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Sample records for plant viral suppressors

  1. Visualization of plant viral suppressor silencing activity in intact leaf lamina by quantitative fluorescent imaging

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    Francis Kevin P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient expression of proteins in plants has become a favoured method over the production of stably transformed plants because, in addition to enabling high protein yields, it is both fast and easy to apply. An enhancement of transient protein expression can be achieved by plant virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins. Since viral suppressor proteins differ in their efficiency to enhance transient protein expression in plants, we developed a whole-leaf green fluorescent protein (GFP-based imaging assay to quantitatively assess suppressor protein activity. Results In a transient GFP-expression assay using wild-type and GFP-transgenic N. benthamiana, addition of the plant viral suppressors Beet mild yellowing virus (BMYV-IPP P0 or Plum pox virus (PPV HC-Pro was shown to increase fluorescent protein expression 3-4-fold, 7 days post inoculation (dpi when compared to control plants. In contrast, in agroinfiltrated patches without suppressor activity, near complete silencing of the GFP transgene was observed in the transgenic N. benthamiana at 21 dpi. Both co-infiltrated suppressors significantly enhanced GFP expression over time, with HC-Pro co-infiltrations leading to higher short term GFP fluorescence (at 7 dpi and P0 giving higher long term GFP fluorescence (at 21 dpi. Additionally, in contrast to HC-Pro co-infiltrations, an area of complete GFP silencing was observed at the edge of P0 co-infiltrated areas. Conclusions Fluorescence imaging of whole intact leaves proved to be an easy and effective method for spatially and quantitatively observing viral suppressor efficiency in plants. This suppressor assay demonstrates that plant viral suppressors greatly enhanced transient GFP expression, with P0 showing a more prolonged suppressor activity over time than HC-Pro. Both suppressors could prove to be ideal candidates for enhancing target protein expression in plants.

  2. rgs-CaM Detects and Counteracts Viral RNA Silencing Suppressors in Plant Immune Priming.

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    Jeon, Eun Jin; Tadamura, Kazuki; Murakami, Taiki; Inaba, Jun-Ichi; Kim, Bo Min; Sato, Masako; Atsumi, Go; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Masuta, Chikara; Nakahara, Kenji S

    2017-10-01

    Primary infection of a plant with a pathogen that causes high accumulation of salicylic acid in the plant typically via a hypersensitive response confers enhanced resistance against secondary infection with a broad spectrum of pathogens, including viruses. This phenomenon is called systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which is a plant priming for adaption to repeated biotic stress. However, the molecular mechanisms of SAR-mediated enhanced inhibition, especially of virus infection, remain unclear. Here, we show that SAR against cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) involves a calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM. We previously reported the antiviral function of rgs-CaM, which binds to and directs degradation of viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), including CMV 2b, via autophagy. We found that rgs-CaM-mediated immunity is ineffective against CMV infection in normally growing tobacco plants but is activated as a result of SAR induction via salicylic acid signaling. We then analyzed the effect of overexpression of rgs-CaM on salicylic acid signaling. Overexpressed and ectopically expressed rgs-CaM induced defense reactions, including cell death, generation of reactive oxygen species, and salicylic acid signaling. Further analysis using a combination of the salicylic acid analogue benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH) and the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 revealed that rgs-CaM functions as an immune receptor that induces salicylic acid signaling by simultaneously perceiving both viral RSS and Ca(2+) influx as infection cues, implying its autoactivation. Thus, secondary infection of SAR-induced tobacco plants with CMV seems to be effectively inhibited through 2b recognition and degradation by rgs-CaM, leading to reinforcement of antiviral RNA silencing and other salicylic acid-mediated antiviral responses.IMPORTANCE Even without an acquired immune system like that in vertebrates, plants show enhanced whole-plant

  3. Interaction between viral RNA silencing suppressors and host factors in plant immunity.

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    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate events in the molecular arms race between the host and pathogen in evaluating plant immunity, a zigzag model is useful for uncovering aspects common to different host-pathogen interactions. By analogy of the steps in virus-host interactions with the steps in the standard zigzag model outlined in recent papers, we may regard RNA silencing as pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against viruses, RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) as effectors to overcome host RNA silencing and resistance gene (R-gene)-mediated defense as effector-triggered immunity (ETI) recognizing RSSs as avirulence proteins. However, because the standard zigzag model does not fully apply to some unique aspects in the interactions between a plant host and virus, we here defined a model especially designed for viruses. Although we simplified the phenomena involved in the virus-host interactions in the model, certain specific interactive steps can be explained by integrating additional host factors into the model. These host factors are thought to play an important role in maintaining the efficacy of the various steps in the main pathway of defense against viruses in this model for virus-plant interactions. For example, we propose candidates that may interact with viral RSSs to induce the resistance response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A strategy for screening an inhibitor of viral silencing suppressors, which attenuates symptom development of plant viruses.

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    Shimura, Hanako; Fukagawa, Takako; Meguro, Ayano; Yamada, Hirokazu; Oh-Hira, Mahito; Sano, Shinsuke; Masuta, Chikara

    2008-12-10

    To find out whether we can control plant virus diseases by blocking viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), we developed a strategy to screen inhibitors that block the association of RSSs with siRNAs using a surface plasmon resonance assay. The screened chemicals were tested in competition with RSSs for binding to siRNAs using a mobility shift assay. We then confirmed that tested chemicals actually inhibited the RSS activity in vivo using a protoplast assay which was developed for this purpose. This entire system can be adapted to screening inhibitors of not only plant viruses but also some animal viruses possessing RSSs.

  5. Comparative analysis of RNA silencing suppression activities between viral suppressors and an endogenous plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

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    Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Park, Han-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kook

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved system that functions as an antiviral mechanism in eukaryotes, including higher plants. To counteract this, several plant viruses express silencing suppressors that inhibit RNA silencing in host plants. Here, we show that both 2b protein from peanut stunt virus (PSV) and a hairpin construct (designated hp-RDR6) that silences endogenous RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) strongly suppress RNA silencing. The Agrobacterium infiltration system was used to demonstrate that both PSV 2b and hp-RDR6 suppressed local RNA silencing as strongly as helper component (HC-Pro) from potato virus Y (PVY) and P19 from tomato bush stunt virus (TBSV). The 2b protein from PSV eliminated the small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) associated with RNA silencing and prevented systemic silencing, similar to 2b protein from cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). On the other hand, hp-RDR6 suppressed RNA silencing by inhibiting the generation of secondary siRNAs. The small coat protein (SCP) of squash mosaic virus (SqMV) also displayed weak suppression activity of RNA silencing. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer was used to investigate whether viral silencing suppressors or hp-RDR6 enhanced accumulations of green fluorescence protein (GFP) and β-glucuronidase (GUS) as markers of expression in leaf tissues of Nicotina benthamiana. Expression of both GFP and GUS was significantly enhanced in the presence of PSV 2b or CMV 2b, compared to no suppression or the weak SqMV SCP suppressor. Co-expression with hp-RDR6 also significantly increased the expression of GFP and GUS to levels similar to those induced by PVY HC-Pro and TBSV P19.

  6. Viral counterdefense on RNA silencing : analysis of RNA silencing suppressors from arthropod-borne negative strand RNA plant viruses

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    Schnettler, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes that RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins encoded by negative-stranded RNA plant viruses are able to interfere with different RNA silencing pathways in a variety of organisms by interacting with double stranded (ds)RNA molecules. These RSS proteins are able to counteract the

  7. Viral counterdefense on RNA silencing : analysis of RNA silencing suppressors from arthropod-borne negative strand RNA plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnettler, E.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes that RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins encoded by negative-stranded RNA plant viruses are able to interfere with different RNA silencing pathways in a variety of organisms by interacting with double stranded (ds)RNA molecules. These RSS proteins are able to counteract the

  8. RNA silencing and plant viral diseases.

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    Wang, Ming-Bo; Masuta, Chikara; Smith, Neil A; Shimura, Hanako

    2012-10-01

    RNA silencing plays a critical role in plant resistance against viruses, with multiple silencing factors participating in antiviral defense. Both RNA and DNA viruses are targeted by the small RNA-directed RNA degradation pathway, with DNA viruses being also targeted by RNA-directed DNA methylation. To evade RNA silencing, plant viruses have evolved a variety of counter-defense mechanisms such as expressing RNA-silencing suppressors or adopting silencing-resistant RNA structures. This constant defense-counter defense arms race is likely to have played a major role in defining viral host specificity and in shaping viral and possibly host genomes. Recent studies have provided evidence that RNA silencing also plays a direct role in viral disease induction in plants, with viral RNA-silencing suppressors and viral siRNAs as potentially the dominant players in viral pathogenicity. However, questions remain as to whether RNA silencing is the principal mediator of viral pathogenicity or if other RNA-silencing-independent mechanisms also account for viral disease induction. RNA silencing has been exploited as a powerful tool for engineering virus resistance in plants as well as in animals. Further understanding of the role of RNA silencing in plant-virus interactions and viral symptom induction is likely to result in novel anti-viral strategies in both plants and animals.

  9. Three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by a 20-kb viral RNA genome

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    Lu, Rui; Folimonov, Alexey; Shintaku, Michael; Li, Wan-Xiang; Falk, Bryce W.; Dawson, William O.; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2004-11-01

    Viral infection in both plant and invertebrate hosts requires a virus-encoded function to block the RNA silencing antiviral defense. Here, we report the identification and characterization of three distinct suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by the 20-kb plus-strand RNA genome of citrus tristeza virus (CTV). When introduced by genetic crosses into plants carrying a silencing transgene, both p20 and p23, but not coat protein (CP), restored expression of the transgene. Although none of the CTV proteins prevented DNA methylation of the transgene, export of the silencing signal (capable of mediating intercellular silencing spread) was detected only from the F1 plants expressing p23 and not from the CP- or p20-expressing F1 plants, demonstrating suppression of intercellular silencing by CP and p20 but not by p23. Thus, intracellular and intercellular silencing are each targeted by a CTV protein, whereas the third, p20, inhibits silencing at both levels. Notably, CP suppresses intercellular silencing without interfering with intracellular silencing. The novel property of CP suggests a mechanism distinct to p20 and all of the other viral suppressors known to interfere with intercellular silencing and that this class of viral suppressors may not be consistently identified by Agrobacterium coinfiltration because it also induces RNA silencing against the infiltrated suppressor transgene. Our analyses reveal a sophisticated viral counter-defense strategy that targets the silencing antiviral pathway at multiple steps and may be essential for protecting CTV with such a large RNA genome from antiviral silencing in the perennial tree host. RNA interference | citrus tristeza virus | virus synergy | antiviral immunity

  10. Supervised learning classification models for prediction of plant virus encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

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    Zeenia Jagga

    Full Text Available Viral encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins interfere with the host RNA silencing machinery, facilitating viral infection by evading host immunity. In plant hosts, the viral proteins have several basic science implications and biotechnology applications. However in silico identification of these proteins is limited by their high sequence diversity. In this study we developed supervised learning based classification models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins in plant viruses. We developed four classifiers based on supervised learning algorithms: J48, Random Forest, LibSVM and Naïve Bayes algorithms, with enriched model learning by correlation based feature selection. Structural and physicochemical features calculated for experimentally verified primary protein sequences were used to train the classifiers. The training features include amino acid composition; auto correlation coefficients; composition, transition, and distribution of various physicochemical properties; and pseudo amino acid composition. Performance analysis of predictive models based on 10 fold cross-validation and independent data testing revealed that the Random Forest based model was the best and achieved 86.11% overall accuracy and 86.22% balanced accuracy with a remarkably high area under the Receivers Operating Characteristic curve of 0.95 to predict viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins. The prediction models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressors can potentially aid identification of novel viral RNA silencing suppressors, which will provide valuable insights into the mechanism of RNA silencing and could be further explored as potential targets for designing novel antiviral therapeutics. Also, the key subset of identified optimal features may help in determining compositional patterns in the viral proteins which are important determinants for RNA silencing suppressor activities. The best prediction model developed in the study is available as a

  11. [RNA silencing and viral disease induction in plants].

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    Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara

    2012-06-01

    RNA silencing plays an important role in plant resistance against viruses. As a counter-defense against RNA silencing, plant viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs). RNA silencing is likely to play a major role in disease development. For example, RSSs have been found to disturb the gene expression controlled by miRNAs in plant tissue and organ development, resulting in plant malformation. Mosaic symptoms, which are typical in virus-infected plants, are actually a consequence of local arms race between host RNA silencing and viral RSSs. In addition, recent studies revealed that viral siRNAs could induce RNA silencing even against a certain host gene and thus a disease symptom through a complementary (homologous) sequence coincidentally found between virus and host gene. RNA silencing is the principal mediator of viral pathogenicity and disease induction and therefore should be exploited as a powerful tool for engineering virus resistance in plants as well as in animals.

  12. A viral suppressor protein inhibits host RNA silencing by hooking up with Argonautes

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    Jin, Hailing

    2010-05-01

    RNA viruses are particularly vulnerable to RNAi-based defenses in the host, and thus have evolved specific proteins, known as viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs), as a counterdefense. In this issue of Genes & Development, Azevedo and colleagues (pp. 904-915) discovered that P38, the VSR of Turnip crinkle virus, uses its glycine/tryptophane (GW) motifs as an ARGONAUTE (AGO) hook to attract and disarm the host\\'s essential effector of RNA silencing. Several GW motif-containing cellular proteins are known to be important partners of AGOs in RNA silencing effector complexes in yeast, plants, and animals. The GW motif appears to be a versatile and effective tool for regulating the activities of RNA silencing pathways, and the use of GW mimicry to compete for and inhibit host AGOs may be a strategy used by many pathogens to counteract host RNAi-based defenses. © 2010 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS): novel strategy of viruses to ablate the host RNA interference (RNAi) defense system.

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    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recent studies of mammalian viruses exhibiting RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity have further advanced our understanding of RNAi in terms of host-virus interactions. Viral proteins and non-coding viral RNAs can inhibit the RNAi (miRNA/siRNA) pathway through different mechanisms. Mammalian viruses having dsRNA-binding regions and GW/WG motifs appear to have a high chance of conferring RSS activity. Although, RSSs of plant and invertebrate viruses have been well characterized, mammalian viral RSSs still need in-depth investigations to present the concrete evidences supporting their RNAi ablation characteristics. The information presented in this review together with any perspective research should help to predict and identify the RSS activity-endowed new viral proteins that could be the potential targets for designing novel anti-viral therapeutics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of viral suppressors of RNAi by a reporter assay in Drosophila S2 cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleef, K.W. van; Mierlo, J.T. van; Beek, M. van den; Rij, R.P. van

    2011-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway plays an important role in antiviral immunity in insects. To -counteract the RNAi-mediated immune response of their hosts, several insect viruses, such as Flock house virus, Drosophila C virus, and Cricket paralysis virus, encode potent viral suppressors of RNAi (

  15. Identification of viral suppressors of RNAi by a reporter assay in Drosophila S2 cell culture

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    Cleef, K.W. van; Mierlo, J.T. van; Beek, M. van den; Rij, R.P. van

    2011-01-01

    The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway plays an important role in antiviral immunity in insects. To -counteract the RNAi-mediated immune response of their hosts, several insect viruses, such as Flock house virus, Drosophila C virus, and Cricket paralysis virus, encode potent viral suppressors of RNAi (

  16. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing hinder exogenous and endogenous small RNA pathways in Drosophila.

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    Bassam Berry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In plants and insects, RNA interference (RNAi is the main responder against viruses and shapes the basis of antiviral immunity. Viruses counter this defense by expressing viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs. While VSRs in Drosophila melanogaster were shown to inhibit RNAi through different modes of action, whether they act on other silencing pathways remained unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that expression of various plant and insect VSRs in transgenic flies does not perturb the Drosophila microRNA (miRNA pathway; but in contrast, inhibits antiviral RNAi and the RNA silencing response triggered by inverted repeat transcripts, and injection of dsRNA or siRNA. Strikingly, these VSRs also suppressed transposon silencing by endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings identify VSRs as tools to unravel small RNA pathways in insects and suggest a cosuppression of antiviral RNAi and endo-siRNA silencing by viruses during fly infections.

  17. A Viral Noncoding RNA Complements a Weakened Viral RNA Silencing Suppressor and Promotes Efficient Systemic Host Infection

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    Flobinus, Alyssa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Klein, Elodie; Ratti, Claudio; Bouzoubaa, Salah; Gilmer, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic movement of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta macrocarpa depends on viral RNA3, whereas in Nicotiana benthamiana this RNA is dispensable. RNA3 contains a coremin motif of 20 nucleotides essential for the stabilization of noncoding RNA3 (ncRNA3) and for long-distance movement in Beta species. Coremin mutants that are unable to accumulate ncRNA3 also do not achieve systemic movement in Beta species. A mutant virus carrying a mutation in the p14 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR), unable to move long distances, can be complemented with the ncRNA3 in the lesion phenotype, viral RNA accumulation, and systemic spread. Analyses of the BNYVV VSR mechanism of action led to the identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) pathway as a target of the virus VSR and the assignment of a VSR function to the ncRNA3. PMID:27782046

  18. A viral suppressor of RNA silencing inhibits ARGONAUTE 1 function by precluding target RNA binding to pre-assembled RISC.

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    Kenesi, Erzsébet; Carbonell, Alberto; Lózsa, Rita; Vértessy, Beáta; Lakatos, Lóránt

    2017-07-27

    In most eukaryotes, RNA silencing is an adaptive immune system regulating key biological processes including antiviral defense. To evade this response, viruses of plants, worms and insects have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing proteins (VSRs). Various VSRs, such as P1 from Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV), inhibit the activity of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) including an ARGONAUTE (AGO) protein loaded with a small RNA. However, the specific mechanisms explaining this class of inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that SPMMV P1 interacts with AGO1 and AGO2 from Arabidopsis thaliana, but solely interferes with AGO1 function. Moreover, a mutational analysis of a newly identified zinc finger domain in P1 revealed that this domain could represent an effector domain as it is required for P1 suppressor activity but not for AGO1 binding. Finally, a comparative analysis of the target RNA binding capacity of AGO1 in the presence of wild-type or suppressor-defective P1 forms revealed that P1 blocks target RNA binding to AGO1. Our results describe the negative regulation of RISC, the small RNA containing molecular machine. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts.

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    Fabian, Marc R; Andrew White, K

    2007-08-01

    The analysis of viral RNA is a fundamental aspect of plant RNA virus research. Studies that focus on viral RNAs often involve virus infections of plant protoplasts (see UNITS 16D.1-16D.4). Protoplast offer the advantage of simultaneous initiation of infections, which allows for superior temporal and quantitative analyses of viral RNAs. The efficient isolation of intact viral RNA is key to any such investigations. This unit describes two basic protocols for extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts. An approach for preparing double-stranded viral RNA from total RNA pools is also provided. The viral RNA prepared by using these techniques can be used for further analyses such as primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting.

  20. Silencing and Innate Immunity in Plant Defense Against Viral and Non-Viral Pathogens

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    Anna S. Zvereva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The frontline of plant defense against non-viral pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and oomycetes is provided by transmembrane pattern recognition receptors that detect conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, leading to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI. To counteract this innate defense, pathogens deploy effector proteins with a primary function to suppress PTI. In specific cases, plants have evolved intracellular resistance (R proteins detecting isolate-specific pathogen effectors, leading to effector-triggered immunity (ETI, an amplified version of PTI, often associated with hypersensitive response (HR and programmed cell death (PCD. In the case of plant viruses, no conserved PAMP was identified so far and the primary plant defense is thought to be based mainly on RNA silencing, an evolutionary conserved, sequence-specific mechanism that regulates gene expression and chromatin states and represses invasive nucleic acids such as transposons. Endogenous silencing pathways generate 21-24 nt small (sRNAs, miRNAs and short interfering (siRNAs, that repress genes post-transcriptionally and/or transcriptionally. Four distinct Dicer-like (DCL proteins, which normally produce endogenous miRNAs and siRNAs, all contribute to the biogenesis of viral siRNAs in infected plants. Growing evidence indicates that RNA silencing also contributes to plant defense against non-viral pathogens. Conversely, PTI-based innate responses may contribute to antiviral defense. Intracellular R proteins of the same NB-LRR family are able to recognize both non-viral effectors and avirulence (Avr proteins of RNA viruses, and, as a result, trigger HR and PCD in virus-resistant hosts. In some cases, viral Avr proteins also function as silencing suppressors. We hypothesize that RNA silencing and innate immunity (PTI and ETI function in concert to fight plant viruses. Viruses counteract this dual defense by effectors that suppress both PTI-/ETI-based innate responses

  1. Misregulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8 underlies the developmental abnormalities caused by three distinct viral silencing suppressors in Arabidopsis.

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    Florence Jay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, micro (miRNAs and trans-acting (ta-siRNAs synthesized directly or indirectly through the DICER-LIKE-1 (DCL1 ribonuclease have roles in patterning and hormonal responses, while DCL2,3,4-dependent small-interfering (siRNAs are mainly involved in silencing of transposable elements and antiviral defense. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs produced by phytoviruses to counter plant defense may perturb plant developmental programs because of the collision of their inhibitory effects with the regulatory action of endogenous miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. This could explain the similar developmental aberrations displayed by Arabidopsis miRNA/ta-siRNA pathway mutants, including dcl1, and by some VSR-expressing plants. Nonetheless, the molecular bases for these morphological aberrations have remained mysterious, and their contribution to viral disease symptoms/virulence unexplored. The extent of VSR inhibitory actions to other types of endogenous small RNAs remains also unclear. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing constitutively HcPro, P19 and P15, three unrelated VSRs. We show that VSR expression has comparable, yet modest effects on known miRNA and ta-siRNA target RNA levels, similar to those observed using an hypomorphic dcl1 mutation. However, by combining results of transcriptome studies with deep-sequencing data from immuno-precipitated small RNAs, additional, novel endogenous targets of miRNA and ta-siRNA were identified, unraveling an unsuspected complexity in the origin and scope-of-action of these molecules. Other stringent analyses pinpointed misregulation of the miR167 target AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8 (ARF8 as a major cause for the developmental aberrations exhibited by VSR transgenic plants, but also for the phenotypes induced during normal viral infection caused by the HcPro-encoding Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV. Neither RNA silencing, its suppression by VSRs, nor the virulence/accumulation of Tu

  2. Satellite RNAs interfere with the function of viral RNA silencing suppressors

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    Wanxia eShen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small subviral RNAs and depend on the helper virus for replication and spread. satRNAs can attenuate helper virus-induced symptoms, the mechanism of which remains unclear. Here, we show that two virus-encoded suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b and Tombusvirus P19, suppress hairpin RNA (hpRNA-induced silencing of a β-glucuronidase (GUS gene in Nicotiana benthamiana. This suppression can be overcome by CMV Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat via the Y-Sat-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which bind to the VSRs and displace the bound hpGUS-derived siRNAs. We also show that microRNA target gene expression in N. tabacum was elevated by CMV infection, presumably due to function of the 2b VSR, but this upregulation of microRNA target genes was reversed in the presence of Y-Sat. These results suggest that satRNA infection minimizes the effect of VSRs on host siRNA and microRNA-directed silencing. Our results suggest that the high abundance of satRNA-derived siRNAs contributes to symptom attenuation by binding helper virus-encoded VSRs, minimizing the capacity of the VSRs to bind host siRNA and miRNA and interfere with their function.

  3. Mimic Phosphorylation of a βC1 Protein Encoded by TYLCCNB Impairs Its Functions as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing and a Symptom Determinant.

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    Zhong, Xueting; Wang, Zhan Qi; Xiao, Ruyuan; Cao, Linge; Wang, Yaqin; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2017-08-15

    Phosphorylation of the βC1 protein encoded by the betasatellite of tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNB-βC1) by SNF1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1) plays a critical role in defense of host plants against geminivirus infection in Nicotiana benthamiana However, how phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 impacts its pathogenic functions during viral infection remains elusive. In this study, we identified two additional tyrosine residues in TYLCCNB-βC1 that are phosphorylated by SnRK1. The effects of TYLCCNB-βC1 phosphorylation on its functions as a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) and a symptom determinant were investigated via phosphorylation mimic mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Mutations that mimic phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 at tyrosine 5 and tyrosine 110 attenuated disease symptoms during viral infection. The phosphorylation mimics weakened the ability of TYLCCNB-βC1 to reverse transcriptional gene silencing and to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing and abolished its interaction with N. benthamiana ASYMMETRIC LEAVES 1 in N. benthamiana leaves. The mimic phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 had no impact on its protein stability, subcellular localization, or self-association. Our data establish an inhibitory effect of phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 on its pathogenic functions as a VSR and a symptom determinant and provide a mechanistic explanation of how SnRK1 functions as a host defense factor.IMPORTANCE Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), which causes a severe yellow leaf curl disease in China, is a monopartite geminivirus associated with the betasatellite (TYLCCNB). TYLCCNB encodes a single pathogenicity protein, βC1 (TYLCCNB-βC1), which functions as both a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) and a symptom determinant. Here, we show that mimicking phosphorylation of TYLCCNB-βC1 weakens its ability to reverse transcriptional gene silencing, to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing, and to interact with N

  4. Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    We have made a number of interesting observations of importance to the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. Topics include the genome of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), recombination of the CMV genome, transgenic plants and viral movement genes, mapping resistance breakage sequences in the tomato mosaic virus (TMV) genome, and mapping pathogeneticity domains and viral RNA heterogeneity. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Rice grassy stunt virus nonstructural protein p5 serves as a viral suppressor of RNA silencing and interacts with nonstructural protein p3.

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    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Xiao-juan; Wu, Kang-cheng; Zheng, Lu-Ping; Ding, Zuo-mei; Li, Fei; Zou, Peng; Yang, Liang; Wu, Jian-guo; Wu, Zu-jian

    2015-11-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), a member of the genus Tenuivirus, causes serious rice disease in Southeast Asian countries. In this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based transient expression assay was conducted to show that p5, encoded on RNA5 in the viral sense, is a viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR). Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between p5 and all RGSV proteins except pC1 and pC2 were investigated using Gal4-based yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) experiments. The results demonstrated that p5 interacts with itself and with p3 encoded on RNA3 in the viral sense. p5-p5 and p5-p3 interactions were detected by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, and the p5-p3 interaction was confirmed by subcellular co-localization and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assays. Using the Y2H system, we demonstrated that the p5-p3 interaction requires both the N-terminal (amino acid residues 1 to 99) and C-terminal (amino acid residues 94 to 191) domains of p5. In addition, either p5 or p3 could enhance the pathogenicity of potato virus X (PVX) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. A much more significant enhancement of PVX pathogenicity and accumulation was observed when p5 and p3 were expressed together. Our data also showed that RGSV p3 does not function as a VSR, and it had no effect on the VSR activity of p5 or the subcellular localization pattern of p5 in plant cells from Nicotiana benthamiana.

  6. Heterologous RNA-silencing suppressors from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses support plum pox virus infection.

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    Maliogka, Varvara I; Calvo, María; Carbonell, Alberto; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    HCPro, the RNA-silencing suppressor (RSS) of viruses belonging to the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is a multifunctional protein presumably involved in all essential steps of the viral infection cycle. Recent studies have shown that plum pox potyvirus (PPV) HCPro can be replaced successfully by cucumber vein yellowing ipomovirus P1b, a sequence-unrelated RSS from a virus of the same family. In order to gain insight into the requirement of a particular RSS to establish a successful potyviral infection, we tested the ability of different heterologous RSSs from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses to substitute for HCPro. Making use of engineered PPV chimeras, we show that PPV HCPro can be replaced functionally by some, but not all, unrelated RSSs, including the NS1 protein of the mammal-infecting influenza A virus. Interestingly, the capacity of a particular RSS to replace HCPro does not correlate strictly with its RNA silencing-suppression strength. Altogether, our results suggest that not all suppression strategies are equally suitable for efficient escape of PPV from the RNA-silencing machinery. The approach followed here, based on using PPV chimeras in which an under-consideration RSS substitutes for HCPro, could further help to study the function of diverse RSSs in a 'highly sensitive' RNA-silencing context, such as that taking place in plant cells during the process of a viral infection.

  7. Glycoconjugates as elicitors or suppressors of plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silipo, Alba; Erbs, Gitte; Shinya, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading microorganisms in vertebrates and the only line of defense in invertebrates and plants. Bacterial glyco-conjugates, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and peptidoglycan (PGN) from the cell...... walls of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and fungal and oomycete glycoconjugates such as oligosaccharides derived from the cell wall components ß-glucan, chitin and chitosan, have been found to act as elicitors of plant innate immunity. These conserved indispensable microbe......-specific molecules are also referred to as microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Other glyco-conjugates such as bacterial extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and cyclic glucan have been shown to suppress innate immune responses, thus conversely promoting pathogenesis. MAMPs are recognized by the plant...

  8. Silicon control of bacterial and viral diseases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakr Nachaat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon plays an important role in providing tolerance to various abiotic stresses and augmenting plant resistance against diseases. However, there is a paucity of reports about the effect of silicon on bacterial and viral pathogens of plants. In general, the effect of silicon on plant resistance against bacterial diseases is considered to be due to either physical defense or increased biochemical defense. In this study, the interaction between silicon foliar or soil-treatments and reduced bacterial and viral severity was reviewed. The current review explains the agricultural importance of silicon in plants, refers to the control of bacterial pathogens in different crop plants by silicon application, and underlines the different mechanisms of silicon-enhanced resistance. A section about the effect of silicon in decreasing viral disease intensity was highlighted. By combining the data presented in this study, a better comprehension of the complex interaction between silicon foliar- or soil-applications and bacterial and viral plant diseases could be achieved.

  9. Plant viral vectors based on tobamoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibov, V; Shivprasad, S; Turpen, T H; Dawson, W; Koprowski, H

    1999-01-01

    The potential of plant virus-based transient expression vectors is substantial. One objective is the production of large quantities of foreign peptides or proteins. At least one commercial group (Biosource Technologies) is producing large quantities of product in the field, has built factories to process truck-loads of material and soon expects to market virus-generated products. In the laboratory, large amounts of protein have been produced for structural or biochemical analyses. An important aspect of producing large amounts of a protein or peptide is to make the product easily purifiable. This has been done by attaching peptides or proteins to easily purified units such as virion particles or by exporting proteins to the apoplast so that purification begins with a highly enriched product. For plant molecular biology, virus-based vectors have been useful in identifying previously unknown genes by overexpression or silencing or by expression in different genotypes. Also, foreign peptides fused to virions are being used as immunogens for development of antisera for experimental use or as injected or edible vaccines for medical use. As with liposomes and microcapsules, plant cells and plant viruses are also expected to provide natural protection for the passage of antigen through the gastrointestinal tract. Perhaps the greatest advantage of plant virus-based transient expression vectors is their host, plants. For the production of large amounts of commercial products, plants are one of the most economical and productive sources of biomass. They also present the advantages of lack of contamination with animal pathogens, relative ease of genetic manipulation and the presence eukaryotic protein modification machinery.

  10. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2015-11-11

    Background The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides bacteria and archaea with molecular immunity against invading phages and conjugative plasmids. Recently, CRISPR/Cas9 has been used for targeted genome editing in diverse eukaryotic species. Results In this study, we investigate whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system could be used in plants to confer molecular immunity against DNA viruses. We deliver sgRNAs specific for coding and non-coding sequences of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) into Nicotiana benthamiana plants stably overexpressing the Cas9 endonuclease, and subsequently challenge these plants with TYLCV. Our data demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system targeted TYLCV for degradation and introduced mutations at the target sequences. All tested sgRNAs exhibit interference activity, but those targeting the stem-loop sequence within the TYLCV origin of replication in the intergenic region (IR) are the most effective. N. benthamiana plants expressing CRISPR/Cas9 exhibit delayed or reduced accumulation of viral DNA, abolishing or significantly attenuating symptoms of infection. Moreover, this system could simultaneously target multiple DNA viruses. Conclusions These data establish the efficacy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for viral interference in plants, thereby extending the utility of this technology and opening the possibility of producing plants resistant to multiple viral infections.

  11. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  12. Rewiring carotenoid biosynthesis in plants using a viral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, Eszter; Llorente, Briardo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Plants can be engineered to sustainably produce compounds of nutritional, industrial or pharmaceutical relevance. This is, however, a challenging task as extensive regulation of biosynthetic pathways often hampers major metabolic changes. Here we describe the use of a viral vector derived from Tobacco etch virus to express a whole heterologous metabolic pathway that produces the health-promoting carotenoid lycopene in tobacco tissues. The pathway consisted in three enzymes from the soil bacteria Pantoea ananatis. Lycopene is present at undetectable levels in chloroplasts of non-infected leaves. In tissues infected with the viral vector, however, lycopene comprised approximately 10% of the total carotenoid content. Our research further showed that plant viruses that express P. ananatis phytoene synthase (crtB), one of the three enzymes of the heterologous pathway, trigger an accumulation of endogenous carotenoids, which together with a reduction in chlorophylls eventually result in a bright yellow pigmentation of infected tissues in various host-virus combinations. So, besides illustrating the potential of viral vectors for engineering complex metabolic pathways, we also show a yellow carotenoid-based reporter that can be used to visually track infection dynamics of plant viruses either alone or in combination with other visual markers. PMID:28139696

  13. Expression of geminiviral AC2 RNA silencing suppressor changes sugar and jasmonate responsive gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soitamo Arto J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-silencing is a conserved gene regulation and surveillance machinery, which in plants, is also used as major defence mechanism against viruses. Various virus-specific dsRNA structures are recognized by the silencing machinery leading to degradation of the viral RNAs or, as in case of begomoviruses, to methylation of their DNA genomes. Viruses produce specific RNA silencing suppressor (RSS proteins to prevent these host defence mechanisms, and as these interfere with the silencing machinery they also disturb the endogenous silencing reactions. In this paper, we describe how expression of AC2 RSS, derived from African cassava mosaic geminivirus changes transcription profile in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum leaves and in flowers. Results Expression of AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants induced clear phenotypic changes both in leaves and in flowers. Transcriptomes of these plants were strongly altered, with total of 1118 and 251 differentially expressed genes in leaves and flowers, respectively. The three most up-regulated transcript groups were related to stress, cell wall modifications and signalling, whereas the three most down-regulated groups were related to translation, photosynthesis and transcription. It appears that many of the gene expression alterations appeared to be related to enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene, and consequent enhancement of the genes and pathways that are regulated by these hormones, or to the retrograde signalling caused by the reduced photosynthetic activity and sugar metabolism. Comparison of these results to a previous transcriptional profiling of HC-Pro RSS-expressing plants revealed that some of same genes were induced by both RSSs, but their expression levels were typically higher in AC2 than in HC-Pro RSS expressing plants. All in all, a large number of transcript alterations were found to be specific to each of the RSS expressing transgenic plants. Conclusions AC2 RSS in

  14. Expression of geminiviral AC2 RNA silencing suppressor changes sugar and jasmonate responsive gene expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soitamo, Arto J; Jada, Balaji; Lehto, Kirsi

    2012-11-07

    RNA-silencing is a conserved gene regulation and surveillance machinery, which in plants, is also used as major defence mechanism against viruses. Various virus-specific dsRNA structures are recognized by the silencing machinery leading to degradation of the viral RNAs or, as in case of begomoviruses, to methylation of their DNA genomes. Viruses produce specific RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to prevent these host defence mechanisms, and as these interfere with the silencing machinery they also disturb the endogenous silencing reactions. In this paper, we describe how expression of AC2 RSS, derived from African cassava mosaic geminivirus changes transcription profile in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and in flowers. Expression of AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants induced clear phenotypic changes both in leaves and in flowers. Transcriptomes of these plants were strongly altered, with total of 1118 and 251 differentially expressed genes in leaves and flowers, respectively. The three most up-regulated transcript groups were related to stress, cell wall modifications and signalling, whereas the three most down-regulated groups were related to translation, photosynthesis and transcription. It appears that many of the gene expression alterations appeared to be related to enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonate and ethylene, and consequent enhancement of the genes and pathways that are regulated by these hormones, or to the retrograde signalling caused by the reduced photosynthetic activity and sugar metabolism. Comparison of these results to a previous transcriptional profiling of HC-Pro RSS-expressing plants revealed that some of same genes were induced by both RSSs, but their expression levels were typically higher in AC2 than in HC-Pro RSS expressing plants. All in all, a large number of transcript alterations were found to be specific to each of the RSS expressing transgenic plants. AC2 RSS in transgenic tobacco plants interferes with the silencing

  15. (Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    During the last year we have made a number of important observations in the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. By directly sequencing Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV) movement genes, previously undetected sequence alterations common to specific viral strains were found. The difficulty in regenerating transgenic tomato plants containing the Tm-2 gene was overcome. Tobacco plants transformed with Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) are being characterized. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing CMV coat protein have shown no correlation between coat protein expression and level of resistance. Specific amino acid changes have been found to correlate with CMV resistance breaking and degree of pathogenicity. Satellite RNAs are shown to be too unstable for use as a biological control agent. The aphid transmission domain CMV has been localized to one (or more) of three amino acids; constructs have been made to determine the exact amino acids involved. 15 refs.

  16. EFFECT OF SALINITY ON VIRAL DISEASE SPREAD IN PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldakimova N.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress is an important factor affecting the quality and quantity of crop yields. The total area of the world’s land exposed salinity increased to 15% in 2011 compared to 7% in 2001. In addition, crops are susceptible to disease, which strongly affects the yield. Thus, viral diseases reduce crop yield, sometimes up to 80-100%, for example Eggplant mottled crinkle virus (EMCV can infect up to 100% yield of eggplant. Taken together, these two stress factors can cause enormous economic damage to agriculture. Despite of the importance, the effect of salinity on plant virus disease has not been well studied.In our study, we investigated the effect of high concentrations of salt (150mM NaCl on the systemic viral disease caused by EMCV. The virus causes the systemic necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana. Systemic accumulation of virus at high concentrations of NaCl was drastically reduced. In the plants exposed to salt stress (100mM and 150mM NaCl for 21 days before infection systemic symptoms were significantly delayed. The relationship between plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress factors may indicate the existence of universal defensive pathways of plant adaptation to unfavorable conditions.

  17. A trio of viral proteins tunes aphid-plant interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack H Westwood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Virus-induced deterrence to aphid feeding is believed to promote plant virus transmission by encouraging migration of virus-bearing insects away from infected plants. We investigated the effects of infection by an aphid-transmitted virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, on the interaction of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the natural hosts for CMV, with Myzus persicae (common names: 'peach-potato aphid', 'green peach aphid'. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infection of Arabidopsis (ecotype Col-0 with CMV strain Fny (Fny-CMV induced biosynthesis of the aphid feeding-deterrent 4-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methylglucosinolate (4MI3M. 4MI3M inhibited phloem ingestion by aphids and consequently discouraged aphid settling. The CMV 2b protein is a suppressor of antiviral RNA silencing, which has previously been implicated in altering plant-aphid interactions. Its presence in infected hosts enhances the accumulation of CMV and the other four viral proteins. Another viral gene product, the 2a protein (an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, triggers defensive signaling, leading to increased 4MI3M accumulation. The 2b protein can inhibit ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1, a host factor that both positively-regulates 4MI3M biosynthesis and negatively-regulates accumulation of substance(s toxic to aphids. However, the 1a replicase protein moderated 2b-mediated inhibition of AGO1, ensuring that aphids were deterred from feeding but not poisoned. The LS strain of CMV did not induce feeding deterrence in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Inhibition of AGO1 by the 2b protein could act as a booby trap since this will trigger antibiosis against aphids. However, for Fny-CMV the interplay of three viral proteins (1a, 2a and 2b appears to balance the need of the virus to inhibit antiviral silencing, while inducing a mild resistance (antixenosis that is thought to promote transmission. The strain-specific effects of CMV on Arabidopsis-aphid interactions, and differences

  18. Dual interaction of a geminivirus replication accessory factor with a viral replication protein and a plant cell cycle regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settlage, S B; Miller, A B; Gruissem, W; Hanley-Bowdoin, L

    2001-01-20

    Geminiviruses replicate their small, single-stranded DNA genomes through double-stranded DNA intermediates in plant nuclei using host replication machinery. Like most dicot-infecting geminiviruses, tomato golden mosaic virus encodes a protein, AL3 or C3, that greatly enhances viral DNA accumulation through an unknown mechanism. Earlier studies showed that AL3 forms oligomers and interacts with the viral replication initiator AL1. Experiments reported here established that AL3 also interacts with a plant homolog of the mammalian tumor suppressor protein, retinoblastoma (pRb). Analysis of truncated AL3 proteins indicated that pRb and AL1 bind to similar regions of AL3, whereas AL3 oligomerization is dependent on a different region of the protein. Analysis of truncated AL1 proteins located the AL3-binding domain between AL1 amino acids 101 and 180 to a region that also includes the AL1 oligomerization domain and the catalytic site for initiation of viral DNA replication. Interestingly, the AL3-binding domain was fully contiguous with the domain that mediates AL1/pRb interactions. The potential significance of AL3/pRb binding and the coincidence of the domains responsible for AL3, AL1, and pRb interactions are discussed.

  19. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  20. Herbal plants and plant preparations as remedial approach for viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjhu, Rajesh Kumar; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Maity, Hindol; Dowarha, Deepu; Devadiga, Santhosha; Nag, Snehlata; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2015-12-01

    Herbal plants, plant preparations and phytoconstituents have proved useful in attenuating infectious conditions and were the only remedies available, till the advent of antibiotics (many being of plant origin themselves). Among infectious diseases, viral diseases in particular, remain the leading cause of death in humans globally. A variety of phytoconstituents derived from medicinal herbs have been extensively studied for antiviral activity. Based on this rationale, an online search was performed, which helped to identify a large number of plant species harboring antiviral molecules. These herbal sources have been reported individually or in combinations across a large number of citations studied. Activities against rabies virus, Human immunodeficiency virus, Chandipura virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus, Enterovirus, Influenza A/H1N1 and other influenza viruses were discovered during the literature search. This review includes all such plant species exhibiting antiviral properties. The review also encompasses composition and methodologies of preparing various antiviral formulations around the globe. An elaborate section on the formulations filed for patent registration, along with non-patented formulations, has also been included in this article. To conclude, herbal sources provide researchers enormous scope to explore and bring out viable alternatives against viral diseases, considering non-availability of suitable drug candidates and increasing resistance to existing drug molecules for many emerging and re-emerging viral diseases.

  1. Viral suppressors of RNA interference impair RNA silencing induced by a Semliki Forest virus replicon in tick cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, S.; Billecocq, A.; Crance, J.M.; Prins, M.W.; Garin, D.; Bouloy, M.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently shown that infection of ISE6 tick cells by a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) expressing a heterologous gene induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and silencing of the gene. To gain information on RNA interference (RNAi) in ticks, three known viral inhibitors that act in diff

  2. Viral suppressors of RNA interference impair RNA silencing induced by a Semliki Forest virus replicon in tick cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, S.; Billecocq, A.; Crance, J.M.; Prins, M.W.; Garin, D.; Bouloy, M.

    2006-01-01

    It was recently shown that infection of ISE6 tick cells by a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) expressing a heterologous gene induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and silencing of the gene. To gain information on RNA interference (RNAi) in ticks, three known viral inhibitors that act in diff

  3. Identification of viral and phytoplasmal agents responsible for diseases affecting plants of Gaillardia Foug. in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardia plants exhibiting symptoms characteristic of viral and phytoplasmal diseases were collected at botanical gardens and floriculture farms in Lithuania. Cucumber mosaic virus was isolated from diseased plants exhibiting symptoms characterized stunting, color breaking and malformation of flo...

  4. Localization of viral antigens in leaf protoplasts and plants by immunogold labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, van J.W.M.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of an immunocytochemical technique, immunogold labelling, new in the light and electron microscopic study of the plant viral infection. In Chapter 1 the present state of knowledge of the plant viral infection process, as revealed by in

  5. Localization of viral antigens in leaf protoplasts and plants by immunogold labelling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, van J.W.M.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of an immunocytochemical technique, immunogold labelling, new in the light and electron microscopic study of the plant viral infection. In Chapter 1 the present state of knowledge of the plant viral infection process, as revealed by insitu studies

  6. Localization of viral antigens in leaf protoplasts and plants by immunogold labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lent, van J.W.M.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the application of an immunocytochemical technique, immunogold labelling, new in the light and electron microscopic study of the plant viral infection. In Chapter 1 the present state of knowledge of the plant viral infection process, as revealed by

  7. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides.

