 visitors and obtained a total of 1211 street choices in their routes. We proposed a utility function, sum of weighted space syntax indices, and other indices, and estimated the parameters for weights on the basis of maximum likelihood. These models consider both street networks, distance from destination, direction of the street choice and other spatial compositions (numbers of pedestrians, cars, shops, and elevation. The first model explains the characteristics of the street where many people tend to walk or stay. The second model explains the mechanism underlying the street choice of visitors and clarifies the differences in the weights of street choice parameters among the various attributes, such as gender, existence of destinations, number of people, etc. For all the attributes considered, the influences of DISTANCE and DIRECTION are strong. On the other hand, the influences of Int.V, SHOPS, CARS, ELEVATION, and WIDTH are different for each attribute. People with defined destinations tend to choose streets that “have more shops, and are wider and lower”. In contrast, people with undefined destinations tend to choose streets of high Int.V. The choice of males is affected by Int.V, SHOPS, WIDTH (positive and CARS (negative. Females prefer streets that have many shops, and couples tend to choose downhill streets. The behavior of individual persons is affected by all variables. The behavior of people visiting in groups is affected by SHOP and WIDTH (positive.

  2. Analyzing the Impact of Visitors on Page Views with Google Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD AMIN OMIDVAR

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a flexible methodology to analyze the effectiveness of different variables on various dependent variables which all are times series and especially shows how to use a timeseries regression on one of the most important and primary index (page views per visit on Google analytic and in conjunction it shows how to use the most suitable data to gain a more accurate result. Search engine visitors have a variety of impact on page views which cannot be described by single regression. On one hand referral visitors are well-fitted on linear regression with low impact. On the other hand, direct visitors made a huge impact on page views. The higher connection speed does not simply imply higher impact on page views and the content of web page and the territory of visitors can help connection speed to describe user behavior.Returning visitors have some similarities with direct visitors.

  3. Visitors' effects on the welfare of animals in the zoo: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1970s, research about zoo visitors' effects on the welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity has intensified. Numerous studies have shown that characteristics such as visitor presence, density, activity, size, and position are associated with animal behavioral and--to a lesser extent physiological--changes. Studies usually interpret these changes as negative (undesirable) or positive (enriching), but it remains unclear whether they significantly impinge on animal welfare. To make confident conclusions about visitors' effects necessitates more studies using (a) a wider range of animal groupings, (b) measures of stress, (c) visitor-animal variables, and (d) other methodological improvements In the meantime, in addition to further research, individual zoos need to emphasize (a) monitoring the stress indicators of their captive animals, (b) observing visitor behavior, and (c) ensuring that staffs are aware of the "visitor effect" concept.

  4. 2014 National Park visitor spending effects: economic contributions to local communities, states, and the nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Huber, Christopher; Koontz, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    The National Park System covers more than 84 million acres and is comprised of more than 401 sites across the Nation. These lands managed by the National Park Service (NPS) serve as recreational destinations for visitors from across the Nation and around the world. On vacations or on day trips, NPS visitors spend time and money in the gateway communities surrounding NPS sites. Spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway economies. The NPS has been measuring and reporting visitor spending and economic effects for the past 25 years. The 2012 analysis marked a major revision to the NPS visitor spending effects analyses, with the development of the Visitor Spending Effects model (VSE model) which replaced the previous Money Generation Model (see Cullinane Thomas et al. (2014) for a description of how the VSE model differs from the previous model). This report provides updated VSE estimates associated with 2014 NPS visitation.

  5. Analyzing the Impact of Visitors on Page Views with Google Analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Omidvar, Mohammad Amin; Shokry, Najes; 10.5121/ijwest.2011.2102

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a flexible methodology to analyze the effectiveness of different variables on various dependent variables which all are times series and especially shows how to use a time series regression on one of the most important and primary index (page views per visit) on Google analytic and in conjunction it shows how to use the most suitable data to gain a more accurate result. Search engine visitors have a variety of impact on page views which cannot be described by single regression. On one hand referral visitors are well-fitted on linear regression with low impact. On the other hand, direct visitors made a huge impact on page views. The higher connection speed does not simply imply higher impact on page views and the content of web page and the territory of visitors can help connection speed to describe user behavior. Returning visitors have some similarities with direct visitors.

  6. Flower size and longevity influence florivory in the large-flowered shrub Cistus ladanifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixido, Alberto L.; Méndez, Marcos; Valladares, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Plants with larger and longer-lived flowers receive more pollinator visits and increase reproductive success, though may also suffer more from antagonistic interactions with animals. Florivores can reduce fruit and seed production, so selection on flower size, floral longevity and/or number of flowers may thus be determined by the relative effects of both pollinators and florivores. In this study flowers of Cistus ladanifer, a large-flowered Mediterranean shrub, were monitored to evaluate the effects of flower size, floral longevity and number of flowers on levels of florivory in four populations. Number of flowers was variable but did not differ among populations. Both flower size and floral longevity of C. ladanifer showed broad variation and significantly differed among populations. Overall, 7% of flowers suffered attack by florivores, which were mainly ants picking the stamens and beetles consuming petals and pollen. Within-populations, larger and longer-lived flowers tended to be affected by florivores more frequently. The low overall incidence of florivores and its lack of between-population variation suggest that florivory may not influence intraspecific variation of these floral traits. However, moderate florivory levels on the largest and longest-lived flowers open the possibility of exerting selection towards smaller and shorter-lived flowers in some of the populations studied.

  7. Flower, fruit phenology and flower traits in Cordia boissieri (Boraginaceae from northeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Adrian Martínez-Adriano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We characterized variations in Cordia boissieri flowers and established if these variations occur between plants or between flowering events. Flowering and fruiting was measured for 256 plants. A GLM test was used to determine the relationship between flowering and fruit set processes and rainfall. We performed measurements of floral traits to detect variations within the population and between flowering events. The position of the anthers with respect to the ovary was determined in 1,500 flowers. Three out of four flowering events of >80% C. boissieri plants occurred after rainfall events. Only one flowering event occurred in a drought. Most plants flowered at least twice a year. The overlapping of flowering and fruiting only occurred after rainfall. Anthesis lasted three-to-five days, and there were two flower morphs. Half of the plants had longistylus and half had brevistylus flowers. Anacahuita flower in our study had 1–4 styles; 2–9 stamens; 6.5–41.5 mm long corolla; sepals from 4.5–29.5 mm in length; a total length from 15.5–59 mm; a corolla diameter from 10.5–77 mm. The nectar guide had a diameter from 5–30.5 mm; 4–9 lobes; and 5 distinguishable nectar guide colors. The highest variation of phenotypic expression was observed between plants.

  8. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  9. The Griffith Observatory exhibit programme: Turning visitors into observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins Petersen, C.; Pine, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most Southern Californians and the many visitors who come to Los Angeles, the venerable Griffith Observatory is the shining white building in the Hollywood Hills, once referred to by director E. C. Krupp as "the hood ornament of Los Angeles". It is also familiar to moviegoers in numerous films, most notably the famous James Dean flick, Rebel Without a Cause. Griffith Jenkins Griffith gave funding for construction of the Observatory to the city, as he wanted to create a "people's observatory". Since opening in 1935, the institution has been sharing the skies for free with anyone who wants to see them.

  10. 2013 National Park visitor spending effects: economic contributions to local communities, states, and the nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Huber, Christopher C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) manages the nation's most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors form across the nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. This economic effects analysis measures how NPS visitor spending cycles through local economies, generating business sales and supporting jobs and income.

  11. 2012 National Park visitor spending effects: economic contributions to local communities, states, and the nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Huber, Christopher C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) manages the nation's most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. This economic effects analysis measures how NPS visitor spending cycles through local economies, generating business sales and supporting jobs and income.

  12. Influence of Visitors' Flows on Indoor Air Quality of Museum Premises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Volodymyr; Lysak, Pavlo

    2012-06-01

    The article considers the influence of visitors' flows on indoor air quality of museum premises and work of ventilation and air conditioning systems. The article provides the analysis of the heat input from visitors, the results of mathematical simulation of visitors flow influence on indoor air quality. Several advice options are provided on application of variable air volume systems for provision of constant indoor air quality.

  13. National park visitor segments and their interest in rural tourism services and intention to revisit

    OpenAIRE

    SIEVÄNEN TUIJA; NEUVONEN MARJO; POUTA EIJA

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to understand national park visitors’ interests to use tourism services provided in the vicinity of Linnansaari, Seitseminen and Repovesi national parks in Southern Finland. Separate visitor groups were identified based on their use of tourism services and their intention to revisit the area. Data were generated from a questionnaire survey of 736 visitors to the national parks. The analyses revealed five dimensions of interest in tourism services from which five visitor groups ...

  14. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ansong

    Full Text Available Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63% having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  15. Health visitors and breastfeeding support: influence of knowledge and self-efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Væth, Michael; Olsen, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about what influences health visitors' breastfeeding support. The objective was to describe health visitors' breastfeeding experiences, beliefs, knowledge and self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance and determine the impact of a training course on these factors, and how...... the two groups on years since education, own breastfeeding experiences, beliefs or self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance except that health visitors in the intervention group, who had completed the course, demonstrated significantly higher scores on knowledge questions (P ... health visitors in the intervention group reported significantly higher self-efficacy in guidance on three of five breastfeeding problems (P

  16. VISITOR MANAGEMENT, A TOOL FOR SUSTAINABLE TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN PROTECTED AREAS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A N Candrea; A Ispas

    2009-01-01

    .... In order to manage protected areas within acceptable ecological and social carrying capacities, tourism planners need to monitor visitor numbers, leisure activities and behaviour and understand...

  17. Analyzing traffic source impact on returning visitors ratio in information provider website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetio, A.; Sari, P. K.; Sharif, O. O.; Sofyan, E.

    2016-04-01

    Web site performance, especially returning visitor is an important metric for an information provider web site. Since high returning visitor is a good indication of a web site’s visitor loyalty, it is important to find a way to improve this metric. This research investigated if there is any difference on returning visitor metric among three web traffic sources namely direct, referral and search. Monthly returning visitor and total visitor from each source is retrieved from Google Analytics tools and then calculated to measure returning visitor ratio. The period of data observation is from July 2012 to June 2015 resulting in a total of 108 samples. These data then analysed using One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to address our research question. The results showed that different traffic source has significantly different returning visitor ratio especially between referral traffic source and the other two traffic sources. On the other hand, this research did not find any significant difference between returning visitor ratio from direct and search traffic sources. The owner of the web site can focus to multiply referral links from other relevant sites.

  18. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  19. Effects of flowering phenology and synchrony on the reproductive success of a long-flowering shrub

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Traveset, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flowering phenology and synchrony with biotic and abiotic resources are crucial traits determining the reproductive success in insect-pollinated plants. In seasonal climates, plants flowering for long periods should assure reproductive success when resources are more predictable. In this work, we evaluated the relationship between flowering phenology and synchrony and reproductive success in Hypericum balearicum, a shrub flowering all year round but mainly during spring and summer. We studied...

  20. New evidence: Why flowers self-fertilize?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Studies on some Himalayan Sginger flowers have contributed novel empirical evidence to Charles Darwin's self-pollination theory, according to CAS researchers from the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden.

  1. A Role for Auxin in Flower Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youfa Cheng; Yunde Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Auxin has long been implicated in many aspects of plant growth and development including flower development. However, the exact roles of auxin in flower development have not been well defined until the recent identification of auxin biosynthesis mutants. Auxin is necessary for the initiation of floral primordia,and the disruption of auxin biosynthesis, polar auxin transport or auxin signaling leads to the failure of flower formation. Auxin also plays an essential role in specifying the number and identity of floral organs.Further analysis of the relationship between the auxin pathways and the known flower development genes will provide critical information regarding mechanisms of organogenesis and pattern formation in plants.

  2. [Pathways of flowering regulation in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongping; Yang, Jing; Yang, Mingfeng

    2015-11-01

    Flowering, the floral transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth, is induced by diverse endogenous and exogenous cues, such as photoperiod, temperature, hormones and age. Precise flowering time is critical to plant growth and evolution of species. The numerous renewal molecular and genetic results have revealed five flowering time pathways, including classical photoperiod pathway, vernalization pathway, autonomous pathway, gibberellins (GA) pathway and newly identified age pathway. These pathways take on relatively independent role, and involve extensive crosstalks and feedback loops. This review describes the complicated regulatory network of this floral transition to understand the molecular mechanism of flowering and provide references for further research in more plants.

  3. CMS inaugurates its high-tech visitor centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The new Building SL53 on CERN’s Cessy site in France is ready to welcome the thousands of visitors (30,000 in 2013) who come to learn about CMS each year. It boasts low energy consumption and the possibility, in the future, of being heated by recycling the heat given off by the detector.   The new Building SL53 at CERN’s Cessy site in France will be inaugurated on 24 May 2014. “Constructed by the GS Department and the firm Dimensione, the building meets the operational requirements of the CMS experiment, which require the uninterrupted use of its infrastructure,” explains Martin Gastal, the member of the collaboration in charge of the project. Its 560 m2 surface area features a meeting room, eight offices, an open space for CMS users, a rest area with a kitchen, sanitary facilities including showers, and a conference room in which to receive visitors. “The new conference room on the ground floor can accommodate 50 people,&am...

  4. Exploitation of Wild Flowers and the Sustainable Development of Flowers Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG Li; PANG Songling; ZHUO Lihuan

    2008-01-01

    This article introduced the new methods on the research of the wild flowers and plants idioplasmic resources, elaborated the introduction and domestication and exploitation of wild flowers and plants idioplasmatic resources and the sustainable development of flowers and plants industry in China, and put forward some proposals on the existing question and the prospects for the development.

  5. Visitor perceptions and the shifting social carrying capacity of South Sinai's coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leujak, Wera; Ormond, Rupert F G

    2007-04-01

    To investigate how the perceptions and behaviour of visitors to coral reefs are influenced by their prior experience and knowledge of marine life, a questionnaire-based study was undertaken at sites in the Ras Mohammed National Park and at Sharm El Sheikh, South Sinai, Egypt. It was evident that over the 10-20 years during which these reefs have deteriorated (mainly due to reef-flat trampling), there have been interrelated shifts in the nature of visitors making use of them. First, there has been a shift from experienced divers and snorkellers to inexperienced snorkellers and non-snorkellers with a poorer knowledge of reef biology. Second, there has been a shift in the predominant nationalities of visitors, from German and British, through Italian, to Russian. More recent user groups both stated and showed that they had less experience of snorkelling; they also showed less knowledge of marine life and less interest in learning about it. Visitor perceptions of both the state of the marine life on the reefs and the acceptability of current visitor numbers also varied between groups. More recent visitor groups and visitors with less knowledge were more satisfied with reef health. In general, however, visitor perceptions of reef health did not correlate well with actual reef conditions, probably because more experienced visitors preferred less impacted sites with which they were nevertheless less satisfied than inexperienced visitors at heavily impacted sites. More recent visitor groups were also less bothered by crowding on the shore or in the water. Consequently, the apparent "social carrying capacity" of sites seems to be increasing to a level well above the likely "ecological carrying capacity".

  6. Will woody plant encroachment impact the visitor experience and economy of conservation areas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma F. Gray

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Woody plant encroachment into savannas is a globally prevalent phenomenon and impacts ecosystem goods and services such as biodiversity, carbon storage, nutrient cycling, grazing and hydrology. The direct ecological and economic consequences for rangelands have been fairly well studied, but, to our knowledge, the economic impact on conservation efforts has not been investigated. African savannas are important as conservation areas because they support large numbers of the world’s remaining megafauna. This study used visitor surveys and long-term mammal distribution data to investigate how an increase in tree density might affect the visibility of animals in a conservation area, which could reduce the satisfaction of visitors to the area. We found that apparent herd sizes and density of animals were much reduced in woody areas, suggesting that visibility is negatively impacted. Visitor surveys determined that a large fraction (almost half of potential future visitors to the park may be lost if animals became more difficult to see and that the majority of these would be the higher-spending visitors. Responses differed depending on the origin of visitors, with international visitors being more interested in seeing animals, whilst local visitors were more content with just being away from the city. The results suggest that woody plant encroachment may have significant impacts on visitor numbers to savanna conservation areas, whilst animal numbers and densities may also be significantly impacted.Conservation implications: The results pointed to potentially significant economic consequences for conservation efforts as visitors become less satisfied with their experience. Perceptions of visitors are important for management decisions as park fees contribute significantly to conservation efforts. This could ultimately result in a reduced capacity for African conservation areas to conserve their biodiversity effectively. The results suggest that

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of soybean flowering genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chol-Hee Jung

    Full Text Available Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant

  8. Scent glands in legume flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, C R; Souza, C D; Barros, T C; Teixeira, S P

    2014-01-01

    Scent glands, or osmophores, are predominantly floral secretory structures that secrete volatile substances during anthesis, and therefore act in interactions with pollinators. The Leguminosae family, despite being the third largest angiosperm family, with a wide geographical distribution and diversity of habits, morphology and pollinators, has been ignored with respect to these glands. Thus, we localised and characterised the sites of fragrance production and release in flowers of legumes, in which scent plays an important role in pollination, and also tested whether there are relationships between the structure of the scent gland and the pollinator habit: diurnal or nocturnal. Flowers in pre-anthesis and anthesis of 12 legume species were collected and analysed using immersion in neutral red, olfactory tests and anatomical studies (light and scanning electron microscopy). The main production site of floral scent is the perianth, especially the petals. The scent glands are distributed in a restricted way in Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Anadenanthera peregrina, Inga edulis and Parkia pendula, constituting mesophilic osmophores, and in a diffuse way in Bauhinia rufa, Hymenaea courbaril, Erythrostemon gilliesii, Poincianella pluviosa, Pterodon pubescens, Platycyamus regnellii, Mucuna urens and Tipuana tipu. The glands are comprised of cells of the epidermis and mesophyll that secrete mainly terpenes, nitrogen compounds and phenols. Relationships between the presence of osmophores and type of anthesis (diurnal and nocturnal) and the pollinator were not found. Our data on scent glands in Leguminosae are original and detail the type of diffuse release, which has been very poorly studied.

