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Sample records for plant source protein

  1. Taurine supplemented plant protein based diets with alternative lipid sources for juvenile sea bream, sparus aurata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two lipid sources were evaluated as fish oil replacements in fishmeal free, plant protein based diets for juvenile gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata. A twelve week feeding study was undertaken to examine the performance of fish fed the diets with different sources of essential fatty acids (canola o...

  2. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  3. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-08-21

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public.

  4. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M. Pasiakos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2007–2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years. Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public.

  5. Alternative plant protein sources for pigs and chickens in the tropics – nutritional value and constraints: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Lascano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the tropics, a large number of smallholder farms contribute significantly to food security by raising pigs and poultry for domestic consumption and for sale on local markets. The high cost and, sometimes, the lack of availability of commercial protein supplements is one of the main limitations to efficient animal production by smallholders. Locally-grown forages and grain legumes offer ecological benefits such as nitrogen fixation, soil improvement, and erosion control which contribute to improve cropping efficiency. Besides these agronomical assets, they can be used as animal feeds in mixed farming systems. In this paper we review options to include locally-grown forages and grain legumes as alternative protein sources in the diets of pigs and poultry in order to reduce farmers’ dependence on externally-purchased protein concentrates. The potential nutritive value of a wide range of forages and grain legumes is presented and discussed. The influence of dietary fibre and plant secondary metabolites contents and their antinutritive consequences on feed intake, digestive processes and animal performances are considered according to the varying composition in those compounds of the different plant species and cultivars covered in this review. Finally, methods to overcome the antinutritive attributes of the plant secondary metabolites using heat, chemical or biological treatment are reviewed regarding their efficiency and their suitability in low input farming systems.

  6. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed.

  7. Advances in animal and plant protein sources in place of fish meal%动植物蛋白源替代鱼粉研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周歧存; 麦康森; 刘永坚; 谭北平

    2005-01-01

    With the fast development of aquaculture, fish meal needs increased in recent years, however the quantity of fish catching decreases gradually. Fishmeal is a limited feed resource, and serious concem exists on the future availability of this feedstuff for incorporation in fish diets. Undoubtedly, fish meal is well recognized as the best dietary protein source for most marine carnivorous fishes which required high dietary protein levels compared to omnivorous or herbivorous fish. Fishmeal is known for their high content of essential amino acids and fatty acids, low carbohydrates, high digestibility, low levels of anti-nutritional factors (for fresh fish meal) and is a very good source of minerals and is highly palatable. Thus fish meal is in high demand as the protein source for many formulated diets. However, production of fish meal consumes approximately 35 % of the total global fish catch, and the increasing price and potentially unstable supply in the market could be limiting factors for marine fish culture. There have been strong efforts to define and develop cost-effective protein sources that can, at least partly, substitute for expensive high-quality fish meals in least-cost feed formulations. The search for fish meal substitutes and altemative dietary protein sources is an international research priority that could be of considerable economic advantages. Therefore it is urgent task to find animal and plant protein sources in place of fish meal. Among these, plant feedstuffs have received most attention in recent years, but due to their amino acid unbalances, .presence of anti-nutritional factors and low palatability, a high level of replacement of fish meal with plant feedstuffs in omnivorous fish is generally not well accepted. This paper reviews the research status for other protein sources replacing fish meal based on available information in the literature. Animal and plant protein sources nutrient values are evaluated from the aspect of digestibility

  8. Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feeding trial was conducted in a closed system with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) juveniles (mean weight, 2.84 g) to examine the effects of total replacement of fish meal (FM), with and without supplementation of DL-methionine (Met) and L-lysine (Lys), by plant protein sources. Fish were f...

  9. Plant protein glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  10. Plant nuclear envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    Compared to research in the animal field, the plant NE has been clearly under-investigated. The available data so far indicate similarities as well as striking differences that raise interesting questions about the function and evolution of the NE in different kingdoms. Despite a seemingly similar structure and organization of the NE, many of the proteins that are integral components of the animal NE appear to lack homologues in plant cells. The sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has not led to the identification of homologues of animal NE components, but has indicated that the plant NE must have a distinct protein composition different from that found in metazoan cells. Besides providing a selective barrier between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, the plant NE functions as a scaffold for chromatin but the scaffolding components are not identical to those found in animal cells. The NE comprises an MTOC in higher plant cells, a striking difference to the organization of microtubule nucleation in other eukaryotic cells. Nuclear pores are present in the plant NE, but identifiable orthologues of most animal and yeast nucleoporins are presently lacking. The transport pathway through the nuclear pores via the action of karyopherins and the Ran cycle is conserved in plant cells. Interestingly, RanGAP is sequestered to the NE in plant cells and animal cells, yet the targeting domains and mechanisms of attachment are different between the two kingdoms. At present, only a few proteins localized at the plant NE have been identified molecularly. Future research will have to expand the list of known protein components involved in building a functional plant NE.

  11. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin B. Comerford

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars—all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product’s glucoregulatory effects.

  12. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerford, Kevin B; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-07-23

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars-all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product's glucoregulatory effects.

  13. Amino acid content of selected plant, algae and insect species: a search for alternative protein sources for use in pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Sarah; Buff, Preston R; Yu, Zengshou; Fascetti, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    In response to global economic duress and heightened consumer awareness of nutrition and health, sustainable and natural ingredients are in demand. Identification of alternative sources of nitrogen and amino acids, including taurine, may help meet dietary requirements while fostering sustainability and natural feeding approaches. Twenty plants, eighteen marine algae and five insect species were analysed. All samples were freeze-dried, hydrolysed and filtered prior to amino acid analysis. Samples for amino acids were analysed in duplicate and averaged. Nitrogen was analysed and crude protein (CP) determined by calculation. With the exception of taurine concentration in soldier fly larvae, all insects exceeded both the National Research Council's canine and feline minimal requirements (MR) for growth of all essential amino acids (EAA) and CP. Although some plants and marine algal species exceeded the canine and feline MR for growth for EAA and CP, only very low concentrations of taurine were found in plants. Taurine concentration in insects was variable but high, with the greatest concentration found in ants (6·42 mg/g DM) and adult flesh flies (3·33 mg/g DM). Taurine was also high in some macroalgae, especially the red algal species: Mazaella spp. (4·11 mg/g DM), Porphyra spp. (1·22 mg/g DM) and Chondracanthus spp. (6·28 mg/g DM). Preliminary results suggest that insects and some marine algal species may be practical alternatives to traditional protein and supplemental taurine sources in pet foods. Safety, bioavailability, palatability and source variability of alternative items as food ingredients should be investigated prior to incorporation into canine and feline diets.

  14. Effects of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foiklang, Suban; Wanapat, Metha; Toburan, Wetchasit

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine effect of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block (HQFB) on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo. Four rumen-fistulated swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four kinds of plant protein sources (coarse rice bran (CRB), cassava hay (CH), Phaseolus calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay (MH)) were mixed in the HQFB. HQFBs were allowed to be licked at free choice, and urea-lime-treated rice straw (ULRS) were fed ad libitum. It was found that bacterial population and fungal zoospores in CH-fed group tended to be higher than those in other groups. Moreover, protozoal population in CH, P. calcaratus hay, and MH were lower than those in CRB supplemented group (P < 0.05). Cellulolytic bacterial population was highest in CH-fed group while proteolytic bacteria population was highest in P. calcaratus hay-fed group (P < 0.05). CH-fed group had higher ULRS intake than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Nutrient digestibility of CP, NDF, and ADF in CH-fed group was significantly higher than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Total VFA was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). N absorption was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). Based on this study, it could be concluded that cassava hay, P. calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay are potential to be used as protein sources in the HQFBs especially cassava hay.

  15. Arabinogalactan proteins in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Szczuka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AGPs (arabinogalactan-proteins are the major constituent of arabic gum and have been used as emulsifiers and stabilizing agents. They are also one of the most abundant and heterogeneous class forming a large family of proteoglycans that sculpt the surface not only of plant but also of all eukaryotic cells. Undoubtedly, AGPs appear in numerous biological processes, playing diverse functions. Despite their abundance in nature and industrial utility, the in vivofunction(s of AGPs still remains unclear or even unknown. AGPs are commonly distributed in different plant organs and probably participate in all aspects of plant growth and development including reproduction (e.g. they are present in the stigma including stigma exudates, and in transmitting tissues in styles, pollen grains, and pollen tubes. The functions and evident involvement of AGPs in sexual plant reproduction in a few plant species as Actinidia deliciosa (A.Chev. C.F.Liang & A.R.Ferguson, Amaranthus hypochondriacus L., Catharanthus roseus (L. G.Don, Lolium perenneL. and Larix deciduaMill. are known from literature. The localization of two kinds of AGP epitopes, recognized by the JIM8 and JIM13 mAbs, in anatomically different ovules revealed some differences in spatial localization of these epitopes in ovules of monocots Galanthus nivalis L. and Galtonia candicans (Baker Decne. and dicots like Oenothera species and Sinapis albaL. A detailed study of the localization of AGPs in egg cells, zygotes, including the zygote division stage, and in two-celled proembryos in Nicotiana tabacumL. prompts consideration of the necessity of their presence in the very early steps of ontogenesis. The selective labeling obtained with AGP mAbs JIM8, JIM13, MAC207, and LM2 during Arabidopsis thaliana(L. Heynh. development suggests that some AGPs can be regarded as molecular markers for gametophytic cell differentiation. Moreover, the results show evident differences in the distribution of specific AGP

  16. Renal Diet for Vegetarians: Which Protein Sources Are Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calories and other important nutrients. Type of vegetarian diet Protein sources Vegan — allows only plant-based foods Soy protein (tofu, ... ... for vegan renal patients. The Vegetarian Resource Group. http://www. ...

  17. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  18. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  19. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Degradability Coefficients and Ruminalpostruminal Digestibility of Dry Matter and Crude Protein of some Plant Protein Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gasem tahan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of electron beam irradiation on degradability coefficients and ruminal- postruminal digestibility of dry matter and crude protein of soybean meal, canola meal and Lathyrus sativus seed, irradiated at doses of 50, 100 and 150 kGy was investigated. Ruminal degradability of dry matter and crude protein was determined by in situ method using two cannulated Holstein heifers. Ruminal- postruminal digestibility of dry matter and crude protein was determined by in situ (nylon bag-in vitro (daisy digestor techniques. Data analyzed using SAS software as randomized completely design and the treatment means were compared using Tukey test. The results indicated that irradiation had no effect on dry matter, ether extract and ash content of feeds. In soybean meal, washout fraction and potentially degradable fraction of dry matter and crude protein was higher and lower at dose of 150 kGy irradiation than other treatments, respectively, and degradation rate constant and ruminal effective degradability of dry matter and crude protein was lower at all doses of irradiation than untreated soybean meal. In canola meal, irradiation at doses of 50 and 100 kGy decreased washout fraction and increased potentially degradable fraction of crude protein compared with untreated canola meal. In Lathyrus sativus seed, only potentially degradable fraction of dry matter and crude protein was lower at dose of 150 kGy irradiation than untreated Lathyrus sativus seed. Ruminal digestibility of crude protein decreased in soybean meal at doses of 100 and 150 kGy irradiation and for canola meal at all doses of irradiation than untreated samples. Total tract digestibility of crude protein decreased in soybean meal at dose of 150 kGy irradiation and for canola meal at all doses of irradiation than untreated samples. In Lathyrus sativus seed, ruminal-postruminal digestibility and total tract digestibility of dry matter increased at doses of 100 and 150 kGy irradiation than untreated

  20. Intake of total, animal and plant proteins, and their food sources in 10 countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halkjaer, J.; Olsen, A.; Bjerregaard, L. J.; Deharveng, G.; Tjonneland, A.; Welch, A. A.; Crowe, F. L.; Wirfalt, E.; Hellstrom, V.; Niravong, M.; Touvier, M.; Linseisen, J.; Steffen, A.; Ocke, M. C.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Chirlaque, M. D.; Larranaga, N.; Ferrari, P.; Contiero, P.; Frasca, G.; Engeset, D.; Lund, E.; Misirli, G.; Kosti, M.; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.; Bingham, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe dietary protein intakes and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Between 1995 and 2000, 36 034 persons, aged between 35 and 74 years, were administered a

  1. Amino acid content of selected plant, algae and insect species: a search for alternative protein sources for use in pet foods*

    OpenAIRE

    McCusker, Sarah; Buff, Preston R.; Yu, Zengshou; Fascetti,Andrea J.

    2014-01-01

    In response to global economic duress and heightened consumer awareness of nutrition and health, sustainable and natural ingredients are in demand. Identification of alternative sources of nitrogen and amino acids, including taurine, may help meet dietary requirements while fostering sustainability and natural feeding approaches. Twenty plants, eighteen marine algae and five insect species were analysed. All samples were freeze-dried, hydrolysed and filtered prior to amino acid analysis. Samp...

  2. Seaweed: A valuable marine plant source

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.; Pereira, N.

    Seaweed, one of the components of seashore, is the most unique and important marine living resource. Its multi-ranged applications are of economic as well as ecological importance. These plants have been a source of food, feed and medicine...

  3. Novel anticancer agents from plant sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah Unnati; Shah Ripal; Acharya Sanjeev; Acharya Niyati

    2013-01-01

    Plants remain an important source of new drugs,new drug leads and new chemical entities.Plant based drug discovery resulted mainly in the development of anticancer and anti-infectious agents,and continues to contribute to the new leads in clinical trials.Natural product drugs play a dominant role in pharmaceutical care.Several plant-derived compounds are currently successfully employed in cancer treatment.There are many classes of plant-derived cytotoxic natural products studied for further improvement and development of drugs.New anticancer drugs derived from research on plant antitumor agents will be continuously discovered.The basic aim of this review is to explore the potential of newly discovered anticancer compounds from medicinal plants,as a lead for anticancer drug development.It will be helpful to explore the medicinal value of plants and for new drug discovery from them for the researchers and scientists around the globe.

  4. Dietary Protein Intake in Dutch Elderly People: A Focus on Protein Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tieland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sufficient high quality dietary protein intake is required to prevent or treat sarcopenia in elderly people. Therefore, the intake of specific protein sources as well as their timing of intake are important to improve dietary protein intake in elderly people. Objectives: to assess the consumption of protein sources as well as the distribution of protein sources over the day in community-dwelling, frail and institutionalized elderly people. Methods: Habitual dietary intake was evaluated using 2- and 3-day food records collected from various studies involving 739 community-dwelling, 321 frail and 219 institutionalized elderly people. Results: Daily protein intake averaged 71 ± 18 g/day in community-dwelling, 71 ± 20 g/day in frail and 58 ± 16 g/day in institutionalized elderly people and accounted for 16% ± 3%, 16% ± 3% and 17% ± 3% of their energy intake, respectively. Dietary protein intake ranged from 10 to 12 g at breakfast, 15 to 23 g at lunch and 24 to 31 g at dinner contributing together over 80% of daily protein intake. The majority of dietary protein consumed originated from animal sources (≥60% with meat and dairy as dominant sources. Thus, 40% of the protein intake in community-dwelling, 37% in frail and 29% in institutionalized elderly originated from plant based protein sources with bread as the principle source. Plant based proteins contributed for >50% of protein intake at breakfast and between 34% and 37% at lunch, with bread as the main source. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from animal protein, with meat as the dominant source. Conclusion: Daily protein intake in these older populations is mainly (>80% provided by the three main meals, with most protein consumed during dinner. More than 60% of daily protein intake consumed is of animal origin, with plant based protein sources representing nearly 40% of total protein consumed. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from

  5. Bioactivities of alternative protein sources and their potential health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlanto, A; Mattila, P; Mäkinen, S; Pajari, A-M

    2017-08-14

    Increasing the utilisation of plant proteins is needed to support the production of protein-rich foods that could replace animal proteins in the human diet so as to reduce the strain that intensive animal husbandry poses to the environment. Lupins, quinoa and hempseed are significant sources of energy, high quality proteins, fibre, vitamins and minerals. In addition, they contain compounds such as polyphenols and bioactive peptides that can increase the nutritional value of these plants. From the nutritional standpoint, the right combination of plant proteins can supply sufficient amounts of essential amino acids for human requirements. This review aims at providing an overview of the current knowledge of the nutritional properties, beneficial and non-nutritive compounds, storage proteins, and potential health benefits of lupins, quinoa and hempseed.

  6. Leaf protein concentrate as food supplement from arid zone plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mala

    2010-06-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas where prevalence of droughts and famines is a recurring feature, forest cover can in general make valuable contributions to food security and provide income to the rural poor. Protein and calorie malnutrition is widespread in these areas leading to high child mortality rate. Plant species can play an important role in overcoming this by being used as a source of leaf protein concentrate (LPC), a highly nutritious food. LPC should be considered seriously as it can serve as an additional protein source in the case of non-ruminants and man, especially in drought prone areas. The use of LPC in developing countries as an alternative protein source to fishmeal in broiler diet holds tremendous promise as it can substantially lower high cost of fishmeal and eventually the acute shortage of animal protein supply. Potential tropical plants for LPC production have been evaluated and selected for further research by United States Department of Agriculture. The present study was aimed to determine the potential of arid zone plants for preparation of LPC. Extraction characteristics of the several plant species have been studied and the quality of LPC prepared from them was investigated. Different fractions, chloroplastic and cytoplasmic proteins, were analyzed for their crude protein contents. Analysis of LPC shows considerable differences in their protein contents, which was found to range from 13.7 to 88.9%. Based on this, Achyranthes aspera and Tephrosia purpurea were found to be the best suited plants for LPC preparation.

  7. Effects of soybean oligosaccharides on lipid metabolism of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus Temminck et Schlegel) fed animal or plant protein source-based diets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Junming; MAI Kangsen; AI Qinghui; ZHANG Wenbing

    2007-01-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary soybean oligosaccharides (SBOS) on the levels of cholesterol in plasma and liver,and the fatty acid composition in muscle and liver of juvenile Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus Temminck et Schlegel).Four isonitrogenous and isocaloric practical diets (crude protein 49%,gross energy 19 kJ/g) including only fish meal (FM) or soy protein isolate (SPI) as sole dietary protein source with (Diets FMO and SPIO) or without (Diets FM and SPI) supplemented SBOS (stachyose,2.61%;raffinose,0.61%) were formulated.Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate aquaria stocked with 30 fish (initial body weight 1.93 ±0.02 g) each.Fish were maintained in the flow-through aquaria at water temperature ranging from 22.0℃ to 25.0℃ and fed twice (08:00,16:00) daily to apparent satiation for 8 weeks.Dietary SBOS supplementation significantly increased the levels of total cholesterol (TC) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in plasma of the fish fed FM-based diets (P<0.05),but no significant differences were observed at the levels of plasma triacylglycerol (TG) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (P>0.05).The levels of TC,TG,HDL-C and LDL-C,and LDL-C/HDLC ratio in plasma of the fish fed SPI-based diets were not significantly influenced by the supplemented SBOS (P>0.05).Supplementation of SBOS did not influence the hepatic TC,TG and lipid contents and lipid droplet accumulation in fish fed FM-based diets,but significantly decreased the hepatic TC,TG and lipid contents and lipid droplet accumulation in fish fed SPI-based diets (P<0.05).In contrast,supplemented SBOS significantly increased fecal cholesterol extraction in the fish fed FM-based diets (P<0.05),but no significant difference was observed in the fish fed SPI-based diets (P>0.05).The fatty acid composition in muscle and liver was not significantly affected by supplemental SBOS regardless of

  8. Substituição da farinha de carne suína por fontes vegetais em dietas para carpa-húngara Replacement of pork meal by plant protein sources in Hungarian carp diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Taffarel Bergamin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o crescimento e a qualidade de carcaça de carpa-húngara alimentada com dietas em que houve substituição da farinha de carne suína por farelos de soja e canola, bem como determinar parâmetros bioquímicos do metabolismo dos peixes e a qualidade sensorial do filé. Cada um dos farelos contribuiu com 50% da proteína na mistura. Cinco dietas foram avaliadas, com níveis de substituição (0, 25, 50, 75 e 100% da proteína da farinha de carne suína pela mistura das fontes vegetais. A inclusão de fontes proteicas vegetais nas dietas reduziu o crescimento, a deposição de gordura corporal e no filé, e o colesterol total dos peixes. A cor e o sabor dos filés não foram afetados pela inclusão das fontes proteicas vegetais. A dieta à base de farinha de carne suína é mais eficiente para o crescimento da carpa-húngara, e proporciona maior deposição de proteína no peixe inteiro e no filé.The objective of this work was to evaluate growth and carcass composition of Hungarian carp fed with diets in which pork meat meal was replaced by a combination of canola and soybean meals, as well as to determine fish metabolism biochemical parameters and the sensorial quality of the fillet. Each plant meal contributed with 50% of the dietary protein of the mixture. Five diets were tested, with replacement levels of 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of pork meal by plant protein sources. The inclusion of the plant-protein meal in the diet results in lower overall growth, lower body and fillet lipid deposition and lower total cholesterol of the fish. Color and flavor of the fillets were not affected by inclusion of plant protein sources. A pork meat meal based diet is more efficient for Hungarian carp growth, and provides higher whole fish and fillet protein deposition.

  9. Coal-fired plants worst point sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvingson, P.

    2007-03-15

    Coal-fired power plants dominate the twenty worst emitters, not only of carbon dioxide but also of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, in the 25 'old' EU member countries. Seven plants are among the 25 worst on all three lists. They are Belchatow, Rybnik and Kozience in Poland, Cottam and Longannet in the UK, Puentes in Spain and Taranto in Italy. All data refer to 2004. German plants are among the worst in respect of carbon dioxide - nine of the 25 biggest point sources are in Germany. Topping the list for sulphur dioxide is the coal-fired Puentes power plant in the northwest of Spain. Second highest as regards sulphur dioxide is the Megalopolis A (I, II, III) complex on the Peloponnesian peninsula in Greece. Close by is Megalopolis B (IV), also on the worst 25 list. All are fired with lignite from local deposits. British plants account for nine of the 25 worst emitters of nitrogen oxides. Figures from tables reproduced in the article are from the European Pollutant Emission Register, EPER which covers 11,500 industrial facilities in the EU25 and Norway and has recently been updated with 2004 figures. 3 tabs., 1 photo.

  10. Cassava leaves as protein source for pigs in Central Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to evaluate the use of cassava leaves as protein sources for pigs when used at high levels in the diet, either in fresh form or with simplified methods of processing. In twenty cassava varieties taken from the upper part of the plant at the root

  11. Plant protein and animal proteins: do they differentially affect cardiovascular disease risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-11-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Inside a plant nucleus: discovering the proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovská, Beáta; Šebela, Marek; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear proteins are a vital component of eukaryotic cell nuclei and have a profound effect on the way in which genetic information is stored, expressed, replicated, repaired, and transmitted to daughter cells and progeny. Because of the plethora of functions, nuclear proteins represent the most abundant components of cell nuclei in all eukaryotes. However, while the plant genome is well understood at the DNA level, information on plant nuclear proteins remains scarce, perhaps with the exception of histones and a few other proteins. This lack of knowledge hampers efforts to understand how the plant genome is organized in the nucleus and how it functions. This review focuses on the current state of the art of the analysis of the plant nuclear proteome. Previous proteome studies have generally been designed to search for proteins involved in plant response to various forms of stress or to identify rather a modest number of proteins. Thus, there is a need for more comprehensive and systematic studies of proteins in the nuclei obtained at individual phases of the cell cycle, or isolated from various tissue types and stages of cell and tissue differentiation. All this in combination with protein structure, predicted function, and physical localization in 3D nuclear space could provide much needed progress in our understanding of the plant nuclear proteome and its role in plant genome organization and function.

  13. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis related (PR proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens.

  14. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  15. Source-sink relationships in radish plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Starck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of source-sink relationships in di- and tetraploidal radish plants grown in. hydroponic cultures was investigated in two stages of their development: with intensively growing swollen hypocotyl and in the period of actively accumulating nutrients in the storage organ. It was found, that the proportion, between the mass of organs, their RGR and NAR was very similar in di- and tetraploidal populations, probably owing to a similar rate of photosynthesis and pattern of assimilates distribution. The high variability of swollen hypocotyls size is slightly correlated with the size of the whole aerial part and is not correlated with the rate of photosynthesis in leaves. Partial defoliation of radish plants did not affect the rate of photosynthesis of the remaining leaves. Only in the cotyledones the oldest donors of 14C-assimilates, a slight compensation of photosynthesis was reported. It may suggest, that the rate of photosynthesis in radish plants is not under the control of sink activity. The size of the storage organ have determined in some extent its attractive force and influenced the amount of 14C-assimilates exported from their donors. Translocation of photosynthates from the young, still growing leaves was conditioned mainly by their retention power. Therefore, in young radish plants cotyledons were the main donor of 14C-assimilates.

  16. Plants: a source for new antimycobacterial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Suriyanarayanan, Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, also called TB, is currently a major health hazard due to multidrug-resistant forms of bacilli. Global efforts are underway to eradicate TB using new drugs with new modes of action, higher activity, and fewer side effects in combination with vaccines. For this reason, unexplored new sources and previously explored sources were examined and around 353 antimycobacterial compounds (Nat Prod Rep 2007; 24: 278-297) 7 have been previously reported. To develop drugs from these new sources, additional work is required for preclinical and clinical results. Since ancient times, different plant part extracts have been used as traditional medicines against diseases including tuberculosis. This knowledge may be useful in developing future powerful drugs. Plant natural products are again becoming important in this regard. In this review, we report 127 antimycobacterial compounds and their antimycobacterial activities. Of these, 27 compounds had a minimum inhibitory concentration of < 10 µg/mL. In some cases, the mechanism of activity has been determined. We hope that some of these compounds may eventually develop into effective new drugs against tuberculosis.

  17. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  18. Producing proteins in transgenic plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, J W; Thomas, D W

    2001-08-01

    The requirement for large quantities of therapeutic proteins has fueled interest in the production of recombinant proteins in plants and animals. The first commercial products to be made in this way have experienced much success, and it is predicted that in the future a plethora of protein products will be made using these 'natural' bioreactors.

  19. F-box proteins in flowering plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathway has been shown to control several key biological processes such as cell division, development, metabolism and immune response. F-box proteins, as a part of SCF (Skp1-Cullin (or Cdc53)-F-box) complex, functioned by interacting with substrate proteins, leading to their subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. To date, several F-box proteins identified in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum have been shown to play important roles in auxin signal transduction, floral organ formation, flowering and leaf senescence. Arabidopsis genome sequence analysis revealed that it encodes over 1000 predicted F-box proteins accounting for about 5% of total predicted proteins. These results indicate that the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation involving the F-box proteins is an important mechanism controlling plant gene expression. Here, we review the known F-box proteins and their functionsin flowering plants.

  20. Plant cellulose synthesis: CESA proteins crossing kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Turner, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose is a biopolymer of considerable economic importance. It is synthesised by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) in species ranging from bacteria to higher plants. Enormous progress in our understanding of bacterial cellulose synthesis has come with the recent publication of both the crystal structure and biochemical characterisation of a purified complex able to synthesis cellulose in vitro. A model structure of a plant CESA protein suggests considerable similarity between the bacterial and plant cellulose synthesis. In this review article we will cover current knowledge of how plant CESA proteins synthesise cellulose. In particular the focus will be on the lessons learned from the recent work on the catalytic mechanism and the implications that new data on cellulose structure has for the assembly of CESA proteins into the large complex that synthesis plant cellulose microfibrils.

  1. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  2. Investigation of the effects of dietary protein source on copper and zinc bioavailability in rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited research has examined the effects that dietary protein sources have on copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) absorption, interactions and utilization in rainbow trout. Therefore, the objective of the first trial was to determine what effect protein source (plant vs. animal based), Cu source (complex vs....

  3. Studies on the development of infant foods from plant protein sources. Part II. Effect of processing conditions on the chemical and nutritive properties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleque, A; Elías, L G; Braham, J E; Bressani, R

    1985-09-01

    In order to improve the taste, flavor and nutritional quality of chickpea (Cicer arietinum), various processing conditions were studied. The decorticated samples were processed under various conditions, either by presoaking or non-soaking in water or sodium carbonate solution. The proteins were also isolated from water or carbonate-presoaked chickpea and subjected to various processing. Carbonate-presoaked samples gave slightly lower protein and ash values. No major changes in other constituents were observed. Subjective analysis of the intensity of characteristic chickpea flavor in processed samples was carried out, indicating some improvement in the carbonate-presoaked samples. Carbonate-treated samples exhibited a lighter color. The carbonate presoaking procedure had no adverse effect on the availability of lysine and nitrogen solubility index (NSI), as compared to the water-presoaking procedure. The time required to inactivate trypsin inhibitors in carbonate-presoaked chickpea at boiling temperature, was half that required in the case of water-presoaked ones. Under the conditions used in treating chickpea with sodium carbonate, no beneficial effect was observed in reducing the tannin content. No significant differences were observed in net protein ratio (NPR) among the various processed chickpea samples, even though in some cases isolated protein gave significantly lower NPR values. Digestibility values were higher for isolated protein than for whole chickpea samples.

  4. Protein dynamics and proteolysis in plant vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müntz, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Plant cells cannot live without their vacuoles. The tissues and organs of a plant contain a wide variety of differentiated and specialized vacuoles -- even a single plant cell can possess two or more types of vacuoles. Vacuolar proteins are encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized in the cytoplasm. Their transport into the vacuolar compartment is under cytoplasmic control. Transcription seems to be a major control level for differential protein supply to the vacuoles. It is at this level that vacuole differentiation and functions are mainly integrated into cellular processes. Recycling amino acids generated by protein degradation is a major function of the vacuole. This is most evident when storage proteins are mobilized in storage tissues of generative or vegetative organs in order to nourish the embryo of germinating seeds or sprouting buds. When specific proteins are transferred to the vacuole for immediate degradation this compartment contributes to the adaptation of protein complexes in response to changes in developmental or environmental conditions. Vacuolar proteases are involved in protein degradation during reversible senescence and programmed cell death, which is also called irreversible senescence. Vacuoles contribute to defence against pathogens and herbivores by limited and unlimited proteolysis. Our present knowledge on functions and processes of vacuolar protein dynamics in plants is reviewed. Research perspectives are deduced.

  5. Posttranslational Protein Modifications in Plant Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality, and allow for rapid responses, all at relatively low costs for the cell. PTMs play key roles in plants through their impact on signaling, gene expression, protein stability and interactions, and enzyme kinetics. Following a brief discussion of the experimental and bioinformatics challenges of PTM identification, localization, and quantification (occupancy), a concise overview is provided of the major PTMs and their (potential) functional consequences in plants, with emphasis on plant metabolism. Classic examples that illustrate the regulation of plant metabolic enzymes and pathways by PTMs and their cross talk are summarized. Recent large-scale proteomics studies mapped many PTMs to a wide range of metabolic functions. Unraveling of the PTM code, i.e. a predictive understanding of the (combinatorial) consequences of PTMs, is needed to convert this growing wealth of data into an understanding of plant metabolic regulation.

  6. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  7. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Gisèle; Charmont, Stéphane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Hervé; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (i) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (ii) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (iii) the presence of proteins ...

  8. Formulation of plant based Rainbow trout feeds on an Ideal Protein Basis can reduce total dietary protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish meal has been a primary protein source in trout feeds and any changes that can reduce fish meal levels and total costs are beneficial. Replacing fish meal with plant protein is a first step, but amino acid content of plant based diets can be limiting. Amino acids are needed for many metabolic...

  9. Alternative protein sources in sea bass nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Agaro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Intensive fish farming profitability is declining word-wide. This situation is mainly due to the extensive reliance on fish meal (FM as feed ingredient in finfish diets in order to meet the high dietary protein needs. FM quality and prices are variable and its global supply is decreasing and highly dependent on meteoric events (e.g. El niño. Several protein sources are potentially excellent alternatives to FM...

  10. Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density in the Guinea Savanna Zone of Ghana. ... protein maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid to plant density and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. ... Optimal N rate was not affected by plant density.

  11. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  12. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bidochka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  13. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  14. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  15. Health benefits and risks of plant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicova-Kudlackova, M; Babinska, K; Valachovicova, M

    2005-01-01

    Plant proteins have a reduced content of essential amino acids in comparison to animal proteins. A significant reduction of limiting amino acids (methionine, lysine, tryptophan) means lower protein synthesis. In subjects with predominant or exclusive consumption of plant food a higher incidence of hypoproteinemia due to significant reduction of methionine and lysine intakes was observed. On the other hand, lower intake of these amino acids provides a preventive effect against cardiovascular disease via cholesterol regulation by an inhibited hepatic phospholipid metabolism. Vegetarians have a significantly higher intake of non-essential amino acids arginine and pyruvigenic amino acids glycine, alanine, serine. When plant protein is high in non-essential amino acids, down-regulation of insulin and up-regulation of glucagon is a logical consequence. The action of glucagon in the liver is mediated by stimulation of adenyl cyclase that raises cyclic-AMP (adenosine-3,5-monophosphate) concentrations. Cyclic-AMP down-regulates the synthesis of a number of enzymes required for de novo lipogenesis and cholesterol synthesis, up-regulates key gluconeogenic enzymes and the LDL receptors and decreases the IGF-1 activity (insulin-like growth factor). Cyclic-AMP thus provides a reduction of atherosclerosis risk factors as well as a retardation of cancer development. A sufficient consumption of plant proteins has the protective effects against chronic degenerative diseases (Tab. 2, Ref. 26).

  16. Influence of protein source on amino acid uptake patterns and protein utilization in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Holm, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang

    Matrixes of different protein sources (fish and plant products) combined with the use of crystalline amino acids allow for formulation of diets that meet fish requirements with little or no effect on protein digestibility and/or feed intake. Despite this, a total or partial replacement of fish meal...... induces reduced growth performances that remain partly unexplained. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of exchanging the protein source on protein utilization. Marine (fish meal) and vegetable (pea protein) sources were used with or without supplementation of crystalline amino...

  17. Diagonal chromatography to study plant protein modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Jacques, Silke; Stes, Elisabeth; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Goormachtig, Sofie; Gevaert, Kris

    2016-08-01

    An interesting asset of diagonal chromatography, which we have introduced for contemporary proteome research, is its high versatility concerning proteomic applications. Indeed, the peptide modification or sorting step that is required between consecutive peptide separations can easily be altered and thereby allows for the enrichment of specific, though different types of peptides. Here, we focus on the application of diagonal chromatography for the study of modifications of plant proteins. In particular, we show how diagonal chromatography allows for studying proteins processed by proteases, protein ubiquitination, and the oxidation of protein-bound methionines. We discuss the actual sorting steps needed for each of these applications and the obtained results. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  18. 不同植物蛋白源饲料对黄鳝生长及肉质的影响%Effect of different plant protein sources on growth performance and muscle nutrition in Monopterus albus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘望城; 龚世园; 田罡

    2013-01-01

    以豆粕、菜粕、棉粕为主要植物蛋白源,配制3种蛋白含量为46%的配合饲料,分别饲养人工繁殖的黄鳝苗(体质量12.56±1.17 g)60 d,探讨不同植物蛋白源饲料对黄鳝生长性能与肉质的影响.试验结果表明:棉粕组黄鳝增重率、特定生长率、蛋白质效率和饲料系数分别为145.01%、1.47%、88.2%和2.46,在3组中生长性能表现最佳,与其他2组差异显著,豆粕组次之,菜粕组表现最差;3组黄鳝在肝体指数、内脏指数、肥满度方面均没有显著性差异;豆粕组黄鳝肌肉粗蛋白含量3组中最高,显著高于其他2组;菜粕组黄鳝肌肉粗脂肪含量最高,显著高于豆粕组与棉粕组;豆粕组与菜粕组黄鳝在肌肉粗灰分方面并没有显著差异,棉粕组显著最低.%A 2-month feeding experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different plant protein sources on growth performance in rice field eel,Monopterus albus.Soybean meal,rapeseed meal,cottonseed meal and white fish meal,fermented soybean meal were used as the main protein source.Three diets with 46 % total protein from different plant resources were formulated to fed the fish with an average weight of 12.56±1.17 g.The results showed that eel had the best performance in weight gain,specific growth rate,protein efficiency ratio and feed conversion ratio in the cottonseed meal group (CMP).In the soybean meal group(SMP),the crude protein content of eel muscle was significantly higher than the CMP group and rapeseed meal group(RMP).In the RMP group,the crude fat content of eel muscle was significantly higher than the other two groups.There were no significant differences of viscerasomatic index,hepatosomatic index,condition factor among different treatments.

  19. Plant villins:Versatile actin regulatory proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanjin Huang; Xiaolu Qu; Ruihui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of actin dynamics is a central theme in cel biology that is important for different aspects of cel physiology. Vil in, a member of the vil in/gelsolin/fragmin superfamily of proteins, is an important regulator of actin. Vil ins contain six gelsolin homology domains (G1–G6) and an extra headpiece domain. In contrast to their mammalian counterparts, plant vil ins are expressed widely, implying that plant vil ins play a more general role in regulating actin dynamics. Some plant vil ins have a defined role in modifying actin dynamics in the pol en tube;most of their in vivo activities remain to be ascertained. Recently, our understanding of the functions and mechanisms of action for plant vil ins has progressed rapidly, primarily due to the advent of Arabidopsis thaliana genetic approaches and imaging capabilities that can visualize actin dynamics at the single filament level in vitro and in living plant cel s. In this review, we focus on discussing the biochemical activities and modes of regulation of plant vil ins. Here, we present current understand-ing of the functions of plant vil ins. Final y, we highlight some of the key unanswered questions regarding the functions and regulation of plant vil ins for future research.

  20. The evolution and function of protein tandem repeats in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, Elke; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Sequence tandem repeats (TRs) are abundant in proteomes across all domains of life. For plants, little is known about their distribution or contribution to protein function. We exhaustively annotated TRs and studied the evolution of TR unit variations for all Ensembl plants. Using phylogenetic patterns of TR units, we detected conserved TRs with unit number and order preserved during evolution, and those TRs that have diverged via recent TR unit gains/losses. We correlated the mode of evolution of TRs to protein function. TR number was strongly correlated with proteome size, with about one-half of all TRs recognized as common protein domains. The majority of TRs have been highly conserved over long evolutionary distances, some since the separation of red algae and green plants c. 1.6 billion yr ago. Conversely, recurrent recent TR unit mutations were rare. Our results suggest that the first TRs by far predate the first plants, and that TR appearance is an ongoing process with similar rates across the plant kingdom. Interestingly, the few detected highly mutable TRs might provide a source of variation for rapid adaptation. In particular, such TRs are enriched in leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) commonly found in R genes, where TR unit gain/loss may facilitate resistance to emerging pathogens.

  1. Engineering of complex protein sialylation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Castilho, Alexandra; Strasser, Richard; Grünwald-Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Strubl, Sebastian; Galuska, Christina Elisabeth; Zlatina, Kristina; Galuska, Sebastian Peter; Werner, Stefan; Thiesler, Hauke; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Steinkellner, Herta

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are abundant terminal modifications of protein-linked glycans. A unique feature of Sia, compared with other monosaccharides, is the formation of linear homo-polymers, with its most complex form polysialic acid (polySia). Sia and polySia mediate diverse biological functions and have great potential for therapeutic use. However, technological hurdles in producing defined protein sialylation due to the enormous structural diversity render their precise investigation a challenge. Here, we describe a plant-based expression platform that enables the controlled in vivo synthesis of sialylated structures with different interlinkages and degree of polymerization (DP). The approach relies on a combination of stably transformed plants with transient expression modules. By the introduction of multigene vectors carrying the human sialylation pathway into glycosylation-destructed mutants, transgenic plants that sialylate glycoproteins in α2,6- or α2,3-linkage were generated. Moreover, by the transient coexpression of human α2,8-polysialyltransferases, polySia structures with a DP >40 were synthesized in these plants. Importantly, plant-derived polySia are functionally active, as demonstrated by a cell-based cytotoxicity assay and inhibition of microglia activation. This pathway engineering approach enables experimental investigations of defined sialylation and facilitates a rational design of glycan structures with optimized biotechnological functions. PMID:27444013

  2. Sources, instrumentation and detectors for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Nave, C

    2001-01-01

    Some of the requirements for protein crystallography experiments on a synchrotron are described. Although data from different types of crystal are often collected without changing the X-ray beam properties, there are benefits if the incident beam is matched to a particular crystal and its diffraction pattern. These benefits are described with some examples. Radiation damage and other effects impose limits on the dose and dose rate on a protein crystal if the maximum amount of data is to be obtained. These limitations have possible consequences for the X-ray source required. Presently available commercial detector systems provide excellent data for protein crystallography but do not quite reach the specifications of the 'ideal' detector. In order to collect the most accurate data (e.g. for very weak anomalous scattering applications) detectors that produce near photon counting statistics over a wide dynamic range are required. It is possible that developments in 'pixel' detectors will allow these demanding exp...

  3. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Plants Inhibiting Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inderdeep Kaur; R C Gupta; Munish Puri

    2011-01-01

    Many plants contain ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) with N-glycosidase activity,which depurinate large ribosomal RNA and arrest protein synthesis.RIPs so far tested inhibit replication of mRNA as well as DNA viruses and these proteins,isolated from plants,are found to be effective against a broad range of viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV),hepatitis B virus (HBV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV).Most of the research work related to RIPs has been focused on antiviral activity against HIV; however,the exact mechanism of antiviral activity is still not clear.The mechanism of antiviral activity was thought to follow inactivation of the host cell ribosome,leading to inhibition of viral protein translation and host cell death.Enzymatic activity of RIPs is not hmited to depurination of the large rRNA,in addition they can depurinate viral DNA as well as RNA.Recently,Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ clinical trials have demonstrated the potential use of RIPs for treating patients with HIV disease.The aim of this review is to focus on various RIPs from plants associated with anti-HIV activity.

  4. 三种植物蛋白源对黄鳝生长和肌肉营养成分的影响%Effects of Three Plant Protein Sources on Growth and Muscle Nutrition of Monopterus albus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田罡; 龚世园; 潘望城

    2013-01-01

    在添加等量鱼粉的基础上,分别以豆粕、棉粕、菜粕为原料配制成三组等氮等能的饲料(蛋白质含量约为38%)饲喂黄鳝(Monopterus albus).结果表明,豆粕组、棉粕组、菜粕组三个试验组之间末均重、增重率、特定生长率差异显著(P<0.05),豆粕组黄鳝的生长性能和饲料利用率最好,棉粕组次之,菜粕组最差;三个试验组之间肥满度、脏体比和肝体比无显著差异,但豆粕组的脏体比和肝体比大于棉粕组和菜粕组;三种植物蛋白源对黄鳝肌肉营养成分有一定影响,豆粕组与菜粕组、棉粕组相比,粗蛋白含量较高,而粗脂肪含量较低,表明豆粕组黄鳝的营养价值较高.%On the same addition level of fish meal,soybean meal,cotton seed meal and rapeseed meal were used to make three iso-nitrogenous diets (38% crude protein level),and feed the Monopterus albus.The results showed that between soybean meal group,cotton meal group and rapeseed meal group,there was a significant difference on growth and feed utilization rate of M.albus(P<0.05).The growth performance and feed utilization rate of soybean meal were significantly higher than the cotton meal group and rapeseed meal group,and the rapeseed meal group was the worst.There was no significant difference of condition factor、VSI and HIS among three experimental groups,and the VSI and HIS of soybean meal group was highter than cotton meal group and rapeseed meal group.There was some effect on muscle nutrition of M.albus for the three plant protein sources.The crude protein content of soybean meal group was higher than cotton seed meal and rapeseed meal,but the crude fat content was lower than the cotton seed meal and rapeseed meal,indicated the soybean meal had higher nutrition value.