  8. FACT Proteins, SUPT16H and SSRP1, Are Transcriptional Suppressors of HIV-1 and HTLV-1 That Facilitate Viral Latency*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huachao; Santoso, Netty; Power, Derek; Simpson, Sydney; Dieringer, Michael; Miao, Hongyu; Gurova, Katerina; Giam, Chou-Zen; Elledge, Stephen J.; Zhu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Our functional genomic RNAi screens have identified the protein components of the FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) complex, SUPT16H and SSRP1, as top host factors that negatively regulate HIV-1 replication. FACT interacts specifically with histones H2A/H2B to affect assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes, as well as transcription elongation. We further investigated the suppressive role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 transcription. First, depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein enhances Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR (long terminal repeat) promoter activity. Second, HIV-1 Tat interacts with SUPT16H but not SSRP1 protein. However, both SUPT16H and SSRP1 are recruited to LTR promoter. Third, the presence of SUPT16H interferes with the association of Cyclin T1 (CCNT1), a subunit of P-TEFb, with the Tat-LTR axis. Removing inhibitory mechanisms to permit HIV-1 transcription is an initial and key regulatory step to reverse post-integrated latent HIV-1 proviruses for purging of reservoir cells. We therefore evaluated the role of FACT proteins in HIV-1 latency and reactivation. Depletion of SUPT16H or SSRP1 protein affects both HIV-1 transcriptional initiation and elongation and spontaneously reverses latent HIV-1 in U1/HIV and J-LAT cells. Similar effects were observed with a primary CD4+ T cell model of HIV-1 latency. FACT proteins also interfere with HTLV-1 Tax-LTR-mediated transcription and viral latency, indicating that they may act as general transcriptional suppressors for retroviruses. We conclude that FACT proteins SUPT16H and SSRP1 play a key role in suppressing HIV-1 transcription and promoting viral latency, which may serve as promising gene targets for developing novel HIV-1 latency-reversing agents. PMID:26378236

  9. [Detection of viral infection pathogens in medicinal plants grown in Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, L T; Korenieva, A A; Molchanets', O V; Boĭko, A L

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of viral infection on medicinal plant plantations is carried out. Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Valeriana officinalis L., Plantago major L. with symptoms of viral infection were revealed. Viral nature of symptoms was proved with biotesting method. Morphology and sizes of virus particles, detected in Panax ginseng method. Morphology and sizes of virus particles, detected in Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, Valeriana officinalis L., Plantago major L., were determined with electron microscopy method. The paper is presented in Ukrainian.

  10. Coat protein mutations in an attenuated Cucumber mosaic virus encoding mutant 2b protein that lacks RNA silencing suppressor activity induces chlorosis with photosynthesis gene repression and chloroplast abnormalities in infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Ryota; Wada, Tomoya; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2014-05-01

    In tobacco plants, the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) pepo strain induces mosaic symptoms, including pale green chlorosis and malformed tissues. Here, we characterized the involvement of 2b protein and coat protein (CP) in the development of mosaic symptoms. A 2b mutant (R46C) that lacks viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity showed an asymptomatic phenotype with low levels of virus accumulation. Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein did not complement the virulence of the R46C, although it did restore high-level virus accumulation. However, R46C mutants expressing mutated CP in which the amino acid P129 was mutated to A, E, C, Q, or S induced chlorosis that was associated with reduced expression of chloroplast and photosynthesis related genes (CPRGs) and abnormal chloroplasts with fewer thylakoid membranes. These results suggest that the CP of the CMV pepo strain acquires virulence by amino acid mutations, which causes CPRG repression and chloroplast abnormalities.

  11. Targeted viral-mediated plant genome editing using crispr/cas9

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2015-12-17

    The present disclosure provides a viral-mediated genome-editing platform that facilitates multiplexing, obviates stable transformation, and is applicable across plant species. The RNA2 genome of the tobacco rattle virus (TRV) was engineered to carry and systemically deliver a guide RNA molecules into plants overexpressing Cas9 endonuclease. High genomic modification frequencies were observed in inoculated as well as systemic leaves including the plant growing points. This system facilitates multiplexing and can lead to germinal transmission of the genomic modifications in the progeny, thereby obviating the requirements of repeated transformations and tissue culture. The editing platform of the disclosure is useful in plant genome engineering and applicable across plant species amenable to viral infections for agricultural biotechnology applications.

  12. A metagenomic assessment of viral contamination on fresh parsley plants irrigated with fecally tainted river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cassi, X; Timoneda, N; Gonzales-Gustavson, E; Abril, J F; Bofill-Mas, S; Girones, R

    2017-09-18

    Microbial food-borne diseases are still frequently reported despite the implementation of microbial quality legislation to improve food safety. Among all the microbial agents, viruses are the most important causative agents of food-borne outbreaks. The development and application of a new generation of sequencing techniques to test for viral contaminants in fresh produce is an unexplored field that allows for the study of the viral populations that might be transmitted by the fecal-oral route through the consumption of contaminated food. To advance this promising field, parsley was planted and grown under controlled conditions and irrigated using contaminated river water. Viruses polluting the irrigation water and the parsley leaves were studied by using metagenomics. To address possible contamination due to sample manipulation, library preparation, and other sources, parsley plants irrigated with nutritive solution were used as a negative control. In parallel, viruses present in the river water used for plant irrigation were analyzed using the same methodology. It was possible to assign viral taxons from 2.4 to 74.88% of the total reads sequenced depending on the sample. Most of the viral reads detected in the river water were related to the plant viral families Tymoviridae (66.13%) and Virgaviridae (14.45%) and the phage viral families Myoviridae (5.70%), Siphoviridae (5.06%), and Microviridae (2.89%). Less than 1% of the viral reads were related to viral families that infect humans, including members of the Adenoviridae, Reoviridae, Picornaviridae and Astroviridae families. On the surface of the parsley plants, most of the viral reads that were detected were assigned to the Dicistroviridae family (41.52%). Sequences related to important viral pathogens, such as the hepatitis E virus, several picornaviruses from species A and B as well as human sapoviruses and GIV noroviruses were detected. The high diversity of viral sequences found in the parsley plants

  13. Antiviral RNA silencing viral counter defense in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this thesis centres around the mechanism of RNA silencing in relation to virus-host interaction, an area of increasing importance. It shows how this recently disclosed mechanism can be used to produce virus-resistant plants. Based on the activity of the RNA silencing machin

  14. Antiviral RNA silencing viral counter defense in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this thesis centres around the mechanism of RNA silencing in relation to virus-host interaction, an area of increasing importance. It shows how this recently disclosed mechanism can be used to produce virus-resistant plants. Based on the activity of the RNA silencing

  15. Antiviral RNA silencing viral counter defense in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this thesis centres around the mechanism of RNA silencing in relation to virus-host interaction, an area of increasing importance. It shows how this recently disclosed mechanism can be used to produce virus-resistant plants. Based on the activity of the RNA silencing machin

  16. Supplementary Material for: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides bacteria and archaea with molecular immunity against invading phages and conjugative plasmids. Recently, CRISPR/Cas9 has been used for targeted genome editing in diverse eukaryotic species. Results In this study, we investigate whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system could be used in plants to confer molecular immunity against DNA viruses. We deliver sgRNAs specific for coding and non-coding sequences of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) into Nicotiana benthamiana plants stably overexpressing the Cas9 endonuclease, and subsequently challenge these plants with TYLCV. Our data demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system targeted TYLCV for degradation and introduced mutations at the target sequences. All tested sgRNAs exhibit interference activity, but those targeting the stem-loop sequence within the TYLCV origin of replication in the intergenic region (IR) are the most effective. N. benthamiana plants expressing CRISPR/Cas9 exhibit delayed or reduced accumulation of viral DNA, abolishing or significantly attenuating symptoms of infection. Moreover, this system could simultaneously target multiple DNA viruses. Conclusions These data establish the efficacy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for viral interference in plants, thereby extending the utility of this technology and opening the possibility of producing plants resistant to multiple viral infections.

  17. Possible involvement of maize Rop1 in the defence responses of plants to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanyong; Shi, Yan; Li, Yongqiang; Cheng, Yuqin; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Zaifeng

    2012-09-01

    The expression of host genes can be altered during the process of viral infection. To investigate the viral infection-induced up-regulated gene expression changes of maize at different time intervals post-inoculation with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library was constructed. A total of 454 cDNA clones were identified to be viral infection-induced up-regulated genes. The influence of Rop1 on the infection of maize by SCMV was investigated. The results showed that transient silencing of the ZmRop1 gene through virus-induced gene silencing enhanced the accumulation and systemic infection of SCMV and another potyvirus (Pennisetum mosaic virus) in maize plants, whereas transient over-expression of ZmRop1 in maize protoplasts reduced SCMV accumulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the heterologous expression of ZmRop1 impaired Potato virus X infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. These data suggest that ZmRop1 may play a role in plant defence responses to viral infection.

  18. Simulated microgravity effects on the resistance of potato plants to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, L. T.; Gordyeichik, O. I.; Taran, O. P.

    Our earlier research results showed that prolonged clinostating impeded the reproduction of the wheat streak mosaic virus WSMV in artificially infected Apogee wheat plants The WSMW reproduction reduction leads to the formation of yield at the expense of the various physiologo-biochemical mechanisms of adaptation The results of our research activities open up the possibilities for the creation of new biotechnologies for both orbital and terrestrial conditions There arises a need to verify this phenomenon on potato plants which reproduce by tubers and in which viral infection unlike the WSMV is easily spread with planting material The initial parental potato plants were cultivated in a universal clinostat Cycle-2 and horizontal clinostat KG-8 on artificial substrate employing a balanced nutrient mixture of macro and microelements Viral antigens were detected in the organs of infected plants by a solid-phase immunoenzymatic analysis in its indirect das-ELISA variant sandwich variant A test system manufactured by the Bioreba firm Switzerland was employed for diagnostics The reader of the Termo Labsystems Opsis MR firm was employed for the measurements of optical density of the immunoenzymatic reaction product with a software of the Dynex Revelation Quicklik USA at wavelength of 405 630 nm Virion identification was carried out using the electron microscopy negative contrasting procedure Statistical data processing was performed using Excel AGROSTAT program We investigated the effects of clinostating on the development of viral

  19. Influence of planting date on incidence and severity of viral disease on cucurbits under field condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahoua Kone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three field experiments were conducted to assess the effect of planting date on the incidence of viral diseases and the severity and the susceptibility of the cultivars. Two cultivars of cucumber (Hybrid Tokyo F1 and Poinsett and one local variety of zucchini (Bolle were used for the evaluation in May-July 2014, September-November 2014, and February-April 2015. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used for the experiments. Data were collected on disease incidence, severity, and time until first symptoms occurred. Area under severity index progress curve (AUSIPC and area under disease progress curve (AUDPC were calculated respectively for disease severity as well as the incidence on each cultivar. The results demonstrate the susceptibility of all cultivars to the tested viral diseases. The effect of planting dates on cultivars was significantly different (P  0.05 in planting date-variety interaction.

  20. Hyperspectral remote sensing applications for monitoring and stress detection in cultural plants: viral infections in tobacco plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Petrov, Nikolai; Maneva, Svetla

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to reveal the presence of viral infections in two varieties of tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L.) as well as to discriminate the levels of the disease using hyperspectral leaf reflectance. Data sets were collected from two tobacco cultivars, Xanthi and Rustica, known as most widespread in Bulgaria. Experimental plants were grown in a greenhouse under controlled conditions. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf plants of cultivar Xanthi were inoculated with Potato virus Y (PVY) while the Rustica plants were inoculated with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). These two viruses are worldwide distributed and cause significant yield losses in many economically important crops. In the course of time after inoculation the concentration of the viruses in plant leaves was assessed by erological analysis via DAS-ELISA and RT-PCR techniques. Hyperspectral reflectance data were collected by a portable fibreoptics spectrometer in the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges (450-850 nm). As control plants healthy untreated tobacco plants were used. The significance of the differences between reflectance spectra of control and infected leaves was analyzed by means of Student's t-criterion at pred (640-680 nm), red edge (690-720 nm) and near infrared (720-780 nm) spectral ranges. Changes in SRC were found for both viral treatments and comparative analysis showed that the influence of PVY was stronger. The discrimination of disease intensity was achieved by derivative analysis of the red edge position.

  1. Rapid high-yield expression of full-size IgG antibodies in plants coinfected with noncompeting viral vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Giritch, Anatoli; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Engler, Carola; van Eldik, Gerben; Botterman, Johan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    Plant viral vectors allow expression of heterologous proteins at high yields, but so far, they have been unable to express heterooligomeric proteins efficiently. We describe here a rapid and indefinitely scalable process for high-level expression of functional full-size mAbs of the IgG class in plants. The process relies on synchronous coinfection and coreplication of two viral vectors, each expressing a separate antibody chain. The two vectors are derived from two different plant viruses tha...

  2. Untranslated regions of diverse plant viral RNAs vary greatly in translation enhancement efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Qiuling

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole plants or plant cell cultures can serve as low cost bioreactors to produce massive amounts of a specific protein for pharmacological or industrial use. To maximize protein expression, translation of mRNA must be optimized. Many plant viral RNAs harbor extremely efficient translation enhancers. However, few of these different translation elements have been compared side-by-side. Thus, it is unclear which are the most efficient translation enhancers. Here, we compare the effects of untranslated regions (UTRs containing translation elements from six plant viruses on translation in wheat germ extract and in monocotyledenous and dicotyledenous plant cells. Results The highest expressing uncapped mRNAs contained viral UTRs harboring Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-like cap-independent translation elements (BTEs. The BYDV BTE conferred the most efficient translation of a luciferase reporter in wheat germ extract and oat protoplasts, while uncapped mRNA containing the BTE from Tobacco necrosis virus-D translated most efficiently in tobacco cells. Capped mRNA containing the Tobacco mosaic virus omega sequence was the most efficient mRNA in tobacco cells. UTRs from Satellite tobacco necrosis virus, Tomato bushy stunt virus, and Crucifer-infecting tobamovirus (crTMV did not stimulate translation efficiently. mRNA with the crTMV 5′ UTR was unstable in tobacco protoplasts. Conclusions BTEs confer the highest levels of translation of uncapped mRNAs in vitro and in vivo, while the capped omega sequence is most efficient in tobacco cells. These results provide a basis for understanding mechanisms of translation enhancement, and for maximizing protein synthesis in cell-free systems, transgenic plants, or in viral expression vectors.

  3. A novel procedure for the localization of viral RNAs in protoplasts and whole plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengli; Simon, Anne E

    2003-09-01

    Analysis of virus spread using co-expressed reporter proteins has provided important details on cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of viruses in plants. However, most viruses cannot tolerate insertion of large non-viral segments or loss of any open-reading frames, procedures required to detect viruses non-evasively. A technique used to localize mRNAs intracellularly in yeast has been modified for detection of viral RNAs in whole plants. The technique makes use of the binding of the coat protein of MS2 bacteriophage (CPMS2) to a 19 base hairpin (hp). A fusion protein, consisting of the CPMS2, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and a nuclear localization signal (NLS), was nuclear-localized upon transient expression in protoplasts. However, addition of the hp to the 3' untranslated region of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV-hp) and co-transfection of the virus and fusion protein construct into protoplasts resulted in the re-location of GFP to the cytoplasm. Neither the insertion of the hp nor the interaction with the fusion protein impaired any viral functions. Transgenic plants expressing the GFP-NLS-CPMS2 fusion protein were generated, and GFP was detected in nuclei of young plant cells. Foci of GFP cytoplasmic fluorescence were detected in TCV-hp-inoculated leaves at 2 days post-inoculation. Later, GFP was detected in young leaves near the midvein and in the base (support) cells of trichomes in the vicinity of secondary and tertiary veins. In older leaves, cytoplasmic GFP could be visualized throughout many of the leaves. This technique should be amenable for detection of any virus with a transformable plant (or animal) host and may also prove useful for localizing properly engineered host RNAs.

  4. A family of plasmodesmal proteins with receptor-like properties for plant viral movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Khalid; Boutant, Emmanuel; Hofmann, Christina; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement.

  5. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Kundu, Chanakya N. [School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar (India); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, School of Medicine, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Choudhuri, Tathagata, E-mail: tatha@ils.res.in [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan, Bolpur (India)

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  6. Disruption of vector transmission by a plant-expressed viral glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Astúa, Mauricio; Rotenberg, Dorith; Leach-Kieffaber, Alexandria; Schneweis, Brandi A; Park, Sunghun; Park, Jungeun K; German, Thomas L; Whitfield, Anna E

    2014-03-01

    Vector-borne viruses are a threat to human, animal, and plant health worldwide, requiring the development of novel strategies for their control. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the 10 most economically significant plant viruses and, together with other tospoviruses, is a threat to global food security. TSWV is transmitted by thrips, including the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. Previously, we demonstrated that the TSWV glycoprotein GN binds to thrips vector midguts. We report here the development of transgenic plants that interfere with TSWV acquisition and transmission by the insect vector. Tomato plants expressing GN-S protein supported virus accumulation and symptom expression comparable with nontransgenic plants. However, virus titers in larval insects exposed to the infected transgenic plants were three-log lower than insects exposed to infected nontransgenic control plants. The negative effect of the GN-S transgenics on insect virus titers persisted to adulthood, as shown by four-log lower virus titers in adults and an average reduction of 87% in transmission efficiencies. These results demonstrate that an initial reduction in virus infection of the insect can result in a significant decrease in virus titer and transmission over the lifespan of the vector, supportive of a dose-dependent relationship in the virus-vector interaction. These findings demonstrate that plant expression of a viral protein can be an effective way to block virus transmission by insect vectors.

  7. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Kristian; Uttenthal, Åse; Jones, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucle....... The epitope used occurs in three different virus species-MEV, canine parvovirus, and feline panleukopenia virus-and thus the same vaccine could be used in three economically important viral hosts-mink, dogs, and cats, respectively....

  8. Tubular structure induced by a plant virus facilitates viral spread in its vector insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    Full Text Available Rice dwarf virus (RDV replicates in and is transmitted by a leafhopper vector in a persistent-propagative manner. Previous cytopathologic and genetic data revealed that tubular structures, constructed by the nonstructural viral protein Pns10, contain viral particles and are directly involved in the intercellular spread of RDV among cultured leafhopper cells. Here, we demonstrated that RDV exploited these virus-containing tubules to move along actin-based microvilli of the epithelial cells and muscle fibers of visceral muscle tissues in the alimentary canal, facilitating the spread of virus in the body of its insect vector leafhoppers. In cultured leafhopper cells, the knockdown of Pns10 expression due to RNA interference (RNAi induced by synthesized dsRNA from Pns10 gene strongly inhibited tubule formation and prevented the spread of virus among insect vector cells. RNAi induced after ingestion of dsRNA from Pns10 gene strongly inhibited formation of tubules, preventing intercellular spread and transmission of the virus by the leafhopper. All these results, for the first time, show that a persistent-propagative virus exploits virus-containing tubules composed of a nonstructural viral protein to traffic along actin-based cellular protrusions, facilitating the intercellular spread of the virus in the vector insect. The RNAi strategy and the insect vector cell culture provide useful tools to investigate the molecular mechanisms enabling efficient transmission of persistent-propagative plant viruses by vector insects.

  9. Membrane Bioreactor-Based Wastewater Treatment Plant in Saudi Arabia: Reduction of Viral Diversity, Load, and Infectious Capacity

    KAUST Repository

    Jumat, Muhammad

    2017-07-18

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR)-based wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia was assessed over a nine-month period for virus removal efficiency. Viral diversity was detected using omics-based approaches. Log reduction values (LRV) of Adenoviruses (AdV) and Enteroviruses (EV) were enumerated using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) and assessed for infectivity using fluorescence-based infection assays. MBR treatment was successful in reducing viral diversity. Plant viruses remained abundant in the treated effluent. Human enteric viruses were present in lower abundance than plant viruses, and were reduced by MBR at varying LRV. AdV copy numbers were reduced by 3.7-log. Infectious AdV was not detected in the effluent. EV copy numbers were reduced by 1.7-log post MBR and infectious EV decreased by an average of 2.0-log. Infectious EV was detected in the chlorinated effluent, occasionally in concentrations that approximate to its 50% infectious dose. Overall, results indicated that a MBR-based wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effectively reduces viral diversity, viral load, and infectious capacity by up to 4-logs. These findings suggest potential concerns associated with plant and human enteric viruses for reuse events in this country. Local guidelines for assessment of treated water quality should take into consideration both infectious viral concentration and LRV.

  10. Enhanced transgene expression in sugarcane by co-expression of virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Ji Gao

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional gene silencing is commonly observed in polyploid species and often poses a major limitation to plant improvement via biotechnology. Five plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing were evaluated for their ability to counteract gene silencing and enhance the expression of the Enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (EYFP or the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene in sugarcane, a major sugar and biomass producing polyploid. Functionality of these suppressors was first verified in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells, and later tested by transient expression in sugarcane young leaf segments and protoplasts. In young leaf segments co-expressing a suppressor, EYFP reached its maximum expression at 48-96 h post-DNA introduction and maintained its peak expression for a longer time compared with that in the absence of a suppressor. Among the five suppressors, Tomato bushy stunt virus-encoded P19 and Barley stripe mosaic virus-encoded γb were the most efficient. Co-expression with P19 and γb enhanced EYFP expression 4.6-fold and 3.6-fold in young leaf segments, and GUS activity 2.3-fold and 2.4-fold in protoplasts compared with those in the absence of a suppressor, respectively. In transgenic sugarcane, co-expression of GUS and P19 suppressor showed the highest accumulation of GUS levels with an average of 2.7-fold more than when GUS was expressed alone, with no detrimental phenotypic effects. The two established transient expression assays, based on young leaf segments and protoplasts, and confirmed by stable transgene expression, offer a rapid versatile system to verify the efficiency of RNA silencing suppressors that proved to be valuable in enhancing and stabilizing transgene expression in sugarcane.

  11. HC-Pro viral suppressor from tobacco vein banding mosaic virus interferes with DNA methylation and activates the salicylic acid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Xu, Yanan; Liu, Yuqing; Meng, Dawei; Jin, Taicheng; Zhou, Xiaofu

    2016-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important signalling molecule that is synthesized by plants and induces the expression of resistance genes. The SA pathway is typically activated by DNA viruses as well as RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrated that heper-component protease (HC-Pro) encoded by tobacco vein banding mosaic virus (TVBMV) decreases in DNA methylation at the promoters of the regulators ACD6 and NPR1 in the SA pathway. We found that the overexpression of HC-Pro increases the expression of components in the SA pathway in plants. The results revealed that HC-Pro interferes in DNA methylation and activates the SA pathway in the HC-Pro transgenic plants and TVBMV-infected plants. We further found that the accumulation of siRNAs derived from the promoter repeats of ACD6 and NPR1 is greatly reduced in the HC-Pro plants. Our results suggested that HC-Pro-mediated interference with DNA methylation is likely caused by a reduction in accumulation of siRNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 of Sporisorium reilianum changes inflorescence branching at early stages in di- and monocot plants and induces fruit abortion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsler, Frank; Schwinges, Patrick; Schirawski, Jan

    2016-05-03

    sporisorium reilianum f. sp. zeae is a biotrophic smut fungus that infects maize (Zea mays). Among others, the fungus-plant interaction is governed by secreted fungal effector proteins. The effector SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 (SAD1) changes the development of female inflorescences and induces outgrowth of subapical ears in S. reilianum-infected maize. When stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana as a GFP-SAD1 fusion protein, SAD1 induces earlier inflorescence branching and abortion of siliques. Absence of typical hormone-dependent phenotypes in other parts of the transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing GFP-SAD1 hint to a hormone-independent induction of bud outgrowth by SAD1. Silique abortion and bud outgrowth are also known to be controlled by carbon source concentration and by stress-induced molecules, making these factors interesting potential SAD1 targets.

  13. Influence of spaceflight on the efficiency of tomatoes quality and plant resistance to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashchenko, Anna; Mishchenko, Lidiya

    Tomatoes are an important agricultural crop. The use of plants for life support in long-term space flight advances multiple problems - an adaptation to microgravity and taste. Conditions of microgravity are stressful for plants and they cause them adaptation syndrome to protect and preserve homeostasis (Kordyum, 2010, 2012;. Hasenstein, 1999). Tomatoes are also a product of the diet of astronauts, which is an important part of their life - the regeneration gas environment (photosynthesis), the relaxation factor in psychological people and a powerful antioxidant. In 2007, the tomato seeds, genetically created by scientists from the University of North Carolina, was placed on the International Space Station. But the experiment failed because the seedlings died (Khodakovskaya). Although researchers do not bind this fact with microgravity, it is clear that the study of this factor on plants is rather important. Therefore, the study of the effect of space flight conditions on plant species continues. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of space flight on tomato plant resistance to viral infection and quality products. Seeds of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Sort Podmoskovny early) 6 years (1992-1998) were in terms of long-term space flight on the Russian space station "Mir". Then the seeds germinated in the spring of 2011 and grew up in the Earth's field on the natural infectious background. Part of the plants underwent 5 reproductive phase, resulting in 2011 investigated tomatoes from seed 1st and 5th reproduction, in 2012 - the second and sixth, respectively, and in 2013 - as the second and sixth (sow seeds obtained by us in the Ukraine in 2011.) In our research we used two controls: № 1 (stationary control) - plants of the first generation seeds which were not in outer space; № 2 - five plants from seed reproduction that exhibited in space and were grown in parallel under the same conditions of the studied plants. Defining of

  14. Differences in serum IgA responses to HIV-1 gp41 in elite controllers compared to viral suppressors on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Rafiq; Moldoveanu, Zina; Wei, Qing; Golub, Elizabeth T; Durkin, Helen G; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Herold, Betsy C; Nowicki, Marek J; Kassaye, Seble; Cho, Michael W; Pinter, Abraham; Landay, Alan L; Mestecky, Jiri; Kozlowski, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    A responses and affinity maturation of anti-gp41 IgA antibodies occurs to a greater extent in EC than in subjects on HAART. Future studies will be required to determine if IgA antibodies in EC may contribute in control of viral replication.

  15. [Effects of seven RNA silencing suppressors on heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein expression mediated by a plant virus-based system in Nicotiana benthamiana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Dong, Jie; Cao, Min; Mu, Hongzhen; Ding, Guoping; Zhang, Hong

    2012-11-01

    To test the effects of 7 virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) for enhancement of a plant virus-based vector system-mediated heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven transient expression vectors for the 7 RSSs were constructed and co-inoculated on the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana with PVXdt-GFP vector, a novel Potato virus X-based plant expression vector, through agroinfiltration. The protein and mRNA expression levels of the reporter gene GFP in the co-inoculated Nicotiana leaves were examined by Western blotting, ELISA and RT-qPCR to assess the effect of the RSSs for GFP expression enhancement. The 7 RSSs differed in the degree and duration of enhancement of heterologous GFP expression, and the p19 protein of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) induced the highest expression of GFP. African cassava mosaic virus AC2 protein and Rice yellow mettle virus P1 protein produced no obvious enhancement GFP expression. Transient co-expression of RSSs suppresses host silencing response to allow high-level and long-term expression of heterologous genes in plant, but the optimal RSS has to be identified for each plant virus-based expression vector system.

  16. Screening and identification of virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjee, Sumona; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Mukherjee, Sunil K

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing, including RNA interference, is a novel method of gene regulation and one of the potent host-defense mechanisms against the viruses. In the course of evolution, the viruses have encoded proteins with the potential to suppress the host RNA silencing mechanism as a counterdefense strategy. The virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) can serve as important biological tools to dissect the detailed RNA silencing pathways and also to evolve the antiviral strategies. Screening and identification of the RSSs are indeed of utmost significance in the field of plant biotechnology. We describe two Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) reporter-based plant assay systems that rely on two different principles, namely reversal of silencing and enhancement of rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminiviral replicon. These proof-of-concept examples and assay systems could be used to screen various plant, animal, and insect viral ORFs for identification of the RSS activities.

  17. Probing the MicroRNA and Small Interfering RNA Pathways with Virus-Encoded Suppressors of RNA SilencingW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Parizotto, Eneida Abreu; Himber, Christophe; Voinnet, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effectors of RNA silencing, a process involved in defense through RNA interference (RNAi) and in development. Plant viruses are natural targets of RNA silencing, and as a counterdefensive strategy, they have evolved highly diverse silencing suppressor proteins. Although viral suppressors are usually thought to act at distinct steps of the silencing machinery, there had been no consensus system so far that allowed a strict side-by-side analysis of those factors. We have set up such a system in Arabidopsis thaliana and used it to compare the effects of five unrelated viral silencing suppressors on the siRNA and miRNA pathways. Although all the suppressors inhibited RNAi, only three of them induced developmental defects, indicating that the two pathways are only partially overlapping. These developmental defects were remarkably similar, and their penetrance correlated with inhibition of miRNA-guided cleavage of endogenous transcripts and not with altered miRNA accumulation per se. Among the suppressors investigated, the tombusviral P19 protein coimmunoprecipitated with siRNA duplexes and miRNA duplexes corresponding to the primary cleavage products of miRNA precursors. Thus, it is likely that P19 prevents RNA silencing by sequestering both classes of small RNAs. Moreover, the finding here that P19 binds siRNAs and suppresses RNAi in Hela cells also suggests that this factor may be useful to dissect the RNA silencing pathways in animals. Finally, the differential effects of the silencing suppressors tested here upon other types of Arabidopsis silencing-related small RNAs revealed a surprising variety of biosynthetic and, presumably, functional pathways for those molecules. Therefore, silencing suppressors are valuable probes of the complexity of RNA silencing. PMID:15084715

  18. Viral small interfering RNAs target host genes to mediate disease symptoms in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A Smith

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat has a small non-protein-coding RNA genome that induces yellowing symptoms in infected Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco. How this RNA pathogen induces such symptoms has been a longstanding question. We show that the yellowing symptoms are a result of small interfering RNA (siRNA-directed RNA silencing of the chlorophyll biosynthetic gene, CHLI. The CHLI mRNA contains a 22-nucleotide (nt complementary sequence to the Y-Sat genome, and in Y-Sat-infected plants, CHLI expression is dramatically down-regulated. Small RNA sequencing and 5' RACE analyses confirmed that this 22-nt sequence was targeted for mRNA cleavage by Y-Sat-derived siRNAs. Transformation of tobacco with a RNA interference (RNAi vector targeting CHLI induced Y-Sat-like symptoms. In addition, the symptoms of Y-Sat infection can be completely prevented by transforming tobacco with a silencing-resistant variant of the CHLI gene. These results suggest that siRNA-directed silencing of CHLI is solely responsible for the Y-Sat-induced symptoms. Furthermore, we demonstrate that two Nicotiana species, which do not develop yellowing symptoms upon Y-Sat infection, contain a single nucleotide polymorphism within the siRNA-targeted CHLI sequence. This suggests that the previously observed species specificity of Y-Sat-induced symptoms is due to natural sequence variation in the CHLI gene, preventing CHLI silencing in species with a mismatch to the Y-Sat siRNA. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration of small RNA-mediated viral disease symptom production and offer an explanation of the species specificity of the viral disease.

  19. Rapid screening of RNA silencing suppressors by using a recombinant virus derived from beet necrotic yellow vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilley, H; Bortolamiol, D; Jonard, G; Bouzoubaa, S; Ziegler-Graff, V

    2009-10-01

    To counteract plant defence mechanisms, plant viruses have evolved to encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins. These proteins can be identified by a range of silencing suppressor assays. Here, we describe a simple method using beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) that allows a rapid screening of RSS activity. The viral inoculum consisted of BNYVV RNA1, which encodes proteins involved in viral replication, and two BNYVV-derived replicons: rep3-P30, which expresses the movement protein P30 of tobacco mosaic virus, and rep5-X, which allows the expression of a putative RSS (X). This approach has been validated through the use of several known RSSs. Two potential candidates have been tested and we show that, in our system, the P13 protein of burdock mottle virus displays RSS activity while the P0 protein of cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV does not.

  20. Analysis of chikungunya virus proteins reveals that non-structural proteins nsP2 and nsP3 exhibit RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Kalika; Anand, Abhishek; Dubey, Sunil Kumar; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Sunil, Sujatha

    2016-11-30

    RNAi pathway is an antiviral defence mechanism employed by insects that result in degradation of viral RNA thereby curbing infection. Several viruses including flaviviruses encode viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) to counteract the antiviral RNAi pathway. Till date, no VSR has been reported in alphaviruses. The present study was undertaken to evaluate chikungunya virus (CHIKV) proteins for RNAi suppressor activity. We systematically analyzed all nine CHIKV proteins for RNAi suppressor activity using Sf21 RNAi sensor cell line based assay. Two non-structural proteins, namely, nsP2 and nsP3 were found to exhibit RNAi suppressor activity. We further validated the findings in natural hosts, namely in Aedes and in mammalian cell lines and further through EMSA and Agrobacterium infiltration in GFP silenced transgenic tobacco plants. Domains responsible for maximum RNAi suppressor activity were also identified within these proteins. RNA binding motifs in these domains were identified and their participation in RNAi suppression evaluated using site directed mutagenesis. Sequence alignment of these motifs across all species of known alphaviruses revealed conservation of these motifs emphasizing on a similar role of action in other species of alphaviruses as well. Further validation of RNAi suppressor activity of these proteins awaits establishment of specific virus infection models.

  1. Tailorable Release of Small Molecules Utilizing Plant Viral Nanoparticles and Fibrous Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing

    We have engineered Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) derived plant viral nanoparticles (PVNs) within a fibrous matrix to optimize its application for delivery and controlled release of active ingredients. RCNMV's structure and unique response to divalent cation depletion and re-addition enables the infusion of small molecules into its viral capsid through a pore formation mechanism. While this PVN technology shows a potential use in nano-scale therapeutic drug delivery, its inherent molecular dynamics to environmental stimuli places a constraint on its application and functionality as a vehicle for tailorable release of loading cargo. In this study, we enhance the understanding of the PVN technology by elucidating its mechanism for loading and triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox), a chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer. Of critical importance is the methodology for manipulation of Dox's loading capacity and its binding location on either the exterior or interior of the virion capsid. The ability to control the active ingredient binding location provides an additional approach of tunable release from the PVN delivery vehicle besides its inherent pH- and ion- responsive release of loading cargo. The efficacious and controlled release strategy for agricultural active ingredients, such as nematicides, is also a large social need right now. Crop infestation of plant parasite nematodes causes in excess of 157 billion in worldwide crop damage annually. If an effective control strategy for these pests could be developed, it is estimated that the current market for effective nematicides is between 700 million and $1 billion each year worldwide. In this study, we report on the utilization of PVN technology to encapsulate the biological nematicide, abamectin (Abm), within the PVN's interior capsid (PVNAbm). Creating PVNAbm addresses Abm's issues of soil immobility while rendering a controlled release strategy for its bioavailability to root knot nematodes (RKNs

  2. Risk Assessment of Synergism and Recombination on the Transgenic Plants Containing Viral Movement Protein and Replicase Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Yan-bing; LI Gui-xin; WEN Rui; ZHOU Xue-ping

    2003-01-01

    The transgenic tobacco plants transformed with movement protein gene of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) or Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and partial replicase gene of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) P1 isolate (CMV-P1), were inoculated with Potato virus X, Potato virus Y, TMV and CMV isolate RB (CMVRB), respectively. Symptom observation showed there were no symptom differences in transgenic tobacco plants as compared with those in non-transgenic tobacco plants. ELISA also illustrated that the virus concentrations in the transgenic plants were similar to those in non-transgenic plants, indicating that no synergism is found in these plants. The transgenic tobacco plants expressing movement protein gene of ToMV or partial replicase gene of CMV-P1 were inoculated with TMV and CMV-RB, respectively. The local or systemic infected leaves were then used for elucidation of the possible virus recombination in transgenic plants with biological infectivity test, ELISA and immuno-capture RT-PCR. Within 16 months, no recombination was found between transformed genes and inoculated virus genomes. The research provides fundamental data for understanding of the possible risk of the transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  3. Research Advances. Image Pinpoints All 5 Million Atoms in Viral Coat; Bilirubin, "Animals-Only" Pigment, Found in Plants; New Evidence Shows Humans Make Salicylic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2009-08-01

    Recent "firsts" in chemical research: image of a viral capsid pinpointing 5 million atoms; isolation and identification of an "animal" pigment, bilirubin, from a plant source; evidence that humans make salicylic acid.

  4. dsRNA sensing during viral infection: lessons from plants, worms, insects, and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Isaque João da Silva; Olmo, Roenick Proveti; Silva, Emanuele Guimarães; Marques, João Trindade

    2013-05-01

    Host defense systems often rely on direct and indirect pattern recognition to sense the presence of invading pathogens. Patterns can be molecules directly produced by the pathogen or indirectly generated by changes in host parameters as a consequence of infection. Viruses are intracellular pathogens that hijack the cellular machinery to synthesize their own molecules making direct recognition of viral molecules a great challenge. Antiviral systems in prokaryotes and eukaryotes commonly exploit aberrant nucleic acid sensing to recognize virus infection as host and viral nucleic acid metabolism can greatly differ. Indeed, the generation of dsRNA is often associated with viral infection. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on the mechanisms of viral dsRNA sensing utilized by 2 important antiviral defense systems, RNA interference (RNAi) and the vertebrate immune system. The major viral sensors of the vertebrate immune systems are RIG-like receptors, while RNAi pathways depend on Dicer proteins. These 2 families of sensors share a similar helicase domain with high specificity for dsRNA, which is necessary, but not sufficient for efficient recognition by these receptors. Additional intrinsic features to the dsRNA molecule are also necessary for activation of antiviral systems. Studies utilizing synthetic ligands, in vitro biochemistry and reporter systems have greatly helped increase our knowledge on intrinsic features of dsRNA recognition. However, characteristics such as subcellular localization are extrinsic to the dsRNA itself, but certainly influence the recognition in vivo. Thus, mechanisms of viral dsRNA recognition must address how cellular sensors are recruited to nucleic acids or vice versa. Accessory proteins are likely important for in vivo recognition of extrinsic features of viral RNA, but have mostly remained undiscovered due to the limitations of previous strategies. Hence, the identification of novel components of antiviral systems must take

  5. Rapid high-yield expression of full-size IgG antibodies in plants coinfected with noncompeting viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giritch, Anatoli; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Engler, Carola; van Eldik, Gerben; Botterman, Johan; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri

    2006-10-03

    Plant viral vectors allow expression of heterologous proteins at high yields, but so far, they have been unable to express heterooligomeric proteins efficiently. We describe here a rapid and indefinitely scalable process for high-level expression of functional full-size mAbs of the IgG class in plants. The process relies on synchronous coinfection and coreplication of two viral vectors, each expressing a separate antibody chain. The two vectors are derived from two different plant viruses that were found to be noncompeting. Unlike vectors derived from the same virus, noncompeting vectors effectively coexpress the heavy and light chains in the same cell throughout the plant body, resulting in yields of up to 0.5 g of assembled mAbs per kg of fresh-leaf biomass. This technology allows production of gram quantities of mAbs for research purposes in just several days, and the same protocol can be used on an industrial scale in situations requiring rapid response, such as pandemic or terrorism events.

  6. Tobacco calmodulin-like protein provides secondary defense by binding to and directing degradation of virus RNA silencing suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara; Yamada, Syouta; Shimura, Hanako; Kashihara, Yukiko; Wada, Tomoko S; Meguro, Ayano; Goto, Kazunori; Tadamura, Kazuki; Sueda, Kae; Sekiguchi, Toru; Shao, Jun; Itchoda, Noriko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Ito, Kimihito; Carthew, Richard W; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2012-06-19

    RNA silencing (RNAi) induced by virus-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is in a sense regarded as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of viruses, is a general plant defense mechanism. To counteract this defense, plant viruses express RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), many of which bind to dsRNA and attenuate RNAi. We showed that the tobacco calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM, counterattacked viral RSSs by binding to their dsRNA-binding domains and sequestering them from inhibiting RNAi. Autophagy-like protein degradation seemed to operate to degrade RSSs with the sacrifice of rgs-CaM. These RSSs could thus be regarded as secondary viral PAMPs. This study uncovered a unique defense system in which an rgs-CaM-mediated countermeasure against viral RSSs enhanced host antiviral RNAi in tobacco.

  7. Improved silencing suppression and enhanced heterologous protein expression are achieved using an engineered viral helper component proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikonen, T; Rajamäki, M-L; Valkonen, J P T

    2013-11-01

    RNA silencing limits transient expression of heterologous proteins in plants. Co-expression of viral silencing suppressor proteins can increase and prolong protein expression, but highly efficient silencing suppressors may stress plant tissue and be detrimental to protein yields. Little is known whether silencing suppression could be improved without harm to plant tissues. This study reports development of enhanced silencing suppressors by engineering the helper component proteinase (HCpro) of Potato virus A (PVA). Mutations were introduced to a short region of HCpro (positions 330-335 in PVA HCpro), which is hypervariable among potyviruses. Three out of the four HCpro mutants suppressed RNA silencing more efficiently and sustained expression of co-expressed jellyfish green fluorescent protein for a longer time than wild-type HCpro in agroinfiltrated leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Leaf tissues remained healthy-looking without any visible signs of stress.

  8. Hijack it, Change it: How do Plant Viruses Utilize the Host Secretory Pathway for Efficient Viral Replication and Spread?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo ePatarroyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells has an elaborated set of endomembrane compartments involved in the synthesis, modification and sorting of proteins and lipids. The secretory pathway in plant cells shares many features with that in other eukaryotic cells but also has distinct characteristics important for fundamental cell and developmental processes and for proper immune responses. Recently, there has been evidence that the remodeling of this pathway, and often the formation of viral induced organelles, play an important role in viral replication and spread. The modification of the host secretory pathway seems to be a common feature among most single-stranded positive ss(+RNA and even some DNA viruses. In this review, we will present the recent advances in the organization and dynamics of the plant secretory pathway and the molecular regulation of membrane trafficking in the pathway. We will also discuss how different plant viruses may interact with the host secretory pathway for their efficient replication and spread, with a focus on Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV.

  9. Viral RNase3 Co-Localizes and Interacts with the Antiviral Defense Protein SGS3 in Plant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Weinheimer

    Full Text Available Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; family Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III endoribonuclease (RNase3 that suppresses post-transcriptional RNA interference (RNAi and eliminates antiviral defense in sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas. For RNAi suppression, RNase3 cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNAs (ds-siRNA and long dsRNA to fragments that are too short to be utilized in RNAi. However, RNase3 can suppress only RNAi induced by sense RNA. Sense-mediated RNAi involves host suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6. In this study, subcellular localization and host interactions of RNase3 were studied in plant cells. RNase3 was found to interact with SGS3 of sweetpotato and Arabidopsis thaliana when expressed in leaves, and it localized to SGS3/RDR6 bodies in the cytoplasm of leaf cells and protoplasts. RNase3 was also detected in the nucleus. Co-expression of RNase3 and SGS3 in leaf tissue enhanced the suppression of RNAi, as compared with expression of RNase3 alone. These results suggest additional mechanisms needed for efficient RNase3-mediated suppression of RNAi and provide new information about the subcellular context and phase of the RNAi pathway in which RNase3 realizes RNAi suppression.

  10. Tobacco calmodulin-like protein provides secondary defense by binding to and directing degradation of virus RNA silencing suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara; Yamada, Syouta; Shimura, Hanako; KASHIHARA, Yukiko; Wada, Tomoko S.; Meguro, Ayano; Goto, Kazunori; Tadamura, Kazuki; Sueda, Kae; Sekiguchi, Toru; Shao, Jun; Itchoda, Noriko; Matsumura, Takeshi; Igarashi, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing (RNAi) induced by virus-derived double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is in a sense regarded as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) of viruses, is a general plant defense mechanism. To counteract this defense, plant viruses express RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs), many of which bind to dsRNA and attenuate RNAi. We showed that the tobacco calmodulin-like protein, rgs-CaM, counterattacked viral RSSs by binding to their dsRNA-binding domains and sequestering them from inhi...

  11. Viral recombination blurs taxonomic lines: examination of single-stranded DNA viruses in a wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M. Pearson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the structure and dynamics of microbial communities, especially those of economic concern, is of paramount importance to maintaining healthy and efficient microbial communities at agricultural sites and large industrial cultures, including bioprocessors. Wastewater treatment plants are large bioprocessors which receive water from multiple sources, becoming reservoirs for the collection of many viral families that infect a broad range of hosts. To examine this complex collection of viruses, full-length genomes of circular ssDNA viruses were isolated from a wastewater treatment facility using a combination of sucrose-gradient size selection and rolling-circle amplification and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq. Single-stranded DNA viruses are among the least understood groups of microbial pathogens due to genomic biases and culturing difficulties, particularly compared to the larger, more often studied dsDNA viruses. However, the group contains several notable well-studied examples, including agricultural pathogens which infect both livestock and crops (Circoviridae and Geminiviridae, and model organisms for genetics and evolution studies (Microviridae. Examination of the collected viral DNA provided evidence for 83 unique genotypic groupings, which were genetically dissimilar to known viral types and exhibited broad diversity within the community. Furthermore, although these genomes express similarities to known viral families, such as Circoviridae, Geminiviridae, and Microviridae, many are so divergent that they may represent new taxonomic groups. This study demonstrated the efficacy of the protocol for separating bacteria and large viruses from the sought after ssDNA viruses and the ability to use this protocol to obtain an in-depth analysis of the diversity within this group.