  9. Sexual dimorphism in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Spencer C H; Hough, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Among dioecious flowering plants, females and males often differ in a range of morphological, physiological, and life-history traits. This is referred to as sexual dimorphism, and understanding why it occurs is a central question in evolutionary biology. Our review documents a range of sexually dimorphic traits in angiosperm species, discusses their ecological consequences, and details the genetic and evolutionary processes that drive divergence between female and male phenotypes. We consider why sexual dimorphism in plants is generally less well developed than in many animal groups, and also the importance of sexual and natural selection in contributing to differences between the sexes. Many sexually dimorphic characters, including both vegetative and flowering traits, are associated with differences in the costs of reproduction, which are usually greater in females, particularly in longer-lived species. These differences can influence the frequency and distribution of females and males across resource gradients and within heterogeneous environments, causing niche differences and the spatial segregation of the sexes. The interplay between sex-specific adaptation and the breakdown of between-sex genetic correlations allows for the independent evolution of female and male traits, and this is influenced in some species by the presence of sex chromosomes. We conclude by providing suggestions for future work on sexual dimorphism in plants, including investigations of the ecological and genetic basis of intraspecific variation, and genetic mapping and expression studies aimed at understanding the genetic architecture of sexually dimorphic trait variation.

  10. Fertilization Mechanisms in Flowering Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Sprunck, Stefanie; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-02-08

    Compared with the animal kingdom, fertilization is particularly complex in flowering plants (angiosperms). Sperm cells of angiosperms have lost their motility and require transportation as a passive cargo by the pollen tube cell to the egg apparatus (egg cell and accessory synergid cells). Sperm cell release from the pollen tube occurs after intensive communication between the pollen tube cell and the receptive synergid, culminating in the lysis of both interaction partners. Following release of the two sperm cells, they interact and fuse with two dimorphic female gametes (the egg and the central cell) forming the major seed components embryo and endosperm, respectively. This process is known as double fertilization. Here, we review the current understanding of the processes of sperm cell reception, gamete interaction, their pre-fertilization activation and fusion, as well as the mechanisms plants use to prevent the fusion of egg cells with multiple sperm cells. The role of Ca(2+) is highlighted in these various processes and comparisons are drawn between fertilization mechanisms in flowering plants and other eukaryotes, including mammals.

  11. Fertilization Mechanisms in Flowering Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Sprunck, Stefanie; Wessel, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the animal kingdom, fertilization is particularly complex in flowering plants (angiosperms). Sperm cells of angiosperms have lost their motility and require transportation as a passive cargo by the pollen tube cell to the egg apparatus (egg cell and accessory synergid cells). Sperm cell release from the pollen tube occurs after intensive communication between the pollen tube cell and the receptive synergid, culminating in the lysis of both interaction partners. Following release of the two sperm cells they interact and fuse with two dimorphic female gametes (egg and central cell) forming the major seed components embryo and endosperm, respectively. This process is known as double fertilization. Here we review the current understanding of the processes of sperm cell reception, gamete interaction, their pre-fertilization activation and fusion as well as the mechanisms plants use to prevent the fusion of egg cells with multiple sperm cells. The role of Ca2+ is highlighted in these various processes and comparisons are drawn between fertilization mechanisms in flowering plants and other eukaryotes including mammals. PMID:26859271

  12. Self-pollination rate and floral-display size in Asclepias syriaca (Common Milkweed) with regard to floral-visitor taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Aaron F; Barrows, Edward M

    2014-06-23

    Animals fertilize thousands of angiosperm species whose floral-display sizes can significantly influence pollinator behavior and plant reproductive success. Many studies have measured the interactions among pollinator behavior, floral-display size, and plant reproductive success, but few studies have been able to separate the effects of pollinator behavior and post-pollination processes on angiosperm sexual reproduction. In this study, we utilized the highly self-incompatible pollinium-pollination system of Asclepias syriaca (Common Milkweed) to quantify how insect visitors influenced male reproductive success measured as pollen removal, female reproductive success measured as pollen deposition, and self-pollination rate. We also determined how floral-display size impacts both visitor behavior and self-pollination rate. Four insect taxonomic orders visited A. syriaca: Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, and Lepidoptera. We focused on three groups of visitor taxa within two orders (Hymenoptera and Lepidoptera) with sample sizes large enough for quantitative analysis: Apis mellifera (Western Honey Bee), Bombus spp. (bumble bees) and lepidopterans (butterflies and moths). Qualitatively, lepidopterans had the highest pollinator importance values, but the large variability in the lepidopteran data precluded meaningful interpretation of much of their behavior. The introduced A. mellifera was the most effective and most important diurnal pollinator with regard to both pollen removal and pollen deposition. However, when considering the self-incompatibility of A. syriaca, A. mellifera was not the most important pollinator because of its high self-pollination rate as compared to Bombus spp. Additionally, the rate of self-pollination increased more rapidly with the number of flowers per inflorescence in A. mellifera than in the native Bombus spp. Apis mellifera's high rate of self-pollination may have significant negative effects on both male and female reproductive successes

  13. The Potential Influence of Bumble Bee Visitation on Foraging Behaviors and Assemblages of Honey Bees on Squash Flowers in Highland Agricultural Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenghua; Pan, Dongdong; Teichroew, Jonathan; An, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Bee species interactions can benefit plant pollination through synergistic effects and complementary effects, or can be of detriment to plant pollination through competition effects by reducing visitation by effective pollinators. Since specific bee interactions influence the foraging performance of bees on flowers, they also act as drivers to regulate the assemblage of flower visitors. We selected squash (Cucurbita pepo L.) and its pollinators as a model system to study the foraging response of honey bees to the occurrence of bumble bees at two types of sites surrounded by a high amount of natural habitats (≥ 58% of land cover) and a low amount of natural habitats (≤ 12% of land cover) in a highland agricultural ecosystem in China. At the individual level, we measured the elapsed time from the departure of prior pollinator(s) to the arrival of another pollinator, the selection of honey bees for flowers occupied by bumble bees, and the length of time used by honey bees to explore floral resources at the two types of sites. At the community level, we explored the effect of bumble bee visitation on the distribution patterns of honey bees on squash flowers. Conclusively, bumble bee visitation caused an increase in elapsed time before flowers were visited again by a honey bee, a behavioral avoidance by a newly-arriving honey bee to select flowers occupied by bumble bees, and a shortened length of time the honey bee takes to examine and collect floral resources. The number of overall bumble bees on squash flowers was the most important factor explaining the difference in the distribution patterns of honey bees at the community level. Furthermore, decline in the number of overall bumble bees on the squash flowers resulted in an increase in the number of overall honey bees. Therefore, our study suggests that bee interactions provide an opportunity to enhance the resilience of ecosystem pollination services against the decline in pollinator diversity.

  14. The Potential Influence of Bumble Bee Visitation on Foraging Behaviors and Assemblages of Honey Bees on Squash Flowers in Highland Agricultural Ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghua Xie

    Full Text Available Bee species interactions can benefit plant pollination through synergistic effects and complementary effects, or can be of detriment to plant pollination through competition effects by reducing visitation by effective pollinators. Since specific bee interactions influence the foraging performance of bees on flowers, they also act as drivers to regulate the assemblage of flower visitors. We selected squash (Cucurbita pepo L. and its pollinators as a model system to study the foraging response of honey bees to the occurrence of bumble bees at two types of sites surrounded by a high amount of natural habitats (≥ 58% of land cover and a low amount of natural habitats (≤ 12% of land cover in a highland agricultural ecosystem in China. At the individual level, we measured the elapsed time from the departure of prior pollinator(s to the arrival of another pollinator, the selection of honey bees for flowers occupied by bumble bees, and the length of time used by honey bees to explore floral resources at the two types of sites. At the community level, we explored the effect of bumble bee visitation on the distribution patterns of honey bees on squash flowers. Conclusively, bumble bee visitation caused an increase in elapsed time before flowers were visited again by a honey bee, a behavioral avoidance by a newly-arriving honey bee to select flowers occupied by bumble bees, and a shortened length of time the honey bee takes to examine and collect floral resources. The number of overall bumble bees on squash flowers was the most important factor explaining the difference in the distribution patterns of honey bees at the community level. Furthermore, decline in the number of overall bumble bees on the squash flowers resulted in an increase in the number of overall honey bees. Therefore, our study suggests that bee interactions provide an opportunity to enhance the resilience of ecosystem pollination services against the decline in pollinator diversity.

  15. Pollination networks of oil-flowers: a tiny world within the smallest of all worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Elisângela L S; Machado, Isabel C; Mello, Marco A R

    2009-09-01

    1. In the Neotropics, most plants depend on animals for pollination. Solitary bees are the most important vectors, and among them members of the tribe Centridini depend on oil from flowers (mainly Malpighiaceae) to feed their larvae. This specialized relationship within 'the smallest of all worlds' (a whole pollination network) could result in a 'tiny world' different from the whole system. This 'tiny world' would have higher nestedness, shorter path lengths, lower modularity and higher resilience if compared with the whole pollination network. 2. In the present study, we contrasted a network of oil-flowers and their visitors from a Brazilian steppe ('caatinga') to whole pollination networks from all over the world. 3. A network approach was used to measure network structure and, finally, to test fragility. The oil-flower network studied was more nested (NODF = 0.84, N = 0.96) than all of the whole pollination networks studied. Average path lengths in the two-mode network were shorter (one node, both for bee and plant one-mode network projections) and modularity was lower (M = 0.22 and four modules) than in all of the whole pollination networks. Extinctions had no or small effects on the network structure, with an average change in nestedness smaller than 2% in most of the cases studied; and only two species caused coextinctions. The higher the degree of the removed species, the stronger the effect and the higher the probability of a decrease in nestedness. 4. We conclude that the oil-flower subweb is more cohesive and resilient than whole pollination networks. Therefore, the Malpighiaceae have a robust pollination service in the Neotropics. Our findings reinforce the hypothesis that each ecological service is in fact a mosaic of different subservices with a hierarchical structure ('webs within webs').

  16. Air in xylem vessels of cut flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Meeteren, van U.; Keijzer, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Until now all studies on the role of air emboli in the water uptake of cut flowers describe indirect methods to demonstrate the presencFe of air in the plant tissues. Using cut chrysanthemum flowers, this report is the first one that directly visualises both air and water in xylem ducts of cut

  17. Postharvest: Cut flowers and potted plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past fifty years, the cut flower market has changed dramatically, from a local market with growers located on city outskirts, to a global one; flowers and cut foliage sourced from throughout the world are sold as bunches or combined into arrangements and bouquets in the major target markets. ...

  18. Flower development of Begonia franconis Liebm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghoef, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chapter 1The effects of growth-regulating substances and environmental conditions on the composition of Begonia franconis Liebm. inflorescences were analysed. The inflorescences are generally composed of two male flowers and one terminal female flower.Auxins, gibberellins, and cytokinins, added to t

  19. An Environmental Approach to Positive Emotion: Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Haviland-Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than 5000 years, people have cultivated flowers although there is no known reward for this costly behavior. In three different studies we show that flowers are a powerful positive emotion “inducer”. In Study 1, flowers, upon presentation to women, always elicited the Duchenne or true smile. Women who received flowers reported more positive moods 3 days later. In Study 2, a flower given to men or women in an elevator elicited more positive social behavior than other stimuli. In Study 3, flowers presented to elderly participants (55+ age elicited positive mood reports and improved episodic memory. Flowers have immediate and long-term effects on emotional reactions, mood, social behaviors and even memory for both males and females. There is little existing theory in any discipline that explains these findings. We suggest that cultivated flowers are rewarding because they have evolved to rapidly induce positive emotion in humans, just as other plants have evolved to induce varying behavioral responses in a wide variety of species leading to the dispersal or propagation of the plants.

  20. Flower development of Begonia franconis Liebm.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghoef, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chapter 1

    The effects of growth-regulating substances and environmental conditions on the composition of Begonia franconis Liebm. inflorescences were analysed. The inflorescences are generally composed of two male flowers and one terminal female flower.

    Auxins,

  1. Presence of two types of flowers with respect to nectar sugar in two gregariously flowering species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chaitali Anand; Chaitrali Umranikar; Pooja Shintre; Anuja Damle; Janhavi Kale; Jahnavi Joshi; Milind Watve

    2007-06-01

    Many species of animal-pollinated flowers are known to vary widely in the nectar content of flowers. Some proportion of flowers in many species is apparently nectarless, and such flowers are believed to be ‘cheaters’. Cheating may explain a part of the variability in nectar content. If cheating exists as a qualitatively different strategy then we expect bimodality in the distribution of nectar content of flowers. It has been shown in a multispecies study that gregarious species have a higher proportion of cheater flowers. We studied the frequency distribution of total nectar sugar in two gregariously flowering species Lantana camara and Utricularia purpurascens, which differed in other floral and ecological characters. At the population level, both the species showed significant bimodality in the total sugar content of flowers. The obvious sources of heterogeneity in the data did not explain bimodality. In Lantana camara, bimodality was observed within flowers of some of the individual plants sampled. In Utricularia purpurascens the proportion of nectarless flowers was more in high-density patches, suggesting that the gregariousness hypothesis may work within a species as well. The results support the hypothesis of cheating as a distinct strategy since two distinct types of flowers were observed in both the species. The effect of density in Utricularia purpurascens also supports the gregariousness hypothesis.

  2. Meta-analysis of phenotypic selection on flowering phenology suggests that early flowering plants are favoured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Ollerton, Jeff; Parra-Tabla, Victor; De-Nova, J Arturo

    2011-05-01

    Flowering times of plants are important life-history components and it has previously been hypothesized that flowering phenologies may be currently subject to natural selection or be selectively neutral. In this study we reviewed the evidence for phenotypic selection acting on flowering phenology using ordinary and phylogenetic meta-analysis. Phenotypic selection exists when a phenotypic trait co-varies with fitness; therefore, we looked for studies reporting an association between two components of flowering phenology (flowering time or flowering synchrony) with fitness. Data sets comprising 87 and 18 plant species were then used to assess the incidence and strength of phenotypic selection on flowering time and flowering synchrony, respectively. The influence of dependence on pollinators, the duration of the reproductive event, latitude and plant longevity as moderators of selection were also explored. Our results suggest that selection favours early flowering plants, but the strength of selection is influenced by latitude, with selection being stronger in temperate environments. However, there is no consistent pattern of selection on flowering synchrony. Our study demonstrates that phenotypic selection on flowering time is consistent and relatively strong, in contrast to previous hypotheses of selective neutrality, and has implications for the evolution of temperate floras under global climate change. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  3. Living Liquid: Design and Evaluation of an Exploratory Visualization Tool for Museum Visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Liao, I; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Frazier, J

    2012-12-01

    Interactive visualizations can allow science museum visitors to explore new worlds by seeing and interacting with scientific data. However, designing interactive visualizations for informal learning environments, such as museums, presents several challenges. First, visualizations must engage visitors on a personal level. Second, visitors often lack the background to interpret visualizations of scientific data. Third, visitors have very limited time at individual exhibits in museums. This paper examines these design considerations through the iterative development and evaluation of an interactive exhibit as a visualization tool that gives museumgoers access to scientific data generated and used by researchers. The exhibit prototype, Living Liquid, encourages visitors to ask and answer their own questions while exploring the time-varying global distribution of simulated marine microbes using a touchscreen interface. Iterative development proceeded through three rounds of formative evaluations using think-aloud protocols and interviews, each round informing a key visualization design decision: (1) what to visualize to initiate inquiry, (2) how to link data at the microscopic scale to global patterns, and (3) how to include additional data that allows visitors to pursue their own questions. Data from visitor evaluations suggests that, when designing visualizations for public audiences, one should (1) avoid distracting visitors from data that they should explore, (2) incorporate background information into the visualization, (3) favor understandability over scientific accuracy, and (4) layer data accessibility to structure inquiry. Lessons learned from this case study add to our growing understanding of how to use visualizations to actively engage learners with scientific data.

  4. 76 FR 52013 - Notice of Continuation of Visitor Services-Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Continuation of Visitor Services--Yosemite National Park AGENCY: National..., the National Park Service intends to request a continuation of visitor services in Yosemite National... Services Program, National Park Service, 1201 Eye Street, NW., 11th Floor, Washington, DC 20005;...

  5. 77 FR 11567 - Notice of Extension of Visitor Services-Mount Rainier National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Extension of Visitor Services--Mount Rainier National Park AGENCY: National..., the National Park Service intends to request an extension of visitor services in Mount Rainier National Park for a period not to exceed one year from the expiration date of the current contract....

  6. Using Google Analytics to measure visitor statistics: The case of food composition websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkala, H.; Presser, K.; Christensen, Tue

    2012-01-01

    Measuring visitor statistics is a core activity for any website provider. However, the analytical methods have so far been quite limited, difficult, expensive, or cumbersome. Google Analytics (GA) offers a free tool for measuring and analysing visitor statistics. GA was tested on three food...... website providers to utilise either GA or another of the similar tools available....

  7. Meeting the visitor: Distribution and dissemination of mobile guides at the museum front desk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Ditte

    Over the years, the benefits of mobile devices in museums have been explored in a number of papers. Yet studies show that encouraging visitors to use mobile interpretation is the largest challenge in implementing mobile projects in museums. One of the keys to encouraging visitors to use mobile...