  5. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    OpenAIRE

    Fumio Watanabe; Yukinori Yabuta; Tomohiro Bito; Fei Teng

    2014-01-01

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently av...

  6. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  7. Plant Antifreeze Proteins and Their Expression Regulatory Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Yuan-zhen; Lin Shan-zhi; Zhang Zhi-yi; Zhang Wei; Liu Wen-feng

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the major limiting environmental factors which constitutes the growth, development,productivity and distribution of plants. Over the past several years, the proteins and genes associated with freezing resistance of plants have been widely studied. The recent progress of domestic and foreign research on plant antifreeze proteins and the identification and characterization of plant antifreeze protein genes, especially on expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are reviewed in this paper. Finally, some unsolved problems and the trend of research in physiological functions and gene expression regulatory mechanism of plant antifreeze proteins are discussed.

  8. Stable isotope techniques in plant water sources:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes widely exist in various kinds of natural water.Plants have to cope with various water sources:rainwater,soil water,groundwater,sea water,and mixtures.These are usually characterized by different isotopic signatures (18O/16O and D/H ratios).Because there are relative abundance variations in water,and plant roots do not discriminate against specific water isotopes during water uptake,hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of water within plants provide new information on water sources,interactions between plant species and water use patterns under natural conditions.At present,the measurement of δD,δ18O composition of various potential water sources and stem water has become significant means to identify plant water sources.Based on previous studies,this review highlights recent advances such as theory basis,methodology,as well as different spatial and temporal scales,and existed questions and prospects.Stable isotope techniques for estimating plant water sources have provided valuable tools for conducting basic and applied research.Future studies emphasize the modification of preparing methods,isotope technique combined with other measurements,and aerial organs of plant water source should be en-couraged.

  9. Marine macroscopic plants as biomass sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of marine plants, recent and current research, and studies at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and California Institute of Technology are reviewed. The latter program including laboratory and field studies on giant kelp is discussed. The use of deep ocean water and the nutrient requirements of giant kelp were studied. Test farm structure and problems are presented. (MHR)

  10. Properties for sourcing Nigerian larvicidal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebajo, Adeleke Clement; Famuyiwa, Funmilayo Gladys; Aliyu, Fatima Abosede

    2014-06-19

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of chikungunya, yellow and dengue fevers. Dengue fever is the major cause of child morbidity and hospitalisation in some Asian and African countries, while yellow fever is prevalent in Nigeria. The development of resistance to the available insecticides has necessitated the continued search for safer ones from plants. Eighteen plant extracts with ethnomedical claims of or demonstrated febrifuge, antimalarial, insecticidal and insect repellent biological activities were tested for activity against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti. About 61% of the eighteen extracts demonstrated high to moderate larvicidal activity. Extracts of Piper nigrum and Abrus precatorius seeds were the most active and the larvicidal constituent(s) of the latter should be determined.

  11. Properties for Sourcing Nigerian Larvicidal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke Clement Adebajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of chikungunya, yellow and dengue fevers. Dengue fever is the major cause of child morbidity and hospitalisation in some Asian and African countries, while yellow fever is prevalent in Nigeria. The development of resistance to the available insecticides has necessitated the continued search for safer ones from plants. Eighteen plant extracts with ethnomedical claims of or demonstrated febrifuge, antimalarial, insecticidal and insect repellent biological activities were tested for activity against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti. About 61% of the eighteen extracts demonstrated high to moderate larvicidal activity. Extracts of Piper nigrum and Abrus precatorius seeds were the most active and the larvicidal constituent(s of the latter should be determined.

  12. New fuel cell plants and power sources for submarines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforov, B.; Sokolov, V. [CDB ME ' ' Rubin' ' (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    The existing storage batteries for submarines have been analyzed, the quality of their design has been estimated and a power plant with electrochemical generators (fuel cells) has been suggested as an electric energy source. The history and the status of power plant design in Russia have been reflected. (authors)

  13. Wild edible plants: a potential source of nutraceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Singh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild edible fruits of Randia dumatorum ( Manhar, fruiting bodies of fungi, Asterus hygromatricus (Putpura , Costus speciosus (Kevkand and Pureria tuberosa (Patal Kumdha were collected from differentlocalities of central region which are being consumed raw or as vegetable . These species evaluated for their nutritional and anti nutritional parameters. Fruiting bodies of A.hygromatricus contain high carbohydrate content i.e. 29.48% and 35.41% in outer and inner part respectively and fruits of R. dumetorum contain high carbohydrate (18.93%. A.hygromatricus is the good source of protein. Water soluble vitamins- ascorbic acid and thiamine were also found to be present in both R.dumetorum and A.hygromatricus Minerals viz., calcium, phosphorus and magnesium were also in appreciable amount. Polysaccharide-Starch contents in tubers varied from 25.82-38.30%.C.speciosus possess high protein value (19.20%. Lipid/oil content was also estimated in species, which contribute high energy value of tubers. Diosgenin, contents was estimated in Costus speciosus collected from different localities of centralregion, varied 1.37-2.11%. The all plant species contain high food value. Food energy provided by the edible parts of the species variedfrom 126 g calories to 336 g calories which is comparable with other commonly used edible species. The above mentioned plant species are being utilized in different areas of central region according totheir availability and scarcity during the season and contained high amount of nutritional compositions and used as vegetables as well as medicinal purposes.

  14. Unconventional protein sources for poultry feeding – opportunities and threats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der A.F.B.; Krimpen, van M.M.; Veldkamp, T.; Kwakkel, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    In search for sustainable alternatives for fish meal and overseas vegetable protein sources some selected protein sources were evaluated. These included oil seed co-products, grain legumes and their concentrates, insects, leaf and aquatic proteins, etc. These sources differ substantially in terms of

  15. The Limitations and Potential for Plant Proteins in Aquafeeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current feed formulations for carnivorous fish species have been to reduce the concentrations of fish meal protein replace them with plant proteins. The choice of plant proteins that can effectively substitute for fish meal protein is currently limited, and fish performance is often compromised whe...

  16. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei

    2014-01-01

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups. PMID:24803097

  17. Vitamin B12-Containing Plant Food Sources for Vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Watanabe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

  18. Vitamin B₁₂-containing plant food sources for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Fumio; Yabuta, Yukinori; Bito, Tomohiro; Teng, Fei

    2014-05-05

    The usual dietary sources of Vitamin B12 are animal-derived foods, although a few plant-based foods contain substantial amounts of Vitamin B12. To prevent Vitamin B12 deficiency in high-risk populations such as vegetarians, it is necessary to identify plant-derived foods that contain high levels of Vitamin B12. A survey of naturally occurring plant-derived food sources with high Vitamin B12 contents suggested that dried purple laver (nori) is the most suitable Vitamin B12 source presently available for vegetarians. Furthermore, dried purple laver also contains high levels of other nutrients that are lacking in vegetarian diets, such as iron and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dried purple laver is a natural plant product and it is suitable for most people in various vegetarian groups.

  19. G protein signaling in plants: minus times minus equals plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stateczny, Dave; Oppenheimer, Jara; Bommert, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are key regulators in the transduction of extracellular signals both in animals and plants. In plants, heterotrimeric G protein signaling plays essential roles in development and in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, over the last decade it has become clear that plants have unique mechanisms of G protein signaling. Although plants share most of the core components of heterotrimeric G proteins, some of them exhibit unusual properties compared to their animal counterparts. In addition, plants do not share functional GPCRs. Therefore the well-established paradigm of the animal G protein signaling cycle is not applicable in plants. In this review, we summarize recent insights into these unique mechanisms of G protein signaling in plants with special focus on the evident potential of G protein signaling as a target to modify developmental and physiological parameters important for yield increase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vegetable Protein Sources Used as Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Colibar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The comparative effect of using some vegetal raw flours (Glycine hispida, Phaseolus vulgaris and Vicia faba, treated by autoclaving, introduced in the feeding white rats, was followed by the presented experiments. Feeding growing rats with diets containing raw grain legumes, as the main source of protein, reduce the rate of growth. This effect attenuates with the aging of rats. Inhibition of growth is the most evident in the consumption of raw beans (by 33% over the control group. Autoclaving reduces the level of anti-nutritive factors (with 0.2% - 36.73% and decreases the growth inhibition (with 10.7% - 27.51%.

  1. New protein sources and food legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Simone; Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz; Ricci, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Growing global food demand has generated a greater interest in the consumption of new and diversified protein sources. Novel foodstuffs represent a challenge for food law as they need proper safety assessments before obtaining market permission. The case of edible insects and European law is a good...... representation of this issue because a selection of food grade insect species may be available on the European market in the coming years. However, European legislation does not explicitly address edible insects. Consequently, this has left a grey area, allowing different interpretations of the legislation among...... Member States. The aim of this paper is to analyse the challenge of the safe management of edible insects in the context of the current legal framework. The current Novel Food legislation, as well as the forthcoming version of the legislation, will be analysed and discussed in relation to edible insects...

  2. Determination of Main Noise Sources in a Thermal Power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahangiri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Power plants are as the major industries that have a large number of workers, providing they health is important. Exposure to occupational noise is the pervasive physical agent in industries like power plants and may impact health and for safety status for people. Determination of the sources of noise in workplaces is important step in noise control plans. This study aimed to assess noise pollution and determine the main sources of noise in a power plant for. .Material and Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on the ground floor of the turbine unit of a thermal power plant. Measurements was done based on the ISO-9612 and ISO-11200 standard using by the calibrated sound level meter model TES-1389 on “A” frequency weighting and “Slow” mode for time response. Surfer V.10 software was used for interpolation and noise maps producing. Based on grid method measuring for indicating of noise propagation, we set buffer of danger areas to determine main sources of noise. Also, we used the minimized grid method for measuring and study of noise denotation in vertical surface in each main sources. .Result: The results showed that the measured indoor sound pressure level in all areas where at the risk category of the units. The highest average sound pressure level was belonged to the unit 2, with 93.1 dB(A. We find the feed water pumps were the main sources in all of the studied units. Among the four main components of the main sources, the highest noise levels associated with the main pump and the gearbox section with about 100 9B(L and dominant frequency of 2000 Hz. .Conclusion: Considering that feed water pumps had major sources in indoor power plant noise pollution, engineering noise control such as providing enclosures is necessary to reduce noise pollution to safe levels in the studied plant it is necessary.

  3. Maize DELLA proteins dwarf plant8 and dwarf plant9 as modulators of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawit, Shai J; Wych, Heidi M; Xu, Deping; Kundu, Suman; Tomes, Dwight T

    2010-11-01

    DELLA proteins are nuclear-localized negative regulators of gibberellin signaling found ubiquitously throughout higher plants. Dominant dwarfing mutations of DELLA proteins have been primarily responsible for the dramatic increases in harvest index of the 'green revolution'. Maize contains two genetic loci encoding DELLA proteins, dwarf plant8 (d8) and dwarf plant 9 (d9). The d8 gene and three of its dominant dwarfing alleles have been previously characterized at the molecular level. Almost 20 years after the initial description of the mutant, this investigation represents the first molecular characterization of d9 and its gibberellin-insensitive mutant, D9-1. We have molecularly, subcellularly and phenotypically characterized the gene products of five maize DELLA alleles in transgenic Arabidopsis. In dissecting the molecular differences in D9-1, a critical residue for normal DELLA function has been uncovered, corresponding to E600 of the D9 protein. The gibberellin-insensitive D9-1 was found to produce dwarfing and, notably, earlier flowering in Arabidopsis. Conversely, overexpression of the D9-1 allele delayed flowering in transgenic maize, while overexpression of the d9 allele led to earlier flowering. These results corroborate findings that DELLA proteins are at the crux of many plant developmental pathways and suggest differing mechanisms of flowering time control by DELLAs in maize and Arabidopsis.

  4. Enrichment of pasta with different plant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Sharma, Savita; Nagi, H P S; Ranote, P S

    2013-10-01

    Effects of supplementation of plant proteins from mushroom powder, Bengal gram flour and defatted soy flour at different levels were assessed on the nutritional quality of pasta. Supplementation of wheat semolina was done with mushroom powder (0-12%), Bengal gram flour (0-20%) and defatted soy flour (0-15%). Mushroom powder and defatted soy flour increased the cooking time of pasta whereas non significant variation was observed in cooking time of Bengal gram supplemented pasta. Significant correlation (r = 0.97, p ≤ 0.05) was observed between water absorption and volume expansion of pasta. Instantization of pasta by steaming improved the cooking quality. Steamed pasta absorbed less water and leached fewer solids during cooking. On the basis of cooking and sensory quality, pasta in combination with 8% mushroom powder, 15% Bengal gram flour and 9% defatted soy flour resulted in a better quality and nutritious pasta.

  5. The Katanin Microtubule Severing Protein in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Katanin is a heterodimeric microtubule (MT) severing protein that uses energy from ATP hydrolysis to generate internal breaks along MTs. Katanin p60, one of the two subunits, possesses ATPase and MT-bindinglsevering activities, and the p80 subunit is responsible for targeting of katanin to certain subcellular locations. In animals, katanin plays an important role in the release of MTs from their nucleation sites in the centrosome. It is also involved in severing MTs into smaller fragments which can serve as templates for further polymerization to increase MT number during meiotic and mitotic spindle assembly. Katanin homologs are present in a wide variety of plant species. The Arabidopsis katanin homolog has been shown to possess ATP-dependent MT severing activity in vitro and exhibit a punctate localization pattern at the cell cortex and the perinuclear region. Disruption of katanin functions by genetic mutations causes a delay in the disappearance of the perinuclear MT array and results in an aberrant organization of cortical MTs in elongating cells. Consequently, katanin mutations lead to defects in cell elongation, cellulose microfibril deposition, and hormonal responses. Studies of katanin in plants provide new insights into our understanding of its roles in cellular functions.

  6. Green factory: plants as bioproduction platforms for recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianfeng; Dolan, Maureen C; Medrano, Giuliana; Cramer, Carole L; Weathers, Pamela J

    2012-01-01

    Molecular farming, long considered a promising strategy to produce valuable recombinant proteins not only for human and veterinary medicine, but also for agriculture and industry, now has some commercially available products. Various plant-based production platforms including whole-plants, aquatic plants, plant cell suspensions, and plant tissues (hairy roots) have been compared in terms of their advantages and limits. Effective recombinant strategies are summarized along with descriptions of scalable culture systems and examples of commercial progress and success.

  7. Protein import into plant mitochondria: signals, machinery, processing, and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcha, Monika W; Kmiec, Beata; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Teixeira, Pedro F; Glaser, Elzbieta; Whelan, James

    2014-12-01

    The majority of more than 1000 proteins present in mitochondria are imported from nuclear-encoded, cytosolically synthesized precursor proteins. This impressive feat of transport and sorting is achieved by the combined action of targeting signals on mitochondrial proteins and the mitochondrial protein import apparatus. The mitochondrial protein import apparatus is composed of a number of multi-subunit protein complexes that recognize, translocate, and assemble mitochondrial proteins into functional complexes. While the core subunits involved in mitochondrial protein import are well conserved across wide phylogenetic gaps, the accessory subunits of these complexes differ in identity and/or function when plants are compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), the model system for mitochondrial protein import. These differences include distinct protein import receptors in plants, different mechanistic operation of the intermembrane protein import system, the location and activity of peptidases, the function of inner-membrane translocases in linking the outer and inner membrane, and the association/regulation of mitochondrial protein import complexes with components of the respiratory chain. Additionally, plant mitochondria share proteins with plastids, i.e. dual-targeted proteins. Also, the developmental and cell-specific nature of mitochondrial biogenesis is an aspect not observed in single-celled systems that is readily apparent in studies in plants. This means that plants provide a valuable model system to study the various regulatory processes associated with protein import and mitochondrial biogenesis.

  8. 14-3-3 proteins in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Robatzek, Silke

    2015-05-01

    14-3-3 proteins define a eukaryotic-specific protein family with a general role in signal transduction. Primarily, 14-3-3 proteins act as phosphosensors, binding phosphorylated client proteins and modulating their functions. Since phosphorylation regulates a plethora of different physiological responses in plants, 14-3-3 proteins play roles in multiple signaling pathways, including those controlling metabolism, hormone signaling, cell division, and responses to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Increasing evidence supports a prominent role of 14-3-3 proteins in regulating plant immunity against pathogens at various levels. In this review, potential links between 14-3-3 function and the regulation of plant-pathogen interactions are discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins in response to pathogen perception, interactions between 14-3-3 proteins and defense-related proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins as targets of pathogen effectors.

  9. 植物蛋白源替代鱼粉对鱼类机体氧化胁迫的研究进展%Advances in the Effects of Dietary Substitution of Plant Protein Sources for Fish Meal on Oxidative Stress of Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜海波

    2012-01-01

    合理的开发与利用植物蛋白源已成为解决鱼粉全球性缺乏的重要途径之一。较高比例的植物蛋白源会导致鱼体承受的氧化胁迫加剧,进而造成机体损伤,影响鱼类对植物蛋白源的利用效率。文章对已开展的研究结果进行归纳、分析与讨论,旨在为提高鱼类对植物蛋白源利用研究开拓新的思路。%Fish meal is the major source of animal protein in aquaculture diet, the increasing demand for fish meal by aquaculture industry makes fish meal become an increasingly expensive and limiting commodity. Therefore, it is necessary to find alternatives to partially or completely replace fish meal to make plant protein sources more affordable. Aiming to the potential application of plant protein sources for fish, the present paper summarized the oxidative stress caused by the dietary fish meal replacement practice. It is mentioned that the study about the dietary fish meal replacement for fish species served as an important way for the sustainability of aquaculture.

  10. Expanded impact of protein N-myristoylation in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, José A; Giglione, Carmela

    2008-01-01

    N-MYR controls the function of the plant protein complex SnRK1, described as one of the most important plant regulatory protein in stress and energy signalling. In plant cells, N-MYR is involved in a significantly higher number of metabolic pathways than in yeast or human. Some N-myristoylated protein families are solely encountered in plant cells. This lipid modification could be involved in the control of the redox imbalances originating from different stresses in plants. This prevalence of N-MYR in such proteins is unique to the plant kingdom. We hypothesize that this expansion of the mechanism in plants improves the control of the damages induced by environmental changes. PMID:19704499

  11. Potential Sources of Polarized Light from a Plant Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements have demonstrated that sunlight polarized during a first surface reflection by shiny leaves dominates the optical polarization of the light reflected by shiny-leafed plant canopies having approximately spherical leaf angle probability density functions ("Leaf Angle Distributions" - LAD). Yet for other canopies - specifically those without shiny leaves and/or spherical LADs - potential sources of optically polarized light may not always be obvious. Here we identify possible sources of polarized light within those other canopies and speculate on the ecologically important information polarization measurements of those sources might contain.

  12. Plant Protein Inhibitors of Enzymes: Their Role in Animal Nutrition and Plant Defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Current information and research related to plant protein inhibitors of enzymes are reviewed, including potential uses of the inhibitors for medical treatment and for breeding plant varieties with greater resistance to insects. (DC)

  13. PlantLoc: an accurate web server for predicting plant protein subcellular localization by substantiality motif

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shengnan; Li, Tonghua; Cong, Peisheng; Xiong, Wenwei; Wang, Zhiheng; Sun, Jiangming

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of subcellular localizations (SCLs) of plant proteins relates to their functions and aids in understanding the regulation of biological processes at the cellular level. We present PlantLoc, a highly accurate and fast webserver for predicting the multi-label SCLs of plant proteins. The PlantLoc server has two innovative characters: building localization motif libraries by a recursive method without alignment and Gene Ontology information; and establishing simple architecture for rapi...

  14. Heterotrimeric G protein-coupled signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Jones, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    Investigators studying G protein-coupled signaling--often called the best-understood pathway in the world owing to intense research in medical fields--have adopted plants as a new model to explore the plasticity and evolution of G signaling. Much research on plant G signaling has not disappointed. Although plant cells have most of the core elements found in animal G signaling, differences in network architecture and intrinsic properties of plant G protein elements make G signaling in plant cells distinct from the animal paradigm. In contrast to animal G proteins, plant G proteins are self-activating, and therefore regulation of G activation in plants occurs at the deactivation step. The self-activating property also means that plant G proteins do not need and therefore do not have typical animal G protein-coupled receptors. Targets of activated plant G proteins, also known as effectors, are unlike effectors in animal cells. The simpler repertoire of G signal elements in Arabidopsis makes G signaling easier to manipulate in a multicellular context.

  15. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation techniques, proteins were extracted and isolated from four different unicellular sources (Arthrospira (spirulina) maxima, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraselmis impellucida, and Scenedesmus dimorphus). Despite differences in protein contents of the sources (27–62% w/w) and in protein extractability (17–74% w/w), final protein isolates were obtained that had similar protein contents (62–77% w/w) and protein yields (3–9% w/w). Protein solubility as a function of pH was different between the sources and in ionic strength dependency, especially at pH < 4.0. Overall, the characterization and extraction protocol used allows a relatively fast and well-described isolation of purified proteins from novel protein sources. PMID:28701042

  16. Plant biology: gatekeepers of the road to protein perdition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-06

    Targeting membrane proteins for degradation requires the sequential action of ESCRT sub-complexes ESCRT-0 to ESCRT-III. Although this machinery is generally conserved among kingdoms, plants lack the essential ESCRT-0 components. A new report closes this gap by identifying a novel protein family that substitutes for ESCRT-0 function in plants.

  17. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  18. Comparing human-Salmonella with plant-Salmonella protein-protein interaction predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia eSchleker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is the most frequent food-borne disease world-wide and can be transmitted to humans by a variety of routes, especially via animal and plant products. Salmonella bacteria are believed to use not only animal and human but also plant hosts despite their evolutionary distance. This raises the question if Salmonella employs similar mechanisms in infection of these diverse hosts. Given that most of our understanding comes from its interaction with human hosts, we investigate here to what degree knowledge of Salmonella-human interactions can be transferred to the Salmonella-plant system. Reviewed are recent publications on analysis and prediction of Salmonella-host interactomes. Putative protein-protein interactions (PPIs between Salmonella and its human and Arabidopsis hosts were retrieved utilizing purely interolog-based approaches in which predictions were inferred based on available sequence and domain information of known PPIs, and machine learning approaches that integrate a larger set of useful information from different sources. Transfer learning is an especially suitable machine learning technique to predict plant host targets from the knowledge of human host targets. A comparison of the prediction results with transcriptomic data shows a clear overlap between the host proteins predicted to be targeted by PPIs and their gene ontology enrichment in both host species and regulation of gene expression. In particular, the cellular processes Salmonella interferes with in plants and humans are catabolic processes. The details of how these processes are targeted, however, are quite different between the two organisms, as expected based on their evolutionary and habitat differences. Possible implications of this observation on evolution of host-pathogen communication are discussed.

  19. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, Emma; Wierenga, Peter A.; Schrama, Johan W.; Gruppen, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation

  20. Production of recombinant proteins in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasson, Carole; Michel, Rémy; Lienard, David; Saint-Jore-Dupas, Claude; Sourrouille, Christophe; de March, Ghislaine Grenier; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified suspension-cultured plant cells offer a promising system for production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed, when compared to other plant-based production platforms that have been explored, suspension-cultured plant cells have the advantage of being totally devoid of problems associated with the vagaries of weather, pest, soil and gene flow in the environment. Because of short growth cycles, the timescale needed for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell culture can be counted in days or weeks after transformation compared to months needed for the production in transgenic plants. Moreover, recovery and purification of recombinant proteins from plant biomass is an expensive and technically challenging business that may amount to 80-94% of the final product cost. One additional advantage of plant cell culture is that the recombinant protein fused with a signal sequence can be expressed and secreted into the culture medium, and therefore recovered and purified in the absence of large quantities of contaminating proteins. Consequently, the downstream processing of proteins extracted from plant cell culture medium is less expensive, which may/does balance the higher costs of fermentation. When needed for clinical use, recombinant proteins are easily produced in suspension-cultured plant cells under certified, controllable and sterile conditions that offer improved safety and provide advantages for good manufacturing practices and regulatory compliance. In this chapter, we present basic protocols for rapid generation of transgenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum, Oriza sativa and Arabidopis

  1. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  2. Transcription regulation by CHD proteins to control plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng eHu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CHD (Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA binding proteins have been characterized in various species as important transcription regulators by their chromatin remodeling activity. However, in plant the function of these proteins has hardly been analyzed before except that Arabidopsis PICKLE and rice CHR729 are identified to play critical roles in the regulation of series of genes involved in developmental or stress responding process. In this review we focus on how plant CHD proteins regulate gene expression and the role of these proteins in controlling plant development and stress response.

  3. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein content in the plants under examination constitutes 18 to 25%o of dry matter. Albumins and glutelins are the most abundant protein fractions.

  4. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein conten...

  5. The nutritive value of some selected Tanzanian plant food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnembuka, B V; Eggum, B O

    1993-07-01

    The chemical composition of different varieties of field beans (Vicia faba L.), cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), groundnuts (Voandzeia subterranea), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were determined. Nutrients analysed in these materials included amino acids, starch, sugar, fibre, minerals and antinutritional factors. All the materials were further tested in balance trials with rats; true protein digestibility (TD), biological value (BV), net protein utilization (NPU) and digestible energy (DE) were evaluated. Based on the chemical analyses as well as on the biological data, the nutritive value of plant materials between species as well as between varieties within species differed considerably. Therefore, more quality evaluation studies along with plant breeding programmes are needed to select the most promising varieties from the nutritional point of view.

  6. Extraction of plant proteins for two-dimensional electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Granier, Fabienne

    1988-01-01

    Three different extraction procedures for two-dimensional electrophoresis of plant proteins are compared: (i) extraction of soluble proteins with a nondenaturing Tris-buffer, (ii) denaturing extraction in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate at elevated temperature allowing the solubilization of membrane proteins in addition to a recovery of soluble proteins, and (iii) a trichloroacetic acid-acetone procedure allowing the direct precipitation of total proteins.

  7. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  8. A method to determine plant water source using transpired water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Menchaca

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A method to determine the stable isotope ratio of a plant's water source using the plant's transpired water is proposed as an alternative to standard xylem extraction methods. The method consists of periodically sampling transpired waters from shoots or leaves enclosed in sealed, transparent bags which create a saturated environment, preclude further evaporation and allow the progressive mixing of evaporated transpired water and un-evaporated xylem water. The method was applied on trees and shrubs coexisting in a non-irrigated area where stable isotope ratios of local environmental waters are well characterized. The results show Eucalyptus globulus (tree and Genista monspessulana (shrub using water sources of different isotopic ratios congruent with groundwater and soil water respectively. In addition, tritium concentrations indicate that pine trees (Pinus sylvestris switch water source from soil water in the winter to groundwater in the summer. The method proposed is particularly useful in remote or protected areas and in large scale studies related to water management, environmental compliance and surveillance, because it eliminates the need for destructive sampling and greatly reduces costs associated with laboratory extraction of xylem waters from plant tissues for isotopic analyses.

  9. Roles of F-box Proteins in Plant Hormone Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haichuan YU; Jiao WU; Nanfei XU; Ming PENG

    2007-01-01

    The F-box protein is an important component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Skpl-Cullin-F-box protein complex. It binds specific substrates for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. The F-box proteins contain a signature F-box motif at their amino-terminus and some protein-protein interaction motifs at their carboxyterminus, such as Trp-Asp repeats or leucine rich repeats. Many F-box proteins have been identified to be involved in plant hormone response as receptors or important medial components. These breakthrough findings shed light on our current understanding of the structure and function of the various F-box proteins,their related plant hormone signaling pathways, and their roles in regulating plant development.

  10. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been fo

  12. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been

  13. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  14. Significance of inducible defense-related proteins in infected plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Rep, M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Inducible defense-related proteins have been described in many plant species upon infection with oomycetes, fungi, bacteria, or viruses, or insect attack. Several types of proteins are common and have been classified into 17 families of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). Others have so far been fo

  15. ROSMARINIC ACID AND ITS PLANT SOURCES IN THE CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Paliy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the content of phenolics and rosmarinic acid in 32 species of aromatic and medicinal plants from Lamiaceae, Asteraceae and Apiaceae families, native to the South Coast of the Crimea. The concentration of phenolic compounds in the studied species was 490.3 – 18511.0 mg/100g of plant raw materials. Rosmarinic acid was found in 15 species from Lamiaceae and Asteraceae families. Rosmarinic acid was not noticed in the studied plants from Apiaceae family. The concentration of rosmarinic acid in the studied plants amounted to 40.6 – 2535.5 mg/100g of plant raw materials. On the basis of the obtained results such species as Origanum vulgare L., Majorana hortensis Moench., Mentha longifolia L., Thymus vulgaris L. (thymol type can be considered as a promising source of rosmarinic acid.

  16. Sources of dietary protein in relation to blood pressure in a general Dutch population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieke Altorf-van der Kuil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the relation of different dietary protein types with blood pressure (BP. We examined whether intake of total, plant, animal, dairy, meat, and grain protein was related to BP in a cross sectional cohort of 20,820 Dutch adults, aged 20-65 y and not using antihypertensive medication. DESIGN: Mean BP levels were calculated in quintiles of energy-adjusted protein with adjustment for age, sex, BMI, education, smoking, and intake of energy, alcohol, and other nutrients including protein from other sources. In addition, mean BP difference after substitution of 3 en% carbohydrates or MUFA with protein was calculated. RESULTS: Total protein and animal protein were not associated with BP (p(trend = 0.62 and 0.71 respectively, both at the expense of carbohydrates and MUFA. Systolic BP was 1.8 mmHg lower (p(trend36 g/d than in the lowest (<27 g/d quintile of plant protein. This inverse association was present both at the expense of carbohydrates and MUFA and more pronounced in individuals with untreated hypertension (-3.6 mmHg than in those with normal (+0.1 mmHg or prehypertensive BP (-0.3 mmHg; p(interaction<0.01. Meat and grain protein were not related to BP. Dairy protein was directly associated with systolic BP (+1.6 mmHg, p(trend<0.01, but not with diastolic BP (p(trend = 0.24. CONCLUSIONS: Total protein and animal protein were not associated with BP in this general untreated Dutch population. Plant protein may be beneficial to BP, especially in people with elevated BP. However, because high intake of plant protein may be a marker of a healthy diet and lifestyle in general, confirmation from randomized controlled trials is warranted.

  17. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  18. Carbon source feeding strategies for recombinant protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... methanol oxidase, PTS, peroxisomal targeting signals; DHAS, .... methanol metabolism inside peroxisomes starts with the ..... reactions 26: lactate dehydrogenase (E.C.1.1.1.27), 27: pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (pyruvate dehydrogenase, .... therapeutic protein expression (Jenkins et al., 1996). For.

  19. Protein oxidation in plant mitochondria as a stress indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, I.M.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    Plant mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as an unavoidable side product of aerobic metabolism, but they have mechanisms for regulating this production such as the alternative oxidase. Once produced, ROS can be removed by several different enzyme systems. Finally, should the first ...... oxidation of cysteine and methionine side chains is an important mechanism for regulating enzyme activity. Mitochondria from both mammalian and plant tissues contain a number of oxidised proteins, but the relative abundance of these post-translationally modified forms is as yet unknown...... shock proteins. Plant mitochondria contain a number of different proteases, but their role in removing oxidatively damaged proteins is, as yet, unclear....

  20. Therapeutically important proteins from in vitro plant tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Pauline M

    2013-01-01

    Plant cells cultured in liquid medium in bioreactors are now being used commercially to produce biopharmaceutical proteins. The emergence of in vitro plant cell culture as a production vehicle reflects the importance of key biosafety and biocontainment concerns affecting the competitiveness of alternative systems such as mammalian cell culture and agriculture. Food plant species are particularly attractive as hosts for in vitro protein production: the risk of transgene escape and food chain contamination is eliminated using containment facilities, while regulatory approval for oral delivery of drugs may be easier than if non-edible species were used. As in whole plants, proteolysis in cultured plant cells can lead to significant degradation of foreign proteins after synthesis; however, substantial progress has been made to counter the destructive effects of proteases in plant systems. Although protein secretion into the culture medium is advantageous for product recovery and purification, measures are often required to minimise extracellular protease activity and product losses due to irreversible surface adsorption. Disposable plastic bioreactors, which are being used increasingly in mammalian cell bioprocessing, are also being adopted for plant cell culture to allow rapid scale-up and generation of saleable product. This review examines a range of technical and regulatory issues affecting the choice of industrial production platform for foreign proteins, and assesses progress in the development of in vitro plant systems for biopharmaceutical production.

  1. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-09-19

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase repertoire, or kinome, is in general significantly larger than other eukaryotes, ranging in size from 600 to 2500 members. This large variation in kinome size is mainly due to the expansion and contraction of a few families, particularly the receptor-like kinase/Pelle family. A number of protein kinases reside in highly conserved, low copy number families and often play broadly conserved regulatory roles in metabolism and cell division, although functions of plant homologues have often diverged from their metazoan counterparts. Members of expanded plant kinase families often have roles in plant-specific processes and some may have contributed to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, non-adaptive explanations, such as kinase duplicate subfunctionalization and insufficient time for pseudogenization, may also contribute to the large number of seemingly functional protein kinases in plants.

  2. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Ramírez-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa, average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81 aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230 nt. Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400 nt. Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520 aa, whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240 aa. Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  3. REVIEW: The Early Application of Electrophoresis of Protein in Higher Plant Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURANTO

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are firstly, to study the advantages of electrophoretic techniques. Secondly, to look at the usefulness of a few mediums support of electrophoretic proteins especially the acrylamide gel. Thirdly, to examine the number of plant organs which could be used as the sources of plant proteins, and how these plants protein should be applied in the medium support that has been selected. Besides, the staining and detection procedures would be described, while the application of electrophoretic approach in higher plant taxonomy will also be evaluated. In this study we recorded that a number of taxonomic problems usually caused by morphological complexity within species can be solved using this experimental approach of electrophoresis. This method has been considered very useful in helping taxonomists making decisions.

  4. Targeted Interactomics in Plants Through Protein Complex Isolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geert De Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    TAPtag technology is the most widely applied tool to pick up in situ protein interactions in a proteome wide setting.Our research team has developed a versatile TAP technology platform for protein complex isolation from plants.We isolated complexes for hundreds of proteins and extensively demonstrated the power of our technology for protein discovery,functional analysis of proteins and protein complexes,and the modelling of protein networks.Complexes are purified from Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures or seedlings and we are currently translating the technology towards crop plants to bring complex purification in a developmental context.Besides protein complexes,we are deriving protocol variations to isolate chromatin complexes.

  5. MPIC: a mitochondrial protein import components database for plant and non-plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcha, Monika W; Narsai, Reena; Devenish, James; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    In the 2 billion years since the endosymbiotic event that gave rise to mitochondria, variations in mitochondrial protein import have evolved across different species. With the genomes of an increasing number of plant species sequenced, it is possible to gain novel insights into mitochondrial protein import pathways. We have generated the Mitochondrial Protein Import Components (MPIC) Database (DB; http://www.plantenergy.uwa.edu.au/applications/mpic) providing searchable information on the protein import apparatus of plant and non-plant mitochondria. An in silico analysis was carried out, comparing the mitochondrial protein import apparatus from 24 species representing various lineages from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and algae to Homo sapiens (human) and higher plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), Oryza sativa (rice) and other more recently sequenced plant species. Each of these species was extensively searched and manually assembled for analysis in the MPIC DB. The database presents an interactive diagram in a user-friendly manner, allowing users to select their import component of interest. The MPIC DB presents an extensive resource facilitating detailed investigation of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and allowing patterns of conservation and divergence to be recognized that would otherwise have been missed. To demonstrate the usefulness of the MPIC DB, we present a comparative analysis of the mitochondrial protein import machinery in plants and non-plant species, revealing plant-specific features that have evolved.

  6. NMCP/LINC proteins: putative lamin analogs in plants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciska, Malgorzata; Moreno Diaz de la Espina, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Lamins are the main components of the metazoan lamina, and while the organization of the nuclear lamina of metazoans and plants is similar, there are apparently no genes encoding lamins or most lamin-binding proteins in plants. Thus, the plant lamina is not lamin-based and the proteins that form this structure are still to be characterized. Members of the plant NMCP/LINC/CRWN protein family share the typical tripartite structure of lamins, although the 2 exhibit no sequence similarity. However, given the many similarities between NMCP/LINC/CRWN proteins and lamins (structural organization, position of conserved regions, sub-nuclear distribution, solubility, and pattern of expression), these proteins are good candidates to carry out the functions of lamins in plants. Moreover, functional analysis of NMCP/LINC mutants has revealed their involvement in maintaining nuclear size and shape, another activity fulfilled by lamins. This review summarizes the current understanding of NMCP/LINC proteins and discusses future studies that will be required to demonstrate definitively that these proteins are plant analogs of lamins.

  7. Inhalable dust and protein exposure in soybean processing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Adri; Rees, David; Fourie, Anna M; Wilson, Kerry S; Harris-Roberts, Joanne; Robinson, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about inhalable dust concentrations in soybean processing plants in southern Africa. This project measured inhalable dust in soybean plants in the region and correlated dust measurements with total protein and soy trypsin inhibitor. Sixty-four personal inhalable dust measurements were taken in three processing plants. Levels of total protein and soy trypsin inhibitor were determined in only two of the three plants. Correlations between inhalable dust, total protein and trypsin inhibitor were determined for 44 of 64 samples. In plants' production areas, inhalable dust levels were 0.24-35.02 mg/m3 (median 2.58 mg/m3). Total protein and soy trypsin inhibitor levels were 29.41-448.82 microg/m3 (median 90.09 microg/m3) and 0.05-2.58 microg/m3 (median 0.07 microg/m3), respectively. No statistically significant correlations between presence of inhalable dust and soy trypsin inhibitor were found. Total protein and soy trypsin inhibitor were better correlated. This study indicates that total protein might be a good proxy for soybean specific protein concentrations in soybean processing plants.

  8. Production of therapeutic proteins through plant tissue and cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza S. Gharelo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, pharmaceutical recombinant protein is increasingly used in treatment of many diseases such as hepatitis, anemia, diabetes and cancer. Different protein expression systems have been used for the expression of recombinant proteins in which each of them face obstacles that make utilizing them as comprehensive expression system in order to express wide variety of proteins difficult. Plant cell as a eukaryotic expression system have many advantages compared to other hosts. They are very "safe" and significantly decrease concerns about the contamination of recombinant proteins with human pathogens. In addition to this, plants as eukaryotic expression system perform proper post-translational modification, in case of eukaryotic proteins, and appropriate folding resulting in right function in biological environments. Therefore, the production of pharmaceutical protein through plant cells can be absolutely promising approach. In this review, the production of pharmaceutical protein in plant cells, advantages and disadvantages, offered methods and techniques for developing recombinant protein yields, and affective factors on the whole process of pharmaceutical protein expression in the molecular level will be reviewed.

  9. Transport proteins of the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, S. M.; Haubrick, L. L.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed molecular and genetic approaches have enabled the identification and functional characterization of novel genes encoding ion channels, ion carriers, and water channels of the plant plasma membrane.

  10. Medicinal plants: a source of anti-parasitic secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Michael

    2012-10-31

    This review summarizes human infections caused by endoparasites, including protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes, which affect more than 30% of the human population, and medicinal plants of potential use in their treatment. Because vaccinations do not work in most instances and the parasites have sometimes become resistant to the available synthetic therapeutics, it is important to search for alternative sources of anti-parasitic drugs. Plants produce a high diversity of secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxic, anti-parasitic and anti-microbial properties. These drugs often interfere with central targets in parasites, such as DNA (intercalation, alkylation), membrane integrity, microtubules and neuronal signal transduction. Plant extracts and isolated secondary metabolites which can inhibit protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Trichomonas and intestinal worms are discussed. The identified plants and compounds offer a chance to develop new drugs against parasitic diseases. Most of them need to be tested in more detail, especially in animal models and if successful, in clinical trials.

  11. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    .... In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost...

  12. Did Convergent Protein Evolution Enable Phytoplasmas to Generate 'Zombie Plants'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümpler, Florian; Gramzow, Lydia; Theißen, Günter; Melzer, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplasmas are pathogenic bacteria that reprogram plant development such that leaf-like structures instead of floral organs develop. Infected plants are sterile and mainly serve to propagate phytoplasmas and thus have been termed 'zombie plants'. The developmental reprogramming relies on specific interactions of the phytoplasma protein SAP54 with a small subset of MADS-domain transcription factors. Here, we propose that SAP54 folds into a structure that is similar to that of the K-domain, a protein-protein interaction domain of MADS-domain proteins. We suggest that undergoing convergent structural and sequence evolution, SAP54 evolved to mimic the K-domain. Given the high specificity of resulting developmental alterations, phytoplasmas might be used to study flower development in genetically intractable plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant latex: A natural source of pharmaceuticals and pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times use of plant natural products has increased tremendously, and there is a very high demand of herbal products for therapeutic, clinical, agricultural purposes. Plant latex is a rich source of pharmaceuticals, pesticides and immune allergens. It also contains important biomolecules such as glycosides, tannins, phytosterols, Flavonoids, acetogenins and saponins, which show diverse biolgical activities against bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoans, nematodes, insects, and cancer and tumours. It is also used as disinfectant, anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative agent that provides protection in wounds. It contains wide variety of industrially important metabolic substances which can be harvested, modified, quenched, and polymerized easily for making goods and materials by up-gradation of technology. No doubt it is a future raw material for many bioengineering and biotechnological industries.