  12. Effect of temperature on the pathogenesis, accumulation of viral and satellite RNAs and on plant proteome in peanut stunt virus and satellite RNA-infected plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra eObrępalska-Stęplowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is an important environmental factor influencing plant development in natural and diseased conditions. The growth rate of plants grown at 27°C is more rapid than for plants grown at 21°C. Thus, temperature affects the rate of pathogenesis progression in individual plants. We have analyzed the effect of temperature conditions (either 21°C or 27°C during the day on the accumulation rate of the virus and satellite RNA (satRNA in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected by peanut stunt virus (PSV with and without its satRNA, at four time points. In addition, we extracted proteins from PSV and PSV+satRNA-infected plants harvested at 21 dpi, when disease symptoms began to appear on plants grown at 21°C and were well developed on those grown at 27°C, to assess the proteome profile in infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants grown at these two temperatures, using 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry approaches. The accumulation rate of the viral RNAs and satRNA was more rapid at 27°C at the beginning of the infection and then rapidly decreased in PSV-infected plants. At 21 dpi, PSV and satRNA accumulation was higher at 21°C and had a tendency to increase further. In all studied plants grown at 27°C, we observed a significant drop in the identified proteins participating in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism at the proteome level, in comparison to plants maintained at 21°C. On the other hand, the proteins involved in protein metabolic processes were all more abundant in plants grown at 27°C. This was especially evident when PSV-infected plants were analyzed, where increase in abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis, degradation, and folding was revealed. In mock-inoculated and PSV-infected plants we found an increase in abundance of the majority of stress-related differently-regulated proteins and those associated with protein metabolism. In contrast, in PSV+satRNA-infected plants the shift in the

  13. New Viral Vector for Superproduction of Epitopes of Vaccine Proteins in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyulkina, L.G.; Skurat, E.V.; Frolova, O.Yu.; Komarova, T.V.; Karger, E.M.; Atabekov, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    The novel viral vectors PVX-CP AltMV and PVXdt-CP AltMV are superexpressors of the capsid protein (CP). These viral vectors were constructed on the basis of the potato virus X (PVX) genome andAlternantheramosaic virus (AltMV) CP gene. The expression, based on the hybrid viral vectors, is genetically safe, since the systemic transport and formation of infective viral particles are blocked. CP AltMV can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) in the absence of genomic RNA. The vectors can be used for the presentation of foreign peptides (including epitopes of human pathogens) on the surface of the VLP. The N-terminal extracellular domain (M2e) of the influenza virus A M2 protein and its truncated variant (ΔM2e) were used as model heterologous peptides for the construction of the chimeric CP AltMV. Chimeric CP AltMV retains its ability to self-assemble into VLP. The epitopes of the M2 influenza virus protein were not eliminated during the process of accumulation, polymerization and purification of chimeric VLP AltMV, providing evidence of the stability of chimeric VLP with C-terminal heterologous epitopes. It appears that VLP produced by the vectors PVX-CP AltMV and PVXdt-CP AltMV can be used in the field of biotechnology for the presentation of the epitopes of vaccine proteins on their surfaces. The chimeric VLP AltMV with the presented foreign epitopes can be used as candidate vaccines. PMID:22649706

  14. Extraction of nuclei from sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus-infected plants yields a polymerase that synthesizes viral mRNAs and polyadenylated plus-strand leader RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, J D; Choi, T. J.; Jackson, A O

    1996-01-01

    Although the primary sequence of the genome of the plant rhabdovirus sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) has been determined, little is known about the composition of the viral polymerase or the mechanics of viral transcription and replication. In this paper, we report the partial isolation and characterization of an active SYNV polymerase from nuclei of SYNV-infected leaf tissue. A salt extraction procedure is shown to be an effective purification step for recovery of the polymerase from the nuc...

  15. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  16. Reduction of viral load in whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gen.) feeding on RNAi-mediated bean golden mosaic virus resistant transgenic bean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Nayhanne T; de Faria, Josias C; Aragão, Francisco J L

    2015-12-02

    The RNAi concept was explored to silence the rep gene from the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) and a genetically modified (GM) bean immune to the virus was previously generated. We investigated if BGMV-viruliferous whiteflies would reduce viral amount after feeding on GM plants. BGMV DNA amount was significantly reduced in whiteflies feeding in GM-plants (compared with insects feeding on non-GM plants) for a period of 4 and 8 days in 52% and 84% respectively.

  17. Possible consequences of the overlap between the CaMV 35S promoter regions in plant transformation vectors used and the viral gene VI in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podevin, Nancy; du Jardin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Multiple variants of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) are used to drive the expression of transgenes in genetically modified plants, for both research purposes and commercial applications. The genetic organization of the densely packed genome of this virus results in sequence overlap between P35S and viral gene VI, encoding the multifunctional P6 protein. The present paper investigates whether introduction of P35S variants by genetic transformation is likely to result in the expression of functional domains of the P6 protein and in potential impacts in transgenic plants. A bioinformatic analysis was performed to assess the safety for human and animal health of putative translation products of gene VI overlapping P35S. No relevant similarity was identified between the putative peptides and known allergens and toxins, using different databases. From a literature study it became clear that long variants of the P35S do contain an open reading frame, when expressed, might result in unintended phenotypic changes. A flowchart is proposed to evaluate possible unintended effects in plant transformants, based on the DNA sequence actually introduced and on the plant phenotype, taking into account the known effects of ectopically expressed P6 domains in model plants.

  18. Viral protein inhibits RISC activity by argonaute binding through conserved WG/GW motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Giner

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific gene-inactivation system that also functions as an antiviral mechanism in higher plants and insects. To overcome antiviral RNA silencing, viruses express silencing-suppressor proteins. These viral proteins can target one or more key points in the silencing machinery. Here we show that in Sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV, type member of the Ipomovirus genus, family Potyviridae, the role of silencing suppressor is played by the P1 protein (the largest serine protease among all known potyvirids despite the presence in its genome of an HC-Pro protein, which, in potyviruses, acts as the suppressor. Using in vivo studies we have demonstrated that SPMMV P1 inhibits si/miRNA-programmed RISC activity. Inhibition of RISC activity occurs by binding P1 to mature high molecular weight RISC, as we have shown by immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that P1 targets Argonaute1 (AGO1, the catalytic unit of RISC, and that suppressor/binding activities are localized at the N-terminal half of P1. In this region three WG/GW motifs were found resembling the AGO-binding linear peptide motif conserved in metazoans and plants. Site-directed mutagenesis proved that these three motifs are absolutely required for both binding and suppression of AGO1 function. In contrast to other viral silencing suppressors analyzed so far P1 inhibits both existing and de novo formed AGO1 containing RISC complexes. Thus P1 represents a novel RNA silencing suppressor mechanism. The discovery of the molecular bases of P1 mediated silencing suppression may help to get better insight into the function and assembly of the poorly explored multiprotein containing RISC.

  19. Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

    2006-11-01

    Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing

  20. From Agrobacterium to viral vectors: genome modification of plant cells by rare cutting restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Ira; Honig, Arik; Omid, Ayelet; De Costa, Noam; Marhevka, Elena; Cohen, Barry; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and biotechnologists require methods to accurately modify the genome of higher eukaryotic cells. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, site-specific mutagenesis, site-specific insertion of foreign DNA, and replacement and deletion of native sequences. Accurate genome modifications in plant species have been rather limited, with only a handful of plant species and genes being modified through the use of early genome-editing techniques. The development of rare-cutting restriction enzymes as a tool for the induction of site-specific genomic double-strand breaks and their introduction as a reliable tool for genome modification in animals, animal cells and human cell lines have paved the way for the adaptation of rare-cutting restriction enzymes to genome editing in plant cells. Indeed, the number of plant species and genes which have been successfully edited using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and engineered homing endonucleases is on the rise. In our review, we discuss the basics of rare-cutting restriction enzyme-mediated genome-editing technology with an emphasis on its application in plant species.

  1. Plant genotype and induced defenses affect the productivity of an insect-killing obligate viral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Ikkei; McCarthy, Elizabeth M; Elderd, Bret D; Hoover, Kelli

    2017-09-01

    Plant-mediated variations in the outcomes of host-pathogen interactions can strongly affect epizootics and the population dynamics of numerous species, including devastating agricultural pests such as the fall armyworm. Most studies of plant-mediated effects on insect pathogens focus on host mortality, but few have measured pathogen yield, which can affect whether or not an epizootic outbreak occurs. Insects challenged with baculoviruses on different plant species and parts can vary in levels of mortality and yield of infectious stages (occlusion bodies; OBs). We previously demonstrated that soybean genotypes and induced anti-herbivore defenses influence baculovirus infectivity. Here, we used a soybean genotype that strongly reduced baculovirus infectivity when virus was ingested on induced plants (Braxton) and another that did not reduce infectivity (Gasoy), to determine how soybean genotype and induced defenses influence OB yield and speed of kill. These are key fitness measures because baculoviruses are obligate-killing pathogens. We challenged fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, with the baculovirus S. frugiperda multi-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) during short or long-term exposure to plant treatments (i.e., induced or non-induced genotypes). Caterpillars were either fed plant treatments only during virus ingestion (short-term exposure to foliage) or from the point of virus ingestion until death (long-term exposure). We found trade-offs of increasing OB yield with slower speed of kill and decreasing virus dose. OB yield increased more with longer time to death and decreased more with increasing virus dose after short-term feeding on Braxton compared with Gasoy. OB yield increased significantly more with time to death in larvae that fed until death on non-induced foliage than induced foliage. Moreover, fewer OBs per unit of host tissue were produced when larvae were fed induced foliage than non-induced foliage. These findings highlight the

  2. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalsgaard, K.; Uttenthal, A.; Jones, T.D.; Xu, F.; Merrywater, A.; Hamilton, W.D.O.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Kamstrup, S.; Lomonos, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucleoti

  3. A Genetic Approach to the Identification of Plant Genes Involved in Viral Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-30

    fluorouracil ( 5FU ) (CD) when infected with RCNMV. A library of EMS mutants will be generated for Luc- and CD-expressing plant lines. Plantlets from the...lines will be infected with RCNMV and selected for resistance to 5FU . Surviving mutants will be examined for the presence of RCNMV in the inoculated

  4. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalsgaard, K.; Uttenthal, A.; Jones, T.D.; Xu, F.; Merrywater, A.; Hamilton, W.D.O.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Kamstrup, S.; Lomonos, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucleoti

  5. Nonlinear diffusion and viral spread through the leaf of a plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Maureen P.; Waterhouse, Peter M.; Munoz-Lopez, María Jesús; Anderssen, Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    The spread of a virus through the leaf of a plant is both spatially and temporally causal in that the present status depends on the past and the spatial spread is compactly supported and progresses outwards. Such spatial spread is known to occur for certain nonlinear diffusion processes. The first compactly supported solution for nonlinear diffusion equations appears to be that of Pattle published in 1959. In that paper, no explanation is given as to how the solution was derived. Here, we show how the solution can be derived using Lie symmetry analysis. This lays a foundation for exploring the behavior of other choices for nonlinear diffusion and exploring the addition of reaction terms which do not eliminate the compactly supported structure. The implications associated with using the reaction-diffusion equation to model the spatial-temporal spread of a virus through the leaf of a plant are discussed.

  6. The expression of a mountain cedar allergen comparing plant-viral apoplastic and yeast expression systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moehnke, Marcie H.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.; Kearney, Christopher M

    2008-01-01

    Jun a 3, a major allergenic protein in mountain cedar pollen, causes seasonal allergic rhinitis in hypersensitive individuals. Recombinant Jun a 3 was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana interstitial fluid (300 μg/g leaf material) and Pichia pastoris (100 μg/ml media). Polyclonal anti-Jun a 3 and IgE antibodies from the sera of allergic patients both reacted with the recombinant protein. Of the two systems, recombinant protein from the plant apoplast contained fewer contaminating proteins. Thi...

  7. Hairpin RNA derived from viral NIa gene confers immunity to wheat streak mosaic virus infection in transgenic wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Muhammad; Ayala-Navarrete, Ligia; Millar, Anthony A; Larkin, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), vectored by Wheat curl mite, has been of great economic importance in the Great Plains of the United States and Canada. Recently, the virus has been identified in Australia, where it has spread quickly to all major wheat growing areas. The difficulties in finding adequate natural resistance in wheat prompted us to develop transgenic resistance based on RNA interference (RNAi). An RNAi construct was designed to target the nuclear inclusion protein 'a' (NIa) gene of WSMV. Wheat was stably cotransformed with two plasmids: pStargate-NIa expressing hairpin RNA (hpRNA) including WSMV sequence and pCMneoSTLS2 with the nptII selectable marker. When T(1) progeny were assayed against WSMV, ten of sixteen families showed complete resistance in transgenic segregants. The resistance was classified as immunity by four criteria: no disease symptoms were produced; ELISA readings were as in uninoculated plants; viral sequences could not be detected by RT-PCR from leaf extracts; and leaf extracts failed to give infections in susceptible plants when used in test-inoculation experiments. Southern blot hybridization analysis indicated hpRNA transgene integrated into the wheat genome. Moreover, accumulation of small RNAs derived from the hpRNA transgene sequence positively correlated with immunity. We also showed that the selectable marker gene nptII segregated independently of the hpRNA transgene in some transgenics, and therefore demonstrated that it is possible using these techniques, to produce marker-free WSMV immune transgenic plants. This is the first report of immunity in wheat to WSMV using a spliceable intron hpRNA strategy.

  8. The expression of a mountain cedar allergen comparing plant-viral apoplastic and yeast expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehnke, Marcie H; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M; Kearney, Christopher M

    2008-07-01

    Jun a 3, a major allergenic protein in mountain cedar pollen, causes seasonal allergic rhinitis in hypersensitive individuals. Recombinant Jun a 3 was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana interstitial fluid (300 microg/g leaf material) and Pichia pastoris (100 microg/ml media). Polyclonal anti-Jun a 3 and IgE antibodies from the sera of allergic patients both reacted with the recombinant protein. Of the two systems, recombinant protein from the plant apoplast contained fewer contaminating proteins. This method allows for a more convenient and inexpensive expression of the recombinant allergen, which will allow for further structural studies and may prove useful in diagnostic and/or immunotherapeutic strategies for cedar allergy.

  9. Tumor suppressor and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliette Martin; Jean-Frangois Dufour

    2008-01-01

    A few signaling pathways are driving the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. Each of these pathways possesses negative regulators. These enzymes, which normally suppress unchecked cell proliferation, are circumvented in the oncogenic process, either the over-activity of oncogenes is sufficient to annihilate the activity of tumor suppressors or tumor suppressors have been rendered ineffective. The loss of several key tumor suppressors has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we systematically review the evidence implicating tumor suppressors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. Developmental Defects Mediated by the P1/HC-Pro Potyviral Silencing Suppressor Are Not Due to Misregulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlotshwa, Sizolwenkosi; Pruss, Gail J; MacArthur, John L; Reed, Jason W; Vance, Vicki

    2016-11-01

    Plant viral suppressors of RNA silencing induce developmental defects similar to those caused by mutations in genes involved in the microRNA pathway. A recent report has attributed viral suppressor-mediated developmental defects to up-regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 8 (ARF8), a target of miR167. The key piece of evidence was that the developmental defects in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing viral suppressors were greatly alleviated in the F1 progeny of a cross with plants carrying the arf8-6 mutation. Arf8-6 is a SALK line T-DNA insertion mutant, a class of mutations prone to inducing transcriptional silencing of transgenes expressed from the 35S promoter. We have reinvestigated the role of ARF8 in viral suppressor-mediated developmental defects, using two independent arf8 mutations and the P1/HC-Pro potyviral suppressor of silencing. Progeny of a cross between P1/HC-Pro transgenic Arabidopsis and the arf8-6 T-DNA insertion mutant showed little effect on the P1/HC-Pro phenotype in the F1 generation, but almost all arf8-6/P1/HC-Pro progeny had lost the phenotype in the F2 generation. However, the loss of phenotype in the F2 generation was not correlated with the number of functional copies of the ARF8 gene. Instead, it reflected transcriptional silencing of the P1/HC-Pro transgene, as evidenced by a pronounced decrease in P1/HC-Pro mRNA and the appearance of 35S promoter small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, an independent loss-of-function point mutation, Arf8-8, had no detectable effects on P1/HC-Pro phenotype in either the F1 or F2 generations. Together, these data argue against the previously reported role of increased ARF8 expression in developmental defects caused by P1/HC-Pro. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Co-evolution between Globodera rostochiensis and potato driving sequence diversity of NB-LRR resistance loci and nematode suppressors of plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Sedentary plant parasitic nematodes have evolved sophisticated strategies that allow them to transform host cells in the roots of host plants into feeding structures. These complex structures enable the nematodes to complete their life cycle inside a single host plant. Feeding structure initiation a

  12. Co-evolution between Globodera rostochiensis and potato driving sequence diversity of NB-LRR resistance loci and nematode suppressors of plant immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Sedentary plant parasitic nematodes have evolved sophisticated strategies that allow them to transform host cells in the roots of host plants into feeding structures. These complex structures enable the nematodes to complete their life cycle inside a single host plant. Feeding structure initiation a

  13. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  14. Neurons and Tumor Suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas W Zochodne

    2014-01-01

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to e...

  15. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Král, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor's Thesis deals with effective promotional tools called viral marketing. The main contribution of the thesis is the definition and history of viral marketing, making analysis of process of viral marketing, progresses definition and rules for creating a viral campaign. And also aspects are necessary for a successful viral spread. There are analysis of the characteristics of social media which are dividing according to the orientation and marketing tactics. Thesis is especially about so...

  16. Bioinformatics approaches for viral metagenomics in plants using short RNAs: model case of study and application to a Cicer arietinum population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirovano, Walter; Miozzi, Laura; Boetzer, Marten; Pantaleo, Vitantonio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past years deep sequencing experiments have opened novel doors to reconstruct viral populations in a high-throughput and cost-effective manner. Currently a substantial number of studies have been performed which employ next generation sequencing techniques to either analyze known viruses by means of a reference-guided approach or to discover novel viruses using a de novo-based strategy. Taking advantage of the well-known Cymbidium ringspot virus we have carried out a comparison of different bioinformatics tools to reconstruct the viral genome based on 21-27 nt short (s)RNA sequencing with the aim to identify the most efficient pipeline. The same approach was applied to a population of plants constituting an ancient variety of Cicer arietinum with red seeds. Among the discovered viruses, we describe the presence of a Tobamovirus referring to the Tomato mottle mosaic virus (NC_022230), which was not yet observed on C. arietinum nor revealed in Europe and a viroid referring to Hop stunt viroid (NC_001351.1) never reported in chickpea. Notably, a reference sequence guided approach appeared the most efficient in such kind of investigation. Instead, the de novo assembly reached a non-appreciable coverage although the most prominent viral species could still be identified. Advantages and limitations of viral metagenomics analysis using sRNAs are discussed.

  17. Expression of a viral polymerase-bound host factor turns human cell lines permissive to a plant- and insect-infecting virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Ricardo B.; Figueiredo, Juliana; Resende, Renato de O.; De Avila, Antonio C.

    2005-01-01

    Tospoviruses are the only plant-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae family of ambisense ssRNA viruses. Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV), the type-member, also causes mild infection on its main insect vector, Frankliniella occidentalis. Herein, we identified an F. occidentalis putative transcription factor (FoTF) that binds to the TSWV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and to viral RNA. Using in vitro RNA synthesis assays, we show that addition of purified FoTF improves viral replication, but not transcription. Expression of FoTF deletion mutants, unable to bind the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or viral RNA, blocks TSWV replication in F. occidentalis cells. Finally, expression of FoTF wild-type turns human cell lines permissive to TSWV replication. These data indicate that FoTF is a host factor required for TSWV replication in vitro and in vivo, provide an experimental system that could be used to compare molecular defense mechanisms in plant, insect, and human cells against the same pathogen (TSWV), and could lead to a better understanding of evolutionary processes of ambisense RNA viruses. PMID:15657123

  18. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin [Institut für Biomaterialien und biomolekulare Systeme, Abteilung für Molekularbiologie und Virologie der Pflanzen, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Gronenborn, Bruno [Institut des Sciences du Végétal, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jeske, Holger, E-mail: holger.jeske@bio.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Biomaterialien und biomolekulare Systeme, Abteilung für Molekularbiologie und Virologie der Pflanzen, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  19. The mungbean yellow mosaic begomovirus transcriptional activator protein transactivates the viral promoter-driven transgene and causes toxicity in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2007-12-01

    The Begomovirus transcriptional activator protein (TrAP/AC2/C2) is a multifunctional protein which activates the viral late gene promoters, suppresses gene silencing, and determines pathogenicity. To study TrAP-mediated transactivation of a stably integrated gene, we generated transgenic tobacco plants with a Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AV1 late gene promoter-driven reporter gene and supertransformed them with the MYMV TrAP gene driven by a strong 35S promoter. We obtained a single supertransformed plant with an intact 35S-TrAP gene that activated the reporter gene 2.5-fold. However, 10 of the 11 supertransformed plants did not have the TrAP region of the T-DNA, suggesting the likely toxicity of TrAP in plants. Upon transformation of wild-type tobacco plants with the TrAP gene, six of the seven transgenic plants obtained had truncated T-DNAs which lacked TrAP. One plant, which had the intact TrAP gene, did not express TrAP. The apparent toxic effect of the TrAP transgene was abolished by mutations in its nuclear-localization signal or zinc-finger domain and by deletion of its activation domain. Therefore, all three domains of TrAP, which are required for transactivation and suppression of gene silencing, also are needed for its toxic effect.

  20. Tobacco mosaic virus infection results in an increase in recombination frequency and resistance to viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens in the progeny of infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Golubov, Andrey; Kalischuk, Melanie; Kawchuk, Lawrence M; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Our previous experiments showed that infection of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) leads to an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of infected plants also had an increased rate of rearrangements in resistance gene-like loci. Here, we report that tobacco plants infected with TMV exhibited an increase in HRF in two consecutive generations. Analysis of global genome methylation showed the hypermethylated genome in both generations of plants, whereas analysis of methylation via 5-methyl cytosine antibodies demonstrated both hypomethylation and hypermethylation. Analysis of the response of the progeny of infected plants to TMV, Pseudomonas syringae, or Phytophthora nicotianae revealed a significant delay in symptom development. Infection of these plants with TMV or P. syringae showed higher levels of induction of PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 gene expression and higher levels of callose deposition. Our experiments suggest that viral infection triggers specific changes in progeny that promote higher levels of HRF at the transgene and higher resistance to stress as compared with the progeny of unstressed plants. However, data reported in these studies do not establish evidence of a link between recombination frequency and stress resistance.

  1. Inhibition of RNA silencing by the coat protein of Pelargonium flower break virus: distinctions from closely related suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Turiño, Sandra; Hernández, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    Viral-derived double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) activate RNA silencing, generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which are incorporated into an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that promotes homology-dependent degradation of cognate RNAs. To counteract this, plant viruses express RNA silencing suppressors. Here, we show that the coat protein (CP) of Pelargonium flower break virus (PFBV), a member of the genus Carmovirus, is able to efficiently inhibit RNA silencing. Interestingly, PFBV CP blocked both sense RNA- and dsRNA-triggered RNA silencing and did not preclude generation of siRNAs, which is in contrast with the abilities that have been reported for other carmoviral CPs. We have also found that PFBV CP can bind siRNAs and that this ability correlates with silencing suppression activity and enhancement of potato virus X pathogenicity. Collectively, the results indicate that PFBV CP inhibits RNA silencing by sequestering siRNAs and preventing their incorporation into a RISC, thus behaving similarly to unrelated viral suppressors but dissimilarly to orthologous ones.

  2. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    BLÁHOVÁ, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  3. Single- and double-stranded viral RNAs in plants infected with the potexviruses papaya mosaic virus and foxtail mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, G A; Johnston, R; Bancroft, J B

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of viral RNA were recovered from polyribosomes purified from papaya leaves infected with papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and from barley leaves infected with foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV): full-length viral RNAs [6.8 and 6.2 kilobases (kb), respectively]; less abundant intermediate subgenomic RNAs (2.2 and 1.9 kb), and abundant, small subgenomic RNAs (1 and 0.9 kb). Small amounts of the PapMV-specified 1.0-kb subgenomic RNA were encapsidated, whereas no encapsidated subgenomic RNAs could be found in preparations of FoMV. Immunoprecipitation of the products of in vitro translation of the small subgenomic RNA of both viruses showed that it codes for the corresponding viral coat protein. FoMV genomic RNA isolated from polyribosomes also directed the efficient synthesis of a 37- to 38-kilodalton protein which was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum raised against the coat protein. We presume this product to be a readthrough protein initiated to the 5' side of and in the same reading frame as the coat protein-coding sequences in FoMV RNA. The predominant double-stranded viral-specified RNAs in tissues infected with PapMV, FoMV, and clover yellow mosaic virus were genome sized (6.8, 6.2, and 7.0 kb pairs, respectively). If double-stranded RNAs corresponding to coat protein subgenomic RNAs exist, they must be present in much lower relative abundances.

  4. Elicitation of hypersensitive responses in Nicotiana glutinosa by the suppressor of RNA silencing protein P0 from poleroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken-Der; Empleo, Roman; Nguyen, Tan Tri V; Moffett, Peter; Sacco, Melanie Ann

    2015-06-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) proteins that confer resistance to viruses recognize viral gene products with diverse functions, including viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs). The P0 protein from poleroviruses is a VSR that targets the ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) protein for degradation, thereby disrupting RNA silencing and antiviral defences. Here, we report resistance against poleroviruses in Nicotiana glutinosa directed against Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV). The P0 proteins from TuYV (P0(T) (u) ), PLRV (P0(PL) ) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (P0(CA) ) were found to elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in N. glutinosa accession TW59, whereas other accessions recognized P0(PL) only. Genetic analysis showed that recognition of P0(T) (u) by a resistance gene designated RPO1 (Resistance to POleroviruses 1) is inherited as a dominant allele. Expression of P0 from a Potato virus X (PVX) expression vector transferred recognition to the recombinant virus on plants expressing RPO1, supporting P0 as the unique Polerovirus factor eliciting resistance. The induction of HR required a functional P0 protein, as P0(T) (u) mutants with substitutions in the F-box motif that abolished VSR activity were unable to elicit HR. We surmised that the broad P0 recognition seen in TW59 and the requirement for the F-box protein motif could indicate detection of P0-induced AGO1 degradation and disruption of RNA silencing; however, other viral silencing suppressors, including the PVX P25 that also causes AGO1 degradation, failed to elicit HR in N. glutinosa. Investigation of P0 elicitation of RPO1 could provide insight into P0 activities within the cell that trigger resistance. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Understanding and targeting a novel plant viral proteinase/substrate interaction. Final report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, W.

    1995-10-01

    The past 3 years of funding have focused our efforts on trying to understand the molecular basis of a unique substrate interaction displayed by a viral proteinase. We have made good progress and during this funding period we have made four contributions to the scientific literature and have developed the application of the proteinase in the expression and purification of recombinant fusion proteins. A comprehensive review of virus-encoded proteinases, written during the funding period, emphazing the tremendous similarity of viral proteinases with their cellular counterparts and at the same time detail the unique characteristics which permit them to function in a cellular environment. The focus of the research effort was the tobacco etch virus (TEV) 27kDa NIa proteinase.

  6. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  7. High-level HIV-1 Nef transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana using the P19 gene silencing suppressor protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianco Linda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, different HIV antigens have been successfully expressed in plants by either stable transformation or transient expression systems. Among HIV proteins, Nef is considered a promising target for the formulation of a multi-component vaccine due to its implication in the first steps of viral infection. Attempts to express Nef as a single protein product (not fused to a stabilizing protein in transgenic plants resulted in disappointingly low yields (about 0.5% of total soluble protein. In this work we describe a transient expression system based on co-agroinfiltration of plant virus gene silencing suppressor proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana, followed by a two-step affinity purification protocol of plant-derived Nef. Results The effect of three gene silencing viral suppressor proteins (P25 of Potato Virus X, P19 of either Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus and Tomato Bushy Stunt virus on Nef transient expression yield was evaluated. The P19 protein of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus (AMCV-P19 gave the highest expression yield in vacuum co-agroinfiltration experiments reaching 1.3% of total soluble protein, a level almost three times higher than that previously reported in stable transgenic plants. The high yield observed in the co-agroinfiltrated plants was correlated to a remarkable decrease of Nef-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs indicating an effective modulation of RNA silencing mechanisms by AMCV-P19. Interestingly, we also showed that expression levels in top leaves of vacuum co-agroinfiltrated plants were noticeably reduced compared to bottom leaves. Moreover, purification of Nef from agroinfiltrated tissue was achieved by a two-step immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography protocol with yields of 250 ng/g of fresh tissue. Conclusion We demonstrated that expression level of HIV-1 Nef in plant can be improved using a transient expression system enhanced by the AMCV-P19 gene silencing suppressor

  8. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  9. Development of a plant viral-vector-based gene expression assay for the screening of yeast cytochrome p450 monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Kathleen; Nguyen, Long V; Khan, Faizah; Pogue, Gregory P; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; Panda, Sanjay; Pinot, Franck; Oriedo, Vincent B; Rasochova, Lada; Subramanian, Mani; Miller, Barbara; White, Earl L

    2003-02-01

    Development of a gene discovery tool for heterologously expressed cytochrome P450 monooxygenases has been inherently difficult. The activity assays are labor-intensive and not amenable to parallel screening. Additionally, biochemical confirmation requires coexpression of a homologous P450 reductase or complementary heterologous activity. Plant virus gene expression systems have been utilized for a diverse group of organisms. In this study we describe a method using an RNA vector expression system to phenotypically screen for cytochrome P450-dependent fatty acid omega-hydroxylase activity. Yarrowia lipolytica CYP52 gene family members involved in n-alkane assimilation were amplified from genomic DNA, cloned into a plant virus gene expression vector, and used as a model system for determining heterologous expression. Plants infected with virus vectors expressing the yeast CYP52 genes (YlALK1-YlALK7) showed a distinct necrotic lesion phenotype on inoculated plant leaves. No phenotype was detected on negative control constructs. YlALK3-, YlALK5-, and YlALK7-inoculated plants all catalyzed the terminal hydroxylation of lauric acid as confirmed using thin-layer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. The plant-based cytochrome P450 phenotypic screen was tested on an n-alkane-induced Yarrowia lipolytica plant virus expression library. A subset of 1,025 random library clones, including YlALK1-YlALK7 constructs, were tested on plants. All YlALK gene constructs scored positive in the randomized screen. Following nucleotide sequencing of the clones that scored positive using a phenotypic screen, approximately 5% were deemed appropriate for further biochemical analysis. This report illustrates the utility of a plant-based system for expression of heterologous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and for the assignment of gene function.

  10. Extraction of nuclei from sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus-infected plants yields a polymerase that synthesizes viral mRNAs and polyadenylated plus-strand leader RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J D; Choi, T J; Jackson, A O

    1996-01-01

    Although the primary sequence of the genome of the plant rhabdovirus sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) has been determined, little is known about the composition of the viral polymerase or the mechanics of viral transcription and replication. In this paper, we report the partial isolation and characterization of an active SYNV polymerase from nuclei of SYNV-infected leaf tissue. A salt extraction procedure is shown to be an effective purification step for recovery of the polymerase from the nuclei. Full-length, polyadenylated SYNV N and M2 mRNAs and plus-strand leader RNA are among the products of the in vitro polymerase reactions. Polyadenylation of the plus-strand leader RNA in vitro is shown with RNase H and specific oligonucleotides. This is the first report of a polyadenylated plus-strand leader RNA for a minus-strand RNA virus, a feature that may reflect adaptation of SYNV to replication in the nucleus. Analysis of the SYNV proteins present in the polymerase extract suggests that the N, M2, and L proteins are components of the transcription complex. Overall, the system we developed promises to be useful for an in-depth characterization of the mechanics of SYNV RNA synthesis.

  11. Identification of Pns6, a putative movement protein of RRSV, as a silencing suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qiying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA silencing is a potent antiviral response in plants. As a counterdefense, most plant and some animal viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors. In this study, we showed that Pns6, a putative movement protein of Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV, exhibited silencing suppressor activity in coinfiltration assays with the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c. Pns6 of RRSV suppressed local silencing induced by sense RNA but had no effect on that induced by dsRNA. Deletion of a region involved in RNA binding abolished the silencing suppressor activity of Pns6. Further, expression of Pns6 enhanced Potato virus × pathogenicity in N. benthamiana. Collectively, these results suggested that RRSV Pns6 functions as a virus suppressor of RNA silencing that targets an upstream step of the dsRNA formation in the RNA silencing pathway. This is the first silencing suppressor to be identified from the genus Oryzavirus.

  12. HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity is conserved across kingdoms and counteracts translational repression of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuiming; Zhong, Xuehua; Yu, Lianbo; Ding, Biao; de Haan, Peter; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2009-01-13

    The RNA silencing pathway is an intracellular innate response to virus infections and retro-transposons. Many plant viruses counter this host restriction by RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity of a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, e.g., tomato bushy stunt virus P19. Here, we demonstrate P19 and HIV-1 Tat function across the plant and animal kingdoms and suppress a common step in RNA silencing that is downstream of small RNA maturation. Our experiments reveal that RNA silencing in HIV-1 infected human cells severely attenuates the translational output of the unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA, and possibly all HIV-1 transcripts. The attenuation in gag mRNA translation is exacerbated by K51A substitution in the Tat double-stranded RNA-binding domain. Tat, plant virus RSS, or Dicer downregulation rescues robust gag translation and bolsters HIV-1 virion production. The reversal of HIV-1 translation repression by plant RSS supports the recent finding in Arabidopsis that plant miRNAs operate by translational inhibition. Our results identify common features between RNA silencing suppression of plant and animal viruses. We suggest that RNA silencing-mediated translation repression plays a strategic role in determining the viral set-point in a newly HIV-1-infected patient.

  13. The p122 subunit of Tobacco Mosaic Virus replicase is a potent silencing suppressor and compromises both small interfering RNA- and microRNA-mediated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Tibor; Bovi, Aurelie; Dalmay, Tamás; Burgyán, József

    2007-11-01

    One of the functions of RNA silencing in plants is to defend against molecular parasites, such as viruses, retrotransposons, and transgenes. Plant viruses are inducers, as well as targets, of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. Replication intermediates or folded viral RNAs activate RNA silencing, generating small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are the key players in the antiviral response. Viruses are able to counteract RNA silencing by expressing silencing-suppressor proteins. It has been shown that many of the identified silencing-suppressor proteins bind long double-stranded RNA or siRNAs and thereby prevent assembly of the silencing effector complexes. In this study, we show that the 122-kDa replicase subunit (p122) of crucifer-infecting Tobacco mosaic virus (cr-TMV) is a potent silencing-suppressor protein. We found that the p122 protein preferentially binds to double-stranded 21-nucleotide (nt) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) intermediates with 2-nt 3' overhangs inhibiting the incorporation of siRNA and miRNA into silencing-related complexes (e.g., RNA-induced silencing complex [RISC]) both in vitro and in planta but cannot interfere with previously programmed RISCs. In addition, our results also suggest that the virus infection and/or sequestration of the siRNA and miRNA molecules by p122 enhances miRNA accumulation despite preventing its methylation. However, the p122 silencing suppressor does not prevent the methylation of certain miRNAs in hst-15 mutants, in which the nuclear export of miRNAs is compromised.

  14. Behavior of RNAi suppressor protein 2b of Cucumber mosaic virus in planta in presence and absence of virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Shelly; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Singh, Priyanka; Mishra, Anil K

    2008-08-01

    The 2b protein encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been shown as a virus counter defense factor that interferes with the RNAi pathway. The 2b gene from CMV-banana, New Delhi isolate (CMV-NDLS) was amplified from CMV infected cucumber plants to generate the sense and antisense binary vector constructs for 2b expression and repression in planta. Constitutive expression of 2b gene in healthy Nicotiana tabacum caused phenotypic aberrations during somatic embryogenesis, which were not observed when expressed in CMV infected N. tabacum. Further, the established virus population in CMV infected N. tabacum was not affected by constitutive expression and repression of 2b gene. Thus, indicating its role in initiation of gene silencing, at the early stage of viral infection. This is the first demonstration of differential behavior of 2b suppressor protein in host development in the absence and presence of virus.

  15. RNAi suppressor P19 can be broadly exploited for enhanced adenovirus replication and microRNA knockdown experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschhuber, Christina; Mueck-Haeusl, Martin; Zhang, Wenli; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a key regulator of various biological systems including viral infection. Within a virus life cycle gene products can be modulated by the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway which can crucially impact productive virus replication. Herein we explored the RNA interference suppressor protein P19 derived from a plant virus and we found that P19 enhanced adenovirus replication up to 100-fold. Critical factors responsible for this observation were overexpression of adenovirus encoded genes on mRNA and protein levels. To investigate the impact of this phenomenon on recombinant viruses, we exploited its feasibility for therapeutic and genomic applications. We found that P19 significantly increased recombinant adenovirus yields enabling up-scaling for preclinical and clinical studies. Moreover, adenoviruses possessed significantly higher oncolytic activity by expression of P19. Finally, we show that introducing a p19 expression cassette into high-capacity adenovirus provides a strategy to analyze RNAi knockdown in a tissue-specific manner.

  16. The 7a accessory protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus acts as an RNA silencing suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjee, Sumona; Minhas, Ankita; Sood, Vikas; Ponia, Sanket S; Banerjea, Akhil C; Chow, Vincent T K; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Lal, Sunil K

    2010-10-01

    RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) are well studied for plant viruses but are not well defined to date for animal viruses. Here, we have identified an RSS from a medically important positive-sense mammalian virus, Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The viral 7a accessory protein suppressed both transgene and virus-induced gene silencing by reducing the levels of small interfering RNA (siRNA). The suppression of silencing was analyzed by two independent assays, and the middle region (amino acids [aa] 32 to 89) of 7a was responsible for suppression. Finally, the RNA suppression property and the enhancement of heterologous replicon activity by the 7a protein were confirmed for animal cell lines.

  17. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori R Shapiro

    Full Text Available Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV. We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant

  18. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lori R; Salvaudon, Lucie; Mauck, Kerry E; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Stephenson, Andrew G; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  19. Expression of the plant viral protease NIa in the brain of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease mitigates Aβ pathology and improves cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kyung; Han, Hye-Eun; Kim, Hannah; Lee, Jung-Eun; Choi, Daehan; Park, Woo Jin; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2012-12-31

    The plant viral protease, NIa, has a strict substrate specificity for the consensus sequence of Val-Xaa-His-Gln, with a scissoring property after Gln. We recently reported that NIa efficiently cleaved the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which contains the sequence Val-His-His-Gln in the vicinity of the cleavage site by α-secretase, and that the expression of NIa using a lentiviral system in the brain of AD mouse model reduced plaque deposition levels. In the present study, we investigated whether exogenous expression of NIa in the brain of AD mouse model is beneficial to the improvement of cognitive deficits. To address this question, Lenti-NIa was intracerebrally injected into the brain of Tg-APPswe/ PS1dE9 (Tg-APP/PS1) mice at 7 months of age and behavioral tests were performed 15-30 days afterwards. The results of the water maze test indicated that Tg-APP/PS1 mice which had been injected with Lenti-GFP showed an increased latency in finding the hidden-platform and markedly enhanced navigation near the maze-wall, and that such behavioral deficits were significantly reversed in Tg-APP/PS1 mice injected with Lenti-NIa. In the passive avoidance test, Tg-APP/PS1 mice exhibited a severe deficit in their contextual memory retention, which was reversed by NIa expression. In the marble burying test, Tg-APP/PS1 mice buried marbles fewer than non-transgenic mice, which was also significantly improved by NIa. After behavioral tests, it was verified that the Tg-APP/PS1 mice with Lenti-NIa injection had reduced Aβ levels and plaque deposition when compared to Tg-APP/PS1 mice. These results showed that the plant viral protease, NIa, not only reduces Aβ pathology, but also improves behavioral deficits.

  20. Viral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Forest; Barott, Katie

    2013-03-01

    Viruses are major drivers of global biogeochemistry and the etiological agents of many diseases. They are also the winners in the game of life: there are more viruses on the planet than cellular organisms and they encode most of the genetic diversity on the planet. In fact, it is reasonable to view life as a viral incubator. Nevertheless, most ecological and evolutionary theories were developed, and continue to be developed, without considering the virosphere. This means these theories need to be to reinterpreted in light of viral knowledge or we need to develop new theory from the viral point-of-view. Here we briefly introduce our viral planet and then address a major outstanding question in biology: why is most of life viral? A key insight is that during an infection cycle the original virus is completely broken down and only the associated information is passed on to the next generation. This is different for cellular organisms, which must pass on some physical part of themselves from generation to generation. Based on this premise, it is proposed that the thermodynamic consequences of physical information (e.g., Landauer's principle) are observed in natural viral populations. This link between physical and genetic information is then used to develop the Viral Information Hypothesis, which states that genetic information replicates itself to the detriment of system energy efficiency (i.e., is viral in nature). Finally, we show how viral information can be tested, and illustrate how this novel view can explain existing ecological and evolutionary theories from more fundamental principles.

  1. Plant immunity against viruses: antiviral immune receptors in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Iara P; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2017-03-01

    Among the environmental limitations that affect plant growth, viruses cause major crop losses worldwide and represent serious threats to food security. Significant advances in the field of plant-virus interactions have led to an expansion of potential strategies for genetically engineered resistance in crops during recent years. Nevertheless, the evolution of viral virulence represents a constant challenge in agriculture that has led to a continuing interest in the molecular mechanisms of plant-virus interactions that affect disease or resistance. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of the antiviral immune system in plants and the latest breakthroughs reported in plant defence against viruses. Particular attention is given to the immune receptors and transduction pathways in antiviral innate immunity. Plants counteract viral infection with a sophisticated innate immune system that resembles the non-viral pathogenic system, which is broadly divided into pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and effector-triggered immunity. An additional recently uncovered virus-specific defence mechanism relies on host translation suppression mediated by a transmembrane immune receptor. In all cases, the recognition of the virus by the plant during infection is central for the activation of these innate defences, and, conversely, the detection of host plants enables the virus to activate virulence strategies. Plants also circumvent viral infection through RNA interference mechanisms by utilizing small RNAs, which are often suppressed by co-evolving virus suppressors. Additionally, plants defend themselves against viruses through hormone-mediated defences and activation of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS), which alternatively impairs and facilitates viral infection. Therefore, plant defence and virulence strategies co-evolve and co-exist; hence, disease development is largely dependent on the extent and rate at which these opposing

  2. VIRAL MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    OLENTSOVA Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This project seeks to investigate how the company Gitz can create awareness towards their brand by using viral marketing. To do this we analyze which elements of viral marketing the company can use, to reach their goal. In order to utilize the selected tools of viral marketing best possible, we need to figure out the company’s customer segment and figure out how to reach that segment. This has been done with the use of Henrik Dahl’s Minerva-model that divides the population into f...

  3. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  4. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  5. Viral quasispecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections.

  6. Identification of a Functional Plasmodesmal Localization Signal in a Plant Viral Cell-To-Cell-Movement Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our fundamental knowledge of the protein-sorting pathways required for plant cell-to-cell trafficking and communication via the intercellular connections termed plasmodesmata has been severely limited by the paucity of plasmodesmal targeting sequences that have been identified to date. To address this limitation, we have identified the plasmodesmal localization signal (PLS in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV cell-to-cell-movement protein (MP, which has emerged as the paradigm for dissecting the molecular details of cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. We report here the identification of a bona fide functional TMV MP PLS, which encompasses amino acid residues between positions 1 and 50, with residues Val-4 and Phe-14 potentially representing critical sites for PLS function that most likely affect protein conformation or protein interactions. We then demonstrated that this PLS is both necessary and sufficient for protein targeting to plasmodesmata. Importantly, as TMV MP traffics to plasmodesmata by a mechanism that is distinct from those of the three plant cell proteins in which PLSs have been reported, our findings provide important new insights to expand our understanding of protein-sorting pathways to plasmodesmata.