  8. Exploring Use of New Media in Environmental Education Contexts: Introducing Visitors' Technology Use in Zoos Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocco, Victor; Danter, Elizabeth H.; Heimlich, Joseph E.; Dunckel, Betty A.; Myers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Modern zoological gardens have invested substantial resources in technology to deliver environmental education concepts to visitors. Investment in these media reflects a currently unsubstantiated belief that visitors will both use and learn from these media alongside more traditional and less costly displays. This paper proposes a model that…

  9. Coaching via Electronic Performance Feedback to Support Home Visitors' Use of Caregiver Coaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick Oborn, Kellie M.; Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recommended practices for Part C early childhood special education home visitors encourage use of caregiver coaching strategies to enhance learning opportunities within the natural routines of infants and toddlers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent professional development intervention on home visitors' use…

  10. 77 FR 62223 - Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... No: 2012-25204] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Board of Visitors Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting... of Committee: Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: October...

  11. 76 FR 45543 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DOD. ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center meeting scheduled for August 3 and 4, 2011 published in the...

  12. Coaching via Electronic Performance Feedback to Support Home Visitors' Use of Caregiver Coaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick Oborn, Kellie M.; Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recommended practices for Part C early childhood special education home visitors encourage use of caregiver coaching strategies to enhance learning opportunities within the natural routines of infants and toddlers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent professional development intervention on home visitors' use…

  13. National forest visitor spending averages and the influence of trip-type and recreation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric M. White; Daniel I. Stynes

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of national forest recreation visitor spending serve us inputs to regional economic analyses and help to identify the economic linkages between national forest recreation use and local forest communities. When completing recreation-related analyses, managers, planners, and researchers frequently think of visitors in terms of recreation activity. When...

  14. Designing a sampling system for concurrently measuring outdoor recreation visitation and describing visitor characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald B.K. English; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Susan M. Kocis

    2004-01-01

    Two primary information needs for managing recreation areas and the visitors to those areas are: (1) good estimates of visitation volume, and (2) accurate descriptions of visitor characteristics, such as length of stay, frequency of visit, and primary activity. For National Forests in the United States of America with large undeveloped areas, efficient sampling for the...

  15. 77 FR 41196 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Teleconference Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy) and advise the Administrator of the Federal Emergency...

  16. 78 FR 32241 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting AGENCY: Department... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013. 3. Time: 2 p...). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy leadership will...

  17. 76 FR 31308 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... USMA Board of Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6...

  18. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy...

  19. 77 FR 69648 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board... of the Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy...

  20. 76 FR 58028 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy...

  1. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy...

  2. 77 FR 57102 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy) and advise the Administrator of the Federal Emergency...

  3. 76 FR 41490 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy...

  4. 76 FR 36933 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board... Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy...

  5. 77 FR 61775 - Cancellation; Federal Advisory Committee Meeting: Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting cancellation. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board... Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy...

  6. 75 FR 7571 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Tuesday, March 9, 2010. 3. Time: 12:30... provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy leadership will provide the Board updates on the...

  7. 75 FR 3901 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy...

  8. 78 FR 60266 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... Visitors (BoV). Members of the Board will be provided updates on Academy issues. 6. Agenda: The Academy...

  9. 77 FR 21576 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Teleconference Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy) and...

  10. 77 FR 5818 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... committee teleconference meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... of the Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy...

  11. Visitor and recreation impact monitoring: Is it lost in the gulf between science and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    2006-01-01

    Park managers have seldom had the scientific information on recreation and its impacts that they need. Despite allocating substantial portions of park budgets to visitor management, few resources are typically allocated to recreation science. This is hugely problematic. Visitors are a focal species in every park and yet we have little systematic information about how...

  12. 22 CFR 41.31 - Temporary visitors for business or pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary visitors for business or pleasure. 41... business or pleasure. (a) Classification. An alien is classifiable as a nonimmigrant visitor for business... temporary stay (consular officers are authorized, if departure of the alien as required by law does not...

  13. 77 FR 31724 - Exchange Visitor Program-Summer Work Travel; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 22 CFR Part 62 RIN 1400-AD14 Exchange Visitor Program--Summer Work Travel; Correction AGENCY: Department of... Exchange Visitor Program--Summer Work Travel interim final rule published in the Federal Register on May...

  14. Hobby-Related Information-Seeking Behaviour of Highly Dedicated Online Museum Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper explores the characteristics of online museum visitors in an everyday life, information-seeking context. Method: A triangulation of research methods was applied. A Web questionnaire survey gave initial, quantitative information about online museum visitors to a military museum. Follow-up interviews (n = 24) obtained rich,…

  15. Validation of the Visitor and Resident Framework in an E-Book Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelsmann, Hazel C.; Greifeneder, Elke; Lauridsen, Nikoline D.; Nielsen, Anja G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: By applying the visitor and resident framework on e-book usage, the article explores whether the concepts of a resident and a visitor can help to explain e-book use, and can help to gain a better insight into users' motivations for e-book use. Method: A questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were conducted with users of the…

  16. Gateways as a means of visitor management in national parks and protected areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beunen, R.; Regnerus, H.D.; Jaarsma, C.F.

    2008-01-01

    Managers of national parks and other protected areas need to balance visitor needs with conservation objectives. In Western Europe, these areas are often part of a "living landscape" where people live and work and where the area roads are used not only by visitors but also by utilitarian local bound

  17. Exploring Use of New Media in Environmental Education Contexts: Introducing Visitors' Technology Use in Zoos Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocco, Victor; Danter, Elizabeth H.; Heimlich, Joseph E.; Dunckel, Betty A.; Myers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Modern zoological gardens have invested substantial resources in technology to deliver environmental education concepts to visitors. Investment in these media reflects a currently unsubstantiated belief that visitors will both use and learn from these media alongside more traditional and less costly displays. This paper proposes a model that…

  18. 77 FR 65870 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on December 3,...

  19. 75 FR 18167 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on June 28, 2010,...

  20. 78 FR 53430 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on September 30,...

  1. 75 FR 22559 - Federal Advisory Committee; Air University Board of Visitors; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Air University Board of Visitors; Charter Renewal AGENCY... the charter for the Air University Board of Visitors (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER..., 703-601-6128. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Board is a discretionary Federal advisory committee...

  2. Influence of benchmarking on wilderness visitor and manager perceptions of campsite conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph P. Flood

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare visitor and manager perceptions of how heavily impacted wilderness campsites and restoration activities to restore them influence quality of visitor experience and opinions of managers. The study conducted in the Mission Mountains Wilderness ("MMW") is located in northwestern Montana and managed by the USDA Forest...

  3. What’s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as ‘plants that grow where they are not wanted’. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people’s age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors’ overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks. PMID:26252004

  4. In vitro flowering of Dendrobium candidum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王光远; 许智宏; 蔡德发; 蔡南海

    1997-01-01

    Dendrobium candidum, a wild orchid species from China, normally requires three to four years of cultivation before it can produce flowers. The effects of plant hormones and polyamines on flower initiation of this species in tissue culture were investigated. The addition of spermidine, or BA, or the combination of NAA and BA to the culture medium can induce protocorms or shoots to flower within three to six months with a frequency of 31.6% -45.8%. The flowering frequency can be further increased to 82.8 % on the average by pre-treatment of protocorms in an ABA-containing medium followed by transfer onto MS medium with BA. The induction of precocious flowering de-pends on the developmental stage of the experimental materials (protocorms, shoots and plantlets) used , and usually occurs only when root formation is inhibited.

  5. Genetic markers for flowering in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paina, Cristiana; Byrne, Stephen; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan

    2011-01-01

    genes will be converted to molecular markers and mapped in an existing mapping population previously characterized for flowering time and vernalization response. References: Amasino, R.M., Michaels S.D. (2010). The Timing of Flowering. Plant Physiology 154: 516–520 Greenup, A., W. Peacock, W.J., Dennis...... E.S., Trevaskis, B. (2009). The molecular biology of seasonal flowering-responses in Arabidopsis and the cereals. Annals of Botany 103: 1165–1172 Distelfeld, A.,Li, C., Dubcovsky J. (2009). Regulation of flowering in temperate cereals. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 12:178–184 Jung, C., Müller, A.......E. (2009). Flowering time control and applications in plant breeding. Trends in Plant Science 14 /10: 563-573 Andersen, J.L., Jensen, L.B., Asp, T., Lübberstedt, T. (2006). Vernalization response in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) involves orthologues of diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum) VRN1...

  6. Zoo visitors' understanding of terms denoting research activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Lloyd

    2014-07-01

    Zoos have increasingly sought to justify their existence by reference to a scientific role particularly in the domains of animal welfare and conservation. Given recent initiatives by the UK government to foster public engagement with science, it is timely to investigate public attitudes towards primary research activity by zoos. This study reports the views of 83 visitors to Edinburgh Zoo. Within certain items in a structured interview noun terms denoting research activity were manipulated ("research" versus "studies") as was their qualification (adjective "scientific" present or absent before the noun term). "Research" was associated with a restricted and negative perception of investigatory activity. This effect was intensified when the noun term was preceded by "scientific". It is concluded that there is a continuing need to challenge public perceptions, particularly of the phrase "scientific research"; that in the meantime zoos should perhaps exercise caution when using it in relation to their activities.

  7. Home visitors and child health in England: advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cowley

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the early years as a focus for reducing health inequalities as well as one that is important for the children themselves. This paper describes the introduction in England of Sure Start Local Programmes, which included home visiting within a community development approach, and an intensive home visiting programme, the Nurse-Family partnership, for disadvantaged teenage mothers. It reflects on changes and challenges in service provision to mothers and their pre-school children in England, explaining that a long tradition of home visiting was, paradoxically, reduced as attention focused on the newer initiatives. This is now being addressed, with attention to a range of evidence based programmes and a specific focus on heath visitor provision.

  8. Evaluation of Social Carrying Capacity of Topkapi Palace By Employees and Visitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurban Ünlüönen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Visitors’ using attraction resources at an optimum level is essential for the sustainable usage of areas. In fact Topkapı Palace arouses a considerable level of interest in terms of resources it has and this interest consequently leads to a concentration of visitors and a high degree of usage. The concentration in the area has utmost importance in terms of visitor carrying capacity. One of the groups who can evaluate the concentration present in this area most efficiently is the employees of the palace who are in continuous interaction with the visitors. One of the main objectives of this study is revealing the opinions of the employees on visitor carrying capacity. In order to gather information from the employees, face-to-face interview technique has been used and the evaluations of the employees have shown that visitor concentration has reached a level which may cause some negative results.

  9. Frequent visitors to psychiatric emergency services: staff attitudes and temporal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia; Zeman, Lori Lackman; Yeager, Lindsay; Mischel, Edward; Amirsadri, Alireza

    2002-11-01

    Providing quality psychiatric emergency services is becoming more difficult as utilization rates soar, especially by individuals who are frequent visitors. To address this issue, a staff survey and analysis of admission patterns were conducted. Staff were more likely to believe that frequent visitors sought care because they had difficulty accessing alternative services, had basic needs unmet, were substance abusers, wanted inpatient admission, and were noncompliant with treatment plans. The 1999 temporal admission pattern documented that frequent visitors' admissions were higher during the first week of the month and inclement weather. Surprisingly, the infrequent visitors' admissions also were higher during the first week of the month. Together, these findings suggest that, in this urban location, frequent visitors are disadvantaged individuals lacking support and alternative treatment settings who use psychiatric emergency services to meet basic needs.

  10. An analysis of visitors' length of stay through noninvasive Bluetooth monitoring in the Louvre Museum

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Yuji; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Art Museums traditionally employ observations and surveys to enhance their knowledge of visitors' behavior and experience. However, these approaches often produce spatially and temporally limited empirical evidence and measurements. Only recently has the ubiquity of digital technologies revolutionized the ability to collect data on human behavior. Consequently, the greater availability of large-scale datasets based on quantifying visitors' behavior provides new opportunities to apply computational and comparative analytical techniques. In this paper, we attempt to analyze visitors' behavior in the Louvre Museum from anonymized longitudinal datasets collected from noninvasive Bluetooth sensors. We examine visitors' length of stay in the museum and consider this relationship with occupation density around artwork. This data analysis increases the knowledge and understanding of museum professionals related to the experience of visitors.

  11. Lightning safety awareness of visitors in three California national parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichenthal, Lori; Allen, Jacoby; Davis, Kyle P; Campagne, Danielle; Snowden, Brandy; Hughes, Susan

    2011-09-01

    To assess the level of lightning safety awareness among visitors at 3 national parks in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. A 12-question, short answer convenience sample survey was administered to participants 18 years of age and over concerning popular trails and points of interest with known lightning activity. There were 6 identifying questions and 5 knowledge-based questions pertaining to lightning that were scored on a binary value of 0 or 1 for a total of 10 points for the survey instrument. Volunteers in Fresno, California, were used as a control group. Participants were categorized as Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park (SEKI), frontcountry (FC), or backcountry (BC); Yosemite National Park (YNP) FC or BC; and Fresno. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test for differences between groups. 467 surveys were included for analysis: 77 in Fresno, 192 in SEKI, and 198 in YNP. National park participants demonstrated greater familiarity with lightning safety than individuals from the metropolitan community (YNP 5.84 and SEKI 5.65 vs Fresno 5.14, P = .0032). There were also differences noted between the BC and FC subgroups (YNP FC 6.07 vs YNP BC 5.62, P = .02; YNP FC 6.07 vs SEKI FC 5.58, P = .02). Overall results showed that participants had certain basic lightning knowledge but lacked familiarity with other key lightning safety recommendations. While there are statistically significant differences in lightning safety awareness between national parks and metropolitan participants, the clinical impact of these findings are debatable. This study provides a starting point for providing educational outreach to visitors in these national parks. Copyright © 2011 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ESTUDIOS DE VISITANTES A MUSEOS (VISITOR STUDIES IN MUSEUMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Sánchez Keilyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo ofrece un estudio bibliográfico en torno a las investigaciones sobre la relación entre la museografía y sus visitantes. El objetivo central de este documento consiste en elaborar una clasificación de esos estudios en programas de investigación de manera que sirva de punto de partida para la construcción de una pedagogía del Museo. Para este fin, se utiliza la propuesta de Schulman, sobre tipificación de estudios en programas de investigación y, al respecto, se plantean cuatro tipos: investigaciones centradas en lo museográfico, investigaciones centradas en el comportamiento museal, investigaciones centradas en la interacción dispositivo-visitantes y las investigaciones centradas en la evaluación museográfica. Se concluye que los resultados de investigación de estos programas, junto con el conocimiento de las técnicas de diseño y a la teoría educativa, serían la base central de un planteamiento sobre pedagogía museológica.Abstract: This article is a bibliographical research study of museography and the relationship of visitors to them. The main objective of this paper is to develop a classification system of these studies of research programs which serve as a starting point for systematizing the pedagogics of the museum. The author's fourfold typology of research programs builds on Schulman’s (1989 program research concept: museography centered research, museum behavior centered research, museum interaction (visitor-exhibition centered research, and museum evaluation centered research. The article reaches the conclusion that the research findings of these programs along with knowledge of design techniques and educational theory will serve as the primary basis for a Museology pedagogy proposal.

  13. The Variation of Oncidium Rosy Sunset Flower Volatiles with Daily Rhythm, Flowering Period, and Flower Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Tien Chiu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oncidium is an important ornamental crop worldwide, and in recent years, the characteristics of the flower aroma have become a concern for breeders. This study used headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis of the volatile compounds to study the aroma characteristics of Onc. Rosy Sunset. A total of 45 compounds were identified, with the major compound being linalool. Onc. Rosy Sunset had the highest odor concentration from 10:00 to 12:00 and lowest from 20:00 to 24:00. The inflorescence emitted the highest quantities of volatile compounds during stages 3–6, which then decreased with the aging of the flowers. In Onc. Rosy Sunset, the sepals and petals were the major parts for the floral fragrance emission, in which linalool content was the highest, whereas the lip and column had a different composition of major volatile compounds, of which benzaldehyde, β-myrcene, and β-caryophyllene dominated.

  14. Flowering phenology in subalpine meadows: does climate variation influence community co-flowering patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Jessica; Inouye, David W; Thomson, James D

    2010-02-01

    Climate change is expected to alter patterns of species co-occurrence, in both space and time. Species-specific shifts in reproductive phenology may alter the assemblages of plant species in flower at any given time during the growing season. Temporal overlap in the flowering periods (co-flowering) of animal-pollinated species may influence reproductive success if competitive or facilitative interactions between plant species affect pollinator services. We used a 33-year data set on flowering phenology in subalpine meadows in Colorado, USA, to determine whether interannual variation in snowmelt date, which marks the start of the growing season, affected co-flowering patterns. For two of four species considered, we found a significant relationship between snowmelt timing and composition of the assemblage of co-flowering plants. In years of early snowmelt, Lathyrus lanszwertii var. leucanthus (Fabaceae), the species we investigated in most detail, tended to overlap with earlier-flowering species and with fewer species overall. In particular, overlap with the flowering period of Lupinus polyphyllus var. prunophilus, with which Lathyrus leucanthus shares pollinators, was significantly reduced in early-snowmelt years. The observed association between timing of snowmelt and patterns of flowering overlap could not have been predicted simply by examining temporal trends in the dates of peak flowering of the dominant species in the community, as peak flowering dates have largely shifted in parallel with respect to snowmelt date. However, subtle interspecific differences in responsiveness of flowering time, duration, and intensity to interannual climate variation have likely contributed to the observed relationship. Although much of the year-to-year variation in flowering overlap remains unexplained by snowmelt date, our finding of a measurable signal of climate variation suggests that future climate change may lead to altered competitive environments for these wildflower

  15. 78 FR 58343 - Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... National Park Service Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S... reference Information Collection 1024-NEW, Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks in.... II. Data OMB Control Number: XXXX-New. Title: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in US...