  14. Extraction and downstream processing of plant-derived recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, J F; Twyman, R M; Fischer, R

    2015-11-01

    Plants offer the tantalizing prospect of low-cost automated manufacturing processes for biopharmaceutical proteins, but several challenges must be addressed before such goals are realized and the most significant hurdles are found during downstream processing (DSP). In contrast to the standardized microbial and mammalian cell platforms embraced by the biopharmaceutical industry, there are many different plant-based expression systems vying for attention, and those with the greatest potential to provide inexpensive biopharmaceuticals are also the ones with the most significant drawbacks in terms of DSP. This is because the most scalable plant systems are based on the expression of intracellular proteins in whole plants. The plant tissue must therefore be disrupted to extract the product, challenging the initial DSP steps with an unusually high load of both particulate and soluble contaminants. DSP platform technologies can accelerate and simplify process development, including centrifugation, filtration, flocculation, and integrated methods that combine solid-liquid separation, purification and concentration, such as aqueous two-phase separation systems. Protein tags can also facilitate these DSP steps, but they are difficult to transfer to a commercial environment and more generic, flexible and scalable strategies to separate target and host cell proteins are preferable, such as membrane technologies and heat/pH precipitation. In this context, clarified plant extracts behave similarly to the feed stream from microbes or mammalian cells and the corresponding purification methods can be applied, as long as they are adapted for plant-specific soluble contaminants such as the superabundant protein RuBisCO. Plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins cannot yet compete directly with established platforms but they are beginning to penetrate niche markets that allow the beneficial properties of plants to be exploited, such as the ability to produce 'biobetters' with tailored

  15. MICROORGANISMS: A MARVELOUS SOURCE OF SINGLE CELL PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agam Nangul

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing global population living below the poverty line is driving the scientific community to search for non-conventional protein sources that can replace conventional expensive ones. Microbial proteins, or single-cell protein (SCP, represent a potential future nutrient source for human food and animal feed. These microbial proteins can be grown rapidly on substrates with minimum dependence on soil, water and climate conditions. They can be produced from algae, fungi and bacteria the chief sources of SCP. It is convenient to use microorganisms for production of SCP as they grow rapidly and have high protein content. Industrially, they can be produced from algal biomass, yeast, fungi. There are several other ways of getting SCP as well. Despite numerous advantages of SCP, they have disadvantages and toxic effects too, especially related to mycotoxins and bacterial toxins.

  16. Effect of Various Protein Sources on Body Weight Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnevik, Alexander Krokedal

    Background: Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity, finding effective dietary strategies for weight loss and weight maintenance is of great interest. High protein diets are reported to protect against diet-induced obesity, however less is known about how different protein sources affect body...... with the consumption of lean meat in Western background diets was only evident with free access to the diets, most likely due to differences in body composition. We purpose that the beneficial effects of lean seafood consumption in relation to body weight regulation may be due to an enrichment of the amino acids...... weight regulation. We aimed to investigate how various protein sources influenced body weight development and glucose metabolism by feeding obesity prone male C57/BL6 mice various protein sources in different background diets. Results: In high fat/high sucrose diets (HF/HS), high fat/high protein diets...

  17. Protein tyrosine nitration: A new challenge in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Juan B Barroso

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress.

  18. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications.

  19. Towards plant protein refinery: Review on protein extraction using alkalo and potential enzymatic assistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sari, Y.W.; Mulder, W.J.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Bruins, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    The globally increasing protein demands require additional resources to those currently available. Furthermore, the optimal usage of protein fractions from both traditional and new protein resources, such as algae and leaves, is essential. Here, we present an overview on alkaline plant protein extra

  20. Towards plant protein refinery: Review on protein extraction using alkalo and potential enzymatic assistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sari, Y.W.; Mulder, W.J.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Bruins, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    The globally increasing protein demands require additional resources to those currently available. Furthermore, the optimal usage of protein fractions from both traditional and new protein resources, such as algae and leaves, is essential. Here, we present an overview on alkaline plant protein

  1. PredPlantPTS1: A Web Server for the Prediction of Plant Peroxisomal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Sigrun; Buchwald, Daniela; Lingner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes) with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e., novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i) the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii) information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii) the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de.

  2. PredPlantPTS1: a web server for the prediction of plant peroxisomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun eReumann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1. However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e. novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de.

  3. Energy sources and power plants; Energiequellen und Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Detlef [Helmut-Schmidt-Univ. / Univ. der Bundeswehr, Hamburg (Germany). Professur fuer Elektrische Energiesysteme; Schulz, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Energy is obtained from various energy sources (coal, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear fuels, wind energy, solar energy, hydro power, biomass, geothermal energy). These differ in each case with respect to their availability, methods of their production and the required power plant technologies. As technologies of the future fuel cells and nuclear fusion are traded. [German] Energie wird aus verschiedenen Energietraegern gewonnen (Kohle, Erdoel, Erdgas, Kernbrennstoffe, Windenergie, Solarenergie, Wasserkraft, Biomasse, Geothermie). Diese unterscheiden sich jeweils hinsichtlich ihrer Verfuegbarkeit, der Methoden ihrer Gewinnung und der benoetigten Kraftwerkstechnologien. Als Zukunftstechnologien werden Brennstoffzellen und Kernfusion gehandelt.

  4. A continuum of research projects to improve extraction of oil and proteins in oilseed plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Martine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the actual context of fossil sources rarefaction, global warming, and of increase of the world global population, is to promote the use of molecules derived from renewable sources such as plants. Among these molecules, lipids and proteins are targets of interest. Plant lipids from oilseeds are attractive substitutes to the use of fossil oil. Till the beginning of the 20th century, numerous products used in the daily life were derived from natural renewable products. For instance, plant oil was commonly used as fuel for vehicles and was entering in the composition of paintings, lubricants etc. Unfortunately, natural oils have been progressively replaced by cheaper fossil oil in the fabrication of these products. Nowadays, fossil oils are becoming increasingly expensive being a finite comodity. It is thus important to reduce our dependence from fossil oil and develop substitution industries. Oilseeds contain important amounts of proteins which are mainly used in feed. As several kilograms of plant protein are needed to obtain one kilogram of animal protein, the interest toward using plant protein in food is reinforced. The developments of the use of plant lipids, as well as proteins are a major stakes for the competitiveness of European agriculture and industry, as well as for sustainable development. Extraction of oil and proteins from rapeseed has a significant cost, in term of energy and solvent uses, and finally affects the ultimate quality of the products (protein digestibility. In order to quantitatively extract seed reserves under mild conditions, it will be necessary to limit the amount of energy needed, and avoid any use of solvents. Ideally, seeds should be processed in a bio refinery. In this paper, we will describe how oilseeds store their reserves, and roadblocks for improving actual oilseed extraction processes. A continuum of research projects aimed at answering targeted questions will be presented, with selected

  5. Oxidation of Proteins in Plants-Mechanisms and Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Møller, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... or postponing oxidation of residues more important for the function of the protein.......The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic...... of modified proteins by affinity purification. Although there are several technical caveats with such approaches, they have been useful in documenting the extent of oxidative modification of proteins and have highlighted a number of proteins where oxidative modification is critical for protein function...

  6. Using the telobox to search for plant telomere binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peška, Vratislav; Schrumpfová, Petra Procházková; Fajkus, Jiŕí

    2011-03-01

    Telobox is a Myb-related DNA-binding domain which is present in a number of yeast, plant and animal proteins. Its capacity to bind preferentially double-stranded telomeric DNA has been used in numerous studies to search for candidate telomeric proteins in various organisms, including plants. Here we provide an overview of these studies with a special emphasis on plants, where a specific subfamily of the proteins possessing the N-terminally positioned telobox is present in addition to more common C-terminal telobox proteins. We further demonstrate the presence of a telobox protein (CpTBP1) in Cestrum parqui, a plant lacking typical telomeres and telomerase. The protein shows nuclear localisation and association with chromatin. The role of this protein in ancestral and current telomere structure is discussed in the evolutionary context. Altogether, the present overview shows the importance of the telobox domain in a search for candidate telomere proteins but at the same time warns against oversimplified identification of any telobox protein with telomere structure without appropriate evidence of its telomeric localisation and function.

  7. Crowd sourcing difficult problems in protein science().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Dedicated computing resources are expensive to develop, maintain, and administrate. Frequently, research groups require bursts of computing power, during which progress is still limited by available computing resources. One way to alleviate this bottleneck would be to use additional computing resources. Today, many computing devices remain idle most of the time. Passive volunteer computing exploits this unemployed reserve of computing power by allowing device-owners to donate computing time on their own devices. Another complementary way to alleviate bottlenecks in computing resources is to use more efficient algorithms. Engaging volunteer computing employs human intuition to help solve challenging problems for which efficient algorithms are difficult to develop or unavailable. Designing engaging volunteer computing projects is challenging but can result in high-quality solutions. Here, we highlight four examples. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  8. Kareel plant: A natural source of medicines and nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Capparis decidua or kareel is an indigenous medicinal plant of India having large biodiversity in different north-western states of India. The young flower bud and fruits are used to make pickles while caper berries are used as vegetable. Plant has its wider utility in traditional folk medicine and is used as ailments to relieve variety of pains or aches such as toothache, cough and asthma heal. Plant contains few important secondary metabolites such as quercetin which act as melanogenesis stimulator and also increase tyrosinase protein expression. Capparis sp. seeds contain lectin that exhibit potent anti HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition activity and also inhibits proliferation of hepatoma HepG2 and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. It shows anti-rheumatic, anti-diabitic, anti-arthritis and anti-gout agent. C. decidua contains generous quantities of alkaloids, fatty acids, terpenes, vitamins, fibre and oils that show greater medicinal and nutritive value. It also contains saccharides, glycosides, flavonoids, volatile oils, sterols and steroids, which showed multiple pharmacological effects such as anti-inflammatory, odynolysis, anti-fungus, hepatoprotective effect, hypoglycemic activity, anti-oxidation, anti-hyperlipemia, anti-coagulated blood, smooth muscle stimulation, anti-stress reaction. Cadabicine an alkaloid that occurs in leaves shows anti-parasitic activity, while root bark and pulp are used to kill helminthes. Due to enzymatic inhibition plant extract shows the ability to control Leishmania major and L. infantum, L. donovani, L. braziliensis, Crithidia fasciculata and Herpetomonas muscarum infection. In the present review article both medicinal and nutraceutical properties of C decidua have been described in detail and special emphasis is given on its sustainable use of plant and its conservation in natural habitat.

  9. Heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant protein (HIPP): characterization of a family of proteins exclusive to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu-Neto, João Braga; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia C; de Oliveira, Luiz Felipe Valter; Zanettini, Maria Helena Bodanese; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia

    2013-04-01

    Metallochaperones are key proteins for the safe transport of metallic ions inside the cell. HIPPs (heavy metal-associated isoprenylated plant proteins) are metallochaperones that contain a metal binding domain (HMA) and a C-terminal isoprenylation motif. In this study, we provide evidence that proteins of this family are found only in vascular plants and may be separated into five distinct clusters. HIPPs may be involved in (a) heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification mechanisms, especially those involved in cadmium tolerance, (b) transcriptional responses to cold and drought, and (c) plant-pathogen interactions. In particular, our results show that the rice (Oryza sativa) HIPP OsHIPP41 gene is highly expressed in response to cold and drought stresses, and its product is localized in the cytosol and the nucleus. The results suggest that HIPPs play an important role in the development of vascular plants and in plant responses to environmental changes.

  10. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-03

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data.

  11. Impact of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wen Z.; Zhao, Wen J.; Luo, Na N.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and atmospheric particles can diffuse and absorb solar radiation, and directly affect plant photosynthesis and related protein expression. In this study, for the first time, we performed an extensive investigation of the effects of aerosols and atmospheric particles on plant leaf proteins by combining Geographic Information System and proteomic approaches. Data on particles with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm (PM1) from different locations across the city of Beijing and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the past 6 years (2007-2012) were collected. In order to make the study more reliable, we segregated the influence of soil pollution by measuring the heavy metal content. On the basis of AOD and PM1, two regions corresponding to strong and weak diffuse solar radiations were selected for analyzing the changes in the expression of plant proteins. Our results demonstrated that in areas with strong diffuse solar radiations, plant ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was expressed at higher levels, but oxygen evolved in enhancer protein and light-harvesting complex II protein were expressed at lower levels. The expression of ATP synthase subunit beta and chlorophyll a-b binding protein were similar in both regions. By analyzing the changes in the expression of these leaf proteins and their functions, we conclude that aerosols and atmospheric particles stimulate plant photosynthesis facilitated by diffuse solar radiations.

  12. The dynamics of plant plasma membrane proteins: PINs and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschnig, Christian; Vert, Grégory

    2014-08-01

    Plants are permanently situated in a fixed location and thus are well adapted to sense and respond to environmental stimuli and developmental cues. At the cellular level, several of these responses require delicate adjustments that affect the activity and steady-state levels of plasma membrane proteins. These adjustments involve both vesicular transport to the plasma membrane and protein internalization via endocytic sorting. A substantial part of our current knowledge of plant plasma membrane protein sorting is based on studies of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transport proteins, which are found at distinct plasma membrane domains and have been implicated in directional efflux of the plant hormone auxin. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in establishing such polar protein distributions, focusing on PINs and other key plant plasma membrane proteins, and we highlight the pathways that allow for dynamic adjustments in protein distribution and turnover, which together constitute a versatile framework that underlies the remarkable capabilities of plants to adjust growth and development in their ever-changing environment.

  13. Plant antifungal proteins and their applications in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Juan; Yuan, Su-Su; Jiang, Luan-Luan; Ye, Xiu-Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wu, Zu-Jian

    2015-06-01

    Fungi are far more complex organisms than viruses or bacteria and can develop numerous diseases in plants that cause loss of a substantial portion of the crop every year. Plants have developed various mechanisms to defend themselves against these fungi which include the production of low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites and proteins and peptides with antifungal activity. In this review, families of plant antifungal proteins (AFPs) including defensins, lectins, and several others will be summarized. Moreover, the application of AFPs in agriculture will also be analyzed.

  14. Metabolic adaptation in transplastomic plants massively accumulating recombinant proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bally

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant chloroplasts are endowed with an astonishing capacity to accumulate foreign proteins. However, knowledge about the impact on resident proteins of such high levels of recombinant protein accumulation is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used proteomics to characterize tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum plastid transformants massively accumulating a p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD or a green fluorescent protein (GFP. While under the conditions used no obvious modifications in plant phenotype could be observed, these proteins accumulated to even higher levels than ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, the most abundant protein on the planet. This accumulation occurred at the expense of a limited number of leaf proteins including Rubisco. In particular, enzymes involved in CO(2 metabolism such as nuclear-encoded plastidial Calvin cycle enzymes and mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase were found to adjust their accumulation level to these novel physiological conditions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results document how protein synthetic capacity is limited in plant cells. They may provide new avenues to evaluate possible bottlenecks in recombinant protein technology and to maintain plant fitness in future studies aiming at producing recombinant proteins of interest through chloroplast transformation.

  15. Plant Oils as Potential Sources of Vitamin D

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    Gabriele I Stangl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat vitamin D insufficiency in a population, reliable diet sources of vitamin D are required. The recommendations to consume more oily fish and the use of UVB treated yeast are already applied strategies to address vitamin D insufficiency. This study aimed to elucidate the suitability of plant oils as an alternative vitamin D source. Therefore, plant oils that are commonly used in human nutrition were firstly analyzed for their content of vitamin D precursors and metabolites. Secondly, selected oils were exposed to a short-term UVB irradiation to stimulate the synthesis of vitamin D. Finally, to elucidate the efficacy of plant-derived vitamin D to improve the vitamin D status, we fed UVB-exposed wheat germ oil for 4 weeks to mice and compared them with mice that received non-exposed or vitamin D3 supplemented wheat germ oil. Sterol analysis revealed that the selected plant oils contained high amounts of ergosterol, but also 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC, with the highest concentrations found in wheat germ oil. Exposure to UVB irradiation resulted in a partial conversion of ergosterol and 7-DHC to vitamin D2 and D3 in these oils. Mice fed the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil were able to improve their vitamin D status as shown by the rise in the plasma concentration of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD and the liver content of vitamin D compared to mice fed the non-exposed oil. However, the plasma concentration of 25(OHD of mice fed the UVB-treated oil did not reach the values observed in the group fed the D3 supplemented oil. It was striking that the intake of the UVB-exposed oil resulted in distinct accumulation of vitamin D2 in the livers of these mice. In conclusion, plant oils, in particular wheat germ oil, contain considerable amounts of vitamin D precursors which can be converted to vitamin D via UVB exposure. However, the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil was less effective to improve the 25(OHD plasma concentration than a supplementation with vitamin D

  16. Unfolded protein response in plants: one master, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberti, Cristina; Kim, Sang-Jin; Stefano, Giovanni; Brandizzi, Federica

    2015-10-01

    To overcome endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, ER-localized stress sensors actuate distinct downstream organelle-nucleus signaling pathways to invoke a cytoprotective response, known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Compared to yeast and metazoans, plant UPR studies are more recent but nevertheless fascinating. Here we discuss recent discoveries in plant UPR, highlight conserved and unique features of the plant UPR as well as critical yet-open questions whose answers will likely make significant contributions to the understanding plant ER stress management.

  17. Pleiotropic roles of cold shock domain proteins in plants

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    Kentaro eSasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cold shock domain (CSD is a nucleic acid binding domain that is widely conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. In Escherichia coli, cold shock proteins (CSPs are composed solely of a CSD and function as RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures. Cellular RNAs tend to be folded into unfavorable structures under low temperature conditions, and RNA chaperones resolve these structures, recovering functionality of the RNAs. CSP functions are associated mainly with cold adaptation, but they are also involved in other biological processes under normal growth conditions. Eukaryotic CSD proteins contain auxiliary domains in addition to the CSD and regulate many biological processes such as development and stress tolerance. In plants, it has been demonstrated that CSD proteins play essential roles in acquiring freezing tolerance. In addition, it has been suggested that some plant CSD proteins regulate embryo development, flowering time and fruit development. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic biological functions of cold shock domain proteins in plants and discuss possible mechanisms by which plant CSD proteins regulate the functions of RNA molecules.

  18. Effect of dietary protein source on piglet meat quality characteristics

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    Panagiotis E Simitzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to examine the effects of different dietary protein sources (soybean meal vs whey protein on piglet meat quality characteristics. Eighteen castrated male Large White × Duroc × Landrace piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Piglets were kept in individual metabolic cages and fed ad libitum over a period of 38 days the following 2 diets: diet SB, which was formulated to meet the nutrient requirements of piglets using soybean meal as the main crude protein source and diet WP, where SB was totally replaced by a mixture of whey proteins on equal digestible energy and crude protein basis. At the end of the experiment, piglets were weighed and slaughtered. After overnight chilling, samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle were taken and were used for meat quality measurements.         No significant differences were observed in the values of pH, colour, water holding capacity, shear force and intramuscular fat content of L. dorsi muscle between the dietary treatments. Measurement of lipid oxidation values showed that dietary supplementation with different protein sources did not influence meat antioxidant properties during refrigerated storage. The SB piglets had lower 14:0 (P<0.01 and higher 18:3n-3 (P<0.001 levels in intramuscular fat in comparison with WP piglets. However, these changes were attributed to background differences in the dietary FA profile and not to a direct protein source effect. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the examined dietary protein sources (soybean meal or whey protein do not have a significant effect on meat quality characteristics of piglets.

  19. Effects of different sources of protein on digestive characteristics, microbial efficiency, and nutrient flow in dairy goats

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    Nivea Regina de Oliveira Felisberto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Diets formulated with protein sources presenting different resistance to ruminal degradation were compared by evaluating ruminal parameters, production and microbial efficiency and nutrients flow to the omasum in goats. Eight rumen cannulated non-lactating, non-pregnant goats were distributed in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with two replicates. Treatments consisted of four diets where different sources of plant protein accounted for the major protein source named soybean meal, source of higher ruminal degradability, and three other sources of higher resistance of degradation: roasted soybean, corn gluten meal, and cottonseed cake. Amounts of rumen protein were similar among rations; however, flows of dry matter, protein and non-fiber carbohydrate to omasum were higher for diets with protein source with reduced rumen degradation rate. Higher values of rumen ammonia were obtained by using ration with soybean meal as major source of protein. Higher values of pH were obtained for rations with roasted soybean e cottonseed cake. Regarding kinetic of transit, similar values were found among rations. Diets with protein sources presenting reduced ruminal degradation increase nutrients flow to the omasum in goats and alter digestive parameters such as pH and ammonia without compromising bacteria growth and efficiency, which grants their use for dairy goats with similar efficiency to rations using more degradable sources of protein.

  20. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Gupta; Renu Deswal

    2014-12-01

    Overwintering plants secrete antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to provide freezing tolerance. These proteins bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystals that are formed in the apoplast during subzero temperatures. Antifreeze activity has been detected in more than 60 plants and AFPs have been purified from 15 of these, including gymnosperms, dicots and monocots. Biochemical characterization of plant antifreeze activity, as determined by the high ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activities and low thermal hysteresis (TH) of AFPs, showed that their main function is inhibition of ice crystal growth rather than the lowering of freezing temperatures. However, recent studies showed that antifreeze activity with higher TH also exists in plants. Calcium and hormones like ethylene and jasmonic acid have been shown to regulate plant antifreeze activity. Recent studies have shown that plant AFPs bind to both prism planes and basal planes of ice crystals by means of two flat ice binding sites. Plant AFPs have been postulated to evolve from the OsLRR-PSR gene nearly 36 million years ago. In this review, we present the current scenario of plant AFP research in order to understand the possible potential of plant AFPs in generation of freezing-tolerant crops.

  1. Protein disorder in plants: a view from the chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yruela Inmaculada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intrinsically unstructured state of some proteins, observed in all living organisms, is essential for basic cellular functions. In this field the available information from plants is limited but it has been reached a point where these proteins can be comprehensively classified on the basis of disorder, function and evolution. Results Our analysis of plant genomes confirms that nuclear-encoded proteins follow the same trend than other multi-cellular eukaryotes; however, chloroplast- and mitochondria- encoded proteins conserve the patterns of Archaea and Bacteria, in agreement with their phylogenetic origin. Based on current knowledge about gene transference from the chloroplast to the nucleus, we report a strong correlation between the rate of disorder of transferred and nuclear-encoded proteins, even for polypeptides that play functional roles back in the chloroplast. We further investigate this trend by reviewing the set of chloroplast ribosomal proteins, one of the most representative transferred gene clusters, finding that the ribosomal large subunit, assembled from a majority of nuclear-encoded proteins, is clearly more unstructured than the small one, which integrates mostly plastid-encoded proteins. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the evolutionary dynamics of the plant nucleus adds disordered segments to genes alike, regardless of their origin, with the notable exception of proteins currently encoded in both genomes, probably due to functional constraints.

  2. RNA-protein interactions in plant disease: hackers at the dinner table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Pietro D

    2015-09-01

    Plants are the source of most of our food, whether directly or as feed for the animals we eat. Our dinner table is a trophic level we share with the microbes that also feed on the primary photosynthetic producers. Microbes that enter into close interactions with plants need to evade or suppress detection and host immunity to access nutrients. They do this by deploying molecular tools - effectors - which target host processes. The mode of action of effector proteins in these events is varied and complex. Recent data from diverse systems indicate that RNA-interacting proteins and RNA itself are delivered by eukaryotic microbes, such as fungi and oomycetes, to host plants and contribute to the establishment of successful interactions. This is evidence that pathogenic microbes can interfere with the host software. We are beginning to see that pathogenic microbes are capable of hacking into the plants' immunity programs. © 2015 The Author. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Interactions between plant proteins/enzymes and other food components, and their effects on food quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chenyan; Zhao, Guanghua; Ning, Yong

    2017-05-24

    Plant proteins are the main sources of dietary protein for humans, especially for vegetarians. There are a variety of components with different properties coexisting in foodstuffs, so the interactions between these components are inevitable to occur, thereby affecting food quality. Among these interactions, the interplay between plant proteins/enzymes from fruits and vegetables, cereals, and legumes and other molecules plays an important role in food quality, which recently has gained a particular scientific interest. Such interactions not only affect the appearances of fruits and vegetables and the functionality of cereal products but also the nutritive properties of plant foods. Non-covalent forces, such as hydrogen bond, hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, and van der Waals forces, are mainly responsible for these interactions. Future outlook is highlighted with aim to suggest a research line to be followed in further studies.

  4. Evolution of specifier proteins in glucosinolate-containing plants

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    Kuchernig Jennifer C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucosinolate-myrosinase system is an activated chemical defense system found in plants of the Brassicales order. Glucosinolates are stored separately from their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases, in plant tissues. Upon tissue damage, e.g. by herbivory, glucosinolates and myrosinases get mixed and glucosinolates are broken down to an array of biologically active compounds of which isothiocyanates are toxic to a wide range of organisms. Specifier proteins occur in some, but not all glucosinolate-containing plants and promote the formation of biologically active non-isothiocyanate products upon myrosinase-catalyzed glucosinolate breakdown. Results Based on a phytochemical screening among representatives of the Brassicales order, we selected candidate species for identification of specifier protein cDNAs. We identified ten specifier proteins from a range of species of the Brassicaceae and assigned each of them to one of the three specifier protein types (NSP, nitrile-specifier protein, ESP, epithiospecifier protein, TFP, thiocyanate-forming protein after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Together with nine known specifier proteins and three putative specifier proteins found in databases, we subjected the newly identified specifier proteins to phylogenetic analyses. Specifier proteins formed three major clusters, named AtNSP5-cluster, AtNSP1-cluster, and ESP/TFP cluster. Within the ESP/TFP cluster, specifier proteins grouped according to the Brassicaceae lineage they were identified from. Non-synonymous vs. synonymous substitution rate ratios suggested purifying selection to act on specifier protein genes. Conclusions Among specifier proteins, NSPs represent the ancestral activity. The data support a monophyletic origin of ESPs from NSPs. The split between NSPs and ESPs/TFPs happened before the radiation of the core Brassicaceae. Future analyses have to show if TFP activity evolved from ESPs at least twice

  5. Mixed compared with single-source proteins in high-protein diets affect kidney structure and function differentially in obese fa/fa Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devassy, Jessay G; Wojcik, Jennifer L; Ibrahim, Naser H M; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-02-01

    Questions remain regarding the potential negative effects of dietary high protein (HP) on kidney health, particularly in the context of obesity in which the risk for renal disease is already increased. To examine whether some of the variability in HP effects on kidney health may be due to source of protein, obese fa/fa Zucker rats were given HP (35% of energy from protein) diets containing either casein, soy protein, or a mixed source of animal and plant proteins for 12 weeks. Control lean and obese rats were given diets containing casein at normal protein (15% of energy from protein) levels. Body weight and blood pressure were measured, and markers of renal structural changes, damage, and function were assessed. Obesity alone resulted in mild renal changes, as evidenced by higher kidney weights, proteinuria, and glomerular volumes. In obese rats, increasing the protein level using the single, but not mixed, protein sources resulted in higher renal fibrosis compared with the lean rats. The mixed-protein HP group also had lower levels of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, even though this diet further increased kidney and glomerular size. Soy and mixed-protein HP diets also resulted in a small number of damaged glomeruli, while soy compared with mixed-protein HP diet delayed the increase in blood pressure over time. Since obesity itself confers added risk of renal disease, an HP diet from mixed-protein sources that enables weight loss but has fewer risks to renal health may be advantageous.

  6. Illuminating plant biology: using fluorescent proteins for high-throughput analysis of protein localization and function in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Sylvester, Anne W; Jackson, David

    2010-03-01

    First discovered in jellyfish, fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been successfully optimized for use as effective biomarkers within living plant cells. When exposed to light, FPs fused to a protein or regulatory element will fluoresce, and non-invasively mark expression and protein localization, which allows for the in vivo monitoring of diverse cellular processes. In this review, we discuss how FP technology has evolved from small-scale analysis of individual genes to more high-throughput techniques for global expression and functional profiling in plants.

  7. The oxidative protein folding machinery in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Isabel; Meyer, Andreas J

    2013-08-01

    Formation of intra-molecular disulfides and concomitant oxidative protein folding is essential for stability and catalytic function of many soluble and membrane-bound proteins in the endomembrane system, the mitochondrial inter-membrane space and the thylakoid lumen. Disulfide generation from free cysteines in nascent polypeptide chains is generally a catalysed process for which distinct pathways exist in all compartments. A high degree of similarities between highly diverse eukaryotic and bacterial systems for generation of protein disulfides indicates functional conservation of key processes throughout evolution. However, while many aspects about molecular function of enzymatic systems promoting disulfide formation have been demonstrated for bacterial and non-plant eukaryotic organisms, it is now clear that the plant machinery for oxidative protein folding displays distinct details, suggesting that the different pathways have been adapted to plant-specific requirements in terms of compartmentation, molecular function and regulation. Here, we aim to evaluate biological diversity by comparing the plant systems for oxidative protein folding to the respective systems from non-plant eukaryotes.

  8. Dietary protein intake in Dutch elderly people: a focus on protein sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieland, C.A.B.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, K.J.; Loon, van L.J.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sufficient high quality dietary protein intake is required to prevent or treat sarcopenia in elderly people. Therefore, the intake of specific protein sources as well as their timing of intake are important to improve dietary protein intake in elderly people. Objectives: to assess the

  9. Potential application of microalga Spirulina platensis as a protein source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupatini, Anne Luize; Colla, Luciane Maria; Canan, Cristiane; Colla, Eliane

    2017-02-01

    The high protein level of various microalgal species is one of the main reasons to consider them an unconventional source of this compound. Spirulina platensis stands out for being one of the richest protein sources of microbial origin (460-630 g kg(-1) , dry matter basis), having similar protein levels when compared to meat and soybeans. The use of S. platensis in food can bring benefits to human health owing to its chemical composition, since it has high levels of vitamins, minerals, phenolics, essential fatty acids, amino acids and pigments. Furthermore, the development of new protein sources to supply the shortage of this nutrient is an urgent need, and protein from S. platensis plays an important role in this scenario. In this sense, extraction processes that allow maximum protein yield and total utilization of biomass is an urgent need, and ultrasonic waves have proven to be an effective extraction technique. The number of scientific papers related to protein fraction from S. platensis is still limited; thus further studies on its functional and technological properties are needed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies. PMID:23536550

  11. Heterotrimeric G protein signalling in the plant kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Daisuke; Chen, Jin-Gui; Botella, José Ramón; Jones, Alan M

    2013-03-27

    In animals, heterotrimeric G proteins, comprising α-, β-and γ-subunits, perceive extracellular stimuli through cell surface receptors, and transmit signals to ion channels, enzymes and other effector proteins to affect numerous cellular behaviours. In plants, G proteins have structural similarities to the corresponding molecules in animals but transmit signals by atypical mechanisms and effector proteins to control growth, cell proliferation, defence, stomate movements, channel regulation, sugar sensing and some hormonal responses. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular regulation of plant G proteins, their effectors and the physiological functions studied mainly in two model organisms: Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa). We also look at recent progress on structural analyses, systems biology and evolutionary studies.

  12. The importance of lipid modified proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-01-01

    Membranes have long been known to act as more than physical barriers within and between plant cells. Trafficking of membrane proteins, signalling from and across membranes, organisation of membranes and transport through membranes are all essential processes for plant cellular function. These processes rely on a myriad array of proteins regulated in a variety of manners and are frequently required to be directly associated with membranes. For integral membrane proteins, the mode of membrane association is readily apparent, but many peripherally associated membrane proteins are outwardly soluble proteins. In these cases the proteins are frequently modified by the addition of lipids allowing direct interaction with the hydrophobic core of membranes. These modifications include N-myristoylation, S-acylation (palmitoylation), prenylation and GPI anchors but until recently little was truly known about their function in plants. New data suggest that these modifications are able to act as more than just membrane anchors, and dynamic S-acylation in particular is emerging as a means of regulating protein function in a similar manner to phosphorylation. This review discusses how these modifications occur, their impact on protein function, how they are regulated, recent advances in the field and technical approaches for studying these modifications.

  13. Expression and affinity purification of recombinant proteins from plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Urvee A.; Sur, Gargi; Daunert, Sylvia; Babbitt, Ruth; Li, Qingshun

    2002-01-01

    With recent advances in plant biotechnology, transgenic plants have been targeted as an inexpensive means for the mass production of proteins for biopharmaceutical and industrial uses. However, the current plant purification techniques lack a generally applicable, economic, large-scale strategy. In this study, we demonstrate the purification of a model protein, beta-glucuronidase (GUS), by employing the protein calmodulin (CaM) as an affinity tag. In the proposed system, CaM is fused to GUS. In the presence of calcium, the calmodulin fusion protein binds specifically to a phenothiazine-modified surface of an affinity column. When calcium is removed with a complexing agent, e.g., EDTA, calmodulin undergoes a conformational change allowing the dissociation of the calmodulin-phenothiazine complex and, therefore, permitting the elution of the GUS-CaM fusion protein. The advantages of this approach are the fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the target protein under mild elution conditions, thus preserving the activity of the target protein. Two types of transformation methods were used in this study, namely, the Agrobacterium-mediated system and the viral-vector-mediated transformation system. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  14. Predicting N-terminal myristoylation sites in plant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podell Sheila

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-terminal myristoylation plays a vital role in membrane targeting and signal transduction in plant responses to environmental stress. Although N-myristoyltransferase enzymatic function is conserved across plant, animal, and fungal kingdoms, exact substrate specificities vary, making it difficult to predict protein myristoylation accurately within specific taxonomic groups. Results A new method for predicting N-terminal myristoylation sites specifically in plants has been developed and statistically tested for sensitivity, specificity, and robustness. Compared to previously available methods, the new model is both more sensitive in detecting known positives, and more selective in avoiding false positives. Scores of myristoylated and non-myristoylated proteins are more widely separated than with other methods, greatly reducing ambiguity and the number of sequences giving intermediate, uninformative results. The prediction model is available at http://plantsp.sdsc.edu/myrist.html. Conclusion Superior performance of the new model is due to the selection of a plant-specific training set, covering 266 unique sequence examples from 40 different species, the use of a probability-based hidden Markov model to obtain predictive scores, and a threshold cutoff value chosen to provide maximum positive-negative discrimination. The new model has been used to predict 589 plant proteins likely to contain N-terminal myristoylation signals, and to analyze the functional families in which these proteins occur.

  15. Function and regulation of plant major intrinsic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovic, Milan

    detoxification. Plant Noduline 26-like Intrinsic Proteins (NIPs) can channel As(III) and consequently influence the detoxification process. The role of the Tonoplast Intrinsic Proteins (TIPs) in As(III) detoxification remains to be clarified, yet TIPs could have an impact on As(III) accumulation in plant cell......(III) by PCs. There is thus great interest in perceiving mechanisms of transport and detoxification of arsenic in order to improve soil management and crops through breeding and iotechnology. This result is important for the further understanding of arsenic etoxification mechanisms which could eventually lead...

  16. vProtein: identifying optimal amino acid complements from plant-based foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Woolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indispensible amino acids (IAAs are used by the body in different proportions. Most animal-based foods provide these IAAs in roughly the needed proportions, but many plant-based foods provide different proportions of IAAs. To explore how these plant-based foods can be better used in human nutrition, we have created the computational tool vProtein to identify optimal food complements to satisfy human protein needs. METHODS: vProtein uses 1251 plant-based foods listed in the United States Department of Agriculture standard release 22 database to determine the quantity of each food or pair of foods required to satisfy human IAA needs as determined by the 2005 daily recommended intake. The quantity of food in a pair is found using a linear programming approach that minimizes total calories, total excess IAAs, or the total weight of the combination. RESULTS: For single foods, vProtein identifies foods with particularly balanced IAA patterns such as wheat germ, quinoa, and cauliflower. vProtein also identifies foods with particularly unbalanced IAA patterns such as macadamia nuts, degermed corn products, and wakame seaweed. Although less useful alone, some unbalanced foods provide unusually good complements, such as Brazil nuts to legumes. Interestingly, vProtein finds no statistically significant bias toward grain/legume pairings for protein complementation. These analyses suggest that pairings of plant-based foods should be based on the individual foods themselves instead of based on broader food group-food group pairings. Overall, the most efficient pairings include sweet corn/tomatoes, apple/coconut, and sweet corn/cherry. The top pairings also highlight the utility of less common protein sources such as the seaweeds laver and spirulina, pumpkin leaves, and lambsquarters. From a public health perspective, many of the food pairings represent novel, low cost food sources to combat malnutrition. Full analysis results are available online

  17. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodges Matthew E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes.

  18. LIFEGUARD proteins support plant colonization by biotrophic powdery mildew fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Corina; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Eichmann, Ruth

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic microbes manipulate eukaryotic cells during invasion and target plant proteins to achieve host susceptibility. BAX INHIBITOR-1 (BI-1) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident cell death suppressor in plants and animals and is required for full susceptibility of barley to the barley powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei. LIFEGUARD (LFG) proteins resemble BI-1 proteins in terms of predicted membrane topology and cell-death-inhibiting function in metazoans, but display clear sequence-specific distinctions. This work shows that barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes harbour five LFG genes, HvLFGa-HvLFGe and AtLFG1-AtLFG5, whose functions are largely uncharacterized. As observed for HvBI-1, single-cell overexpression of HvLFGa supports penetration success of B. graminis f.sp. hordei into barley epidermal cells, while transient-induced gene silencing restricts it. In penetrated barley epidermal cells, a green fluorescent protein-tagged HvLFGa protein accumulates at the site of fungal entry, around fungal haustoria and in endosomal or vacuolar membranes. The data further suggest a role of LFG proteins in plant-powdery mildew interactions in both monocot and dicot plants, because stable overexpression or knockdown of AtLFG1 or AtLFG2 also support or delay development of the powdery mildew fungus Erysiphe cruciferarum on the respective Arabidopsis mutants. Together, this work has identified new modulators of plant-powdery mildew interactions, and the data further support functional similarities between BI-1 and LFG proteins beyond cell death regulation.

  19. How do filamentous pathogens deliver effector proteins into plant cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Petre

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens.

  20. How Do Filamentous Pathogens Deliver Effector Proteins into Plant Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Kamoun, Sophien

    2014-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens. PMID:24586116

  1. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha-Drori, Keren; Shichrur, Keren; Katz, Aviva; Oliva, Moran; Angelovici, Ruthie; Yalovsky, Shaul; Ohad, Nir

    2004-11-01

    Protein function is often mediated via formation of stable or transient complexes. Here we report the determination of protein-protein interactions in plants using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). The yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was split into two non-overlapping N-terminal (YN) and C-terminal (YC) fragments. Each fragment was cloned in-frame to a gene of interest, enabling expression of fusion proteins. To demonstrate the feasibility of BiFC in plants, two pairs of interacting proteins were utilized: (i) the alpha and beta subunits of the Arabidopsis protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), and (ii) the polycomb proteins, FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) and MEDEA (MEA). Members of each protein pair were transiently co-expressed in leaf epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis. Reconstitution of a fluorescing YFP chromophore occurred only when the inquest proteins interacted. No fluorescence was detected following co-expression of free non-fused YN and YC or non-interacting protein pairs. Yellow fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm of cells that expressed PFT alpha and beta subunits, or in nuclei and cytoplasm of cells that expressed FIE and MEA. In vivo measurements of fluorescence spectra emitted from reconstituted YFPs were identical to that of a non-split YFP, confirming reconstitution of the chromophore. Expression of the inquest proteins was verified by immunoblot analysis using monoclonal antibodies directed against tags within the hybrid proteins. In addition, protein interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitations. These results demonstrate that plant BiFC is a simple, reliable and relatively fast method for determining protein-protein interactions in plants.

  2. Screening of Caatinga plants as sources of lectins and trypsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcoverde, José Hélton Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Aline de Souza; Neves, Fernanda Pacífico de Almeida; Dionízio, Bianca Paiva; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; Carneiro-da-Cunha, Maria das Graças

    2014-01-01

    Although it is one of the most threatened areas in the Earth, there are few studies on the biotechnological potential of the Caatinga. This work evaluated 36 extracts from 27 Caatinga plants for lectin and trypsin inhibitor activities. The presence of lectin was detected in 77.7% of samples by haemagglutinating assay. The highest values of specific haemagglutinating activity were found in extracts of leaves from Mimosa lewesii, Bauhinia acuruana and Manilkara rufula and in branches from Myracrodruon urundeuva. Trypsin inhibitor activity was detected in 63.9% of the tested extracts, strong inhibitory effect (>70%) being found in 11 samples. This work demonstrates that Caatinga is a potential source of bioactive plant proteins that can be isolated and studied for several applications. The biochemical prospecting of Caatinga is essential for collection of bioactive principles so as to add conservation value to the region.

  3. Mapping of protein-protein interaction sites in the plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin.

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    Haruka Kameda

    Full Text Available Knowing the manner of protein-protein interactions is vital for understanding biological events. The plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin (Fd, a well-known small iron-sulfur protein with low redox potential, partitions electrons to a variety of Fd-dependent enzymes via specific protein-protein interactions. Here we have refined the crystal structure of a recombinant plant-type Fd I from the blue green alga Aphanothece sacrum (AsFd-I at 1.46 Å resolution on the basis of the synchrotron radiation data. Incorporating the revised amino-acid sequence, our analysis corrects the 3D structure previously reported; we identified the short α-helix (67-71 near the active center, which is conserved in other plant-type [2Fe-2S] Fds. Although the 3D structures of the four molecules in the asymmetric unit are similar to each other, detailed comparison of the four structures revealed the segments whose conformations are variable. Structural comparison between the Fds from different sources showed that the distribution of the variable segments in AsFd-I is highly conserved in other Fds, suggesting the presence of intrinsically flexible regions in the plant-type [2Fe-2S] Fd. A few structures of the complexes with Fd-dependent enzymes clearly demonstrate that the protein-protein interactions are achieved through these variable regions in Fd. The results described here will provide a guide for interpreting the biochemical and mutational studies that aim at the manner of interactions with Fd-dependent enzymes.

  4. The effect of the unfolded protein response on the production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David Rhys; Walmsley, Amanda Maree

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are currently produced through a wide variety of host systems, including yeast, E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. One of the most recent systems developed uses plant cells. While considerable advances have been made in the yields and fidelity of plant-made recombinant proteins, many of these gains have arisen from the development of recombinant factors. This includes elements such as highly effective promoters and untranslated regions, deconstructed viral vectors, silencing inhibitors, and improved DNA delivery techniques. However, unlike other host systems, much of the work on recombinant protein production in plants uses wild-type hosts that have not been modified to facilitate recombinant protein expression. As such, there are still endogenous mechanisms functioning to maintain the health of the cell. The result is that these pathways, such as the unfolded protein response, can actively work to reduce recombinant protein production to maintain the integrity of the cell. This review examines how issues arising from the unfolded protein response have been addressed in other systems, and how these methods may be transferable to plant systems. We further identify several areas of host plant biology that present attractive targets for modification to facilitate recombinant protein production.

  5. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases

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    Leinonen Rasko

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. Results We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV or Microsoft Excel (XLS files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. Conclusion We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR

  6. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Chen; Huafang Lai

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene d...

  7. Analysis of Protein Import into Chloroplasts Isolated from Stressed Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Qihua; Jarvis, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Chloroplasts are organelles with many vital roles in plants, which include not only photosynthesis but numerous other metabolic and signaling functions. Furthermore, chloroplasts are critical for plant responses to various abiotic stresses, such as salinity and osmotic stresses. A chloroplast may contain up to ~3,000 different proteins, some of which are encoded by its own genome. However, the majority of chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and synthesized in the cytosol, and these proteins need to be imported into the chloroplast through translocons at the chloroplast envelope membranes. Recent studies have shown that the chloroplast protein import can be actively regulated by stress. To biochemically investigate such regulation of protein import under stress conditions, we developed the method described here as a quick and straightforward procedure that can easily be achieved in any laboratory. In this method, plants are grown under normal conditions and then exposed to stress conditions in liquid culture. Plant material is collected, and chloroplasts are then released by homogenization. The crude homogenate is separated by density gradient centrifugation, enabling isolation of the intact chloroplasts. Chloroplast yield is assessed by counting, and chloroplast intactness is checked under a microscope. For the protein import assays, purified chloroplasts are incubated with (35)S radiolabeled in vitro translated precursor proteins, and time-course experiments are conducted to enable comparisons of import rates between genotypes under stress conditions. We present data generated using this method which show that the rate of protein import into chloroplasts from a regulatory mutant is specifically altered under osmotic stress conditions.