  7. Strong resistance against Rice grassy stunt virus is induced in transgenic rice plants expressing double-stranded RNA of the viral genes for nucleocapsid or movement proteins as targets for RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takumi; Ogamino, Takumi; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Nakajima, Masami; Akutsu, Katsumi; Omura, Toshihiro; Sasaya, Takahide

    2013-05-01

    Rice grassy stunt virus (RGSV), a member of the genus Tenuivirus, causes significant economic losses in rice production in South, Southeast, and East Asian countries. Growing resistant varieties is the most efficient method to control RGSV; however, suitable resistance genes have not yet been found in natural rice resources. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RGSV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi). It is important to target viral genes that play important roles in viral infection and proliferation at an early stage of viral replication. Our recent findings obtained from an RNAi experiment with Rice stripe virus (RSV), a tenuivirus, revealed that the genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins were appropriate targets for RNAi to confer resistance against RSV. In this study, we transformed rice plants by introducing an RNAi construct of the RGSV genes for the nucelocapsid protein pC5 or movement protein pC6. All progenies from self-fertilized transgenic plants had strong resistance against RGSV infection and did not allow the proliferation of RGSV. Thus, our strategy to target genes for nucleocapsid and movement proteins for conferring viral resistance might be applicable to the plant viruses in the genus Tenuivirus.

  8. Seed-borne viral dsRNA elements in three cultivated Raphanus and Brassica plants suggest three cryptoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liqiang; Liu, Jianning; Zhang, Qiong; Fu, Runying; Zhu, Xiwu; Li, Chao; Chen, Jishuang

    2016-04-01

    Since the 1970s, several dsRNA viruses, including Radish yellow edge virus, Raphanus sativus virus 1, Raphanus sativus virus 2, and Raphanus sativus virus 3, have been identified and reported as infecting radish. In the present study, in conjunction with a survey of seed-borne viruses in cultivated Brassica and Raphanus using the dsRNA diagnostic method, we discovered 3 novel cryptoviruses that infect Brassica and Raphanus: Raphanus sativus partitivirus 1, which infects radish (Raphanus sativus); Sinapis alba cryptic virus 1, which infects Sinapis alba; and Brassica rapa cryptic virus 1 (BrCV1), which infects Brassica rapa. The genomic organization of these cryptoviruses was analyzed and characterized. BrCV1 might represent the first plant partitivirus found in Gammapartitivirus. Additionally, the evolutionary relationships among all of the partitiviruses reported in Raphanus and Brassica were analyzed.

  9. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  10. Plant viral nanoparticles-based HER2 vaccine: Immune response influenced by differential transport, localization and cellular interactions of particulate carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Myers, Jay T; Woods, Sarah E; Gong, Xingjian; Czapar, Anna E; Commandeur, Ulrich; Huang, Alex Y; Levine, Alan D; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-03-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to elicit an endogenous adaptive immune response that can successfully recognize and eliminate residual or recurring tumors. Such approaches can potentially overcome shortcomings of passive immunotherapies by generating long-lived therapeutic effects and immune memory while limiting systemic toxicities. A critical determinant of vaccine efficacy is efficient transport and delivery of tumor-associated antigens to professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) with natural tropism for APCs and a high payload carrying capacity may be particularly effective vaccine carriers. The applicability of VNP platform technologies is governed by stringent structure-function relationships. We compare two distinct VNP platforms: icosahedral cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and filamentous potato virus X (PVX). Specifically, we evaluate in vivo capabilities of engineered VNPs delivering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) epitopes for therapy and prophylaxis of HER2(+) malignancies. Our results corroborate the structure-function relationship where icosahedral CPMV particles showed significantly enhanced lymph node transport and retention, and greater uptake by/activation of APCs compared to filamentous PVX particles. These enhanced immune cell interactions and transport properties resulted in elevated HER2-specific antibody titers raised by CPMV- vs. PVX-based peptide vaccine. The 'synthetic virology' field is rapidly expanding with numerous platforms undergoing development and preclinical testing; our studies highlight the need for systematic studies to define rules guiding the design and rational choice of platform, in the context of peptide-vaccine display technologies.

  11. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl betasatellites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Shukla; Sunita Dalal; V G Malathi

    2013-03-01

    Virus encoded RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) are the key components evolved by the viruses to counter RNA-silencing defense of plants. Whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses infecting tomato crop code for five different proteins, ORF AC4, ORF AC2 and ORF AV2 in DNA-A component, ORF BV1 in DNA-B and ORF C1 in satellite DNA which are predicted to function as silencing suppressors. In the present study suppressor function of ORF C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite CLCuMB–[IN:Sri:02] and Luffa leaf distortion betasatellite LuLDB-[IN:Lu:04] were examined. Agroinfiltration of GFP-silenced Nicotiana tabaccum cv. Xanthi with the cells expressing C1 protein resulted in reversal of silenced GFP expression. GFP-siRNA level was more than 50-fold lower compared to silenced plants in plants infiltrated with C1 gene from ToLCBB. However, in the case of 35S-C1 CLCuMB and 35S-C1 LuLDB construct, although GFP was expressed, siRNA level was not reduced, indicating that the step at which C1 interfere in RNA-silencing pathway is different.

  12. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl betasatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Richa; Dalal, Sunita; Malathi, V G

    2013-03-01

    Virus encoded RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) are the key components evolved by the viruses to counter RNA-silencing defense of plants. Whitefly-transmitted begomoviruses infecting tomato crop code for five different proteins, ORF AC4, ORF AC2 and ORF AV2 in DNA-A component, ORF BV1 in DNA-B and ORF beta C1 in satellite DNA beta which are predicted to function as silencing suppressors. In the present study suppressor function of ORF beta C1 of three betasatellites Tomato leaf curl Bangalore betasatellite ToLCBB-[IN:Hess:08], Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite CLCuMB-[IN:Sri:02] and Luffa leaf distortion betasatellite LuLDB-[IN:Lu:04] were examined. Agroinfiltration of GFP-silenced Nicotiana tabaccum cv. Xanthi with the cells expressing betaC1 protein resulted in reversal of silenced GFP expression. GFP-siRNA level was more than 50-fold lower compared to silenced plants in plants infiltrated with betaC1 gene from ToLCBB. However, in the case of 35S-beta C1 CLCuMB and 35S- beta C1 LuLDB construct, although GFP was expressed, siRNA level was not reduced, indicating that the step at which beta C1 interfere in RNA-silencing pathway is different.

  13. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  14. Viral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  15. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  16. Tumor Suppressor Inactivation in the Pathogenesis of Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor functions are essential to control cellular proliferation, to activate the apoptosis or senescence pathway to eliminate unwanted cells, to link DNA damage signals to cell cycle arrest checkpoints, to activate appropriate DNA repair pathways, and to prevent the loss of adhesion to inhibit initiation of metastases. Therefore, tumor suppressor genes are indispensable to maintaining genetic and genomic integrity. Consequently, inactivation of tumor suppressors by somatic mutations or epigenetic mechanisms is frequently associated with tumor initiation and development. In contrast, reactivation of tumor suppressor functions can effectively reverse the transformed phenotype and lead to cell cycle arrest or death of cancerous cells and be used as a therapeutic strategy. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease associated with infection of CD4 T cells by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-I. HTLV-I-associated T-cell transformation is the result of a multistep oncogenic process in which the virus initially induces chronic T-cell proliferation and alters cellular pathways resulting in the accumulation of genetic defects and the deregulated growth of virally infected cells. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating the inactivation of tumor suppressors in the pathogenesis of HTLV-I.

  17. Oncogenes, protooncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijiya, N; Gewirtz, A M

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of normal human hematopoiesis has expanded greatly. We have increased our knowledge of regulatory growth factors, the receptors through which they act, and the secondary messengers involved in transducing the growth/differentiation signals from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. This knowledge has revealed potential mechanisms for inducing the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. This applies in particular to the role of viral oncogenes and cellular protooncogenes and, more recently, to the role of tumor suppressor genes. Protooncogenes are intimately involved in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, any amplification, mutation, structural alteration, or change in transcriptional regulation of protooncogenes might lead to or be associated with induction of the malignant phenotype. Based on the importance of these genes in leukemogenesis and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that targeted disruption of leukemogenic genes may be of therapeutic value.

  18. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  19. Efficient Agrobacterium-based transient expression system for the production of biopharmaceuticals in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circelli, Patrizia; Donini, Marcello; Villani, Maria Elena; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    We have recently described an efficient transient expression system mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens for the production of HIV-1 Nef protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. In order to enhance the yield of recombinant protein we assayed the effect of three gene-silencing viral suppressor proteins (P25 of Potato Virus X, P19 of Artichoke Mottled Crinckle virus and Tomato Bushy Stunt virus) on Nef expression levels. Results demonstrated that AMCV-P19 gave the highest Nef yield (1.3% of total soluble protein) and that this effect was correlated to a remarkable decrease of Nef-specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) indicating an effective modulation of RNA silencing mechanisms. Here we report additional data on the production of different heterologous proteins including human immunoglobulin heavy and light chains and a virus coat protein that demonstrate the robustness of this co-agroinfiltration expression system boosted by the AMCV-P19 gene-silencing suppressor. PMID:21326930

  20. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance II. Maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

  1. Suppressor cells in transplantation tolerance. II. maturation of suppressor cells in the bone marrow chimera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutschka, P.J.; Ki, P.F.; Beschorner, W.E.; Hess, A.D.; Santos, G.W.

    1981-10-01

    Histoincompatible bone marrow allografts were established in lethally irradiated rats. At various times after transplantation, the spleen cells were harvested, subjected to mixed lymphocyte cultures, and assayed for suppressor cells in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer studies. Alloantigen-nonspecific suppressor cells appeared in the chimera at 40 days after grafting, coinciding with the resolution of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At 250 days the nonspecific suppressor cells were replaced by suppressor cells specifically suppressing donor-versus-host alloantigen responses. At 720 days suppressor cells could no longer be identified by in vitro methods but were identified by in vivo adoptive transfer of transplantation tolerance. After injection of host-type antigen into chimeras, the suppressor cells could be again demonstrated by in vitro methods.

  2. Dicer-2 processes diverse viral RNA species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Sabin

    Full Text Available RNA silencing pathways play critical roles in gene regulation, virus infection, and transposon control. RNA interference (RNAi is mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which are liberated from double-stranded (dsRNA precursors by Dicer and guide the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC to targets. Although principles governing small RNA sorting into RISC have been uncovered, the spectrum of RNA species that can be targeted by Dicer proteins, particularly the viral RNAs present during an infection, are poorly understood. Dicer-2 potently restricts viral infection in insects by generating virus-derived siRNAs from viral RNA. To better characterize the substrates of Dicer-2, we examined the virus-derived siRNAs produced during the Drosophila antiviral RNAi response to four different viruses using high-throughput sequencing. We found that each virus was uniquely targeted by the RNAi pathway; dicing substrates included dsRNA replication intermediates and intramolecular RNA stem loops. For instance, a putative intergenic RNA hairpin encoded by Rift Valley Fever virus generates abundant small RNAs in both Drosophila and mosquito cells, while repetitive sequences within the genomic termini of Vaccinia virus, which give rise to abundant small RNAs in Drosophila, were found to be transcribed in both insect and mammalian cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the RNA species targeted by Dicer-2 can be modulated by the presence of a viral suppressor of RNAi. This study uncovered several novel, heavily targeted features within viral genomes, offering insight into viral replication, viral immune evasion strategies, and the mechanism of antiviral RNAi.

  3. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  4. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  5. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandita Sahana

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya. We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome, but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome, associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54, which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  6. ABCE1 is a highly conserved RNA silencing suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairi Kärblane

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette sub-family E member 1 (ABCE1 is a highly conserved protein among eukaryotes and archaea. Recent studies have identified ABCE1 as a ribosome-recycling factor important for translation termination in mammalian cells, yeast and also archaea. Here we report another conserved function of ABCE1. We have previously described AtRLI2, the homolog of ABCE1 in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as an endogenous suppressor of RNA silencing. In this study we show that this function is conserved: human ABCE1 is able to suppress RNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, in mammalian HEK293 cells and in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Using co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we found a number of potential ABCE1-interacting proteins that might support its function as an endogenous suppressor of RNA interference. The interactor candidates are associated with epigenetic regulation, transcription, RNA processing and mRNA surveillance. In addition, one of the identified proteins is translin, which together with its binding partner TRAX supports RNA interference.

  7. The cricket paralysis virus suppressor inhibits microRNA silencing mediated by the Drosophila Argonaute-2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Besnard-Guérin

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are potent regulators of gene expression. They also act in defense pathways against invading nucleic acids such as transposable elements or viruses. To counteract these defenses, viruses have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs. Plant viruses encoded VSRs interfere with siRNAs or miRNAs by targeting common mediators of these two pathways. In contrast, VSRs identified in insect viruses to date only interfere with the siRNA pathway whose effector Argonaute protein is Argonaute-2 (Ago-2. Although a majority of Drosophila miRNAs exerts their silencing activity through their loading into the Argonaute-1 protein, recent studies highlighted that a fraction of miRNAs can be loaded into Ago-2, thus acting as siRNAs. In light of these recent findings, we re-examined the role of insect VSRs on Ago-2-mediated miRNA silencing in Drosophila melanogaster. Using specific reporter systems in cultured Schneider-2 cells and transgenic flies, we showed here that the Cricket Paralysis virus VSR CrPV1-A but not the Flock House virus B2 VSR abolishes silencing by miRNAs loaded into the Ago-2 protein. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that insect VSR have the potential to directly interfere with the miRNA silencing pathway.

  8. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect avia

  9. Antiviral activity of tumor-suppressor pathways: clues from molecular piracy by KSHV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, P S; Chang, Y

    1998-04-01

    A common feature of many tumor viruses is that they possess genes that produce specific proteins to inhibit major cellular tumor-suppressor pathways. Despite intensive studies, the reasons why these diverse and unrelated viruses have independently evolved oncogenes remains obscure. Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV8) has pirated a number of recognizable cellular genes that are key to cell survival and proliferation. In this review, we provide an overview of the known activities of these viral genes and show that many of these pirated proteins affect the same cellular pathways targeted by other, unrelated tumor viruses. We speculate that tumor-suppressor pathways are used by the cell as a primary defense against persistent virus infection, in addition to their well-known activity in regulating cell proliferation.

  10. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21–22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, di...

  11. The ING tumor suppressors in cellular senescence and chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Susann; Klitzsch, Alexandra; Baniahmad, Aria

    2011-07-18

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) proteins represent a type II tumor suppressor family comprising five conserved genes, ING1 to ING5. While ING1, ING2 and ING3 proteins are stable components of the mSIN3a-HDAC complexes, the association of ING1, ING4 and ING5 with HAT protein complexes was also reported. Among these the ING1 and ING2 have been analyzed more deeply. Similar to other tumor suppressor factors the ING proteins are also involved in many cellular pathways linked to cancer and cell proliferation such as cell cycle regulation, cellular senescence, DNA repair, apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and modulation of chromatin.A common structural feature of ING factors is the conserved plant homeodomain (PHD), which can bind directly to the histone mark trimethylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me3). PHD mutants lose the ability to undergo cellular senescence linking chromatin mark recognition with cellular senescence. ING1 and ING2 are localized in the cell nucleus and associated with chromatin modifying enzymes, linking tumor suppression directly to chromatin regulation. In line with this, the expression of ING1 in tumors is aberrant or identified point mutations are mostly localized in the PHD finger and affect histone binding. Interestingly, ING1 protein levels increase in replicative senescent cells, latter representing an efficient pathway to inhibit cancer proliferation. In association with this, suppression of p33ING1 expression prolongs replicative life span and is also sufficient to bypass oncogene-induced senescence. Recent analyses of ING1- and ING2-deficient mice confirm a tumor suppressive role of ING1 and ING2 and also indicate an essential role of ING2 in meiosis.Here we summarize the activity of ING1 and ING2 as tumor suppressors, chromatin factors and in development.

  12. Evolution of the HIV-1 nef gene in HLA-B*57 Positive Elite Suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Siliciano Robert F; Ray Stuart C; Bailey Justin R; O'Connell Karen A; Brennan Timothy P; Salgado Maria; Blankson Joel N

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Elite controllers or suppressors (ES) are HIV-1 infected patients who maintain viral loads of < 50 copies/ml without antiretroviral therapy. CD8+ T cells are thought to play a key role in the control of viral replication and exert selective pressure on gag and nef in HLA-B*57 positive ES. We previously showed evolution in the gag gene of ES which surprisingly was mostly due to synonymous mutations rather than non-synonymous mutation in targeted CTL epitopes. This finding could be the...

  13. Viral Marketing Past Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Nessipbekova, Zarina

    2010-01-01

    The work studies the viral marketing. These are past viral campaigns, viral campaigns today, and evaluates their actuality. The work tries to predict the development of viral marketing on the basis of the research done by the author.

  14. Control of HIV-1 in Elite Suppressors despite Ongoing Replication and Evolution in Plasma Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Karen A; Brennan, Timothy P.; Bailey, Justin R.; Ray, Stuart C.; Robert F. Siliciano; Blankson, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    A subset of HIV-1-infected patients known as elite controllers or suppressors (ES) control the virus naturally. We have previously demonstrated sequence discordance between proviral and plasma gag clones in ES, much of which can be attributed to selective pressure from the host (J. R. Bailey, T. M. Williams, R. F. Siliciano, and J. N. Blankson, J. Exp. Med. 203:1357-1369, 2006). However, it is not clear whether ongoing viral replication continues in ES once the control of viremia has been est...

  15. Tumor suppressor identified as inhibitor of inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a protein, FBXW7, which acts as a tumor suppressor, is also important for the reduction in strength of inflammatory pathways. It has long been recognized that a complex interaction exists between cancer causing mechanisms

  16. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3 complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  17. Use of the modified viral satellite DNA vector to silence mineral nutrition-related genes in plants: silencing of the tomato ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO1, as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE XiuXia; JIN ChongWei; LI GuiXin; YOU GuangYi; ZHOU XuePing; ZHENG ShaoJian

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is potentially an attractive reverse-genetics tool for studies of plant gene function, but whether it is effective in silencing mineral nutritional-related genes in roots has not been demonstrated. Here we report on an efficient VIGS system that functions in tomato roots using a modified viral satellite DNA (DNAmβ) associated with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV). A cDNA fragment of the ferric chelate reductase gene (FRO1) from tomato was inserted into the DNAmβ vector. Tomato roots agro-inoculated with DNAmβ carrying both a fragment of FRO1 and TYLCCNV used as a helper virus exhibited a significant reduction at the FRO1 mRNA level. As a consequence, ferric chelate reductase activity, as determined by visualization of the pink FeBPDS3complex was significantly decreased. Our results clearly demonstrated that VIGS system can be employed to investigate gene function associated with plant nutrient uptake in roots.

  18. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  19. Wound-induced rgs-CaM gets ready for counterresponse to an early stage of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadamura, Kazuki; Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2012-12-01

    Plants and animals can recognize the invasion of pathogens through their perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Plant PRRs identified have been exclusively receptor-like kinases/proteins (RLK/Ps), and no RLK/P that can detect viruses has been identified to date. RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi) is regarded as an antiviral basal immunity because the majority of plant viruses has RNA as their genomes and encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to counterattack antiviral RNAi. Many RSSs were reported to bind to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs), which are regarded as viral PAMPs. We have recently identified a tobacco calmodulin (CaM)-like protein, rgs-CaM, as a PRR that binds to diverse viral RSSs through its affinity for the dsRNA-binding domains. Because rgs-CaM seems to target RSSs for autophagic degradation with self-sacrifice, the expression level of rgs-CaM is important for antiviral activity. Here, we found that the rgs-CaM expression was induced immediately (within 1 h) after wounding at a wound site on tobacco leaves. Since the invasion of plant viruses is usually associated with wounding, and several hours are required for viruses to replicate to a detectable level in invaded cells, the wound-induced expression of rgs-CaM seems to be linked to its antiviral function, which should be ready before the virus establishes infection. CaMs and CaM-like proteins usually transduce calcium signals through their binding to endogenous targets. Therefore, rgs-CaM is a unique CaM-like protein in terms of binding to exogenous targets and functioning as an antiviral PRR.

  20. Genetic suppressors of the Lotus japonicus har1-1 hypernodulation phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Jeremy; Karas, Bogumil; Ross, Loretta

    2006-01-01

    symbiosis (RNS), a screen for suppressors of the L. japonicus har1-1 hypernodulation phenotype was performed. Of 150,000 M2 plants analyzed, 61 stable L. japonicus double-mutant lines were isolated. In the context of the har1-1 mutation, 26 mutant lines were unable to form RNS, whereas the remaining 35...... mutant lines carried more subtle symbiotic phenotypes, either forming white ineffective nodules or showing reduced nodulation capacity. When challenged with Glomus intraradices, 18 of the 61 suppressor lines were unable to establish a symbiosis with this arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus. Using a combined...... because some of them may specify novel plant functions that regulate nodule development in L. japonicus. To facilitate mapping of the latter class of mutants, an introgression line, in which the har1-1 allele was introduced into a polymorphic background of L. japonicus ecotype MG20, was constructed...

  1. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics.

  2. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  3. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infecti

  4. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  5. Cap analog and Potato virus A HC-Pro silencing suppressor improve GFP transient expression using an infectious virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Amin-Alah; Afsharifar, Alireza

    2017-06-01

    Transient expression of proteins in plants has become a choice to facilitate recombinant protein production with its fast and easy application. On the other hand, host defensive mechanisms have been reported to reduce the efficiency of transient expression in plants. Hence, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of cap analog and Potato virus A helper component proteinase (PVA HC-Pro) on green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression efficiency. N. benthamiana leaves were inoculated with capped or un-capped RNA transcripts of a Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) construct containing a green fluorescent protein reporter gene (TCV-sGFP) in place of its coat protein (CP) ORF. PVA HC-Pro as a viral suppressor of RNA silencing was infiltrated in trans by Agrobacterium tumefaciens, increased the GFP foci diameter to six and even more cells in both capped and un capped treatments. The expression level of GFP in inoculated plants with TCV-sGFP transcript pre-infiltrated with PVA HC-Pro was 12.97-fold higher than the GFP accumulation level in pre-infiltrated leaves with empty plasmid (EP) control. Also, the yield of GFP in inoculated N. benthamiana plants with capped TCV-sGFP transcript pre-infiltrated with EP and PVA HC-Pro was 1.54 and 1.2-fold respectively, greater than the level of GFP expressed without cap analog application at 5 days post inoculation (dpi). In addition, the movement of TCV-sGFP was increased in some cells of inoculated leaves with capped transcripts. Results of this study indicated that PVA HC-Pro and mRNA capping can increase GFP expression and its cell to cell movement in N. benthamiana.

  6. Characterization of an amber suppressor in Pneumococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasc, A M; Vacher, J; Buckingham, R; Sicard, A M

    1979-01-01

    Partial revertant has been isolated, with resistance to aminopterin intermediate between wild type and mutant. This phenotype is the result of a mutation at a gene unlinked to the amiA locus. This suppressor mutation (su+) has no phenotypic characteristics by itself except a slow growth. 9 amiA mutants (belonging to 6 sites) are affected by su+ out of the 30 investigated mutants (i.e. 22 sites). The efficiency of suppression is site dependent. Two sites out of 14 mutants belonging to the thymidylate synthetase gene are suppressible. Thymidylate synthetase activity is partially restored by su+. Optochin mutants can also be suppressed. Thus su+ is not gene specific but site specific. Moreover when the str-41 allele conferring resistance to streptomycin is introduced by transformation, the suppression effect is restricted. All these properties are characteristic of an informational suppressor. The t-RNA extracted from the suppressor strain su+ but not the wild type restored the synthesis of coat protein coded by RNA from an amber mutant of bacteriophage f2. Attempts to detect ochre suppression activity gave negative results. It is suggested that the su+ gene is amber specific. Thus su+ can provide insight into the nature of suppressible mutations which should be point mutations. Both low efficiency and high efficiency mutants are affected by su+; this is additional evidence that both categories contain point mutations.

  7. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  8. Molecular and epigenetic analysis of the fragile histidine triad tumour suppressor gene in equine sarcoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strazzullo Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sarcoids are peculiar equine benign tumours. Their onset is associated with Bovine Papillomavirus type -1 or -2 (BPV-1/2 infection. Little is known about the molecular interplay between viral infection and neoplastic transformation. The data regarding papillomavirus infections in human species show the inactivation of a number of tumour suppressor genes as basic mechanism of transformation. In this study the putative role of the tumour suppressor gene Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT in sarcoid tumour was investigated in different experimental models. The expression of the oncosuppressor protein was assessed in normal and sarcoid cells and tissue. Results Nine paraffin embedded sarcoids and sarcoid derived cell lines were analysed for the expression of FHIT protein by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence techniques and western blotting. These analyses revealed the absence of signal in seven out of nine sarcoids. The two sarcoid derived cell lines too showed a reduced signal of the protein. To investigate the causes of the altered protein expression, the samples were analysed for the DNA methylation profile of the CpG island associated with the FHIT promoter. The analysis of the 32 CpGs encompassing the region of interest showed no significative differential methylation profile between pathological tissues and cell lines and their normal counterparts. Conclusion This study represent a further evidence of the role of a tumour suppressor gene in equine sarcoids and approaches the epigenetic regulation in this well known equine neoplasm. The data obtained in sarcoid tissues and sarcoid derived cell lines suggest that also in horse, as in humans, there is a possible involvement of the tumour suppressor FHIT gene in BPV induced tumours. DNA methylation seems not to be involved in the gene expression alteration. Further studies are needed to understand the basic molecular mechanisms involved in reduced FHIT expression.

  9. Elite suppressor-derived HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins exhibit reduced entry efficiency and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Kara G; Lobritz, Michael A; Bailey, Justin R; Johnston, Samantha; Nguyen, Sandra; Lee, Benhur; Chou, Tom; Siliciano, Robert F; Markowitz, Martin; Arts, Eric J

    2009-04-01

    Elite suppressors (ES) are a rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain HIV-1 viral loads below the limit of detection by ultra-sensitive clinical assays in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Mechanism(s) responsible for this elite control are poorly understood but likely involve both host and viral factors. This study assesses ES plasma-derived envelope glycoprotein (env) fitness as a function of entry efficiency as a possible contributor to viral suppression. Fitness of virus entry was first evaluated using a novel inducible cell line with controlled surface expression levels of CD4 (receptor) and CCR5 (co-receptor). In the context of physiologic CCR5 and CD4 surface densities, ES envs exhibited significantly decreased entry efficiency relative to chronically infected viremic progressors. ES envs also demonstrated slow entry kinetics indicating the presence of virus with reduced entry fitness. Overall, ES env clones were less efficient at mediating entry than chronic progressor envs. Interestingly, acute infection envs exhibited an intermediate phenotypic pattern not distinctly different from ES or chronic progressor envs. These results imply that lower env fitness may be established early and may directly contribute to viral suppression in ES individuals.

  10. Elite suppressor-derived HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins exhibit reduced entry efficiency and kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara G Lassen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Elite suppressors (ES are a rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals who are able to maintain HIV-1 viral loads below the limit of detection by ultra-sensitive clinical assays in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Mechanism(s responsible for this elite control are poorly understood but likely involve both host and viral factors. This study assesses ES plasma-derived envelope glycoprotein (env fitness as a function of entry efficiency as a possible contributor to viral suppression. Fitness of virus entry was first evaluated using a novel inducible cell line with controlled surface expression levels of CD4 (receptor and CCR5 (co-receptor. In the context of physiologic CCR5 and CD4 surface densities, ES envs exhibited significantly decreased entry efficiency relative to chronically infected viremic progressors. ES envs also demonstrated slow entry kinetics indicating the presence of virus with reduced entry fitness. Overall, ES env clones were less efficient at mediating entry than chronic progressor envs. Interestingly, acute infection envs exhibited an intermediate phenotypic pattern not distinctly different from ES or chronic progressor envs. These results imply that lower env fitness may be established early and may directly contribute to viral suppression in ES individuals.

  11. OrthoDB v9.1: cataloging evolutionary and functional annotations for animal, fungal, plant, archaeal, bacterial and viral orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Tegenfeldt, Fredrik; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Simão, Felipe A.; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Seppey, Mathieu; Loetscher, Alexis; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.

    2017-01-01

    OrthoDB is a comprehensive catalog of orthologs, genes inherited by extant species from a single gene in their last common ancestor. In 2016 OrthoDB reached its 9th release, growing to over 22 million genes from over 5000 species, now adding plants, archaea and viruses. In this update we focused on usability of this fast-growing wealth of data: updating the user and programmatic interfaces to browse and query the data, and further enhancing the already extensive integration of available gene functional annotations. Collating functional annotations from over 100 resources, and enabled us to propose descriptive titles for 87% of ortholog groups. Additionally, OrthoDB continues to provide computed evolutionary annotations and to allow user queries by sequence homology. The OrthoDB resource now enables users to generate publication-quality comparative genomics charts, as well as to upload, analyze and interactively explore their own private data. OrthoDB is available from http://orthodb.org. PMID:27899580

  12. Second-site suppressors of HIV-1 capsid mutations: restoration of intracellular activities without correction of intrinsic capsid stability defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ruifeng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disassembly of the viral capsid following penetration into the cytoplasm, or uncoating, is a poorly understood stage of retrovirus infection. Based on previous studies of HIV-1 CA mutants exhibiting altered capsid stability, we concluded that formation of a capsid of optimal intrinsic stability is crucial for HIV-1 infection. Results To further examine the connection between HIV-1 capsid stability and infectivity, we isolated second-site suppressors of HIV-1 mutants exhibiting unstable (P38A or hyperstable (E45A capsids. We identified the respective suppressor mutations, T216I and R132T, which restored virus replication in a human T cell line and markedly enhanced the fitness of the original mutants as revealed in single-cycle infection assays. Analysis of the corresponding purified N-terminal domain CA proteins by NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the E45A and R132T mutations induced structural changes that are localized to the regions of the mutations, while the P38A mutation resulted in changes extending to neighboring regions in space. Unexpectedly, neither suppressor mutation corrected the intrinsic viral capsid stability defect associated with the respective original mutation. Nonetheless, the R132T mutation rescued the selective infectivity impairment exhibited by the E45A mutant in aphidicolin-arrested cells, and the double mutant regained sensitivity to the small molecule inhibitor PF74. The T216I mutation rescued the impaired ability of the P38A mutant virus to abrogate restriction by TRIMCyp and TRIM5α. Conclusions The second-site suppressor mutations in CA that we have identified rescue virus infection without correcting the intrinsic capsid stability defects associated with the P38A and E45A mutations. The suppressors also restored wild type virus function in several cell-based assays. We propose that while proper HIV-1 uncoating in target cells is dependent on the intrinsic stability of the viral capsid, the

  13. An antiviral defense role of AGO2 in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagger J W Harvey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Argonaute (AGO proteins bind to small-interfering (siRNAs and micro (miRNAs to target RNA silencing against viruses, transgenes and in regulation of mRNAs. Plants encode multiple AGO proteins but, in Arabidopsis, only AGO1 is known to have an antiviral role. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To uncover the roles of specific AGOs in limiting virus accumulation we inoculated turnip crinkle virus (TCV to Arabidopsis plants that were mutant for each of the ten AGO genes. The viral symptoms on most of the plants were the same as on wild type plants although the ago2 mutants were markedly hyper-susceptible to this virus. ago2 plants were also hyper-susceptible to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, confirming that the antiviral role of AGO2 is not specific to a single virus. For both viruses, this phenotype was associated with transient increase in virus accumulation. In wild type plants the AGO2 protein was induced by TCV and CMV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results we propose that there are multiple layers to RNA-mediated defense and counter-defense in the interactions between plants and their viruses. AGO1 represents a first layer. With some viruses, including TCV and CMV, this layer is overcome by viral suppressors of silencing that can target AGO1 and a second layer involving AGO2 limits virus accumulation. The second layer is activated when the first layer is suppressed because AGO2 is repressed by AGO1 via miR403. The activation of the second layer is therefore a direct consequence of the loss of the first layer of defense.

  14. Viral marketing on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Štverák, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Thesis provides an overview of viral marketing. It describes the process by which you can be inspired to implement viral campaign. The thesis includes analysis of specific viral Web project. The aim of this thesis is to create a breakdown of the various components of viral marketing, to establish conditions that should be satisfied for the viral marketing to success, suggesting how to use viral marketing on social network Facebook and evaluate the various components of this service for the pr...

  15. Hepatitis viral aguda

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés; René F Espinosa Álvarez

    1998-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, ...

  16. Understanding Image Virality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Example non-viral images. Figure 1: Top: Images with high viral scores in our dataset depict internet “celebrity” memes ex. “Grumpy Cat”; Bottom: Images...of images that is most similar to ours is the concurrently introduced viral meme generator of Wang et al., that combines NLP and Computer Vision (low...doing any of our tasks. The test included questions about widely spread Reddit memes and jargon so that anyone familiar with Reddit can easily get a high

  17. Dual role of TRBP in HIV replication and RNA interference: viral diversion of a cellular pathway or evasion from antiviral immunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clerzius Guerline

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increasing evidence indicates that RNA interference (RNAi may be used to provide antiviral immunity in mammalian cells. Human micro (miRNAs can inhibit the replication of a primate virus, whereas a virally-encoded miRNA from HIV inhibits its own replication. Indirect proof comes from RNAi suppressors encoded by mammalian viruses. Influenza NS1 and Vaccinia E3L proteins can inhibit RNAi in plants, insects and worms. HIV-1 Tat protein and Adenovirus VA RNAs act as RNAi suppressors in mammalian cells. Surprisingly, many RNAi suppressors are also inhibitors of the interferon (IFN-induced protein kinase R (PKR but the potential overlap between the RNAi and the IFN pathways remains to be determined. The link between RNAi as an immune response and the IFN pathway may be formed by a cellular protein, TRBP, which has a dual role in HIV replication and RNAi. TRBP has been isolated as an HIV-1 TAR RNA binding protein that increases HIV expression and replication by inhibiting PKR and by increasing translation of structured RNAs. A recent report published in the Journal of Virology shows that the poor replication of HIV in astrocytes is mainly due to a heightened PKR response that can be overcome by supplying TRBP exogenously. In two recent papers published in Nature and EMBO Reports, TRBP is now shown to interact with Dicer and to be required for RNAi mediated by small interfering (si and micro (miRNAs. The apparent discrepancy between TRBP requirement in RNAi and in HIV replication opens the hypotheses that RNAi may be beneficial for HIV-1 replication or that HIV-1 may evade the RNAi restriction by diverting TRBP from Dicer and use it for its own benefit.

  18. Effects of seven RNA silencing suppressors on heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein expression mediated by a plant virus-based system in Nicotiana benthamiana%7种RNA沉默抑制子对植物病毒载体表达系统表达水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盛; 董洁; 曹慜; 穆红珍; 丁国平; 张虹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of 7 virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) for enhancement of a plant virus-based vector system-mediated heterologous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Methods Seven transient expression vectors for the 7 RSSs were constructed and co-inoculated on the leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana with PVXdt-GFP vector, a novel Potato virus X-based plant expression vector, through agroinfiltration. The protein and mRNA expression levels of the reporter gene GFP in the co-inoculated Nicotiana leaves were examined by Western blotting, ELISA and RT-qPCR to assess the effect of the RSSs for GFP expression enhancement. Results The 7 RSSs differed in the degree and duration of enhancement of heterologous GFP expression, and the pl9 protein of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) induced the highest expression of GFP. African cassava mosaic virus AC2 protein and Rice yellow mettle virus PI protein produced no obvious enhancement GFP expression. Conclusion Transient co-expression of RSSs suppresses host silencing response to allow high-level and long-term expression of heterologous genes in plant, but the optimal RSS has to be identified for each plant virus-based expression vector system.%目的 探索不同植物病毒RNA沉默抑制子对植物病毒载体表达系统重组蛋白表达水平的作用,为合理高效地利用这一新型的外源基因表达平台奠定基础.方法 构建了7种不同的RNA沉默抑制子瞬时表达载体,以农杆菌渗滤法,与马铃薯X病毒表达载体PVXdt-GFP共侵染寄主植物本明烟,通过对报告基因绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)的荧光观察,并以Western blotting、ELISA 和RT-qPCR等测定GFP在烟草中的表达情况,分析不同RNA沉默抑制子对植物中外源基因表达水平的作用和特点.结果 7种病毒RNA沉默抑制子对外源基因GFP在烟草中表达水平的作用效果和持续时间存在差异,其中,番茄丛矮病毒的P19蛋白的

  19. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contaminated food or water, although person-to-person transmission also is possible. Rotavirus. Worldwide, this is the ... contaminated drinking water is a cause of viral diarrhea, in many cases the virus is passed through ...

  20. Hepatitis viral aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, and the complementary examinations with special emphasis on the viral markers and the positive diagnosis were also considered

  1. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed.

  2. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Antonio; Massarotti, Marco

    2017-07-17

    A bottleneck for immunotherapy of cancer is the immunosuppressive microenvironment in which the tumor cells proliferate. Cancers harness the immune regulatory mechanism that prevents autoimmunity from evading immunosurveillance and promoting immune destruction. Regulatory T cells, myeloid suppressor cells, inhibitory cytokines and immune checkpoint receptors are the major components of the immune system acting in concert with cancer cells and causing the subversion of anti-tumor immunity. This redundant immunosuppressive network poses an impediment to efficacious immunotherapy by facilitating tumor progression. Tumor-associated myeloid cells comprise heterogeneous populations acting systemically (myeloid-derived suppressor cells/MDSCs) and/or locally in the tumor microenvironment (MDSCs and tumor-associated macrophages/TAMs). Both populations promote cancer cell proliferation and survival, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and elicit immunosuppression through different pathways, including the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors. Several evidences have demonstrated that myeloid cells can express different functional programs in response to different microenvironmental signals, a property defined as functional plasticity. The opposed extremes of this functional flexibility are generally represented by the classical macrophage activation, which identifies inflammatory and cytotoxic M1 polarized macrophages, and the alternative state of macrophage activation, which identifies M2 polarized anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive macrophages. Functional skewing of myeloid cells occurs in vivo under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and autoimmunity. Here we discuss how myeloid suppressor cells can on one hand support tumor growth and, on the other, limit autoimmune responses, indicating that their therapeutic reprogramming can generate opportunities in relieving immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment or

  3. Suppressors of Recb Mutations in Salmonella Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, N. R.; Roth, J.

    1994-01-01

    Using a screen that directly assesses transductional proficiency, we have isolated suppressors of recB mutations in Salmonella typhimurium. The alleles of sbcB reported here are phenotypically distinct from those isolated in Escherichia coli in that they restore recombination proficiency (Rec(+)), resistance to ultraviolet light (UV(R)), and mitomycin C resistance (MC(R)) in the absence of an accompanying sbcCD mutation. In addition the sbcB alleles reported here are co-dominant to sbcB(+). W...

  4. SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION4,a New var2 Suppressor Locus,Encodes a Pioneer Protein that Is Required for Chloroplast Biogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Yu; Gordon R.Gray; Steven R.Rodermel; Sung-Soon Park; Xiayan Liu; Andrew Foudree; Aigen Fu; Marta Powikrowska; Anastassia Khrouchtchova; Poul Erik Jensen; Jillian N.Kriger

    2011-01-01

    VAR2 is an integral thylakoid membrane protein and a member of the versatile FtsH class of metalloproteases in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Recessive mutations in the VAR2 locus give rise to variegated plants (var2) that contain white sectors with abnormal plastids and green sectors with normal-appearing chloroplasts. In a continuing effort to isolate second-site suppressors of var2 variegation,we characterize in this report ems2505,a suppressor strain that has a vi-rescent phenotype due to a missense mutation in At4g28590,the gene for a pioneer protein. We designated this gene SVR4 (for SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATI0N4) and the mutant allele in ems2505 as svr4-1. We demonstrate that SVR4 is located in chloroplasts and that svr4-1 single mutants are normal with respect to chloroplast anatomy and thylakoid membrane protein accumulation. However,they are modestly impaired in several aspects of photochemistry and have enhanced non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) capacity. A T-DNA insertion allele of SVR4,svr4-2,is seedling-lethal due to an early blockage of chloroplast development. We conclude that SVR4 is essential for chloroplast biogenesis,and hypothesize that SVR4 mediates some aspect of thylakoid structure or function that controls NPQ. We propose that in the suppressor strain,photoinhibitory pressure caused by a lack of VAR2 is ameliorated early in chloroplast development by enhanced NPQ capacity caused by reduced SVR4 activity. This would result in an increase in the number of chloroplasts that are able to surmount a threshold necessary to avoid photo-damage and thereby develop into functional chloroplasts.

  5. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  6. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  7. Microvesicles and Viral Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis. PMID:21976651

  8. Microvesicles and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckes, David G; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2011-12-01

    Cells secrete various membrane-enclosed microvesicles from their cell surface (shedding microvesicles) and from internal, endosome-derived membranes (exosomes). Intriguingly, these vesicles have many characteristics in common with enveloped viruses, including biophysical properties, biogenesis, and uptake by cells. Recent discoveries describing the microvesicle-mediated intercellular transfer of functional cellular proteins, RNAs, and mRNAs have revealed additional similarities between viruses and cellular microvesicles. Apparent differences include the complexity of viral entry, temporally regulated viral expression, and self-replication proceeding to infection of new cells. Interestingly, many virally infected cells secrete microvesicles that differ in content from their virion counterparts but may contain various viral proteins and RNAs. For the most part, these particles have not been analyzed for their content or functions during viral infection. However, early studies of microvesicles (L-particles) secreted from herpes simplex virus-infected cells provided the first evidence of microvesicle-mediated intercellular communication. In the case of Epstein-Barr virus, recent evidence suggests that this tumorigenic herpesvirus also utilizes exosomes as a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication through the transfer of signaling competent proteins and functional microRNAs to uninfected cells. This review focuses on aspects of the biology of microvesicles with an emphasis on their potential contributions to viral infection and pathogenesis.

  9. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  10. MYMIV-AC2, a geminiviral RNAi suppressor protein, has potential to increase the transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Jamilur; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Gene silencing is one of the limiting factors for transgene expression in plants. But the plant viruses have learnt to suppress gene silencing by encoding the protein(s), called RNA silencing suppressor(s) (RSS). Hence, these proteins could be used to overcome the limitation for transgene expression. The RNAi suppressors, namely HC-Pro and P19, have been shown to enhance the transgene expression but other RSS proteins have not been screened for similar role. Moreover, none of RSSs from the DNA viruses are known for enhancing the expression of transgenes. The Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus within the family of Geminiviridae encodes an RSS called the AC2 protein. Here, we used AC2 to elevate the expression of the transgenes. Upon introduction of MYMIV-AC2 in the silenced GFP transgenic tobacco lines, by either genetic hybridisation or transgenesis, the GFP expression was enhanced several fold in F1 and T0 lines. The GFP-siRNA levels were much reduced in F1 and T0 lines compared with those of the initial parental silenced lines. The enhanced GFP expression was also observed at the cellular level. This approach was also successful in enhancing the expression of another transgene, namely topoisomeraseII.

  11. Effect of natural and ARV-induced viral suppression and viral breakthrough on anti-HIV antibody proportion and avidity in patients with HIV-1 subtype B infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Wendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viral suppression and viral breakthrough impact the humoral immune response to HIV infection. We evaluated the impact of viral suppression and viral breakthrough on results obtained with two cross-sectional HIV incidence assays. METHODS: All samples were collected from adults in the US who were HIV infected for >2 years. Samples were tested with the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA which measures the proportion of IgG that is HIV-specific, and with an antibody avidity assay based on the Genetic Systems 1/2+ O ELISA. We tested 281 samples: (1 30 samples from 18 patients with natural control of HIV-1 infection known as elite controllers or suppressors (2 72 samples from 18 adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART, with 1 sample before and 2-6 samples after ART initiation, and (3 179 samples from 20 virally-suppressed adults who had evidence of viral breakthrough receiving ART (>400 copies/ml HIV RNA and with subsequent viral suppression. RESULTS: For elite suppressors, 10/18 had BED-CEIA values <0.8 normalized optical density units (OD-n and these values did not change significantly over time. For patients receiving ART, 14/18 had BED-CEIA values that decreased over time, with a median decrease of 0.42 OD-n (range 0.10 to 0.63/time point receiving ART. Three patterns of BED-CEIA values were observed during viral breakthrough: (1 values that increased then returned to pre-breakthrough values when viral suppression was re-established, (2 values that increased after viral breakthrough, and (3 values that did not change with viral breakthrough. CONCLUSIONS: Viral suppression and viral breakthrough were associated with changes in BED-CEIA values, reflecting changes in the proportion of HIV-specific IgG. These changes can result in misclassification of patients with long-term HIV infection as recently infected using the BED-CEIA, thereby influencing a falsely high value for cross-sectional incidence estimates.