  16. Self-Regulated Learning in the Museum: Understanding the Relationship of Visitor's Goals, Learning Strategies, and Appraisals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Urhahne, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) in the museum was explored by 2 investigations. The first one investigated 233 visitors on their goals and intended learning strategies by questionnaire before they visited the science museum. Results indicated visitors' learning goals can predict their intended deep-learning strategy. Moreover, visitors can be…

  17. The relationship between visitor characteristics and learning-associated behaviors in a science museum discovery space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozowski Boisvert, Dorothy; Jochums Slez, Brenda

    As informal educational institutions, science museums must do more than entertain and amaze visitors. Museum educators must design exhibits that attract and hold the attention of visitors long enough so that the visitors become engaged with the exhibits and learn from them. In order for museum educators to develop such exhibits, more information is needed about the variables associated with learning in museums. This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge on informal education by examining the relationship between visitor characteristics and attraction, holding power, and visitor engagement.One hundred fifty-four visitors to a science museum discovery space were observed as they interacted freely with the exhibits. Trained volunteers recorded the subjects' movements including the exhibits at which they stopped (attraction), the amount of time spent at each exhibit (holding power), and behaviors indicative of subjects' engagement levels with the exhibits. Data indicated significant differences between age group and the holding power of exhibits. Though not significant statistically, a similar trend was noted between age group and attraction and visitor engagement level. No significant differences were found between gender or social grouping and attraction, holding power, or engagement levels.

  18. Spatially Characterizing Visitor Use and Its Association with Informal Trails in Yosemite Valley Meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden-Schreiner, Chelsey; Leung, Yu-Fai

    2013-07-01

    Ecological impacts associated with nature-based recreation and tourism can compromise park and protected area goals if left unrestricted. Protected area agencies are increasingly incorporating indicator-based management frameworks into their management plans to address visitor impacts. Development of indicators requires empirical evaluation of indicator measures and examining their ecological and social relevance. This study addresses the development of the informal trail indicator in Yosemite National Park by spatially characterizing visitor use in open landscapes and integrating use patterns with informal trail condition data to examine their spatial association. Informal trail and visitor use data were collected concurrently during July and August of 2011 in three, high-use meadows of Yosemite Valley. Visitor use was clustered at statistically significant levels in all three study meadows. Spatial data integration found no statistically significant differences between use patterns and trail condition class. However, statistically significant differences were found between the distance visitors were observed from informal trails and visitor activity type with active activities occurring closer to trail corridors. Gender was also found to be significant with male visitors observed further from trail corridors. Results highlight the utility of integrated spatial analysis in supporting indicator-based monitoring and informing management of open landscapes. Additional variables for future analysis and methodological improvements are discussed.

  19. Case-control study of frequent visitors to an urban psychiatric emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Zeman, Lori L; Yeager, Lindsay; White, Aja; Mischel, Edward; Amirsadri, Alireza

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for people who use psychiatric emergency services repeatedly and to estimate their financial charges. The authors used interviews and chart reviews to compare 74 patients who had six or more visits to an urban psychiatric emergency service in the 12 months before an index visit with 74 patients who had five or fewer visits. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors. Independent risk factors for frequent visitors were self-reported hospitalization in the past 12 months, need for medications as the self-reported reason for seeking care, being homeless or living in an institution, and not giving the name of a friend or family member for interview. The level of burden for support of persons who were interviewed was low and did not differ between frequent and infrequent visitors. Compared with infrequent visitors, frequent visitors had greater utilization of inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services, general emergency services, and crisis residential services in the 12 months before the index visit and greater utilization of general emergency services and psychiatric emergency services in the three months after the index visit. Frequent visitors' median financial charge for those services was 16,200 US dollars greater (5.9 times greater) than that of infrequent visitors. Frequent visitors represent resource-poor mentally ill persons who have high levels of utilization of health care facilities besides psychiatric emergency services. Possible clinical interventions for these patients include focused medication reviews.

  20. Enhancing Visitor Experiences Using Thematic Interpretation in Park Guiding Service in Sarawak National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Victor Luna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing visitor experiences is arguably the primary and most important goal for interpretation by many protected area managers and tourism business. However, little research has been conducted in Sarawak, Malaysia to directly quantify the effects of thematic interpretation has on tourist experiences. Drawing on the TORE-model of interpretation and through the inception of Park Guiding Training and Licensing System in Sarawak since 2007, this quantitative study examines the effectiveness of thematic interpretive guided tours delivered by park guides at Bako National Park, Sarawak, with the assumption that it will further enhance visitor experiences. A descriptive analysis and Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis of sub-indicators of the global evaluation of interpretation of site, and sub-indicators of elaboration surveyed from visitors of purposively sampled park guides revealed a strong measurement and correlation coefficients of visitors’ overall quality of thematic intepretive guided tours effecting visitor satisfaction and experiences. These findings provide empirical evidence that good thematic interpretive guided tour makes a positive impacts on visitor experiences, thus making training of tourism businesses' employees as park guides as a good investment. The suggestions for further research in influencing visitor attitude and shaping visitor behaviour are offered.

  1. Innovative Interactive Visitor Experiences Focused on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettvin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Science Center has adopted a multi-pronged approach to introduce visitors to the concepts of climate change and linkages to human behavior in an informal science education setting. We leverage key fixed exhibit assets derived from collaborations with NOAA: Science on a Sphere and an exhibit kiosk showcasing local CO2 measurements that are adjacent on our exhibit floor. NOAA PMEL Scientists deployed a sensor at the top of the Space Needle that measures variability in atmospheric CO2 over Seattle; the kiosk showcases these near-real-time, daily, weekly and monthly measurements as well as similar observations from a NOAA buoy near Aberdeen, Washington. Displays of these data enable visitors to see first-hand varying CO2 levels in urban and remote marine environments as well as seasonal cycling. It also reveals quantifiable increases in CO2 levels over a relatively short time (~5 years). Trained interpreters help visitors understand linkages between personal behavior and corresponding CO2 footprints. Interpreters discuss connections between local and regional CO2 measurements displayed on the kiosk, and global Sphere datasets including NOAA Carbon Tracker, changing arctic sea ice coverage and sea level rise projections. Portable Discovery Carts, consisting of props and interactive, hands-on activities provide a platform for facilitated interpretation on a series of topics. We have developed two climate focused carts: 'Sinks and Sources' that examines materials and activities that produce and absorb carbon, and 'Ocean Acidification' that shows how absorption of atmospheric CO2 is changing ocean composition and its habitability for marine life. These carts can be deployed anywhere on the exhibit floor but are primarily used adjacent to the Sphere and the kiosk, making it possible to have a range of conversations about global and local CO2 levels, linkages to individual and collective behaviour and associated implications. Additional collaborations with members of

  2. Impacts of global warming on the interaction between host plants,insect pests and their natural enemies%全球气候变暖对“植物-害虫-天敌”互作系统的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚凤銮; 尤民生

    2012-01-01

    Global change, especially global warming, has become a global problem and challenge. Because insects hare a short generation time and high reproductive rate they are likely to manifest effects of global wanning in their development, reproduction and survival. Global warming can potentially affect insects in several ways, such as phonological changes, and latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in distribution. Insects are living in an interactive system with many species of plants and predators, all of which are affected directly or indirectly by changes in temperature. Such influences can lead to large variation in relative growth rates and phenological synchrony of host plants, insect pests and their natural enemies, and such species-specific responses to global warming can change the interactive system of interspecific ( food-chain) components. Insects may escape unsuitable temperatures either temporally or spatially. Temporal escape is achieved by dormancy and diapauses whereas spatial escape is achieved by migration and dispersal. Variation in temporal or spatial synchrony can lead to changes in the species composition of communities and resultant changes in ecosystem services and function.%全球气候变化是近来人类关注的焦点问题,其最显著的特征是气候变暖.因为昆虫具有生活周期短、繁殖率高等特点,所以,气候变暖对昆虫的发育、繁殖和存活会产生强烈的直接影响.气候变暖促使一些昆虫提前春天的物候现象,向高纬度或高海拔地区迁移.然而,昆虫在自然界并非孤立地存在,它们与寄主植物和自然天敌相互联系、相互作用,并在长期的进化过程中逐渐适应特定区域的气候条件.因此,全球气候变暖对“植物-害虫-天敌”的种间关系必然产生直接或间接的影响,导致不同昆虫之间以及昆虫与其相关营养层的物种之间的相互关系在气候变化下呈现出时间上的异步性和空间上的错位,从而影响

  3. Flower Power at the Dutch Flower Auctions? Application of an Inverse Almost Ideal Demand System

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Information on price-quantity relationships will enable flower producers to reduce risk and raise profits through better timing of rotations as well as better utilization of limited greenhouse space. The present paper presents econometric evidence on such price-quantity relationships for major species of cut flowers at the Dutch flower auctions. Specifically, an inverse linear approximate almost ideal demand model with seasonal adjustments is applied. This paper is introducing trigonometric f...

  4. Recent advances of flowering locus T gene in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Rong, Xiaofeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Flowering Locus T (FT) can promote flowering in the plant photoperiod pathway and also facilitates vernalization flowering pathways and other ways to promote flowering. The expression of products of the FT gene is recognized as important parts of the flowering hormone and can induce flowering by long-distance transportation. In the present study, many FT-like genes were isolated, and the transgenic results show that FT gene can promote flowering in plants. This paper reviews the progress of the FT gene and its expression products to provide meaningful information for further studies of the functions of FT genes.

  5. Caught in the act: pollination of sexually deceptive trap-flowers by fungus gnats in Pterostylis (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ryan D; Scaccabarozzi, Daniela; Retter, Bryony A; Hayes, Christine; Brown, Graham R; Dixon, Kingsley W; Peakall, Rod

    2014-03-01

    Pterostylis is an Australasian terrestrial orchid genus of more than 400 species, most of which use a motile, touch-sensitive labellum to trap dipteran pollinators. Despite studies dating back to 1872, the mechanism of pollinator attraction has remained elusive. This study tested whether the fungus gnat-pollinated Pterostylis sanguinea secures pollination by sexual deception. The literature was used to establish criteria for confirming sexual deception as a pollination strategy. Observations and video recordings allowed quantification of each step of the pollination process. Each floral visitor was sexed and DNA barcoding was used to evaluate the degree of pollinator specificity. Following observations that attraction to the flowers is by chemical cues, experimental dissection of flowers was used to determine the source of the sexual attractant and the effect of labellum orientation on sexual attraction. Fruit set was quantified for 19 populations to test for a relationship with plant density and population size. A single species of male gnat (Mycetophilidae) visited and pollinated the rewardless flowers. The gnats often showed probing copulatory behaviour on the labellum, leading to its triggering and the temporary entrapment of the gnat in the flower. Pollen deposition and removal occurred as the gnat escaped from the flower via the reproductive structures. The labellum was the sole source of the chemical attractant. Gnats always alighted on the labellum facing upwards, but when it was rotated 180 ° they attempted copulation less frequently. Pollination rate showed no relationship with orchid population size or plant density. This study confirms for the first time that highly specific pollination by fungus gnats is achieved by sexual deception in Pterostylis. It is predicted that sexual deception will be widespread in the genus, although the diversity of floral forms suggests that other mechanisms may also operate.

  6. Caught in the act: pollination of sexually deceptive trap-flowers by fungus gnats in Pterostylis (Orchidaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ryan D.; Scaccabarozzi, Daniela; Retter, Bryony A.; Hayes, Christine; Brown, Graham R.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Peakall, Rod

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Pterostylis is an Australasian terrestrial orchid genus of more than 400 species, most of which use a motile, touch-sensitive labellum to trap dipteran pollinators. Despite studies dating back to 1872, the mechanism of pollinator attraction has remained elusive. This study tested whether the fungus gnat-pollinated Pterostylis sanguinea secures pollination by sexual deception. Methods The literature was used to establish criteria for confirming sexual deception as a pollination strategy. Observations and video recordings allowed quantification of each step of the pollination process. Each floral visitor was sexed and DNA barcoding was used to evaluate the degree of pollinator specificity. Following observations that attraction to the flowers is by chemical cues, experimental dissection of flowers was used to determine the source of the sexual attractant and the effect of labellum orientation on sexual attraction. Fruit set was quantified for 19 populations to test for a relationship with plant density and population size. Key Results A single species of male gnat (Mycetophilidae) visited and pollinated the rewardless flowers. The gnats often showed probing copulatory behaviour on the labellum, leading to its triggering and the temporary entrapment of the gnat in the flower. Pollen deposition and removal occurred as the gnat escaped from the flower via the reproductive structures. The labellum was the sole source of the chemical attractant. Gnats always alighted on the labellum facing upwards, but when it was rotated 180 ° they attempted copulation less frequently. Pollination rate showed no relationship with orchid population size or plant density. Conclusions This study confirms for the first time that highly specific pollination by fungus gnats is achieved by sexual deception in Pterostylis. It is predicted that sexual deception will be widespread in the genus, although the diversity of floral forms suggests that other mechanisms may also

  7. "Say it...near the flower shop": further evidence of the effect of flowers on mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    For millennia, flowers have been used to convey romance. In this study, 18-25-year-old women (N = 600) walking alone in a shopping mall were approached by an attractive 20-year-old male-confederate who solicited them for their phone number. The women were solicited as they were walking in the area of a flower shop, a cake shop, or a women's shoes shop. It was found that women agreed more favorably to the confederate's courtship solicitation when solicited in the area of the flower shop. Positive mood induced by exposure to flowers was used to explain these results.

  8. Flower solid modeling based on sketches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan DING; Shu-chang XU; Xiu-zi YE; Yin ZHANG; San-yuan ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method to model flowers of solid shape. Based on (Ijiri et al., 2005)'s method, we separate individual flower modeling and inflorescence modeling procedures into structure and geometry modeling. We incorporate interactive editing gestures to allow the user to edit structure parameters freely onto structure diagram. Furthermore, we use free-hand sketching techniques to allow users to create and edit 3D geometrical elements freely and easily. The final step is to automatically merge all independent 3D geometrical elements into a single waterproof mesh. Our experiments show that this solid modeling approach is promising. Using our approach, novice users can create vivid flower models easily and freely. The generated flower model is waterproof. It can have applications in visualization, animation, gaming, and toys and decorations if printed out on 3D rapid prototyping devices.

  9. Flowers of annonaceae: Morphology, classification, and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusden, van E.C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the diversity in floral characters of Annonaceae and their distribution over the family, and discusses their value for classification and generic delimitation. Flower morphology predominated historical classifications of this family since Hooker & Thomson (1855)

  10. Endothermy by flowers of Rhizanthes lowii (Rafflesiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, S; Grace, J; Bänziger, H

    2000-08-01

    Rhizanthes lowii (Beccari) Harms (Rafflesia- ceae) is a parasitic plant that grows in the understory of the rainforest in South-East Asia. This plant does not have leaves, stems, or photosynthetic tissue and is characterised by the emission of a strong odour that attracts the natural pollinators, carrion flies. Flowers that volatilise odorous compounds and attract carrion flies, beetles and other insects are often thermogenic. Here we present evidence of both thermogenesis and thermoregulation in R. lowii from microclimate and tissue temperatures measured during different stages of flower development in R. lowii, in natural conditions in Brunei, Borneo. Endothermy was detected in young and mature buds as well as in blooming flowers and even in decaying tissues 3 or more days after blooming. Tissue temperatures were maintained at 7-9 K above air temperature, in both female and male flowers, at all stages of floral development.

  11. The evolutionary root of flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Nikiforova, Svetlana V; Biggs, Patrick J; Zhong, Bojian; Delange, Peter; Martin, William; Woetzel, Stefan; Atherton, Robin A; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Correct rooting of the angiosperm radiation is both challenging and necessary for understanding the origins and evolution of physiological and phenotypic traits in flowering plants. The problem is known to be difficult due to the large genetic distance separating flowering plants from other seed plants and the sparse taxon sampling among basal angiosperms. Here, we provide further evidence for concern over substitution model misspecification in analyses of chloroplast DNA sequences. We show that support for Amborella as the sole representative of the most basal angiosperm lineage is founded on sequence site patterns poorly described by time-reversible substitution models. Improving the fit between sequence data and substitution model identifies Trithuria, Nymphaeaceae, and Amborella as surviving relatives of the most basal lineage of flowering plants. This finding indicates that aquatic and herbaceous species dominate the earliest extant lineage of flowering plants. [; ; ; ; ; .].

  12. USING BACH FLOWER IN HOLISTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Ferreira do Nascimento

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a narrative review from scientific literature that aimed to describe concepts and approaches for indications of the therapeutic use of Bach flower remedies in holistic psychotherapy. The review was developed in February 2016 from books, official documents and articles indexed in Lilacs and Scielo databases. Bach flower remedies is a therapeutic method that aims to restore the balance of human being, restoring its vital energy through holistic care. Because the flower essences act on psychic and emotional dimension of individual, when employed in holistic psychotherapy can provide greater autonomy, self-care and effectiveness compared to other alternative methods. The literature indicated that flower essence therapy is a safe practice and can be used in a complementary to health care, but should be performed by qualified professionals. It has also shown to be a promising and important area for nursing professional, but it still requires greater investment in research in the area to support the practice.