  8. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein.

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    Abdallah Khatib

    Full Text Available Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58 is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed.

  9. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Abdallah; Arhab, Yani; Bentebibel, Assia; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Noiriel, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG) catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed.

  10. Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C; Longo, Valter D; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-10-01

    Defining what represents a macronutritionally balanced diet remains an open question and a high priority in nutrition research. Although the amount of protein may have specific effects, from a broader dietary perspective, the choice of protein sources will inevitably influence other components of diet and may be a critical determinant for the health outcome. To examine the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality. This prospective cohort study of US health care professionals included 131 342 participants from the Nurses' Health Study (1980 to end of follow-up on June 1, 2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986 to end of follow-up on January 31, 2012). Animal and plant protein intake was assessed by regularly updated validated food frequency questionnaires. Data were analyzed from June 20, 2014, to January 18, 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Of the 131 342 participants, 85 013 were women (64.7%) and 46 329 were men (35.3%) (mean [SD] age, 49 [9] years). The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein (5th-95th percentile, 9%-22%) and 4% for plant protein (5th-95th percentile, 2%-6%). After adjusting for major lifestyle and dietary risk factors, animal protein intake was not associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 1.02 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05; P for trend = .33) but was associated with higher cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.08 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P for trend = .04). Plant protein was associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90 per 3% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.86-0.95; P for trend based on smoking, heavy alcohol intake, overweight or obesity, and physical inactivity, but not evident among those without any of these risk factors. Replacing animal protein of various origins with plant protein was associated with lower mortality. In particular, the HRs for all

  11. Unconventional protein secretion in plants: a critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David G; Ding, Yu; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional protein secretion (UPS) is a collective term for mechanisms by which cytosolic proteins that lack a signal peptide ("leaderless secretory proteins" (LSPs)) can gain access to the cell exterior. Numerous examples of UPS have been well documented in animal and yeast cells. In contrast, our understanding of the mechanism(s) and function of UPS in plants is very limited. This review evaluates the available literature on this subject. The apparent large numbers of LSPs in the plant secretome suggest that UPS also occurs in plants but is not a proof. Although the direct transport of LSPs across the plant plasma membrane (PM) has not yet been described, it is possible that as in other eukaryotes, exosomes may be released from plant cells through fusion of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) with the PM. In this way, LSPs, but also small RNAs (sRNAs), that are passively taken up from the cytosol into the intraluminal vesicles of MVBs, could reach the apoplast. Another possible mechanism is the recently discovered exocyst-positive organelle (EXPO), a double-membrane-bound compartment, distinct from autophagosomes, which appears to sequester LSPs.

  12. Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) in plants: a complex gene family with major impacts on plant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Kerrie L; Bhave, Mrinal

    2007-10-01

    The ubiquitous cell membrane proteins called aquaporins are now firmly established as channel proteins that control the specific transport of water molecules across cell membranes in all living organisms. The aquaporins are thus likely to be of fundamental significance to all facets of plant growth and development affected by plant-water relations. A majority of plant aquaporins have been found to share essential structural features with the human aquaporin and exhibit water-transporting ability in various functional assays, and some have been shown experimentally to be of critical importance to plant survival. Furthermore, substantial evidence is now available from a number of plant species that shows differential gene expression of aquaporins in response to abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, or cold and clearly establishes the aquaporins as major players in the response of plants to conditions that affect water availability. This review summarizes the function and regulation of these genes to develop a greater understanding of the response of plants to water insufficiency, and particularly, to identify tolerant genotypes of major crop species including wheat and rice and plants that are important in agroforestry.

  13. Avirulence proteins of plant pathogens: determinants of victory and defeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luderer, R.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The simplest way to explain the biochemical basis of the gene-for-gene concept is by direct interaction between a pathogen-derived avirulence (Avr) gene product and a receptor protein, which is encoded by the matching resistance (R) gene of the host plant. The number of R genes for which the

  14. Novel Hydrophobin Fusion Tags for Plant-Produced Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritala, Anneli; Linder, Markus; Joensuu, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobin fusion technology has been applied in the expression of several recombinant proteins in plants. Until now, the technology has relied exclusively on the Trichoderma reesei hydrophobin HFBI. We screened eight novel hydrophobin tags, T. reesei HFBII, HFBIII, HFBIV, HFBV, HFBVI and Fusarium verticillioides derived HYD3, HYD4 and HYD5, for production of fusion proteins in plants and purification by two-phase separation. To study the properties of the hydrophobins, we used N-terminal and C-terminal GFP as a fusion partner. Transient expression of the hydrophobin fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed large variability in accumulation levels, which was also reflected in formation of protein bodies. In two-phase separations, only HFBII and HFBIV were able to concentrate GFP into the surfactant phase from a plant extract. The separation efficiency of both tags was comparable to HFBI. When the accumulation was tested side by side, HFBII-GFP gave a better yield than HFBI-GFP, while the yield of HFBIV-GFP remained lower. Thus we present here two alternatives for HFBI as functional fusion tags for plant-based protein production and first step purification. PMID:27706254

  15. Microtubule Associated Proteins in Plants and the Processes They Manage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) are proteins that physically bind to microtubules in eukaryotes. MAPs play important roles in regulating the polymerization and organization of microtubules and in using the ensuing microtubule arrays to carry out a variety of cellular functions. In plants, MAPs manage the construction, repositioning, and dismantling of four distinct microtubule arrays throughout the cell cycle. Three of these arrays, the cortical array, the preprophase band,and the phragmoplast, are prominent to plants and are responsible for facilitating cell wall deposition and modification,transducing signals, demarcating the plane of cell division, and forming the new cell plate during cytokinesis, This review highlights important aspects of how MAPs in plants establish and maintain microtubule arrays as well as regulate cell growth, cell division, and cellular responses to the environment.

  16. Long-chain n-3 PUFA: plant v. marine sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine M; Burdge, Graham

    2006-02-01

    Increasing recognition of the importance of the long-chain n-3 PUFA, EPA and DHA, to cardiovascular health, and in the case of DHA to normal neurological development in the fetus and the newborn, has focused greater attention on the dietary supply of these fatty acids. The reason for low intakes of EPA and DHA in most developed countries (0.1-0.5 g/d) is the low consumption of oily fish, the richest dietary source of these fatty acids. An important question is whether dietary intake of the precursor n-3 fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid (alphaLNA), can provide sufficient amounts of tissue EPA and DHA by conversion through the n-3 PUFA elongation-desaturation pathway. alphaLNA is present in marked amounts in plant sources, including green leafy vegetables and commonly-consumed oils such as rape-seed and soyabean oils, so that increased intake of this fatty acid would be easier to achieve than via increased fish consumption. However, alphaLNA-feeding studies and stable-isotope studies using alphaLNA, which have addressed the question of bioconversion of alphaLNA to EPA and DHA, have concluded that in adult men conversion to EPA is limited (approximately 8%) and conversion to DHA is extremely low (<0.1%). In women fractional conversion to DHA appears to be greater (9%), which may partly be a result of a lower rate of utilisation of alphaLNA for beta-oxidation in women. However, up-regulation of the conversion of EPA to DHA has also been suggested, as a result of the actions of oestrogen on Delta6-desaturase, and may be of particular importance in maintaining adequate provision of DHA in pregnancy. The effect of oestrogen on DHA concentration in pregnant and lactating women awaits confirmation.

  17. Protein domains and architectural innovation in plant-associated Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downie J Allan

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of new complex biological behaviour tends to arise by novel combinations of existing building blocks. The functional and evolutionary building blocks of the proteome are protein domains, the function of a protein being dependent on its constituent domains. We clustered completely-sequenced proteomes of prokaryotes on the basis of their protein domain content, as defined by Pfam (release 16.0. This revealed that, although there was a correlation between phylogeny and domain content, other factors also have an influence. This observation motivated an investigation of the relationship between an organism's lifestyle and the complement of domains and domain architectures found within its proteome. Results We took a census of all protein domains and domain combinations (architectures encoded in the completely-sequenced proteobacterial genomes. Nine protein domain families were identified that are found in phylogenetically disparate plant-associated bacteria but are absent from non-plant-associated bacteria. Most of these are known to play a role in the plant-associated lifestyle, but they also included domain of unknown function DUF1427, which is found in plant symbionts and pathogens of the alpha-, beta- and gamma-Proteobacteria, but not known in any other organism. Further, several domains were identified as being restricted to phytobacteria and Eukaryotes. One example is the RolB/RolC glucosidase family, which is found only in Agrobacterium species and in plants. We identified the 0.5% of Pfam protein domain families that were most significantly over-represented in the plant-associated Proteobacteria with respect to the background frequencies in the whole set of available proteobacterial proteomes. These included guanylate cyclase, domains implicated in aromatic catabolism, cellulase and several domains of unknown function. We identified 459 unique domain architectures found in phylogenetically diverse plant pathogens

  18. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

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    Trusov Yuri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX. According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species.

  19. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henikoff Steven

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3, which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere protein C (CENP-C, that is characterized by a single 24 amino-acid motif (CENPC motif. Results Whereas we find no evidence that mammalian CenH3 (CENP-A has been evolving adaptively, mammalian CENP-C proteins contain adaptively evolving regions that overlap with regions of DNA-binding activity. In plants we find that CENP-C proteins have complex duplicated regions, with conserved amino and carboxyl termini that are dissimilar in sequence to their counterparts in animals and fungi. Comparisons of Cenpc genes from Arabidopsis species and from grasses revealed multiple regions that are under positive selection, including duplicated exons in some grasses. In contrast to plants and animals, yeast CENP-C (Mif2p is under negative selection. Conclusions CENP-Cs in all plant and animal lineages examined have regions that are rapidly and adaptively evolving. To explain these remarkable evolutionary features for a single-copy gene that is needed at every mitosis, we propose that CENP-Cs, like some CenH3s, suppress meiotic drive of centromeres during female meiosis. This process can account for the rapid evolution and the complexity of centromeric DNA in plants and animals as compared to fungi.

  20. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert S.; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C.; Campbell, Peter C.; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P.; Wood, Craig C.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia. PMID:28316608

  1. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert S; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C; Campbell, Peter C; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P; Wood, Craig C

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  3. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  4. Performance of lambs fed alternative protein sources to soybean meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe José Lins Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of alternative protein sources (castor bean cake, sunflower cake, and sunflower seed to soybean meal on the intake and performance of 40 lambs, initially weighing 19.8±1.84 kg, fed diets based on Tifton grass hay. The experimental design was completely randomized blocks. There were no differences in the nutrient intake of castor bean diets compared with soybean meal. The intake of nutrients in the sunflower cake and sunflower seed diets was decreased compared with soybean meal. The apparent digestibility coefficients of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber of sunflower cake and sunflower seed diets were decreased compared with soybean meal. The average daily weight gain of animals fed the castor bean diet (0.190 kg was not different from that of the animals fed the soybean meal diet (0.217 kg. The sunflower cake and sunflower seed diets provided less weight gain (0.171 and 0.135 kg d-1, respectively than soybean meal due to the lower nutrient intake. The hot carcass yield and true yield were not affected by the protein sources. The neck, ribs, and ham weights were similar in lambs fed soybean meal and castor bean cake diets. It is recommended to use castor bean as an alternative protein source in the diet of lambs.

  5. Quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions by split firefly luciferase complementation in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Dandan

    2014-07-01

    This unit describes the split firefly luciferase complementation (SFLC) assay, a high-throughput quantitative method that can be used to investigate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in plant mesophyll protoplasts. In SFLC, the two proteins to be tested for interaction are expressed as chimeric proteins, each fused to a different half of firefly luciferase. If the proteins interact, a functional luciferase can be transitorily reconstituted, and is detected using the cell-permeable substrate D-luciferin. An advantage of the SFLC assay is that dynamic changes in PPIs in a cell can be detected in a near real-time manner. Another advantage is the unusually high DNA co-transfection and protein expression efficiencies that can be achieved in plant protoplasts, thereby enhancing the throughput of the method.

  6. A proteomic strategy for global analysis of plant protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Uma K; Xiong, Yi; McBride, Zachary; Kihara, Daisuke; Xie, Jun; Hall, Mark C; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2014-10-01

    Global analyses of protein complex assembly, composition, and location are needed to fully understand how cells coordinate diverse metabolic, mechanical, and developmental activities. The most common methods for proteome-wide analysis of protein complexes rely on affinity purification-mass spectrometry or yeast two-hybrid approaches. These methods are time consuming and are not suitable for many plant species that are refractory to transformation or genome-wide cloning of open reading frames. Here, we describe the proof of concept for a method allowing simultaneous global analysis of endogenous protein complexes that begins with intact leaves and combines chromatographic separation of extracts from subcellular fractions with quantitative label-free protein abundance profiling by liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to the crude cytosolic fraction of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using size exclusion chromatography, we identified hundreds of cytosolic proteins that appeared to exist as components of stable protein complexes. The reliability of the method was validated by protein immunoblot analysis and comparisons with published size exclusion chromatography data and the masses of known complexes. The method can be implemented with appropriate instrumentation, is applicable to any biological system, and has the potential to be further developed to characterize the composition of protein complexes and measure the dynamics of protein complex localization and assembly under different conditions.

  7. A novel family of plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Vidya; Poulet, Axel; Détourné, Gwénaëlle; Tatout, Christophe; Vanrobays, Emmanuel; Evans, David E; Graumann, Katja

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a new family of higher plant nuclear envelope-associated proteins (NEAPs) that interact with other proteins of the nuclear envelope. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the family consists of three genes expressed ubiquitously (AtNEAP1-3) and a pseudogene (AtNEAP4). NEAPs consist of extensive coiled-coil domains, followed by a nuclear localisation signal and a C-terminal predicted transmembrane domain. Domain deletion mutants confirm the presence of a functional nuclear localisation signal and transmembrane domain. AtNEAP proteins localise to the nuclear periphery as part of stable protein complexes, are able to form homo- and heteromers, and interact with the SUN domain proteins AtSUN1 and AtSUN2, involved in the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. An A. thaliana cDNA library screen identified a putative transcription factor called AtbZIP18 as a novel interactor of AtNEAP1, which suggest a connection between NEAP and chromatin. An Atneap1 Atneap3 double-knockout mutant showed reduced root growth, and altered nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. Thus AtNEAPs are suggested as inner nuclear membrane-anchored coiled-coil proteins with roles in maintaining nuclear morphology and chromatin structure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Towards plant protein refinery: Review on protein extraction using alkali and potential enzymatic assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Yessie W; Mulder, Wilhelmus J; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2015-08-01

    The globally increasing protein demands require additional resources to those currently available. Furthermore, the optimal usage of protein fractions from both traditional and new protein resources, such as algae and leaves, is essential. Here, we present an overview on alkaline plant protein extraction including the potentials of enzyme addition in the form of proteases and/or carbohydrolases. Strategic biomass selection, combined with the appropriate process conditions can increase protein yields after extraction. Enzyme addition, especially of proteases, can be useful when alkaline protein extraction yields are low. These additions can also be used to enable processing at a pH closer to 7 to avoid the otherwise severe conditions that denature proteins. Finally, a protein biorefinery concept is presented that aims to upcycle residual biomass by separating essential amino acids to be used for food and feed, and non-essential amino acids for production of bulk chemicals.

  9. Sea Cucumber: New source of Protein for Human Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Vaz Pratas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture, probably the fastest growing food-producing sector, now accounts for nearly 50 percent of the world's food fish consumed by humans, and this share is expected to increase further to meet future demand. Sea cucumbers are considered highly marketable product and this has resulted in an increasing overfishing of natural sea cucumber stocks. Nevertheless, these resources are almost unexploited in the Mediterranean region. Many species of holothurians have been recognized as an alternative source of first quality protein and considered a putative functional food, like hypocholesterolemic proprieties and contain many other bioactive compounds. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine and compare the protein content of two sea cucumber species, Holothuria forskali and Stichopus regalis. The Kjeldahl method was used to determine the crude protein through the measurement of nitrogen amount in each sample. The obtained results demonstrated that both species contain high protein levels, with higher results for S. regalis, which revealed values between 19,1% and 20,4%. H. forskali showed a protein level among 12,1% and 15,4%. Holothurian protein levels reveal great potential for human consumption. Those resources can be used as a partial substitute of fish meal (eg. sea bream nutrition, either to intern market as well as for exportation to Asian countries. Sea cucumber farming could have lucrative potential in the Mediterranean, converting sea cucumbers into aquaculture value-added products bringing to this region profitable economic benefits.

  10. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. In plant activation: an inducible, hyperexpression platform for recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we describe a novel protein production platform that provides both activation and amplification of transgene expression in planta. The In Plant Activation (INPACT) system is based on the replication machinery of tobacco yellow dwarf mastrevirus (TYDV) and is essentially transient gene expression from a stably transformed plant, thus combining the advantages of both means of expression. The INPACT cassette is uniquely arranged such that the gene of interest is split and only reconstituted in the presence of the TYDV-encoded Rep/RepA proteins. Rep/RepA expression is placed under the control of the AlcA:AlcR gene switch, which is responsive to trace levels of ethanol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun) plants containing an INPACT cassette encoding the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter had negligible background expression but accumulated very high GUS levels (up to 10% total soluble protein) throughout the plant, within 3 d of a 1% ethanol application. The GUS reporter was replaced with a gene encoding a lethal ribonuclease, barnase, demonstrating that the INPACT system provides exquisite control of transgene expression and can be adapted to potentially toxic or inhibitory compounds. The INPACT gene expression platform is scalable, not host-limited, and has been used to express both a therapeutic and an industrial protein.

  12. Nitration of plant apoplastic proteins from cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Wojtaszek, Przemysław

    2015-04-29

    Nitric oxide causes numerous protein modifications including nitration of tyrosine residues. This modification, though one of the greatest biological importance, is poorly recognized in plants and is usually associated with stress conditions. In this study we analyzed nitrotyrosines from suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, treated with NO modulators and exposed to osmotic stress, as well as of BY2 cells long-term adapted to osmotic stress conditions. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that the cell wall area is one of the compartments most enriched in nitrotyrosines within a plant cell. Subsequently, we analyzed nitration of ionically-bound cell-wall proteins and identified selected proteins with MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Proteomic analysis indicated that there was no significant increase in the amount of nitrated proteins under the influence of NO modulators, among them 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), considered a donor of nitrating agent, peroxynitrite. Moreover, osmotic stress conditions did not increase the level of nitration in cell wall proteins isolated from suspension cells, and in cultures long-term adapted to stress conditions; that level was even reduced in comparison with control samples. Among identified nitrotyrosine-containing proteins dominated the ones associated with carbon circulation as well as the numerous proteins responding to stress conditions, mainly peroxidases. High concentrations of nitric oxide found in the cell wall and the ability to produce large amounts of ROS make the apoplast a site highly enriched in nitrotyrosines, as presented in this paper. Analysis of ionically bound fraction of the cell wall proteins indicating generally unchanged amounts of nitrotyrosines under influence of NO modulators and osmotic stress, is noticeably different from literature data concerning, however, the total plant proteins analysis. This observation is supplemented by further nitroproteome analysis, for cells long

  13. Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Kasimova, Marina R.; Krab, Klaas

    2005-01-01

    Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria NAD(P)H has a central position in respiratory metabolism. It is produced by a large number of enzymes, e.g. the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial matrix and is oxidised by, amongst others, the respiratory chain. Most...... of this NAD(P)H appears to be bound to proteins, in fact free NAD(P)H – an important parameter in metabolic regulation - has never been observed in mitochondria. We have estimated free and bound NAD(P)H in isolated plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions. The fluorescence spectra of free...... and bound NADH was determined and used to deconvolute fluorescence spectra of actively respiring mitochondria. Most of the mitochondrial NADH is bound in states 2 and 4. The amount of free NADH is lower but relatively constant even increasing a little in state 3 where it is about equal to bound NADH...

  14. Amyloid-like protein inclusions in tobacco transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villar-Piqué

    Full Text Available The formation of insoluble protein deposits in human tissues is linked to the onset of more than 40 different disorders, ranging from dementia to diabetes. In these diseases, the proteins usually self-assemble into ordered β-sheet enriched aggregates known as amyloid fibrils. Here we study the structure of the inclusions formed by maize transglutaminase (TGZ in the chloroplasts of tobacco transplastomic plants and demonstrate that they have an amyloid-like nature. Together with the evidence of amyloid structures in bacteria and fungi our data argue that amyloid formation is likely a ubiquitous process occurring across the different kingdoms of life. The discovery of amyloid conformations inside inclusions of genetically modified plants might have implications regarding their use for human applications.

  15. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  16. Recent advances in understanding the control of secretory proteins by the unfolded protein response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shimpei; Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-04-29

    The membrane transport system is built on the proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen (ER stress) disrupts ER homeostasis and disturbs the transport system. In response to ER stress, eukaryotic cells activate intracellular signaling (named the unfolded protein response, UPR), which contributes to the quality control of secretory proteins. On the other hand, the deleterious effects of UPR on plant health and growth characteristics have frequently been overlooked, due to limited information on this mechanism. However, recent studies have shed light on the molecular mechanism of plant UPR, and a number of its unique characteristics have been elucidated. This study briefly reviews the progress of understanding what is happening in plants under ER stress conditions.

  17. Spent Fuel Source Term Calculation of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Zhi-long; WAN; Hai-xia; LI; Long; WU; Xiao-chun; SHAO; Jing; LIU; Li-li; ZHANG; Jing

    2013-01-01

    The spent fuel of nuclear power plant should be transported to reprocessing plant for reprocessing after reserving for a period of time.Before that,safety analysis and environmental impact assessment should be carried on to the transportation process,which need radioactive source term calculation and analysis.The task of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant spent fuel source term calculation includes estimation of

  18. Plasma membrane protein trafficking in plant-microbe interactions: a plant cell point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eLeborgne-Castel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure their physiological and cellular functions, plasma membrane (PM proteins must be properly conveyed from their site of synthesis, i.e. the endoplasmic reticulum, to their final destination, the PM, through the secretory pathway. PM protein homeostasis also relies on recycling and/or degradation, two processes that are initiated by endocytosis. Vesicular membrane trafficking events to and from the PM have been shown to be altered when plant cells are exposed to mutualistic or pathogenic microbes. In this review, we will describe the fine-tune regulation of such alterations, and their consequence in PM protein activity. We will consider the formation of intracellular perimicrobial compartments, the PM protein trafficking machinery of the host, and the delivery or retrieval of signaling and transport proteins such as pattern-recognition receptors, producers of reactive oxygen species, and sugar transporters.

  19. Aromatic Plants as a Source of Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Florou-Paneri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic plants, also known as herbs and spices, have been used since antiquity as folk medicine and as preservatives in foods. The best known aromatic plants, such as oregano, rosemary, sage, anise, basil, etc., originate from the Mediterranean area. They contain many biologically active compounds, mainly polyphenolics, which have been found to possess antimicrobial, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiprotozoal, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory properties. Currently, the demand for these plants and their derivatives has increased because they are natural, eco-friendly and generally recognized as safe products. Therefore, aromatic plants and their extracts have the potential to become new generation substances for human and animal nutrition and health. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the literature surrounding the in vivo and in vitro use of aromatic plants.

  20. Value Source of Integrated Refining/Chemical Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    Based on an integrated refining/chemical plant processing 15 Mt/a of crude and manufacturing 1.0 Mt/a of ethylene under the guideline of"engaging in refining, olefins and aromatics by whatever appropriate means" to maximize the overall value of the integrated refining/chemical plant, it is necessary to concentrate on working on the flow diagram and the solution for mutual supply of materials between the refinery and ethylene plant. After analyzing the feedstock slate, the composition and properties of products, it is proposed to optimize the integrated refining/chemical plant in order to reduce investment and operating cost to realize maximization of the value of the integrated plant.

  1. Use of transglutaminases in foods and potential utilization of plants as a transglutaminase source – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bittencourt Luciano

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2012v25n4p1   Transglutaminases (TGases are enzymes able to catalyze acyl-transfer reactions introducing covalent cross-links between proteins, peptides and primary amines. Animal TGases were the first studied and are divided in nine different groups of isoenzymes. They have a wide range of functions in the metabolism of most animal cells, and share the characteristic of being Ca2+-dependent. Microbial and plant TGases were also identified, and there is a vast heterogeneity among their amino acid sequences. Interestingly, it seems that all transglutaminases share a specific amino acid triad of Cys-His-Asp in their catalytic site, which can be found in all tertiary structures of the enzymes yet studied so far. Microbial TGases are the most widely used for food modification due to lower costs and high yields involved with their extraction and purification when compared to mammal sources. TGases are ubiquitously found in a variety of plants, and their utilization for food transformation has been proposed. However, there is only a single attempt using vegetal TGase in food systems, where apple pomace was used to improve the quality of pork meat. The transference of mammalian TGase genes to plants has also been considered and they were found to be successfully expressed in rice and tobacco leaves. These results lead to a new approach, where TGases could be literally farmed for food utilization.

  2. Use of transglutaminases in foods and potential utilization of plants as a transglutaminase source – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando B. Luciano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Transglutaminases (TGases are enzymes able to catalyze acyl-transfer reactions introducing covalent cross-links between proteins, peptides and primary amines. Animal TGases were the first studied and are divided in nine different groups of isoenzymes. They have a wide range of functions in the metabolism of most animal cells, and share the characteristic of being Ca2+-dependent. Microbial and plant TGases were also identified, and here is a vast heterogeneity among their amino acid sequences. Interestingly, it seems that all transglutaminases share a specific amino acid triad of Cys-His-Asp in their catalytic site, which can be found in all tertiary structures of the enzymes yet studied so far. Microbial TGases are the most widely used for food modification due to lower costs and high yields involved with their extraction and purification when compared to mammal sources. TGases are ubiquitously found in a variety of plants, and their utilization for food transformation has been proposed. However, there is only a single attempt using vegetal TGase in food systems, where apple pomace was used to improve the quality of pork meat. The transference of mammalian TGase genes to plants has also been considered and they were found to be successfully expressed in rice and tobacco leaves. These results lead to a new approach, where TGases could be literally farmed for food utilization.

  3. Soybean plant growth study conducted using purified protein hydrolysate-based fertilizer made from chrome-tanned leather waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Anupama; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2015-12-01

    Leather processing discharges enormous amount of chrome containing leather solid waste which creates a major disposal problem. Chrome-tanned leather solid waste is a complex of collagen and chromium. The presence of chromium limits protein application in fertilizer industry. The purified protein hydrolysate with zero chromium could be used as a nitrogen source for fertilizer formulation. In this study, an attempt has been made to employ purified protein hydrolysate derived from chrome-tanned leather shavings (CTLS) in formulation of fertilizer. The formulated fertilizer (1–3 t ha(-1)) is employed as nitrogen source in production of soybean. Plant growth study demonstrates that formulated fertilizer dosage 3 t ha(-1) produced similar effects of commercial fertilizer-treated plants. Application of formulated fertilizer yielded higher seed in plant than commercial fertilizer.

  4. The Yellow Mealworm as a Novel Source of Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Yellow mealworms of different sizes (4.8-182.7 mg were grown in a medium of wheat flour and brewers yeast (95:5 by weight to evaluate their potential as a protein source. Approach: There was an initial adjustment period (3-9 days observed during which the younger larvae (4.8-61.1 mg grew slowly while the older ones (80.3-182.7 mg lost weight. After this initial period, the younger larvae (4.8-122.1 mg increased in weight while the older ones (139.6-182.7 mg continued to lose weight as they entered the pupal stage. For efficient production of larvae, they should be harvested at a weight of 100-110 mg. The moisture issue in the medium presents an important management problem for commercial production. Results: A system in which eggs are separate from adults and hatched in separate chambers would alleviate the danger of losing the larval population due to microbial infection. The moisture, ash, protein and fat contents were 58.1-61.5, 1.8-2.2, 24.3-27.6 and 12.0-12.5%, respectively. Yellow mealworms seem to be a promising source of protein for human consumption with the required fat and essential amino acids. Further research into raising them on a variety of low quality substances/wastes such as saw dust, waste paper, corn starch and potato flour is recommended. Conclusion/Recommendations: The future research should also investigate the nutrition content of the medium (minerals, protein, fat, carbohydrates and vitamins and the effect of environmental parameters (temperature, humidity, production of CO2 and heat on protein yield and quality. This information will aid in the design of an economically viable large scale production system.

  5. Plant Cell Cultures as Source of Cosmetic Active Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Barbulova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decades witnessed a great demand of natural remedies. As a result, medicinal plants have been increasingly cultivated on a commercial scale, but the yield, the productive quality and the safety have not always been satisfactory. Plant cell cultures provide useful alternatives for the production of active ingredients for biomedical and cosmetic uses, since they represent standardized, contaminant-free and biosustainable systems, which allow the production of desired compounds on an industrial scale. Moreover, thanks to their totipotency, plant cells grown as liquid suspension cultures can be used as “biofactories” for the production of commercially interesting secondary metabolites, which are in many cases synthesized in low amounts in plant tissues and differentially distributed in the plant organs, such as roots, leaves, flowers or fruits. Although it is very widespread in the pharmaceutical industry, plant cell culture technology is not yet very common in the cosmetic field. The aim of the present review is to focus on the successful research accomplishments in the development of plant cell cultures for the production of active ingredients for cosmetic applications.

  6. P39, a novel soybean protein allergen, belongs to a plant-specific protein family and is present in protein storage vacuoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ping; Baird, Lisa M; Jung, Rudolf; Zeece, Michael G; Markwell, John; Sarath, Gautam

    2008-03-26

    Soybean lecithins are seeing increasing use in industry as an emulsifier and food additive. They are also a growing source of human food allergies, which arise principally from the proteins fractionating with the lecithin fraction during manufacture. A previous study (Gu, X.; Beardslee, T.; Zeece, M.; Sarath, G.; Markwwell, J. Int Arch. Allergy Immunol. 2001, 126, 218-225) identified several allergenic proteins in soybean lecithins and a soybean IgE-binding protein termed P39 was discovered. However, very little was known about this protein except that it was coded by the soybean genome. This paper investigates key biological and immunological properties of this potential soybean lecithin allergen. P39 is encoded by a multigene family in soybeans and in several other higher plants. The soybean P39-1 protein and its essentially indistinguishable homologue, P39-2, have been cloned and studied. These proteins and their homologues belong to a family of plant-specific proteins of unknown function. In soybeans, P39-1 is seed specific, and its transcript levels are highest in developing seeds and decline during seed maturation. In contrast, P39 protein was detectable only in the fully mature, dry seed. Subcellular fractionation revealed that P39 protein was strongly associated with oil bodies; however, immunolocalization indicated P39 was distributed in the matrix of the protein storage vacuoles, suggesting that association with oil bodies was an artifact arising from the extraction procedure. By the use of recombinant techniques it has also been documented that IgE-binding epitopes are present on several different portions of the P39-1 polypeptide.

  7. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  8. Modeling grain protein formation in relation to nitrogen uptake and remobilization in rice plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yan; LI Weiguo; JING Qi; CAO Weixing; Takeshi Horie

    2007-01-01

    Protein concentration of grain is an important quality index of rice,and formation of grain protein largely depends on pre-anthesis nitrogen assimilation and postanthesis nitrogen remobilization in the rice plant.The primary objective of this study was to develop a simplified process model for simulating nitrogen accumulation and remobilization in plant and protein formation in rice grains on the basis of an established rice growth model.Six field experiments,involving different years,eco-sites,varieties,nitrogen rates,and irrigation regimes,were conducted to obtain the necessary data for model building,genotypic parameter determination,and model validation.Using physiological development time(PDT)as general time scale of development progress and cultivar-specific grain protein concentration as genotypic parameter,the dynamic relationships of plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation to environmental and genetic factors were quantified and synthesized in the present model.The pre-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate by plant changed with the PDT in a negative exponential pattern,and post-anthesis nitrogen uptake rate changed with leaf area index(LA1)in an exponential equation.Post-antbesis nitrogen translocation rate depended on the plant nitrogen concentration and dry weight at anthesis as well as residue nitrogen concentration of plant at maturity.The nitrogen for protein synthesis in grains came from two sources:the nitrogen pre-stored in leaves,stem and sheath before anthesis and then remobilized after anthesis,and the nitrogen absorbed directly by plant after anthesis.Finally,the model was tested by using the data sets of different years,eco-sites,varieties,and N fertilization and irrigation conditions with the root mean square errors(RMSE)0.22%-0.26%,indicating the general and reliable features of the model.It is hoped that by properly integrating with the existing rice growth models,the present model can be used for predicting grain protein concentration and

  9. Effects of Source and Concentrations of Nitrogen and Carbohydrate on Ruminal Microbial Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss microbial protein synthesis and the effects of sources and concentrations of nitrogen and carbohydrate on microbial protein synthesis. Even though ammonia-N is a satisfactory source of nitrogen for the growth of the majority of rumen microbes, substitution of intact protein for urea usually stimulates ruminal microbial protein synthesis. While protein sources high in degradable intake protein (DIP), such as soybean meal, appear to have properties ...

  10. Protein change in plant evolution: tracing one thread connecting molecular and phenotypic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelaine eBartlett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins change over the course of evolutionary time. New protein-coding genes and gene families emerge and diversify, ultimately affecting an organism’s phenotype and interactions with its environment. Here we survey the range of structural protein change observed in plants and review the role these changes have had in the evolution of plant form and function. Verified examples tying evolutionary change in protein structure to phenotypic change remain scarce. We will review the existing examples, as well as draw from investigations into domestication, and quantitative trait locus (QTL cloning studies searching for the molecular underpinnings of natural variation. The evolutionary significance of many cloned QTL has not been assessed, but all the examples identified so far have begun to reveal the extent of protein structural diversity tolerated in natural systems. This molecular (and phenotypic diversity could come to represent part of natural selection’s source material in the adaptive evolution of novel traits. Protein structure and function can change in many distinct ways, but the changes we identified in studies of natural diversity and protein evolution were predicted to fall primarily into one of six categories: altered active and binding sites; hypomorphic and hypermorphic alleles; altered protein-protein interactions; altered domain content; altered protein stability; and altered activity as an activator or repressor. Variability was also observed in the evolutionary scale at which particular changes were observed. Some changes were detected at both micro- and macroevolutionary timescales, while others were observed primarily at deep or shallow phylogenetic levels. This variation might be used to determine the trajectory of future investigations in structural molecular evolution.

  11. Protein change in plant evolution: tracing one thread connecting molecular and phenotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Madelaine E; Whipple, Clinton J

    2013-10-10

    Proteins change over the course of evolutionary time. New protein-coding genes and gene families emerge and diversify, ultimately affecting an organism's phenotype and interactions with its environment. Here we survey the range of structural protein change observed in plants and review the role these changes have had in the evolution of plant form and function. Verified examples tying evolutionary change in protein structure to phenotypic change remain scarce. We will review the existing examples, as well as draw from investigations into domestication, and quantitative trait locus (QTL) cloning studies searching for the molecular underpinnings of natural variation. The evolutionary significance of many cloned QTL has not been assessed, but all the examples identified so far have begun to reveal the extent of protein structural diversity tolerated in natural systems. This molecular (and phenotypic) diversity could come to represent part of natural selection's source material in the adaptive evolution of novel traits. Protein structure and function can change in many distinct ways, but the changes we identified in studies of natural diversity and protein evolution were predicted to fall primarily into one of six categories: altered active and binding sites; altered protein-protein interactions; altered domain content; altered activity as an activator or repressor; altered protein stability; and hypomorphic and hypermorphic alleles. There was also variability in the evolutionary scale at which particular changes were observed. Some changes were detected at both micro- and macroevolutionary timescales, while others were observed primarily at deep or shallow phylogenetic levels. This variation might be used to determine the trajectory of future investigations in structural molecular evolution.

  12. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammue, B P; Thevissen, K; Hendriks, M; Eggermont, K; Goderis, I J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F; Kader, J C

    1995-10-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibits all 12 tested plant pathogenic fungi at concentrations below 10 micrograms mL-1. Its antifungal activity is either not at all or is weakly affected by the presence of different cations at concentrations approximating physiological ionic strength conditions. Ace-AMP1 is also active on two Gram-positive bacteria but is apparently not toxic for Gram-negative bacteria and cultured human cells. In contrast to nsLTPs such as those isolated from radish or maize seeds, Ace-AMP1 was unable to transfer phospholipids from liposomes to mitochondria. On the other hand, lipid transfer proteins from wheat and maize seeds showed little or no antimicrobial activity, whereas the radish lipid transfer protein displayed antifungal activity only in media with low cation concentrations. The relevance of these findings with regard to the function of nsLTPs is discussed.

  13. Regulation of Thermogenesis In Plants: The Interaction of Alternative Oxidase and Plant Uncoupling Mitochondrial Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhu; Jianfei Lu; Jing Wang; Fu Chen; Feifan Leng; Hongyu Li

    2011-01-01

    Thermogenesis is a process of heat production in living organisms.It is rare in plants,but it does occur in some species of angiosperm.The heat iS generated via plant mitochondrial respiration.As possible Involvement in thermogenesis of mitochondrial factors,alternative oxidases(AOXs)and plant uncoupling mitochondrial proteins(PUMPs)have been well studied.AOXs and PUMPs are ubiquitously present in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria.They serve as two major energy dissipation systems that balance mitochondrial respiration and uncoupled phosphorylation by dissipating the H+ redox energy and proton electrochemical gradient(△μH+)as heat,respectively.AOXs and PUMPs exert similar physiological functions during homeothermic heat production in thermogenic plants.AOXs have five isoforms,while PUMPs have six.Both AOXS and PUMPS are encoded by small nuclear multigene families.Multiple isoforms are expressed in different tissues or organs.Extensive studies have been done in the area of thermogenesis in higher plants.In this review,we focus on the involvement and regulation of AOXs and PUMPs in thermogenesis.

  14. The replacement of fishmeal by plant proteins in piglet production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Martelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available According to EC Commission Decision 9/2001 on BSE protection (OJEC, 2001, feedstuffs containing fishmeal can be produced only in establishments manufacturing animal feed which do not prepare feedstuffs for ruminant animals and which are authorised for this purpose by the competent authority. This fact, leading to a reduction of the productive capacity of small establishments, and the increasing aversion of consumers towards the use of animal protein in feedstuffs justify the studies about the possibility of excluding fishmeal from young animal formulations. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of the total replacement of fishmeal by some vegetable protein sources in piglet diets.

  15. Use of plant protein sources in crustacean diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    World production of crustaceans has experienced a steady expansion that is expected to continue as world population increases and demand for quality sea food continues to rise. Paralleling the growth of industry has been an expansion in feed production, which has been primarily dominated by marine s...

  16. Sources of sedimentary humic substances: vascular plant debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, John R.; Hedges, John I.

    1985-10-01

    A modern Washington continental shelf sediment was fractionated densimetrically using either an organic solvent, CBrCl 3, or aqueous ZnCl 2. The resulting low density materials (extraction of fresh and naturally degraded vascular plant materials reveals that significant levels of humic and fulvic acids are obtained using classical extraction techniques. Approximately 1-2% of the carbon from fresh woods and 10-25% from leaves and bark were isolated as humic acids and 2-4 times those levels as fulvic acids. A highly degraded hardwood yielded up to 44% of its carbon as humic and fulvic acids. The humic acids from fresh plants are generally enriched in lignin components relative to carbohydrates and recognizable biochemicals account for up to 50% of the total carbon. Humic and fulvic acids extracted directly from sedimentary plant debris could be responsible for a major fraction of the biochemical component of humic substances.

  17. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin.

  18. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:27526699

  19. Plant Protein Intake Is Associated with Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Serum Bicarbonate in Patients with CKD: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Julia J.; Appel, Lawrence J; Wolf, Myles; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Sozio, Stephen M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Cuevas, Magdalena; Glenn, Melanie J.; Lustigova, Eva; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Porter, Anna C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein from plant, as opposed to animal, sources may be preferred in chronic kidney disease (CKD), due to lower bioavailability of phosphate and lower nonvolatile acid load. Study Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 2938 participants with chronic kidney disease and information on dietary intake at the baseline visit in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Predictors Percentage of total protein from plant sources (% plant protein) was determined by scoring individual food items from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Outcomes Metabolic parameters, including serum phosphate, bicarbonate (HCO3), potassium, and albumin, plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hemoglobin. Measurements We modeled the association between % plant protein and metabolic parameters using linear regression. Models were adjusted for age, sex, race, diabetes, body mass index, eGFR, income, smoking, total energy intake, total protein intake, 24 hour urinary sodium, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and use of diuretics. Results Higher % plant protein was associated with lower FGF23 (p=0.05) and higher HCO3 (p=0.01), but not with serum phosphate or PTH (p=0.9 and 0.5, respectively). Higher % plant protein was not associated with higher serum potassium (p=0.2), lower serum albumin (p=0.2) or lower hemoglobin (p=0.3). The associations of % plant protein with FGF23 and HCO3 did not differ by diabetes status, sex, race, CKD stage (2/3 vs. 4/5) or total protein intake (≤ 0.8 g/kg/d vs. >0.8 g/kg/d) (p-interaction > 0.10 for each). Limitations Cross-sectional study; Determination of % plant protein using the DHQ has not been validated. Conclusions Consumption of a higher percentage of protein from plant sources may lower FGF23 and raise HCO3 in patients with CKD. PMID:22480598

  20. Whiteflies: Developing host plant resistance in watermelon from wild sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The whitefly (Aleyrodidae) Bemisia tabaci causes serious damage to horticultural crops, including watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) and it is known to transmit many plant viruses. This whitefly is highly polyphagous, with over 1,000 known species, and can adapt to the environment. Yet, th...

  1. Moldova Power Sources Development including Nuclear Power Plant possible participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comendant

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For the new power market conditions Moldova power sources development options up to 2030 are evaluated, attempting to propose the best solutions in this respect and the ways they be realized.