  12. Suppressor of RNA silencing encoded by Rice gall dwarf virus genome segment 11

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU FuXiu; ZHAO Qin; RUAN XiaoLei; HE YunWei; LI HuaPing

    2008-01-01

    Rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV) is an important rice pathogen in China and Southeast Asia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of RGDV interactions with plant cells. Here, we have identi-fied an RGDV protein, Pns11, which acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing in coinfiltration assays with the reporter, green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transgenic Nicotiana bentharniana line 16c carrying GFP. Pns11 suppressed local and systemic silencing induced by sense RNA. The spread of mobile FINA si-lencing signals was blocked or inactivated by Pns11. Expression of Pns11 also enhanced Potato virus X pathogenicity in N. benthamiana. This suppressor could reduce, but not eliminate, siRNA in the local and systemic RNA silencing suppression assays, suggesting that Pns11 functions by interfering with initial stages of RNA silencing.

  13. Two suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by cereal-infecting members of the family Luteoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhai, Hao; Zhao, Kun; Wu, Beilei; Wang, Xifeng

    2012-08-01

    Several members of the family Luteoviridae are important pathogens of cultivated plant species of the family Gramineae. In this study, we explored RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) encoded by two cereal-infecting luteoviruses: barley yellow dwarf virus and wheat yellow dwarf virus (BYDV and WYDV, respectively). The P0 protein of WYDV-GPV (P0(GPV)) and the P6 protein of BYDV-GAV (P6(GAV)) displayed RSS activities when expressed in agro-infiltrated leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, by their local ability to inhibit post-transcriptional gene silencing of GFP. Analysis of GFP, mRNA and GFP-specific small interfering RNA indicated that both P0(GPV) and P6(GAV) are suppressors of silencing that can restrain not only local but also systemic gene silencing. This is the first report of RSS activity of the P6 protein in a member of the genus Luteovirus.

  14. Viral induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  15. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  16. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  17. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  18. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  19. Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    AD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4040 TITLE: Mapping Mammary Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Gould, Ph.D...Carcinoma Suppressor Genes in the Laboratory Rat DAMDI7-94-J-4040 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Gould, Ph.D. Hong Lan, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  20. Tumour suppressor genes in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Ganesan, Trivadi S

    2002-01-01

    of the evolution of tumour progression. A major focus of research has been to identify tumour suppressor genes implicated in sporadic ovarian cancer over the past decade. Several tumour suppressor genes have been identified by strategies such as positional cloning and differential expression display. Further...

  1. Commercialization of veterinary viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flore, P H

    2004-12-01

    If vaccines are to reliably prevent disease, they must be developed, produced and quality-controlled according to very strict regulations and procedures. Veterinary viral vaccine registrations are governed by different rules in different countries, but these rules all emphasize that the quality of the raw materials--the cells, eggs, animals or plants that are used in production--need to be carefully controlled. The veterinary vaccine business is also very cost-conscious. Emphasis over the last 5-10 years has therefore been to develop culture systems that minimize labor and sterility problems and thus provide for reliable and cost-effective production. Implementing these often more complex systems in a production environment takes considerable effort, first in scale-up trials and further down the line in convincing production personnel to change their familiar system for something new and possibly untried. To complete scale-up trials successfully, it is absolutely necessary to understand the biochemistry of the cells and the influence of the virus on the cells under scale-up and later production conditions. Once a viral product can be produced on a large scale, it is imperative that the quality of the end-product is controlled in an intelligent way. One needs to know whether the end-product performs in the animal as was intended during its conception in the research and development department. The development of the appropriate tests to demonstrate this plays an important role in the successful development of a vaccine.

  2. Virus Infection of Plants Alters Pollinator Preference: A Payback for Susceptible Hosts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Simon C; Jiang, Sanjie; Murphy, Alex M; Cunniffe, Nik J; Westwood, Jack H; Davey, Matthew P; Bruce, Toby J A; Caulfield, John C; Furzer, Oliver J; Reed, Alison; Robinson, Sophie I; Miller, Elizabeth; Davis, Christopher N; Pickett, John A; Whitney, Heather M; Glover, Beverley J; Carr, John P

    2016-08-01

    Plant volatiles play important roles in attraction of certain pollinators and in host location by herbivorous insects. Virus infection induces changes in plant volatile emission profiles, and this can make plants more attractive to insect herbivores, such as aphids, that act as viral vectors. However, it is unknown if virus-induced alterations in volatile production affect plant-pollinator interactions. We found that volatiles emitted by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis thaliana plants altered the foraging behaviour of bumblebees (Bombus terrestris). Virus-induced quantitative and qualitative changes in blends of volatile organic compounds emitted by tomato plants were identified by gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Experiments with a CMV mutant unable to express the 2b RNA silencing suppressor protein and with Arabidopsis silencing mutants implicate microRNAs in regulating emission of pollinator-perceivable volatiles. In tomato, CMV infection made plants emit volatiles attractive to bumblebees. Bumblebees pollinate tomato by 'buzzing' (sonicating) the flowers, which releases pollen and enhances self-fertilization and seed production as well as pollen export. Without buzz-pollination, CMV infection decreased seed yield, but when flowers of mock-inoculated and CMV-infected plants were buzz-pollinated, the increased seed yield for CMV-infected plants was similar to that for mock-inoculated plants. Increased pollinator preference can potentially increase plant reproductive success in two ways: i) as female parents, by increasing the probability that ovules are fertilized; ii) as male parents, by increasing pollen export. Mathematical modeling suggested that over a wide range of conditions in the wild, these increases to the number of offspring of infected susceptible plants resulting from increased pollinator preference could outweigh underlying strong selection pressures favoring pathogen resistance

  3. Characteristics and outcomes of initial virologic suppressors during analytic treatment interruption in a therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Z Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the placebo-controlled trial ACTG A5197, a trend favoring viral suppression was seen in the HIV-1-infected subjects who received a recombinant Ad5 HIV-1 gag vaccine. OBJECTIVE: To identify individuals with initial viral suppression (plasma HIV-1 RNA set point <3.0 log(10 copies/ml during the analytic treatment interruption (ATI and evaluate the durability and correlates of virologic control and characteristics of HIV sequence evolution. METHODS: HIV-1 gag and pol RNA were amplified and sequenced from plasma obtained during the ATI. Immune responses were measured by flow cytometric analysis and intracellular cytokine expression assays. Characteristics of those with and without initial viral suppression were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. RESULTS: Eleven out of 104 participants (10.6% were classified as initial virologic suppressors, nine of whom had received the vaccine. Initial virologic suppressors had significantly less CD4+ cell decline by ATI week 16 as compared to non-suppressors (median 7 CD4+ cell gain vs. 247 CD4+ cell loss, P = 0.04. However, of the ten initial virologic suppressors with a pVL at ATI week 49, only three maintained pVL <3.0 log(10 copies/ml. HIV-1 Gag-specific CD4+ interferon-γ responses were not associated with initial virologic suppression and no evidence of vaccine-driven HIV sequence evolution was detected. Participants with initial virologic suppression were found to have a lower percentage of CD4+ CTLA-4+ cells prior to treatment interruption, but a greater proportion of HIV-1 Gag-reactive CD4+ TNF-α+ cells expressing either CTLA-4 or PD-1. CONCLUSIONS: Among individuals participating in a rAd5 therapeutic HIV-1 gag vaccine trial, initial viral suppression was found in a subset of patients, but this response was not sustained. The association between CTLA-4 and PD-1 expression on CD4+ T cells and virologic outcome warrants further study in trials of other

  4. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  5. Viral infections in pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  6. Tumor suppressor genes in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghifar, Nahal; Farrokhi, Naser; Naji, Tahereh; Zali, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is mostly due to a series of genetic alterations that are being greatly under the influence of the environmental factors. These changes, mutational or epigenetic modifications at transcriptional forefront and/or post-transcriptional effects via miRNAs, include inactivation and the conversion of proto-oncogene to oncogenes, and/or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Here, a thorough review was carried out on the role of TSGs with the focus on the APC as the master regulator, mutated genes and mal-/dysfunctional pathways that lead to one type of hereditary form of the CRC; namely familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). This review provides a venue towards defining candidate genes that can be used as new PCR-based markers for early diagnosis of FAP. In addition to diagnosis, defining the modes of genetic alterations will open door towards genome editing to either suppress the disease or reduce its progression during the course of action.

  7. Evolution of the PEBP Gene Family in Plants: Functional Diversification in Seed Plant Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Karlgren; Nielas Gyllenstrand; Thomas Källman; Jens F. Sundström; David Moore; Martin Lascoux; Ulf Lagercrantz

    2011-01-01

    ...], MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 [MFT], and TERMINAL FLOWER1 [TFL1] like). In angiosperms, PEBP genes have been shown to function both as promoters and suppressors of flowering and to control plant architecture...

  8. Viral diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, Aric P; Simpson, Janet E; Korte, Scott W

    2005-01-01

    Viral disease in the rabbit is encountered infrequently by the clinical practitioner; however, several viral diseases were reported to occur in this species. Viral diseases that are described in the rabbit primarily may affect the integument, gastrointestinal tract or, central nervous system or maybe multi-systemic in nature. Rabbit viral diseases range from oral papillomatosis, with benign clinical signs, to rabbit hemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis, which may result in significant clinical disease and mortality. The wild rabbit may serve as a reservoir for disease transmission for many of these viral agents. In general, treatment of viral disease in the rabbit is supportive in nature.

  9. Features and Usage Areas of MicroRNAs as Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Seyda Seydel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA are small non-coding RNA of 19–24 nucleotides in length that were discovered 12 years ago by Victor Ambros and colleagues. They are important regulatory molecules in animals and plants. MicroRNAs are downregulate gene expression during various crucial cell processes such as apoptosis, differentiation and development. In addition, some miRNAs may function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. More than 50% of miRNA genes are located in cancer-associated genomic regions or in fragile sites. Overexpressed miRNAs in cancers, such as mir17–92, may function as oncogenes and promote cancer development by negatively regulating tumor suppressor genes and genes that control cell differentiation or apoptosis. Underexpressed miRNAs in cancers, such as let–7, function as tumor suppressor genes and may inhibit cancers by regulating oncogenes and genes that control cell differentiation or apoptosis. miRNA expression profiles may become useful biomarkers for cancer diagnostics. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(1.000: 1-12

  10. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sharma (Suraj); M. Carballo (Manuel); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and

  11. Influence of retinoblastoma-related gene silencing on the initiation of DNA replication by African cassava mosaic virus Rep in cells of mature leaves in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Gareth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses mainly infect terminally differentiated tissues and cells in plants. They need to reprogramme host cellular machinery for DNA replication. This process is thought to be mediated by inactivation of cell-cycle repressor proteins and by induction of host DNA synthesis protein expression through actions of the geminviral replication initiator protein (Rep. Findings Exploiting a Nicotiana benthamiana pOri2 line, which is transformed with a transgene consisting of a direct repeat of the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV-replication origin (Ori flanking a non-viral DNA region, and virus-induced RNA silencing (VIGS, the impact of host gene expression on replication of the ACMV-derived replicon was investigated. The ACMV Rep trans-replicated the viral episomal replicon in leaves of young but not older pOri2 plants. Upon VIGS-mediated down-regulation of N. benthamiana NbRBR1, the retinoblastoma-related protein gene coding for a negative cell-cycle suppressor, recovered the ability of ACMV Rep for trans DNA replication, whereas the silencing of NbPCNA coding for the sliding clamp of DNA polymerase had no effect. Conclusions These results suggest that the cellular machinery for DNA replication in differentiated tissues of older leaves cannot be reprogrammed by Rep alone but may need other uncharacterised viral and plant factors.

  12. Infrared suppressor effect on T63 turboshaft engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, E. E.; Civinskas, K. C.; Walker, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine if there are performance penalties associated with the installation of infrared (IR) suppressors on the T63-A-700 turboshaft engine. The testing was done in a sea-level, static test cell. The same engine (A-E402808 B) was run with the standard OH-58 aircraft exhaust stacks and with the ejector-type IR suppressors in order to make a valid comparison. Repeatability of the test results for the two configurations was verified by rerunning the conditions over a period of days. Test results showed no measurable difference in performance between the standard exhaust stacks and the IR suppressors.

  13. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What is Viral Hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation ...

  14. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  15. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  16. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  17. Viral RNA silencing suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant-and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmissio

  18. Impact of xynthia tempest on viral contamination of shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marco; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Noyer, Mathilde; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2012-05-01

    Viral contamination in oyster and mussel samples was evaluated after a massive storm with hurricane wind named "Xynthia tempest" destroyed a number of sewage treatment plants in an area harboring many shellfish farms. Although up to 90% of samples were found to be contaminated 2 days after the disaster, detected viral concentrations were low. A 1-month follow-up showed a rapid decrease in the number of positive samples, even for norovirus.

  19. The expanding functions of cellular helicases: the tombusvirus RNA replication enhancer co-opts the plant eIF4AIII-like AtRH2 and the DDX5-like AtRH5 DEAD-box RNA helicases to promote viral asymmetric RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Kovalev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC, template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA helicases, including the eIF4AIII-like yeast Fal1p and the DDX5-like Dbp3p and the orthologous plant AtRH2 and AtRH5 DEAD box helicases, which are co-opted by tombusviruses. Unlike the previously characterized DDX3-like AtRH20/Ded1p helicases that bind to the 3' terminal promoter region in the viral minus-strand (-RNA, the other class of eIF4AIII-like RNA helicases bind to a different cis-acting element, namely the 5' proximal RIII(- replication enhancer (REN element in the TBSV (-RNA. We show that the binding of AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases to the TBSV (-RNA could unwind the dsRNA structure within the RIII(- REN. This unique characteristic allows the eIF4AIII-like helicases to perform novel pro-viral functions involving the RIII(- REN in stimulation of plus-strand (+RNA synthesis. We also show that AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases are components of the tombusvirus VRCs based on co-purification experiments. We propose that eIF4AIII-like helicases destabilize dsRNA replication intermediate within the RIII(- REN that promotes bringing the 5' and 3' terminal (-RNA sequences in close vicinity via long-range RNA-RNA base pairing. This newly formed RNA structure promoted by eIF4AIII helicase together with AtRH20 helicase might facilitate the recycling of the viral replicases for multiple rounds of (+-strand synthesis, thus resulting in asymmetrical viral replication.

  20. Immunogenetics of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maureen P; Carrington, Mary

    2005-10-01

    The HLA class I and II genes encode molecules that lie at the heart of the acquired immune response against infectious diseases. Associations between these polymorphic loci and genetically complex infectious diseases have been historically elusive, in contrast to the more obvious HLA associations with autoimmune diseases. High resolution molecular typing of large, clinically well-defined cohorts has begun to uncover evidence for the influence of HLA diversity on diseases of viral etiology, such as those caused by HIV-1, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human papilloma virus. Combinations of HLA and KIR also appear to affect outcome to viral infection, supporting a role for HLA class I diversity in the innate immune response in addition to the acquired immune response.

  1. Viral quasispecies evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of...

  2. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  3. Hepatitis viral C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Poma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El virus de la hepatitis C se trasmite por contacto directo con la sangre de la persona infectada. La mayoría de los pacientes no presenta síntomas en la fase aguda o crónica de la hepatitis. Dos a tres décadas después, algunos pacientes progresan a la cirrosis compensada, que también es asintomática. En un examen de sangre, los anticuerpos se presentan como una sorpresa, porque no se les relaciona con un episodio de contagio. Un embarazo ocasiona la posibilidad de efectos negativos de la infección en la madre o el niño. El tratamiento actual no ofrece la certeza de cura, dependiendo del genotipo viral, y presenta efectos adversos que pueden ser severos. La cirrosis descompensada causa la mayoría de muertes relacionadas con esta infección; algunos de estos pacientes desarrollan carcinoma hepatocelular. La reproducción viral causa partículas virales diferentes del virus original, característica que ha impedido el desarrollo de una vacuna. Actualmente, la prevención consiste en evitar el contacto con sangre infectada. Este artículo revisa la infección con el virus de la hepatitis C, incluyendo los últimos progresos en tratamiento. Es necesario educar a la comunidad acerca de los efectos de este virus en la salud pública.

  4. Connection Cryostats for LHC Dispersion Suppressors

    CERN Document Server

    Marque, S; Genet, M; Skoczen, B

    2004-01-01

    The lattice of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) being built at CERN is based on 8 standard arcs of 2.5 km length. Each arc is bounded on either side by Dispersion Suppressors connected to the arc by connection cryostats providing 15m long drift spaces. As for a dipole magnet, the connection cryostat provides a continuity of beam and insulation vacuum, electrical powering, cryogenic circuits, thermal and radiation shielding. In total 16 modules will be constructed. The stringent functional specification has led to various design options. Among them, a light mechanical structure has been developed with a stiffness comparable to that of a dipole magnet, for alignment purpose. Thermal studies, including lambda front propagation, have been performed to ensure a cooling down time to 1.9 K within the time budget. A special cooling scheme around the beam tubes has been chosen to cope with heat loads produced during operation. We report on the general design of these modules and on the adopted manufacturing process whi...

  5. The tumor suppressor CDKN3 controls mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Grzegorz; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Enzor, Rikki; Dey, Dilip; He, Ying; Gehlhausen, Jeff R; Lehmann, Amalia S; Park, Su-Jung; Yang, Yanzhu; Yang, Xianlin; Chen, Shi; Guan, Xiaowei; Chen, Yanwen; Renbarger, Jamie; Yang, Feng-Chun; Parada, Luis F; Clapp, Wade

    2013-06-24

    Mitosis is controlled by a network of kinases and phosphatases. We screened a library of small interfering RNAs against a genome-wide set of phosphatases to comprehensively evaluate the role of human phosphatases in mitosis. We found four candidate spindle checkpoint phosphatases, including the tumor suppressor CDKN3. We show that CDKN3 is essential for normal mitosis and G1/S transition. We demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDKN3 changes throughout the cell cycle. We show that CDKN3 dephosphorylates threonine-161 of CDC2 during mitotic exit and we visualize CDC2(pThr-161) at kinetochores and centrosomes in early mitosis. We performed a phosphokinome-wide mass spectrometry screen to find effectors of the CDKN3-CDC2 signaling axis. We found that one of the identified downstream phosphotargets, CKβ phosphorylated at serine 209, localizes to mitotic centrosomes and controls the spindle checkpoint. Finally, we show that CDKN3 protein is down-regulated in brain tumors. Our findings indicate that CDKN3 controls mitosis through the CDC2 signaling axis. These results have implications for targeted anticancer therapeutics.

  6. Fitness Trade-Offs Lead to Suppressor Tolerance in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Schacherer, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variation among individuals within a population provides the raw material for phenotypic diversity upon which natural selection operates. Some given variants can act on multiple standing genomic variations simultaneously and release previously inaccessible phenotypes, leading to increased adaptive potential upon challenging environments. Previously, we identified such a variant related to a tRNA nonsense suppressor in yeast. When introduced into other genetic backgrounds, the suppressor led to an increased population phenotypic variance on various culture conditions, conferring background and environment specific selective advantages. Nonetheless, most isolates are intolerant to the suppressor on rich media due to a severe fitness cost. Here, we found that the tolerance to suppressor is related to a surprising level of fitness outburst, showing a trade-off effect to accommodate the cost of carrying the suppressor. To dissect the genetic basis of such trade-offs, we crossed strains with contrasting tolerance levels on rich media, and analyzed the fitness distribution patterns in the offspring. Combining quantitative tetrad analysis and bulk segregant analysis, we identified two genes, namely MKT1 and RGA1, involved in suppressor tolerance. We showed that alleles from the tolerant parent for both genes conferred a significant gain of fitness, which increased the suppressor tolerance. Our results present a detailed dissection of suppressor tolerance in yeast and provide insights into the molecular basis of trade-offs between fitness and evolutionary potential. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Response growth using a low-frequency suppressor.

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    DiGiovanni, Jeffrey J; Nair, Padmaja

    2007-12-01

    Numerous psychophysical studies on two-tone suppression have been carried out. More recently, researchers have attempted to relate the magnitude of suppression to the level of suppressee. [Wojtczak, M., Viemeister, N.F., 2005. Psychophysical response growth under suppression. In: Pressnitzer, D., de Cheveigne, A., McAdams, S., Collet, L. (Eds.), Auditory Signal Processing: Physiology, Psychoaccoustics, and Models. Springer, New York, pp. 67-74] demonstrated that the magnitude of suppression for a higher-frequency, fixed-level suppressor decreases with increasing level of the suppressee. This suggests a linearization of the basilar membrane response in presence of a high-frequency suppressor. The present study expands these results to a low-frequency suppressor of varying intensity levels. Detection of a 10-ms, 4.0-kHz probe was measured under different forward-masking conditions: one with a 200-ms, 4.0-kHz masker (suppressee) presented with no suppressor and another with the same masker paired with a 2.2-kHz, 200-ms suppressor. The 4.0-kHz masker level was varied adaptively and a range of probe levels was used to measure the growth of suppression. Results indicate that (1) the magnitude of suppression increases with increasing suppressor level and (2) generally, the probe level was not related to the magnitude of suppression.

  8. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  9. VIRAL HEPATITIS E DIAGNOSTICS

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    E. Yu. Malinnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The results of clinical and epidemiological studies conducted in the M.P. Chumakov’ Research Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitis and in the different research institutions of the world have been summarized in the current article. Data on etiology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis E are presented. Increasing of significance of this infection for health care system in Russia is emphasized . The actual problems of hepatitis E (autochthonic hepatitis E, hepatitis E as zoonosis, chronic hepatitis E are discussed.

  10. The Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing.

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    Haasnoot, Joost; de Vries, Walter; Geutjes, Ernst-Jan; Prins, Marcel; de Haan, Peter; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-06-01

    RNA silencing or interference (RNAi) is a gene regulation mechanism in eukaryotes that controls cell differentiation and developmental processes via expression of microRNAs. RNAi also serves as an innate antiviral defence response in plants, nematodes, and insects. This antiviral response is triggered by virus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules (dsRNAs) that are produced during infection. To overcome antiviral RNAi responses, many plant and insect viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) that enable them to replicate at higher titers. Recently, several human viruses were shown to encode RSSs, suggesting that RNAi also serves as an innate defence response in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that the Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNAi in mammalian cells and that its RSS activity is functionally equivalent to that of the HIV-1 Tat protein. We show that VP35 can replace HIV-1 Tat and thereby support the replication of a Tat-minus HIV-1 variant. The VP35 dsRNA-binding domain is required for this RSS activity. Vaccinia virus E3L protein and influenza A virus NS1 protein are also capable of replacing the HIV-1 Tat RSS function. These findings support the hypothesis that RNAi is part of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Moreover, the results indicate that RSSs play a critical role in mammalian virus replication.

  11. The Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNA silencing.

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    Joost Haasnoot

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing or interference (RNAi is a gene regulation mechanism in eukaryotes that controls cell differentiation and developmental processes via expression of microRNAs. RNAi also serves as an innate antiviral defence response in plants, nematodes, and insects. This antiviral response is triggered by virus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules (dsRNAs that are produced during infection. To overcome antiviral RNAi responses, many plant and insect viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs that enable them to replicate at higher titers. Recently, several human viruses were shown to encode RSSs, suggesting that RNAi also serves as an innate defence response in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that the Ebola virus VP35 protein is a suppressor of RNAi in mammalian cells and that its RSS activity is functionally equivalent to that of the HIV-1 Tat protein. We show that VP35 can replace HIV-1 Tat and thereby support the replication of a Tat-minus HIV-1 variant. The VP35 dsRNA-binding domain is required for this RSS activity. Vaccinia virus E3L protein and influenza A virus NS1 protein are also capable of replacing the HIV-1 Tat RSS function. These findings support the hypothesis that RNAi is part of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Moreover, the results indicate that RSSs play a critical role in mammalian virus replication.

  12. Viral infections of rabbits.

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    Kerr, Peter J; Donnelly, Thomas M

    2013-05-01

    Viral diseases of rabbits have been used historically to study oncogenesis (e.g. rabbit fibroma virus, cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) and biologically to control feral rabbit populations (e.g. myxoma virus). However, clinicians seeing pet rabbits in North America infrequently encounter viral diseases although myxomatosis may be seen occasionally. The situation is different in Europe and Australia, where myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease are endemic. Advances in epidemiology and virology have led to detection of other lapine viruses that are now recognized as agents of emerging infectious diseases. Rabbit caliciviruses, related to rabbit hemorrhagic disease, are generally avirulent, but lethal variants are being identified in Europe and North America. Enteric viruses including lapine rotavirus, rabbit enteric coronavirus and rabbit astrovirus are being acknowledged as contributors to the multifactorial enteritis complex of juvenile rabbits. Three avirulent leporid herpesviruses are found in domestic rabbits. A fourth highly pathogenic virus designated leporid herpesvirus 4 has been described in Canada and Alaska. This review considers viruses affecting rabbits by their clinical significance. Viruses of major and minor clinical significance are described, and viruses of laboratory significance are mentioned. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism

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    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Bartee, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a ceil type, tissue or species — collectively known as viral tropism — is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role ...

  14. Rescue of a Plant Negative-Strand RNA Virus from Cloned cDNA: Insights into Enveloped Plant Virus Movement and Morphogenesis.

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    Qiang Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reverse genetics systems have been established for all major groups of plant DNA and positive-strand RNA viruses, and our understanding of their infection cycles and pathogenesis has benefitted enormously from use of these approaches. However, technical difficulties have heretofore hampered applications of reverse genetics to plant negative-strand RNA (NSR viruses. Here, we report recovery of infectious virus from cloned cDNAs of a model plant NSR, Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus (SYNV. The procedure involves Agrobacterium-mediated transcription of full-length SYNV antigenomic RNA and co-expression of the nucleoprotein (N, phosphoprotein (P, large polymerase core proteins and viral suppressors of RNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Optimization of core protein expression resulted in up to 26% recombinant SYNV (rSYNV infections of agroinfiltrated plants. A reporter virus, rSYNV-GFP, engineered by inserting a green fluorescence protein (GFP gene between the N and P genes was able to express GFP during systemic infections and after repeated plant-to-plant mechanical passages. Deletion analyses with rSYNV-GFP demonstrated that SYNV cell-to-cell movement requires the sc4 protein and suggested that uncoiled nucleocapsids are infectious movement entities. Deletion analyses also showed that the glycoprotein is not required for systemic infection, although the glycoprotein mutant was defective in virion morphogenesis. Taken together, we have developed a robust reverse genetics system for SYNV that provides key insights into morphogenesis and movement of an enveloped plant virus. Our study also provides a template for developing analogous systems for reverse genetic analysis of other plant NSR viruses.

  15. Rescue of a Plant Negative-Strand RNA Virus from Cloned cDNA: Insights into Enveloped Plant Virus Movement and Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Xiaonan; Qian, ShaSha; Zhou, Xin; Sun, Kai; Chen, Xiaolan; Zhou, Xueping; Jackson, Andrew O; Li, Zhenghe

    2015-10-01

    Reverse genetics systems have been established for all major groups of plant DNA and positive-strand RNA viruses, and our understanding of their infection cycles and pathogenesis has benefitted enormously from use of these approaches. However, technical difficulties have heretofore hampered applications of reverse genetics to plant negative-strand RNA (NSR) viruses. Here, we report recovery of infectious virus from cloned cDNAs of a model plant NSR, Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus (SYNV). The procedure involves Agrobacterium-mediated transcription of full-length SYNV antigenomic RNA and co-expression of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), large polymerase core proteins and viral suppressors of RNA silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Optimization of core protein expression resulted in up to 26% recombinant SYNV (rSYNV) infections of agroinfiltrated plants. A reporter virus, rSYNV-GFP, engineered by inserting a green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene between the N and P genes was able to express GFP during systemic infections and after repeated plant-to-plant mechanical passages. Deletion analyses with rSYNV-GFP demonstrated that SYNV cell-to-cell movement requires the sc4 protein and suggested that uncoiled nucleocapsids are infectious movement entities. Deletion analyses also showed that the glycoprotein is not required for systemic infection, although the glycoprotein mutant was defective in virion morphogenesis. Taken together, we have developed a robust reverse genetics system for SYNV that provides key insights into morphogenesis and movement of an enveloped plant virus. Our study also provides a template for developing analogous systems for reverse genetic analysis of other plant NSR viruses.

  16. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  17. Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor

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    Stoll, R.; Lee, B.M.; Debler, E.W.; Laity, J.H.; Wilson, I.A.; Dyson, H.J.; Wright, P.E.

    2009-06-04

    The zinc finger domain of the Wilms tumor suppressor protein (WT1) contains four canonical Cys{sub 2}His{sub 2} zinc fingers. WT1 binds preferentially to DNA sequences that are closely related to the EGR-1 consensus site. We report the structure determination by both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy of the WT1 zinc finger domain in complex with DNA. The X-ray structure was determined for the complex with a cognate 14 base-pair oligonucleotide, and composite X-ray/NMR structures were determined for complexes with both the 14 base-pair and an extended 17 base-pair DNA. This combined approach allowed unambiguous determination of the position of the first zinc finger, which is influenced by lattice contacts in the crystal structure. The crystal structure shows the second, third and fourth zinc finger domains inserted deep into the major groove of the DNA where they make base-specific interactions. The DNA duplex is distorted in the vicinity of the first zinc finger, with a cytidine twisted and tilted out of the base stack to pack against finger 1 and the tip of finger 2. By contrast, the composite X-ray/NMR structures show that finger 1 continues to follow the major groove in the solution complexes. However, the orientation of the helix is non-canonical, and the fingertip and the N terminus of the helix project out of the major groove; as a consequence, the zinc finger side-chains that are commonly involved in base recognition make no contact with the DNA. We conclude that finger 1 helps to anchor WT1 to the DNA by amplifying the binding affinity although it does not contribute significantly to binding specificity. The structures provide molecular level insights into the potential consequences of mutations in zinc fingers 2 and 3 that are associated with Denys-Drash syndrome and nephritic syndrome. The mutations are of two types, and either destabilize the zinc finger structure or replace key base contact residues.

  18. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

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    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  19. Structure, sequence and expression of the hepatitis delta (δ) viral genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang-Sheng; Choo, Qui-Lim; Weiner, Amy J.; Ou, Jing-Hsiung; Najarian, Richard C.; Thayer, Richard M.; Mullenbach, Guy T.; Denniston, Katherine J.; Gerin, John L.; Houghton, Michael

    1986-10-01

    Biochemical and electron microscopic data indicate that the human hepatitis δ viral agent contains a covalently closed circular and single-stranded RNA genome that has certain similarities with viroid-like agents from plants. The sequence of the viral genome (1,678 nucleotides) has been determined and an open reading frame within the complementary strand has been shown to encode an antigen that binds specifically to antisera from patients with chronic hepatitis δ viral infections.

  20. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  1. Viral quasispecies evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory.

  2. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering

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    Hiroyuki Kugoh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  3. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-12-30

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  4. Some facts and thoughts: p73 as a tumor suppressor gene in the network of tumor suppressors

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    Boominathan Lakshmanane

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The question of whether p73 is a tumor suppressor gene, is not yet answered with full confidence. The lack of spontaneous tumor formation in p73 null mice and infrequent p73 mutations seen in a variety of cancers analyzed would straightaway negate its role as a primary tumor suppressor gene. However, accumulating evidence suggest that p73 gene and its target genes are hypermethylated in the cancer of lymphoid origin. Here I discuss some facts and thoughts that support the idea that p73 could still be a tumor suppressor gene. The tumor suppressor network in which p73 appears to be a participant involves E2F1, JunB, INK4a/p16, ARF/p19, p57kip2 and BRCA1. Knock out of each gene in E2F-1-p73-JunB-p16INK4a network of tumor suppressor proteins result in lymphoma/leukemia formation. Further, I tried to explain why lymphomas are not seen in p73 null mice and why p73 gene is not prone to frequent mutation.

  5. High-Level Systemic Expression of Conserved Influenza Epitope in Plants on the Surface of Rod-Shaped Chimeric Particles

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    Natalia V. Petukhova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant viruses based on the cDNA copy of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV genome carrying different versions of the conserved M2e epitope from influenza virus A cloned into the coat protein (CP gene were obtained and partially characterized by our group previously; cysteines in the human consensus M2e sequence were changed to serine residues. This work intends to show some biological properties of these viruses following plant infections. Agroinfiltration experiments on Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed the efficient systemic expression of M2e peptides, and two point amino acid substitutions in recombinant CPs significantly influenced the symptoms and development of viral infections. Joint expression of RNA interference suppressor protein p19 from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV did not affect the accumulation of CP-M2e-ser recombinant protein in non-inoculated leaves. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from either infected leaves or purified TMV-M2e particles proved the genetic stability of TMV‑based viral vectors. Immunoelectron microscopy of crude plant extracts demonstrated that foreign epitopes are located on the surface of chimeric virions. The rod‑shaped geometry of plant-produced M2e epitopes is different from the icosahedral or helical filamentous arrangement of M2e antigens on the carrier virus-like particles (VLP described earlier. Thereby, we created a simple and efficient system that employs agrobacteria and plant viral vectors in order to produce a candidate broad-spectrum flu vaccine.

  6. Emerging roles of myeloid derived suppressor cells in hepatic inflammation and fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda; Hammerich; Frank; Tacke

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells(MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immune cells that are potent suppressors of immune responses. MDSC emerge in various compartments in the body, such as blood, bonemarrow or spleen, especially in conditions of cancer, infections or inflammation. MDSC usually express CD11 b, CD33, and low levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR in humans or CD11 b and Gr1(Ly6C/G) in mice, and they can be further divided into granulocytic or monocytic MDSC. The liver is an important organ for MDSC induction and accumulation in hepatic as well as extrahepatic diseases. Different hepatic cells, especially hepatic stellate cells, as well as liver-derived soluble factors, including hepatocyte growth factor and acute phase proteins(SAA, KC), can promote the differentiation of MDSC from myeloid cells. Importantly, hepatic myeloid cells like neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages fulfill essential roles in acute and chronic liver diseases. Recent data from patients with liver diseases and animal models linked MDSC to the pathogenesis of hepatic inflammation, fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). In settings of acute hepatitis, MDSC can limit immunogenic T cell responses and subsequent tissue injury. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, MDSC increase and may favor viral persistence. Animal models of chronic liver injury, however, have not yet conclusively clarified the involvement of MDSC for hepatic fibrosis. In human HCC and mouse models of liver cancer, MDSC are induced in the tumor environment and suppress anti-tumoral immune responses. Thus, the liver is a primary site of MDSC in vivo, and modulating MDSC functionality might represent a promising novel therapeutic target for liver diseases.

  7. Suppressor cell function is preserved in pemphigus and pemphigoid

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    King, A.J.; Schwartz, S.A.; Lopatin, D.; Voorhees, J.J.; Diaz, L.A.

    1982-09-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are activated to become suppressor T cells (S-T-C) by incubation with Concanavalin-A (Con-A). This has become the standard method for evaluation of suppressor function in patients. S-T-C function has been found to be impaired in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using this assay, we have investigated suppressor-cell function in 2 autoimmune disorders, bullous pemphigoid (BP) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), studying 6 patients from each group. Three patients with active SLE (positive controls), and 11 normal donors (negative controls) were also included. None of these patients had received systemic therapy with the exception of 2 patients with PV who were treated with gold in the past. PBL from these patients were incubated with and without 40 micrograms/ml Con-A for 72 hr to generate suppressor cells. Both groups of PBL were then irradiated wih 1500 r cobalt. Co-cultures were set up in sextuplicate using normal PBL as responders. Responder PBL were stimulated with 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 micrograms/ml of phytohemagglutin (PHA) and 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 micrograms/ml of Con-A. Cultures were pulsed on day 3 with /sup 3/H-thymidine and harvested on day 4. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test. S-T-C function was found to be significantly impaired in SLE vs normal (p . 0.0316). No statistically significant difference was seen in BP (p . 0.5883) and PV (p . 0.0921) as compared with normals. A defect in suppressor cell function may still be present in patients with PV and BP for the defect may be antigen-specific and therefore remain undetected by the Con-A suppressor assay.

  8. Endogenous viral elements in algal genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; YU Jun; WU Shuangxiu; LIU Tao; SUN Jing; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; LI Xingang; YIN Jinlong; WANG Xumin

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are host-genomic fragments originated from viral genomes. They have been found universally in animal and plant genomes. Here we carried out a systematic screening and analy-sis of EVEs in algal genomes and found that EVEs commonly exist in algal genomes. We classified the EVE fragments into three categories according to the length of EVE fragments. Due to the probability of sequence similarity by chance, we ignored the potential function of medium-length EVE fragments. However, long-length EVE fragments probably had capability to encode protein domains or even entire proteins, and some short-length EVE fragments had high similarity with host's siRNA sequences and possibly served functions of small RNAs. Therefore, short and long EVE fragments might provide regulomic and proteomic novelty to the host's metabolism and adaptation. We also found several EVE fragments shared by more than 3 algal genomes. By phylogenetic analysis of the shared EVEs and their corresponding species, we found that the integration of viral fragments into host genomes was an ancient event, possibly before the divergence of Chlorophytes and Ochrophytes. Our findings show that there is a frequent genetic flow from viruses to algal genomes. Moreover, study on algal EVEs shed light on the virus-host interaction in large timescale and could also help us understand the balance of marine ecosystems.

  9. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

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    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  10. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Coordinated function of cellular DEAD-box helicases in suppression of viral RNA recombination and maintenance of viral genome integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The intricate interactions between viruses and hosts include an evolutionary arms race and adaptation that is facilitated by the ability of RNA viruses to evolve rapidly due to high frequency mutations and genetic RNA recombination. In this paper, we show evidence that the co-opted cellular DDX3-like Ded1 DEAD-box helicase suppresses tombusviral RNA recombination in yeast model host, and the orthologous RH20 helicase functions in a similar way in plants. In vitro replication and recombination assays confirm the direct role of the ATPase function of Ded1p in suppression of viral recombination. We also present data supporting a role for Ded1 in facilitating the switch from minus- to plus-strand synthesis. Interestingly, another co-opted cellular helicase, the eIF4AIII-like AtRH2, enhances TBSV recombination in the absence of Ded1/RH20, suggesting that the coordinated actions of these helicases control viral RNA recombination events. Altogether, these helicases are the first co-opted cellular factors in the viral replicase complex that directly affect viral RNA recombination. Ded1 helicase seems to be a key factor maintaining viral genome integrity by promoting the replication of viral RNAs with correct termini, but inhibiting the replication of defective RNAs lacking correct 5' end sequences. Altogether, a co-opted cellular DEAD-box helicase facilitates the maintenance of full-length viral genome and suppresses viral recombination, thus limiting the appearance of defective viral RNAs during replication.

  12. Noncoding flavivirus RNA displays RNA interference suppressor activity in insect and Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Sterken, Mark G; Leung, Jason Y; Metz, Stefan W; Geertsema, Corinne; Goldbach, Rob W; Vlak, Just M; Kohl, Alain; Khromykh, Alexander A; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV) are highly pathogenic, mosquito-borne flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae) that cause severe disease and death in humans. WNV and DENV actively replicate in mosquitoes and human hosts and thus encounter different host immune responses. RNA interference (RNAi) is the predominant antiviral response against invading RNA viruses in insects and plants. As a countermeasure, plant and insect RNA viruses encode RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins to block the generation/activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Enhanced flavivirus replication in mosquitoes depleted for RNAi factors suggests an important biological role for RNAi in restricting virus replication, but it has remained unclear whether or not flaviviruses counteract RNAi via expression of an RSS. First, we established that flaviviral RNA replication suppressed siRNA-induced gene silencing in WNV and DENV replicon-expressing cells. Next, we showed that none of the WNV encoded proteins displayed RSS activity in mammalian and insect cells and in plants by using robust RNAi suppressor assays. In contrast, we found that the 3'-untranslated region-derived RNA molecule known as subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) efficiently suppressed siRNA- and miRNA-induced RNAi pathways in both mammalian and insect cells. We also showed that WNV sfRNA inhibits in vitro cleavage of double-stranded RNA by Dicer. The results of the present study suggest a novel role for sfRNA, i.e., as a nucleic acid-based regulator of RNAi pathways, a strategy that may be conserved among flaviviruses.

  13. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  14. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soitamo, Arto J; Jada, Balaji; Lehto, Kirsi

    2011-04-20

    RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs). These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA) mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter) the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent). Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1) were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) were also decreased in

  15. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Weinheimer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3 produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are

  16. Dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurugama Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  17. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  18. Sphingolipids in viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Viruses exploit membranes and their components such as sphingolipids in all steps of their life cycle including attachment and membrane fusion, intracellular transport, replication, protein sorting and budding. Examples for sphingolipid-dependent virus entry are found for: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which besides its protein receptors also interacts with glycosphingolipids (GSLs); rhinovirus, which promotes the formation of ceramide-enriched platforms and endocytosis; or measles virus (MV), which induces the surface expression of its own receptor CD150 via activation of sphingomyelinases (SMases). While SMase activation was implicated in Ebola virus (EBOV) attachment, the virus utilizes the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C protein 1 (NPC1) as 'intracellular' entry receptor after uptake into endosomes. Differential activities of SMases also affect the intracellular milieu required for virus replication. Sindbis virus (SINV), for example, replicates better in cells lacking acid SMase (ASMase). Defined lipid compositions of viral assembly and budding sites influence virus release and infectivity, as found for hepatitis C virus (HCV) or HIV. And finally, viruses manipulate cellular signaling and the sphingolipid metabolism to their advantage, as for example influenza A virus (IAV), which activates sphingosine kinase 1 and the transcription factor NF-κB.

  19. Viral infection, inflammation and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, Rachel E; Fatemi, S Hossein

    2013-04-05

    Schizophrenia is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with genetic and environmental etiologies. Prenatal viral/bacterial infections and inflammation play major roles in the genesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we describe a viral model of schizophrenia tested in mice whereby the offspring of mice prenatally infected with influenza at E7, E9, E16, and E18 show significant gene, protein, and brain structural abnormalities postnatally. Similarly, we describe data on rodents exposed to bacterial infection or injected with a synthetic viral mimic (PolyI:C) also demonstrating brain structural and behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, human serologic data has been indispensible in supporting the viral theory of schizophrenia. Individuals born seropositive for bacterial and viral agents are at a significantly elevated risk of developing schizophrenia. While the specific mechanisms of prenatal viral/bacterial infections and brain disorder are unclear, recent findings suggest that the maternal inflammatory response may be associated with fetal brain injury. Preventive and therapeutic treatment options are also proposed. This review presents data related to epidemiology, human serology, and experimental animal models which support the viral model of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Key to the Cancer Puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Steven B.

    1991-01-01

    Author describes developments in understanding of tumor suppressor genes or antioncogenes that he feels is most important breakthrough in solving cancer problem. Describes 1969 starting work of Harris with mouse fibroblast genes and later work of Knudson with retinoblastoma cells. Provides evidence that deletion of chromosome that results in the…

  1. Tunable EMI noise suppressor based on Ni nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Monika, E-mail: monikasharma1604@gmail.com [Centre for Applied Research in Electronics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India); Kuanr, Bijoy K. [Special Centre for Nanoscience, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Manish; Basu, Ananjan [Centre for Applied Research in Electronics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2014-09-01

    We designed, fabricated and evaluated noise suppressors based on Ni nanowire arrays embedded in Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) template in microstrip waveguide geometry. The effects of the length of the nanowires and the device dimensions on the microwave properties of noise suppressor are investigated. Ni nanowires with an average diameter of 200 nm and of various lengths (from 7 µm to 30 µm) were electrodeposited in AAO templates. Scanning electron microscope showed growth of highly ordered nanowires and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed composition of nanowires. Transmission electron microscope verified the diameter and length of the deposited nanowires. The resonance frequency of the noise suppressor can be tuned up to 23 GHz by applying an external magnetic field of 4.5 kOe. This gives a frequency tunability of 66%. Signal attenuation of the device enhances by increasing the bias magnetic field by over 60% and microstrip length by 20%. Therefore such integrated devices are good electromagnetic noise suppressors in wireless communication.