  13. Ecological adaptations of Hypocyrta glabra Hook. flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mychajło Czernećkyj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research on the blooming ecology and the flower morphology of Hypocyrta glabra Hook. (Gesneriaceae cultivated in laboratories and outdoors have been carried out. The life span of flowers and morphological changes in successive phases of the blooming period have been observed. The H. glabra flowers are protandrous and the stamens translocate during the flowering process. The macro- and microstructure of calyx, corolla, androecium, gynoecium and nectaries have been analyzed. The size, shape and viability of pollen grains have been designated and their number per stamen head has been calculated. The location of nectaries in H. glabra flowers has suggested that they stem from the 5th stamen during phylogenesis. It has been proved that the nectaries are provided by numerous vascular bundles and that the nectar is secreted by stomata. The stomatal field comprises 2/5 of nectary height and is situated on the abaxial side of the apix part. The average number of stomata is 63.2 per 1 mm2. The average amount of nectar produced by 10 flowers in their fourth day of life reached 223.7 mg. The sugar concentration was 32.7%. Numerous glandular and non-glandular trichomes have been noticed on the surface of calyx, corolla and gynoecium, which indicate the xeromorphic adaptation of the flower. It has been observed that the numbers of glandular and non-glandular trichomes per unit of the external surface of corolla are similar. Outdoors the secretion produced by calyx and corolla glands was willingly collected by wasps. It seems that such features of H. glabra flowers as position, shape and colour of corolla, the abundance of the nectar and pollen produced are connected with their adaptation to pollination by humming-birds in the species natural environment.

  14. The Rural Open Air Museums: Visitors, Community and Place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlikowska-Piechotka Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rural museums perform not only the traditional tasks but are also the places where both the visitors and the local community members have chances for entertainment and attractive leisure time. Consequently one can find in museums numerous catering offers such as cafes, bistros, snack bars, restaurants, pubs and wine bars. The material presented is the result of theoretical and field studies carried out in the selected open air museums in Poland and focused on newly introduced commercial activities (as catering. Our research results show that the development of sustainable cultural tourism as a generator of income in the open air rural museums is important in the challenging economic time. Museums having catering services of different character could easier overcome financial struggle. Moreover there is no doubt that the introduction of an interesting and ambitious cuisine in the restaurants located in the rural open air museum is of great importance also in other terms: popularization of the food culture, rural tradition of region, healthy diet and lifestyle, chance to increase the museum attractiveness, important economic support to the museum and the local community and the improvement of living quality.

  15. 'Tourist Price' and Diasporic Visitors: Negotiating the Value of Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Wagner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marketplace exchange is implicitly both economic and social. Participants in marketplace encounters assemble into multidimensional categories of familiarity and difference, both through the material culture object for sale and through the interaction between vendors and clients within their transactions. This paper brings attention to the latter through microanalysis of one example from a corpus of recorded marketplace interactions of Moroccan diasporic visitors from Europe with marketplace vendors. This example illustrates a repeatedly observed bargaining strategy: to explicitly or implicitly claim the category of "a son/daughter of this country" (weld/bint el-bled as an argument to lower prices. While vendors did not straightforwardly refute this category of "descendant", they often did respond by introducing other-sometimes seemingly contradictory-categorical differentiations they found relevant to finding a price. This article explores how vendors and diasporic customers negotiate these categories, and how categorization become significant for the emergent value of the goods under negotiation. Through turn-by-turn analysis, I demonstrate how interlocutors engage with ideas of "Moroccanness" beyond ethnonational discourses of belonging, in that "doing being Moroccan" while bargaining becomes a negotiation of being "Moroccan" geographically, socially and economically, as resident in or out of Morocco.

  16. McDonald Observatory Visitor Center Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Armosky, B. J.; Wetzel, M.; Preston, S.

    2002-12-01

    The opening of the new Visitor Center at McDonald Observatory in Fort Davis, Texas provided an opportunity to greatly expand the Observatory's outreach efforts to students and teachers. In addition to a theater, outdoor telescope park, and amphitheater, the facility contains a classroom and an exhibit entitled ``Decoding Starlight." In preparation for the opening, new teacher-friendly materials were written to provide standards aligned (both state and national) classroom activities for students. These activities form the core for both the multi-day Professional Development Program for teachers and the Student Field Experience Program. Student Field Experiences often begin with a tour specifically designed for student groups to emphasize careers and life at the Observatory. The group then interacts with the exhibit using Exhibit Guides that were developed for various grade levels. When their schedule allows, student groups may also participate in nighttime observing activities. Smaller groups (under 30 members) may choose from a menu of hands-on activities offered within the classroom. The positive reception of these activities has led to their inclusion in the existing Elderhostel program for senior citizens. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF 96-26965 ``Fingerprinting the Universe - An Interactive, Bilingual Exhibit on Spectroscopy," NSF 97-05340 ``Universo, Hispanic Heritage Month Programs, and StarDate in the Classroom," and NASA IDEAS HST-ED-90234-.01 ``Enriching the Experience at McDonald Observatory: Pre/Post Visit Materials for Teachers and Students."

  17. Persuasive Communication and Visitors Willingness to Pay Park User Fees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Vujko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study showed that persuasive messages were able to affect on the visitors’ willingness to pay (WTP park user fees (PUF. The primary aim of this study is to measure visitors’ willingness to pay (WTP such fees in Fruška Gora National Park, where no such measurement has previously been undertaken. By setting the main hypothesis that tourists need adequate motivation to pay PUF, the paper sought to answer on two very important questions with the setup of several lower-level hypotheses: are the visitors themselves actually willing to pay PUF? and what are the factors that influence visitors’ willingness to pay (WTP? Using persuasive messages was observed willingness to pay the PUF among 100% of participants. The method survey was conducted on three Park picnic areas, on a random sample of 253 participants. The data were processed with the SPSS program (version 17.0. To determine the frequency of specific deviations chi-square test is used.

  18. Synchrony in the phenology of a culturally iconic spring flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Tim H; Mizera, Tadeusz; Wójtowicz, Wanda; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    We examine the flowering phenology of the cultural iconic Spring Snowflake Leucojum vernum, a considerable tourist attraction, recorded from two sites in western Poland. Flowering dates at the two sites were closely correlated but about 6 days later at the more natural area. The end of flowering was associated with the start of canopy leafing. Early flowering was related to a longer flowering season which may benefit ecotourism under future climate warming.

  19. Synchrony in the phenology of a culturally iconic spring flower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Tim H.; Mizera, Tadeusz; Wójtowicz, Wanda; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    We examine the flowering phenology of the cultural iconic Spring Snowflake Leucojum vernum, a considerable tourist attraction, recorded from two sites in western Poland. Flowering dates at the two sites were closely correlated but about 6 days later at the more natural area. The end of flowering was associated with the start of canopy leafing. Early flowering was related to a longer flowering season which may benefit ecotourism under future climate warming.

  20. The Museum Audiences: from Active Visitors to non-Visitors in the National Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography “G. A. Sanna” of Sassari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Garrido

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This investigation about visitors and non-visitors of the National Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography "G. A. Sanna" aims at investigating the real relationship between this Museum and its territory. The sample was made up of the adult residents of the city of Sassari, who were presented with two questionnaires, one for each group. The results, subsequently compared with other studies on the territory, have shown some of the aspects in the management of the institution that need improving and the potentialities developed in the last few years. The non-visitors study, carried out for the first time in the territory, has been proposed as a reference guide for the Museum’s policy, defining the bases of a more involving approach and a renovated communication strategy.

  1. Phytochrome, plant growth and flowering

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R. W.; Bagnall, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts to use artificially lit cabinets to grow plants identical to those growing in sunlight have provided compelling evidence of the importance of light quality for plant growth. Changing the balance of red (R) to far-red (FR) radiation, but with a fixed photosynthetic input can shift the phytochrome photoequilibrium in a plant and generate large differences in plant growth. With FR enrichment the plants elongate, and may produce more leaf area and dry matter. Similar morphogenic responses are also obtained when light quality is altered only briefly (15-30 min) at the end-of-the-day. Conversely, for plants grown in natural conditions the response of plant form to selective spectral filtering has again shown that red and far-red wavebands are important as found by Kasperbauer and coworkers. Also, where photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) of sunlight have been held constant, the removal of far-red alone alters plant growth. With FR depletion plants grown in sunlight are small, more branched and darker green. Here we examine the implications for plant growth and flowering when the far-red composition of incident radiation in plant growth chambers is manipulated.

  2. Sex determination in flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaporta, S L; Calderon-Urrea, A

    1993-10-01

    In many ways, plants offer unique systems through which to study sex determination. Because the production of unisexual flowers has evolved independently in many plant species, different and novel mechanisms may be operational. Hence, there is probably not one unifying mechanism that explains sex determination in plants. Advances in our understanding of sex determination will come from the analysis of the genetics, molecular biology, and biochemistry of genes controlling sexual determination in plants. Several excellent model systems for bisexual floral development (Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum), monoecy (maize), and dioecy (Silene, asparagus, and mercury) are available for such analyses. The important questions that remain concern the mechanism of action of sex determination genes and their interrelationship, if any, with homeotic genes that determine the sexual identity of floral organ primordia. At the physiological level, the connection between hormone signaling and sexuality is not well understood, although significant correlations have been discovered. Finally, once the genes that regulate these processes are identified, cloned, and studied, new strategies for the manipulation of sexuality in plants should be forthcoming.

  3. Trees as huge flowers and flowers as oversized floral guides: the role of floral color change and retention of old flowers in Tibouchina pulchra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Lourenço Garcia Brito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Floral color changes and retention of old flowers are frequently combined phenomena restricted to the floral guide or single flowers in few-flowered inflorescences. They are thought to increase the attractiveness over long distances and to direct nearby pollinators towards the rewarding flowers. In Tibouchina pulchra, a massively flowering tree, the whole flower changes its color during anthesis. On the first day, the flowers are white and on the next three days, they change to pink. This creates a new large-scale color pattern in which the white pre-changed flowers contrast against the pink post-changed ones over the entire tree. We describe the spectral characteristics of floral colors of T. pulchra and test bumblebees´ response to this color pattern when viewed at different angles (simulating long and short distances. The results indicated the role of different color components in bumblebee attraction and the possible scenario in which this flower color pattern has evolved. We tested bumblebees´ preference for simulated trees with 75% pink and 25% white flowers resembling the color patterns of T. pulchra, and trees with green leaves and pink flowers (control in long-distance approach. We also compared an artificial setting with three pink flowers and one white flower (T. pulchra model against four pink flowers with white floral guides (control in short-distance approach. Bumblebees spontaneously preferred the simulated T. pulchra patterns in both approaches despite similar rewards. Moreover, in short distances, pollinator visits to peripheral, non-rewarding flowers occurred only half as frequently in the simulated T. pulchra when compared to the control. Thefore, this exceptional floral color change and the retention of old flowers in T. pulchra favors the attraction of pollinators over long distances in a deception process while it honestly directs them towards the rewarding flowers at short distances possibly exploring their innate color

  4. User-Generated Geographic Information for Visitor Monitoring in a National Park: A Comparison of Social Media Data and Visitor Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuokko Heikinheimo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Protected area management and marketing require real-time information on visitors’ behavior and preferences. Thus far, visitor information has been collected mostly with repeated visitor surveys. A wealth of content-rich geographic data is produced by users of different social media platforms. These data could potentially provide continuous information about people’s activities and interactions with the environment at different spatial and temporal scales. In this paper, we compare social media data with traditional survey data in order to map people’s activities and preferences using the most popular national park in Finland, Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park, as a case study. We compare systematically collected survey data and the content of geotagged social media data and analyze: (i where do people go within the park; (ii what are their activities; (iii when do people visit the park and if there are temporal patterns in their activities; (iv who the visitors are; (v why people visit the national park; and (vi what complementary information from social media can provide in addition to the results from traditional surveys. The comparison of survey and social media data demonstrated that geotagged social media content provides relevant information about visitors’ use of the national park. As social media platforms are a dynamic source of data, they could complement and enrich traditional forms of visitor monitoring by providing more insight on emerging activities, temporal patterns of shared content, and mobility patterns of visitors. Potentially, geotagged social media data could also provide an overview of the spatio-temporal activity patterns in other areas where systematic visitor monitoring is not taking place.

  5. Strawberry homologue of terminal flower1 integrates photoperiod and temperature signals to inhibit flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Marja; Kurokura, Takeshi; Jiang, Panpan; Mouhu, Katriina; Hytönen, Timo

    2015-04-01

    Photoperiod and temperature are major environmental signals affecting flowering in plants. Although molecular pathways mediating these signals have been well characterized in the annual model plant Arabidopsis, much less information is known in perennials. Many perennials including the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) are induced to flower in response to decreasing photoperiod and temperature in autumn and they flower following spring. We showed earlier that, in contrast with Arabidopsis, the photoperiodic induction of flowering in strawberry occurs in short days (SD) when the decrease in FvFT1 (flowering locus T) and FvSOC1 (suppressor of the overexpression of constans1) expression leads to lower mRNA levels of the floral repressor, FvTFL1 (terminal flower1). By using transgenic lines and gene expression analyses, we show evidence that the temperature-mediated changes in the FvTFL1 mRNA expression set critical temperature limits for the photoperiodic flowering in strawberry. At temperatures below 13 °C, low expression level of FvTFL1 in both SD and long days (LD) allows flower induction to occur independently of the photoperiod. Rising temperature gradually increases FvTFL1 mRNA levels under LD, and at temperatures above 13 °C, SD is required for the flower induction that depends on the deactivation of FvSOC1 and FvTFL1. However, an unknown transcriptional activator, which functions independently of FvSOC1, enhances the expression of FvTFL1 at 23 °C preventing photoperiodic flowering. We suggest that the observed effect of the photoperiod × temperature interaction on FvTFL1 mRNA expression may allow strawberry to induce flowers in correct time in different climates.

  6. Minimising visitor impacts to protected areas: The efficacy of low impact education programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.; Reid, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Protected area managers, tourism providers, and other organisations commonly employ education programmes to address visitation-related impairment of natural and cultural resources, social conditions, and neighbouring communities. These programmes have different names (Leave No Trace, Codes of Conduct, Environmental Guidelines for Tourists) but share common objectives: to sustain opportunities for high quality visitor experiences while avoiding or minimising associated negative impacts to protected area resources, visitor experiences, and park neighbours. Theoretical and empirical research studies in the United States are reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of educational efforts that seek to encourage adoption of low impact behaviours. Findings reveal that most of the visitor education efforts evaluated did effectively alter visitor knowledge, behaviour and/or resource and social conditions in the intended direction. These findings, including discussions of message content, delivery, audience characteristics and theoretical grounding, provide insights for improving the efficacy of future educational efforts.

  7. 77 FR 32952 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board...

  8. 75 FR 76423 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  9. 76 FR 28960 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  10. An Interactive Exhibition about Animal Skeletons: Did the Visitors Learn Any Zoology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Laterveer-de Beer, Manon

    2002-01-01

    Explores museum visitors' understanding of skeleton exhibits and whether such exhibits increase their understanding of the zoology displayed. The exhibition under study focused on the diversity of vertebrae skeletons which were arranged according to the mode of locomotion. (DDR)

  11. The Visitor Picnic Area at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pcncarea)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 1 polygon representing the picnic area for visitors at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The picnic area was...

  12. Traffic Control Plan : DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge, DeSoto Visitor Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Traffic Control Plan for DeSoto NWR outlines objectives for solving the traffic problems on the Refuge by implementing a patrol schedule, restricting visitor...

  13. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  14. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Horicon NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  15. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Tamarac NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  16. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Wheeler NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  17. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  18. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  19. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was...

  20. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Bison Range and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Noxubee NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  3. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Necedah NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Quivira NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  5. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The...

  6. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  7. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Montezuma NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  8. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Assabet River NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to better...

  9. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  10. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Malheur NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  11. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  12. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Monomoy NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  13. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Moosehorn NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  14. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for National Elk Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Elk Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to...

  15. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  16. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Patuxent Research Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Patuxent Research Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to...

  17. Clinical supervision in the provision of intensive home visiting by health visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Patricia; Barlow, Jane

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to explore the perceptions of health visitors working in frontline child protection concerning the role of clinical supervision. Fifteen health visitors ('home visitors') providing an intensive home visiting service to high-risk families in the south east of England were interviewed about their experience of receiving supervision. The model of clinical supervision used was based on the Family Partnership Programme and delivered by two trained psychotherapists. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Home visitors believed that clinical supervision enabled them to maintain boundaries, regulate and reflect on their practice, and develop a better understanding of the issues clients were facing. The model of supervision used and the organisational context were believed to be important factors in the delivery of clinical supervision and to have contributed to its success.

  18. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  19. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for San Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for San Luis National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  20. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  2. Thai visitors' expectations and experiences of explainer interaction within a science museum context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamolpattana, Supara; Chen, Ganigar; Sonchaeng, Pichai; Wilkinson, Clare; Willey, Neil; Bultitude, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In Western literature, there is evidence that museum explainers offer significant potential for enhancing visitors' learning through influencing their knowledge, content, action, behaviour and attitudes. However, little research has focused on the role of explainers in other cultural contexts. This study explored interactions between visitors and museum explainers within the setting of Thailand. Two questionnaires were distributed to 600 visitors and 41 museum explainers. The results demonstrated both potential similarities and differences with Western contexts. Explainers appeared to prefer didactic approaches, focussing on factual knowledge rather than encouraging deep learning. Two-way communication, however, appeared to be enhanced by the use of a 'pseudo-sibling relationship' by explainers. Traditional Thai social reserve was reduced through such approaches, with visitors taking on active learning roles. These findings have implications for training museum explainers in non-Western cultures, as well as museum communication practice more generally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Muscatatuck NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  5. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for National Key Deer Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Key Deer Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to...

  6. Visitor and community survey results for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the community and visitor surveys conducted at Prime Hook NWR from the fall of 2004 through fall of 2005. The purpose...

  7. Determinants of Visitor Pro-Environmental Intentions on Two Small Greek Islands: Is Ecotourism Possible at Coastal Protected Areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

    2012-07-01

    A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass `seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors.