  2. Accidental introductions are an important source of invasive plants in the continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehan, Nora E; Murphy, Julia R; Thorburn, Lukas P; Bradley, Bethany A

    2013-07-01

    Preventing new plant invasions is critical for reducing large-scale ecological change. Most studies have focused on the deliberate introduction of nonnatives via the ornamental plant trade. However, accidental introduction may be an important source of nonnative, invasive plants. Using Web and literature searches, we compiled pathways of introduction to the United States for 1112 nonnative plants identified as invasive in the continental United States. We assessed how the proportion of accidentally and deliberately introduced invasive plants varies over time and space and by growth habit across the lower 48 states. Deliberate introductions of ornamentals are the primary source of invasive plants in the United States, but accidental introductions through seed contaminants are an important secondary source. Invasive forbs and grasses are the most likely to have arrived accidentally through seed contaminants, while almost all nonnative, invasive trees were introduced deliberately. Nonnative plants invading eastern states primarily arrived deliberately as ornamentals, while a high proportion of invasive plants in western states arrived accidentally as seed contaminants. Accidental introductions may be increasing in importance through time. Before 1850, 10 of 89 (11%) of invasive plants arrived accidentally. After 1900, 20 of 65 (31%) arrived accidentally. Recently enacted screening protocols and weed risk assessments aim to reduce the number of potentially invasive species arriving to the United States via deliberate introduction pathways. Increasing proportions of accidentally introduced invasive plants, particularly associated with contaminated seed imports across the western states, suggest that accidental introduction pathways also need to be considered in future regulatory decisions.

  3. Quantification of severe accident source terms of a Westinghouse 3-loop plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Min [Department of Engineering and System Science, and Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec II, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mlee@mail.ess.nthu.edu.tw; Ko, Y.-C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, and Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec II, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2008-04-15

    Integrated severe accident analysis codes are used to quantify the source terms of the representative sequences identified in PSA study. The characteristics of these source terms depend on the detail design of the plant and the accident scenario. A historical perspective of radioactive source term is provided. The grouping of radionuclides in different source terms or source term quantification tools based on TID-14844, NUREG-1465, and WASH-1400 is compared. The radionuclides release phenomena and models adopted in the integrated severe accident analysis codes of STCP and MAAP4 are described. In the present study, the severe accident source terms for risk quantification of Maanshan Nuclear Power Plant of Taiwan Power Company are quantified using MAAP 4.0.4 code. A methodology is developed to quantify the source terms of each source term category (STC) identified in the Level II PSA analysis of the plant. The characteristics of source terms obtained are compared with other source terms. The plant analyzed employs a Westinghouse designed 3-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) with large dry containment.

  4. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    OpenAIRE

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Ty...

  5. Downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins produced in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, Johannes Felix; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    All biological platforms for the manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins produce an initially turbid extract that must be clarified to avoid fouling sensitive media such as chromatography resins. Clarification is more challenging if the feed stream contains large amounts of dispersed particles, because these rapidly clog the filter media typically used to remove suspended solids. Charged polymers (flocculants) can increase the apparent size of the dispersed particles by aggregation, facilitating the separation of solids and liquids, and thus reducing process costs. However, many different factors can affect the behavior of flocculants, including the pH and conductivity of the medium, the size and charge distribution of the particulates, and the charge density and molecular mass of the polymer. Importantly, these properties can also affect the recovery of the target protein and the overall safety profile of the process. We therefore used a design of experiments approach to establish reliable predictive models that characterize the impact of flocculants during the downstream processing of biopharmaceutical proteins. We highlight strategies for the selection of flocculants during process optimization. These strategies will contribute to the quality by design aspects of process development and facilitate the development of safe and efficient downstream processes for plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:24637706

  6. Antidiabetic Indian Plants: A Good Source of Potent Amylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is known as a multifactorial disease. The treatment of diabetes (Type II is complicated due to the inherent patho-physiological factors related to this disease. One of the complications of diabetes is post-prandial hyperglycemia (PPHG. Glucosidase inhibitors, particularly α-amylase inhibitors are a class of compounds that helps in managing PPHG. Six ethno-botanically known plants having antidiabetic property namely, Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss.; Murraya koenigii (L. Sprengel; Ocimum tenuflorum (L. (syn: Sanctum; Syzygium cumini (L. Skeels (syn: Eugenia jambolana; Linum usitatissimum (L. and Bougainvillea spectabilis were tested for their ability to inhibit glucosidase activity. The chloroform, methanol and aqueous extracts were prepared sequentially from either leaves or seeds of these plants. It was observed that the chloroform extract of O. tenuflorum; B. spectabilis; M. koenigii and S. cumini have significant α-amylase inhibitory property. Plants extracts were further tested against murine pancreatic, liver and small intestinal crude enzyme preparations for glucosidase inhibitory activity. The three extracts of O. tenuflorum and chloroform extract of M. koenigi showed good inhibition of murine pancreatic and intestinal glucosidases as compared with acarbose, a known glucosidase inhibitor.

  7. MELCOR code source term characteristics for fast SBO scenario of OPR1000 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seok Jung; Kim, Tae Woon; Park, Sun Hee; Ahn, Kwang Il [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Off site consequence analysis in Level 3 PSA is mainly affected by source terms release characteristics of nuclear plant. The severe accidents analysis codes for quantifying the source terms release characteristics, such as MELCOR or MAAP, could be available to provide the detailed information of these characteristics to assess offsite consequence. To utilize these characteristics from severe accident analysis codes, MELCOR code was used in a specific severe accident scenario, i.e., fast station black out (SBO) for OPR1000 plant.

  8. Investigation of a scanning laser projector as an energy-efficient light source in plant production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murase, Haruhiko; Helm, van der Bob; Oke, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The energy costs for artificial lighting in plant factories are very high, but may be decreased by introducing more efficient light sources. Light absorption in plants takes place in the order of a femtosecond, while the chemical reactions for carbon fixation of 5 milliseconds are limiting the

  9. Dynamin-related proteins in plant post-Golgi traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru eFujimoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Membrane traffic between two organelles begins with the formation of transport vesicles from the donor organelle. Dynamin-related proteins (DRPs, which are large multidomain GTPases, play crucial roles in vesicle formation in post-Golgi traffic. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that animal dynamins, which are members of DRP family, assemble into ring- or helix-shaped structures at the neck of a bud site on the donor membrane, where they constrict and sever the neck membrane in a GTP hydrolysis-dependent manner. While much is known about DRP-mediated trafficking in animal cells, little is known about it in plant cells. So far, two structurally distinct subfamilies of plant DRPs (DRP1 and DRP2 have been found to participate in various pathways of post-Golgi traffic. This review summarizes the structural and functional differences between these two DRP subfamilies, focusing on their molecular, cellular and developmental properties. We also discuss the molecular networks underlying the functional machinery centering on these two DRP subfamilies. Furthermore, we hope that this review will provide direction for future studies on the mechanisms of vesicle formation that are not only unique to plants but also common to eukaryotes.

  10. Dynamin-related proteins in plant post-Golgi traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Membrane traffic between two organelles begins with the formation of transport vesicles from the donor organelle. Dynamin-related proteins (DRPs), which are large multidomain GTPases, play crucial roles in vesicle formation in post-Golgi traffic. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that animal dynamins, which are members of DRP family, assemble into ring- or helix-shaped structures at the neck of a bud site on the donor membrane, where they constrict and sever the neck membrane in a GTP hydrolysis-dependent manner. While much is known about DRP-mediated trafficking in animal cells, little is known about it in plant cells. So far, two structurally distinct subfamilies of plant DRPs (DRP1 and DRP2) have been found to participate in various pathways of post-Golgi traffic. This review summarizes the structural and functional differences between these two DRP subfamilies, focusing on their molecular, cellular and developmental properties. We also discuss the molecular networks underlying the functional machinery centering on these two DRP subfamilies. Furthermore, we hope that this review will provide direction for future studies on the mechanisms of vesicle formation that are not only unique to plants but also common to eukaryotes.

  11. The Increasing Impact of Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Plant Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kyoko; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-03-01

    The active proteome dictates plant physiology. Yet, active proteins are difficult to predict based on transcript or protein levels, because protein activities are regulated post-translationally in their microenvironments. Over the past 10 years, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is increasingly used in plant science. ABPP monitors the activities of hundreds of plant proteins using tagged chemical probes that react with the active site of proteins in a mechanism-dependent manner. Since labeling is covalent and irreversible, labeled proteins can be detected and identified on protein gels and by mass spectrometry using tagged fluorophores and/or biotin. Here, we discuss general concepts, approaches and practical considerations of ABPP, before we summarize the discoveries made using 40 validated probes representing 14 chemotypes that can monitor the active state of >4,500 plant proteins. These discoveries and new opportunities indicate that this emerging functional proteomic technology is a powerful discovery tool that will have an increasing impact on plant science.

  12. Roots of angiosperm formins: The evolutionary history of plant FH2 domain-containing proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žárský Viktor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shuffling of modular protein domains is an important source of evolutionary innovation. Formins are a family of actin-organizing proteins that share a conserved FH2 domain but their overall domain architecture differs dramatically between opisthokonts (metazoans and fungi and plants. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of formins in most eukaryotic kingdoms, aiming to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario that may have produced the current diversity of domain combinations with focus on the origin of the angiosperm formin architectures. Results The Rho GTPase-binding domain (GBD/FH3 reported from opisthokont and Dictyostelium formins was found in all lineages except plants, suggesting its ancestral character. Instead, mosses and vascular plants possess the two formin classes known from angiosperms: membrane-anchored Class I formins and Class II formins carrying a PTEN-like domain. PTEN-related domains were found also in stramenopile formins, where they have been probably acquired independently rather than by horizontal transfer, following a burst of domain rearrangements in the chromalveolate lineage. A novel RhoGAP-related domain was identified in some algal, moss and lycophyte (but not angiosperm formins that define a specific branch (Class III of the formin family. Conclusion We propose a scenario where formins underwent multiple domain rearrangements in several eukaryotic lineages, especially plants and chromalveolates. In plants this replaced GBD/FH3 by a probably inactive RhoGAP-like domain, preserving a formin-mediated association between (membrane-anchored Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton. Subsequent amplification of formin genes, possibly coincident with the expansion of plants to dry land, was followed by acquisition of alternative membrane attachment mechanisms present in extant Class I and Class II formins, allowing later loss of the RhoGAP-like domain-containing formins in angiosperms.

  13. Research progress of pharmacological activities and analytical methods for plant origin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-hong; Chen, Cen; Xia, Zhi-ning; Yang, Feng-qing

    2015-07-01

    As one of the important active components of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), plant origin active proteins have many significant pharmacological functions. According to researches on the plant origin active proteins reported in recent years, pharmacological effects include anti-tumor, immune regulation, anti-oxidant, anti-pathogeny microorganism, anti-thrombus, as well as hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic activities of plant origin were reviewed, respectively. On the other hand, the analytical methods including chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry for plant origin proteins analysis were also summarized. The main purpose of this paper is providing a reference for future development and application of plant active proteins.

  14. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  15. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jamsheer K

    Full Text Available Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  16. Root secreted metabolites and proteins are involved in the early events of plant-plant recognition prior to competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayakar V Badri

    Full Text Available The mechanism whereby organisms interact and differentiate between others has been at the forefront of scientific inquiry, particularly in humans and certain animals. It is widely accepted that plants also interact, but the degree of this interaction has been constricted to competition for space, nutrients, water and light. Here, we analyzed the root secreted metabolites and proteins involved in early plant neighbor recognition by using Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 ecotype (Col as our focal plant co-cultured in vitro with different neighbors [A. thaliana Ler ecotype (Ler or Capsella rubella (Cap]. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed that both root secreted secondary metabolites and proteins clustered separately between the plants grown individually (Col-0, Ler and Cap grown alone and the plants co-cultured with two homozygous individuals (Col-Col, Ler-Ler and Cap-Cap or with different individuals (Col-Ler and Col-Cap. In particularly, we observed that a greater number of defense- and stress-related proteins were secreted when our control plant, Col, was grown alone as compared to when it was co-cultured with another homozygous individual (Col-Col or with a different individual (Col-Ler and Col-Cap. However, the total amount of defense proteins in the exudates of the co-cultures was higher than in the plant alone. The opposite pattern of expression was identified for stress-related proteins. These data suggest that plants can sense and respond to the presence of different plant neighbors and that the level of relatedness is perceived upon initial interaction. Furthermore, the role of secondary metabolites and defense- and stress-related proteins widely involved in plant-microbe associations and abiotic responses warrants reassessment for plant-plant interactions.

  17. Genome-wide computational function prediction of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins by integration of multiple data sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.I.A.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis thaliana is the best studied plant species, the biological role of one third of its proteins is still unknown. We developed a probabilistic protein function prediction method that integrates information from sequences, protein-protein interactions and gene expression. The method

  18. In-plant source term measurements at Fort Calhoun Station - Unit 1. Topical technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, N.C.; Keller, J.H.; Bunting, R.L.; Motes, B.G.; Croney, S.T.

    1978-07-01

    Data obtained from an in-plant source term measurement program are presented. The objective of this program is to provide operational data that can be used in the generic evaluation of plant system design in the licensing process and for updating of the calculational models used by the NRC staff in their evaluation of radioactive waste management systems for operating pressurized water reactors. A data base is provided for radioisotope inventory in plant systems, radioactive waste management system performance, and source terms for both liquid and gaseous systems. Data presented were obtained at the Fort Calhoun Station - Unit 1, operated by the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), located at Blair, Nebraska. In-plant measurements were conducted during the time period from August, 1976 through February 1977. This plant is the first of a planned series of six (6) operating PWR's to be studied.

  19. Dioxin emissions from biomass fired energy plants and other sources in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleicher, O.; Jensen, A.A.; Blinksbjerg, P.; Thomsen, E.; Schilling, B.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents results from a new Danish investigation of emissions of dioxins (PCDD) and furans (PCDF) from various sources carried out for the Danish EPA. The purpose was to investigate smaller sources (in size or emission), for which the knowledge of the PCDD/F emissions was low or missing. The sources were: Five biomass plants (> 1 MW) using straw, wood and chip board residue, a farm size boiler (> 1 MW) using straw, a wood stove during wood pellets, and three district heating plants (> 1 MW) using waste oil. In addition, measurements were made of emissions from barbecuing, and cremation of corpses in two crematories. (Author) 5 refs.

  20. Extraction of condensed tannins from Mexican plant sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcíaa, Ramiro; Aguilera, Antonio; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Rodríguez, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2008-01-01

    Contents of total polyphenols, condensed tannins and proanthocyanidins, and their stability to various pH values and temperatures were studied in Mexican blueberry, cuautecomate fruit, garambullo fruit, aubergine, coffee pulp and residues of black grapes. Several aqueous extracts, obtained through a one-pass-extraction process, were analyzed using liquid chromatography in order to quantify the condensed tannin (proanthocyanidin) content responsible for their antioxidant activity and colour. All tested samples included high proanthocyanidin contents demonstrating that these Mexican fruits and vegetables are good sources of natural antioxidants, and they all could be considered as excellent functional foods due to their bioactivity measured as the condensed tannin level.

  1. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G; Lawson, David M; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  2. Effect of plant proteins and crystalline amino acid supplementation on postprandial plasma amino acid profiles and metabolic response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Holm, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    The use of aquafeeds formulated with plant protein sources supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAAs) is believed to influence amino acid (AA) uptake patterns and AA metabolic fate. Oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion rates were measured in rainbow trout (468.5 +/- A 86.5 g) force fed 0...... to be caused by an unbalanced dietary AA profile and CAA supplementation, rather than inclusion of plant protein concentrate....

  3. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase DBP1 nucleates a protein network with a role in regulating plant defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carrasco

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana DBP1 belongs to the plant-specific family of DNA-binding protein phosphatases. Although recently identified as a novel host factor mediating susceptibility to potyvirus, little is known about DBP1 targets and partners and the molecular mechanisms underlying its function. Analyzing changes in the phosphoproteome of a loss-of-function dbp1 mutant enabled the identification of 14-3-3λ isoform (GRF6, a previously reported DBP1 interactor, and MAP kinase (MAPK MPK11 as components of a small protein network nucleated by DBP1, in which GRF6 stability is modulated by MPK11 through phosphorylation, while DBP1 in turn negatively regulates MPK11 activity. Interestingly, grf6 and mpk11 loss-of-function mutants showed altered response to infection by the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV, and the described molecular mechanism controlling GRF6 stability was recapitulated upon PPV infection. These results not only contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of DBP factors, but also of MAPK signalling in plants, with the identification of GRF6 as a likely MPK11 substrate and of DBP1 as a protein phosphatase regulating MPK11 activity, and unveils the implication of this protein module in the response to PPV infection in Arabidopsis.

  4. Challenges of protein extraction from recalcitrant plant tissues for proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteins play an important role in several biological processes. Proteomics encompasses basically four principal applications, namely protein mining, protein expression profiling, protein-network mapping and mapping of protein modifications. The results in these applications depend mostly on the c...

  5. The twin arginine protein transport pathway exports multiple virulence proteins in the plant pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhumita V; Mann, Stefan G; Antelmann, Haike; Widdick, David A; Fyans, Joanna K; Chandra, Govind; Hutchings, Matthew I; Toth, Ian; Hecker, Michael; Loria, Rosemary; Palmer, Tracy

    2010-07-01

    Summary Streptomyces scabies is one of a group of organisms that causes the economically important disease potato scab. Analysis of the S. scabies genome sequence indicates that it is likely to secrete many proteins via the twin arginine protein transport (Tat) pathway, including several proteins whose coding sequences may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer and share a common ancestor with proteins in other plant pathogens. Inactivation of the S. scabies Tat pathway resulted in pleiotropic phenotypes including slower growth rate and increased permeability of the cell envelope. Comparison of the extracellular proteome of the wild type and DeltatatC strains identified 73 predicted secretory proteins that were present in reduced amounts in the tatC mutant strain, and 47 Tat substrates were verified using a Tat reporter assay. The DeltatatC strain was almost completely avirulent on Arabidopsis seedlings and was delayed in attaching to the root tip relative to the wild-type strain. Genes encoding 14 candidate Tat substrates were individually inactivated, and seven of these mutants were reduced in virulence compared with the wild-type strain. We conclude that the Tat pathway secretes multiple proteins that are required for full virulence.

  6. Analysis of glycation induced protein cross-linking inhibitory effects of some antidiabetic plants and spices

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, Handunge Kumudu Irani; Handuwalage, Charith Sandaruwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein cross-linking which occurs towards the latter part of protein glycation is implicated in the development of chronic diabetic complications. Glycation induced protein cross-linking inhibitory effects of nine antidiabetic plants and three spices were evaluated in this study using a novel, simple, electrophoresis based method. Methods Methanol extracts of thirteen plants including nine antidiabetic plants and three spices were used. Lysozyme and fructose were incubated at 37 °...

  7. Interspecific transfer of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: An unconsidered source of contaminations of phytopharmaceuticals and plant derived commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Melanie; Wittke, Carina; Lederer, Ines; Klier, Bernhard; Kleinwächter, Maik; Selmar, Dirk

    2016-12-15

    Many plant derived commodities contain traces of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). The main source of these contaminations seems to be the accidental co-harvest of PA-containing weeds. Yet, based on the insights of the newly described phenomenon of the horizontal transfer of natural products, it is very likely that the PA-contaminations may also be due to an uptake of the alkaloids from the soil, previously being leached out from rotting PA-plants. The transfer of PAs was investigated using various herbs, which had been mulched with dried plant material from Senecio jacobaea. All of the acceptor plants exhibited marked concentrations of PAs. The extent and the composition of the imported PAs was dependent on the acceptor plant species. These results demonstrate that PAs indeed are leached out from dried Senecio material into the soil and confirm their uptake by the roots of the acceptor plants and the translocation into the leaves.

  8. Protein modifications in the plant secretory pathway: current status and practical implications in molecular pharming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Loïc; Boulaflous, Aurelia; Benchabane, Meriem; Gomord, Véronique; Michaud, Dominique

    2005-03-01

    Plants have become, over the last ten years, a suitable alternative to microbial and animal cell factories for the production of clinically-useful, therapeutic proteins. Besides the well known advantage of low-cost and large-scale production of safe and biologically active mammalian proteins, plants also are able to perform most post-translational maturations required for biological activity and suitable pharmacokinetics of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this short review we focus on glycosylation and proteolytic processing of plant-made pharmaceuticals during their transport through the plant cell's secretory pathway. We also address the practical implications of these important processes on the effectiveness of plant molecular pharming systems.

  9. A cautionary note on the use of split-YFP/BiFC in plant protein-protein interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstman, Anneke; Tonaco, Isabella Antonia Nougalli; Boutilier, Kim; Immink, Richard G H

    2014-05-30

    Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein), has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginner's guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments.

  10. A Cautionary Note on the Use of Split-YFP/BiFC in Plant Protein-Protein Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Horstman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in plants 10 years ago, the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC method, or split-YFP (yellow fluorescent protein, has gained popularity within the plant biology field as a method to study protein-protein interactions. BiFC is based on the restoration of fluorescence after the two non-fluorescent halves of a fluorescent protein are brought together by a protein-protein interaction event. The major drawback of BiFC is that the fluorescent protein halves are prone to self-assembly independent of a protein-protein interaction event. To circumvent this problem, several modifications of the technique have been suggested, but these modifications have not lead to improvements in plant BiFC protocols. Therefore, it remains crucial to include appropriate internal controls. Our literature survey of recent BiFC studies in plants shows that most studies use inappropriate controls, and a qualitative rather than quantitative read-out of fluorescence. Therefore, we provide a cautionary note and beginner’s guideline for the setup of BiFC experiments, discussing each step of the protocol, including vector choice, plant expression systems, negative controls, and signal detection. In addition, we present our experience with BiFC with respect to self-assembly, peptide linkers, and incubation temperature. With this note, we aim to provide a guideline that will improve the quality of plant BiFC experiments.

  11. Plant serine/arginine-rich proteins: roles in precursor messenger RNA splicing, plant development, and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anireddy S N; Shad Ali, Gul

    2011-01-01

    Global analyses of splicing of precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) have revealed that alternative splicing (AS) is highly pervasive in plants. Despite the widespread occurrence of AS in plants, the mechanisms that control splicing and the roles of splice variants generated from a gene are poorly understood. Studies on plant serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, suggest their role in both constitutive splicing and AS of pre-mRNAs. SR proteins have a characteristic domain structure consisting of one or two RNA recognition motifs at the N-terminus and a C-terminal RS domain rich in arginine/serine dipeptides. Plants have many more SR proteins compared to animals including several plant-specific subfamilies. Pre-mRNAs of plant SR proteins are extensively alternatively spliced to increase the transcript complexity by about six-fold. Some of this AS is controlled in a tissue- and development-specific manner. Furthermore, AS of SR pre-mRNAs is altered by various stresses, raising the possibility of rapid reprogramming of the whole transcriptome by external signals through regulation of the splicing of these master regulators of splicing. Most SR splice variants contain a premature termination codon and are degraded by up-frameshift 3 (UPF3)-mediated nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), suggesting a link between NMD and regulation of expression of the functional transcripts of SR proteins. Limited functional studies with plant SRs suggest key roles in growth and development and plant responses to the environment. Here, we discuss the current status of research on plant SRs and some promising approaches to address many unanswered questions about plant SRs.

  12. Feed palatability and the alternative protein sources in shrimp feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutima Tantikitti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Feed palatability in carnivorous aquaculture species, shrimps in particular, has been crucially related to the presence of compounds acting as attractants that are commonly associated with the prey components under wild conditions. Thus a nutritionally adequate and organoleptically-pleasing diet is essential to achieve satisfactory intake and growth in shrimps. Historically, fishmeal has been an essential dietary component of intensive shrimp cultures because of its nutrient composition and compounds of high attractability. However, in recent years the fishmeal supplies have been dwindling due to over hunting, a diminishing natural fish-stock, elevating prices and market volatility. This has led to search for cheaper sources of suitable protein as fishmeal substitutes. To improve the palatability of diets, various substances have been investigated for their effectiveness in aqua-feed including natural feed ingredients and synthetic flavor substances. For crustacean, attractants characteristically are of low molecular weight, water and ethanol soluble, and amphoteric or basic compounds that are released from potential prey items. Compounds such as free amino acids, especially taurine, hydroxyproline, glycine, arginine, glutamic acid and alanine have been identified to stimulate feeding in shrimps. The same has been identified with organic acids, nucleotides and nucleosides, betaine, and some small peptides. Palatability also has been associated with animal’s past experience with the feed. Understanding the factors that regulate feed palatability is therefore primary for successful shrimp culture.

  13. Characterization of expression of Puumala virus nucleocapsid protein in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Darai, Gholamreza; Süle, Sandor; Rösen-Wolff, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing a foreign gene are a suitable system for the production of relevant immunogens in high amounts that can be used for the development of a new generation of vaccines against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study, the expression of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of hantavirus serotype Puumala in tobacco and potato plants was investigated. Transgenic tobacco and potato plants were generated and established. These transgenic plants expressed the N protein of Puumala virus strain CG-1820. No major differences were observed when the phenotype and growth rates of transgenic plants were compared to those of normal plants. However, it was found that the leaves of transgenic tobacco plants were more slender and the tubers of transgenic potato plants were smaller than those in normal plants. In order to investigate the distribution of the expression of the foreign gene in transgenic plants, the proteins of leaves and roots of the individual transgenic tobacco and potato plants were examined by Western blot analyses. It was found that all transgenic tobacco and potato plants expressed the N protein in the leaves, whereas transgenic potato plants are able to significantly express the viral proteins also in the tubers and roots. The antigens were expressed at a level of 1 ng of protein/5 microg of dried leaves. The hantaviral recombinant N proteins obtained from transgenic tobacco and potato plants were able to elicit specific humoral and mucosal immune responses when administered intraperitoneally or orally to rabbits and mice. The expression of viral proteins in plants has two major advantages compared to other expression systems: firstly, there is no risk of contamination with mammalian viruses or other pathogens, and secondly, the production of high amounts of antigens is cheap and therefore of great economic interest.

  14. Venom allergen-like proteins in secretions of plant-parasitic nematodes activate and suppress extracellular plant immune receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano Torres, J.L.

    2014-01-01

      Parasitic worms threaten human, animal and plant health by infecting people, livestock and crops worldwide. Animals and plants share an anciently evolved innate immune system. Parasites modulate this immune system by secreting proteins to maintain their parasitic lifestyle. This thesis descr

  15. Effect of Replacing Animal Protein with Plant Protein on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie Viguiliouk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on the effect of replacing sources of animal protein with plant protein on glycemic control has been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to assess the effect of this replacement on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through 26 August 2015. We included RCTs ≥ 3-weeks comparing the effect of replacing animal with plant protein on HbA1c, fasting glucose (FG, and fasting insulin (FI. Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data, assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic and quantified (I2-statistic. Thirteen RCTs (n = 280 met the eligibility criteria. Diets emphasizing a replacement of animal with plant protein at a median level of ~35% of total protein per day significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.15%; 95%-CI: −0.26, −0.05%, FG (MD = −0.53 mmol/L; 95%-CI: −0.92, −0.13 mmol/L and FI (MD = −10.09 pmol/L; 95%-CI: −17.31, −2.86 pmol/L compared with control arms. Overall, the results indicate that replacing sources of animal with plant protein leads to modest improvements in glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Owing to uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for larger, longer, higher quality trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02037321.

  16. External and internal sources which inhibit the nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinkjær, O.; Bøgebjerg, P.; Grüttner, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    In connection with the upgrading of the two largest wastewater treatment plants in the Copenhagen area to nutrient removal special attention has been paid to the nitrification process regarding inhibition effects. Inhibitory substances in the wastewater could be identified by simple batch tests......, and the long-term effects on the nitrification process were tested in pilot plants or at full-scale. A distinction could be made between effects produced by wastewater from external sources in the catchment area and internally circulated flows in the wastewater treatment plant. Results from programmes...... the nitrification capacity monitored at the pilot plants has been in agreement with the design basis. The recycling of the scrubber water from the cleaning of sludge incineration flue gas was found to be an important internal source of inhibition at the Lynetten WWTP. Investigations show that it is possible...

  17. Protein, peptide, amino acid composition, and potential functional properties of existing and novel dietary protein sources for monogastrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kar, S.K.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Boeren, S.; Kruijt, L.; Smits, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of current protein resources for novel or alternative sources may be one of the solutions to abolish the expected scarcity of dietary protein for animal feeds. However, little is known about the nutritional, protein composition, and potential functional value of such novel or alternative

  18. RNA-binding proteins in plants: the tip of an iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoroff, Nina V.; Federoff, N. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins, which are involved in the synthesis, processing, transport, translation, and degradation of RNA, are emerging as important, often multifunctional, cellular regulatory proteins. Although relatively few RNA-binding proteins have been studied in plants, they are being identified with increasing frequency, both genetically and biochemically. RNA-binding proteins that regulate chloroplast mRNA stability and translation in response to light and that have been elegantly analyzed in Clamydomonas reinhardtii have counterparts with similar functions in higher plants. Several recent reports describe mutations in genes encoding RNA-binding proteins that affect plant development and hormone signaling.

  19. Analysis of safety information for nuclear power plants and development of source term estimation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Hee [Atomic Creative Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    Current CARE(Computerized Advisory System for Radiological Emergency) in KINS(Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) has no STES(Source Term Estimation System) which links between SIDS(Safety Information Display System) and FADAS(Following Accident Dose Assessment System). So in this study, STES is under development. STES system is the system that estimates the source term based on the safety information provided by SIDS. Estimated source term is given to FADAS as an input for estimation of environmental effect of radiation. Through this first year project STES for the Kori 3,4 and Younggwang 1,2 has been developed. Since there is no CARE for Wolsong(PHWR) plants yet, CARE for Wolsong is under construction. The safety parameters are selected and the safety information display screens and the alarm logic for plant status change are developed for Wolsong Unit 2 based on the design documents for CANDU plants.

  20. Protein body-inducing fusions for high-level production and purification of recombinant proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Richman, Alex; Menassa, Rima

    2011-05-01

    For the past two decades, therapeutic and industrially important proteins have been expressed in plants with varying levels of success. The two major challenges hindering the economical production of plant-made recombinant proteins include inadequate accumulation levels and the lack of efficient purification methods. To address these limitations, several fusion protein strategies have been recently developed to significantly enhance the production yield of plant-made recombinant proteins, while simultaneously assisting in their subsequent purification. Elastin-like polypeptides are thermally responsive biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the purification of recombinant proteins. Hydrophobins are small fungal proteins capable of altering the hydrophobicity of their respective fusion partner, thus enabling efficient purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase systems. Zera, a domain of the maize seed storage protein γ-zein, can induce the formation of protein storage bodies, thus facilitating the recovery of fused proteins using density-based separation methods. These three novel protein fusion systems have also been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins, while concurrently inducing the formation of protein bodies. The packing of these fusion proteins into protein bodies may exclude the recombinant protein from normal physiological turnover. Furthermore, these systems allow for quick, simple and inexpensive nonchromatographic purification of the recombinant protein, which can be scaled up to industrial levels of protein production. This review will focus on the similarities and differences of these artificial storage organelles, their biogenesis and their implication for the production of recombinant proteins in plants and their subsequent purification.

  1. Evaluation of Some Local Egyptian Plants as a Source of Chlorophyll Pigments

    OpenAIRE

    Hammouda, F. M. [فايزة محمود حمودة; Ismail, S I; Hussiney, H. A.; A. A. Hussein

    1994-01-01

    Four plant materials viz. Spinacia oleracae Linn, (spinach), Beta vulgaris Limm (chard), Medicago sativa Linn, (alfalfa) and Petroselinum sativum Hoff. (parsely) were studied as local sources for the preparation of chlorophyll pigments as natural green colour additives. Processing of the plant materials were carried out under different conditions viz. blanching, non-blanching followed by drying in air or electrical oven or in solar dehydrating oven. The qualitative and quantitative evaluation...

  2. [Research on source profile of aerosol organic compounds in leather plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo-Guang; Zhou, Yan; Feng, Zhi-Cheng; Liu, Hui-Xuan

    2009-04-15

    Through investigating current air pollution condition for PM10 in every factories of different style leather plants in Pearl River Delta, characteristic profile of semi-volatile organic compounds in PM10 emitted from leather factories and their contents were researched by using ultrasonic and gas chromatography and mass spectrum technology. The 6 types of organic compounds containing 46 species in total were found in the collected samples, including phenyl compounds, alcohols, PAHs, acids, esters and amides. The concentrations of PM10 in leather tanning plant, leather dying plant and man-made leather plant were 678.5, 454.5, 498.6 microgm x m(-3) respectively, and concentration of organic compounds in PM10 were 10.04, 6.89, 14.21 microg x m(-3) in sequence. The more important type of pollutants in each leather plants had higher contribution to total organic mass as follows, esters and amides in tanning plants profile account for 43.47% and 36.51% respectively; esters and alcohols in dying plants profiles account for 52.52% and 16.16% respectively; esters and amide in man-made leather plant have the highest content and account for 57.07% and 24.17% respectively. In the aerosol organic source profiles of tested leather plants, 9-octadecenamide was the abundant important species with the weight of 26.15% in tanning plant, and Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was up to 44.19% in the dying plant, and Bis(2-ethylhexyl) maleate and 1-hydroxy-piperidine had obviously higher weight in man-made plant than the other two plants.

  3. Multifarious roles of intrinsic disorder in proteins illustrate its broad impact on plant biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolin; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Jones, William T; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are highly abundant in eukaryotic proteomes. Plant IDPs play critical roles in plant biology and often act as integrators of signals from multiple plant regulatory and environmental inputs. Binding promiscuity and plasticity allow IDPs to interact with multiple partners in protein interaction networks and provide important functional advantages in molecular recognition through transient protein-protein interactions. Short interaction-prone segments within IDPs, termed molecular recognition features, represent potential binding sites that can undergo disorder-to-order transition upon binding to their partners. In this review, we summarize the evidence for the importance of IDPs in plant biology and evaluate the functions associated with intrinsic disorder in five different types of plant protein families experimentally confirmed as IDPs. Functional studies of these proteins illustrate the broad impact of disorder on many areas of plant biology, including abiotic stress, transcriptional regulation, light perception, and development. Based on the roles of disorder in the protein-protein interactions, we propose various modes of action for plant IDPs that may provide insight for future experimental approaches aimed at understanding the molecular basis of protein function within important plant pathways.

  4. Agronomic Efficiency of Biosolid as Source of Nitrogen to Banana Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Junqueira Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge (SS or biosolid has been studied as source of nutrient for several different plant species. It also contributes to soil fertility recycling organic matter and plant nutrients. This followup work examines a three-year (2001–2004 field experiment designed to evaluate the response of banana plants (Cavendish subgroup to the application of biosolid as source of nitrogen. The treatments consisted of control (mineral PK, no N, three rates of sludge, and two rates of mineral NPK fertilizer. Plant and soil N concentration, fruit yield, plant height, stem diameter, and foliar endurance index were measured. Fruit yield with mineral fertilization or sludge applications did not differ statistically (P>0.05. Application of biosolid resulted in statistically significant higher agronomic efficiency (P<0.05 in comparison to mineral fertilizers. The concentration of soil mineral nitrogen increased using mineral fertilizer or sludge until 0.80 m after three years of application. The effect of the source of N was smaller than the effect of the rate. Biosolid can be used as source of N for banana growers.

  5. Wild Mediterranean plants as traditional food: a valuable source of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzani, Paola; Rossetto, Monica; De Marco, Veronica; Sacchetti, Linda E; Paoletti, Maurizio G; Rigo, Adelio

    2011-01-01

    Some wild Mediterranean plants used as traditional food are an extraordinary source of antioxidants. We tested some properties of 10 of these herbaceous plants, used in Liguria (Northwest Italy) to prepare a traditional dish known as "prebuggiun." A total of 9 of them were found to have a polyphenol content and antioxidant properties similar or better than those of red chicory and blueberry, which are, in the case of vegetables and fruits, among the richest of antioxidants. Practical Application: In this article, we reported a study on wild plants growing in the Mediterranean area. These herbs have been neglected and this study aimed to revalue these plants because they are an extraordinary source of antioxidants. The increasing demand for natural antioxidants (additives in the food industry too) justifies the search for new sources of natural antioxidants. The revaluation of these plants will be interesting for: (1) consumer health, rediscovering a vegetable source of high antioxidant power; (2) possibility of producing new commercial products, such as food supplements of high quality and low cost; (3) pharmacological applications.

  6. Protein-protein interactions in the plant Golgi apparatus, studied with FRET acceptor photobleaching technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Peter

    to the plant Golgi apparatus and involved mainly in arabinogalactan protein (AGP) biosynthesis. Co-expression analysis identified 4 GTs and 4 NSTs possibly involved in AGP biosynthesis. As part of the method development, the cytoskeleton-acting agent Cytochalasin D was tested as an inhibitor...... of the actinomyosin based movement of Golgi vesicles, and was proved to be superior to commonly used fixatives such as the cross-linking agent paraformaldehyde which causes quenching of the fluorophores. According to FRET analysis, the results showed association between two galactosyltransferases, AtGALT29A and At...

  7. Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

  8. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  9. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  10. Evolution of plant cell wall: Arabinogalactan-proteins from three moss genera show structural differences compared to seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Desirée; Baumann, Alexander; Maeder, Malte; Geske, Thomas; Heise, Esther Marie; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus; Classen, Birgit

    2017-05-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are important proteoglycans of plant cell walls. They seem to be present in most, if not all seed plants, but their occurrence and structure in bryophytes is widely unknown and actually the focus of AGP research. With regard to evolution of plant cell wall, we isolated AGPs from the three mosses Sphagnum sp., Physcomitrella patens and Polytrichastrum formosum. The moss AGPs show structural characteristics common for AGPs of seed plants, but also unique features, especially 3-O-methyl-rhamnose (trivial name acofriose) as terminal monosaccharide not found in arabinogalactan-proteins of angiosperms and 1,2,3-linked galactose as branching point never found in arabinogalactan-proteins before. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP

  12. The multiple plant response to high ammonium conditions: the Lotus japonicus AMT1; 3 protein acts as a putative transceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogato, Alessandra; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    Plant evolved a complex profile of responses to cope with changes of nutrient availability in the soil. These are based on a stringent control of expression and/or activity of proteins involved in nutrients transport and assimilation. Furthermore, a sensing and signaling system for scanning the concentration of substrates in the rooted area and for transmitting this information to the plant machinery controlling root development can be extremely useful for an efficient plant response. Ammonium represents for plants either a preferential nitrogen source or the trigger for toxicity symptoms depending by its concentration. We propose a role for the high affinity Lotus japonicus ammonium transporter LjAMT1;3 as an intracellular ammonium sensor to achieve a convenient modulation of the root development in conditions of potentially toxic external ammonium concentration.

  13. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Proteins Associated with Plant Tolerance to Heat Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingru Huang; Chenping Xu

    2008-01-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress limiting plant growth and productivity in many areas of the world. Understanding mechanisms of plant adaptation to heat stress would facilitate the development of heat-tolerant cultivars for improving productivity in warm climatic regions. Protein metabolism involving protein synthesis and degradation is one of the most sensitive processes to heat stress. Changes in the level and expression pattern of some proteins may play an important role in plant adaptation to heat stress. The identification of stress-responsive proteins and pathways has been facilitated by an increasing number of tools and resources, including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the rapidly expanding nucleotide and amino acid sequence databases. Heat stress may induce or enhance protein expression or cause protein degradation. The induction of heat-responsive proteins, particularly heat shock proteins (HSPs), plays a key role in plant tolerance to heat stress. Protein degradation involving various proteases is also important in regulating plant responses to heat stress. This review provides an overview of recent research on proteomic profiling for the identification of heat-responsive proteins associated with heat tolerance, heat induction and characteristics of HSPs, and protein degradation in relation to plant responses to heat stress.

  15. Improvements in human health through production of human milk proteins in transgenic food plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, T; Chong, D K; Slattery, C W; Langridge, W H

    1999-01-01

    Plants are particularly suitable bioreactors for the production of proteins, as their eukaryotic nature frequently directs the appropriate post-translational modifications of recombinant proteins to retain native biological activity. The autotrophic growth of plants makes this in vivo biosynthesis system economically competitive for supplementation or replacement of conventional production systems in the future. For the production of biologically active proteins, food plants provide the advantage of direct delivery via consumption of transformed plant tissues. Here we describe the production of recombinant human milk proteins in food plants for improvements in human nutrition and health, with emphasis on enhanced nutrition for non-breast fed infants as well as children and adults. Nutritional improvements in edible plants generated through advancements in recombinant DNA technology are rapidly repositioning the world for enjoyment of a more healthful diet for humans in all age groups.

  16. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkina, E I; Melnikova, D N; Bogdanov, I V; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life.

  17. Affixing plant sections without protein based adhesives for protease histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, R; Griglione, R

    1999-01-01

    To submit a section of plant tissue to histochemical analysis using protease, the protein based adhesives which keep the slices attached to the slides must be replaced because they are attacked by the enzyme and the slices are washed off the slides. We devised a method to keep the slices attached to the slides during histochemical extractions and subsequent staining. Slides are frosted on two lateral zones by spreading on them a fluoride paste composed of 15 g barium sulfate, 15 g ammonium difluoride, 8 g oxalic acid, 40 ml glycerine and 12 ml deionized water using a thin paint brush. After removing the paste with tap water and drying the slides, the sections are placed on the central clear zone of the slide and covered with an ethyl-cellulose film that keeps the slices in place and allows the reagents to act through it. To do this, the slides are dipped into 0.5% ethyl cellulose (ETC) prepared in a 4:1 mixture of toluene and absolute ethanol. The ETC coating is layered three times to improve its firmness and its ability to retain the slices on the slides. To obtain perfect adhesion, the slide should be oven dried (40-50 C for 10-15 min) to remove any trace of humidity before applying each layer of ETC. Subsequently the sections can be extracted and stained without undue loss of material.

  18. Plant protein kinase genes induced by drought, high salt and cold stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Drought, high salt and cold are three different kinds of environment stresses that severely influence the growth, development and productivity of crops. They all decrease the water state of plant cells, and consequently result in the harm of plant from water deficit. Several genes encoding protein kinases and induced by drought, high salt and low temperature have been isolated from Arabidopsis. These protein kinases include receptor protein kinase (RPK), MAP kinases, ribosomal-protein kinases and transcription-regulation protein kinase. The expression features of these genes and the regulatory roles of these protein kinases in stress response and signal transduction are discussed.

  19. Towards high-yield production of pharmaceutical proteins with plant cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianfeng; Ge, Xumeng; Dolan, Maureen C

    2011-01-01

    "Molecular farming" in plants with significant advantages in cost and safety is touted as a promising platform for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. While whole-plant produced biopharmaceuticals account for a significant portion of the preclinical and clinical pipeline, plant cell suspension culture, which integrates the merits of whole-plant systems with those of microbial fermentation, is emerging as a more compliant alternative "factory". However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of plant cell bioproduction platform. This review highlights the advantages and recent progress in plant cell culture technology and outlines viable strategies at both the biological and process engineering levels for advancing the economic feasibility of plant cell-based protein production. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include non-mammalian glycosylation and genetic instability will also be discussed.