  2. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  3. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  4. Electrodialytic membrane suppressors for ion chromatography make programmable buffer generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongjing; Srinivasan, Kannan; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2012-01-01

    The use of buffer solutions is immensely important in a great variety of disciplines. The generation of continuous pH gradients in flow systems plays an important role in the chromatographic separation of proteins, high-throughput pK(a) determinations, etc. We demonstrate here that electrodialytic membrane suppressors used in ion chromatography can be used to generate buffers. The generated pH, computed from first principles, agrees well with measured values. We demonstrate the generation of phosphate and citrate buffers using a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) -based anion suppressor and Tris and ethylenediamine buffers using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) -based cation suppressor. Using a mixture of phosphate, citrate, and borate as the buffering ions and using a CEM suppressor, we demonstrate the generation of a highly reproducible (avg RSD 0.20%, n = 3), temporally linear (pH 3.0-11.9, r(2) > 0.9996), electrically controlled pH gradient. With butylamine and a large concentration (0.5 M) of added NaCl, we demonstrate a similar linear pH gradient of large range with a near-constant ionic strength. We believe that this approach will be of value for the generation of eluents in the separation of proteins and other biomolecules and in online process titrations.

  5. "Ring-fencing" BRCA1 tumor suppressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan J; Crossan, Gerry P; Hodskinson, Michael R G

    2011-12-13

    BRCA1 is a crucial human breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor gene. The article by Drost et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell together with a recent paper in Science now provide a clearer picture of how this large and complex protein suppresses tumorigenesis.

  6. Insect symbiotic bacteria harbour viral pathogens for transovarial transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yuyan; Chen, Qian; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Yi; Wei, Taiyun

    2017-03-06

    Many insects, including mosquitoes, planthoppers, aphids and leafhoppers, are the hosts of bacterial symbionts and the vectors for transmitting viral pathogens(1-3). In general, symbiotic bacteria can indirectly affect viral transmission by enhancing immunity and resistance to viruses in insects(3-5). Whether symbiotic bacteria can directly interact with the virus and mediate its transmission has been unknown. Here, we show that an insect symbiotic bacterium directly harbours a viral pathogen and mediates its transovarial transmission to offspring. We observe rice dwarf virus (a plant reovirus) binding to the envelopes of the bacterium Sulcia, a common obligate symbiont of leafhoppers(6-8), allowing the virus to exploit the ancient oocyte entry path of Sulcia in rice leafhopper vectors. Such virus-bacterium binding is mediated by the specific interaction of the viral capsid protein and the Sulcia outer membrane protein. Treatment with antibiotics or antibodies against Sulcia outer membrane protein interferes with this interaction and strongly prevents viral transmission to insect offspring. This newly discovered virus-bacterium interaction represents the first evidence that a viral pathogen can directly exploit a symbiotic bacterium for its transmission. We believe that such a model of virus-bacterium communication is a common phenomenon in nature.

  7. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño; Ana Isabel Toro Montoya

    1996-01-01

    Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principal...

  8. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Much...

  9. Multiplexed Methylation Profiles of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Maria José; Grau, Laura; Franco, Noreli; Orenes, Esteban; Alvarez, Miguel; Blanca, Ana; Heredero, Oscar; Palacios, Alberto; Urrutia, Manuel; Fernández, Jesus María; López-Beltrán, Antonio; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation of tumor suppressors can occur early in carcinogenesis and are potentially important early indicators of cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the methylation of 25 tumor suppressor genes in bladder cancer using a methylation-specific (MS) multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MLPA). Initial analyses in bladder cancer cell lines (n = 14) and fresh-frozen primary bladder tumor specimens (n = 31) supported the panel of genes selected being altered in bladder cancer. The process of MS-MLPA was optimized for its application in body fluids using two independent training and validation sets of urinary specimens (n = 146), including patients with bladder cancer (n = 96) and controls (n = 50). BRCA1 (71.0%), WT1 (38.7%), and RARB (38.7%) were the most frequently methylated genes in bladder tumors, with WT1 methylation being significantly associated with tumor stage (P = 0.011). WT1 and PAX5A were identified as methylated tumor suppressors. In addition, BRCA1, WT1, and RARB were the most frequently methylated genes in urinary specimens. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed significant diagnostic accuracies in both urinary sets for BRCA1, RARB, and WT1. The novelty of this report relates to applying MS-MLPA, a multiplexed methylation technique, for tumor suppressors in bladder cancer and body fluids. Methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes were clinically relevant for histopathological stratification of bladder tumors and offered a noninvasive diagnostic strategy for the clinical management of patients affected with uroepithelial neoplasias. PMID:21227392

  10. The Enamovirus P0 protein is a silencing suppressor which inhibits local and systemic RNA silencing through AGO1 degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusaro, Adriana F. [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Correa, Regis L. [CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia); Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Nakasugi, Kenlee; Jackson, Craig [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kawchuk, Lawrence [Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB T1J4B1 (Canada); Vaslin, Maite F.S. [Depto. de Virologia, IMPPG, UFRJ, 21941-902 (Brazil); Waterhouse, Peter M., E-mail: peter.waterhouse@sydney.edu.au [University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, P.O. Box 1600, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-05-10

    The P0 protein of poleroviruses and P1 protein of sobemoviruses suppress the plant's RNA silencing machinery. Here we identified a silencing suppressor protein (SSP), P0{sup PE}, in the Enamovirus Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1) and showed that it and the P0s of poleroviruses Potato leaf roll virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus have strong local and systemic SSP activity, while the P1 of Sobemovirus Southern bean mosaic virus supresses systemic silencing. The nuclear localized P0{sup PE} has no discernable sequence conservation with known SSPs, but proved to be a strong suppressor of local silencing and a moderate suppressor of systemic silencing. Like the P0s from poleroviruses, P0{sup PE} destabilizes AGO1 and this action is mediated by an F-box-like domain. Therefore, despite the lack of any sequence similarity, the poleroviral and enamoviral SSPs have a conserved mode of action upon the RNA silencing machinery.

  11. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  12. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic

  13. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Husain, Syed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N; Kar, Premashis

    2011-05-23

    Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  14. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,781 (2013) Number of new ...

  15. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of the critical factors to this communications strategy effectiveness remain largely unknown, the mathematical models in epidemiology are presented in this marketing specific field. In this paper, an epidemiological model SIR (Susceptible- Infected-Recovered) to study the effects of a viral marketing strategy is presented. It is made a comparison between the disease parameters and the marketing application, and simulations using the Matlab software are performed. Finally, some conclusions are given and their marketing impli...

  16. Statistical mechanics of viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K

    2015-01-09

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements-yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy-ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together-is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  17. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  18. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  19. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  20. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  1. Efficient Transient Expression of Recombinant Proteins in Plants by the Novel pEff Vector Based on the Genome of Potato Virus X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanova, Eugenia S.; Blokhina, Elena A.; Tsybalova, Liudmila M.; Peyret, Hadrien; Lomonossoff, George P.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2017-01-01

    Agroinfiltration of plant leaves with binary vectors carrying a gene of interest within a plant viral vector is a rapid and efficient method for protein production in plants. Previously, we constructed a self-replicating vector, pA7248AMV, based on the genetic elements of potato virus X (PVX), and have shown that this vector can be used for the expression of recombinant proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. However, this vector is almost 18 kb long and therefore not convenient for genetic manipulation. Furthermore, for efficient expression of the target protein it should be co-agroinfiltrated with an additional binary vector expressing a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing. Here, we improved this expression system by creating the novel pEff vector. Its backbone is about 5 kb shorter than the original vector and it contains an expression cassette for the silencing suppressor, P24, from grapevine leafroll-associated virus-2 alongside PVX genetic elements, thus eliminating the need of co-agroinfiltration. The pEff vector provides green fluorescent protein expression levels of up to 30% of total soluble protein. The novel vector was used for expression of the influenza vaccine candidate, M2eHBc, consisting of an extracellular domain of influenza virus M2 protein (M2e) fused to hepatitis B core antigen. Using the pEff system, M2eHBc was expressed to 5–10% of total soluble protein, several times higher than with original pA7248AMV vector. Plant-produced M2eHBc formed virus-like particles in vivo, as required for its use as a vaccine. The new self-replicating pEff vector could be used for fast and efficient production of various recombinant proteins in plants. PMID:28293244

  2. Viral control of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Galluzzi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the process of pathogen-host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against infection, disabling host cell apoptosis might represent an almost obligate step in the viral life cycle. Conversely, viruses may take advantage of stimulating apoptosis, either to kill uninfected cells from the immune system, or to induce the breakdown of infected cells, thereby favoring viral dissemination. Several viral polypeptides are homologs of host-derived apoptosis-regulatory proteins, such as members of the Bcl-2 family. Moreover, viral factors with no homology to host proteins specifically target key components of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the viral modulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, by focusing in particular on the mechanisms by which viral proteins control the host cell death apparatus.

  3. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  4. Vibration behavior of fuel-element vibration suppressors for the advanced power reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. W.; Fiero, I. B.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary shock and vibration tests were performed on vibration suppressors for the advanced power reactor for space application. These suppressors position the fuel pellets in a pin type fuel element. The test determined the effect of varying axial clearance on the behavior of the suppressors when subjected to shock and vibratory loading. The full-size suppressor was tested in a mockup model of fuel and clad which required scaling of test conditions. The test data were correlated with theoretical predictions for suppressor failure. Good agreement was obtained. The maximum difference with damping neglected was about 30 percent. Neglecting damping would result in a conservative design.

  5. CCR5 is a suppressor for cortical plasticity and hippocampal learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miou; Greenhill, Stuart; Huang, Shan; Silva, Tawnie K; Sano, Yoshitake; Wu, Shumin; Cai, Ying; Nagaoka, Yoshiko; Sehgal, Megha; Cai, Denise J; Lee, Yong-Seok; Fox, Kevin; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory is not understood. Here, we report that decreasing the function of CCR5 increases MAPK/CREB signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice, while neuronal CCR5 overexpression caused memory deficits. Decreasing CCR5 function in mouse barrel cortex also resulted in enhanced spike timing dependent plasticity and consequently, dramatically accelerated experience-dependent plasticity. These results suggest that CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation by viral proteins may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 peptide caused LTP, signaling and memory deficits that were prevented by Ccr5 knockout or knockdown. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in neuroplasticity, learning and memory, and indicate that CCR5 has a role in the cognitive deficits caused by HIV. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20985.001 PMID:27996938

  6. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted.

  7. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardendra Manvikar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted.

  8. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  9. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2012-04-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson's two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of 'two-hit inactivation' in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches in cancer therapy.

  10. Hepatitis B virus: pathogenesis, viral intermediates, and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia-Yee; Locarnini, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Although HBV has the potential to generate an almost limitless spectrum of quasispecies during chronic infection, the viability of the majority of these quasispecies is almost certainly impaired due to constraints imposed by the remarkably compact organization of the HBV genome. On the other hand, single mutations may affect more than one gene and result in complex and unpredictable effects on viral phenotype. Better understanding of the constraints imposed by gene overlap and of genotype-phenotype relationships should help in the development of improved antiviral strategies and management approaches. Although the probability of developing viral resistance is directly proportional to the intensity of selection pressure and the diversity of quasispecies, potent inhibition of HBV replication should be able to prevent development of drug resistance because mutagenesis is replication dependent. If viral replication can be suppressed for a sufficient length of time, viral load should decline to a point where the continued production of quasispecies with the potential to resist new drug treatments no longer occurs. Clinical application of this concept will require optimization of combination therapies analogous to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection. Total cure of hepatitis B will require elimination of the intranuclear pool of viral minichromosomes, which will probably only be achieved by normal cell turnover, reactivation of host immunity, or elucidation of the antiviral mechanisms operating during cytokine clearance in acute hepatitis B (see Fig. 1).

  11. Tv-commercial verliest het van virals

    OpenAIRE

    Gisbergen, M.S. van; Ketelaar, P.E.; Baudoin, P,

    2007-01-01

    Viral commercials werken goed. De meeste jongeren bekijken viral commercials en beoordelen ze positiever dan tv-commercials. Doordat viral commercials volgens consumenten voor vermaak zorgen, ontwijken zij ze minder dan tv-commercials. Ook onthouden jongeren de in viral commercials geadverteerde producten en merken goed. Dit blijkt uit onderzoek van de Radboud Universiteit in samenwerking met De Vos & Jansen onder 412 jongeren.

  12. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  13. Two virus-encoded RNA silencing suppressors, P14 of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus and S6 of Rice black streak dwarf virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lingdi; WANG Zhaohui; WANG Xianbing; LI Dawei; HAN Chenggui; ZHAI Yafeng; YU Jialin

    2005-01-01

    Functional analysis for gene silencing suppressor of P14 gene of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus and S6 gene of Rice black streak dwarf virus was carried out by agro- infiltration with recombinant vectors of Potato virus X. The phenotype observation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression and Northern blot showed that the gene silencing of gfp transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana induced by homologous sequence was strongly suppressed by the immixture infiltration of either the P14 or the S6. In the suppressed plants, the gfp mRNA accumulation was higher than that in the non-suppressed controls and the symptoms caused by PVX infection became more severe, especially the gfp DNA methylation of plant genome was significantly inhabited when co-infiltrated with RBSDV S6 gene. These results suggested that these two virus genes were potentially to encode for proteins as RNA silencing suppressors.

  14. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eKon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the CaMV 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation 0 plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification.

  15. Loss of suppressor-of-fused function promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Kawagoe, R; Sasai, K; Li, Y; Russell, H R; Curran, T; McKinnon, P J

    2007-09-27

    The Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is indispensable for development, and functions to activate a transcriptional program modulated by the GLI transcription factors. Here, we report that loss of a regulator of the SHH pathway, Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), resulted in early embryonic lethality in the mouse similar to inactivation of another SHH regulator, Patched1 (Ptch1). In contrast to Ptch1+/- mice, Sufu+/- mice were not tumor prone. However, in conjunction with p53 loss, Sufu+/- animals developed tumors including medulloblastoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Tumors present in Sufu+/-p53-/- animals resulted from Sufu loss of heterozygosity. Sufu+/-p53-/- medulloblastomas also expressed a signature gene expression profile typical of aberrant SHH signaling, including upregulation of N-myc, Sfrp1, Ptch2 and cyclin D1. Finally, the Smoothened inhibitor, hedgehog antagonist, did not block growth of tumors arising from Sufu inactivation. These data demonstrate that Sufu is essential for development and functions as a tumor suppressor.

  16. Lysine methylation regulates the pRb tumour suppressor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, S; Khaire, N; Inche, A; Carr, S; La Thangue, N B

    2010-04-22

    The pRb tumour suppressor protein has a central role in coordinating early cell cycle progression. An important level of control imposed on pRb occurs through post-translational modification, for example, phosphorylation. We describe here a new level of regulation on pRb, mediated through the targeted methylation of lysine residues, by the methyltransferase Set7/9. Set7/9 methylates the C-terminal region of pRb, both in vitro and in cells, and methylated pRb interacts with heterochromatin protein HP1. pRb methylation is required for pRb-dependent cell cycle arrest and transcriptional repression, as well as pRb-dependent differentiation. Our results indicate that methylation can influence the properties of pRb, and raise the interesting possibility that methylation modulates pRb tumour suppressor activity.

  17. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  18. Caffeine activates tumor suppressor PTEN in sarcoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Hideji; Ohnari, Issei; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yachie, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Akt activation exerts a strong anti-apoptotic effect and inhibits key pro-apoptotic proteins. We investigated the effect of caffeine in the prevention of tumor cell proliferation and induction of cell death. We found that caffeine induced increased intracellular cAMP levels, PTEN activation and Akt inactivation, which to...

  19. Enhanced transfection of brain tumor suppressor genes by photochemical internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih H.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2011-03-01

    One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of a tumor suppressor gene (PAX-6) was investigated in monolayers and spheroids consisting of F98 rat glioma cells.

  20. Functional Study of the Human BRCA2 Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Wang, Y., Lee, M. & Venkitaraman, A. R. Abnormal cytokinesis in cells deficient in the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2. Science 306, 876...tumor suppressor genes in mitotic and meiotic cells. Mol Cell 2, 317-28 (1998). 28. Fuks, F., Milner, J. & Kouzarides, T. BRCA2 associates with...Scully, R. et al. Association of BRCA1 with Rad5l in mitotic and meiotic cells. Cell 88, 265-75 (1997). 49. Nakanishi, K. et al. Human Fanconi anemia

  1. Disrupting Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization: Insights from Metastasis Suppressor Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheena Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer affects approximately 25,000 women in the United States each year and remains one of the most lethal female malignancies. A standard approach to therapy is surgical cytoreduction, after which the remaining microscopic residual disease is treated with chemotherapy. The vast majority of patients have disease recurrence, underscoring the crucial need for approaches to control the regrowth, or colonization, of tissues after local treatment. Improved therapies require mechanistic information about the process of metastatic colonization, the final step in metastasis, in which cancer cells undergo progressive growth at secondary sites. Studies of metastasis suppressors are providing insights into events controlling metastatic colonization. This paper reviews our laboratory's approach to the identification, characterization, and functional testing of the JNKK1/MKK4 metastasis suppressor in ovarian cancer metastatic colonization. Specifically, we demonstrate that interaction of ovarian caner cells with the omental microenvironment activates JNKK1/MKK4 resulting in decreased proliferation without affecting apoptosis. The potential role of the omental microenvironment, specifically milky spot structures, is also described. It is our goal to provide this work as a usable paradigm that will enable others to study metastasis suppressors in clinical and experimental ovarian cancer metastases.

  2. Control of autophagy by oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, M C; Tasdemir, E; Criollo, A; Morselli, E; Vicencio, J M; Carnuccio, R; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Multiple oncogenes (in particular phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K; activated Akt1; antiapoptotic proteins from the Bcl-2 family) inhibit autophagy. Similarly, several tumor suppressor proteins (such as BH3-only proteins; death-associated protein kinase-1, DAPK1; the phosphatase that antagonizes PI3K, PTEN; tuberous sclerosic complex 1 and 2, TSC1 and TSC2; as well as LKB1/STK11) induce autophagy, meaning that their loss reduces autophagy. Beclin-1, which is required for autophagy induction acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor protein, and other essential autophagy mediators (such as Atg4c, UVRAG and Bif-1) are bona fide oncosuppressors. One of the central tumor suppressor proteins, p53 exerts an ambiguous function in the regulation of autophagy. Within the nucleus, p53 can act as an autophagy-inducing transcription factor. Within the cytoplasm, p53 exerts a tonic autophagy-inhibitory function, and its degradation is actually required for the induction of autophagy. The role of autophagy in oncogenesis and anticancer therapy is contradictory. Chronic suppression of autophagy may stimulate oncogenesis. However, once a tumor is formed, autophagy inhibition may be a therapeutic goal for radiosensitization and chemosensitization. Altogether, the current state-of-the art suggests a complex relationship between cancer and deregulated autophagy that must be disentangled by further in-depth investigation.

  3. Thinking outside the box: using metastasis suppressors as molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiolloy, Sophie; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W

    2011-04-01

    Metastasis, the process in which tumor cells move from a primary tumor through the circulation, lodge, and grow in distant locations, is a significant contributor to cancer patient morbidity and mortality, yet remains poorly understood. The molecular processes regulating tumorigenicity and metastasis are distinguishable, suggesting that it is possible to design therapeutic interventions to specifically control metastasis formation. Metastasis suppressors, which specifically regulate metastasis, are being used in "reverse genetics" approaches to discover the phenotypic alterations caused by modulating their levels and/or activity. This strategy is allowing the identification of tumor-host interactions that are crucial for efficient colonization and their disruption can be targeted to suppress metastases formation. In this review we discuss studies addressing invasion and migration, key functions for both early and late in the metastatic process. Metastasis suppressor functions, which modulate lodging and subsequent colonization of the secondary site, are also described. In sum this review focuses on metastasis suppressors that have yielded insight into mechanisms controlling metastasis formation. These serve as platform for out of the box thinking which will enable the discovery of new paradigms in metastasis research. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. BRCA1 tumor suppressor network: focusing on its tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germline mutations of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are a major cause of familial breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1 plays critical roles in the DNA damage response that regulates activities of multiple repair and checkpoint pathways for maintaining genome stability. The BRCT domains of BRCA1 constitute a phospho-peptide binding domain recognizing a phospho-SPxF motif (S, serine; P, proline; × varies; F, phenylalanine. The BRCT domains are frequently targeted by clinically important mutations and most of these mutations disrupt the binding surface of the BRCT domains to phosphorylated peptides. The BRCT domain and its capability to bind phosphorylated protein is required for the tumor suppressor function of BRCA1. Through its BRCT phospho-binding ability BRCA1 forms at least three mutually exclusive complexes by binding to phosphorylated proteins Abraxas, Bach1 and CTIP. The A, B and C complexes, at lease partially undertake BRCA1's role in mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair that maintain genome stability, thus may play important roles in BRCA1's tumor suppressor function.

  5. Isolation of a rice gene homologous to the human putative tumor suppressor gene QM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    QM gene was originally isolated from human by Dowdy et al during a search for a wilms′ tumor suppressor gene. Researches of QM gene focused mainly on animals and yeasts, little was known about plant QM gene. For better understanding of QM gene in rice, a QM homologous fragment was used as a probe to screen rice (Oryza sativa subsp. indica c.v. Guanglu′ ai 4) genomic DNA library,and two clones were obtained. One of them, OSQM2, encoded a highly basic protein of 184 amino acids, the sequence was about 3.1 kb long with a very special promoter region compared with other known QM genes. Seven potential G boxes could be found between -690 and -230. G box, which contains a ACGT core motif, had been reported in many plants to act as a cis acting DNA element in the regulation of genes in a variety of environmental conditions, such as ABA regulated gene expression, red light, UV light, anaerobiosis, and wounding etc. Two closely linked DRE related motifs (dehydration responsive element) could also be found between -182 and 173, which had a CCGAC conserved sequence and had been identified in many cold and drought responsive genes in Arabidopsis. Six MYC recognition sequences with the conserved motif NCANNTGN were also presented, which might be essential for ABA and drought responsive expression of the plant genes.

  6. SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 of Sporisorium reilianum Modulates Inflorescence Branching Architecture in Maize and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Hassan; Drechsler, Frank; Löfke, Christian; Teichmann, Thomas; Schirawski, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The biotrophic fungus Sporisorium reilianum causes head smut of maize (Zea mays) after systemic plant colonization. Symptoms include the formation of multiple female inflorescences at subapical nodes of the stalk because of loss of apical dominance. By deletion analysis of cluster 19-1, the largest genomic divergence cluster in S. reilianum, we identified a secreted fungal effector responsible for S. reilianum-induced loss of apical dominance, which we named SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 (SAD1). SAD1 transcript levels were highly up-regulated during biotrophic fungal growth in all infected plant tissues. SAD1-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins expressed by recombinant S. reilianum localized to the extracellular hyphal space. Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-expressing green fluorescent protein-SAD1 displayed an increased number of secondary rosette-leaf branches. This suggests that SAD1 manipulates inflorescence branching architecture in maize and Arabidopsis through a conserved pathway. Using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid library of S. reilianum-infected maize tissues, we identified potential plant interaction partners that had a predicted function in ubiquitination, signaling, and nuclear processes. Presence of SAD1 led to an increase of the transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN-FORMED1 in the root and a reduction of the branching regulator TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 in the stalk. This indicates a role of SAD1 in regulation of apical dominance by modulation of branching through increasing transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN1 and derepression of bud outgrowth.

  7. VirSorter: mining viral signal from microbial genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2015-05-01

    available through the iPlant Cyberinfrastructure that provides a web-based user interface interconnected with the required computing resources. VirSorter thus complements existing prophage prediction softwares to better leverage fragmented, SAG and metagenomic datasets in a way that will scale to modern sequencing. Given these features, VirSorter should enable the discovery of new viruses in microbial datasets, and further our understanding of uncultivated viral communities across diverse ecosystems.

  8. Classification of suppressor additives based on synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekmann, P., E-mail: peter.broekmann@iac.unibe.ch [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fluegel, A.; Emnet, C.; Arnold, M.; Roeger-Goepfert, C.; Wagner, A. [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Hai, N.T.M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Mayer, D. [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. > These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. > In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). - Abstract: Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). While the type-I suppressor selectively forms efficient barriers for copper inter-diffusion on chloride-terminated electrode surfaces we identified a type-II suppressor that interacts non-selectively with any kind of anions chemisorbed on copper (chloride, sulfate, sulfonate). Type-I suppressors are vital for the superconformal copper growth mode in Damascene processing and show an antagonistic interaction with SPS (Bis-Sodium-Sulfopropyl-Disulfide) which involves the deactivation of this suppressor chemistry. This suppressor deactivation is rationalized in terms of compositional changes in the layer of the chemisorbed anions due to the competition of chloride and MPS (Mercaptopropane Sulfonic Acid) for adsorption sites on the metallic copper surface. MPS is the product of the dissociative SPS adsorption within the preexisting chloride matrix on the copper surface. The non-selectivity in the adsorption behavior of the type-II suppressor is rationalized in terms of anion/cation pairing effects of the poly-cationic suppressor and the anion-modified copper

  9. Block of Viral Movement in Papaya Mutant Plants Resistant to Papaya Ringspot Virus%番木瓜抗病突变体阻碍环斑病毒体内运转

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周国辉; 李华平; 等

    2001-01-01

    应用RT-PCR一步法检测了PRSV Ys株系在感病番木瓜及其抗病突 变体植株体内的运转 动态,结果表明:在感病植株中,接种后48hr接种叶的未接种部位可检出病毒,第4天部分 接种叶柄可检出病毒,第6天植株各部位均能检出病毒;而在抗病植株中,接种后可以而且 仅能 在接种部位检出病毒;因而认为抗病突变体能够阻碍病毒从接种部位运出及(或)向未接种 部位运入。%One-step RT-PCR was used to detect papaya ringspot virus (PRSV ) moveme nt in susceptible and resistant (mutant) papaya (Carica papaya L.) plants. The t ime of post-inoculation at which PRSV was first detected in susceptible plants w as 48 hours in the other area of inoculated leaves out of inoculated sites , 4 d ays in the petioles of inoculated leaf and 6 days in all parts of plant. Compara tively, in resistant plants, the inoculated sites were the only area at which PR SV can be detected any time. Therefore, it was proposed that the mutated resista nce to PRSV protects the virus from moving out of inoculated sites or/and into non-inoculated areas.

  10. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  11. Integrin Activation and Viral Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-dian GAO; Jun-zheng DU; Jian-hua ZHOU; Hui-yun CHANG; Qing-ge XIE

    2008-01-01

    Integrins are members of a ubiquitous membrane receptor family which includes 18 different α subunits and 8 β subunits forming more than 20 α/β heterodimers. Integrins play key functions in vascular endothelial cell and tumour cell adhesion, lymphocyte trafficking, tumor growth and viral infection. Current understanding of the molecular basis of integrins as viral receptors has been achieved through many decades of study into the biology of transmembrane glycoproteins and their interactions with several viruses. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the molecular bases of interactions between viruses and integrins, which are of potential practical significance. Inhibition of virus-integrin interactions at the points of virus attachment or entry will provide a novel approach for the therapeutic treatment of viral diseases.

  12. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principalmente, por factores intrínsecos del virus, como la naturaleza de su ácido nucleico, y por la longevidad
    y tasa reproductiva del huésped.

  13. Acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartt, Russell

    2012-12-01

    Most cases of acute meningitis are infectious and result from a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Acute meningitis is infectious in most cases and caused by a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Shifts in the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens have been influenced by changes in vaccines and their implementation. Seasonal and environmental changes influence the likely viral and rickettsial pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Pertinent testing and treatment can vary with the clinical presentation, season, and possible exposures. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute meningitis.

  14. Cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Said, Adnan

    2015-02-01

    There are several extrahepatic cutaneous manifestations associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. Serum sickness and polyarteritis nodosa are predominantly associated with hepatitis B infection, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia associated vasculitis and porphyria cutanea tarda are more frequently seen in hepatitis C infection. The clinico-pathogenic associations of these skin conditions are not completely defined but appear to involve activation of the host immune system including the complement system. Management of the aforementioned cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis is often similar to that done in cases without viral hepatitis, with control of immune activation being a key strategy. In cases associated with hepatitis B and C, control of viral replication with specific antiviral therapy is also important and associated with improvement in most of the associated clinical manifestations.

  15. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  16. The new research on tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; YANG Hai-fan; YU Lei; PANG lin-lin; LI Hai-jiao; LIU Guang-da

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the world. The carcinogenesis of HCC is multifactorial, multifunctional and multistage. Tumor suppressor gene therapy is one of the strategies, it is mainly used to make use of tumor suppressor gene groups which can inhibit the cell growth, to prevent the expression of oncogenes or to resume the function of anti-oncogenes. But so far, there is not a particular gene to be a main tumor suppressor gene in HCC. Therefore, it is necessary to study on the new anti-oncogenes to explain pathogenesis of liver cancer and seek for the newly effective target to carry on liver cancer gene therapy. PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten) was discovered as a tumor suppressor gene. It functions as a protein tyrosine phosphatase and as a lipid phosphatase. As a lipid phosphatase, PTEN antagonizes PI3K/Akt signaling by dephosphorylating the D3 position of the inositol ring of phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate(PIP3), to generate phosphatidylinositol-4, 5,- biphosphate(PIP2). On the other hand, as a protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTEN can dephosphorylate itself, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the platelet derived growth factor receptor, involves in the migration, adhension of cells. Many researches have been testified that there is a higher frequency of negative expression of PTEN protein in hepatocellular carcinoma, the negative correlation between expression of PTEN gene and differential grade, clinic stage of HCC indicated that in activation of PTEN gene maybe a late incidence in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and may play an important role in the genesis and development of some hepatocellular carcinoma. KLF6, a member of Krupple-like gene family, a ubiquitously expressed zinc finger transcription factor, has an important role in regulating cell growth and differentiation. Several experiments have been proved that the genetic events of tumor

  17. Metagenomics-based analysis of viral communities in dairy lagoon wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamlan, F S; Ederer, M M; Brown, C J; Coats, E R; Crawford, R L

    2013-02-15

    Microbial populations, especially those of viruses, are poorly studied in dairy wastewater treatment operations. Here we report signature nucleic acid metagenomic sequences obtained by pyrosequencing viromes of virus-like particles that were extracted from two dairy waste treatment lagoons. The lagoons are operated in series, with Lagoon I being used as the primary stage and Lagoon II as the secondary stage of wastewater treatment. An average of 2000 sequences was obtained from each lagoon. More than 300 signatures from each lagoon matched sequences in the virus database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). We utilized a bioinformatics approach and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the viral diversity and presence of potential viral pathogens within the lagoons. Our results showed differences in viral community compositions between Lagoon I and Lagoon II, suggesting that the viral community changes significantly in the transition of water between the two lagoons. Furthermore, the diverse viral community in the lagoon samples contained signature sequences of a variety of bacterial, plant, and animal viruses. Bacteriophage sequences dominated the viral community metagenomes in both lagoons. Ultimately these results can be used to identify viral bioindicators to rapidly assess wastewater treatment quality and the potential impacts of dairy operations on watersheds. Our viral metagenomic sequences have been submitted to GenBank (GPID 65805) and can provide insight into the composition and structure of viral communities within wastewaters of dairy lagoon systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Japanese encephalitis virus infection modulates the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in macrophages: implications for the hosts' innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Kiran; Dutta, Kallol; Nazmi, Arshed; Basu, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to subvert the host's immune system and one of them is preventing the infected cells from sending out chemotactic signals to activate the adaptive immune response. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a neuropathologic flavivirus that is responsible for significant number of child mortalities in various parts of South-East Asia. In this study we show that JEV modulates suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS)1 and 3 expression in macrophages to bring about changes in the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, so as to inhibit proinflammatory cyto/chemokine release. Using real time PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining, we show that the expression of type 1 interferons and intracellular expression of viral genes are also affected over time. Also, following the initial activation of SOCS1 and 3, there is production of interferon-inducible anti-viral proteins in the cells which may be responsible for inhibiting viral replication. However, even at later time points, viral genes were still detected from the macrophages, albeit at lesser quantities, than earlier time points, indicative of intracellular persistence of the virus in a latent form. On knocking down SOCS1 and SOCS3 we found a significant decrease in viral gene expression at an early time point, indicating the dysregulation of the signaling cascade leading to increased production of interferon-inducible anti-viral proteins. Taken together, our study provides an insight into the role of JEV infection in modulating the JAK-STAT pathway with the help of SOCS leading to the generation of an antiviral innate immune response.

  19. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  20. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005) compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+) ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2%) were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity. PMID:21605420

  1. PHF2 histone demethylase acts as a tumor suppressor in association with p53 in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K-H; Park, J-W; Sung, H-S; Choi, Y-J; Kim, W H; Lee, H S; Chung, H-J; Shin, H-W; Cho, C-H; Kim, T-Y; Li, S-H; Youn, H-D; Kim, S J; Chun, Y-S

    2015-05-28

    Plant homeodomain finger 2 (PHF2) has a role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression by demethylating H3K9-Me2. Several genome-wide studies have demonstrated that the chromosomal region including the PHF2 gene is often deleted in some cancers including colorectal cancer, and this finding encouraged us to investigate the tumor suppressive role of PHF2. As p53 is a critical tumor suppressor in colon cancer, we tested the possibility that PHF2 is an epigenetic regulator of p53. PHF2 was associated with p53, and thereby, promoted p53-driven gene expression in cancer cells under genotoxic stress. PHF2 converted the chromatin that is favorable for transcription by demethylating the repressive H3K9-Me2 mark. In an HCT116 xenograft model, PHF2 was found to be required for the anticancer effects of oxaliplatin and doxorubicin. In PHF2-deficient xenografts, p53 expression was profoundly induced by both drugs, but its downstream product p21 was not, suggesting that p53 cannot be activated in the absence of PHF2. To find clinical evidence about the role of PHF2, we analyzed the expressions of PHF2, p53 and p21 in human colon cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues from patients. PHF2 was downregulated in cancer tissues and PHF2 correlated with p21 in cancers expressing functional p53. Colon and stomach cancer tissue arrays showed a positive correlation between PHF2 and p21 expressions. Informatics analyses using the Oncomine database also supported our notion that PHF2 is downregulated in colon and stomach cancers. On the basis of these findings, we propose that PHF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in association with p53 in cancer development and ensures p53-mediated cell death in response to chemotherapy.

  2. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  3. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  4. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  5. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  6. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  7. Isolation of tumor suppressor genes from MEN-1 related neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavari, R.; Kinder, B.; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a cancer predisposition syndrome marked by the development of tumors in specific endocrine tissues such as the pituitary, parathyroid and pancreatic islets. Genetic linkage studies have mapped the MEN 1 gene to 11q13, and allelic loss in related tumors suggests that the gene is a tumor suppressor. Because inactivation of tumor suppressors may be accompanied by underexpression, subtractive hybridization was used to isolate potential candidate genes underexpressed in MEN 1 tumors. cDNA was synthesized from tumor and normal parathyroid tissue by RT-PCR. Biotinylated tumor cDNA was used as a driver and normal cDNA as a tester in subtractive hybridization. Following annealing of the driver and tester amplicons, the biotinylated strands were removed with streptavidin. The subtracted material was then used as a probe to isolate clones from a normal pancreatic islet library. Screening 2 x 10{sup 5} plaques yielded 14 positive clones. Of 6 clones analyzed, 3 were confirmed to be underexpressed in parathyroid tumors. Sequence analysis identified 2 clones as human ribosomal protein S10 (RPS10, chromosome 6) and 1 as the islet amyloid polypeptide (1AP, chromosome 12). The precise function of human RPS10 is not known but the related RPS6 functions as a tumor suppressor in Drosophila. 1AP has been implicated in modulation of G protein activity. The remaining positive clones will be mapped to determine if any fall on chromosome 11q13, and additional subtractions with parathyroid and pancreatic islet neoplasms are underway.

  8. Expression of Cucumber mosaic virus suppressor 2b alters FWA methylation and its siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamera, Sadia; Yan, Youngsheng; Song, Xiaoguang; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Murtaza, Iram; Su, Lei; Tariq, Muhammad; Chen, Xiaoying; Fang, Rongxiang

    2016-11-15

    The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) suppressor 2b co-localizes with AGO4 in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of Arabidopsis thaliana Biochemical fractionation of A. thaliana cellular extracts revealed that 2b and AGO4 coexist in multiple size exclusions. 2b transgenic A. thaliana exhibited an enhanced accumulation of 24nt siRNAs from flowering wageningen (FWA) and other heterochromatic loci. These plants also exhibited hypo-methylation of an endogenous- as well as transgene-FWA promoter at non-CG sites. In corroboration, both transgenic 2b and CMV infection affected the regulation of transposons which mimics the ago4 phenotype. In conclusion, 2b perturbs plant defense by interfering with AGO4-regulated transcriptional gene silencing.

  9. Expression of Cucumber mosaic virus suppressor 2b alters FWA methylation and its siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Hamera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV suppressor 2b co-localizes with AGO4 in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions of Arabidopsis thaliana. Biochemical fractionation of A. thaliana cellular extracts revealed that 2b and AGO4 coexist in multiple size exclusions. 2b transgenic A. thaliana exhibited an enhanced accumulation of 24nt siRNAs from flowering wageningen (FWA and other heterochromatic loci. These plants also exhibited hypo-methylation of an endogenous- as well as transgene-FWA promoter at non-CG sites. In corroboration, both transgenic 2b and CMV infection affected the regulation of transposons which mimics the ago4 phenotype. In conclusion, 2b perturbs plant defense by interfering with AGO4-regulated transcriptional gene silencing.

  10. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugel, Stefano; Delpozzo, Federica; Desantis, Giacomo; Papalini, Francesca; Simonato, Francesca; Sonda, Nada; Zilio, Serena; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a subset of myeloid cells that expand under pathological conditions, such as cancer development, acute and chronic infections, trauma, bone marrow transplantations, and some autoimmune diseases. MDSCs mediate a negative regulation of the immune response by affecting different T lymphocyte subsets. Potential mechanisms, which underlie this inhibitory activity range from those requiring direct cell-to-cell contact with others, more indirect, and mediated by the modification of the microenvironment. Pharmacological inhibition of MDSC suppressive pathways is a promising strategy to overcome disease-induced immune defects, which might be a key step in enhancing the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.

  12. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expr...

  13. SIRT1, Is It a Tumor Promoter or Tumor Suppressor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Xia Deng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available SIRT1 has been considered as a tumor promoter because of its increased expression in some types of cancers and its role in inactivating proteins that are involved in tumor suppression and DNA damage repair. However, recent studies demonstrated that SIRT1 levels are reduced in some other types of cancers, and that SIRT1 deficiency results in genetic instability and tumorigenesis, while overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates cancer formation in mice heterozygous for tumor suppressor p53 or APC. Here, I review these recent findings and discuss the possibility that activation of SIRT1 both extends lifespan and inhibits cancer formation.

  14. Functional characterization of duplicated Suppressor of Overexpression of Constans 1-like genes in petunia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill C Preston

    Full Text Available Flowering time is strictly controlled by a combination of internal and external signals that match seed set with favorable environmental conditions. In the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae, many of the genes underlying development and evolution of flowering have been discovered. However, much remains unknown about how conserved the flowering gene networks are in plants with different growth habits, gene duplication histories, and distributions. Here we functionally characterize three homologs of the flowering gene Suppressor Of Overexpression of Constans 1 (SOC1 in the short-lived perennial Petunia hybrida (petunia, Solanaceae. Similar to A. thaliana soc1 mutants, co-silencing of duplicated petunia SOC1-like genes results in late flowering. This phenotype is most severe when all three SOC1-like genes are silenced. Furthermore, expression levels of the SOC1-like genes Unshaven (UNS and Floral Binding Protein 21 (FBP21, but not FBP28, are positively correlated with developmental age. In contrast to A. thaliana, petunia SOC1-like gene expression did not increase with longer photoperiods, and FBP28 transcripts were actually more abundant under short days. Despite evidence of functional redundancy, differential spatio-temporal expression data suggest that SOC1-like genes might fine-tune petunia flowering in response to photoperiod and developmental stage. This likely resulted from modification of SOC1-like gene regulatory elements following recent duplication, and is a possible mechanism to ensure flowering under both inductive and non-inductive photoperiods.

  15. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stocha...

  16. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  17. Exploring the viral world through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Karyna; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-10-01

    Viral metagenomics, or shotgun sequencing of purified viral particles, has revolutionized the field of environmental virology by allowing the exploration of viral communities in a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere. The introduction of viral metagenomics has demonstrated that dominant viruses in environmental communities are not well-represented by the cultured viruses in existing sequence databases. Viral metagenomic studies have provided insights into viral ecology by elucidating the genetic potential, community structure, and biogeography of environmental viruses. In addition, viral metagenomics has expanded current knowledge of virus-host interactions by uncovering genes that may allow viruses to manipulate their hosts in unexpected ways. The intrinsic potential for virus discovery through viral metagenomics can help advance a wide array of disciplines including evolutionary biology, pathogen surveillance, and biotechnology.

  18. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Global Health Health Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal ... Publications » DrugFacts » Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised March ...

  19. Viral commercials: the consumer as marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  20. Viral ecology of a shallow eutrophic lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to give an insight into the ecology of the viral community in a shallow eutrophic lake. To achieve this, the population dynamics, diversity and control of the viral community in Lake Loosdrecht were studied, as well as the impact of the viral community on plankton mortality and comm

  1. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); A. Ruiz-Gonzalez (Aritz); V. Baumgärtner (Volkmar); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow r

  2. The Role of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Immune Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Gervassi, Ana; Jaspan, Heather; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of granulocytic or monocytic cells that suppress innate as well as adaptive immune responses. In healthy adults, immature myeloid cells differentiate into macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes in the bone marrow and MDSC are rarely detected in peripheral blood. However, in certain pathologies, in particular malignancies and chronic infection, differentiation of these cells is altered resulting in accumulation of circulating suppressive myeloid cells. MDSC express suppressive factors such as arginase-1, reactive oxygen species, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which have the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytoxicity, induce the expansion of regulatory T cells, and block natural killer cell activation. It is increasingly recognized that MDSC alter the immune response to several cancers, and perhaps chronic viral infections, in clinically important ways. In this review, we outline the potential contribution of MDSC to the generation of feto-maternal tolerance and to the ineffective immune responses to many infections and vaccines observed in early post-natal life. Granulocytic MDSC are present in large numbers in pregnant women and in cord blood, and wane rapidly during infancy. Furthermore, cord blood MDSC suppress in vitro T cell and NK responses, suggesting that they may play a significant role in human immune ontogeny. However, there are currently no data that demonstrate in vivo effects of MDSC on feto-maternal tolerance or immune ontogeny. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the functional importance of MDSC, including their effects on control of infection and response to vaccination in infancy. Importantly, several pharmacologic interventions have the potential to reverse MDSC function. Understanding the role of MDSC in infant ontogeny and their mechanisms of action could lead to interventions that reduce mortality due to early-life infections. PMID:25165466

  3. The role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in immune ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren eGantt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC are a heterogeneous population of granulocytic or monocytic cells that suppress innate as well as adaptive immune responses. In healthy adults, immature myeloid cells differentiate into macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes in the bone marrow, and MDSC are rarely detected in peripheral blood. However, in certain pathologies, in particular malignancies and chronic infection, differentiation of these cells is altered resulting in accumulation of circulating suppressive myeloid cells. MDSC express suppressive factors such as arginase-1, reactive oxygen species, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which have the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytoxicity, induce the expansion of regulatory T cells, and block natural killer cell activation. It is increasingly recognized that MDSC alter the immune response to several cancers, and perhaps chronic viral infections, in clinically important ways. In this review, we outline the potential contribution of MDSC to the generation of feto-maternal tolerance and to the ineffective immune responses to many infections and vaccines observed in early post-natal life. Granulocytic MDSC are present in large numbers in pregnant women and in cord blood, and wane rapidly during infancy. Furthermore, cord blood MDSC suppress in vitro T cell and NK responses, suggesting that they may play a significant role in human immune ontogeny. However, there are currently no data that demonstrate in vivo effects of MDSC on feto-maternal tolerance or immune ontogeny. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the functional importance of MDSC, including their effects on control of infection and response to vaccination in infancy. Importantly, several pharmacologic interventions have the potential to reverse MDSC function. Understanding the role of MDSC in infant ontogeny and their mechanisms of action could lead to interventions that reduce mortality due to early-life infections.