  8. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2010/2011: Individual refuge results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carlos, Andrew W.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.; Miller, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. This data series consists of 53 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: * Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. * Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results. * Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational activities, and visitation statistics, including a map (where available) and refuge website link

  9. ARE HEALTH VISITORS' OBSERVATIONS OF EARLY PARENT-INFANT INTERACTIONS RELIABLE? A CROSS-SECTIONAL DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ingeborg H; Trillingsgaard, Tea; Simonsen, Marianne; Kronborg, Hanne

    2017-03-01

    Health visitors need competences to promote healthy early parent-infant relationships. The aims of this study were to explore whether there are differences between groups of health visitors with and without additional parenting program education in terms of their knowledge of infant-parent interaction and their observation and assessment skills of such interactions. The cross-sectional study included 36 health visitors' certified Marte Meo therapists and 85 health visitors without additional parenting program education. Health visitors' observation skills were measured assessing five video-recorded mother-infant interactions. A questionnaire was used to measure their intention, self-efficacy, and knowledge. More certified Marte Meo therapists than health visitors without additional parenting program education reported a significantly higher mean level of knowledge of the early relationship, 6.42 (95% CI; 6.18-6.66) versus 5.05 (95% CI; 4.86-6.10), p = .04; and more certified Marte Meo therapists than health visitors without additional parenting program education reported a higher mean level of knowledge of infant self-regulation, 2.44 (95% CI; 2.18-2.71) versus 1.83 (95% CI; 1.62-2.03), p < .001. In the latter group, 54% (95% CI; 0.43-0.64) reported a significantly higher need for further education versus 22% (95% CI; 0.11-0.39), p = .001. Compared to health visitors without any parenting program education, health visitors certified as Marte Meo therapists reported a significantly higher frequency of correct assessment of mothers' sensitivity in two of five video-recordings, with 77.78% (95% CI; 0.61-0.87) compared to 45.88% (95% CI; 0.35-0.57) in Video 3, p = .001, and 69.44% (95% CI; 0.52-0.82) compared to 49.41% (95% CI; 0.39-0.60) in Video 4, p = .04, respectively. The results of the present study support the use of video-based education of health visitors to increase their knowledge of and skills in assessing parent-infant interactions. Randomized controlled

  10. To flower or not to flower, a temperature-sensitive decision. Characterization of flowering responses at high ambient temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, N.

    2015-01-01

    To maximize fitness, plants use environmental cues to optimize growth processes. One of the processes under strong environmental regulation is flowering. Multiple environmental factors influence flowering, including temperature. Both a continuously increased ambient temperature as well as temporary

  11. To flower or not to flower, a temperature-sensitive decision : Characterization of flowering responses at high ambient temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    To maximize fitness, plants use environmental cues to optimize growth processes. One of the processes under strong environmental regulation is flowering. Multiple environmental factors influence flowering, including temperature. Both a continuously increased ambient temperature as well as temporary

  12. Midwives' and health visitors' collaborative relationships: A systematic review of qualitative and quantitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Maria Raisa Jessica Ryc V; Olander, Ellinor K; Needle, Justin J; Bryar, Rosamund M

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration between midwives and health visitors working in maternal and child health services is widely encouraged. This systematic review aimed to identify existing and potential areas for collaboration between midwives and health visitors; explore the methods through which collaboration is and can be achieved; assess the effectiveness of this relationship between these groups, and ascertain whether the identified examples of collaboration are in line with clinical guidelines and policy. A narrative synthesis of qualitative and quantitative studies. Fourteen electronic databases, research mailing lists, recommendations from key authors and reference lists and citations of included papers. Papers were included if they explored one or a combination of: the areas of practice in which midwives and health visitors worked collaboratively; the methods that midwives and health visitors employed when communicating and collaborating with each other; the effectiveness of collaboration between midwives and health visitors; and whether collaborative practice between midwives and health visitors meet clinical guidelines. Papers were assessed for study quality. Eighteen papers (sixteen studies) met the inclusion criteria. The studies found that midwives and health visitors reported valuing interprofessional collaboration, however this was rare in practice. Findings show that collaboration could be useful across the service continuum, from antenatal care, transition of care/handover, to postnatal care. Evidence for the effectiveness of collaboration between these two groups was equivocal and based on self-reported data. In relation, multiple enablers and barriers to collaboration were identified. Communication was reportedly key to interprofessional collaboration. Interprofessional collaboration was valuable according to both midwives and health visitors, however, this was made challenging by several barriers such as poor communication, limited resources, and

  13. Visitor Perceptions of Ancient Egyptian Human Remains in Three United Kindom Museums

    OpenAIRE

    Hugh Kilminster

    2003-01-01

    Although the issues of retention and display of human remains have become topical over the last decade, the thoughts of museum visitors about this topic have not been registered, despite their being the museums’ main stakeholder. The vast majority (82.5%) of 300 respondents questioned in the summer of 2002 at three British museums displaying ancient Egyptian human remains supported the idea of having these remains on display. However, a small percentage of visitors (14.2%) wanted the remains ...

  14. The Environmental Conservation Consciousness of Visitors to Yakushima, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    深見, 聡; 仁木, 可奈子

    2013-01-01

    Ecotourism is lately subject of interest within the field of sustainable tourism. Especially travel to nature world heritage sites are getting more popular within this field. The object of study is Yakushima, the most developed place for ecotourism in Japan. The questionnaire based survey was undertaken in order to know the characteristics and environmental behavior of visitors and the features of environmental conservation consciousness of the visitors were examined.  As a result 3 main p...

  15. Motivations and experiences of museum visitors: The case of the Imperial War Museum, United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Raymond; Kokkranikal, Jithendran

    2015-01-01

    This study explores motivations of visitors to the Imperial War Museum (North and South), United Kingdom, with a view to understanding why people visit museums associated with conflicts. Though museums are part of the education and leisure industry, the distinction between education and leisure is often blurred. There are a number of reasons why people visit museums. Motives of museum visitors can be grouped into intrinsic and extrinsic factors. This study analysed the extent to which museum ...

  16. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  17. Arthropod assemblage related to volatile cues in flowering wheat: interaction between aphid herbivory and soil conditions as induction factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenardis, Adriana E; Szpeiner, Alfonsina; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2014-04-01

    Volatile cues released by plants play an important role in plant-insect interactions and are influenced by pests or soil conditions affecting plant metabolism. Field microcosm experiments were used to characterize arthropod spontaneous assemblies in homogenous unstressed wheat patches exposed to volatile cues coming from wheat plants with different levels of stress. The design was a factorial completely randomized block design with three replications. Source wheat pots combined two stress factors: 1) soil degradation level: high and low, and 2) aphid herbivory: with (A) and without (B). Eighteen experimental units consisted of source stressed wheat pots, connected by tubes conducting the volatile cues to sink wheat patches. These patches were located at the end of the tubes placed in a flowering wheat field. Arthropod assemblies on wheat sinks were different between years and they were associated to the source cues. Soil condition was the main discriminating factor among arthropods when a clear contrast between high and low soil degradation was observed, whereas aphid herbivory was the main discriminating factor when soil condition effects were absent. Main soil properties related with arthropods assembly were Mg and K in the first year and cation exchange capacity, total nitrogen, and pH in the second year of experiment. According to this study, spontaneous arthropod distributions in the homogeneous, unstressed wheat patch responded to the volatile cues coming from wheat sources growing in particular soil conditions. It is possible to suggest that soil-plant-herbivore interactions change wheat cues and this phenomenon produces significant differences in neighboring arthropod community structure.

  18. Visitor evaluations of management actions at a highly impacted Appalachian Trail camping area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Protected area management involves balancing environmental and social objectives. This is particularly difficult at high-use/high-impact recreation sites, because resource protection objectives may require substantial site management or visitor regulation. This study examined visitors? reactions to both of these types of actions at Annapolis Rocks, Maryland, a popular Appalachian Trail camping area. We surveyed visitors before and after implementation of camping policies that included shifting camping to designated newly constructed campsites and prohibiting campfires. Survey results reveal that visitors were more satisfied with all social and environmental indicators after the changes were enacted. An Importance-Performance analysis also determined that management actions improved conditions for factors of greatest concern to campers prior to the changes. Posttreatment visitors were least satisfied with factors related to reduced freedom and to some characteristics of the constructed campsites. Although there was evidence of visitor displacement, the camping changes met management goals by protecting the camping area?s natural resources and improving social conditions.

  19. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  20. Visitor interest in zoo animals and the implications for collection planning and zoo education programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    As zoos have sought to further their conservation missions, they have become powerful providers of environmental education. Outside of "formal" education initiatives, such as those designed for school and other organized groups, or structured public talks programmes, much of the learning potential that the zoo has to offer is around the viewing of animals and the response of visitors to them. In this, zoo learning is a very personal construct, develops from the previous knowledge, and experiences and motivations of each individual. In this article, we make the assertion that learning potential, although difficult to quantify, is very much related to the attractiveness of animal species and the interest that visitors show in them. Using standard behaviorist measures of attraction and interest (the proportion of visitors that stop and for how long), we analyzed the relative interest in 40 zoo species held in a modern UK zoo and the variables that are significant in predicting that popularity. Further to this, the suggestion is made that the zoo collection planning process could use such information to make more informed decisions about which species should be housed for their educational value. Taxonomic grouping was found to be the most significant predictor of visitor interest--that is, visitors were far more interested in mammals than any other group--although body size (length), increasing animal activity and whether the species was the primary or "flagship" species in an exhibit or not, were all found to have a significant bearing on visitor interest.

  1. 2016 National Park visitor spending effects: Economic contributions to local communities, states, and the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Koontz, Lynne

    2017-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) manages the Nation’s most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the Nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. This economic effects analysis measures how NPS visitor spending cycles through local economies, generating business sales and supporting jobs and income. In 2016, the National Park System received an estimated 330,971,689 recreation visits. Visitors to National Parks spent an estimated $18.4 billion in local gateway regions (defined as communities within 60 miles of a park). The contribution of this spending to the national economy was 318 thousand jobs, $12.0 billion in labor income, $19.9 billion in value added, and $34.9 billion in economic output. The lodging sector saw the highest direct contributions with $5.7 billion in economic output directly contributed to local gateway economies nationally. The sector with the next greatest direct contributions was the restaurants and bars sector, with $3.7 billion in economic output directly contributed to local gateway economies nationally. Results from the Visitor Spending Effects report series are available online via an interactive tool. Users can view year-by-year trend data and explore current year visitor spending, jobs, labor income, value added, and economic output effects by sector for national, state, and local economies. This interactive tool is available at https://www.nps.gov/subjects/socialscience/vse.htm.

  2. Technology at the zoo: the influence of a touchscreen computer on orangutans and zoo visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdue, Bonnie M; Clay, Andrea W; Gaalema, Diann E; Maple, Terry L; Stoinski, Tara S

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled touchscreen apparatus (hereafter referred to as "touchscreen") in the orangutan exhibit at Zoo Atlanta provides enrichment to the animals and allows cognitive research to take place on exhibit. This study investigated the impact of the touchscreen on orangutan behavior and visibility, as well as its impact on zoo visitors. Despite previous research suggesting that providing a single computer system may negatively affect orangutan behavior, there was not a significant increase in aggression, stereotypic, or distress-related behaviors following the activation of the on-exhibit touchscreen. We also investigated the possibility that zoo visitors may be negatively affected by technology because it deviates from naturalism. However, we did not find a change in stay time or overall experience rating when the computer was turned on. This research was the first to assess visitor attitudes toward technology at the zoo, and we found that visitors report highly positive attitudes about technology for both animals and visitors. If subjects visited the exhibit when the computer was turned on, they more strongly agreed that orangutans benefit from interacting with computerized enrichment. This study is the first investigation of an on-exhibit touchscreen in group-housed apes; our findings of no negative effects on the animals or zoo visitors and positive attitudes toward technology suggest a significant value of this practice.

  3. Visitor assessment of the mandatory alternative transportation system at Zion National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Britton L; Marquit, Joshua D; Bates, Scott C

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  4. Determining visitors' dispositions toward the designation of a Greek National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machairas, Ioannis; Hovardas, Tasos

    2005-07-01

    This article presents the findings of the first major visitor survey conducted at the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex, situated in northern Greece. The study area is one of a number of sites planned to become National Parks under a recent initiative of the Greek government. We used a logistic regression method to define significant predictors of visitors' awareness and attitude toward park designation, as well as their willingness to pay a conditional entrance fee. Study findings demonstrated that the probability of being aware of the park designation initiative is higher for visitors who obtained information from travel agencies or media to make their destination choice, compared to visitors who resorted to word-of-mouth recommendations. Knowledge and attitudes toward animals living in the study area revealed a limited influence on visitors' dispositions toward park designation. The results of this study call for action to implement education programs for National Park users. These programs should aim at rendering the environmental characteristics of the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex to be significant predictors of visitors' dispositions toward the study area. This would favor its uniqueness as a destination, as well as contribute to its long-term economic sustainability.

  5. Visitor Assessment of the Mandatory Alternative Transportation System at Zion National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Britton L.; Marquit, Joshua D.; Bates, Scott C.

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  6. An interpretive study of Yosemite National Park visitors' perspectives toward alternative transportation in Yosemite Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Dave D

    2007-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) is increasingly focusing on alternative transportation systems in national parks to address environmental and social problems arising from a historical reliance on personal automobiles as the primary means of visitor access. Despite the potential advantages, alternative transportation may require a reorientation in the way that Americans have experienced national parks since the advent of auto-tourism in the early twentieth century. Little research exists, however, on visitor perspectives towards alternative transportation or the rationale underlying their perspectives. It remains unclear how transportation systems affect visitors' experiences of the park landscape or the factors influencing their travel behavior in the parks. This report presents an interpretive study of visitor perspectives toward transportation management in the Yosemite Valley area of Yosemite National Park, California. Qualitative analysis of 160 semi-structured interviews identified individual psychological factors as well as situational influences that affect visitors' behavior and perspectives. Individual psychological factors include perceived freedom, environmental values and beliefs, prior experience with Yosemite National Park and other national parks, prior experience with alternative transportation in national parks, and sensitivity to subjective perceptions of crowding. Situational factors included convenience, access, and flexibility of travel modes, as well as type of visit, type of group, and park use level. Interpretive communication designed to encourage voluntary visitor use of alternative transportation should focus on these psychological and situational factors. Although challenges remain, the results of this study suggest approaches for shaping the way Americans visit and experience their national parks to encourage environmental sustainability.

  7. Exploring visitor acceptability for hardening trails to sustain visitation and minimize impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, K.L.; Marion, J.L.; Lawson, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Protected natural area managers are challenged to provide high quality recreation opportunities and ensure the protection of resources from impacts associated with visitation. Development of visitor use facilities and application of site hardening practices are commonly applied tools for achieving these competing management objectives. This study applies stated choice analysis to examine visitor opinions on acceptability when they are asked to make tradeoffs among competing social, resource and management attributes in backcountry and frontcountry settings of Acadia National Park. This study demonstrates that asking visitors about recreation setting attributes uni-dimensionally, a common approach, can yield less informative responses. Analyses that considered direct tradeoffs revealed more divergent opinions on acceptability for setting attributes than a unidimensional approach. Findings revealed that visitors to an accessible and popular attraction feature supported trail development options to protect resource conditions with unrestricted visitor access. In contrast, visitors to a remote undeveloped island expressed stronger support for no or limited trail development and access restrictions to protect resource conditions.

  8. Soluble proteins and polyphenoloxidase activity in bud flowers, flowers and leaves of cold stored lisianthus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavasini, R.; Nunes, K.N.M.; Favero, B.T.;

    This study evaluated the activity of the enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the content of soluble protein present in lisianthus bud flowers, flowers and leaves in room temperature (24±2°C) and pre-exposure cold chamber at 9±2°C for 24 h, in order to examine a possible correlation between these ...

  9. Cytotoxic and bioactive properties of different color tulip flowers and degradation kinetic of tulip flower anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagdic, Osman; Ekici, Lutfiye; Ozturk, Ismet; Tekinay, Turgay; Polat, Busra; Tastemur, Bilge; Bayram, Okan; Senturk, Berna

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the potential use of anthocyanin-based extracts (ABEs) of wasted tulip flowers as food/drug colorants. For this aim, wasted tulip flowers were samples and analyzed for their bioactive properties and cytotoxicity. Total phenolic contents of the extracts of the claret red (126.55 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dry extract) and orange-red (113.76 mg GAE/g dry extract) flowers were the higher than those of the other tulip flowers. Total anthocyanin levels of the violet, orange-red, claret red and pink tulip flower extracts were determined as 265.04, 236.49, 839.08 and 404.45 mg pelargonidin 3-glucoside/kg dry extract, respectively and these levels were higher than those of the other flowers. The extracts were more effective for the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Yersinia enterocolitica compared to other tested bacteria. Additionally, the cytotoxic effects of five different tulip flower extracts on human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line were investigated. The results showed that the orange red, pink and violet extracts had no cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 cell lines while yellow and claret red extracts appeared to be toxic for the cells. Overall, the extracts of tulip flowers with different colors possess remarkable bioactive and cytotoxic properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. First flowering dates and flowering periods of prairie plants at Woodworth, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callow, J.M.; Kantrud, H.A.; Higgins, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    We recorded flowering events for 97 species of prairie plants for 2-6 years near Woodworth, ND. Earliest and latest flower initiation dates varied by year. Temperature seemed much more important than precipitation in influencing phenology of species that bloom from late March through May, but no strong climatic effect was evident for plants that bloom later in the growing season.