  20. Nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Transport of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is an essential necessity in eukaryotic cells, since the nuclear envelope separates transcription from translation. In the past few years, an increasing number of components of the plant nuclear transport machinery have been characterised. This progress, although far from being completed, confirmed that the general characteristics of nuclear transport are conserved between plants and other organisms. However, plant-specific components were also identified. Interestingly, several mutants in genes encoding components of the plant nuclear transport machinery were investigated, revealing differential sensitivity of plant-specific pathways to impaired nuclear transport. These findings attracted attention towards plant-specific cargoes that are transported over the nuclear envelope, unravelling connections between nuclear transport and components of signalling and developmental pathways. The current state of research in plants is summarised in comparison to yeast and vertebrate systems, and special emphasis is given to plant nuclear transport mutants.

  1. Reduction of lesion growth rate of late blight plant disease in transgenic potato expressing harpin protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李汝刚; 范云六

    1999-01-01

    Using harpin protein gene from apple fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylavora and potato prp1-1 promoter as main DNA elements, the feasibility of using pathogen infection-induced hypersensitive response was explored as a new strategy of engineering fungal disease resistance. Three plant transformation vectors were constructed and 68 transgenic potato plants were produced through Agrobacterium mediated transformation method. Southern, Northern and Western blot analysis demonstrated the insertion, transcription and protein expression of harpin protein gene in transgenic plants. Disease resistance test using a complex race of Phytophthora infestans as challenging pathogen showed that both constitutive and pathogen infection-induced expression of harpin protein gene in transgenic potato reduced the lesion growth rate of fungus. Among plants where harpin protein gene expression was induced only by fungus infection, two plants were found to be highly resistant to P. infestans infection. Fungal hyphae were not pr

  2. Protamine sulfate precipitation method depletes abundant plant seed-storage proteins: A case study on legume plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Ji; Wang, Yiming; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, So Wun; Min, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Chul; Park, Ki Hun; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    Depletion of abundant proteins is one of the effective ways to improve detection and identification of low-abundance proteins. Our previous study showed that protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method can deplete abundant ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) from leaf proteins and is suitable for their in-depth proteome investigation. In this study, we provide evidence that the PSP method can also be effectively used for depletion of abundant seed-storage proteins (SSPs) from the total seed proteins of diverse legume plants including soybean, broad bean, pea, wild soybean, and peanut. The 0.05% protamine sulfate (PS) was sufficient to deplete major SSPs from all legumes tested except for peanut where 0.1% PS was required. SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean and peanut seed proteins showed enriched spots in PS-supernatant than total proteins. Coefficient of variation percentage (%CV) and principal component analysis of 2DE spots support the reproducibility, suitability, and efficacy of the PSP method for quantitative and comparative seed proteome analysis. MALDI-TOF-TOF successfully identified some protein spots from soybean and peanut. Hence, this simple, reproducible, economical PSP method has a broader application in depleting plant abundant proteins including SSPs in addition to RuBisCO, allowing discussion for comprehensive proteome establishment and parallel comparative studies in plants.

  3. Effect of long-term feeding with a plant protein mixture based diet on growth and body/fillet quality traits of large rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    De Francesco, Matilde; Parisi, Giuliana; Medale, Francoise; Lupi, Paola; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Poli, Bianca

    2004-01-01

    Two diets based oil fish meal (FM) or oil a mixture of plant protein sources supplemented with free amino acids (PP) were fed to rainbow trout having a mean initial body weight of 162.5 g reared at 17 +/- 1 degreesC for 24 weeks to evaluate the effect of plant protein sources oil fish growth, morphological and body quality traits. At the end of the growth study, samples were withdrawn for chemical analyses as well as measurements of different parameters of quality. Compared to the FM gro...

  4. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially.

  5. Plant toxic proteins with insecticidal properties. A review on their potentialities as bioinsecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Célia R; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2002-11-01

    To meet the demands for food of the expanding world population, there is need of new ways for protecting plant crops against predators and pathogens while avoiding the use of environmentally aggressive chemicals. A milestone in this field was the introduction into crop plants of genes expressing Bacillus thuringiensis entomotoxic proteins. In spite of the success of this new technology, however, there are difficulties for acceptance of these 'anti-natural' products by the consumers and some concerns about its biosafety in mammals. An alternative could be exploring the plant's own defense mechanisms, by manipulating the expression of their endogenous defense proteins, or introducing an insect control gene derived from another plant. This review deals with the biochemical features and mechanisms of actions of plant proteins supposedly involved in defense mechanisms against insects, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, enzymes inhibitors, arcelins, chitinases, ureases, and modified storage proteins. The potentialities of genetic engineering of plants with increased resistance to insect predation relying on the repertoire of genes found in plants are also discussed. Several different genes encoding plant entomotoxic proteins have been introduced into crop genomes and many of these insect resistant plants are now being tested in field conditions or awaiting commercialization. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of the arsenic binding capacity of plant proteins under conditions of protein extraction for gel electrophoretic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Steier, Sandra; Otto, Matthias

    2009-03-15

    As prerequisite for the investigation of arsenic-binding proteins in plants, the general influence of different extraction parameters on the binding behaviour of arsenic to the plant protein pool was investigated. The concentration of the extraction buffer affected the extraction yield both for proteins and for arsenic revealing an optimal buffer concentration of 5mM Tris/HCl, pH 8. The addition of 1 or 2% (w/v) SDS to the extraction buffer produced a two- to threefold enhancement of the total protein extraction yield but strongly suppressed the simultaneous extraction of arsenic from 80+/-8% extraction yield obtained without SDS to 48+/-2% in presence of 2% (w/v) SDS. The arsenic binding capacity of the protein fraction obtained after extraction with Tris buffer and protein precipitation by trichloroacetic acid in acetone was estimated to be 1.4+/-0.6% independently on the original spiking concentration of arsenic provided in the form of monomethylarsonate to the extracts. Due to the low total protein concentrations of the plant extracts that varied in the range from 75 to 412 microgmL(-1) depending on the extraction parameters, high arsenic concentrations of 263-1001 mg (kgproteinmass)(-1) resulted for spiking concentrations of 10 mgAsL(-1). The optimized protein isolation procedure was applied to plants grown under arsenic exposure and revealed a similar arsenic binding capacity as for the spiked protein extracts.

  7. External and internal sources which inhibit the nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinkjær, O.; Bøgebjerg, P.; Grüttner, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    monitoring the influent to the Lynetten WWTP and the Damhusaen WWTP and the catchment areas have revealed that discharges from industries are to be considered the most important external sources of inhibition. The load from the external sources has decreased during the investigation period, and since 1993...... the nitrification capacity monitored at the pilot plants has been in agreement with the design basis. The recycling of the scrubber water from the cleaning of sludge incineration flue gas was found to be an important internal source of inhibition at the Lynetten WWTP. Investigations show that it is possible...

  8. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  9. 50 ku keratin-like protein and β-microtublin coexist in higher plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IF-like proteins have been obtained from suspension cells of Nicotiana tabacum by selective extraction. Western blot analysis shows that the major components of IF-like proteins are 6 keratin-like proteins of 64, 58, 55, 54, 50 and 45 ku. Specially the 50 ku protein also reacts with polyantibody against microtublin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that the 50 ku protein is composed of two different proteins and their amino acid sequences have been determined. Part of the sequence of one protein is identical to that of -microtublin and the other protein's sequence has no significant homologue, which should be a new sequence-unknown protein. These results suggest that 50 ku keratin-like protein and -microtublin coexist in higher plant cells, and that may lead to the phenomenon of co-distribution of IF and microtuble in plant cells.

  10. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  11. A family of plasmodesmal proteins with receptor-like properties for plant viral movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Khalid; Boutant, Emmanuel; Hofmann, Christina; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Fernandez-Calvino, Lourdes; Didier, Pascal; Lerich, Alexander; Mutterer, Jérome; Thomas, Carole L; Heinlein, Manfred; Mély, Yves; Maule, Andrew J; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are essential but poorly understood structures in plant cell walls that provide symplastic continuity and intercellular communication pathways between adjacent cells and thus play fundamental roles in development and pathogenesis. Viruses encode movement proteins (MPs) that modify these tightly regulated pores to facilitate their spread from cell to cell. The most striking of these modifications is observed for groups of viruses whose MPs form tubules that assemble in PDs and through which virions are transported to neighbouring cells. The nature of the molecular interactions between viral MPs and PD components and their role in viral movement has remained essentially unknown. Here, we show that the family of PD-located proteins (PDLPs) promotes the movement of viruses that use tubule-guided movement by interacting redundantly with tubule-forming MPs within PDs. Genetic disruption of this interaction leads to reduced tubule formation, delayed infection and attenuated symptoms. Our results implicate PDLPs as PD proteins with receptor-like properties involved the assembly of viral MPs into tubules to promote viral movement.

  12. Selection of energy source and evolutionary stable strategies for power plants under financial intervention of government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezalkotob, Ashkan; Mahmoudi, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Currently, many socially responsible governments adopt economic incentives and deterrents to manage environmental impacts of electricity suppliers. Considering the Stackelberg leadership of the government, the government's role in the competition of power plants in an electricity market is investigated. A one-population evolutionary game model of power plants is developed to study how their production strategy depends on tariffs levied by the government. We establish that a unique evolutionary stable strategy (ESS) for the population exists. Numerical examples demonstrate that revenue maximization and environment protection policies of the government significantly affect the production ESS of competitive power plants. The results reveal that the government can introduce a green energy source as an ESS of the competitive power plants by imposing appropriate tariffs.

  13. Selection of energy source and evolutionary stable strategies for power plants under financial intervention of government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezalkotob, Ashkan; Mahmoudi, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Currently, many socially responsible governments adopt economic incentives and deterrents to manage environmental impacts of electricity suppliers. Considering the Stackelberg leadership of the government, the government's role in the competition of power plants in an electricity market is investigated. A one-population evolutionary game model of power plants is developed to study how their production strategy depends on tariffs levied by the government. We establish that a unique evolutionary stable strategy (ESS) for the population exists. Numerical examples demonstrate that revenue maximization and environment protection policies of the government significantly affect the production ESS of competitive power plants. The results reveal that the government can introduce a green energy source as an ESS of the competitive power plants by imposing appropriate tariffs.

  14. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette Rohr

    2005-09-30

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2005 through August 31, 2005. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, fieldwork was completed at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. Stage I toxicological assessments were carried out in normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and Stage II assessments were carried out in a compromised model (myocardial infarction-MI-model). Normal rats were exposed to the following atmospheric scenarios: (1) primary particles; (2) oxidized emissions; (3) oxidized emissions + secondary organic aerosol (SOA)--this scenario was repeated; and (4) oxidized emissions + ammonia + SOA. Compromised animals were exposed to oxidized emissions + SOA (this scenario was also conducted in replicate). Stage I assessment endpoints included breathing pattern/pulmonary function; in vivo chemiluminescence (an indicator of oxidative stress); blood cytology; bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis; and histopathology. Stage II assessments included continuous ECG monitoring via

  15. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  16. Meristem Plant Cells as a Sustainable Source of Redox Actives for Skin Rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila G; Mayer, Wolfgang; de Luca, Chiara

    2017-05-12

    Recently, aggressive advertisement claimed a "magic role" for plant stem cells in human skin rejuvenation. This review aims to shed light on the scientific background suggesting feasibility of using plant cells as a basis of anti-age cosmetics. When meristem cell cultures obtained from medicinal plants are exposed to appropriate elicitors/stressors (ultraviolet, ultrasound ultraviolet (UV), ultrasonic waves, microbial/insect metabolites, heavy metals, organic toxins, nutrient deprivation, etc.), a protective/adaptive response initiates the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Highly bioavailable and biocompatible to human cells, low-molecular weight plant secondary metabolites share structural/functional similarities with human non-protein regulatory hormones, neurotransmitters, pigments, polyamines, amino-/fatty acids. Their redox-regulated biosynthesis triggers in turn plant cell antioxidant and detoxification molecular mechanisms resembling human cell pathways. Easily isolated in relatively large quantities from contaminant-free cell cultures, plant metabolites target skin ageing mechanisms, above all redox imbalance. Perfect modulators of cutaneous oxidative state via direct/indirect antioxidant action, free radical scavenging, UV protection, and transition-metal chelation, they are ideal candidates to restore photochemical/redox/immune/metabolic barriers, gradually deteriorating in the ageing skin. The industrial production of plant meristem cell metabolites is toxicologically and ecologically sustainable for fully "biological" anti-age cosmetics.

  17. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An assessment of soybeans and other vegetable proteins as source of salmonella contamination in pig production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häggblom Per

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of salmonella contaminated feed ingredients on the risk for spreading salmonella to pigs was assessed in response to two incidences when salmonella was spread by feed from two feed mills to 78 swine producing herds. Methods The assessment was based on results from the salmonella surveillance of feed ingredients before introduction to feed mills and from HACCP - based surveillance of the feed mills. Results from the mills of the Company (A that produced the salmonella contaminated feed, were by the Chi. Square test compared to the results from all the other (B - E feed producers registered in Sweden. Isolated serovars were compared to serovars from human cases of salmonellosis. Results Salmonella (28 serovars was frequently isolated from imported consignments of soybean meal (14.6% and rape seed meal (10.0%. Company A largely imported soybean meal from crushing plants with a history of unknown or frequent salmonella contamination. The risk for consignments of vegetable proteins to be salmonella contaminated was 2.4 times (P Conclusions Salmonella contaminated feed ingredients are an important source for introducing salmonella into the feed and food chain. Effective HACCP-based control and associated corrective actions are required to prevent salmonella contamination of feed. Efforts should be taken to prevent salmonella contamination already at the crushing plants. This is challenge for the EU - feed industry due to the fact that 98% of the use of soybean/meal, an essential feed ingredient, is imported from crushing plants of third countries usually with an unknown salmonella status.

  19. QSARs for Plasma Protein Binding: Source Data and Predictions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset has all of the information used to create and evaluate 3 independent QSAR models for the fraction of a chemical unbound by plasma protein (Fub) for...

  20. The Association Between Protein Intake by Source and Osteoporotic Fracture in Older Men: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Shikany, James M; Cawthon, Peggy M; Cauley, Jane A; Taylor, Brent C; Vo, Tien N; Bauer, Douglas C; Orwoll, Eric S; Schousboe, John T; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-03-01

    Dietary protein is a potentially modifiable risk factor for fracture. Our objectives were to assess the association of protein intake with incident fracture among older men and whether these associations varied by protein source or by skeletal site. We studied a longitudinal cohort of 5875 men (mean age 73.6 ± 5.9 years) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. At baseline, protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) with mean intake from all sources = 16.1%TEI. Incident clinical fractures were confirmed by physician review of medical records. There were 612 major osteoporotic fractures, 806 low-trauma fractures, 270 hip fractures, 193 spine fractures, and 919 non-hip non-spine fractures during 15 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models with age, race, height, clinical site, TEI, physical activity, marital status, osteoporosis, gastrointestinal surgery, smoking, oral corticosteroids use, alcohol consumption, and calcium and vitamin D supplements as covariates to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), all expressed per unit (SD = 2.9%TEI) increase. Higher protein intake was associated with a decreased risk of major osteoporotic fracture (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.00) with a similar association found for low-trauma fracture. The association between protein and fracture varied by protein source; eg, increased dairy protein and non-dairy animal protein were associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98] and HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.72 to 0.97], respectively), whereas plant-source protein was not (HR = 0.99 [95% CI, 0.78 to 1.24]). The association between protein and fracture varied by fracture site; total protein was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73 to 0.95]), but not clinical spine fracture (HR = 1.06 [95% CI, 0.92 to 1.22]). In conclusion, those with high protein intake

  1. A tormentor in the quest for plant p53-like proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthout, H.A.A.J; Caspers, M.P.M; Kottenhagen, M.J.; Helmer, Q.; Wang, M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years the presence of p53-like proteins in plants was frequently reported, by using the monoclonal antibody Pab240. By means of protein purification and screening a cDNA library, a Pab240 cross-reacting protein and a cDNA clone were isolated from barley. Peptide- and DNA-sequence

  2. Plasma Membrane Protein Ubiquitylation and Degradation as Determinants of Positional Growth in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Korbei; Christian Luschnig

    2013-01-01

    Being sessile organisms, plants evolved an unparalleled plasticity in their post-embryonic development, allowing them to adapt and fine-tune their vital parameters to an ever-changing environment. Cross-talk between plants and their environment requires tight regulation of information exchange at the plasma membrane (PM). Plasma membrane proteins mediate such communication, by sensing variations in nutrient availability, external cues as well as by controlled solute transport across the membrane border. Localiza-tion and steady-state levels are essential for PM protein function and ongoing research identified cis- and trans-acting determinants, involved in control of plant PM protein localization and turnover. In this overview, we summarize recent progress in our understanding of plant PM protein sorting and degradation via ubiquitylation, a post-translational and reversible modification of proteins. We highlight characterized components of the machinery involved in sorting of ubiquitylated PM proteins and discuss consequences of protein ubiquitylation on fate of selected PM proteins. Specifically, we focus on the role of ubiquitylation and PM protein degradation in the regulation of polar auxin transport (PAT). We combine this regulatory circuit with further aspects of PM protein sorting control, to address the interplay of events that might control PAT and polarized growth in higher plants.

  3. Involvement of lipid-protein complexes in plant-microorganism interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blein Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concerns about the environmental impact of modern agricultural have prompted research for alternate practices to pesticide treatments, notably using plant defense mechanisms. Thus, isolation and characterization of plant defense elicitors have been the main step of studies in many groups. Moreover, in the global concept of interactions between organisms and their environment, a major concern is to discriminate recognition between exogenous and endogenous signals, notably during pathogenic or allergenic interactions involving small proteins, such as elicitins or lipid transfer proteins (LTPs. Elicitins and lipid transfer proteins (LTP are both able to load and transfer lipidic molecules and share some structural and functional properties. While elicitins are known as elicitors of plant defense mechanisms, the biological function of LTPs is still an enigma. They are ubiquitous plant proteins able to load and transfer hydrophobic molecules such as fatty acids or phospholipids. Among them, LTPs1 (type 1 lipid transfer proteins constitute a multigenic family of secreted plant lipid binding proteins that are constitutively expressed in specific tissues and/or induced in response to biotic and abiotic stress (for reviews [1-4]. Their biological function is still unknown, even if some data provide arguments for a role of these proteins in the assembly of extracellular hydrophobic polymers (i.e., cutin and suberin [2, 4] and/or in plant defense against fungal pathogens [1, 3]. Beside their involvement in plant defense, LTPs1 are also known to be pan-allergens of plant-derived foods [5]. Finally, the discovery of the sterol carrier-properties of elicitins has opened new perspectives dealing with the relationship between this function and the elicitor activity of these small cystein-rich proteins. Nevertheless, this elicitor activity is restrained to few plant species, and thus does not appear in accordance with a universal lipid transfer

  4. In-plant source term measurements at Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, N.C.; Bunting, R.L.; Croney, S.T.

    1978-04-01

    The report presents data obtained from an in-plant source term measurement program conducted for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in support of the Effluent Treatment Systems Branch of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The objective of this program is to provide operational data that can be used in the generic evaluation of plant system design in the licensing process and for updating of the calculational models used by the NRC staff in their evaluation of radioactive waste management systems for operating pressurized water reactors. A data base is provided for radioisotope inventory in plant systems, radioactive waste management system performance, and source terms for both liquid and gaseous systems. Data presented were obtained at the Fort Calhoun Station-Unit 1, operated by the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), located at Blair, Nebraska. In-plant measurements were conducted during the time period from August, 1976 through February 1977. This plant is the first of a planned series of six (6) operating PWR's to be studied.

  5. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets.

  6. Source selection problem of competitive power plants under government intervention: a game theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Hafezalkotob, Ashkan; Makui, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Pollution and environmental protection in the present century are extremely significant global problems. Power plants as the largest pollution emitting industry have been the cause of a great deal of scientific researches. The fuel or source type used to generate electricity by the power plants plays an important role in the amount of pollution produced. Governments should take visible actions to promote green fuel. These actions are often called the governmental financial interventions that include legislations such as green subsidiaries and taxes. In this paper, by considering the government role in the competition of two power plants, we propose a game theoretical model that will help the government to determine the optimal taxes and subsidies. The numerical examples demonstrate how government could intervene in a competitive market of electricity to achieve the environmental objectives and how power plants maximize their utilities in each energy source. The results also reveal that the government's taxes and subsidiaries effectively influence the selected fuel types of power plants in the competitive market.

  7. Emerging functions of multi-protein complex Mediator with special emphasis on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Naveen; Agarwal, Pinky; Tyagi, Akhilesh

    2017-10-01

    Mediator is a multi-subunit protein complex which is involved in transcriptional regulation in yeast and other eukaryotes. As a co-activator, it connects information from transcriptional activators/repressors to transcriptional machinery including RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors. It is not only involved in transcription initiation but also has important roles to play in transcription elongation and termination. Functional attributes of different Mediator subunits have been largely defined in yeast and mammalian systems earlier, while such studies in plants have gained momentum recently. Mediator regulates various processes related to plant development and is also involved in biotic and abiotic stress response. Thus, plant Mediator, like yeast and mammalian Mediator complex, is indispensable for plant growth and survival. Interaction of its multiple subunits with other regulatory proteins and their ectopic expression or knockdown in model plant like Arabidopsis and certain crop plants are paving the way to biochemical analysis and unravel molecular mechanisms of action of Mediator in plants.

  8. Iron deficiency chlorosis in plants as related to Fe sources in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, I.; Delgado, A.; de Santiago, A.; del Campillo, M. C.; Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a relevant agricultural problem in many areas of the World where calcareous soils are dominant. Although this problem has been traditionally ascribed to the pH-buffering effect of soil carbonates, the content and type of Fe oxides in soil contribute to explain Fe uptake by plants and the incidence of this problem. During the last two decades, it has been demonstrated Fe extraction with oxalate, related to the content of poorly crystalline Fe oxides, was well-correlated with the chlorophyll content of plants and thus with the incidence of IDC. This reveals the contribution of poorly crystalline Fe oxides in soil to Fe availability to plants in calcareous soils, previously shown in microcosm experiments using ferrihydrite as Fe source in the growing media. In order to supply additional information about the contribution of Fe sources in soil to explain the incidence of IDC and to perform accurate methods to predict it, a set of experiments involving different methods to extract soil Fe and plant cultivation in pots to correlate amounts of extracted Fe with the chlorophyll content of plants (measured using the SPAD chlorophyll meter) were performed. The first experiment involved 21 soils and white lupin cultivation, sequential Fe extraction in soil to study Fe forms, and single extractions (DTPA, rapid oxalate and non-buffered hydroxylamine). After that, a set of experiments in pot involving growing of grapevine rootstocks, chickpea, and sunflower were performed, although in this case only single extractions in soil were done. The Fe fraction more closely related to chlorophyll content in plants (r = 0.5, p citrate + ascorbate (CA) extraction, which was the fraction that releases most of the Fe related to poorly crystalline Fe oxides, thus revealing the key role of these compounds in Fe supply to plants. Fe extracted with CA was more correlated with chlorophyll content in plants that oxalate extractable Fe, probably due to a more

  9. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy R Botella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  10. Plant G-proteins come of age: Breaking the bond with animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Jimmy; Trusov, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs fromthe accepted animal paradigm.

  11. Roles of Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor EF-Tu in Heat Tolerance in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available EF-Tu proteins of plastids, mitochondria, and the cytosolic counterpart EF-1α in plants, as well as EF-Tu proteins of bacteria, are highly conserved and multifunctional. The functions of EF-Tu include transporting the aminoacyl-tRNA complex to the A site of the ribosome during protein biosynthesis; chaperone activity in protecting other proteins from aggregation caused by environmental stresses, facilitating renaturation of proteins when conditions return to normal; displaying a protein disulfide isomerase activity; participating in the degradation of N-terminally blocked proteins by the proteasome; eliciting innate immunity and triggering resistance to pathogenic bacteria in plants; participating in transcription when an E. coli host is infected with phages. EF-Tu genes are upregulated by abiotic stresses in plants, and EF-Tu plays important role in stress responses. Expression of a plant EF-Tu gene confers heat tolerance in E. coli, maize knock-out EF-Tu null mutants are heat susceptible, and over-expression of an EF-Tu gene improves heat tolerance in crop plants. This review paper summarizes the current knowledge of EF-Tu proteins in stress responses in plants and progress on application of EF-Tu for developing crop varieties tolerant to abiotic stresses, such as high temperatures.

  12. Estimation of the Plant Time Constant of Current-Controlled Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.; Malvar, Jano

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the plant time constant is essential to perform a thorough analysis of the current control loop in voltage source converters (VSCs). As the loop behavior can be significantly influenced by the VSC working conditions, the effects associated to converter losses should be included...... of the VSC interface filter measured at rated conditions. This paper extends that method so that both parameters of the plant time constant (resistance and inductance) are estimated. Such enhancement is achieved through the evaluation of the closed-loop transient responses of both axes of the synchronous...

  13. Extraction and purification methods in downstream processing of plant-based recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łojewska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Olejniczak, Szymon; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, the production of recombinant proteins in plant systems has been receiving increased attention. Currently, proteins are considered as the most important biopharmaceuticals. However, high costs and problems with scaling up the purification and isolation processes make the production of plant-based recombinant proteins a challenging task. This paper presents a summary of the information regarding the downstream processing in plant systems and provides a comprehensible overview of its key steps, such as extraction and purification. To highlight the recent progress, mainly new developments in the downstream technology have been chosen. Furthermore, besides most popular techniques, alternative methods have been described.

  14. Underutilised legumes: potential sources for low-cost protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, D; Niranjan, A; Tewari, S K; Pushpangadan, P

    2001-07-01

    Seeds of 104 leguminous species belonging to 17 genera were analysed for their protein contents. The promising ones were investigated for fibre, carbohydrate, ash, oil, fatty acids, amino acid profile and trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). The variation of fibre contents was 4.1-8.9%, carbohydrate 18.4-49.2%, ash 1.8-7.2%, TIA 48.7-87.5 mg/g, oil 1.3-19.8% and protein 11.0-51.6%. The protein content (41-45%) in Acacia mellifera (41.6%), Albizzia lebbek (43.6%), Bauhinia triandra (42.7%), Lathyrus odoratus (42.8%), Parkinsonia aculeata (41.6%), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (41.9%), Sesbania paludosa (41.2%) and S. sesban (43.8%) was in close proximity to soybean (42.8%), whereas Bauhinia retusa (51.6%), B. variegata (46.5%), Delonix elata (48.7%) and Gliricidia maculata (46.3%) showed higher percentages of protein than soybean. The essential amino acid composition of some of the seed proteins was reasonably well balanced (lysine up to 7.6%). The seeds of Bauhinia retusa (18.6%), B. triandra (16.5%), B. variegata (17.3%), Gliricidia maculata (16.2%), Parkia biglandulosa (18.9%) and Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (19.8%) had a good amount of oil, comparable to soybean (18-22%). The fatty acid composition of some genera/species was quite promising with high amount of unsaturated fatty acids.

  15. Effector proteins that modulate plant--insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenhout, Saskia A; Bos, Jorunn I B

    2011-08-01

    Insect herbivores have highly diverse life cycles and feeding behaviors. They establish close interactions with their plant hosts and suppress plant defenses. Chewing herbivores evoke characteristic defense responses distinguishable from general mechanical damage. In addition, piercing-sucking hemipteran insects display typical feeding behavior that suggests active suppression of plant defense responses. Effectors that modulate plant defenses have been identified in the saliva of these insects. Tools for high-throughput effector identification and functional characterization have been developed. In addition, in some insect species it is possible to silence gene expression by RNAi. Together, this technological progress has enabled the identification of insect herbivore effectors and their targets that will lead to the development of novel strategies for pest resistances in plants.

  16. Vectors for multi-color bimolecular fluorescence complementation to investigate protein-protein interactions in living plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Lin-Yun

    2008-10-01

    -color BiFC is a useful technique to determine interactions simultaneously between a given" bait" protein and multiple "prey" proteins in living plant cells. The vectors we have constructed and tested will facilitate the study of protein-protein interactions in many different plant systems.

  17. Induction of protein body formation in plant leaves by elastin-like polypeptide fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joensuu Jussi J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastin-like polypeptides are synthetic biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the simple non-chromatographic purification of recombinant proteins. In addition, elastin-like polypeptide fusions have been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins in plants, thus addressing the major limitation of plant-based expression systems, which is a low production yield. This study's main objectives were to determine the general utility of elastin-like polypeptide protein fusions in various intracellular compartments and to elucidate elastin-like polypeptide's mechanism of action for increasing recombinant protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of plants. Results The effect of elastin-like polypeptide fusions on the accumulation of green fluorescent protein targeted to the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, apoplast, and endoplasmic reticulum was evaluated. The endoplasmic reticulum was the only intracellular compartment in which an elastin-like polypeptide tag was shown to significantly enhance recombinant protein accumulation. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusions induced the formation of a novel type of protein body, which may be responsible for elastin-like polypeptide's positive effect on recombinant protein accumulation by excluding the heterologous protein from normal physiological turnover. Although expressed in the leaves of plants, these novel protein bodies appeared similar in size and morphology to the prolamin-based protein bodies naturally found in plant seeds. The elastin-like polypeptide-induced protein bodies were highly mobile organelles, exhibiting various dynamic patterns of movement throughout the cells, which were dependent on intact actin microfilaments and a functional actomyosin motility system. Conclusion An endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusion approach

  18. Efficient ASK-assisted system for expression and purification of plant F-box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiou; Yao, Ruifeng; Ma, Sui; Hu, Shuai; Li, Suhua; Wang, Yupei; Yan, Chun; Xie, Daoxin; Yan, Jianbin

    2017-09-05

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation plays an essential role in plant growth and development as well as responses to environmental and endogenous signals. F-box protein is one of the key components of the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which recruit specific substrate proteins for subsequent ubiquitination and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation to regulate developmental processes and signaling networks. However, it is not easy to obtain purified F-box proteins with high activity due to their unstable protein structures. Here, we found that Arabidopsis SKP-like proteins (ASKs) can significantly improve soluble expression of F-box proteins and maintain their bioactivity. We established an efficient ASK-assisted method to express and purify plant F-box proteins. The method meets a broad range of criteria required for the biochemical analysis or protein crystallization of plant F-box proteins. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Influence of dietary protein type and iron source on the absorption of amino acids and minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Garaulet, M; Martínez, J A; Marín, J F; Larqué, E; Zamora, S

    2001-12-01

    The apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of amino acids and the balance of minerals (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron) has been determined in rats fed four diets differing in the protein type (casein or soy protein) and iron source (ferrous sulphate or lactate) in order to study the possible interactions of these nutrients. The availability of amino acids, especially essential amino acids, was greater in the diet made with animal protein (casein). The iron source also affected the absorption of most amino acids in all the diets assayed with ferrous sulphate being greater. The balance of iron, magnesium and phosphorus was higher in the diets containing animal protein. The retention of calcium and magnesium was significantly greater when ferrous sulphate was used as iron source. These results demonstrate the important interaction between amino acids and minerals and between the minerals themselves, which must be carefully studied when selecting different types of protein or mineral sources in human or animal nutrition.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL SOURCE-RECEPTOR RELATIONSHIPS: THE ROLE OF COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen L. Robinson; Spyros N. Pandis; Cliff I. Davidson

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) during the period of March 2004 through August 2004. Significant progress was made this project period on the analysis of ambient data, source apportionment, and deterministic modeling activities. Results highlighted in this report include evaluation of the performance of PMCAMx+ for an air pollution episode in the Eastern US, an emission profile for a coke production facility, ultrafine particle composition during a nucleation event, and a new hybrid approach for source apportionment. An agreement was reached with a utility to characterize fine particle and mercury emissions from a commercial coal fired power. Research in the next project period will include source testing of a coal fired power plant, source apportionment analysis, emission scenario modeling with PMCAMx+, and writing up results for submission as journal articles.

  1. Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 L1 Protein in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Li LIU; Wen-Sheng LI; Ting LEI; Jing ZHENG; Zheng ZHANG; Xiao-Fei YAN; Zhe-Zhi WANG; Yi-Li WANG; Lü-Sheng SI

    2005-01-01

    To develop a plant expression system for the production of the human papillomavirus type 16(HPV16) vaccine, we investigated whether the HPV16 L1 protein can be expressed in tobacco plants and whether it can be used as the cheapest form of edible vaccine. The HPV16 L1 coding sequence was amplified by PCR using specific primers from the plasmid pGEM-T-HPV16 containing the template sequence, and subcloned into the intermediate vector pUCmT and binary vector pBI121 consecutively to obtain the plant expression plasmid pBI-L1. The T-DNA regions of the pBI-L1 binary vector contained the constitutive Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and the neomycin phosphotransferase npt Ⅱ gene, which allowed the selection of transformed plants using kanamycin. The tobacco plants were transformed by cocultivating them, using the leaf disc method, with Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404, which harbored the plant expression plasmid. The regenerated transgenic tobacco plants were selected using kanamycin, and confirmed by PCR. The results of the Southern blot assay also showed that the HPV16 L1 gene was integrated stably into the genome of the transformed tobacco plants. The Western blot analysis showed that the transformed tobacco leaves could express the HPV16 L1 protein. Furthermore, it was demonstrated by ELISA assay that the expressed protein accounted for 0.034%-0.076% of the total soluble leaf protein, was able to form 55 nm virus-like particles compatible with HPV virus-like particle (VLP), and induced mouse erythrocyte hemagglutination in vitro. The present results indicate that the HPV16 L1 protein can be expressed in transgenic tobacco plants and the expressed protein possesses the natural features of the HPV 16L1 protein, implying that the HPV16 L1 transgenic plants can be potentially used as an edible vaccine.

  2. Harpins, multifunctional proteins secreted by gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min-Seon; Kim, Wooki; Lee, Chanhui; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2013-10-01

    Harpins are glycine-rich and heat-stable proteins that are secreted through type III secretion system in gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria. Many studies show that these proteins are mostly targeted to the extracellular space of plant tissues, unlike bacterial effector proteins that act inside the plant cells. Over the two decades since the first harpin of pathogen origin, HrpN of Erwinia amylovora, was reported in 1992 as a cell-free elicitor of hypersensitive response (HR), diverse functional aspects of harpins have been determined. Some harpins were shown to have virulence activity, probably because of their involvement in the translocation of effector proteins into plant cytoplasm. Based on this function, harpins are now considered to be translocators. Their abilities of pore formation in the artificial membrane, binding to lipid components, and oligomerization are consistent with this idea. When harpins are applied to plants directly or expressed in plant cells, these proteins trigger diverse beneficial responses such as induction of defense responses against diverse pathogens and insects and enhancement of plant growth. Therefore, in this review, we will summarize the functions of harpins as virulence factors (or translocators) of bacterial pathogens, elicitors of HR and immune responses, and plant growth enhancers.

  3. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  4. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  5. [Soil Heavy Metal Spatial Distribution and Source Analysis Around an Aluminum Plant in Baotou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lian-ke; Li, Hai-peng; Huang, Xue-min; Li, Yu-mei; Jiao, Kun-ling; Sun, Peng; Wang, Wei-da

    2016-03-15

    The soil with 500 m distance from an aluminum plant in Baotou was studied. A total of 64 soil samples were taken from the 0-5 cm, 5-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm layers, and the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn were tested, respectively. The correlation analysis and principal component analysis were used to identify the sources of these heavy metals in soils. The results suggested that the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn in study area were 32.9, 50.35, 69.92, 43.78, 0.54, 554.42 and 36.65 mg · kg⁻¹ respectively. All seven heavy metals tested were overweight compared with the background values of soil in Inner Mongolia. The spatial distribution of heavy metals showed that the horizontal distribution of heavy metals was obviously enriched in the southwest, while in vertical distribution, the heavy metal content (0 to 5 cm) was highest in the surface soil, and the heavy metal content decreased with increasing depth and tended to be stabilized when the depth was over 20 cm. Source analysis showed that the source of Cu, Zn, Cr and Mn might be influenced by the aluminum plant and the surrounding industrial activity. The source of Pb and Cd might be mainly related to road transportation. The source of Ni may be affected by agricultural activities and soil parent material together.

  6. ENERGY SOURCES AFFECT IN VITRO PROPAGATION AND SUBSEQUENT ACCLIMATIZATION OF ANANAS COMOSUS, VAR. SMOOTH CAYENNE PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelign Mengesha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant tissue culture is an inevitable technique to overcome healthy and limited planting materials problems using suitable energy sources. Different carbohydrates have diverse effect on in vitro growing plantlets in terms of growth performance, acclimatization and cost used for micro-propagation. Hence, this paper reports the effects of sucrose, fructose, glucose, table sugar and starch on pineapple in vitro mass propagation and acclimatization as well as the analysis of energy source required cost per a medium. A complete randomized design was used to compare analytic grade sucrose with other four energy sources at 2 and 3 % (w/v. The results revealed that the energy sources with varied concentration strongly influenced the in vitro growth and subsequent acclimatization of pineapple plantlets. Analytic grade sucrose and table sugar at 3 % performed well for in vitro survival rate (100%, shoot amplification (15.3-16.5 shoots, rooting ability (2.5cm long and 12 roots and acclimatization (95.4-97%. However, fructose and glucose required high importation cost (229.1% and 121.9% over analytic grade sucrose, respectively, and have low growth and acclimatization performance next to starch and energy free medium. Thus, table sugar has found to be a suitable alternative energy source for pineapple mass propagation, which saved about 95-97% cost from that of laboratory grade sucrose.

  7. Open source tool for prediction of genome wide protein-protein interaction network based on ortholog information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedamallu Chandra Sekhar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are crucially important for cellular processes. Knowledge of these interactions improves the understanding of cell cycle, metabolism, signaling, transport, and secretion. Information about interactions can hint at molecular causes of diseases, and can provide clues for new therapeutic approaches. Several (usually expensive and time consuming experimental methods can probe protein - protein interactions. Data sets, derived from such experiments make the development of prediction methods feasible, and make the creation of protein-protein interaction network predicting tools possible. Methods Here we report the development of a simple open source program module (OpenPPI_predictor that can generate a putative protein-protein interaction network for target genomes. This tool uses the orthologous interactome network data from a related, experimentally studied organism. Results Results from our predictions can be visualized using the Cytoscape visualization software, and can be piped to downstream processing algorithms. We have employed our program to predict protein-protein interaction network for the human parasite roundworm Brugia malayi, using interactome data from the free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Availability The OpenPPI_predictor source code is available from http://tools.neb.com/~posfai/.

  8. Assessment of water sources to plant growth in rice based cropping systems by stable water isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahindawansha, Amani; Kraft, Philipp; Racela, Heathcliff; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Rice is one of the most water-consuming crops in the world. Understanding water source utilization of rice will help us to improve water use efficiency (WUE) in paddy management. The objectives of our study are to evaluate the isotopic compositions of surface ponded water, soil water, irrigation water, groundwater, rain water and plant water and based on stable water isotope signatures to evaluate the contributions of various water sources to plant growth (wet rice, aerobic rice and maize) together with investigating the contribution of water from different soil horizons for plant growth in different maturity periods during wet and dry seasons. Finally we will compare the water balances and crop yields in both crops during both seasons and calculate the water use efficiencies. This will help to identify the most efficient water management systems in rice based cropping ecosystems using stable water isotopes. Soil samples are collected from 9 different depths at up to 60 cm in vegetative, reproductive and matured periods of plant growth together with stem samples. Soil and plant samples are extracted by cryogenic vacuum extraction. Root samples are collected up to 60 cm depth from 10 cm intercepts leading calculation of root length density and dry weight. Groundwater, surface water, rain water and irrigation water are sampled weekly. All water samples are analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios (d18O and dD) using Los Gatos Research DLT100. Rainfall records, ground water level, surface water level fluctuations and the amount of water irrigated in each field will be measured during the sampling period. The direct inference approach which is based on comparing isotopic compositions (dD and d18O) between plant stem water and soil water will be used to determine water sources taken up by plant. Multiple-source mass balance assessment can provide the estimated range of potential contributions of water from each soil depth to root water uptake of a crop. These

  9. Estimation of the Plant Time Constant of Current-Controlled Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.; Malvar, Jano;

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the plant time constant is essential to perform a thorough analysis of the current control loop in voltage source converters (VSCs). As the loop behavior can be significantly influenced by the VSC working conditions, the effects associated to converter losses should be included...... of the VSC interface filter measured at rated conditions. This paper extends that method so that both parameters of the plant time constant (resistance and inductance) are estimated. Such enhancement is achieved through the evaluation of the closed-loop transient responses of both axes of the synchronous...... in the model, through an equivalent series resistance. In a recent work, an algorithm to identify this parameter was developed, considering the inductance value as known and practically constant. Nevertheless, the plant inductance can also present important uncertainties with respect to the inductance...

  10. Critical issues with cryogenic water extraction for tracing plant's source water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Natalie; Winkler, Anna; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Numerous scientists and disciplines around the world are applying stable water isotope techniques-, especially in the ecohydrological context. For more than two decades, cryogenic vacuum extraction has been the most widely used method for obtaining water from soils and plant tissues for isotope analysis. Recent findings suggested that cryogenic extraction conditions (extraction time, temperature, vacuum threshold) and physicochemical soil properties considerably affected the extracted soil water isotope results. The key question therefore is: Which soil water pool/s are we actually extracting cryogenically under certain extraction conditions and is this soil water pool the source of plant water uptake? We conducted a greenhouse trial with two different plant species grown on two physicochemically different soils (sandy soil and clayey loam) to test the effects of varying cryogenic extraction conditions and physicochemical soil properties on extracted soil water isotope results. We further aimed to identify the unique soil water isotopic signature which mirrors plant's water source. We sampled root crowns and an aliquot of the first and second soil layer for cryogenic water extraction. To determine the plant water available soil water pool/s, we varied water extraction parameters (time and temperature). Our dual-isotope study showed that physicochemical soil properties (i.e. clay content, pore size) along with extraction parameters lead to isotope fractionation effects of soil water. Extraction temperature and time significantly impacted isotope results of clayey loam samples but no effect could be observed for the sandy soil. In general, for water extracts of both soil types, longer extraction times and higher temperatures resulted in enriched isotopic signatures, although this influence was more pronounced for the clayey loam. Determining ideal soil water extraction parameters to identify plant available soil water pools revealed that extraction settings of 200

  11. Multiple plant-wax compounds record differential sources and ecosystem structure in large river catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Jordon D.; Schefuß, Enno; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Pryer, Helena; Galy, Valier V.