  4. The role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in immune ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Gervassi, Ana; Jaspan, Heather; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of granulocytic or monocytic cells that suppress innate as well as adaptive immune responses. In healthy adults, immature myeloid cells differentiate into macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes in the bone marrow and MDSC are rarely detected in peripheral blood. However, in certain pathologies, in particular malignancies and chronic infection, differentiation of these cells is altered resulting in accumulation of circulating suppressive myeloid cells. MDSC express suppressive factors such as arginase-1, reactive oxygen species, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which have the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytoxicity, induce the expansion of regulatory T cells, and block natural killer cell activation. It is increasingly recognized that MDSC alter the immune response to several cancers, and perhaps chronic viral infections, in clinically important ways. In this review, we outline the potential contribution of MDSC to the generation of feto-maternal tolerance and to the ineffective immune responses to many infections and vaccines observed in early post-natal life. Granulocytic MDSC are present in large numbers in pregnant women and in cord blood, and wane rapidly during infancy. Furthermore, cord blood MDSC suppress in vitro T cell and NK responses, suggesting that they may play a significant role in human immune ontogeny. However, there are currently no data that demonstrate in vivo effects of MDSC on feto-maternal tolerance or immune ontogeny. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the functional importance of MDSC, including their effects on control of infection and response to vaccination in infancy. Importantly, several pharmacologic interventions have the potential to reverse MDSC function. Understanding the role of MDSC in infant ontogeny and their mechanisms of action could lead to interventions that reduce mortality due to early-life infections.

  5. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...... in various parts of the viral life cyclus. Most of the receptors encoded by human pathogenic virus are still orphan receptors, i.e. the endogenous ligand is unknown. In the few cases where it has been possible to characterize these receptors pharmacologically, they have been found to bind a broad spectrum...... expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  6. [Recent acquisitions on viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resti, M; Tucci, F; Vierucci, A

    1990-01-01

    In the last years the research on viral hepatitis let to better understand the biological, molecular, immunological and epidemiologic characteristics of the viruses that are responsible for hepatitis. The first studied virus was hepatitis B virus (HBv). The scientific attention is still, today, focused on that virus since new markers of infectivity and biological importance in early diagnosis and in disease evolution have been found. The most important result in the last years in the field of viral hepatitis has been, however, the identification of agents responsible for Non-A-Non-B hepatitis. Its epidemiology and clinical importance are discussed in the present paper. Virus C is the most important parenteral agent of NANB hepatitis. Its epidemiology in at risk populations and its role in post-transfusional and cryptogenetic hepatitis are here discussed. The research of new markers of HCV infection is today considered a main goal since the role of the only marker now available is still under discussion.

  7. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  8. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  9. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  10. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified agains

  11. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  12. RB1: a prototype tumor suppressor and an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) was the first tumor suppressor gene to be molecularly defined. RB1 mutations occur in almost all familial and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma, and this gene is mutated at variable frequencies in a variety of other human cancers. Because of its early discovery, the recessive nature of RB1 mutations, and its frequency of inactivation, RB1 is often described as a prototype for the class of tumor suppressor genes. Its gene product (pRB) regulates transcription and is a negative regulator of cell proliferation. Although these general features are well established, a precise description of pRB's mechanism of action has remained elusive. Indeed, in many regards, pRB remains an enigma. This review summarizes some recent developments in pRB research and focuses on progress toward answers for the three fundamental questions that sit at the heart of the pRB literature: What does pRB do? How does the inactivation of RB change the cell? How can our knowledge of RB function be exploited to provide better treatment for cancer patients?

  13. Experimental investigation of dynamic impact of firearm with suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilikevicius, Arturas; Skeivalas, Jonas; Jurevicius, Mindaugas; Turla, Vytautas; Kilikeviciene, Kristina; Bureika, Gintautas; Jakstas, Arunas

    2017-09-01

    The internal ballistics processes occur in the tube during firearm firing. They cause tremendous vibratory shock forces and robust sounds. The determination of these dynamic parameters is relevant in order to reasonably estimate the firearm ergonomic and noise reduction features. The objective of this study is to improve the reliability of the results of measuring a firearm suppressor's dynamic parameters. The analysis of indicator stability is based on an assessment of dynamic parameters and setting the correlation during experimental research. An examination of the spread of intensity of firearm with suppressor dynamic vibration and an analysis of its signals upon applying the theory of covariance functions are carried out in this paper. The results of measuring the intensity of vibrations in fixed points of a firearm and a shooter have been recorded on a time scale in the form of data arrays (matrices). The estimates of covariance functions between the arrays of digital results in measuring the intensity of firearm vibrations and the estimates of covariance functions of single arrays have been calculated upon changing the quantization interval on the time scale. Software Matlab 7 has been applied in the calculation. Finally, basic conclusions are given.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  15. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  16. Treatment of acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limiting mild disease and can be safely managed at home with careful attention to feeding and respiratory status. Criteria for referral and admission vary between hospitals as do clinical practice in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, and there is confusion and lack of evidence over the best treatment for this condition. Supportive care, including administration of oxygen and fluids, is the cornerstone of current treatment. The majority of infants and children with bronchiolitis do not require specific measures. Bronchodilators should not be routinely used in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, but may be effective in some patients. Most of the commonly used management modalities have not been shown to have a clear beneficial effect on the course of the disease. For example, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies, antibiotics, antiviral therapy, and chest physiotherapy should not be used routinely in the management of bronchiolitis. The potential effect of hypertonic saline on the course of the acute disease is promising, but further studies are required. In critically ill children with bronchiolitis, today there is little justification for the use of surfactant and heliox. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be beneficial in children with severe bronchiolitis but a large trial is needed to determine its value. Finally, very little is known on the effect of the various

  17. Transformation of Mexican lime with an intron-hairpin construct expressing untranslatable versions of the genes coding for the three silencing suppressors of Citrus tristeza virus confers complete resistance to the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Nuria; Plomer, Montserrat; Fagoaga, Carmen; Moreno, Pedro; Navarro, Luis; Flores, Ricardo; Peña, Leandro

    2012-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), the causal agent of the most devastating viral disease of citrus, has evolved three silencing suppressor proteins acting at intra- (p23 and p20) and/or intercellular level (p20 and p25) to overcome host antiviral defence. Previously, we showed that Mexican lime transformed with an intron-hairpin construct including part of the gene p23 and the adjacent 3' untranslated region displays partial resistance to CTV, with a fraction of the propagations from some transgenic lines remaining uninfected. Here, we transformed Mexican lime with an intron-hairpin vector carrying full-length, untranslatable versions of the genes p25, p20 and p23 from CTV strain T36 to silence the expression of these critical genes in CTV-infected cells. Three transgenic lines presented complete resistance to viral infection, with all their propagations remaining symptomless and virus-free after graft inoculation with CTV-T36, either in the nontransgenic rootstock or in the transgenic scion. Accumulation of transgene-derived siRNAs was necessary but not sufficient for CTV resistance. Inoculation with a divergent CTV strain led to partially breaking the resistance, thus showing the role of sequence identity in the underlying mechanism. Our results are a step forward to developing transgenic resistance to CTV and also show that targeting simultaneously by RNA interference (RNAi) the three viral silencing suppressors appears critical for this purpose, although the involvement of concurrent RNAi mechanisms cannot be excluded.

  18. STUDY OF PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION IN AN ANIMAL MODEL OF VIRAL MYOCARDITIS BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马睿; 陈曙霞; 刘晶星

    2000-01-01

    ffeStnn6 Objectif Etudier ie r6le de l'infection virale persistante dans ie pethog4de de la myOCardite virale.ANt~ L' ARN viral dens ie my~rde et ie mug et l' alteration potholedque du m~rde ent ate ewilnd per la techniquede PCR adns un mangle de myrmrdite virale chez ies ~ris. Rhaltats L 'ARN viral a ate detects an 3'jour dens ie mug etie myrmrde. An 8'jour, I 'ARN viral an niveau du mug a ate pertiellement dewnu then f lorsque l' alteration pethologiquedu myocarde a atteint un maximum. he 12'jour, L' ARN ...

  19. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  20. Problems in diagnosing viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, F; Colloredo Mels, G; Bellati, G; Ideo, G; Oliveri, F; Colombatto, P; Brunetto, M R

    1993-01-01

    The most reliable method of making a specific aetiological diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis would be to identify virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responsible for the killing of virus infected hepatocytes in each patient's liver. Unfortunately, this can not be proposed for routine diagnosis and surrogate tests are required. The detection of virus markers, and even of the virus itself, does not imply that liver damage is caused by virus infection. Indirect markers of the host's antiviral immunoresponse have to be used to confirm more specifically the diagnosis of viral hepatitis. IgM antibodies against viral antigens implicated in the elimination of the virus seem to be suitable alternative candidates. Significant changes in the serum values of viraemia and aminotransferases occur within a few days, while a significant variation in liver histology takes much longer. Only the kinetics of the highly variable parameters can be used for an appropriate study of the relationship between viraemia, antiviral immunoresponse, and liver cell necrosis. Quantitative and dynamic analyses of hepatitis virus markers seem the most suitable and reliable methods of monitoring the patients eligible for antiviral treatment and identifying the most appropriate time to start this. PMID:8314490

  1. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Vale-Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC, and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition.

  2. Elite suppressors harbor low levels of integrated HIV DNA and high levels of 2-LTR circular HIV DNA compared to HIV+ patients on and off HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin H Graf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Elite suppressors (ES are a rare population of HIV-infected individuals that are capable of naturally controlling the infection without the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Patients on HAART often achieve viral control to similar (undetectable levels. Accurate and sensitive methods to measure viral burden are needed to elucidate important differences between these two patient populations in order to better understand their mechanisms of control. Viral burden quantification in ES patients has been limited to measurements of total DNA in PBMC, and estimates of Infectious Units per Million cells (IUPM. There appears to be no significant difference in the level of total HIV DNA between cells from ES patients and patients on HAART. However, recovering infectious virus from ES patient samples is much more difficult, suggesting their reservoir size should be much smaller than that in patients on HAART. Here we find that there is a significant difference in the level of integrated HIV DNA in ES patients compared to patients on HAART, providing an explanation for the previous results. When comparing the level of total to integrated HIV DNA in these samples we find ES patients have large excesses of unintegrated HIV DNA. To determine the composition of unintegrated HIV DNA in these samples, we measured circular 2-LTR HIV DNA forms and found ES patients frequently have high levels of 2-LTR circles in PBMC. We further show that these high levels of 2-LTR circles are not the result of inefficient integration in ES cells, since HIV integrates with similar efficiency in ES and normal donor cells. Our findings suggest that measuring integration provides a better surrogate of viral burden than total HIV DNA in ES patients. Moreover, they add significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms that allow viral control and reservoir maintenance in this unique patient population.

  3. Elite suppressors harbor low levels of integrated HIV DNA and high levels of 2-LTR circular HIV DNA compared to HIV+ patients on and off HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Erin H; Mexas, Angela M; Yu, Jianqing J; Shaheen, Farida; Liszewski, Megan K; Di Mascio, Michele; Migueles, Stephen A; Connors, Mark; O'Doherty, Una

    2011-02-01

    Elite suppressors (ES) are a rare population of HIV-infected individuals that are capable of naturally controlling the infection without the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Patients on HAART often achieve viral control to similar (undetectable) levels. Accurate and sensitive methods to measure viral burden are needed to elucidate important differences between these two patient populations in order to better understand their mechanisms of control. Viral burden quantification in ES patients has been limited to measurements of total DNA in PBMC, and estimates of Infectious Units per Million cells (IUPM). There appears to be no significant difference in the level of total HIV DNA between cells from ES patients and patients on HAART. However, recovering infectious virus from ES patient samples is much more difficult, suggesting their reservoir size should be much smaller than that in patients on HAART. Here we find that there is a significant difference in the level of integrated HIV DNA in ES patients compared to patients on HAART, providing an explanation for the previous results. When comparing the level of total to integrated HIV DNA in these samples we find ES patients have large excesses of unintegrated HIV DNA. To determine the composition of unintegrated HIV DNA in these samples, we measured circular 2-LTR HIV DNA forms and found ES patients frequently have high levels of 2-LTR circles in PBMC. We further show that these high levels of 2-LTR circles are not the result of inefficient integration in ES cells, since HIV integrates with similar efficiency in ES and normal donor cells. Our findings suggest that measuring integration provides a better surrogate of viral burden than total HIV DNA in ES patients. Moreover, they add significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms that allow viral control and reservoir maintenance in this unique patient population.

  4. HIV-1 TAR element is processed by Dicer to yield a viral micro-RNA involved in chromatin remodeling of the viral LTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCaffrey Timothy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a regulatory mechanism conserved in higher eukaryotes. The RNAi pathway generates small interfering RNA (siRNA or micro RNA (miRNA from either long double stranded stretches of RNA or RNA hairpins, respectively. The siRNA or miRNA then guides an effector complex to a homologous sequence of mRNA and regulates suppression of gene expression through one of several mechanisms. The suppression of gene expression through these mechanisms serves to regulate endogenous gene expression and protect the cell from foreign nucleic acids. There is growing evidence that many viruses have developed in the context of RNAi and express either a suppressor of RNAi or their own viral miRNA. Results In this study we investigated the possibility that the HIV-1 TAR element, a hairpin structure of ~50 nucleotides found at the 5' end of the HIV viral mRNA, is recognized by the RNAi machinery and processed to yield a viral miRNA. We show that the protein Dicer, the enzyme responsible for cleaving miRNA and siRNA from longer RNA sequences, is expressed in CD4+ T-cells. Interestingly, the level of expression of Dicer in monocytes is sub-optimal, suggesting a possible role for RNAi in maintaining latency in T-cells. Using a biotin labeled TAR element we demonstrate that Dicer binds to this structure. We show that recombinant Dicer is capable of cleaving the TAR element in vitro and that TAR derived miRNA is present in HIV-1 infected cell lines and primary T-cell blasts. Finally, we show that a TAR derived miRNA is capable of regulating viral gene expression and may be involved in repressing gene expression through transcriptional silencing. Conclusion HIV-1 TAR element is processed by the Dicer enzyme to create a viral miRNA. This viral miRNA is detectable in infected cells and appears to contribute to viral latency.

  5. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  6. Breast carcinoma metastasis suppressor gene 1 (BRMS1): update on its role as the suppressor of cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodura, Magdalena Anna; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2015-12-01

    BRMS1 was discovered over a decade ago as a potential tumor suppressor gene. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about the structure of BRMS1, mechanisms of its action and a role of BRMS1 in the cancer progression. As a suppressor of metastasis, BRMS1 has demonstrated a variety of ways to act on the cell functions, such as cell migration, invasiveness, angiogenesis, cell survival, cytoskeleton rearrangements, cell adhesion, and immune recognition. This variety of effects is a likely reason behind the robustness of anti-metastatic influence of BRMS1. Intracellular signaling mechanisms employed by BRMS1 include regulation of transcription, EGF/HER2 signaling, and expression of NF-kB, fascin, osteopontin, and IL-6. Recently reported clinical studies confirm that BRMS1 can indeed be used as a prognostic marker. Approaches to employ BRMS1 in a development of anti-cancer treatment have also been made. The studies reviewed here with respect to BRMS1 structure, cellular effects, intracellular signaling, and clinical value consolidate the importance of BRMS1 in the development of metastasis.

  7. Lateral suppressor and Goblet act in hierarchical order to regulate ectopic meristem formation at the base of tomato leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Susanne; Kohlen, Wouter; Hasson, Alice; Theres, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    In seed plants, new axes of growth are established by the formation of meristems, groups of pluripotent cells that maintain themselves and initiate the formation of lateral organs. After embryonic development, secondary shoot meristems form in the boundary zones between the shoot apical meristem and leaf primordia, the leaf axils. In addition, many plant species develop ectopic meristems at different positions of the plant body. In the compound tomato leaf, ectopic meristems can initiate at the base of leaflets, which are delimited by two distinct boundary zones, referred to as the proximal (PLB) and distal (DLB) leaflet boundaries. We demonstrate that the two leaflet boundaries differ from each other and that ectopic meristem formation is strictly limited to the DLB. Our data suggest that the DLB harbours a group of pluripotent cells that seems to be the launching pad for meristem formation. Initiation of these meristems is dependent on the activities of the transcriptional regulators Goblet (Gob) and Lateral suppressor (Ls), specifically expressed in the DLB. Gob and Ls act in hierarchical order, because Ls transcript accumulation is dependent on Gob activity, but not vice versa. Ectopic meristem formation at the DLB is also observed in other seed plants, like Cardamine pratensis, indicating that it is part of a widespread developmental program. Ectopic meristem formation leads to an increase in the number of buds, enhances the capacity for survival and opens the route to vegetative propagation. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Viral Metagenomics: Analysis of Begomoviruses by Illumina High-Throughput Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Idris

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional DNA sequencing methods are inefficient, lack the ability to discern the least abundant viral sequences, and ineffective for determining the extent of variability in viral populations. Here, populations of single-stranded DNA plant begomoviral genomes and their associated beta- and alpha-satellite molecules (virus-satellite complexes (genus, Begomovirus; family, Geminiviridae were enriched from total nucleic acids isolated from symptomatic, field-infected plants, using rolling circle amplification (RCA. Enriched virus-satellite complexes were subjected to Illumina-Next Generation Sequencing (NGS. CASAVA and SeqMan NGen programs were implemented, respectively, for quality control and for de novo and reference-guided contig assembly of viral-satellite sequences. The authenticity of the begomoviral sequences, and the reproducibility of the Illumina-NGS approach for begomoviral deep sequencing projects, were validated by comparing NGS results with those obtained using traditional molecular cloning and Sanger sequencing of viral components and satellite DNAs, also enriched by RCA or amplified by polymerase chain reaction. As the use of NGS approaches, together with advances in software development, make possible deep sequence coverage at a lower cost; the approach described herein will streamline the exploration of begomovirus diversity and population structure from naturally infected plants, irrespective of viral abundance. This is the first report of the implementation of Illumina-NGS to explore the diversity and identify begomoviral-satellite SNPs directly from plants naturally-infected with begomoviruses under field conditions.

  9. Viral metagenomics: Analysis of begomoviruses by illumina high-throughput sequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Idris, Ali

    2014-03-12

    Traditional DNA sequencing methods are inefficient, lack the ability to discern the least abundant viral sequences, and ineffective for determining the extent of variability in viral populations. Here, populations of single-stranded DNA plant begomoviral genomes and their associated beta- and alpha-satellite molecules (virus-satellite complexes) (genus, Begomovirus; family, Geminiviridae) were enriched from total nucleic acids isolated from symptomatic, field-infected plants, using rolling circle amplification (RCA). Enriched virus-satellite complexes were subjected to Illumina-Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). CASAVA and SeqMan NGen programs were implemented, respectively, for quality control and for de novo and reference-guided contig assembly of viral-satellite sequences. The authenticity of the begomoviral sequences, and the reproducibility of the Illumina-NGS approach for begomoviral deep sequencing projects, were validated by comparing NGS results with those obtained using traditional molecular cloning and Sanger sequencing of viral components and satellite DNAs, also enriched by RCA or amplified by polymerase chain reaction. As the use of NGS approaches, together with advances in software development, make possible deep sequence coverage at a lower cost; the approach described herein will streamline the exploration of begomovirus diversity and population structure from naturally infected plants, irrespective of viral abundance. This is the first report of the implementation of Illumina-NGS to explore the diversity and identify begomoviral-satellite SNPs directly from plants naturally-infected with begomoviruses under field conditions. 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  10. Viral metagenomics: analysis of begomoviruses by illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ali; Al-Saleh, Mohammed; Piatek, Marek J; Al-Shahwan, Ibrahim; Ali, Shahjahan; Brown, Judith K

    2014-03-12

    Traditional DNA sequencing methods are inefficient, lack the ability to discern the least abundant viral sequences, and ineffective for determining the extent of variability in viral populations. Here, populations of single-stranded DNA plant begomoviral genomes and their associated beta- and alpha-satellite molecules (virus-satellite complexes) (genus, Begomovirus; family, Geminiviridae) were enriched from total nucleic acids isolated from symptomatic, field-infected plants, using rolling circle amplification (RCA). Enriched virus-satellite complexes were subjected to Illumina-Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). CASAVA and SeqMan NGen programs were implemented, respectively, for quality control and for de novo and reference-guided contig assembly of viral-satellite sequences. The authenticity of the begomoviral sequences, and the reproducibility of the Illumina-NGS approach for begomoviral deep sequencing projects, were validated by comparing NGS results with those obtained using traditional molecular cloning and Sanger sequencing of viral components and satellite DNAs, also enriched by RCA or amplified by polymerase chain reaction. As the use of NGS approaches, together with advances in software development, make possible deep sequence coverage at a lower cost; the approach described herein will streamline the exploration of begomovirus diversity and population structure from naturally infected plants, irrespective of viral abundance. This is the first report of the implementation of Illumina-NGS to explore the diversity and identify begomoviral-satellite SNPs directly from plants naturally-infected with begomoviruses under field conditions.

  11. Structural characterization of suppressor lipids by high-resolution mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovillos, Mary Joy; Pauling, Josch Konstantin; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Suppressor lipids were originally identified in 1993 and reported to encompass six lipid classes that enable Saccharomyces cerevisiae to live without sphingolipids. Structural characterization, using non-mass spectrometric approaches, revealed that these suppressor lipids are very long...... chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing glycerophospholipids with polar head groups that are typically incorporated into sphingolipids. Here we report, for the first time, the structural characterization of the yeast suppressor lipids using high-resolution mass spectrometry. METHODS: Suppressor lipids were...... isolated by preparative chromatography and subjected to structural characterization using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight and ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Our investigation recapitulates the overall structural features of the suppressor lipids and provides an in-depth characterization...

  12. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  13. Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lade-Keller, Johanne; Guldberg, Per; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays......Melanoma MAPK pathway proteins and associated tumour suppressors: p16 is an independent prognostic biomarker by tissue microarrays...

  14. Immunological and molecular epidemiological characteristics of acute and fulminant viral hepatitis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Syed A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis A virus is an infection of liver; it is hyperendemic in vast areas of the world including India. In most cases it causes an acute self limited illness but rarely fulminant. There is growing concern about change in pattern from asymptomatic childhood infection to an increased incidence of symptomatic disease in the adult population. Objective In-depth analysis of immunological, viral quantification and genotype of acute and fulminant hepatitis A virus. Methods Serum samples obtained from 1009 cases of suspected acute viral hepatitis was employed for different biochemical and serological examination. RNA was extracted from blood serum, reverse transcribed into cDNA and amplified using nested PCR for viral quantification, sequencing and genotyping. Immunological cell count from freshly collected whole blood was carried out by fluorescence activated cell sorter. Results Fulminant hepatitis A was mostly detected with other hepatic viruses. CD8+ T cells count increases in fulminant hepatitis to a significantly high level (P = 0.005 compared to normal healthy control. The immunological helper/suppressor (CD4+/CD8+ ratio of fulminant hepatitis was significantly lower compared to acute cases. The serologically positive patients were confirmed by RT-PCR and total of 72 (69.2% were quantified and sequenced. The average quantitative viral load of fulminant cases was significantly higher (P Conclusions Immunological factors in combination with viral load defines the severity of the fulminant hepatitis A. Phylogenetic analysis of acute and fulminant hepatitis A confirmed genotypes IIIA as predominant against IA with no preference of disease severity.

  15. Role of tumor suppressor genes in transplacental lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, L A; Leone-Kabler, S; O'Sullivan, M G; Miller, M S

    1998-03-01

    Most human cancers involve multiple genetic changes, including activation of oncogenes such as Ki-ras-2 (Kras2) and inactivation of any one of a number of tumor suppressor genes such as p53 and members of the retinoblastoma (Rb) regulatory axis. As part of an ongoing project to determine how in utero exposure to chemical carcinogens affects the molecular pathogenesis of murine lung tumors, the p53 and p16Cdkn2a genes were analyzed by using paraffin-embedded lung tissues from mice treated transplacentally with 3-methylcholanthrene. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exons 5-8 of the p53 gene, as well as their flanking introns, demonstrated an absence of mutations at this gene locus. However, a genetic polymorphism was identified at nt 708 in intron 4 of the DBA/2 strain of mice 5 bp downstream of a 3' branching-point splice signal. Analysis of exons 1 and 2 of the Cdkn2a gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analyses revealed mutations in exon 2 in 7% of the tumors examined. Tumor 23-1 exhibited a CAC-->TAC transition at nt 301 (His74-->Tyr74), and tumor 36-1 exhibited a GGG-->GAG transition at nucleotide 350 (Gly90-->Glu90). Northern blot analysis of 14 of the larger tumors showed a marked decrease in the levels of Rb RNA expression. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a spectrum of pRb expression, with the smaller adenomas showing moderate numbers of nuclei with heterogeneous staining for pRb in contrast with a highly reduced or near-complete absence of expression in the nuclei of larger tumors with features of adenocarcinomas. The low incidence of mutations at tumor suppressor loci suggested that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes was a late event in murine lung tumor pathogenesis. The identification of both mutations at the Cdkn2a gene locus and reduced levels of Rb expression combined with previous studies demonstrating a high incidence of mutated Kras2 alleles in these tumors implies that alterations of the Rb

  16. Signatures of selection and host-adapted gene expression of the Phytophthora infestans RNA silencing suppressor PSR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sophie; von Dahlen, Janina K; Uhlmann, Constanze; Schnake, Anika; Kloesges, Thorsten; Rose, Laura E

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora infestans is a devastating pathogen in agricultural systems. Recently, an RNA silencing suppressor (PSR2, 'Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2') has been described in P. infestans. PSR2 has been shown to increase the virulence of Phytophthora pathogens on their hosts. This gene is one of the few effectors present in many economically important Phytophthora species. In this study, we investigated: (i) the evolutionary history of PSR2 within and between species of Phytophthora; and (ii) the interaction between sequence variation, gene expression and virulence. In P. infestans, the highest PiPSR2 expression was correlated with decreased symptom expression. The highest gene expression was observed in the biotrophic phase of the pathogen, suggesting that PSR2 is important during early infection. Protein sequence conservation was negatively correlated with host range, suggesting host range as a driver of PSR2 evolution. Within species, we detected elevated amino acid variation, as observed for other effectors; however, the frequency spectrum of the mutations was inconsistent with strong balancing selection. This evolutionary pattern may be related to the conservation of the host target(s) of PSR2 and the absence of known corresponding R genes. In summary, our study indicates that PSR2 is a conserved effector that acts as a master switch to modify plant gene regulation early during infection for the pathogen's benefit. The conservation of PSR2 and its important role in virulence make it a promising target for pathogen management.

  17. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  18. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

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    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Muchos de los virus para los cuales existe vacunas también pueden causar encefalitis como: sarampión, paperas, polio, rabia, rubéola, varicela. El virus produce una inflamación del tejido cerebral, la cual puede evolucionar a una destrucción de neuronas, provocar hemorragia y daño cerebral, dando lugar a encefalitis graves, como la encefalitis necrotizante o hemorrágica, con mucho peor pronóstico, produciendo secuelas graves, incluso la muerte. El cuadro clínico, incluye la presencia de cefalea, fiebre y alteración de la conciencia, de rápida progresión. El pronóstico de las encefalitis víricas es variable, algunos casos son leves, con recuperación completa, sin embargo existen casos graves que pueden ocasionar secuelas importantes a nivel cerebral. Es fundamental realizar un diagnóstico lo antes posible, a través de pruebas de laboratorio (bioquímica, PCR, cultivos y de neuroimagen (TAC, RM y ante todo, la instauración de un tratamiento precoz para evitar la evolución del proceso y sus posibles complicaciones. El pronóstico empeora si se retrasa la instauración del tratamiento.

  19. Evaluation of Viral Meningoencephalitis Cases

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    Handan Ilhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retrospectively adult cases of viral encephalitis. METHOD: Fifteen patients described viral encephalitis hospitalized between the years 2006-2011 follow-up and treatment at the infectious diseases clinic were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Most of the patients (%60 had applied in the spring. Fever (87%, confusion (73%, neck stiffness (73%, headache (73%, nausea-vomiting (33%, loss of consciousness (33%, amnesia (33%, agitation (20%, convulsion (%20, focal neurological signs (13%, Brudzinski-sign (13% were most frequently encountered findings. Electroencephalography test was applied to 13 of 14 patients, and pathological findings compatible with encephalitis have been found. Radiological imaging methods such as CT and MRI were performed in 9 of the 14 patients, and findings consistent with encephalitis were reported. All of initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were abnormal. The domination of the first examples was lymphocytes in 14 patients; only one patient had an increase in neutrophilic cells have been found. CSF protein level was high in nine patients, and low glucose level was detected in two patients. Herpes simplex virus polymerized chain reaction (PCR analyze was performed to fourteen patients CSF. Only two of them (14% were found positive. One of the patients sample selectively examined was found to be Parvovirus B19 (+, the other patient urine sample Jacobs-creutzfeld virus PCR was found to be positively. Empiric acyclovir therapy was given to all patients. Neuropsychiatric squeal developed at the one patient. CONCLUSION: The cases in the forefront of change in mental status viral meningoencephalitis should be considered and empirical treatment with acyclovir should be started. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 447-452

  20. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  1. Crossover suppressors and balanced recessive lethals in Caenorhabditis elegans. [Nematode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    Two dominant suppressors of crossing over have been identified following x-ray treatment of the small nematode C. elegans. They suppress crossing over in linkage group II (LGII) about 100-fold and 50-fold and are both tightly linked to LGII markers. One, called C1, segregates independently of all other linkage groups and is homozygous fertile. The other is a translocation involving LGII and X. The translocation also suppresses crossing over along the right half of X and is homozygous lethal. C1 has been used as a balancer of LGII recessive lethal and sterile mutations induced by EMS. The frequencies of occurrence of lethals and steriles were approximately equal. Fourteen mutations were assigned to complementation groups and mapped. They tended to map in the same region where LGII visibles are clustered.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity and subset definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peranzoni, Elisa; Zilio, Serena; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Zanovello, Paola; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are defined in mice on the basis of CD11b and Gr-1 marker expression and the functional ability to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Nevertheless the term 'heterogeneous' remains the first, informal feature commonly attributed to this population. It is clear that CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells are part of a myeloid macropopulation, which comprises at least two subsets of polymorphonuclear and monocytic cells with different immunosuppressive properties. While recent literature shows substantial agreement on the immunoregulatory property of the monocytic MDSC subset, there is still contrasting evidence on the role of the granulocytic fraction. Moreover, this dichotomy holds true for human MDSCs. We attempt here to summarize conflicting findings in the field and provide some possible, unifying explanations.

  4. Effector and suppressor T cells in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe

    2015-06-28

    Celiac disease (CD) is a T-cell mediated immune disease in which gliadin-derived peptides activate lamina propria effector CD4+ T cells. This activation leads to the release of cytokines, compatible with a Th1-like pattern, which play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CD, controlling many aspects of the inflammatory immune response. Recent studies have shown that a novel subset of effector T cells, characterized by expression of high levels of IL-17A, termed Th17 cells, plays a pathogenic role in CD. While these effector T cell subsets produce proinflammatory cytokines, which cause substantial tissue injury in vivo in CD, recent studies have suggested the existence of additional CD4(+) T cell subsets with suppressor functions. These subsets include type 1 regulatory T cells and CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells, expressing the master transcription factor Foxp3, which have important implications for disease progression.

  5. The cell growth suppressor, mir-126, targets IRS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Du, Ying-ying; Lin, Yi-feng; Chen, Ya-ting; Yang, Lu; Wang, Hui-jun; Ma, Duan

    2008-12-05

    miRNAs are a family of approximately 22-nuleotide-long noncoding RNAs involved in the formation and progress of tumors. Since traditional methods for the detection of miRNAs expression have many disadvantages, we developed a simple method called polyA RT PCR. With this method, we detected a series of miRNAs and found that mir-126 is one of the miRNAs underexpressed in breast cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that mir-126 inhibited cell cycle progression from G1/G0 to S. Further studies revealed that mir-126 targeted IRS-1 at the translation level. Knocking down of IRS-1 suppresses cell growth in HEK293 and breast cancer cell MCF-7, which recapitulates the effects of mir-126. In conclusion, we developed a simple method for high-throughput screening of miRNAs and found that mir-126, a cell growth suppressor, targets IRS-1.

  6. The ING tumor suppressor genes: status in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérillon, Claire; Bigot, Nicolas; Pedeux, Rémy

    2014-04-01

    ING genes (ING1-5) were identified has tumor suppressor genes. ING proteins are characterized as Type II TSGs since they are involved in the control of cell proliferation, apoptosis and senescence. They may also function as Type I TSGs since they are also involved in DNA replication and repair. Most studies have reported that they are frequently lost in human tumors and epigenetic mechanisms or misregulation of their transcription may be involved. Recently, studies have described that this loss may be caused by microRNA inhibition. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ING functions, their involvement in tumor suppression and, in order to give a full assessment of the current knowledge, we review all the studies that have examined ING status in human cancers.

  7. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine sponges; turbellarian and monogenetic flatworms; cephalopod, bivalve, and gastropod mollusks; nereid polychaetes; and isopod and decapod crustaceans. Most of the viruses can be tentatively assigned to the Herpesviridae, Baculoviridae, Iridoviridae, Adenoviridae, Papovaviridae, Reoviridae, “Birnaviridae”, Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, and Picornaviridae. Viruslike particles found in oysters might be representatives of the Togaviridae and Retroviridae. Enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses from crustaceans have developmental and morphological characteristics intermediate between families, and some show evidence of relationships to the Paramyxoviridae as well as the Bunyaviridae or Rhabdoviridae. Certain small viruses of shrimp cannot be assigned, even tentatively, to a particular family. Some viruses cause disease in wild and captive hosts, others are associated with disease states but may not be primary instigators, and many occur in apparently normal animals. The frequency of viral disease in natural populations of marine invertebrates is unknown. Several viruses that cause disease in captive animals, with or without experimental intervention, have also been found in diseased wild hosts, including herpeslike viruses of crabs and oysters, iridovirus of octopus, and reolike and bunyalike viruses of crabs. Iridolike viruses have been implicated in massive mortalities of cultured oysters. Baculoviruses, and IHHN virus, which is of uncertain affinities, cause economically damaging diseases in cultured penaeid shrimp. Double or multiple viral infection is common in crabs. For example, a reolike virus and associated rhabdolike virus act synergistically to cause paralytic and fatal disease in Callinectes sapidus. Information on host range, most susceptible stage, and viral latency is available only for viruses of shrimp. One baculovirus attacks five species of New World penaeid shrimp. IHHN virus infects three species of

  8. [The ABC of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, F

    2008-03-01

    Viral hepatitis has long been under-diagnosed. Hepatitis A is an acute disease, while patients infected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are likely to develop chronical infections and severe complications (cancer, cirrhosis). The current treatment of hepatitis B and C consists in alpha interferon (preferably under its pegylated form), in combination with ribavirin for hepatitis C. The frequent and severe adverse effects of interferon-based therapy constitute, however, a major limiting factor (reactions at the injection site, flu-like syndrome, neurological disorders, ...). For hepatitis B, two alternatives are available so far, namely lamivudine and adefovir (used as a prodrug with highe oral bioavailability).

  9. Authentic counterfeit in viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This master thesis deals with authentic fake, a phenomenon present in viral marketing. After a brief introduction into the issue and clarification of terms, the study aims to find out whether a seemingly authentic video recording of a catchy incident helps a marketing campaign to succeed, that is to say to achieve high sharing figures amongst internet users. In a theoretical part, the thesis elaborates information from technical books, publications and internet sources dealing with authentici...

  10. Mast cells in viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Witczak; Ewa Brzezińska-Błaszczyk

    2012-01-01

     There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9), but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Fu...

  11. Germline promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu-Yuan Wu; Zheng Zhang; Jing-Mei Wang; Wen-Wen Guo; Nong Xiao; Qiong He; Ya-Ping Wang; Yi-Mei Fan

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore germline hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor genes MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a in suspected cases of hereditary gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: A group of 140 Chinese GC patients in whom the primary cancer had developed before the age of 60 or who had a familial history of cancer were screened for germline hypermethylation of the MLH1 , CDH1 and P16INK4a tumor suppressor genes. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and modified by sodium bisulfite. The treated DNA was then subjected to bisulfite DNA sequencing for a specific region of the MLH1 promoter. The methylation status of CDH1 or P16INK4a was assayed using methylation- specific PCR. Clonal bisulfite allelic sequencing in positive samples was performed to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the CpG island methylation status of these promoter regions. RESULTS: Methylation of the MLH1 gene promoter was detected in the peripheral blood DNA of only 1/140 (0.7%) of the GC patient group. However, this methylation pattern was mosaic rather than the allelic pattern which has previously been reported for MLH1 in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients. We found that 10% of the MLH1 alleles in the peripheral blood DNA of this patient were methylated, consistent with 20% of cells having one methylated allele. No germline promoter methylation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a genes was detected. CONCLUSION: Mosaic germline epimutation of the MLH1 gene is present in suspected hereditary GC patients in China but at a very low level. Germline epimutation of the CDH1 or P16INK4a gene is not a frequent event.

  12. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  13. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  14. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced tumor suppressor microRNA MiR-34a is growth promoting in EBV-infected B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Eleonora; Salinas, Raul E; Chang, Christina; Zhou, Ting; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Gottwein, Eva; Jacobs, Cassandra; Jima, Dereje; Li, Qi-Jing; Dave, Sandeep S; Luftig, Micah A

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B cells drives their indefinite proliferation into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). B cell immortalization depends on expression of viral latency genes, as well as the regulation of host genes. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating fundamental cellular processes, in this study, we assayed changes in host miRNA expression during primary B cell infection by EBV. We observed and validated dynamic changes in several miRNAs from early proliferation through immortalization; oncogenic miRNAs were induced, and tumor suppressor miRNAs were largely repressed. However, one miRNA described as a p53-targeted tumor suppressor, miR-34a, was strongly induced by EBV infection and expressed in many EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected lymphoma cell lines. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was sufficient to induce miR-34a requiring downstream NF-κB activation but independent of functional p53. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-34a was not toxic in several B lymphoma cell lines, and inhibition of miR-34a impaired the growth of EBV-transformed cells. This study identifies a progrowth role for a tumor-suppressive miRNA in oncogenic-virus-mediated transformation, highlighting the importance of studying miRNA function in different cellular contexts.

  15. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  16. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  17. Sponging of Cellular Proteins by Viral RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Charley, Phillida A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNAs accumulate to high levels during infection and interact with a variety of cellular factors including miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Although many of these interactions exist to directly modulate replication, translation and decay of viral transcripts, evidence is emerging that abundant viral RNAs may in certain cases serve as a sponge to sequester host non coding RNAs and proteins. By effectively reducing the ability of cellular RNA binding proteins to regulate host cell gene exp...

  18. Viral Advertising on Facebook in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Phuong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore which factors affect the effectiveness of viral advertising on Facebook in Vietnam. The quantitative research method is applied in this research and the sample is Vietnamese Facebook users. After the data analysis stage using SPSS, it became clear that weak ties, perceptual affinity and emotions have an impact on the effectiveness of viral advertising. The results provide a pratical implication of how to make an Ad which can go viral on Facebook. Moreo...

  19. Pediatric knowledge about acute viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Franca,Rita; Silva,Luciana; Melo, Maria Clotildes; Cavalcante,Suzy; Lima, Bruno; Rocha, Anita; Gomes, Cristiana; Franca, Mônica

    2004-01-01

    p.227-235 Knowledge about hepatotropic viruses is crucial for pediatricians because of the high prevalence of viral hepatitis during childhood. The multiplicity of hepatotropic viruses, the spectrum of acute and chronic infections, and the sequels of viral hepatitis result in a need for physicians to better understand the clinical and epidemiological context of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as the importance of prevention measures for hepatitis. A descriptive cross-sectional study...

  20. Consumers’ attitude towards viral marketing in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Kiani Irshad ZERNIGAH; Kamran SOHAIL

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advancement of technology has opened many costeffective avenues for marketers to promote their products. One of the emerging techniques of products promotion through the use of technology is viral marketing that is becoming a popular direct marketing tool for marketers across the world. Therefore, marketers should understand factors that result in increased acceptance of viral marketing by consumers. The present research was conducted to investigate consumers’ attitude towards viral...

  1. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  2. A tumour suppressor network relying on the polyamine-hypusine axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuoppo, Claudio; Miething, Cornelius; Lindqvist, Lisa; Reyes, José; Ruse, Cristian; Appelmann, Iris; Yoon, Seungtai; Krasnitz, Alexander; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pappin, Darryl; Pelletier, Jerry; Lowe, Scott W

    2012-07-12

    Tumour suppressor genes encode a broad class of molecules whose mutational attenuation contributes to malignant progression. In the canonical situation, the tumour suppressor is completely inactivated through a two-hit process involving a point mutation in one allele and chromosomal deletion of the other. Here, to identify tumour suppressor genes in lymphoma, we screen a short hairpin RNA library targeting genes deleted in human lymphomas. We functionally identify those genes whose suppression promotes tumorigenesis in a mouse lymphoma model. Of the nine tumour suppressors we identified, eight correspond to genes occurring in three physically linked 'clusters', suggesting that the common occurrence of large chromosomal deletions in human tumours reflects selective pressure to attenuate multiple genes. Among the new tumour suppressors are adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1 (AMD1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), two genes associated with hypusine, a unique amino acid produced as a product of polyamine metabolism through a highly conserved pathway. Through a secondary screen surveying the impact of all polyamine enzymes on tumorigenesis, we establish the polyamine-hypusine axis as a new tumour suppressor network regulating apoptosis. Unexpectedly, heterozygous deletions encompassing AMD1 and eIF5A often occur together in human lymphomas and co-suppression of both genes promotes lymphomagenesis in mice. Thus, some tumour suppressor functions can be disabled through a two-step process targeting different genes acting in the same pathway.

  3. A tumour suppressor network relying on the polyamine–hypusine axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuoppo, Claudio; Miething, Cornelius; Lindqvist, Lisa; Reyes, José; Ruse, Cristian; Appelmann, Iris; Yoon, Seungtai; Krasnitz, Alexander; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pappin, Darryl; Pelletier, Jerry; Lowe, Scott W.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour suppressor genes encode a broad class of molecules whose mutational attenuation contributes to malignant progression. In the canonical situation, the tumour suppressor is completely inactivated through a two-hit process involving a point mutation in one allele and chromosomal deletion of the other1. Here, to identify tumour suppressor genes in lymphoma, we screen a short hairpin RNA library targeting genes deleted in human lymphomas. We functionally identify those genes whose suppression promotes tumorigenesis in a mouse lymphoma model. Of the nine tumour suppressors we identified, eight correspond to genes occurring in three physically linked ‘clusters’, suggesting that the common occurrence of large chromosomal deletions in human tumours reflects selective pressure to attenuate multiple genes. Among the new tumour suppressors are adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1 (AMD1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), two genes associated with hypusine, a unique amino acid produced as a product of polyamine metabolism through a highly conserved pathway2. Through a secondary screen surveying the impact of all polyamine enzymes on tumorigenesis, we establish the polyamine–hypusine axis as a new tumour suppressor network regulating apoptosis. Unexpectedly, heterozygous deletions encompassing AMD1 and eIF5A often occur together in human lymphomas and co-suppression of both genes promotes lymphomagenesis in mice. Thus, some tumour suppressor functions can be disabled through a two-step process targeting different genes acting in the same pathway. PMID:22722845

  4. Gold nanoparticles combined with highly expressed amber suppressor tRNA: a future antibacterial agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoda Song

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nAmber suppressor tRNA is a mutant allele coding for a tRNA, whose anticodon is altered in such a way that the suppressor tRNA inserts an amino acid at an amber codon in translation which leads to suppressing (preventing termination. And some Amber suppressor tRNA strains were found. We propose that gold nanoparticles combined with highly expressed amber suppressor tRNA which can be uptake by cells and recognized by AARS (aminoacyl tRNA synthetase will lead to the formation of C-terminally extended proteins. These proteins probably will not work properly, leading bacteria's death. Because of the difference of tRNA between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, even between different bacteria species, this amber suppressor tRNA is orthogonal for other species and cannot be recognized by AARS, therefore has no toxicity to other species. May it be an excellent antibacterial agent in the future? In this article we provide a screening method for the highly expressed amber suppressor tRNA using randomly bases mutation, radioactive selection, activity test in vivo, and finally linkage of the amber suppressor tRNA to gold nanoparticles.

  5. A metagenomic survey of viral abundance and diversity in mosquitoes from Hubei province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyan Shi

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes as one of the most common but important vectors have the potential to transmit or acquire a lot of viruses through biting, however viral flora in mosquitoes and its impact on mosquito-borne disease transmission has not been well investigated and evaluated. In this study, the metagenomic techniquehas been successfully employed in analyzing the abundance and diversity of viral community in three mosquito samples from Hubei, China. Among 92,304 reads produced through a run with 454 GS FLX system, 39% have high similarities with viral sequences belonging to identified bacterial, fungal, animal, plant and insect viruses, and 0.02% were classed into unidentified viral sequences, demonstrating high abundance and diversity of viruses in mosquitoes. Furthermore, two novel viruses in subfamily Densovirinae and family Dicistroviridae were identified, and six torque tenosus virus1 in family Anelloviridae, three porcine parvoviruses in subfamily Parvovirinae and a Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus in Family Rhabdoviridae were preliminarily characterized. The viral metagenomic analysis offered us a deep insight into the viral population of mosquito which played an important role in viral initiative or passive transmission and evolution during the process.