  11. The biology of flowering and structure of selected elements of Cornus alba L. flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Konarska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The biology of flowering and the micromorphology of Cornus alba flowers were studied using light and scanning electron microscopy. The flowering of white dogwood in 2008 lasted 35 days, and the lifespan of a single flower was 3 days. The number of flowers per inflorescence was variable (on the average, it was 89. The largest group of insects visiting the flowers of C. alba comprised Hymenoptera (mainly bees and andrenids, then ants, dipterans and beetles. They foraged the dogwood flowers most intensively between 11.00 and 15.00. The inconspicuous four-petalled flowers of C. alba were characterised by the occurrence of T-shaped, two-armed non-glandular trichomes covering the receptacle as well as observed on the petals of the corolla, the style of the pistil and the anthers in a smaller number. The trichomes were covered by a thick cuticle with characteristic outgrowths. They contained a living protoplast, and plastids were observed in the cytoplasm of the trichome cells. In addition, anomocytic stomata were found in the epidermis of the receptacle and in the epidermis of the corolla petals. The stigma of the pistil and the adaxial epidermis of the petals were composed of very numerous conical papillae.

  12. Divergence of flowering genes in soybean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moon Young Kim; Jin Hee Shin; Yang Jae Kang; Sang Rea Shim; Suk-Ha Lee

    2012-11-01

    Soybean genome sequences were blasted with Arabidopsis thaliana regulatory genes involved in photoperiod-dependent flowering. This approach enabled the identification of 118 genes involved in the flowering pathway. Two genome sequences of cultivated (Williams 82) and wild (IT182932) soybeans were employed to survey functional DNA variations in the flowering-related homologs. Forty genes exhibiting nonsynonymous substitutions between G. max and G. soja were catalogued. In addition, 22 genes were found to co-localize with QTLs for six traits including flowering time, first flower, pod maturity, beginning of pod, reproductive period, and seed filling period. Among the genes overlapping the QTL regions, two LHY/CCA1 genes, GI and SFR6 contained amino acid changes. The recently duplicated sequence regions of the soybean genome were used as additional criteria for the speculation of the putative function of the homologs. Two duplicated regions showed redundancy of both flowering-related genes and QTLs. ID 12398025, which contains the homeologous regions between chr 7 and chr 16, was redundant for the LHY/CCA1 and SPA1 homologs and the QTLs. Retaining of the CRY1 gene and the pod maturity QTLs were observed in the duplicated region of ID 23546507 on chr 4 and chr 6. Functional DNA variation of the LHY/CCA1 gene (Glyma07g05410) was present in a counterpart of the duplicated region on chr 7, while the gene (Glyma16g01980) present in the other portion of the duplicated region on chr 16 did not show a functional sequence change. The gene list catalogued in this study provides primary insight for understanding the regulation of flowering time and maturity in soybean.

  13. Flower volatiles, crop varieties and bee responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn K Klatt

    Full Text Available Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding.

  14. VISITOR AND EXHIBITOR CLUSTERS AT EASTERN-EUROPEAN AGRICULTURAL FAIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Levente

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no exact information concerning the economic effect of the agricultural exhibitions neither on national nor on international level. Some publications focus on the positive externalities of exhibitions, but the exhibition itself is a neglected topic. Although the fair is one of the most ancient marketing-tools; its role is still relatively high in the marketing mix of different economic sectors, even nowadays, in the Internet-age. One of these sectors is the agribusiness, where the exhibition is a place of business-to-business communication, Customer Relationship Management, and last, but not least an important Point Of Sale. The aim of the present paper is to point out the importance of exhibitions through the assessment of their popularity. From this aim, we have derived the following objectives: - To build a model concerning the relationships among the interested parties. - To asses the visitors of five Eastern-European exhibitions. - To asses the exhibitors of the same exhibitions. - To compare the opinion and expectance of the mentioned groups. - To test the model, based on the questionnaires data. - To measure the radius of attraction by the attendees, as well as by exhibitors I have collected primary data through questionnaires and site visit, and also have obtained secondary data from printed and electronic documents. In this paper, I present a model, which describes the relationships among the interested parties. The data was collected on four different exhibitions: Farmerexpo (Debrecen, Hungary in 2005 and 2006, OMK (Budapest, Hungary from 2005 and Polagra-Farm (Poznan, Poland 2006.

  15. Flower Men: The Australian Canon and Flower Painting 1910-1935

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Elias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Historical studies of Hans Heysen, George Lambert, Tom Roberts and Arthur Streeton concentrate on paintings of landscape and people. Less well known are their paintings of flowers, which take the form of still-life painting or adjuncts to figure painting, such as portraits. While these artists are famous for the masculine way they approached masculine themes, and flower painting represents a stereotypically feminine subject, I argue that by making flowers their object of study, they intended to define and differentiate femininity from masculinity in an era of the ‘New Woman’. Sex and gender are central to the subject of flower painting and are important for discussions about the work produced by all four men, although sex is often camouflaged behind the innocence of naturalistically painted flowers.

  16. Kaempferol glycosides in the flowers of carnation and their contribution to the creamy white flower color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashina, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Masa-atsu; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Onozaki, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawanobu, Shuji; Onoe, Hiroshi; Okamura, Masachika

    2010-12-01

    Three flavonol glycosides were isolated from the flowers of carnation cultivars 'White Wink' and 'Honey Moon'. They were identified from their UV, MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra as kaempferol 3-O-neohesperidoside, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside and kaempferol 3-O-glucosyl-(1 --> 2)-[rhamnosyl-(1 --> 6)-glucoside]. Referring to previous reports, flavonols occurring in carnation flowers are characterized as kaempferol 3-O-glucosides with additional sugars binding at the 2 and/or 6-positions of the glucose. The kaempferol glycoside contents of a nearly pure white flower and some creamy white flower lines were compared. Although the major glycoside was different in each line, the total kaempferol contents of the creamy white lines were from 5.9 to 20.9 times higher than the pure white line. Thus, in carnations, kaempferol glycosides surely contribute to the creamy tone of white flowers.

  17. Flower power: Tree flowering phenology as a settlement cue for migrating birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, L.J.; van Riper, Charles; Fontaine, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    1. Neotropical migrant birds show a clear preference for stopover habitats with ample food supplies; yet, the proximate cues underlying these decisions remain unclear. 2. For insectivorous migrants, cues associated with vegetative phenology (e.g. flowering, leaf flush, and leaf loss) may reliably predict the availability of herbivorous arthropods. Here we examined whether migrants use the phenology of five tree species to choose stopover locations, and whether phenology accurately predicts food availability. 3. Using a combination of experimental and observational evidence, we show migrant populations closely track tree phenology, particularly the flowering phenology of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), and preferentially forage in trees with more flowers. Furthermore, the flowering phenology of honey mesquite reliably predicts overall arthropod abundance as well as the arthropods preferred by migrants for food. 4. Together, these results suggest that honey mesquite flowering phenology is an important cue used by migrants to assess food availability quickly and reliably, while in transit during spring migration. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  18. A visitor motivational typology at Mapungubwe National Park and World Heritage Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe P. Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Mapungubwe National Park and World Heritage Site (MNP is a unique national park in South Africa in that it includes a World Heritage Site of significant importance for the people of southern Africa. MNP is a relatively new national park with low visitor numbers and occupancy rates, which threaten the sustainable management of the park.Research purpose: This study aimed to develop a general visitor profile and to describe the motivational factors for visiting the park in order to support the development of tourism at MNP.Motivation of the study: A tourism management plan is required for the park; however, any planning associated planning requires an assessment of tourist behaviour and needs.Research design, approach and method: An online questionnaire was distributed to a database of visitors to MNP during March−April 2013. A total of 486 responses were received. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics through frequencies and means. Motivator constructs were analysed through a factor analysis.Main findings: The study both confirmed and contradicted previous findings from other national parks in terms of visitor profiles and motivations. Most crucially, this study identified a new motivational factor for visiting national parks, which advances the need to manage the heritage aspect of world heritage sites distinctly from national parks.Managerial implications: The results indicated that visitors to MNP were older and better educated compared to visitors at other national parks. These visitors included predominantly first-time visitors. In addition these visitors are mainly motivated by the need for a nature experience, although the park is not a Big 5 reserve, findings also identified heritage and education as a unique motivational factor for this park.Contribution added: The study promotes the requirement of a unique park-specific tourism management strategy for MNP as the market base of this park is demographically

  19. Mediation of flowering by a calmodulin-dependent proteinkinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (MCK1) appeared important in regulating flowering in tobacco. The expression of modified MCK1 that lacks the C-terminal including calmodulin-binding domain upsets the flowering developmental program, leading to the abortion of flower primordia initiated on the main axis of the plant and, as well, caused the prolongation of the vegetative phase in axillary buds. The abortion process of flowers began first in the developing anthers and subsequently the entire flower senesces. In axillary buds the prolonged vegetative phase was characterized by atypical elongated, narrow, twisted leaves. These results suggested a role for calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homologs in mediating flowering.

  20. Tiger cubs and little flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Short vignettes are related to show the conditions for girls and women in Morocco. Descriptions are given for child labor, literacy, the government's education campaign, youth group efforts to enhance family planning (FP) knowledge, the impact of FP outreach in rural areas, and unmarried mothers. In Morocco's cities, young boys can be seen hawking cigarettes and working in market stalls; in the countryside, boys herd goats or do other farm work. In rural areas girls are hidden by having them perform work around the house or on the farm primarily indoors. Women are supervised by women. 54% work as maids and 39% are apprentices in carpet factories. Parents prefer to have their daughters working and consider it protection from mischief as well as needed income. Only 60% of girls are enrolled in primary school vs. 80% of the boys. In rural areas, only 44% of girls are enrolled, and 20% stay to complete their primary education, while 76% of boys enroll and 63% complete primary school. Literacy of women has an effect on the ability to accurately take birth control pills. All ages of women gather at schools in the evening for lessons in reading and writing in a program supported by the King. Women are pleased with their success in just learning how to write their own names. Television advertisements promote sending children to school, as another part of the Ministry of Education's campaign to increase girl's educational status. There are still not enough schools; many schools are double shift, and communities are building their own schools. Youth clubs, which refer to boys as "tiger cubs" and girls as "little flowers," try to familiarize young people with some basic information about contraception. A traditional midwife relates some problems with girl's education: costs for clothing and supplies, worry about male teachers, and poor role models. In some remote areas, farm families do not send their children to school, because of the distance to schools and the need for

  1. Fit model between participation statement of exhibitors and visitors to improve the exhibition performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina García Magro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of the paper is offers a model of analysis which allows to measure the impact on the performance of fairs, as well as the knowledge or not of the motives of participation of the visitors on the part of the exhibitors. Design/methodology: A review of the literature is established concerning two of the principal interested agents, exhibitors and visitors, focusing. The study is focused on the line of investigation referred to the motives of participation or not in a trade show. According to the information thrown by each perspectives of study, a comparative analysis is carried out in order to determine the degree of existing understanding between both. Findings: The trade shows allow to be studied from an integrated strategic marketing approach. The fit model between the reasons for participation of exhibitors and visitors offer information on the lack of an understanding between exhibitors and visitors, leading to dissatisfaction with the participation, a fact that is reflected in the fair success. The model identified shows that a strategic plan must be designed in which the reason for participation of visitor was incorporated as moderating variable of the reason for participation of exhibitors. The article concludes with the contribution of a series of proposals for the improvement of fairground results. Social implications: The fit model that improve the performance of trade shows, implicitly leads to successful achievement of targets for multiple stakeholders beyond the consideration of visitors and exhibitors. Originality/value: The integrated perspective of stakeholders allows the study of the existing relationships between the principal groups of interest, in such a way that, having knowledge on the condition of the question of the trade shows facilitates the task of the investigator in future academic works and allows that the interested groups obtain a better performance to the participation in fairs, as visitor or as

  2. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko E-mail: okikuchi@net.ipen.br

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.(author)

  3. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.

  4. Pollinators show flower colour preferences but flowers with similar colours do not attract similar pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Sara; Retana, Javier; Gómez, José M; Bosch, Jordi

    2016-08-01

    Colour is one of the main floral traits used by pollinators to locate flowers. Although pollinators show innate colour preferences, the view that the colour of a flower may be considered an important predictor of its main pollinators is highly controversial because flower choice is highly context-dependent, and initial innate preferences may be overridden by subsequent associative learning. Our objective is to establish whether there is a relationship between flower colour and pollinator composition in natural communities. We measured the flower reflectance spectrum and pollinator composition in four plant communities (85 plant species represented by 109 populations, and 32 305 plant-pollinator interactions in total). Pollinators were divided into six taxonomic groups: bees, ants, wasps, coleopterans, dipterans and lepidopterans. We found consistent associations between pollinator groups and certain colours. These associations matched innate preferences experimentally established for several pollinators and predictions of the pollination syndrome theory. However, flowers with similar colours did not attract similar pollinator assemblages. The explanation for this paradoxical result is that most flower species are pollination generalists. We conclude that although pollinator colour preferences seem to condition plant-pollinator interactions, the selective force behind these preferences has not been strong enough to mediate the appearance and maintenance of tight colour-based plant-pollinator associations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Flower Constancy, Insect Psychology, and Plant Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittka, Lars; Thomson, James D.; Waser, Nickolas M.

    Individuals of some species of pollinating insects tend to restrict their visits to only a few of the available plant species, in the process bypassing valuable food sources. The question of why this flower constancy exists is a rich and important one with implications for the organization of natural communities of plants, floral evolution, and our understanding of the learning processes involved in finding food. Some scientists have assumed that flower constancy is adaptive per se. Others argued that constancy occurs because memory capacity for floral features in insects is limited, but attempts to identify the limitations often remained rather simplistic. We elucidate now different sensory and motor memories from natural foraging tasks are stored and retrieved, using concepts from modern learning science and visual search, and conclude that flower constancy is likely to have multiple causes. Possible constraints favoring constancy are interference sensitivity of short-term memory, and temporal limitations on retrieving information from long-term memory as rapidly as from short-term memory, but further empirical evidence is needed to substantiate these possibilities. In addition, retrieving memories may be slower and more prone to errors when there are several options than when an insect copes with only a single task. In addition to memory limitations, we also point out alternative explanations for flower constancy. We then consider the way in which floral parameters, such as interplant distances, nectar rewards, flower morphology, and floral color (as seen through bees' eyes) affect constancy. Finally, we discuss the implications of pollinator constancy for plant evolution. To date there is no evidence that flowers have diverged to favor constancy, although the appropriate tests may not have yet been conducted. However, there is good evidence against the notion that pollinator constancy is involved in speciation or maintenance of plant species integrity.

  6. Impact of zoo visitors on the fecal cortisol levels and behavior of an endangered species: Indian blackbuck (Antelope cervicapra L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Thangavel; Archunan, Govindaraju; Sekar, Mahadevan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated behavioral activities (resting, moving, aggressive, social, and reproductive behavior) and fecal cortisol levels in 8 individually identified adult male blackbucks during periods of varying levels of zoo visitors (zero, low, high, and extremely high zoo visitor density). This study also elucidated whether zoo visitor density could disturb nonhuman animal welfare. This study analyzed fecal cortisol from the samples of blackbuck by radioimmunoassay and found significant differences (p zoo visitors. The ANOVA with Duncan's Multiple Range Test test showed that the fecal cortisol concentration was higher (p zoo visitor density. The results of the study suggest that zoo visitor density affected behavior and adrenocortical secretion in Indian Blackbuck, and this may indicate an animal welfare problem.

  7. Refuges, flower strips, biodiversity and agronomic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Grégory; Wateau, Karine; Legrand, Mickaël; Oste, Sandrine

    2008-01-01

    Several arthropods are natural predators of pests, and they are able to reduce and control their population development. FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais (Federation Regionate de Defense contre les Organismes Nuisibles = Regional Federation for Pest Control) has begun for a long time to form farmers to the recognition of beneficial arthropods and to show them their usefulness. These beneficial insects or arachnids are present everywhere, in orchards and even in fields which are areas relatively poor in biodiversity. Adults feed in the flower strips instead larvae and some adults feed on preys such as aphids or caterpillars. Most of the time, beneficial insects can regulate pest but sometimes, in agricultural area, they can't make it early enough and efficiently. Their action begin too late and there biodiversity and number are too low. It's possible to enhance their action by manipulating the ecological infrastructures, like sewing flower strips or installing refuges. Flower strips increase the density of natural enemies and make them be present earlier in the field in order to control pests. Refuges permit beneficial's to spend winter on the spot. So they're able to be active and to grow in number earlier. From 2004 to 2007, on the one hand, FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais has developed a research program. Its purpose was to inventory practices and also tools and means available and to judge the advisability of using such or such beneficial refuge in orchards. On the second hand, it studied the impact in orchard of refuges on population of beneficial's and the difference there were between manufactured refuges and homemade refuges. Interesting prospects were obtained with some of them. Otherwise, since 2003, FREDON has studied flower strips influence on beneficial population and their impact on pest control. In cabbage fields, results of trials have shown that flower strips lead to a reduction of aphid number under acceptable economic level, up to 50 meters from flower strips

  8. My favourite flowering image: the role of cytokinin as a flowering signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Georges

    2013-12-01

    My favourite flowering image shows a section in a shoot apical meristem of Sinapis alba undertaking the very first step of its transition to flowering. This step is the activation of the SaSOC1 gene, the Sinapis orthologue of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1 (SOC1), in a few central cells of the meristem. Hidden behind this picture is my long quest of physiological signals controlling flowering. Milestones of this story are briefly recounted here and this gives me an opportunity to raise a number of questions about the nature and function of florigen.

  9. A NEW APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF VISITOR PERCEPTIONS TOWARDS A TOURISM DESTINATION: THE ROLE OF FOOD AND WINE EXPERIENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Capitello, Roberta; Agnoli, Lara; Diego BEGALLI

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to propose a new approach to analyse visitor perceptions and experiences in a tourism destination. The purpose is to discuss how the discrete choice models can contribute to the analysis of the tourism destination in the visitor experience perspective. The study pays particular attention to the role of food and wine supply in thetourism experience and the destination perception. This research deepens the theoretical approach to the analysis of visitor perceptions for a tourist ...