    2016-07-01

    The concentrations, distributions, and stable carbon isotopes (δ13C) of plant waxes carried by fluvial suspended sediments contain valuable information about terrestrial ecosystem characteristics. To properly interpret past changes recorded in sedimentary archives it is crucial to understand the sources and variability of exported plant waxes in modern systems on seasonal to inter-annual timescales. To determine such variability, we present concentrations and δ13C compositions of three compound classes (n-alkanes, n-alcohols, n-alkanoic acids) in a 34-month time series of suspended sediments from the outflow of the Congo River. We show that exported plant-dominated n-alkanes (C25-C35) represent a mixture of C3 and C4 end members, each with distinct molecular distributions, as evidenced by an 8.1 ± 0.7‰ (±1σ standard deviation) spread in δ13C values across chain-lengths, and weak correlations between individual homologue concentrations (r = 0.52-0.94). In contrast, plant-dominated n-alcohols (C26-C36) and n-alkanoic acids (C26-C36) exhibit stronger positive correlations (r = 0.70-0.99) between homologue concentrations and depleted δ13C values (individual homologues average ⩽-31.3‰ and -30.8‰, respectively), with lower δ13C variability across chain-lengths (2.6 ± 0.6‰ and 2.0 ± 1.1‰, respectively). All individual plant-wax lipids show little temporal δ13C variability throughout the time-series (1σ ⩽ 0.9‰), indicating that their stable carbon isotopes are not a sensitive tracer for temporal changes in plant-wax source in the Congo basin on seasonal to inter-annual timescales. Carbon-normalized concentrations and relative abundances of n-alcohols (19-58% of total plant-wax lipids) and n-alkanoic acids (26-76%) respond rapidly to seasonal changes in runoff, indicating that they are mostly derived from a recently entrained local source. In contrast, a lack of correlation with discharge and low, stable relative abundances (5-16%) indicate that

  12. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins between male and female plants in Pistacia chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Erhui; Wu, Xiaolin; Shi, Jiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis is a strict dioecious plant with male and female flowers in individuals. In China, P. chinensis is widely planted for biodiesel oil due to high oil content in seeds. In practice it requires to grow more female plants for biodiesel production. At present, there are still no reliable methods for sex determination during the long juvenile stage of this species. In order to develop protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis, proteomic approach was used to identify differentially expressed proteins between male and female plants. Vegetative organs (leaf and stem) rather than reproductive organs/tissues were used for protein extraction so as to develop protein markers which can be used in siblings before flowering. Protein was extracted using a phenol-based protocol. By using two-dimensional electrophoresis, a total of 10 protein spots were found to be differentially expressed in leaf and stem between both sexes, of which 7 were successfully identified by mass spectrometry and matched to 6 functional proteins such as NB-ARC domain containing protein, light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein, asorbate peroxidase (APX), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2, temperature-induced lipocalin (TIL) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK). The sex-related difference displayed in a tissue-specific way, especially in stem. PGK existed in high abundance in stem phloem in the female, but was almost not detected in the male; APX and two TIL species were highly abundant in the stem of male plants, while their abundance was much lower in female plants. Moreover, these abundance differences were further confirmed in individual plants. Hence, it is assumed that APX, PGK and TIL might be promising candidates to serve as protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis. Our results form the basis for a further understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of sex determination in P. chinensis.

  13. Evaluation of Black Tea Polyphenol Extract Against the Retrogradation of Starches from Various Plant Sources

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The effects of black tea polyphenol extract (BTPE) on the retrogradation of starches from different plant sources were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC analysis shows that the gelatinization temperature of maize starch and starches from different rice varieties increased with increasing BTPE level. After storage at 4 °C, BTPE at a concentration of 15% markedly retarded the retrogradation of maize starch and starches from different rice var...

  14. Diverse Roles of Lysin-Motif (LysM Proteins in Mediating Plant-Microbe Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinrong WAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysin-motif (LysM is a protein domain initially identified in a phage protein responsible for binding peptidoglycan, an important component of bacterial cell walls. LysM-containing proteins are distributed in diverse organisms, ranging from microbes to plants and animals (including human beings. Recent studies demonstrated that this group of proteins plays different roles in mediating plant-microbe interactions, leading to defense, symbiosis, or suppression of host defense. These roles are probably related to their potential ability to recognize and bind a specific signal molecule, such as chitooligosaccharides, peptidoglycan, nodulation factors (NFs, and mycorrhization factors (MFs.

  15. Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-08-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP

  16. Influence of protein intake from haem and non-haem animals and plant origin on inflammatory biomarkers among apparently-healthy adults in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Natalia G; Bountziouka, Vassiliki P; Georgousopoulou, Ekavi; Evangelopoulos, Angelos A; Bonou, Maria S; Vogiatzakis, Evangelos D; Barbetseas, John D; Avgerinos, Peter C; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2013-12-01

    Intake of different types of protein may be associated with differences in biomarkers among various populations. This work investigated the influence of protein intake from haem and non-haem animals as well as protein from plants on haematological and biochemical parameters in inflammation among apparently-healthy adults living in Greece, a Mediterranean country. Four hundred and ninety apparently-healthy subjects (46 +/- 16 years, 40% men), who consecutively visited Polykliniki General Hospital for routine examinations, voluntarily agreed to participate in the study (participation rate 85%). Demographic, anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics were recorded. Participants completed a valid, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Protein intake was classified into three sources: protein from haem animals, protein from non-haem animals, and protein from plant origin. Fasting blood samples were taken from all participants; uric acid, creatinine, lipids, cystatin C, haptoglobin, haemoglobin, haematocrit, iron, ferritin, white blood cells, monocytes, platelets, and C-reactive protein were measured. Protein intake from only haem animals was associated with increased haemoglobin and haematocrit levels (p intake of protein from non-haem animals and plant origin was not associated with the investigated haematological and biochemical markers of low-grade chronic inflammation when lifestyle factors and overall dietary habits were taken into account. Intake of protein from only haem animals seems to be consistently associated with haematological markers. The confounding role of dietary habits and lifestyle variables on the tested parameters deserves further attention in future research.

  17. Identification of a new class of lipid droplet-associated proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Patrick J; James, Christopher N; Gidda, Satinder K; Kilaru, Aruna; Dyer, John M; Mullen, Robert T; Ohlrogge, John B; Chapman, Kent D

    2013-08-01

    Lipid droplets in plants (also known as oil bodies, lipid bodies, or oleosomes) are well characterized in seeds, and oleosins, the major proteins associated with their surface, were shown to be important for stabilizing lipid droplets during seed desiccation and rehydration. However, lipid droplets occur in essentially all plant cell types, many of which may not require oleosin-mediated stabilization. The proteins associated with the surface of nonseed lipid droplets, which are likely to influence the formation, stability, and turnover of this compartment, remain to be elucidated. Here, we have combined lipidomic, proteomic, and transcriptomic studies of avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp to identify two new lipid droplet-associated proteins, which we named LDAP1 and LDAP2. These proteins are highly similar to each other and also to the small rubber particle proteins that accumulate in rubber-producing plants. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog to LDAP1 and LDAP2, At3g05500, was localized to the surface of lipid droplets after transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells that were induced to accumulate triacylglycerols. We propose that small rubber particle protein-like proteins are involved in the general process of binding and perhaps the stabilization of lipid-rich particles in the cytosol of plant cells and that the avocado and Arabidopsis protein members reveal a new aspect of the cellular machinery that is involved in the packaging of triacylglycerols in plant tissues.

  18. Protein tyrosine nitration in plants: Present knowledge, computational prediction and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Feigl, Gábor; Bordé, Ádám; Molnár, Árpád; Erdei, László

    2017-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and related molecules (reactive nitrogen species) regulate diverse physiological processes mainly through posttranslational modifications such as protein tyrosine nitration (PTN). PTN is a covalent and specific modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues resulting in altered protein structure and function. In the last decade, great efforts have been made to reveal candidate proteins, target Tyr residues and functional consequences of nitration in plants. This review intends to evaluate the accumulated knowledge about the biochemical mechanism, the structural and functional consequences and the selectivity of plants' protein nitration and also about the decomposition or conversion of nitrated proteins. At the same time, this review emphasizes yet unanswered or uncertain questions such as the reversibility/irreversibility of tyrosine nitration, the involvement of proteasomes in the removal of nitrated proteins or the effect of nitration on Tyr phosphorylation. The different NO producing systems of algae and higher plants raise the possibility of diversely regulated protein nitration. Therefore studying PTN from an evolutionary point of view would enrich our present understanding with novel aspects. Plant proteomic research can be promoted by the application of computational prediction tools such as GPS-YNO2 and iNitro-Tyr software. Using the reference Arabidopsis proteome, Authors performed in silico analysis of tyrosine nitration in order to characterize plant tyrosine nitroproteome. Nevertheless, based on the common results of the present prediction and previous experiments the most likely nitrated proteins were selected thus recommending candidates for detailed future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions.

  20. Simultaneous boosting of source and sink capacities doubles tuber starch yield of potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonik, Claudia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2012-12-01

    An important goal in biotechnological research is to improve the yield of crop plants. Here, we genetically modified simultaneously source and sink capacities in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée) plants to improve starch yield. Source capacity was increased by mesophyll-specific overexpression of a pyrophosphatase or, alternatively, by antisense expression of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in leaves. Both approaches make use of re-routing photoassimilates to sink organs at the expense of leaf starch accumulation. Simultaneous increase in sink capacity was accomplished by overexpression of two plastidic metabolite translocators, that is, a glucose 6-phosphate/phosphate translocator and an adenylate translocator in tubers. Employing such a 'pull' approach, we have previously shown that potato starch content and yield can be increased when sink strength is elevated. In the current biotechnological approach, we successfully enhanced source and sink capacities by a combination of 'pull' and 'push' approaches using two different attempts. A doubling in tuber starch yield was achieved. This successful approach might be transferable to other crop plants in the future.

  1. On analgesic and narcotic plants: Pliny and his Greek sources, the history of a complex graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Grafting is an important concept in the study of Pliny the Elder, who is a compiler of written sources. We intend to examine how this grafting works in Pliny's discussion of analgesic and narcotic plants, especially the most famous: opium poppy, henbane, mandrake, and hound's berry. We will study Pliny's use of Greek sources and ask how he took up his predecessors' works while integrating the changes that took place during the centuries in the diagnosis and treatment of pain. This cultural graft remains elusive because we do not have access to all of Pliny's Greek sources. When Pliny speaks about these plants, he sometimes copies out information, adding or removing details, and occasionally makes significant mistakes. The graft was particularly difficult in this case because these analgesic plants were considered so special and poisonous that they were sometimes rejected or even condemned. Nevertheless, we can say that this cultural graft succeeded, despite some obstacles, because Pliny assimilated and adapted these old Greek materials to his own time, society, and project.

  2. Effects of rare earth elements and REE-binding proteins on physiological responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongwu; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhiwei

    2012-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), which include 17 elements in the periodic table, share chemical properties related to a similar external electronic configuration. REEs enriched fertilizers have been used in China since the 1980s. REEs could enter the cell and cell organelles, influence plant growth, and mainly be bound with the biological macromolecules. REE-binding proteins have been found in some plants. In addition, the chlorophyll activities and photosynthetic rate can be regulated by REEs. REEs could promote the protective function of cell membrane and enhance the plant resistance capability to stress produced by environmental factors, and affect the plant physiological mechanism by regulating the Ca²⁺ level in the plant cells. The focus of present review is to describe how REEs and REE-binding proteins participate in the physiological responses in plants.

  3. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of a plant protein related to human B-cell receptor-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabekova, Anastasia K; Pankratenko, Anna V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Owens, Robert A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Morozov, Sergey Y

    2017-01-01

    Human B-cell receptor-associated protein BAP31 (HsBAP31) is the endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein involved in protein sorting and transport as well as pro-apoptotic signaling. Plant orthologs of HsBAP31 termed 'plant BAP-like proteins' (PBL proteins) have thus far remained unstudied. Recently, the PBL protein from Nicotiana tabacum (NtPBL) was identified as an interactor of Nt-4/1, a plant protein known to interact with plant virus movement proteins and affect the long-distance transport of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) via the phloem. Here, we have compared the sequences of PBL proteins and studied the biochemical properties of NtPBL. Analysis of a number of fully sequenced plant genomes revealed that PBL-encoding genes represent a small multigene family with up to six members per genome. Two conserved motifs were identified in the C-terminal region of PBL proteins. The NtPBL C-terminal hydrophilic region (NtPBL-C) was expressed in bacterial cells, purified, and used for analysis of its RNA binding properties in vitro. In gel shift experiments, NtPBL-C was found to bind several tested RNAs, showing the most efficient binding to microRNA precursors (pre-miRNA) and less efficient interaction with PSTVd. Mutational analysis suggested that NtPBL-C has a composite RNA-binding site, with two conserved lysine residues in the most C-terminal protein region being involved in binding of pre-miRNA but not PSTVd RNA. Virus-mediated transient expression of NtPBL-C in plants resulted in stunting and leaf malformation, developmental abnormalities similar to those described previously for blockage of miRNA biogenesis/function. We hypothesize that the NtPBL protein represents a previously undiscovered component of the miRNA pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  5. PIN protein phosphorylation by plant AGC3 kinases and its role in polar auxin transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Polar cell-to-cell transport of plant hormone auxin mediated by plasma membrane (PM)-localized PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers generates auxin gradients that provide positional information for various plant developmental processes. The apical-basal polar localization of the PIN proteins that

  6. dbPPT: a comprehensive database of protein phosphorylation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han; Deng, Wankun; Wang, Yongbo; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important protein post-translational modifications, the reversible phosphorylation is critical for plants in regulating a variety of biological processes such as cellular metabolism, signal transduction and responses to environmental stress. Numerous efforts especially large-scale phosphoproteome profiling studies have been contributed to dissect the phosphorylation signaling in various plants, while a large number of phosphorylation events were identified. To provide an integrated data resource for further investigations, here we present a comprehensive database of dbPPT (database of Phosphorylation site in PlanTs, at http://dbppt.biocuckoo.org), which contains experimentally identified phosphorylation sites in proteins from plants. The phosphorylation sites in dbPPT were manually curated from the literatures, whereas datasets in other public databases were also integrated. In total, there were 82,175 phosphorylation sites in 31,012 proteins from 20 plant organisms in dbPPT, presenting a larger quantity of phosphorylation sites and a higher coverage of plant species in comparison with other databases. The proportions of residue types including serine, threonine and tyrosine were 77.99, 17.81 and 4.20%, respectively. All the phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites in the database were critically annotated. Since the phosphorylation signaling in plants attracted great attention recently, such a comprehensive resource of plant protein phosphorylation can be useful for the research community. Database URL: http://dbppt.biocuckoo.or

  7. Plant-derived natural products as sources of anti-quorum sensing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tan, Li Ying; Krishnan, Thiba; Chong, Yee Meng; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-05-13

    Quorum sensing is a system of stimuli and responses in relation to bacterial cell population density that regulates gene expression, including virulence determinants. Consequently, quorum sensing has been an attractive target for the development of novel anti-infective measures that do not rely on the use of antibiotics. Anti-quorum sensing has been a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections as it is unlikely to develop multidrug resistant pathogens since it does not impose any selection pressure. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented and plant-based natural products have been extensively studied in this context. Plant matter is one of the major sources of chemicals in use today in various industries, ranging from the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food biotechnology to the textile industries. Just like animals and humans, plants are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, it is therefore logical to expect that plants have developed sophisticated of chemical mechanisms to combat pathogens. In this review, we have surveyed the various types of plant-based natural products that exhibit anti-quorum sensing properties and their anti-quorum sensing mechanisms.

  8. Plant-Derived Natural Products as Sources of Anti-Quorum Sensing Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a system of stimuli and responses in relation to bacterial cell population density that regulates gene expression, including virulence determinants. Consequently, quorum sensing has been an attractive target for the development of novel anti-infective measures that do not rely on the use of antibiotics. Anti-quorum sensing has been a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections as it is unlikely to develop multidrug resistant pathogens since it does not impose any selection pressure. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented and plant-based natural products have been extensively studied in this context. Plant matter is one of the major sources of chemicals in use today in various industries, ranging from the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food biotechnology to the textile industries. Just like animals and humans, plants are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, it is therefore logical to expect that plants have developed sophisticated of chemical mechanisms to combat pathogens. In this review, we have surveyed the various types of plant-based natural products that exhibit anti-quorum sensing properties and their anti-quorum sensing mechanisms.

  9. Physiological and genetic characterization of plant growth and gravitropism in LED light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitzer, Gerald F.

    1994-01-01

    Among the many problems of growing plants in completely controlled environments, such as those anticipated for the space station and the CELSS program, is the need to provide light that is both adequate for photosynthesis and of proper quality for normal growth and development. NASA scientists and engineers have recently become interested in the possibility of utilizing densely packed, solid state, light emitting diodes (LED's) as a source for this light. Unlike more conventional incandescent or electrical discharge lamps, these sources are highly monochromatic and lack energy in spectral regions thought to be important for normal plant development. In addition, a recent observation by NASA scientist has suggested that infra-red LED's, that are routinely used as photographic safelights for plants grown in darkness, may interact with the ability of plants to detect gravity. In order to establish how plants respond to light from these LED light sources we carried out a series of experiments with known pigment mutants of the model mustard plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, growing in either a gravity field or on a clinostat to simulate a micro-gravity environment. Results indicate that only red light from the 665 nm LED's disrupts the ability of normal wildtype seedlings to detect a gravity stimulus. There was no consistent effect found for the far-red (735 nm) LED's or either of the infrared (880 nm or 935 nm) LED sources but both showed some effect in one or more of the genotypes tested. Of these five members of the phytochrome multigene family in Arabidopsis, only the phytochrome B pigment mutant (hy3) lacked the ability to detect gravity under all conditions. There was no effect of either micro-gravity (clinostat) or the infra-red LED's on the light induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Measurements of the pigment phytochrome in oats also showed no photoconversion by 15 min irradiations with the infra-red LED's. We conclude that phytochrome B is required for the

  10. The Salmonella effector protein SpvC, a phosphothreonine lyase is functional in plant cells

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Christina

    2014-10-17

    Salmonella is one of the most prominent causes of food poisoning and growing evidence indicates that contaminated fruits and vegetables are an increasing concern for human health. Successful infection demands the suppression of the host immune system, which is often achieved via injection of bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In this report we present the function of Salmonella effector protein in plant cell, supporting the new concept of trans-kingdom competence of this bacterium. We screened a range of Salmonella Typhimurium effector proteins for interference with plant immunity. Among these, the phosphothreonine lyase SpvC attenuated the induction of immunity-related genes when present in plant cells. Using in vitro and in vivo systems we show that this effector protein interacts with and dephosphorylates activated Arabidopsis Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase 6 (MPK6), thereby inhibiting defense signaling. Moreover, the requirement of Salmonella SpvC was shown by the decreased proliferation of the ΔspvC mutant in Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that some Salmonella effector proteins could have a conserved function during proliferation in different hosts. The fact that Salmonella and other Enterobacteriaceae use plants as hosts strongly suggests that plants represent a much larger reservoir for animal pathogens than so far estimated.

  11. Protein tyrosine nitration in higher plants grown under natural and stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Palma, José M.; del Río, Luis A.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification (PTM) mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that is linked to nitro-oxidative damages in plant cells. During the last decade, the identification of proteins undergoing this PTM under adverse environmental conditions has increased. However, there is also a basal endogenous nitration which seems to have a regulatory function. The technological advances in proteome analysis have allowed identifying these modified proteins and have shown that the number and identity of the nitrated proteins change among plant species, analysed organs and growing/culture conditions. In this work, the current knowledge of protein tyrosine nitration in higher plants under different situations is reviewed. PMID:23444154

  12. Current perspective on protein S-acylation in plants: more than just a fatty anchor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Charlotte H; Hemsley, Piers A

    2015-03-01

    Membranes are an important signalling platform in plants. The plasma membrane is the point where information about the external environment must be converted into intracellular signals, while endomembranes are important sites of protein trafficking, organization, compartmentalization, and intracellular signalling. This requires co-ordinating the spatial distribution of proteins, their activation state, and their interacting partners. This regulation frequently occurs through post-translational modification of proteins. Proteins that associate with the cell membrane do so through transmembrane domains, protein-protein interactions, lipid binding motifs/domains or use the post-translational addition of lipid groups as prosthetic membrane anchors. S-acylation is one such lipid modification capable of anchoring proteins to the membrane. Our current knowledge of S-acylation function in plants is fairly limited compared with other post-translational modifications and S-acylation in other organisms. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that S-acylation can act as more than just a simple membrane anchor: it can also act as a regulatory mechanism in signalling pathways in plants. S-acylation is, therefore, an ideal mechanism for regulating protein function at membranes. This review discusses our current knowledge of S-acylated proteins in plants, the interaction of different lipid modifications, and the general effects of S-acylation on cellular function.

  13. Signals fly when kinases meet Rho-of-plants (ROP) small G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Attila; Lajkó, Dézi Bianka

    2015-08-01

    Rho-type small GTP-binding plant proteins function as two-state molecular switches in cellular signalling. There is accumulating evidence that Rho-of-plants (ROP) signalling is positively controlled by plant receptor kinases, through the ROP guanine nucleotide exchange factor proteins. These signalling modules regulate cell polarity, cell shape, hormone responses, and pathogen defence, among other things. Other ROP-regulatory proteins might also be subjected to protein phosphorylation by cellular kinases (e.g., mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases), in order to integrate various cellular signalling pathways with ROP GTPase-dependent processes. In contrast to the role of kinases in upstream ROP regulation, much less is known about the potential link between ROP GTPases and downstream kinase signalling. In other eukaryotes, Rho-type G-protein-activated kinases are widespread and have a key role in many cellular processes. Recent data indicate the existence of structurally different ROP-activated kinases in plants, but their ROP-dependent biological functions still need to be validated. In addition to these direct interactions, ROPs may also indirectly control the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases or calcium-dependent protein kinases. These kinases may therefore function as upstream as well as downstream kinases in ROP-mediated signalling pathways, such as the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate kinases involved in cell polarity establishment.

  14. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  15. Integrated Analysis Platform: An Open-Source Information System for High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukas, Christian; Chen, Dijun; Pape, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    High-throughput phenotyping is emerging as an important technology to dissect phenotypic components in plants. Efficient image processing and feature extraction are prerequisites to quantify plant growth and performance based on phenotypic traits. Issues include data management, image analysis, and result visualization of large-scale phenotypic data sets. Here, we present Integrated Analysis Platform (IAP), an open-source framework for high-throughput plant phenotyping. IAP provides user-friendly interfaces, and its core functions are highly adaptable. Our system supports image data transfer from different acquisition environments and large-scale image analysis for different plant species based on real-time imaging data obtained from different spectra. Due to the huge amount of data to manage, we utilized a common data structure for efficient storage and organization of data for both input data and result data. We implemented a block-based method for automated image processing to extract a representative list of plant phenotypic traits. We also provide tools for build-in data plotting and result export. For validation of IAP, we performed an example experiment that contains 33 maize (Zea mays 'Fernandez') plants, which were grown for 9 weeks in an automated greenhouse with nondestructive imaging. Subsequently, the image data were subjected to automated analysis with the maize pipeline implemented in our system. We found that the computed digital volume and number of leaves correlate with our manually measured data in high accuracy up to 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. In summary, IAP provides a multiple set of functionalities for import/export, management, and automated analysis of high-throughput plant phenotyping data, and its analysis results are highly reliable.

  16. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  17. Influence of Nitrogen Sources and Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria Inoculation on Growth, Crude Fiber and Nutrient Uptake in Squash (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne ex Poir.) Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Alice I. TCHIAZE; Victor D. TAFFOUO; Henri FANKEM; Kenne, Martin; Régis BAZIRAMAKENGA; Ekodeck, Georges E.; Antoun, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR, B) have immense potential application in sustainable agriculture as ecofriendly biofertilizers and biopesticides. In this study, the effects of three nitrogen (N) sources (NO3-, NH4+ and NO3NH4) and PGPR on growth, crude fiber and nutrient uptake were investigated in squash plants. Some growth parameters [root dry weight (RDW), shoot dry weight (SDW), total plant dry weight (PDW), number of leaves (NL), shoot length (SL), stem diameter (SD) and numb...

  18. Plants as a production platform for high-value proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, L.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current treatments of inflammatory disorders are often based on therapeutic proteins. These proteins, so-called biopharmaceuticals, are isolated from a natural resource or, more often, made using cell based fermentation systems. The most common production platforms are based

  19. Plants as a production platform for high-value proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, L.B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current treatments of inflammatory disorders are often based on therapeutic proteins. These proteins, so-called biopharmaceuticals, are isolated from a natural resource or, more often, made using cell based fermentation systems. The most common production platforms are based

  20. An in silico analysis of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelan James

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An in silico analysis of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus from a variety of species; including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis, Ectocarpus siliculosus, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, Physcomitrella patens, Selaginella moellendorffii, Picea glauca, Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana was undertaken to determine if components differed within and between plant and non-plant species. Results The channel forming subunits of the outer membrane components Tom40 and Sam50 are conserved between plant groups and other eukaryotes. In contrast, the receptor component(s in green plants, particularly Tom20, (C. reinhardtii, C. variabilis, P. patens, S. moellendorffii, P. glauca, O. sativa and A. thaliana are specific to this lineage. Red algae contain a Tom22 receptor that is orthologous to yeast Tom22. Furthermore, plant mitochondrial receptors display differences between various plant lineages. These are evidenced by distinctive motifs in all plant Metaxins, which are absent in red algae, and the presence of the outer membrane receptor OM64 in Angiosperms (rice and Arabidopsis, but not in lycophytes (S. moellendorffii and gymnosperms (P. glauca. Furthermore, although the intermembrane space receptor Mia40 is conserved across a wide phylogenetic range, its function differs between lineages. In all plant lineages, Tim17 contains a C-terminal extension, which may act as a receptor component for the import of nucleic acids into plant mitochondria. Conclusions It is proposed that the observed functional divergences are due to the selective pressure to sort proteins between mitochondria and chloroplasts, resulting in differences in protein receptor components between plant groups and other organisms. Additionally, diversity of receptor components is observed within the plant kingdom. Even when receptor components are orthologous across plant and non-plant species, it appears that the functions of these have expanded or

  1. Proteins as the source of physiologically and functionally active peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Iwaniak

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The market of functional foods and beverages develops dynamically. Biological activities of many food components which occur naturally become an issue of many scientific and industrial interests. The structural and chemical changes occurring during the proteins processing lead to the release of bioactive peptides. Their multifunctional activity is based on their structure and other factors including e.g. hydrophobicity, charge, or microelements binding properties. This article focuses on peptides with other physiological and functional activities such as antithromobotic, antioxidative, antibacterial and antifungal, sensory, and improving those nutritional value of food.

  2. Responses of Plant Proteins to Heavy Metal Stress—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Kamrul Hasan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to environmental pollutants such as heavy metal(s by triggering the expression of genes that encode proteins involved in stress response. Toxic metal ions profoundly affect the cellular protein homeostasis by interfering with the folding process and aggregation of nascent or non-native proteins leading to decreased cell viability. However, plants possess a range of ubiquitous cellular surveillance systems that enable them to efficiently detoxify heavy metals toward enhanced tolerance to metal stress. As proteins constitute the major workhorses of living cells, the chelation of metal ions in cytosol with phytochelatins and metallothioneins followed by compartmentalization of metals in the vacuoles as well as the repair of stress-damaged proteins or removal and degradation of proteins that fail to achieve their native conformations are critical for plant tolerance to heavy metal stress. In this review, we provide a broad overview of recent advances in cellular protein research with regards to heavy metal tolerance in plants. We also discuss how plants maintain functional and healthy proteomes for survival under such capricious surroundings.

  3. Heat Shock Proteins: A Review of the Molecular Chaperones for Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jin Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to persistently changing stresses and have to be able to interpret and respond to them. The stresses, drought, salinity, chemicals, cold and hot temperatures, and various pathogen attacks have interconnected effects on plants, resulting in the disruption of protein homeostasis. Maintenance of proteins in their functional native conformations and preventing aggregation of non-native proteins are important for cell survival under stress. Heat shock proteins (HSPs functioning as molecular chaperones are the key components responsible for protein folding, assembly, translocation, and degradation under stress conditions and in many normal cellular processes. Plants respond to pathogen invasion using two different innate immune responses mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs or resistance (R proteins. HSPs play an indispensable role as molecular chaperones in the quality control of plasma membrane-resident PRRs and intracellular R proteins against potential invaders. Here, we specifically discuss the functional involvement of cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER HSPs/chaperones in plant immunity to obtain an integrated understanding of the immune responses in plant cells.

  4. Atmospheric Aerosol Source-Receptor Relationships: The Role of Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen L. Robinson; Spyros N. Pandis; Cliff I. Davidson

    2005-12-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) during the period of March 2005 through August 2005. Significant progress was made this project period on the source characterization, source apportionment, and deterministic modeling activities. This report highlights new data on road dust, vegetative detritus and motor vehicle emissions. For example, the results show significant differences in the composition in urban and rural road dust. A comparison of the organic of the fine particulate matter in the tunnel with the ambient provides clear evidence of the significant contribution of vehicle emissions to ambient PM. The source profiles developed from this work are being used by the source-receptor modeling activities. The report presents results on the spatial distribution of PMF-factors. The results can be grouped into three different categories: regional sources, local sources, or potentially both regional and local sources. Examples of the regional sources are the sulfate and selenium PMF-factors which most likely-represent coal fired power plants. Examples of local sources are the specialty steel and lead factors. There is reasonable correspondence between these apportionments and data from the EPA TRI and AIRS emission inventories. Detailed comparisons between PMCAMx predictions and measurements by the STN and IMPROVE measurements in the Eastern US are presented. Comparisons were made for the major aerosol components and PM{sub 2.5} mass in July 2001, October 2001, January 2002, and April 2002. The results are encouraging with average fraction biases for most species less than 0.25. The improvement of the model performance during the last two years was mainly due to the comparison of the model predictions with the continuous measurements in the Pittsburgh Supersite. Major improvements have included the descriptions: of ammonia emissions (CMU inventory), night time nitrate chemistry, EC emissions and their diurnal

  5. Using plant growth modeling to analyse C source-sink relations under drought: inter and intra specific comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit ePallas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to assimilate C and allocate NSC (non structural carbohydrates to the most appropriate organs is crucial to maximize plant ecological or agronomic performance. Such C source and sink activities are differentially affected by environmental constraints. Under drought, plant growth is generally more sink than source limited as organ expansion or appearance rate is earlier and stronger affected than C assimilation. This favors plant survival and recovery but not always agronomic performance as NSC are stored rather than used for growth due to a modified metabolism in source and sink leaves. Such interactions between plant C and water balance are complex and plant modeling can help analyzing their impact on plant phenotype. This paper addresses the impact of trade-offs between C sink and source activities and plant production under drought, combining experimental and modeling approaches. Two contrasted monocotyledonous species (rice, oil palm were studied. Experimentally, the sink limitation of plant growth under moderate drought was confirmed as well as the modifications in NSC metabolism in source and sink organs. Under severe stress, when C source became limiting, plant NSC concentration decreased. Two plant models dedicated to oil palm and rice morphogenesis were used to perform a sensitivity analysis and further explore how to optimize C sink and source drought sensitivity to maximize plant growth. Modeling results highlighted that optimal drought sensitivity depends both on drought type and species and that modeling is a great opportunity to analyse such complex processes. Further modeling needs and more generally the challenge of using models to support complex trait breeding are discussed.

  6. Computation of surface electrical potentials of plant cell membranes . Correspondence To published zeta potentials from diverse plant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinraide; Yermiyahu; Rytwo

    1998-10-01

    A Gouy-Chapman-Stern model has been developed for the computation of surface electrical potential (psi0) of plant cell membranes in response to ionic solutes. The present model is a modification of an earlier version developed to compute the sorption of ions by wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Scout 66) root plasma membranes. A single set of model parameters generates values for psi0 that correlate highly with published zeta potentials of protoplasts and plasma membrane vesicles from diverse plant sources. The model assumes ion binding to a negatively charged site (R- = 0.3074 &mgr;mol m-2) and to a neutral site (P0 = 2.4 &mgr;mol m-2) according to the reactions R- + IZ &rlharr; RIZ-1 and P0 + IZ &rlharr; PIZ, where IZ represents an ion of charge Z. Binding constants for the negative site are 21, 500 M-1 for H+, 20,000 M-1 for Al3+, 2,200 M-1 for La3+, 30 M-1 for Ca2+ and Mg2+, and 1 M-1 for Na+ and K+. Binding constants for the neutral site are 1/180 the value for binding to the negative site. Ion activities at the membrane surface, computed on the basis of psi0, appear to determine many aspects of plant-mineral interactions, including mineral nutrition and the induction and alleviation of mineral toxicities, according to previous and ongoing studies. A computer program with instructions for the computation of psi0, ion binding, ion concentrations, and ion activities at membrane surfaces may be requested from the authors.

  7. A Crispy Delicacy: Augosoma Beetle as Alternative Source of Protein in East Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Muafor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the exoskeleton of the Augosoma centaurus (Dynastinae is hard and difficult to chew, this insect is often gathered in Eastern Cameroon for food in periods of availability. Nine ethnic groups in Eastern Cameroon were surveyed to understand the role of this insect in assuring food security, using quantitative and qualitative social science approaches. Both the larvae and adult stages of this beetle are habitually consumed in the areas studied. In total, about 65% of consumers prefer consuming the adults, while 35% prefer consuming the larvae. About 24% of consumers derive the same satisfaction from the consumption of Augosoma or other edible insects. Close to 39% of consumers prefer other edible insects to Augosoma, while 37% prefer the consumption of Augosoma to other edible insects. This beetle usually occurs at a period when other edible insects are not available, therefore constituting a good source of alternative protein in this region where poverty, poaching, and biodiversity erosion are still a major problem. Furthermore, the gathering of this beetle for food is equally a means of biological pest control of raffia plants and a tool to enhance community-based conservation of the areas global biodiversity.

  8. Salmon protein hydrolysate as a protein source in feed for young pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Blaabjerg, Karoline; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2012-01-01

    Salmon protein hydrolysate (SPH) is made from fresh by-products from farmed salmon that are minced and acidified to hydrolyse proteins into peptides and free amino acids. The objective of this study was to evaluate SPH in young pigs compared to soy protein concentrate (SPC), fish meal (FM...

  9. Glycosylation of hemoglobin and plasma proteins in petrochemical plant workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrug, A.; Tomaszewski, L.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin and (plasma) proteins has been measured in 111 workers of 6 MZRiP departments in Plock and in 54 healthy people. In all subjects the mean concentrations of glycosylated hemoglobin and glycosylated plasma proteins have been in so called wide range of normal values. Significant shifts of glycosylated Hb concentrations have been found in two departments--those of ethylenederivatives and distillation. The concentration of glycosylated plasma proteins has been elevated only in workers of the Catalytic Processes Department.

  10. Introgression of leginsulin, a cysteine-rich protein, and high-protein trait from an Asian soybean plant introduction genotype into a North American experimental soybean line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Oehrle, Nathan W; Alaswad, Alaa A; Baxter, Ivan; Wiebold, William J; Nelson, Randall L

    2015-03-25

    Soybean is an important protein source for both humans and animals. However, soybean proteins are relatively poor in the sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Improving the content of endogenous proteins rich in sulfur-containing amino acids could enhance the nutritive value of soybean meal. Leginsulin, a cysteine-rich peptide, predominantly accumulates in Asian soybean accessions but not in most North American cultivars. By screening diverse soybean accessions from the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection, we were able to identify one plant introduction, PI 427138, as a high-protein line with relatively high amounts of both elemental sulfur and leginsulin. We introgressed these desirable traits from PI 427138 into an experimental line with the aim of improving the overall protein content and quality of seed proteins. Biochemical characterization of inbred progenies from the cross of LD00-3309 with PI 427138 grown at six locations revealed stable ingression of high protein, high elemental sulfur, and high leginsulin accumulation. Comparison of soybean seed proteins resolved by high-resolution 2-D gel electrophoresis in combination with Delta2D image analysis software revealed preferential accumulation of a few glycinin subunits contributed to the increased protein content in the introgressed lines. Amino acid analysis revealed that even though the leginsulin introgressed lines had higher protein, leginsulin, and elemental sulfur, the overall concentration of sulfur-containing amino acids was not significantly altered when compared with the parental lines. The experimental soybean lines developed during this study (Leg-3, Leg-7, and Leg-8) lack A5, A4, and B3 glycinin subunits and could be utilized in breeding programs to develop high-quality tofu cultivars.

  11. Annotation of Selaginella moellendorffii major intrinsic proteins and the evolution of the protein family in terrestrial plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Isa Anderberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs also called aquaporins form pores in membranes to facilitate the permeation of water and certain small polar solutes across membranes. MIPs are present in virtually every organism but are uniquely abundant in land plants. To elucidate the evolution and function of MIPs in terrestrial plants, the MIPs encoded in the genome of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii were identified and analyzed. In total 19 MIPs were found in S. moellendorffii belonging to six of the seven MIP subfamilies previously identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Only three of the MIPs were classified as members of the conserved water specific plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP subfamily whereas almost half were found to belong to the diverse NOD26-like intrinsic protein (NIP subfamily permeating various solutes. The small number of PIPs in S. moellendorffii is striking compared to all other land plants and no other species has more NIPs than PIPs. Similar to moss, S. moellendorffii only has one type of tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP. Based on ESTs from non-angiosperms we conclude that the specialized groups of TIPs present in higher plants are not found in primitive vascular plants but evolved later in a common ancestor of seed plants. We also note that the silicic acid permeable NIP2 group that has been reported from angiosperms appears at the same time. We suggest that the expansion of the number MIP isoforms in higher plants is primarily associated with an increase in the different types of specialized tissues rather than the emergence of vascular tissue per se and that the loss of subfamilies has been possible due to a functional overlap between some subfamilies.

  12. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lofthouse, J T

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  13. Pharmaceutical proteins produced in plant bioreactor in recent years

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... post-translational modification processes do not take place. Plant-derived ... monoclonal antibody (mAB) S19, and this gene (scFv1 9) was expressed in ..... seeds and characterization of its biological activity. Biotechnol. Lett.

  14. Pollen indication to source plants in the eastern desert of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuecong; XU Qinghai; ZHAO Yingkui; YANG Xiaolan; XIAO Jule; CHEN Hui; L(U) Xinmiao

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the indication of major pollen types to source plants, 39 surface pollen samples are collected from 39 plant communities. The results show that diversity of pollen assemblages presents in different communities. Chenopodiaceae pollen percentages are highest in Kalidium communities and Ceratoides communities (higher than 45%, average is 63.4%), but high Ephedra pollen percentages (higher than 3.3%, average is 16.5%)in Ceratoides communities make it distinguished from Kalidium communities. Artemisia pollen percentages (more than 50%) are much higher than Chenopodiaceae (less than 35%) in Artemisia Communities. Nitraria pollen percentages (higher than 2%, average is 13.6%) are highest in Nitraria communities compared with those in other community patterns. Tamariceae pollen percentages (higher than 2%, average is 8.6%) are highest both in Tetraena and Reaumuria communities compared with those in other community patterns. But in Reaumuria communities, Artemisia pollen percentages are higher than Chenopodiaceae with some other pollen types such as Gramineae, Compositae, Leguminosae; on the contrary, in Tetraena communities, Artemisia pollen percentages are less than Chenopodiaceae with few other pollen types. Calligonum pollen only appears in Calligonum communities (higher than 2%,average is 5%). The results of cluster analysis (CLA) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) show that the pollen indication to source plants can be reflected by association indices (A), over-representation indices (O), under-representation indices (U), R-value, the average pollen percentages where parent plants are absent (Xa) and the average pollen percentages where parent plants are present (Xp). Zygophyllum, Calligonum, Tetraena, Tribulus and Tamariceae can indicate source plants very well, owing to high A scores. Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae and Gramineae have high R-values, and Nitraria, Cruciferae and sedum have high O scores, so they are over-represented types

  15. Palatability of water-soluble extracts of protein sources and replacement of fishmeal by a selected mixture of protein sources for juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Poor palatability is a limiting factor for replacing fishmeal with other protein sources in aquaculture. The water-soluble molecules with low molecular weights are the major determinants of the palatability of diets. The present study was conducted to investigate the palatability of water-soluble extracts from single protein source (single extract pellets) and the mixture of these extracts with different proportions (blended extract pellets) in juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus). Then according to the palatability of blended extract pellets, an optimal mixture proportion was selected, and a new protein source made from raw protein materials with the selected proportion was formulated to replace fishmeal. Summarily, the palatability of single extract pellets for turbot was descendent from fishmeal to pet-food grade poultry by-product meal, wheat gluten meal, soybean meal, peanut meal, meat and bone meal, and corn gluten meal. Subsequently, according to the palatability of single extract pellets, 52 kinds of blended extract pellets were designed to test their palatability. The results showed that the pellets presented remarkably different palatability, and the optimal one was diet 52 (wheat gluten meal: pet-food grade poultry by-product meal: meat and bone meal: corn gluten meal = 1:6:1:2). The highest ingestion ratio (the number of pellets ingested/the number of pellets fed) was 0.73 ± 0.03, which was observed in Diet 52. Then five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (20 kJ g-1 gross energy) diets were formulated by replacing 0 (control), 35%, 50%, 65% and 80% of fishmeal with No.52 blending proportion. After a 10-weeks feeding trial, a consistent feed intake was found among all replacement treatments. Replacement level of fishmeal up to 35% did not significantly influence final body weight, specific growth rate, feed efficiency ratio, and protein efficiency ratio of turbot. Therefore, the water-soluble extracts of protein sources play an

  16. Conserved and variable correlated mutations in the plant MADS protein network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.D.J.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plant MADS domain proteins are involved in a variety of developmental processes for which their ability to form various interactions is a key requisite. However, not much is known about the structure of these proteins or their complexes, whereas such knowledge would be valuable for a bet

  17. Structure-function analysis of the NB-ARC domain of plant disease resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, G.; Mayr, G.; Kasiem, M.M.A.; Albrecht, M.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. Most resistance proteins contain a central nucleotide-binding domain. This so-called NB-ARC domain consists of three subdomains: NB, ARC1, and ARC2. The NB-ARC domain is a fun

  18. Total Soluble Protein Extraction for Improved Proteomic Analysis of Transgenic Rice Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raorane, Manish L; Narciso, Joan O; Kohli, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput platforms, proteomics has become a powerful tool to search for plant gene products of agronomic relevance. Protein extractions using multistep protocols have been shown to be effective to achieve better proteome profiles than simple, single-step extractions. These protocols are generally efficient for above ground tissues such as leaves. However, each step leads to loss of some amount of proteins. Additionally, compounds such as proteases in the plant tissues lead to protein degradation. While protease inhibitor cocktails are available, these alone do not seem to suffice when roots are included in the plant sample. This is obvious given the lack of high molecular weight (HMW) proteins obtained from samples that include root tissue. For protein/proteome analysis of transgenic plant roots or of seedlings, which include root tissue, such pronounced protein degradation is especially undesirable. A facile protein extraction protocol is presented, which ensures that despite the inclusion of root tissues there is minimal loss in total protein components.

  19. Supercomplexes of photosystem I and antenna proteins in cyanobacteria and green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouril, R.; Zygadlo, A.; Jensen, P. E.; Yeremenko, N.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; D'Haene, S.; Dekker, J.P.; Boekema, E.J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) can form supercomplexes with various types of antenna proteins. One such protein is Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII). In plants it is bound in its trimeric form to dimeric PSII. In spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana most dimers bind 2-4 LHCII trimers. W

  20. The PsbW protein stabilizes the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Cerdan, Jose G.; Kovacs, Laszlo; Toth, Tuende; Kereiche, Sami; Aseeva, Elena; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mamedov, Fikret; Funk, Christiane; Schroder, Wolfgang P.; Tóth, Tünde; Kereïche, Sami; Schröder, Wolfgang P.