  6. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  7. Exploring Text Virality in Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guerini, Marco; Ozbal, Gozde

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to shed some light on the concept of virality - especially in social networks - and to provide new insights on its structure. We argue that: (a) virality is a phenomenon strictly connected to the nature of the content being spread, rather than to the influencers who spread it, (b) virality is a phenomenon with many facets, i.e. under this generic term several different effects of persuasive communication are comprised and they only partially overlap. To give ground to our claims, we provide initial experiments in a machine learning framework to show how various aspects of virality can be independently predicted according to content features.

  8. Chronic viral hepatitis : diagnosis and therapeutics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, George Y; Koff, Raymond S

    2001-01-01

    .... The discussion of patient management includes contributions on developing novel therapeutics, supporting patients during therapy, alternative treatments, the use of drugs in chronic viral hepatitis...

  9. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  10. Two-Dimensional Phase Transition of Viral Capsid Gives Insights into Subunit Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresset, Guillaume; Chen, Jingzhi; Chevreuil, Maelenn; Nhiri, Naïma; Jacquet, Eric; Lansac, Yves

    2017-01-01

    We show that the thermal dissociation of icosahedral viral capsids can be interpreted in terms of a two-dimensional phase transition. The approach provides a useful framework to get direct insights into the interactions at work between viral components. We devise a mean-field lattice model that relates the melting temperature to subunit attractive energy, effective charge, and chemical potential. Through fluorescence thermal shift assay on a plant viral system, we illustrate how the model gives access to the interaction parameters for empty and loaded viral capsids in various ionic conditions. This work should help construct physical models accounting for the assembly and disassembly mechanisms of viruses, with possible fallout in the development of therapeutic inhibitors.

  11. The olive leaf extract exhibits antiviral activity against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia rhabdovirus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micol, Vicente; Caturla, Nuria; Pérez-Fons, Laura; Más, Vicente; Pérez, Luis; Estepa, Amparo

    2005-06-01

    A commercial plant extract derived from olive tree leaf (Olea europaea) (LExt) and its major compound, oleuropein (Ole), inhibited the in vitro infectivity of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), a salmonid rhabdovirus. Incubation of virus with LExt or Ole before infection reduced the viral infectivity to 10 and 30%, respectively. Furthermore, LExt drastically decreased VHSV titers and viral protein accumulation (virucidal effect) in a dose dependent manner when added to cell monolayers 36 h post-infection. On the other hand, both the LExt and Ole were able to inhibit cell-to-cell membrane fusion induced by VHSV in uninfected cells, suggesting interactions with viral envelope. Therefore, we propose that O. europaea could be used as a potential source of promising natural antivirals, which have demonstrated to lack impact on health and environment. In addition, Ole could be used to design other related antiviral agents.

  12. A Conserved Carboxylesterase Is a SUPPRESSOR OF AVRBST-ELICITED RESISTANCE in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnac, Sébastien; Wilson, Ariane; Nuwer, Jamie; Kirik, Angela; Baranage, Gayathri; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    AvrBsT is a type III effector from Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria that is translocated into plant cells during infection. AvrBsT is predicted to encode a Cys protease that targets intracellular host proteins. To dissect AvrBsT function and recognition in Arabidopsis thaliana, 71 ecotypes were screened to identify lines that elicit an AvrBsT-dependent hypersensitive response (HR) after Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) infection. The HR was observed only in the Pi-0 ecotype infected with Xcc strain 8004 expressing AvrBsT. To create a robust pathosystem to study AvrBsT immunity in Arabidopsis, the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) strain DC3000 was engineered to translocate AvrBsT into Arabidopsis by the Pseudomonas type III secretion (T3S) system. Pi-0 leaves infected with Pst DC3000 expressing a Pst T3S signal fused to AvrBsT-HA (AvrBsTHYB-HA) elicited HR and limited pathogen growth, confirming that the HR leads to defense. Resistance in Pi-0 is caused by a recessive mutation predicted to inactivate a carboxylesterase known to hydrolyze lysophospholipids and acylated proteins in eukaryotes. Transgenic Pi-0 plants expressing the wild-type Columbia allele are susceptible to Pst DC3000 AvrBsTHYB-HA infection. Furthermore, wild-type recombinant protein cleaves synthetic p-nitrophenyl ester substrates in vitro. These data indicate that the carboxylesterase inhibits AvrBsT-triggered phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of the SUPPRESSOR OF AVRBST-ELICITED RESISTANCE1. PMID:17293566

  13. A conserved carboxylesterase is a SUPPRESSOR OF AVRBST-ELICITED RESISTANCE in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnac, Sébastien; Wilson, Ariane; Nuwer, Jamie; Kirik, Angela; Baranage, Gayathri; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2007-02-01

    AvrBsT is a type III effector from Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria that is translocated into plant cells during infection. AvrBsT is predicted to encode a Cys protease that targets intracellular host proteins. To dissect AvrBsT function and recognition in Arabidopsis thaliana, 71 ecotypes were screened to identify lines that elicit an AvrBsT-dependent hypersensitive response (HR) after Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris (Xcc) infection. The HR was observed only in the Pi-0 ecotype infected with Xcc strain 8004 expressing AvrBsT. To create a robust pathosystem to study AvrBsT immunity in Arabidopsis, the foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) strain DC3000 was engineered to translocate AvrBsT into Arabidopsis by the Pseudomonas type III secretion (T3S) system. Pi-0 leaves infected with Pst DC3000 expressing a Pst T3S signal fused to AvrBsT-HA (AvrBsTHYB-HA) elicited HR and limited pathogen growth, confirming that the HR leads to defense. Resistance in Pi-0 is caused by a recessive mutation predicted to inactivate a carboxylesterase known to hydrolyze lysophospholipids and acylated proteins in eukaryotes. Transgenic Pi-0 plants expressing the wild-type Columbia allele are susceptible to Pst DC3000 AvrBsTHYB-HA infection. Furthermore, wild-type recombinant protein cleaves synthetic p-nitrophenyl ester substrates in vitro. These data indicate that the carboxylesterase inhibits AvrBsT-triggered phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Here, we present the cloning and characterization of the SUPPRESSOR OF AVRBST-ELICITED RESISTANCE1.

  14. STUDY OF PERSISTENT VIRAL INFECTION IN AN ANIMALMODEL OF VIRAL MYOCARDITIS BY PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the role of persistent viral infection in the mechanism of viral myocarditis. Methods A mice model of CVB3m viral myocarditis was made and the viral RNA in mice myocardium and whole blood sample was tested by using polymerase chain reaction ( PCR ) technique. The pathological changes in mice myocardium were determined. Results On day 3, the viral gene in whole blood and myocardium was found, which partly became negative on day 8, but the change of myocardial pathology became obvious. Although the blood specimens were tested negatively on day 12, the viral gene in mice myocardium remained positive within 120d. Conclusion This study indicates that persistent viral infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis.

  15. Evidence for allosteric variants of wild-type p53, a tumour suppressor protein.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A tumour suppressor function for p53 is indicated in human lung cancer and in carcinoma of the colorectum. Loss of suppressor function, by mutation of the p53 gene, is associated with activation of p53 as an oncogene. The suppressor (wild type) and oncogenic (mutant) forms of the murine p53 protein are distinguishable at the molecular level by reactivity with anti-p53 monoclonal antibodies. For example, activated mutant p53 fails to react with PAb246 (p53-246 degrees). We now demonstrate that...

  16. Viral diseases of northern ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Frölich

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes viral diseases reported in northern ungulates and those that are a potential threat to these species. The following diseases are discussed: bovine viral diarrhoea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD, alphaherpesvirus infections, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF, poxvirus infections, parainfluenza type 3 virus infection, Alvsborg disease, foot-and-mouth disease, epizootic haemorrhage disease of deer and bluetongue disease, rabies, respiratory syncytial virus infection, adenovirus infection, hog-cholera, Aujeszky's disease and equine herpesvirus infections. There are no significant differences in antibody prevalence to BVDV among deer in habitats with high, intermediate and low density of cattle. In addition, sequence analysis from the BVDV isolated from roe deer (Capreolus capreolus showed that this strain was unique within BVDV group I. Distinct BVDV strains might circulate in free-ranging roe deer populations in Germany and virus transmission may be independent of domestic livestock. Similar results have been obtained in a serological survey of alpha-herpesviruses in deer in Germany. Malignant catarrhal fever was studied in fallow deer (Cervus dama in Germany: the seroprevalence and positive PCR results detected in sheep originating from the same area as the antibody-positive deer might indicate that sheep are the main reservoir animals. Contagious ecthyma (CE is a common disease in domestic sheep and goats caused by the orf virus. CE has been diagnosed in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis, mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus, Dall sheep (Ovis dalli, chamois (Rupkapra rupi-capra, muskox {Ovibos moschatus and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. Most parainfluenza type 3 virus infections are mild or clinically undetectable. Serological surveys in wildlife have been successfully conducted in many species. In 1985, a new disease was identified in Swedish moose (Alces alces, designated as Alvsborg disease. This wasting syndrome probably

  17. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  18. The polyomavirus middle T-antigen oncogene activates the Hippo pathway tumor suppressor Lats in a Src-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanzer, M; Ricardo-Lax, I; Keshet, R; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-08-06

    The polyomavirus middle T antigen (PyMT) is an oncogene that activates the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, and physically interacts with Taz (WWTR1). Taz is a pro-oncogenic transcription coactivator of the Tead transcription factors. The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway activates the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates Taz, leading to its nuclear exclusion and blunting Tead coactivation. We found that Taz was required for transformation by PyMT, but counter-intuitively, Taz was exclusively cytoplasmic in the presence of PyMT. We demonstrate that in the presence of PyMT, wild-type Taz was phosphorylated by Lats, in a Src-dependent manner. Consistently, a Lats refractory Taz mutant did not undergo cytoplasmic retention by PyMT. We show that Yap, the Taz paralog, and Shp2 phosphatase were nuclear excluded as well. Our findings describe a noncanonical activation of Lats, and an unprecedented Tead-independent role for Taz and Yap in viral-mediated oncogenesis.

  19. [Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

  20. (Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

  1. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  2. [Microbiological diagnosis of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Roberto; Aguilera, Antonio; Córdoba, Juan; Fuertes, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Liver inflammation or hepatitis has many different causes, both infectious and non-infectious. Among the former, viral infection is responsible for at least half of all hepatitis worldwide. Different viruses have been described with primary tropism for liver tissue. These microorganisms have been successively named with letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E and G. The aim of this paper is to review this heterogeneous group of viruses in its most basic aspects, including clinical implications, treatment, main control, and prophylactic measures and, of special interest, diagnostic approaches, both serological and molecular, which are used for their detection, quantification and characterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  4. Viral bronchiolitis for the clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Dominic A

    2011-04-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is common, and about 98-99% of infants are managed in the home. Because about 95% of infants < 2 years old are infected with respiratory syncytial virus, however, bronchiolitis is the commonest reason for admission to hospital in the first 6 months of life. It is usually a self-limiting condition lasting around a week in previously well children. About 1% of infants are admitted to hospital, and about 10% of hospitalised infants will require admission to the intensive care unit. Respiratory syncytial virus is isolated from about 70% of infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis. The emphasis of hospital treatment is to ensure adequate hydration and oxygenation. Other than supplemental oxygen, little in the way of pharmacological treatment has been demonstrated to alter the course of the illness or the risk of wheezing in the months following bronchiolitis.

  5. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  6. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  7. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, Misao [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ariumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ariumi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto [Department of Viral Oncology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Shimotohno, Kunitada [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-8516 (Japan); Kato, Nobuyuki [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  8. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  9. Influence of viral infection on essential oil composition of Ocimum basilicum (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Alice; Duarte, Ligia M L; Santos, Déborah Y A C

    2011-08-01

    Ocimum basilicum L., popularly known as sweet basil, is a Lamiaceae species whose essential oil is mainly composed of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and phenylpropanoids. The contents of these compounds can be affected by abiotic and biotic factors such as infections caused by viruses. The main goal of this research was an investigation of the effects of viral infection on the essential oil profile of common basil. Seeds of O. basilicum L. cv. Genovese were sowed and kept in a greenhouse. Plants presenting two pairs of leaves above the cotyledons were inoculated with an unidentified virus isolated from a field plant showing chlorotic yellow spots and foliar deformation. Essential oils of healthy and infected plants were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GCMS. Changes in essential oil composition due to viral infection were observed. Methyleugenol and p-cresol,2,6-di-tert-butyl were the main constituents. However, methyleugenol contents were significantly decreased in infected plants.

  10. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  11. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Cases Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Discussion Hepatitis A virus Index PAGE DESCRIPTION Table 2.1 Reported ...

  12. Viral Quasispecies Assembly via Maximal Clique Enumeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toepfer, A.; Marschall, T.; Bull, R.A.; Luciani, F.; Schoenhuth, A.; Beerenwinkel, N.

    2014-01-01

    Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the s

  13. Emerging Viral Diseases of Tomato Crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, I.M.; Lapidot, M.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Viral diseases are an important limiting factor in many crop production systems. Because antiviral products are not available, control strategies rely on genetic resistance or hygienic measures to prevent viral diseases, or on eradication of diseased crops to control such diseases. Increasing intern

  14. Correlation between myeloid-derived suppressor cells and gastric cancer begin with chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the ratio change of circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells(MDSCs) and cellular immune function in healthy volunteers,chronic gastritis patients,gastric intraepithelial neoplasia patients and gastric cancer patients

  15. Characterization of the viral O-glycopeptidome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cló, Emiliano; Kracun, Stjepan K; Nudelman, Aaron S

    2012-01-01

    Viral envelope proteins mediate interactions with host cells, leading to internalization and intracellular propagation. Envelope proteins are glycosylated and are known to serve important functions in masking host immunity to viral glycoproteins. However, the viral infectious cycle in cells may...... also lead to aberrant glycosylation that may elicit immunity. Our knowledge of immunity to aberrant viral glycans and glycoproteins is limited, potentially due to technical limitations in identifying immunogenic glycans and glycopeptide epitopes. This work describes three different complementary...... methods for high-throughput screening and identification of potential immunodominant O-glycopeptide epitopes on viral envelope glycoproteins: (i) on-chip enzymatic glycosylation of scan peptides, (ii) chemical glycopeptide microarray synthesis, and (iii) a one-bead-one-compound random glycopeptide library...

  16. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Origins and challenges of viral dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Wang, David

    2017-02-09

    The accurate classification of viral dark matter - metagenomic sequences that originate from viruses but do not align to any reference virus sequences - is one of the major obstacles in comprehensively defining the virome. Depending on the sample, viral dark matter can make up from anywhere between 40 and 90% of sequences. This review focuses on the specific nature of dark matter as it relates to viral sequences. We identify three factors that contribute to the existence of viral dark matter: the divergence and length of virus sequences, the limitations of alignment based classification, and limited representation of viruses in reference sequence databases. We then discuss current methods that have been developed to at least partially circumvent these limitations and thereby reduce the extent of viral dark matter.

  18. Caspar, a suppressor of antibacterial immunity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungjin; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Eunhee; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2006-10-31

    Drosophila has a primitive yet highly effective innate immune system. Although the infection-dependent activation mechanisms of the Drosophila immune system are well understood, its inhibitory regulation remains elusive. To find novel suppressors of the immune system, we performed a genetic screening for Drosophila mutants with hyperactivated immune responses and isolated a loss-of-function mutant of caspar whose product is homologous to Fas-associating factor 1 in mammals. Interestingly, caspar mutant flies showed increased antibacterial immune responses including increased resistance to bacterial infection and a constitutive expression of diptericin, a representative antibacterial peptide gene. Conversely, ectopic expression of caspar strongly suppressed the infection-dependent gene expression of diptericin, which allowed bacterial outgrowth. Consistent with these physiological phenotypes, Caspar negatively regulated the immune deficiency (Imd)-mediated immune responses by blocking nuclear translocation of Relish, an NF-kappaB transcription factor. In addition, we further demonstrated that Dredd-dependent cleavage of Relish, a prerequisite event for the nuclear entry of Relish, is the target of the Caspar-mediated suppression of the Imd pathway. Remarkably, Caspar was highly specific for the Imd pathway and did not affect the Toll pathway, which is crucial for antifungal immunity. Collectively, our elucidation of an inhibitory mechanism of the Imd pathway by Caspar will provide a valuable insight into understanding complex regulatory mechanisms of the innate immune systems in both Drosophila and mammals.

  19. SIRT3: Oncogene and Tumor Suppressor in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margalida Torrens-Mas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3, the major deacetylase in mitochondria, plays a crucial role in modulating oxygen reactive species (ROS and limiting the oxidative damage in cellular components. SIRT3 targets different enzymes which regulate mitochondrial metabolism and participate in ROS detoxification, such as the complexes of the respiratory chain, the isocitrate dehydrogenase, or the manganese superoxide dismutase. Thus, SIRT3 activity is essential in maintaining mitochondria homeostasis and has recently received great attention, as it is considered a fidelity protein for mitochondrial function. In some types of cancer, SIRT3 functions as a tumoral promoter, since it keeps ROS levels under a certain threshold compatible with cell viability and proliferation. On the contrary, other studies describe SIRT3 as a tumoral suppressor, as SIRT3 could trigger cell death under stress conditions. Thus, SIRT3 could have a dual role in cancer. In this regard, modulation of SIRT3 activity could be a new target to develop more personalized therapies against cancer.

  20. Expression of the Metastasis Suppressor KAI1 in Uveal Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn C. Maloney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Uveal melanoma (UM is an intraocular tumor that leads to metastatic disease in approximately 50% of afflicted patients. There is no efficacious treatment for metastatic disease in this cancer. Identification of markers that can offer prognostic and therapeutic value is a major focus in this field at present. KAI1 is a metastasis suppressor gene that has been reported to play a role in various human malignancies, although it has not previously been evaluated in UM. Purpose. To investigate the expression of KAI1 in UM and its potential value as a prognostic marker. Materials and Methods. 18 cases of human primary UM were collected and immunostained for KAI1 expression. A pathologist evaluated staining intensity and distribution semiquantitatively. Each case was categorized as group 1 (low staining or group 2 (high staining. Results. In group 2, two of the 12 cases presented with metastasis. Conversely, in group 1, five out of 6 cases had metastasis. The mean follow-up of patients who did not develop metastasis was 81.81 months (median: 75 months versus 42.14 months (median: 44 months for patients with metastasis. Conclusions. KAI1 is a promising candidate marker that may offer prognostic value in UM; it may also represent a therapeutic target in metastatic disease.

  1. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui Feng; Cen Zhang; Rui Wu; Wenwei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed, small non-coding RNA molecules which play a key role in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs interact with p53 and its network at multiple levels. p53 regulates the transcription expression and the maturation of a group of miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNAs can regulate the activity and function of p53 through direct repression of p53 or its regulators in cells. These findings have demonstrated that miRNAs are important components in the p53 network, and also added another layer of complexity to the p53 network.

  2. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  3. The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1: lessons from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saara Ollila; Tomi P. M(a)kel(a)

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 are important in hereditary Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,as well as in sporadic cancers including lung and cervical cancer.LKB1 is a kinase-activating Kinase,and a number of LKB1-dependent phosphorylation cascades regulate fundamental cellular and organismal processes in at least metabolism,polarity,cytoskeleton organization,and proliferation.Conditional targeting approaches are beginning to demonstrate the relevance and specificity of these signaling pathways in development and homeostasis of multiple organs.More than one of the pathways also appear to contribute to tumor growth following Lkb1 deficiencies based on a number of mouse tumor models.Lkb1-dependent activation of AMPK and subsequent inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling are implicated in several of the models,and other less well characterized pathways are also involved.Conditional targeting studies of Lkb1 also point an important role of LKB1 in epithelial-masenchymal interactions,significantly expanding knowledge on the relevance of LKB1 in human disease.

  4. Vitamin D receptor, a tumor suppressor in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are well-established regulators of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, it was not a great surprise that deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) should predispose the skin to tumor formation, and that the combination of deleting both the VDR and calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) should be especially pro-oncogenic. In this review I have examined 4 mechanisms that appear to underlie the means by which VDR acts as a tumor suppressor in skin. First, DNA damage repair is curtailed in the absence of the VDR, allowing mutations in DNA to accumulate. Second and third involve the increased activation of the hedgehog and β-catenin pathways in the epidermis in the absence of the VDR, leading to poorly regulated proliferation with reduced differentiation. Finally, VDR deletion leads to a shift in the expression of long noncoding RNAs toward a more oncogenic profile. How these different mechanisms interact and their relative importance in the predisposition of the VDR null epidermis to tumor formation remain under active investigation.

  5. Potential of lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldırım Hatice Kalkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergens causes some symptoms as all asthma, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic rhinitis. These symptoms are seen twice as many in women than in men. The major wine allergens reported in wines are endochitinase 4A and lipid-transfer protein (LTP. This review deal with possibilities of using lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies. Phenolic compounds present in wines have not only antioxidant properties causing radical scavenging but also some special properties reported in many in vitro studies as regulating functions in inflammatory cells as mast cells. So what is the role of lactic acid bacteria in these cases? Lactic acid bacteria are used during malolactic fermentation step of wine production with purpose of malic acid reduction. During this bioconversion complex phenolic compounds could be hydrolysed by bacterial enzymes to their aglycone forms. Obtained aglycons could pass through the intestinal epithelium of human and allowed reduction of IgE antibody production by affecting Th1/ Th2 ratio. Considering different contents and quantities of phenols in different grape varieties and consequently in different wines more studies are required in order to determine which lactic acid bacteria and strains could be effective in suppressing wine allergens.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  7. RASSF6; the Putative Tumor Suppressor of the RASSF Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Iwasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans have 10 genes that belong to the Ras association (RA domain family (RASSF. Among them, RASSF7 to RASSF10 have the RA domain in the N-terminal region and are called the N-RASSF proteins. In contradistinction to them, RASSF1 to RASSF6 are referred to as the C-RASSF proteins. The C-RASSF proteins have the RA domain in the middle region and the Salvador/RASSF/Hippo domain in the C-terminal region. RASSF6 additionally harbors the PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif. Expression of RASSF6 is epigenetically suppressed in human cancers and is generally regarded as a tumor suppressor. RASSF6 induces caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis. RASSF6 interacts with mammalian Ste20-like kinases (homologs of Drosophila Hippo and cross-talks with the Hippo pathway. RASSF6 binds MDM2 and regulates p53 expression. The interactions with Ras and Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP1 are also suggested by heterologous protein-protein interaction experiments. RASSF6 regulates apoptosis and cell cycle through these protein-protein interactions, and is implicated in the NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. We summarize our current knowledge about RASSF6 and discuss what common and different properties RASSF6 and the other C-RASSF proteins have.

  8. TANGO is a tumor suppressor of malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2006-12-15

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new family member of the melanoma inhibitory activity gene family. The gene codes for a 14 kDa protein of so far unknown function. In our study we revealed that TANGO was downregulated or lost in 9 melanoma cell lines when compared to normal melanocytes and in most of the 8 tumor samples analyzed. The losses were associated with advanced stage of the disease. These results were confirmed in situ by immunohistochemistry on 10 paraffin-embedded sections of human malignant melanoma primary tumors and melanoma skin metastases. A small reduction of TANGO was also seen in different benign and atypical nevi when compared to normal skin. For functional analysis of TANGO we evaluated TANGO re-expressing melanoma cell clones and antisense TANGO cell clones with a complete loss of TANGO. Functional assays with TANGO transfected or treated cell lines revealed that TANGO expression reduces motility, whereas reduction of TANGO enhances migration. Our studies, therefore, indicate that reduction of TANGO expression contributes to tumor progression. These results taken together provide the first indications for a tumor suppressor role of TANGO gene in human malignant melanoma.

  9. Notch1 functions as a tumor suppressor in mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michael; Wolfer, Anita; Raj, Kenneth; Kummer, J Alain; Mill, Pleasantine; van Noort, Mascha; Hui, Chi-chung; Clevers, Hans; Dotto, G Paolo; Radtke, Freddy

    2003-03-01

    Notch proteins are important in binary cell-fate decisions and inhibiting differentiation in many developmental systems, and aberrant Notch signaling is associated with tumorigenesis. The role of Notch signaling in mammalian skin is less well characterized and is mainly based on in vitro studies, which suggest that Notch signaling induces differentiation in mammalian skin. Conventional gene targeting is not applicable to establishing the role of Notch receptors or ligands in the skin because Notch1-/- embryos die during gestation. Therefore, we used a tissue-specific inducible gene-targeting approach to study the physiological role of the Notch1 receptor in the mouse epidermis and the corneal epithelium of adult mice. Unexpectedly, ablation of Notch1 results in epidermal and corneal hyperplasia followed by the development of skin tumors and facilitated chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. Notch1 deficiency in skin and in primary keratinocytes results in increased and sustained expression of Gli2, causing the development of basal-cell carcinoma-like tumors. Furthermore, Notch1 inactivation in the epidermis results in derepressed beta-catenin signaling in cells that should normally undergo differentiation. Enhanced beta-catenin signaling can be reversed by re-introduction of a dominant active form of the Notch1 receptor. This leads to a reduction in the signaling-competent pool of beta-catenin, indicating that Notch1 can inhibit beta-catenin-mediated signaling. Our results indicate that Notch1 functions as a tumor-suppressor gene in mammalian skin.

  10. A recombination suppressor contributes to ecological speciation in OSTRINIA moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, C B; Li, X; Dopman, E B

    2015-06-01

    Despite unparalleled access to species' genomes in our post-genomic age, we often lack adequate biological explanations for a major hallmark of the speciation process-genetic divergence. In the presence of gene flow, chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions are thought to promote divergence and facilitate speciation by suppressing recombination. Using a combination of genetic crosses, phenotyping of a trait underlying ecological isolation, and population genetic analysis of wild populations, we set out to determine whether evidence supports a role for recombination suppressors during speciation between the Z and E strains of European corn borer moth (Ostrinia nubilalis). Our results are consistent with the presence of an inversion that has contributed to accumulation of ecologically adaptive alleles and genetic differentiation across roughly 20% of the Ostrinia sex chromosome (~4 Mb). Patterns in Ostrinia suggest that chromosomal divergence may involve two separate phases-one driving its transient origin through local adaptation and one determining its stable persistence through differential introgression. As the evolutionary rate of rearrangements in lepidopteran genomes appears to be one of the fastest among eukaryotes, structural mutations may have had a disproportionate role during adaptive divergence and speciation in Ostrinia and in other moths and butterflies.

  11. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..g/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plaque forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC. (orig.*.

  12. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, U.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..m/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plawue forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC.

  13. Suppressor cell activity in a proliferative disorder of T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupa, A; Thomas, M E; Moore, H; Bradley, J; Zola, H; Hooper, M; Harding, P

    1981-06-01

    We report details of the immunological profile of a patient with the candidiasis endocrinopathy syndrome who has developed T-type chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The patient is anergic to a panel of delayed hypersensitivity skin tests, and has poor in vitro mitogenic responses, but B cell function in vivo is not impaired. Subsequent functional studies have revealed that cells from the patient have a significant suppressive effect in coculture (P less than 0.05) on the responses of healthy donor lymphocytes (NR) to the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). A degree of selectivity for the suppressive effect is suggested by the lack of similar effects on coculture responses to the mitogens concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Mitomycin C treatment of the patient's cells reduced their suppressive activity but significant suppression was still observed in the majority of PHA cocultures. The suppressor activity required the presence of the patient's cells in cocultures, as no suppression was observed when the patient's serum or cell culture supernatant were included instead of the patient's cells in NR cultures.

  14. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  15. ERF is a Potential ERK Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0277 TITLE: ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rohit...Bose CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ERF is a Potential ERK-Modulated Tumor Suppressor in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0277

  16. SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 of Sporisorium reilianum Modulates Inflorescence Branching Architecture in Maize and Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Hassan; Löfke, Christian; Teichmann, Thomas; Schirawski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic fungus Sporisorium reilianum causes head smut of maize (Zea mays) after systemic plant colonization. Symptoms include the formation of multiple female inflorescences at subapical nodes of the stalk because of loss of apical dominance. By deletion analysis of cluster 19-1, the largest genomic divergence cluster in S. reilianum, we identified a secreted fungal effector responsible for S. reilianum-induced loss of apical dominance, which we named SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 (SAD1). SAD1 transcript levels were highly up-regulated during biotrophic fungal growth in all infected plant tissues. SAD1-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins expressed by recombinant S. reilianum localized to the extracellular hyphal space. Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-expressing green fluorescent protein-SAD1 displayed an increased number of secondary rosette-leaf branches. This suggests that SAD1 manipulates inflorescence branching architecture in maize and Arabidopsis through a conserved pathway. Using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid library of S. reilianum-infected maize tissues, we identified potential plant interaction partners that had a predicted function in ubiquitination, signaling, and nuclear processes. Presence of SAD1 led to an increase of the transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN-FORMED1 in the root and a reduction of the branching regulator TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 in the stalk. This indicates a role of SAD1 in regulation of apical dominance by modulation of branching through increasing transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN1 and derepression of bud outgrowth. PMID:26511912

  17. Suppression of RNA silencing by a plant DNA virus satellite requires a host calmodulin-like protein to repress RDR6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense. To counteract host defense, plant viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs that target different effector molecules in the RNA silencing pathway. Evidence has shown that plants also encode endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing (ESRs that function in proper regulation of RNA silencing. The possibility that these cellular proteins can be subverted by viruses to thwart host defense is intriguing but has not been fully explored. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana calmodulin-like protein Nbrgs-CaM is required for the functions of the VSR βC1, the sole protein encoded by the DNA satellite associated with the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV. Nbrgs-CaM expression is up-regulated by the βC1. Transgenic plants over-expressing Nbrgs-CaM displayed developmental abnormities reminiscent of βC1-associated morphological alterations. Nbrgs-CaM suppressed RNA silencing in an Agrobacterium infiltration assay and, when over-expressed, blocked TYLCCNV-induced gene silencing. Genetic evidence showed that Nbrgs-CaM mediated the βC1 functions in silencing suppression and symptom modulation, and was required for efficient virus infection. Moreover, the tobacco and tomato orthologs of Nbrgs-CaM also possessed ESR activity, and were induced by betasatellite to promote virus infection in these Solanaceae hosts. We further demonstrated that βC1-induced Nbrgs-CaM suppressed the production of secondary siRNAs, likely through repressing RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 expression. RDR6-deficient N. benthamiana plants were defective in antiviral response and were hypersensitive to TYLCCNV infection. More significantly, TYLCCNV could overcome host range restrictions to infect Arabidopsis thaliana when the plants carried a RDR6 mutation. These findings demonstrate a distinct mechanism of VSR for suppressing PTGS through usurpation of a host ESR, and

  18. Invariant NKT cells: regulation and function during viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Juno

    Full Text Available Natural killer T cells (NKT cells represent a subset of T lymphocytes that express natural killer (NK cell surface markers. A subset of NKT cells, termed invariant NKT cells (iNKT, express a highly restricted T cell receptor (TCR and respond to CD1d-restricted lipid ligands. iNKT cells are now appreciated to play an important role in linking innate and adaptive immune responses and have been implicated in infectious disease, allergy, asthma, autoimmunity, and tumor surveillance. Advances in iNKT identification and purification have allowed for the detailed study of iNKT activity in both humans and mice during a variety of chronic and acute infections. Comparison of iNKT function between non-pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection models and chronic HIV-infected patients implies a role for iNKT activity in controlling immune activation. In vitro studies of influenza infection have revealed novel effector functions of iNKT cells including IL-22 production and modulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, but ex vivo characterization of human iNKT cells during influenza infection are lacking. Similarly, as recent evidence suggests iNKT involvement in dengue virus pathogenesis, iNKT cells may modulate responses to a number of emerging pathogens. This Review will summarize current knowledge of iNKT involvement in responses to viral infections in both human and mouse models and will identify critical gaps in knowledge and opportunities for future study. We will also highlight recent efforts to harness iNKT ligands as vaccine adjuvants capable of improving vaccination-induced cellular immune responses.

  19. Interplay between viral infections and genetic alterations in liver cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Hainaut

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    With over 500 000 annual deaths, Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and a leading cause of death in developing countries where about 80% of the cases arise. Risk factors include chronic hepatitis infections (hepatitis B, (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV viruses, alcohol, dietary contaminants such as falatoxins The incidence shows important geographic variations, accor In southern Asia, HCC development is mainly related to the endemic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV infection, cases with hot spot mutation in codon 249 (249ser of TP53 tumor suppressor gene were also described and associated to a low-intermediate exposure rate to Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. Presence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection was also detected in 12 - 17% of HCC cases. Despite the increasing number of studies identifying viral/host interactions in viro-induced HCC or describing potential pathways for hepatocarcinogenesis, precise mechanism has not been identified so far. HBV was demonstrated to enhance hepatocarcinogenesis by different manners; HBV chronic infection is associated to active hepatitis (CAH and cirrhosis which are hepatic complications considered as early stage for HCC development. These complications mobilise the host immune response, the resulting inflammation initiates and selects the first genetic alteration at the origin of loss of cell control. Moreover, HBV can also promote carcinogenesis through genetic instability generated by its common integration in host DNA. HBV proteins, as HBx, was proven to interact with a variety of targets in the host cell including protein or host transcription factor such as, in particular, the p53 protein or the transcription factor E4F, which is implicated in growth, differenciation and senescence. Specific HBV mutations or distinct HBV genotypes are associated to higher risks factors for HCC or hepatic complications leading

  20. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  1. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  2. [Treatment of viral hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O

    1996-12-14

    Viral hepatitis C is a serious public health problem in France by the number of infected patients, the evolutive profile and by the lack of fully efficient therapeutics. However, the risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma may not be so high as it has been stated until now. Interferon alpha is at the present time, the only approved drug for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Its efficiency on criteria such as normalization of aminotransferases values or negativation of viremia is obtained in less than 25% of patients. The present recommendation is to use 3 MU of interferon alpha, 3 times per week during 12 months. While interferon leads to improvement of histologic lesions, it is not yet proved that a treatment by interferon can reduce, years after, the incidence of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. No therapeutic strategy has been defined yet for the frequent situations of "no response", relapses or presence of factors that reduce the efficacy of treatment (high initial viremia level, genotype 1b, cirrhosis). It is possible that the course of patients having low or no elevation of aminotransferases and/or minimal histologic lesions, is good without any treatment. The efficacy of interferon alone appears insufficient. Thus trials in progress concern associations of antiviral drugs such as vidarabine. In lack of vaccine, preventive treatment is essential and depends upon knowledge of conditions of transmission of the virus. Transmission through blood and intravenous drug addiction represent 60 to 70% of cases of hepatitis C.

  3. Immunological techniques in viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehermann, Barbara; Naoumov, Nikolai V

    2007-03-01

    The need to quantitate and monitor immune responses of large patient cohorts with standardized techniques is increasing due to the growing range of treatment options for hepatitis B and hepatitis C, the development of combination therapies, and candidate experimental vaccines for HCV. In addition, advances in immunological techniques have provided new tools for detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of cellular immune responses. At present, there is substantial variation in laboratory protocols, reagents, controls and analysis and presentation of results. Standardization of immunological assays would therefore allow better comparison of results amongst individual laboratories and patient cohorts. The EASL-sponsored and AASLD-endorsed Monothematic Conference on Clinical Immunology in Viral Hepatitis was held at the University College London, United Kingdom, Oct 7-8, 2006 to bring together investigators with research experience in clinical immunology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections for in-depth discussion, critical evaluation and standardization of immunological assays. This report summarizes the information presented and discussed at the conference, but is not intended to represent a consensus statement. Our aim is to highlight topics and issues that were supported by general agreement and those that were controversial, as well as to provide suggestions for future work.

  4. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia L Smits

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow rapid phylogenetic characterization of these new viruses. Often, however, complete viral genomes are not recovered, but rather several distinct contigs derived from a single entity, some of which have no sequence homology to any known proteins. De novo assembly of single viruses from a metagenome is challenging, not only because of the lack of a reference genome, but also because of intrapopulation variation and uneven or insufficient coverage. Here we explored different assembly algorithms, remote homology searches, genome-specific sequence motifs, k-mer frequency ranking, and coverage profile binning to detect and obtain viral target genomes from metagenomes. All methods were tested on 454-generated sequencing datasets containing three recently described RNA viruses with a relatively large genome which were divergent to previously known viruses from the viral families Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae. Depending on specific characteristics of the target virus and the metagenomic community, different assembly and in silico gap closure strategies were successful in obtaining near complete viral genomes.

  5. Persistent human papillomavirus infection in the etiology of cervical carcinoma: The role of immunological, genetic, viral and cellular factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živadinović Radomir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to present the role of human papillomavirus (HPV in cervical carcinogenesis from several aspects. By explaining the HPV virus lifecycle and structure, its effect on cervical cell cycle and subversion of immune response can be better understood. Early E region of the viral genome encodes proteins that are directly involved in carcinogenesis. The E6 protein binds to p53 protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene blocking and degrading it, which in turn prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. E6 is also capable of telomerase activation, which leads to cell immortalization; it also reacts with host proto-oncogene c-jun, responsible for transcription, shortens G1 phase and speeds up the transition from G1 to S phase of the cells infected by HPV. E7 forms bonds with retinoblastoma protein (product of tumor-suppressor gene and inactivates it. It can inactivate cyclin inhibitors p21, p27, and abrogate the mitotic spindle checkpoint with the loss of protective effect of pRB and p53. The immune system cannot initiate early immunological reaction since the virus is non-lytic, while the concentration of viral proteins - antigens is low and has a basal intracellular position. Presentation through Langerhans cells (LC is weak, because the number of these cells is low due to the effect of HPV. E7 HPV reduces the expression of E-cadherin, which is responsible for LC adhesion to HPVtransformed keratinocytes. Based on these considerations, it may be concluded that the process of cervical carcinogenesis includes viral, genetic, cellular, molecular-biological, endocrine, exocrine and immunological factors.

  6. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  7. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A skeptical look at viral immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, I A; Rouse, B T

    1997-12-01

    In the past several years, many viral gene products have been found to encode proteins which interfere with immune defense mechanisms. Whether these interactions between virus and immune system components are actually evasion mechanisms used during viral infections in their natural hosts remains to be proven. In vitro studies do, however, reveal several tactics which may aid viral replication and dissemination by interfering with components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this manuscript, we discuss the more intensively studied of these putative in vitro evasion tactics and ponder their relevance in in vivo situations.

  9. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S.; Bajer, Magdalena M.; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J.; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H.; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2–4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted. PMID:26982744

  10. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Tobias; Blees, Johanna S; Bajer, Magdalena M; Wild, Janine; Pescatori, Luca; Cuzzucoli Crucitti, Giuliana; Scipione, Luigi; Costi, Roberta; Henrich, Curtis J; Brüne, Bernhard; Colburn, Nancy H; Di Santo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)disulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2-4) or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6). We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted.

  11. Diaryl Disulfides as Novel Stabilizers of Tumor Suppressor Pdcd4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schmid

    Full Text Available The translation inhibitor and tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported to be lost in various tumors and put forward as prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. Decreased Pdcd4 protein stability due to PI3K-mTOR-p70S6K1 dependent phosphorylation of Pdcd4 followed by β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction of the protein was characterized as a major mechanism contributing to the loss of Pdcd4 expression in tumors. In an attempt to identify stabilizers of Pdcd4, we used a luciferase-based high-throughput compatible cellular assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4 in response to mitogen stimulation. Following a screen of approximately 2000 compounds, we identified 1,2-bis(4-chlorophenyldisulfide as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer. To determine an initial structure-activity relationship, we used 3 additional compounds, synthesized according to previous reports, and 2 commercially available compounds for further testing, in which either the linker between the aryls was modified (compounds 2-4 or the chlorine residues were replaced by groups with different electronic properties (compounds 5 and 6. We observed that those compounds with alterations in the sulfide linker completely lost the Pdcd4 stabilizing potential. In contrast, modifications in the chlorine residues showed only minor effects on the Pdcd4 stabilizing activity. A reporter with a mutated phospho-degron verified the specificity of the compounds for stabilizing the Pdcd4 reporter. Interestingly, the active diaryl disulfides inhibited proliferation and viability at concentrations where they stabilized Pdcd4, suggesting that Pdcd4 stabilization might contribute to the anti-proliferative properties. Finally, computational modelling indicated that the flexibility of the disulfide linker might be necessary to exert the biological functions of the compounds, as the inactive compound appeared to be energetically more restricted.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL LIPOSOMAL VIRAL VACCINE SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova OA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With the transport links development there is rather important issue respiratory viral infections spread, especially influenza. The only method controlling influenza is vaccination. Search and development effective and safe vaccines is important. Material and methods. In base SO "Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" in the scientific theme "Developing new approaches to creating viral vaccines and study specific activity depending of type and degree component`s modification" was created several experimental influenza vaccine with subsequent component`s modification for selecting the most optimal pattern of safety and immunogenicity. In assessing the influenza vaccine safety is using a few criteria, including, reactivity, as measured by the frequency of local and systemic adverse (negative effects, which due to its introduction, and for lipid content drugs, ability to influence oxidation processes. At present study phase was determined: a systemic reaction and local reaction of delayed-type hypersensitivity (foot pad swelling assay;b lipids and proteins peroxidation processes after administration officinal and experimental vaccines (content protein’s carbonyl groups, lipid’s hydroperoxides, activity of glutathione-peroxidase.Study objects were trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, "Vaxigrip" (Sanofi Pasteur, S.A., France, "Inflexal V" (Biotech Ltd. Berne, Switzerland and experimental vaccine samples. Highest immunogenicity vaccines had undergone improvements and modifications using adjuvant systems and acylation influenza proteins. Liposomes 2 – the experimental influenza vaccine with a liposome negative charge and antigenic composition like split vaccines "Vaksihryp". Liposomes 2.1 - the adjuvantexperimental influenza vaccine with modifications liposomal components (etoniy and chlorophyllipt molecules embedded in liposomal membrane. Liposomes 2.2 - the adjuvant

  13. Viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francque Sven M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors in the world. The incidence of HCC varies considerably with the geographic area because of differences in the major causative factors. Chronic hepatitis B and C, mostly in the cirrhotic stage, are responsible for the great majority of cases of HCC worldwide. The geographic areas at the highest risk are South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, here hepatitis B is highly endemic and is the main cause of HCC. In areas with an intermediate rate of HCC such as Southern Europe and Japan, hepatitis C is the predominant cause, whereas in low rate areas such as Northern Europe and the USA, HCC is often related to other factors as alcoholic liver disease. There is a rising incidence in HCC in developed countries during the last two decades, due to the increasing rate of hepatitis C infection and improvement of the clinical management of cirrhosis. Methods This article reviews the literature on hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Medline search was carried out using these key words and articles were selected on epidemiology, risk factors, screening, and prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma. Results Screening of patients with advanced chronic hepatitis B and C with hepatic ultrasound and determination of serum alfa-fetoprotein may improve the detection of HCC, but further studies are needed whether screening improves clinical outcome. Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV/HCV can be implicated in the development of HCC in an indirect way, through induction of chronic inflammation, or directly by means of viral proteins or, in the case of HBV, by creation of mutations by integration into the genome of the hepatocyte. Conclusion The most effective tool to prevent HCC is avoidance of the risk factors such as viral infection. For HBV, a very effective vaccine is available. Preliminary data from Taiwan indicate a protective effect of universal vaccination on the

  14. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  15. Metatranscriptomic analysis of extremely halophilic viral communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Fernando; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; Meseguer, Inmaculada; López, Cristina; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Parro, Víctor; Antón, Josefa

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, we analyzed the viral expression in one crystallizer using a metatranscriptomic approach in which clones from a metaviromic library were immobilized in a microarray and used as probes...

  16. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barr virus, also called infectious mononucleosis; herpesvi rus; parvovirus; and adenovirus. What are the symptoms of viral ... such as cytomega lovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpesvirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus. These cases are called non-A– ...

  17. viral infections of the central nervous system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) include both acute and chronic conditions ... ADEM is a rare, immune-mediated disorder that is triggered by an environmental stimulus in ... difficulties and apathy. Typically there is cognitive ...

  18. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  20. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...