  10. The Effect of Mechanical Noise and Natural Sound on Visitor Experiences in Units of the National Park System

    OpenAIRE

    Gramann, Dr. James; National Park Service; U.S. Department of the Interior

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews research on the effects of mechanical noise and natural sound on visitor experiences in national parks. Three approaches to studying noise impacts are described. Most noise research to date has addressed the impact of air-tour overflights on visitor experiences. these impacts are localized with significant percentages of visitors in some parks reporting interference with natural sounds from aircraft noise. Research also shows that unthreatening natural environments can ...

  11. Glyphosate and Dicamba Inhibit Flowering of Native Willamette Valley Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful flowering is essential for reproduction of native plants and production of food for herbivores. It is also an important alternative endpoint for assessment of ecological risks from chemical stressors such as herbicides. We evaluated flowering phenology after herbicide...

  12. DNA tests for strawberry: perpetual flowering - Bx215

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpetual flowering strawberries have great economic value to the fresh market industry. Floral initiation in strawberry is largely determined by photoperiod, temperature, and genetics. Commercially grown strawberries are generally classified as remontant (repeated or perpetual flowering, day neutr...

  13. Impact of Cut-Flower Industries on Sustainable Livelihood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of Cut-Flower Industries on Sustainable Livelihood and Poverty Reduction in ... Annals of Humanities and Development Studies ... A sample of 200 respondents were obtained from five cut-flower companies, including Kiliflora, Tanzania ...

  14. Glyphosate and Dicamba Inhibit Flowering of Native Willamette Valley Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful flowering is essential for reproduction of native plants and production of food for herbivores. It is also an important alternative endpoint for assessment of ecological risks from chemical stressors such as herbicides. We evaluated flowering phenology after herbicide...

  15. Experimental Studies Cast Doubt on Deceit Syndrome of Bat Flower

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Bat Flower (Tacca chantrieri) is a southwest China's species of a tropical plant genus called Tacca,which features near black flowers,conspicuous involucral bracts and whisker-like filiform bracteoles.

  16. Mutation in TERMINAL FLOWER1 reverses the photoperiodic requirement for flowering in the wild strawberry Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Elli A; Mouhu, Katriina; Albani, Maria C; Kurokura, Takeshi; Rantanen, Marja; Sargent, Daniel J; Battey, Nicholas H; Coupland, George; Elomaa, Paula; Hytönen, Timo

    2012-07-01

    Photoperiodic flowering has been extensively studied in the annual short-day and long-day plants rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), whereas less is known about the control of flowering in perennials. In the perennial wild strawberry, Fragaria vesca (Rosaceae), short-day and perpetual flowering long-day accessions occur. Genetic analyses showed that differences in their flowering responses are caused by a single gene, SEASONAL FLOWERING LOCUS, which may encode the F. vesca homolog of TERMINAL FLOWER1 (FvTFL1). We show through high-resolution mapping and transgenic approaches that FvTFL1 is the basis of this change in flowering behavior and demonstrate that FvTFL1 acts as a photoperiodically regulated repressor. In short-day F. vesca, long photoperiods activate FvTFL1 mRNA expression and short days suppress it, promoting flower induction. These seasonal cycles in FvTFL1 mRNA level confer seasonal cycling of vegetative and reproductive development. Mutations in FvTFL1 prevent long-day suppression of flowering, and the early flowering that then occurs under long days is dependent on the F. vesca homolog of FLOWERING LOCUS T. This photoperiodic response mechanism differs from those described in model annual plants. We suggest that this mechanism controls flowering within the perennial growth cycle in F. vesca and demonstrate that a change in a single gene reverses the photoperiodic requirements for flowering.

  17. Using the Delphi Technique to Identify Key Elements for Effective and Sustainable Visitor Use Planning Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P. Fefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas around the world receive nearly 800 billion visits/year, with international tourism continuing to increase. While protected areas provide necessary benefits to communities and visitors, the increased visitation may negatively impact the resource and the recreational experience, hence the need to manage visitor use in protected areas around the world. This research focused on obtaining information from experts to document their experiences utilizing one visitor use planning framework: Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP. Using the Delphi Technique, 31 experts from seven regions around the world were asked to identify elements necessary for effective visitor management, as well as elements that facilitated or limited success when using VERP. Elements were categorized and rated in terms of importance. Scoring of the final categories was analyzed using Wilcoxon and Median non-parametric statistical tests. Results suggest that planning challenges stem from limitations in organizational capacity to support a long-term, adaptive management process, inferring that VERP may be sufficiently developed, but implementation capacity may not. The results can be used to refine existing frameworks, and to aid in the development of new recreation frameworks.

  18. The Stochastic Dynamics for Ecological Tourism System with Visitor Educational Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing visitation in parks and protected areas continues to present a considerable challenge for worldwide land managers with allowing recreational use while preserving natural conditions. In China, the fast expanding visitation in protected areas is quickly damaging the natural resources and precious culture without effective visitor education, while regulation and site management are also gaining very limited efficacy. We propose a differential equation to describe the ecological tourism system. Shown by the theoretical proof and numerical simulation, the ecological tourism system is unstable without any perturbed factors, especially visitor educational intervention, because the solution of the dynamic system explodes in a finite time given any initial value. Supposing that the intrinsic increasing rate of stakeholders in the systems stochastically perturbed by the visitor educational intervention, we discover that the stochastic dynamic model can effectively suppress the explosion of the solution. As such, we demonstrate that the tourism system can develop steadily and safely even under a large amount of visitors in public vacation, when employing continuous visitor education intervention programmes.

  19. Visits to the ATLAS cavern - A record of 20000 visitors in 2006!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessandra Ciocio

    The year 2006 closed with the impressive record of just under 20000 visitors to the ATLAS cavern. These visitors come from all walks of life - people within ATLAS, groups from other CERN divisions, retired CERN staff, school groups both from the local area and from far away, companies looking for something different as a special outing, celebrities (Cirque du Soleil, Black Eyed Peas hip-hop group) passing through Geneva who had read Angels and Demons, a stream of VIP visitors and now, more and more, Press visitors. There have been public visits in the ATLAS cavern since the middle of 2003. At that time a lot of the visitors were guided by Bernard Lebegue and Francois Butin. The total number of visits in 2003 was 2220 people. Not bad for just two guides! Over the following three years demand for visits increased to such an extent that the ATLAS Visits Service was created and is now run very successfully under the supervision of Connie Potter in the ATLAS Secretariat in close collaboration with the ever-helpfu...

  20. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M Waller

    Full Text Available Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre. The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  1. Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation.

  2. Factors Influencing Visitors to Suburban Open Space Areas near a Northern Japanese City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Shoji

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Visitor information often serves as the basis for the management plan of parks. However, there exist few scientific and fundamental surveys for parks and open spaces in Japan. We analyzed the correlation between the number of visitors and the various factors in a suburban open space in a northern Japanese city, Takino Park. To explain the fluctuations in the number of visitors in Takino Park, multiple regression analyses with the stepwise method were conducted. The analyses employed social factors and meteorological factors, such as the day of the week, school vacations, temperature and the weather. The results show that the most influential factor is the day of the week, i.e., Sundays and holidays. The weather is also influential as the number of visitors decreases on rainy and snowy days. Comparing different seasons of the year, we found that influential factors varied from one season to the other. A key distinguishing finding of our results is that the weather conditions at the departure site and the weather forecast are also determining factors. These findings will help park managers understand the current situations and examine future management strategies to maintain and enhance visitor satisfaction, and improve information services.

  3. SVM to detect the presence of visitors in a smart home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Johanna; Larimer, Nicole; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Pavel, Misha; Hayes, Tamara L

    2012-01-01

    With the rising age of the population, there is increased need to help elderly maintain their independence. Smart homes, employing passive sensor networks and pervasive computing techniques, enable the unobtrusive assessment of activities and behaviors of the elderly which can be useful for health state assessment and intervention. Due to the multiple health benefits associated with socializing, accurately tracking whether an individual has visitors to their home is one of the more important aspects of elders' behaviors that could be assessed with smart home technology. With this goal, we have developed a preliminary SVM model to identify periods where untagged visitors are present in the home. Using the dwell time, number of sensor firings, and number of transitions between major living spaces (living room, dining room, kitchen and bathroom) as features in the model, and self report from two subjects as ground truth, we were able to accurately detect the presence of visitors in the home with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 0.89 for subject 1, and of 0.67 and 0.78 for subject 2, respectively. These preliminary data demonstrate the feasibility of detecting visitors with in-home sensor data, but highlight the need for more advanced modeling techniques so the model performs well for all subjects and all types of visitors.

  4. Visitantes florales nocturnos del girasol (Helianthus annuus, Asterales: Asteraceae en la Argentina Nocturnal floral visitors of sunflower (Helianthus annuus, Asterales: Asteraceae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P Torretta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available El girasol (Helianthus annuus es un cultivo oleaginoso, polinizado por Apis mellifera L. y otras abejas en distintas regiones del mundo. Sin embargo, sus flores también son visitadas por insectos de actividad nocturna. Durante tres campañas agrícolas, se determinó la diversidad de los visitantes nocturnos de capítulos de girasol, en cinco sitios de Argentina. También se estudió el comportamiento de forrajeo de los principales visitantes y la variación de la receptividad estigmática a lo largo del día, con el fin de establecer si estos visitantes contribuyen a la polinización. Al menos 67 especies o morfoespecies pertenecientes a cuatro órdenes de visitantes nocturnos fueron colectadas. El orden más rico y abundante fue Lepidoptera (44 especies o morfoespecies, cinco familias, seguido por Coleoptera (18 especies o morfoespecies, nueve familias, Orthoptera (tres morfoespecies, una familia y Blattaria (dos especies, una familia. Los lepidópteros forrajearon exclusivamente por néctar, mientras que los individuos de los demás órdenes consumieron polen y/o partes florales. El estigma se encontró receptivo durante las horas de luz, con una receptividad máxima al mediodía (12:00 - 14:00. Llamativamente, las flores del girasol son visitadas por mayor número de polillas que de abejas. Debido a que las polillas consumen néctar y potencialmente transportan polen entre flores, en un momento del día en que los estigmas se encuentran menos receptivos, es improbable que polinicen efectivamente el cultivo.Sunflower (Helianthus annuus is an oilseed crop pollinated by Apis mellifera L. and other diurnal bees in different regions of the world. However, their flowers are also visited by insects active at night. During three agricultural years, the diversity of nocturnal visitors to sunflower heads was assessed in five different sites in Argentina. The foraging behavior of the main visitors as well as the stigmatic receptivity variations along

  5. Flowering and sex expression in Acer L. : a biosystemic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de P.C.

    1976-01-01

    A review and an analysis is given of flowering and sex expression in Acer. The process of sex differentiation was studied in physiological experiments and could be influenced by accelerated flowering and by removal of female.gif flower buds just after bud break. The paper further includes notes on t

  6. Vascular occlusion in stems of cut rose flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of cut rose flowers, a major horticultural crop in the Netherlands, is often unsatisfactory. During vase-life premature signs of water stress occur, such as slow growth of the bud which often results in poor flower opening, wilting of both the flowers and the leaves, and bending

  7. The Symbolic Meanings of “Flowering Judas”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Yan

    2014-01-01

    In the short story “Flowering Judas”, Katherine Anne Porter employed the writing technique - symbolism. Among others, “Flowering Judas” is the most important symbolic image. This paper tries to analyze the symbolic meanings of “Flowering Judas”, so that the readers can understand the theme of the this story much better.

  8. The Symbolic Meanings of “Flowering Judas”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian; Yan

    2014-01-01

    In the short story"Flowering Judas",Katherine Anne Porter employed the writing technique—symbolism.Among others,"Flowering Judas"is the most important symbolic image.This paper tries to analyze the symbolic meanings of"Flowering Judas",so that the readers can understand the theme of the this story much better.

  9. Internet log service for flower supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thors, M.

    2004-01-01

    Onderzoekers van Agrotechnology & Food Innovations van Wageningen UR hebben data ontwikkelt en getest om de kwaliteit en houdbaarheid van snijbloemen tijdens langdurig transport te behoudenThis summer has seen the completion of a project to develop quality tracking and tracing for cut flowers. S

  10. Gravitropism in cut flower stalks of snapdragon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philosoph-Hadas, S.; Friedman, H.; Meir, S.; Berkovitz-SimanTov, R.; Rosenberger, I.; Halevy, A.H.; Kaufman, P.B.; Balk, P.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    The negative gravitropic response of cut flower stalks is a complex multistep process that requires the participation of various cellular components acting in succession or in parallel. The process was particularly characterized in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.) spikes with regard to (1) gravity

  11. Teaching Art with Art: Flowers in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Justifies examining still-life pictures of flowers to provide students with an opportunity to learn how one distinguishes between deeply artistic pictures full of emotion and pictures lacking this quality. Claims that students will develop their own artistic expression. Offers pictures by Diego Rivera, Watanabe Shiko, Consuelo Kanaga, and Rachel…

  12. Gravitropism in cut flower stalks of snapdragon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philosoph-Hadas, S.; Friedman, H.; Meir, S.; Berkovitz-SimanTov, R.; Rosenberger, I.; Halevy, A.H.; Kaufman, P.B.; Balk, P.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    The negative gravitropic response of cut flower stalks is a complex multistep process that requires the participation of various cellular components acting in succession or in parallel. The process was particularly characterized in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.) spikes with regard to (1) gravity

  13. Alkaloids of the flowers of Pancratium maritimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, D T; Frahm, A W

    1998-10-01

    The defatted ethanolic extract of the fresh flowers of Pancratium maritimum L. yielded the four known alkaloids lycorine, maritidine, lycoramine, and galanthamine. The structures of the isolated alkaloids were determined mainly through spectroscopic studies including one- and two-dimensional NMR (COSY, NOESY, DEPT, HETCOR, and HMBC) and CD techniques. Some spectral data are newly reported or revised.

  14. Interspecific hybridization of flower bulbs: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to introduce new characters such as resistances, flower shape and colour, from wild species into the cultivar assortment of lily it is necessary to overcome interspecific crossing barriers.. Several techniques have been used for wide interspecific lily crosses with species and cultivars fro

  15. Teaching Art with Art: Flowers in Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    1998-01-01

    Justifies examining still-life pictures of flowers to provide students with an opportunity to learn how one distinguishes between deeply artistic pictures full of emotion and pictures lacking this quality. Claims that students will develop their own artistic expression. Offers pictures by Diego Rivera, Watanabe Shiko, Consuelo Kanaga, and Rachel…

  16. Interspecific hybridization of flower bulbs: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to introduce new characters such as resistances, flower shape and colour, from wild species into the cultivar assortment of lily it is necessary to overcome interspecific crossing barriers.. Several techniques have been used for wide interspecific lily crosses with species and cultivars

  17. Interspecific hybridization of flower bulbs: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to introduce new characters such as resistances, flower shape and colour, from wild species into the cultivar assortment of lily it is necessary to overcome interspecific crossing barriers.. Several techniques have been used for wide interspecific lily crosses with species and cultivars fro

  18. Preference and performance of western flower thrips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogel, de W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Differences in performance on, and preference for, different plant parts were studied on cucumber plants. On these plants thrips are often most abundant on the youngest plant parts. This suggests that the youngest leaves are most suitable for western flower thrips. We assessed if differences in

  19. Internet log service for flower supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thors, M.

    2004-01-01

    Onderzoekers van Agrotechnology & Food Innovations van Wageningen UR hebben data ontwikkelt en getest om de kwaliteit en houdbaarheid van snijbloemen tijdens langdurig transport te behoudenThis summer has seen the completion of a project to develop quality tracking and tracing for cut flowers. S

  20. Floral biology of Stachytarpheta maximiliani Scham. (Verbenaceae and its floral visitors Biologia floral de Stachytarpheta maximiliani Scham. (Verbenaceae e seus visitantes florais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana de Freitas Barbola

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the reproductive system of Stachytarpheta maximiliani (Verbenaceae, including its floral biology, nectar and pollen availability and insect foraging patterns, identifying whose species act as pollinators. It was carried out in a Brazilian Atlantic rain forest site. Observations on the pollination biology of the Verbenaceae S. maximiliani indicate that their flowering period extends from September through May. Anthesis occurs from 5:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and nectar and pollen are available during all the anthesis. Many species of beetles, hemipterans, flies, wasps, bees and butterflies visit their flowers, but bees and butterflies are the most frequent visitors. The flowers are generally small, gathered in dense showy inflorescences. A complex of floral characteristcs, such as violet-blue color of flowers, long floral tubes, without scents, nectar not exposed, high concentration of sugar in nectar (about 32%, allowed identification of floral syndromes (melittophily and psicophily and function for each visitor. The bees, Bombus morio, B. atratus, Trigonopedia ferruginea, Xylocopa brasilianorum and Apis mellifera and the butterflies Corticea mendica mendica, Corticea sp., Vehilius clavicula, Urbanus simplicius, U. teleus and Heraclides thoas brasiliensis, are the most important pollinators.Este estudo descreve alguns aspectos do sistema reprodutivo de Stachytarpheta maximiliani (Verbenaceae, incluindo características da flor, disponibilidade de néctar e pólen e o padrão de forrageio dos insetos visitantes florais, em uma área de Floresta Atlântica, no sul do Brasil. Observações sobre sua biologia floral indicam que esta espécie tem um período de floração que se estende de setembro a maio, antese diurna (das 5:30h às 17:00h e oferta de néctar e pólen praticamente durante todo o período de antese. Suas flores são visitadas por diferentes espécies de coleópteros, dípteros, hemípteros, himenópteros e lepid