    2011-01-01

    P>PsbW, a 6.1-kDa low-molecular-weight protein, is exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, and associates with the photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. In vivo and in vitro comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type plants with T-DNA insertion knock-out mutants completely lacking the PsbW protei

  1. A three step approach for removing organic matter from South African water sources and treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkambule, T. I.; Krause, R. W. M.; Haarhoff, J.; Mamba, B. B.

    The high variability in the levels and composition of natural organic matter (NOM) in South-African water sources in different regions means that no single treatment process can be prescribed for each water treatment plant operating in the country. In order to remove NOM from water in a water treatment train, the composition of the NOM in the source water must be taken into account, especially as it may not necessarily be uniform since the composition is dependent on local environmental situation. The primary objective of this study was to characterise the NOM present in South African source waters through an extensive sampling of representative water types across the country and then develop a rapid NOM characterisation protocol. Water samples were thus collected from eight different water treatment plants located throughout the country at different sites of their water treatment trains. Raw water samples, the intermediate samples before filtration and water samples before disinfection were collected at these drinking water treatment plants. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEMs), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), ultraviolet (UV) characterisation (200-900 nm) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) analysis were used to characterise the NOM in the water samples. The FEEM and UV results revealed that the samples were composed mainly of humic substances with a high UV-254 absorbance, while some samples had marine humic substances and non-humic substances. The sample’s DOC results were within the range of 3.25-21.44 mg C/L, which was indicative of the varying nature of the NOM composition in the regions where samples were obtained. The BDOC fraction of the NOM, on the other hand, ranged from 20% to 65%, depending on the geographical location of the sampling site. It is evident from the results obtained that the NOM composition varied per sampling site which would eventually have a bearing on its treatability. The various water treatment

  2. Delivering of Proteins to the Plant Vacuole—An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Pereira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trafficking of soluble cargo to the vacuole is far from being a closed issue as it can occur by different routes and involve different intermediates. The textbook view of proteins being sorted at the post-Golgi level to the lytic vacuole via the pre-vacuole or to the protein storage vacuole mediated by dense vesicles is now challenged as novel routes are being disclosed and vacuoles with intermediate characteristics described. The identification of Vacuolar Sorting Determinants is a key signature to understand protein trafficking to the vacuole. Despite the long established vacuolar signals, some others have been described in the last few years, with different properties that can be specific for some cells or some types of vacuoles. There are also reports of proteins having two different vacuolar signals and their significance is questionable: a way to increase the efficiency of the sorting or different sorting depending on the protein roles in a specific context? Along came the idea of differential vacuolar sorting, suggesting a possible specialization of the trafficking pathways according to the type of cell and specific needs. In this review, we show the recent advances in the field and focus on different aspects of protein trafficking to the vacuoles.

  3. Neem (Azadirachta indica) Seed Cake/Kernel as Protein Source in Ruminants Feed

    OpenAIRE

    Aruwayo, A.; S.A. Maigandi

    2013-01-01

    Ruminant production that is very popular in Nigeria livestock production faces series of problems, chief among them is the shortage of protein supply in adequate amount for optimum performance of the animals. The forages, which constitute the bulk of the source of feed for these animals, fluctuate in supply with poor nutrient content especially during the dry season of the year. The convectional protein concentrates which boost the protein supply faces intense competition from man. It has bec...

  4. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  5. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  6. A comparative analysis of recombinant protein expression in different biofactories: bacteria, insect cells and plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecchele, Elisa; Merlin, Matilde; Brozzetti, Annalisa; Falorni, Alberto; Pezzotti, Mario; Avesani, Linda

    2015-03-23

    Plant-based systems are considered a valuable platform for the production of recombinant proteins as a result of their well-documented potential for the flexible, low-cost production of high-quality, bioactive products. In this study, we compared the expression of a target human recombinant protein in traditional fermenter-based cell cultures (bacterial and insect) with plant-based expression systems, both transient and stable. For each platform, we described the set-up, optimization and length of the production process, the final product quality and the yields and we evaluated provisional production costs, specific for the selected target recombinant protein. Overall, our results indicate that bacteria are unsuitable for the production of the target protein due to its accumulation within insoluble inclusion bodies. On the other hand, plant-based systems are versatile platforms that allow the production of the selected protein at lower-costs than Baculovirus/insect cell system. In particular, stable transgenic lines displayed the highest-yield of the final product and transient expressing plants the fastest process development. However, not all recombinant proteins may benefit from plant-based systems but the best production platform should be determined empirically with a case-by-case approach, as described here.

  7. The Trichoderma-plant interaction is mediated by avirulence proteins produced by this fungus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruocco M; Kip N; P J G M de Wit; Lorito M; Lanzuise S; Woo S L; Ambrosino P; Marra R; Turrà D; Gigante S; Formisno E; Scala F

    2004-01-01

    @@ The molecular basis of Trichoderma -plant interaction is very complex and still not completely understood. The colonization of the root system by rhizosphere competent strains of Trichoderma results in increased development of root/aerial systems, in improved yields and in plant disease control.Other beneficial effects, such as the induction of plant systemic resistance, have also been described.To understand the mechanisms involved we are using different approaches, including the making of transformants expressing genes that encode for compounds able to affect plant response to pathogens.Trichoderma transformants carrying the avirulence gene Avr4 from Cladosporium fulvum under the control of constitutive and inducible promoters were obtained and tested on tomato plants having the Cf4 resistance gene. Necrosis and suberification zones, similar to the symptoms appearing during Cladosporium-tomato interaction, were found when the roots of the Cf4 plants were treated with Avr4-Trichoderma. This demonstrates that selected Trichoderma strains are able to transfer to the plant molecules that may deeply affect metabolism, disease resistance etc. Therefore, these beneficial fungi can be regarded as biotechnological tools to provide a variety of crops with useful compounds.Moreover, in in vitro competition assays the transformants were found to be more effective as antagonists against Alternaria alternata than the wild type. Trichoderma sends a variety of biochemical signals to the plants including avirulence molecules; therefore the presence of avr-like proteins in the fungus proteome was investigated. Proteome analysis has permitted us to isolate and sequence many proteins potentially having this function. From the extraeellular protein extracts, we have purified and sequenced a protein with structural characteristics similar to Avr4 of C. fulvum.The protein, Hytra1, was found to be a hydrophobin with chitin binding activity, the typical 8cysteine residues, and 4

  8. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-02-19

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells.

  9. Exploring the potential of endophytes from medicinal plants as sources of antimycobacterial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin, Alfonsus; Miller, Kristin I; Neilan, Brett A

    2014-01-01

    Natural product drug discovery has regained interest due to low production costs, structural diversity, and multiple uses of active compounds to treat various diseases. Attention has been directed towards medicinal plants as these plants have been traditionally used for generations to treat symptoms of numerous diseases. It is established that plants harbour microorganisms, collectively known as endophytes. Exploring the as-yet untapped natural products from the endophytes increases the chances of finding novel compounds. The concept of natural products targeting microbial pathogens has been applied to isolate novel antimycobacterial compounds, and the rapid development of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has significantly increased the need for new treatments against this pathogen. It remains important to continuously screen for novel compounds from natural sources, particularly from rarely encountered microorganisms, such as the endophytes. This review focuses on bioprospecting for polyketides and small peptides exhibiting antituberculosis activity, although current treatments against tuberculosis are described. It is established that natural products from these structure classes are often biosynthesised by microorganisms. Therefore it is hypothesised that some bioactive polyketides and peptides originally isolated from plants are in fact produced by their endophytes. This is of interest for further endophyte natural product investigations.

  10. Plant uptake of phosphorus from sparingly available P- sources as affected by Trichoderma asperellum T34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Garcia-Lopez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of Trichoderma asperellum T34 to the plant uptake of phosphorus (P from sparingly phytoavailable forms such as insoluble calcium (Ca phosphates and phytates was studied. Two experiments with cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. on siliceous sand were performed involving two factors, namely: (i P source, viz., KH2PO4, phytate (Ins6P, and phosphate rock (PR, and (ii inoculation with T34. Liquid pure cultures of T34 were also used. T34 increased the total content in P of cucumber roots irrespective of the particular P form and enhanced total P uptake by plants with P supplied as Ins6P or PR. The increased phytase activity observed with T34 contributes to explain its favourable influence on the uptake of P supplied as Ins6P. Solubilization of Ca phosphates from PR was favoured by the slightly acidifying effect and the increased organic anion concentration promoted by the fungus in the plant growth media. It can be concluded that T34 can improve P nutrition in plants grown on media containing phytates or insoluble Ca phosphates as dominant P forms.

  11. Evaluation of Protein Extraction Methods for Proteomic Analysis of Non-Model Recalcitrant Plant Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Plant tissues contain relatively low amounts of proteins whose extraction is often difficult due to the presence of interfering compounds such as rigid cellulosic cell wall, storage polysaccharides, lipids and other contaminants that can cause protein degradation or modification. Therefore it is important to optimize protein extraction and to establish a robust protocol for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and downstream processing. In this study, acetone, trichloroacetic acid/aceto...

  12. Plant biostimulants: physiological responses induced by protein hydrolyzed-based products and humic substances in plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Nardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In recent years, the use of biostimulants in sustainable agriculture has been growing. Biostimulants can be obtained from different organic materials and include humic substances (HS, complex organic materials, beneficial chemical elements, peptides and amino acids, inorganic salts, seaweed extracts, chitin and chitosan derivatives, antitranspirants, amino acids and other N-containing substances. The application of biostimulants to plants leads to higher content of nutrients in their tissue and positive metabolic changes. For these reasons, the development of new biostimulants has become a focus of scientific interest. Among their different functions, biostimulants influence plant growth and nitrogen metabolism, especially because of their content in hormones and other signalling molecules. A significant increase in root hair length and density is often observed in plants treated with biostimulants, suggesting that these substances induce a “nutrient acquisition response” that favors nutrient uptake in plants via an increase in the absorptive surface area. Furthermore, biostimulants positively influence the activity and gene expression of enzymes functioning in the primary and secondary plant metabolism. This article reviews the current literature on two main classes of biostimulants: humic substances and protein-based biostimulants. The characteristic of these biostimulants and their effects on plants are thoroughly described.

  13. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  14. NBS-LRR Proteins and Their Partners: Molecular Switches of Plant Defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chunyan; QIU Hongmei; WANG Jialin; WANG Jing; CHEN Qingshan; HU Guohua

    2008-01-01

    Specificity of the plant innate immune system is often conferred by resistance (R) proteins. Most plant disease resistance (R) proteins contain a series of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a nucleotide-binding site (NBS), and a putative amino-terminal signaling domain. They are termed NBS-LRR proteins. The LRRs are mainly involved in recognition, and the amino-terminal domain determines signaling specificity, whereas the NBS domain presumably functions as a molecular switch. During the past years, the most important discoveries are the role of partners in NBS-LRR gene mediated defenses, mounting support for the so-called "guard hypothesis" of R gene function, and providing evidence for intramolecular interactions and intelmolecular interactions within NBS-LRR proteins as a mode of signaling regulation. The outcome of these interactions determines whether a plant activates its defense responses.

  15. Glow in the Dark: Fluorescent Proteins as Cell and Tissue-Specific Markers in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenzislava Ckurshumova; Adriana E. Caragea; Rochelle S. Goldstein; Thomas Berleth

    2011-01-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants,fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types,to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes,and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes.Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes.The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms.In developmental studies,the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical,where morphological markers of tissues,cell types,or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable.In this review,we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  16. Distillery wastes as external carbon sources for denitrification in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwionka, K; Makinia, J; Kaszubowska, M; Majtacz, J; Angowski, M

    2012-01-01

    In this study, by-products from alcohol production were examined in terms of their potential application as external carbon sources for enhancing denitrification in biological nutrient removal systems. Three types of batch tests were used to compare the effects of the distillery by-products, such as fusel oil, syrup and reject water, on the non-acclimated activated sludge. Much higher nitrate utilization rates (NURs) were observed for the latter two carbon sources. In the conventional NUR measurements (one-phase experiments), the observed NURs with syrup and reject water were 3.2-3.3 g N/(kg VSS h) compared with 1.0 g N/(kg VSS h) obtained for fusel oils from two different distilleries. When the carbon sources were added at the beginning of the anoxic phase preceded by an anaerobic phase (two-phase experiments), the NURs were 4.2 g N/(kg VSS h) (syrup and reject water) and 2.4-2.7 g N/(kg VSS h) (fusel oils). The heterotrophic yield coefficient, determined based on the conventional OUR measurements, varied in a relatively narrow range (0.72-0.79 g COD/g COD) for all the examined carbon sources. Due to advantageous composition (much higher COD concentrations and COD/N ratios), fusel is a preferred carbon source for practical handling in full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  17. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens.

  18. Construction and analysis of the transgenic carrot and celery plants expressing the recombinant thaumatin II protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchakivska Yu. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To obtain the transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II in order to increase plant stress tolerance. Methods. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the carrot and celery seedlings was used for obtaining the transgenic plants. Presence and transcription of the transgene in plant tissues were proved by PCR and RT-PCR analysis. The plants were tested for the biotic stress tolerance by in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activity assays and for the salinity and osmotic stress tolerance by plant survival test in presence of NaCl and PEG in different concentrations. Results. Transgenic plants able to express recombinant thaumatin II gene (transcription proved for 60–100 % were obtained by agrobacterial transformation. The transgenic carrot plant extracts inhibited the growth of the studied phytopathogenic bacteria strains but exhibited no antifungal activity. Survival level of transgenic plants under the salinity and osmotic stress effect was definitely higher comparing to the untransgenic ones. The analysis of the photosynthetic pigment content in the transgenic carrot plants showed no significant difference of this parameter under salinity stress that may indicate a possible protective activity of the recombinant protein. Conclusions. The obtained in our study transgenic carrot and celery plants able to express the recombinant thaumatin II gene were characterized by antibacterial activity and increased tolerance to salinity and osmotic stress factors.

  19. Production of fungal protein from cellulosic plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaram, N.; Kunhi, A.A.M.; Geethadevi, B.R.; Rao, T.N.R.

    1979-01-01

    The ability of 5 Aspergillus niger strains, a Penicillium chrysogenum strain, a Pestalotia strain, and a basidiomycete to produce microbial protein on 3 alkali-treated cellulosic substrates (rice straw, bagasse, and peanut shells) was evaluated. Most strains grew better on rice straw than on the other 2 substrates. Penicillium chrysogenum St-F3B produced more protein on all 3 substrates than did any of the other strains with a maximum production on rice straw of 85 mg/g substrate after 72 h incubation on a rotary shaker at pH 3.5 to 6.0. An inverse relation between substrate concentration and protein production per g substrate was observed with this organism.

  20. Molecular farming of pharmaceutical proteins using plant suspension cell and tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, Stefan; Raven, Nicole; Fischer, Rainer; Twyman, Richard M; Schiermeyer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Plants have been used for more than 20 years to produce recombinant proteins but only recently has the focus shifted away from proof-of-principle studies (i.e. is my protein expressed and is it functional?) to a serious consideration of the requirements for sustainable productivity and the regulatory approval of pharmaceutical products (i.e. is my protein safe, is it efficacious, and does the product and process comply with regulatory guidelines?). In this context, plant tissue and cell suspension cultures are ideal production platforms whose potential has been demonstrated using diverse pharmaceutical proteins. Typically, cell/tissue cultures are grown in containment under defined conditions, allowing process controls to regulate growth and product formation, thus ensuring regulatory compliance. Recombinant proteins can also be secreted to the culture medium, facilitating recovery and subsequent purification because cells contain most of the contaminating proteins and can be removed from the culture broth. Downstream processing costs are therefore lower compared to whole plant systems, balancing the higher costs of the fermentation equipment. In this article, we compare different approaches for the production of valuable proteins in plant cell suspension and tissue cultures, describing the advantages and disadvantages as well as challenges that must be overcome to make this platform commercially viable. We also present novel strategies for system and process optimization, helping to increase yields and scalability.

  1. Dietary intake and main sources of plant lignans in five European countries

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    Inge Tetens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dietary intakes of plant lignans have been hypothesized to be inversely associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and cancer. Earlier studies were based on a Finnish lignan database (Fineli® with two lignan precursors, secoisolariciresinol (SECO and matairesinol (MAT. More recently, a Dutch database, including SECO and MAT and the newly recognized lignan precursors lariciresinol (LARI and pinoresinol (PINO, was compiled. The objective was to re-estimate and re-evaluate plant lignan intakes and to identify the main sources of plant lignans in five European countries using the Finnish and Dutch lignan databases, respectively. Methods: Forty-two food groups known to contribute to the total lignan intake were selected and attributed a value for SECO and MAT from the Finnish lignan database (Fineli® or for SECO, MAT, LARI, and PINO from the Dutch database. Total intake of lignans was estimated from food consumption data for adult men and women (19–79 years from Denmark, Finland, Italy, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the contribution of aggregated food groups calculated using the Dutch lignin database. Results: Mean dietary lignan intakes estimated using the Dutch database ranged from 1 to 2 mg/day, which was approximately four-fold higher than the intakes estimated from the Fineli® database. When LARI and PINO were included in the estimation of the total lignan intakes, cereals, grain products, vegetables, fruit and berries were the most important dietary sources of lignans. Conclusion: Total lignin intake was approximately four-fold higher in the Dutch lignin database, which includes the lignin precursors LARI and PINO, compared to estimates based on the Finnish database based only on SECO and MAT. The main sources of lignans according to the Dutch database in the five countries studied were cereals and grain products, vegetables, fruit, berries, and beverages.

  2. 40 CFR 174.526 - Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.526 Section 174.526... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.526 Hygromycin B phosphotransferase (APH4) marker protein in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues...

  3. Uptake of Silicon by Sugarcane from Applied Sources May Not Reflect Plant-Available Soil Silicon and Total Silicon Content of Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm G. Keeping

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soils of the tropics and sub-tropics are typically acid and depleted of soluble sources of silicon (Si due to weathering and leaching associated with high rainfall and temperatures. Together with intensive cropping, this leads to marginal or deficient plant Si levels in Si-accumulating crops such as rice and sugarcane. Although such deficiencies can be corrected with exogenous application of Si sources, there is controversy over the effectiveness of sources in relation to their total Si content, and their capacity to raise soil and plant Si concentrations. This study tested the hypothesis that the total Si content and provision of plant-available Si from six sources directly affects subsequent plant Si uptake as reflected in leaf Si concentration. Two trials with potted cane plants were established with the following Si sources as treatments: calcium silicate slag, fused magnesium (thermo phosphate, volcanic rock dust, magnesium silicate, and granular potassium silicate. Silicon sources were applied at rates intended to achieve equivalent elemental soil Si concentrations; controls were untreated or lime-treated. Analyses were conducted to determine soil and leaf elemental concentrations. Among the sources, calcium silicate produced the highest leaf Si concentrations, yet lower plant-available soil Si concentrations than the thermophosphate. The latter, with slightly higher total Si than the slag, produced substantially greater increases in soil Si than all other products, yet did not significantly raise leaf Si above the controls. All other sources did not significantly increase soil or leaf Si concentrations, despite their high Si content. Hence, the total Si content of sources does not necessarily concur with a product's provision of soluble soil Si and subsequent plant uptake. Furthermore, even where soil pH was raised, plant uptake from thermophosphate was well below expectation, possibly due to its limited liming capacity. The ability of

  4. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann David GJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their “brightness” and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. Results The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. Conclusions From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  5. Tail-anchored membrane proteins: exploring the complex diversity of tail-anchored-protein targeting in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Ben M; Mullen, Robert T

    2011-02-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are special class of integral membrane proteins that in recent years have received a considerable amount of attention due to their diverse cellular functions and unique targeting and insertion mechanisms. Defined by the presence of a single, hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain at or near their C terminus, TA proteins must be inserted into membranes post-translationally and are orientated such that their larger N-terminal domain (most often the functional domain) faces the cytosol, while their shorter C-terminal domain faces the interior of the organelle. The C-terminal domain of TA proteins also usually contains the information responsible for their selective targeting to the proper subcellular membrane, a process that, based primarily on studies with yeasts and mammals, appears to be highly complex due to the presence of multiple pathways. Within this context, we discuss here the biogenesis of plant TA proteins and the potential for hundreds of new TA proteins identified via bioinformatics screens to contribute to the already remarkable number of roles that this class of membrane proteins participates in throughout plant growth and development.

  6. Profiling of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant extracts using in-source CID fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Ádám; Abrankó, László

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids (HCQAs) are a major class of phenolic plant secondary metabolites, belonging to the chlorogenic acid family. Various health-beneficial properties of HCQAs have been shown, which has drawn interest for HCQA profiling in plants of human consumption. However, this task remains challenging, because several isomeric HCQAs can be present in the sample with identical molecular formulae and the limited availability of reference standards poses additional challenges to their identification. In the present work, a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q/TOF-MS) method accompanied with an effective data filtering protocol is presented, which is shown to be suitable for the identification of HCQAs in plant materials in a non-targeted manner. Both collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation performed in a collision cell and in-source (CID) fragmentation were used to produce accurate mass fragments. It was shown that fragmentation characteristics required for identification of regio-isomers of HCQAs can be achieved with in-source CID fragmentation, enabling the use of a single-stage MS system with in-source fragmentation for convincing identification of HCQAs. Based on a thorough validation of identified HCQA compounds using coffee bean extracts as reference samples, comprehensive profiling of HCQAs in two apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) genotypes ('Preventa' and 'Gönci magyarkajszi') was carried out for the first time and the following 10 HCQAs were shown to be present in apricot fruit: 3-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), cis-3-CQA, 4-CQA, 5-CQA, cis-5-CQA, 3,5-diCQA, 3-p-coumaroylquinic acid (pCoQA), 4-pCoQA, 3-feruloylquinic acid (FQA) and cis-3-FQA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. An HPLC-ESI-Q/TOF-MS method suitable for the identification of hydroxycinnamoyilquinic acids (HCQAs) in plant material in a non-targeted manner was developed. Single-stage, high

  7. Regulation of starch accumulation by granule-associated plant 14-3-3 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnke, P C; Chung, H J; Wu, K; Ferl, R J

    2001-01-16

    In higher plants the production of starch is orchestrated by chloroplast-localized biosynthetic enzymes, namely starch synthases, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and starch branching and debranching enzymes. Diurnal regulation of these enzymes, as well as starch-degrading enzymes, influences both the levels and composition of starch, and is dependent in some instances upon phosphorylation-linked regulation. The phosphoserine/threonine-binding 14-3-3 proteins participate in environmentally responsive phosphorylation-related regulatory functions in plants, and as such are potentially involved in starch regulation. We report here that reduction of the epsilon subgroup of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins by antisense technology resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase in leaf starch accumulation. Dark-governed starch breakdown was unaffected in these "antisense plants," indicating an unaltered starch-degradation pathway and suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in regulation of starch synthesis. Absorption spectra and gelatinization properties indicate that the starch from the antisense plants has an altered branched glucan composition. Biochemical characterization of protease-treated starch granules from both Arabidopsis leaves and maize endosperm showed that 14-3-3 proteins are internal intrinsic granule proteins. These data suggest a direct role for 14-3-3 proteins in starch accumulation. The starch synthase III family is a possible target for 14-3-3 protein regulation because, uniquely among plastid-localized starch metabolic enzymes, all members of the family contain the conserved 14-3-3 protein phosphoserine/threonine-binding consensus motif. This possibility is strengthened by immunocapture using antibodies to DU1, a maize starch synthase III family member, and direct interaction with biotinylated 14-3-3 protein, both of which demonstrated an association between 14-3-3 proteins and DU1 or DU1-like proteins.

  8. Pilot study on binding of bovine salivary proteins to grit silicates and plant phytoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Marcus; M Kaiser, Thomas; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    Mostly fed with grass in fresh or conserved form, cattle and other livestock have to cope with silicate defence bodies from plants (phytoliths) and environmental silicates (grit), which abrade tooth enamel and could additionally interact with various salivary proteins. To detect potential candidates for silicate-binding proteins, bovine whole saliva was incubated with grass-derived phytoliths and silicates. Interactions of salivary proteins with pulverized bovine dental enamel and dentine were additionally analysed. After intense washing, the powder fractions were loaded onto 1D-polyacrylamide gels, most prominent adhesive protein bands were cut out and proteins were identified by mass spectrometry within three independent replicates. All materials were mainly bound by bovine odorant-binding protein, bovine salivary protein 30×10(3) and carbonic anhydrase VI. The phytolith/silicate fraction showed additional stronger interaction with haemoglobin β and lactoperoxidase. Conceivably, the binding of these proteins to the surfaces may contribute to biological processes occurring on them.

  9. Overview of OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS, a novel class of plant-specific growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shucai eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OVATE FAMILY PROTEINS (OFPs are a class of proteins with a conserved OVATE domain. OVATE protein was first identified in tomato as a key regulator of fruit shape. OFPs are plant-specific proteins that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom including mosses and lycophytes. Transcriptional activity analysis of Arabidopsis OFPs (AtOFPs in protoplasts suggests that they act as transcription repressors. Functional characterization of OFPs from different plant species including Arabidopsis, rice, tomato, pepper and banana suggests that OFPs regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development, which is likely achieved by interacting with different types of transcription factors including the KNOX and BELL classes, and/or directly regulating the expression of target genes such as Gibberellin 20 oxidase (GA20ox. Here, we examine how OVATE was originally identified, summarize recent progress in elucidation of the roles of OFPs in regulating plant growth and development, and describe possible mechanisms underpinning this regulation. Finally, we review potential new research directions that could shed additional light on the functional biology of OFPs in plants.

  10. Development of a cell sorting procedure to increase the sensitivity of detection of protein-protein interactions in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Wong, Sek Man

    2011-05-01

    To visualize subcellular localization of viral proteins and interactions between viral proteins and host proteins in vivo, transfection of plasmids into protoplasts to over-express transiently fusion proteins with a fluorescent tag is a common method. However, due to the low efficiency (0.1-3.0%) of plasmid transfection into protoplasts, it is difficult to identify protoplasts that emit fluorescence using confocal microscopy. A flow cytometry sorting protocol was developed for separating kenaf protoplasts that emit yellow fluorescence. The sorted protoplasts showed strong fluorescence and the protoplasts were intact. This will improve the use of confocal microscopy for studying subcellular localization and protein interactions in protoplasts isolated from plants with low transfection efficiency.

  11. The Possibility to use a Nuclear Power Plant as a Source of Electrical Energy and Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Minkiewicz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article issues concernig the possibility of nuclear power plant (NPP operation also as a source of heat, which means combined heat and power production, have been described. CHP work is possible and profitable only in those areas where high thermal power demand occurs, which means near city agglomerations such as Warsaw or the Tri-City. Two levels of thermal power delivered to the heating system have been considered. Preliminary technical and economic studies regarding NPP location by Żarnowiec Lake have confirmed the NPP potential to work as a primary source of heat in the heating network system, which would feed the regions of Wejherowo and Gdynia.

  12. Mouse fat storage-inducing transmembrane protein 2 (FIT2) promotes lipid droplet accumulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yingqi; McClinchie, Elizabeth; Price, Ann; Nguyen, Thuy N; Gidda, Satinder K; Watt, Samantha C; Yurchenko, Olga; Park, Sunjung; Sturtevant, Drew; Mullen, Robert T; Dyer, John M; Chapman, Kent D

    2017-07-01

    Fat storage-inducing transmembrane protein 2 (FIT2) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized protein that plays an important role in lipid droplet (LD) formation in animal cells. However, no obvious homologue of FIT2 is found in plants. Here, we tested the function of FIT2 in plant cells by ectopically expressing mouse (Mus musculus) FIT2 in Nicotiana tabacum suspension-cultured cells, Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Confocal microscopy indicated that the expression of FIT2 dramatically increased the number and size of LDs in leaves of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis, and lipidomics analysis and mass spectrometry imaging confirmed the accumulation of neutral lipids in leaves. FIT2 also increased seed oil content by ~13% in some stable, overexpressing lines of Arabidopsis. When expressed transiently in leaves of N. benthamiana or suspension cells of N. tabacum, FIT2 localized specifically to the ER and was often concentrated at certain regions of the ER that resembled ER-LD junction sites. FIT2 also colocalized at the ER with other proteins known to be involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis or LD formation in plants, but not with ER resident proteins involved in electron transfer or ER-vesicle exit sites. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mouse FIT2 promotes LD accumulation in plants, a surprising functional conservation in the context of a plant cell given the apparent lack of FIT2 homologues in higher plants. These results suggest also that FIT2 expression represents an effective synthetic biology strategy for elaborating neutral lipid compartments in plant tissues for potential biofuel or bioproduct purposes. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cloning and expression analysis of a dirigent protein gene from the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renhua Wu; Lili Wang; Zhi Wang,; Haihong Shang; Xia Liu; Yan Zhu; Dongdong Qi; Xin Deng

    2009-01-01

    Resurrection plants are tolerant to extreme dehydration and are useful model systems to study genes that play a role in drought tolerance.A gene fragment encoding a dirigent protein that is predicted to function in lignin biosynthesis was identified from leaves of the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica via cDNA microarray screening.A cDNA,designated BhDIRI,containing the complete predicted open reading frame,was obtained by 5'-RACE.BhDIRI transcripts were found to be accumulated in response to changes in plant dehydration status,exogenously applied phytohormones and signaling molecules,and temperature stresses.BhDIRl encodes a protein of 199 amino acids,which shows 20-40% similarity to dirigent proteins reported from other plants.BhDIRI is predicted to contain a cleavable signal peptide at the N-terminal,and its plasma membrane/cell wall localization was confirmed using a GFP fusion protein assay.Consistent with this discovery,the acid-soluble lignin content decreased in dehydrated B.hygrometrica leaves.Taken together,our results indicate a protective role for a dirigent protein in response to drought stress by changing the physical characters of lignin which in turn is predicted to affect the mechanical strength and flexibility of the plant cell wall.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shucen; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-05-01

    Being a major factory for protein synthesis, assembly, and export, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a precise and robust ER quality control (ERQC) system monitoring its product line. However, when organisms are subjected to environmental stress, whether biotic or abiotic, the levels of misfolded proteins may overwhelm the ERQC system, tilting the balance between the capacity of and demand for ER quality control and resulting in a scenario termed ER stress. Intense or prolonged ER stress may cause damage to the ER as well as to other organelles, or even lead to cell death in extreme cases. To avoid such serious consequences, cells activate self-rescue programs to restore protein homeostasis in the ER, either through the enhancement of protein-folding and degradation competence or by alleviating the demands for such reactions. These are collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR). Long investigated in mammalian cells and yeasts, the UPR is also of great interest to plant scientists. Among the three branches of UPR discovered in mammals, two have been studied in plants with plant homologs existing of the ER-membrane-associated activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1). This review discusses the molecular mechanisms of these two types of UPR in plants, as well as the consequences of insufficient UPR, with a focus on experiments using model plants.

  15. Natural plant sugar sources of Anopheles mosquitoes strongly impact malaria transmission potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Gu

    Full Text Available An improved knowledge of mosquito life history could strengthen malaria vector control efforts that primarily focus on killing mosquitoes indoors using insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying. Natural sugar sources, usually floral nectars of plants, are a primary energy resource for adult mosquitoes but their role in regulating the dynamics of mosquito populations is unclear. To determine how the sugar availability impacts Anopheles sergentii populations, mark-release-recapture studies were conducted in two oases in Israel with either absence or presence of the local primary sugar source, flowering Acacia raddiana trees. Compared with population estimates from the sugar-rich oasis, An. sergentii in the sugar-poor oasis showed smaller population size (37,494 vs. 85,595, lower survival rates (0.72 vs. 0.93, and prolonged gonotrophic cycles (3.33 vs. 2.36 days. The estimated number of females older than the extrinsic incubation period of malaria (10 days in the sugar rich site was 4 times greater than in the sugar poor site. Sugar feeding detected in mosquito guts in the sugar-rich site was significantly higher (73% than in the sugar-poor site (48%. In contrast, plant tissue feeding (poor quality sugar source in the sugar-rich habitat was much less (0.3% than in the sugar-poor site (30%. More important, the estimated vectorial capacity, a standard measure of malaria transmission potential, was more than 250-fold higher in the sugar-rich oasis than that in the sugar-poor site. Our results convincingly show that the availability of sugar sources in the local environment is a major determinant regulating the dynamics of mosquito populations and their vector potential, suggesting that control interventions targeting sugar-feeding mosquitoes pose a promising tactic for combating transmission of malaria parasites and other pathogens.

  16. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles as a rich source of information for arthropod predators: fundamental and applied aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to arthropod herbivory with the induction of volatiles that attract predatory arthropods that attack the herbivores. These so-called herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) appear to be important sources of information that mediate many interactions within a plant–arthropod communit

  17. [Development characteristics of aquatic plants in a constructed wetland for treating urban drinking water source at its initial operation stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Ma, Xin-Tang; Zhou, Lan; Zhou, Qing-Yuan; Wang, Zhong-Qiong; Wang, Wei-Dong; Yin, Cheng-Qing

    2011-08-01

    The development characteristics and improvement measures of aquatic plants were studied in Shijiuyang Constructed Wetland (SCW) at its initial operation stage. SCW was a large-scale wetland aiming to help relieve the source water pollution in Jiaxing City. A checklist of vascular plants in SCW was built, and species composition, life forms, biomass and association distributions were examined. Our objectives were to examine the diversity and community structure of aquatic plants in SCW at its initial operation stage, and to find out the possible hydrophyte improvement measures. The survey results showed that there were 49 vascular plant species belonging to 41 genera, 25 families in SCW, which greatly exceeded the artificially transplanted 13 species. The life forms of present aquatic plants in SCW were dominated by hygrophilous plants (20 species) and emerged plants (17 species), which accounted for 75.5% of the total number of aquatic plants. The aquatic plants transplanted artificially were dominated by emerged plants (accounted for 69.2%), while those naturally developed were predominated by hygrophilous plants (accounted for 47.2%). The horizontal distribution of aquatic plant community in SCW was mixed in the form of mosaics, which made up typical association complex. Except association Aeschynomene indica L., the dominant species of other associations were all those transplanted artificially. The naturally grown species scattered throughout the SCW and only occupied a small percentage. A marked difference was detected on the species and species richness of aquatic plants in different regions of SCW. Biomass of aquatic plant associations in SCW was 167.7 t. SCW has shown a trend of succession heading for quick increase of plant diversity at the primary operation stage. This trend provides a good material base for the future stable community of aquatic plants in SCW. According to the current status of aquatic plants, some suggestions were put forward on the

  18. Streamlined Construction of the Cyanobacterial CO2-Fixing Organelle via Protein Domain Fusions for Use in Plant Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esquer, C Raul; Shubitowski, Tyler B; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles that sequester segments of biochemical pathways within a protein shell. Given their functional diversity, BMCs constitute a rich source of metabolic modules for applications in synthetic biology. The carboxysome, the cyanobacterial BMC for CO(2) fixation, has attracted significant attention as a target for installation into chloroplasts and serves as the foundation for introducing other types of BMCs into plants. Carboxysome assembly involves a series of protein-protein interactions among at least six gene products to form a metabolic core, around which the shell assembles. This complexity creates significant challenges for the transfer, regulation, and assembly of carboxysomes, or any of the myriad of functionally distinct BMCs, into heterologous systems. To overcome this bottleneck, we constructed a chimeric protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus that structurally and functionally replaces four gene products required for carboxysome formation. The protein was designed based on protein domain interactions in the carboxysome core. The resulting streamlined carboxysomes support photosynthesis. This strategy obviates the need to regulate multiple genes and decreases the genetic load required for carboxysome assembly in heterologous systems. More broadly, the reengineered carboxysomes represent a proof of concept for a domain fusion approach to building multifunctional enzymatic cores that should be generally applicable to the engineering of BMCs for new functions and cellular contexts.

  19. An Arabidopsis mitochondrial uncoupling protein confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Begcy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants are challenged by a large number of environmental stresses that reduce productivity and even cause death. Both chloroplasts and mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species under normal conditions; however, stress causes an imbalance in these species that leads to deviations from normal cellular conditions and a variety of toxic effects. Mitochondria have uncoupling proteins (UCPs that uncouple electron transport from ATP synthesis. There is evidence that UCPs play a role in alleviating stress caused by reactive oxygen species overproduction. However, direct evidence that UCPs protect plants from abiotic stress is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tolerances to salt and water deficit were analyzed in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress a UCP (AtUCP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds of AtUCP1 transgenic lines germinated faster, and adult plants showed better responses to drought and salt stress than wild-type (WT plants. These phenotypes correlated with increased water retention and higher gas exchange parameters in transgenic plants that overexpress AtUCP1. WT plants exhibited increased respiration under stress, while transgenic plants were only slightly affected. Furthermore, the transgenic plants showed reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in stressed leaves compared with WT plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Higher levels of AtUCP1 improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, and this protection was correlated with lower oxidative stress. Our data support previous assumptions that UCPs reduce the imbalance of reactive oxygen species. Our data also suggest that UCPs may play a role in stomatal closure, which agrees with other evidence of a direct relationship between these proteins and photosynthesis. Manipulation of the UCP protein expression in mitochondria is a new avenue for crop improvement and may lead to crops with greater tolerance for challenging environmental conditions.

  20. Inventory and source term evaluation of Russian nuclear power plants for marine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reistad, O. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Oelgaard, P.L. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    2006-04-15

    This report discusses inventory and source term properties in regard to operation and possible releases due to accidents from Russian marine reactor systems. The first part of the report discusses relevant accidents on the basis of both Russian and western sources. The overview shows that certain vessels were much more accident prone compared to others, in addition, there have been a noteworthy reduction in accidents the last two decades. However, during the last years new types of incidents, such as collisions, has occurred more frequently. The second part of the study considers in detail the most important factors for the source term; reactor operational characteristics and the radionuclide inventory. While Russian icebreakers has been operated on a similar basis as commercial power plants, the submarines has different power cyclograms which results in considerable lower values for fission product inventory. Theoretical values for radionuclide inventory are compared with computed results using the modelling tool HELIOS. Regarding inventory of transuranic elements, the results of the calculations are discussed in detail for selected vessels. Criticality accidents, loss-of-cooling accidents and sinking accidents are considered, bases on actual experiences with these types of accident and on theoretical considerations, and source terms for these accidents are discussed in the last chapter. (au)

  1. Proposal on a sustainable strategy to avoid point source pollution of water with plant protection products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestdagh, Inge; Bonicelli, Bernard; Laplana, Ramon; Roettele, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results and lessons learned from the TOPPS project (Training the Operators to prevent Pollution from Point Sources), a proposal on a sustainable strategy to avoid point source pollution from Plant Protection Products (PPPs) was made. Within this TOPPS project (2005-2008), stakeholders were interviewed and research and analysis were done in 6 pilot catchment areas (BE, FR, DE, DK, IT, PL). Next, there was a repeated survey on operators' perception and opinion to measure changes resulting from TOPPS activities and good and bad practices were defined based on the Best Management Practices (risk analysis). Aim of the proposal is to suggest a strategy considering the differences between countries which can be implemented on Member State level in order to avoid PPP pollution of water through point sources. The methodology used for the up-scaLing proposal consists of the analysis of the current situation, a gap analysis, a consistency analysis and organisational structures for implementation. The up-scaling proposal focuses on the behaviour of the operators, on the equipment and infrastructure available with the operators. The proposal defines implementation structures to support correct behaviour through the development and updating of Best Management Practices (BMPs) and through the transfer and the implementation of these BMPs. Next, the proposal also defines requirements for the improvement of equipment and infrastructure based on the defined key factors related to point source pollution. It also contains cost estimates for technical and infrastructure upgrades to comply with BMPs.

  2. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Zaman Nouri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4, type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress.

  3. Effects of plant protein blends on growth performance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the greatest challenges is to increase the amount of plant protein in the diet of carnivorous fishes because they have been shown to have decreased growth and protein utilization when fed diets containing plant proteins such as soybean meal. The purpose of this study was to determine the eff...

  4. Salinity-induced changes in protein expression in the halophytic plant Nitraria sphaerocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhui; Cheng, Tielong; Wang, Pengkai; Liu, Weidong; Xiao, Jiao; Yang, Yunqiang; Hu, Xiangyang; Jiang, Zeping; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2012-09-18

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress that inhibits plant growth and development. Plants have evolved complex adaptive mechanisms that respond to salinity stress. However, an understanding of how plants respond to salinity stress is far from being complete. In particular, how plants survive salinity stress via alterations to their intercellular metabolic networks and defense systems is largely unknown. To delineate the responses of Nitraria sphaerocarpa cell suspensions to salinity, changes in their protein expression patterns were characterized by a comparative proteomic approach. Cells that had been treated with 150 mM NaCl for 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9 days developed several stress-related phenotypes, including those affecting morphology and biochemical activities. Of ~1100 proteins detected in 2-DE gel patterns, 130 proteins showed differences in abundance with more than 1.5-fold when cells were stressed by salinity. All but one of these proteins was identified by MS and database searching. The 129 spots contained 111 different proteins, including those involved in signal transduction, cell rescue/defense, cytoskeleton and cell cycle, protein folding and assembly, which were the most significantly affected. Taken together, our results provide a foundation to understand the mechanism of salinity response.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Maria Cristina Suarez; Petersen, Morten; Mundy, John

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have evolved to transduce environmental and developmental signals into adaptive and programmed responses. MAPK cascades relay and amplify signals via three types of reversibly phosphorylated kinases leading to the phosphorylation of subs...... the Arabidopsis thaliana MAPKs MPK3, 4, and 6 and MAP2Ks MKK1, 2, 4, and 5. Future work needs to focus on identifying substrates of MAPKs, and on understanding how specificity is achieved among MAPK signaling pathways....

  6. The Xanthomonas campestris effector protein XopDXcc8004 triggers plant disease tolerance by targeting DELLA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Leitao; Rong, Wei; Luo, Hongli; Chen, Yinhua; He, Chaozu

    2014-11-01

    Plants protect themselves from the harmful effects of pathogens by resistance and tolerance. Disease resistance, which eliminates pathogens, can be modulated by bacterial type III effectors. Little is known about whether disease tolerance, which sustains host fitness with a given pathogen burden, is regulated by effectors. Here, we examined the effects of the Xanthomonas effector protein XopDXcc8004 on plant disease defenses by constructing knockout and complemented Xanthomonas strains, and performing inoculation studies in radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. radiculus XiaoJinZhong) and Arabidopsis plants. XopDXcc8004 suppresses disease symptoms without changing bacterial titers in infected leaves. In Arabidopsis, XopDXcc8004 delays the hormone gibberellin (GA)-mediated degradation of RGA (repressor of ga1-3), one of five DELLA proteins that repress GA signaling and promote plant tolerance under biotic and abiotic stresses. The ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif-containing region of XopDXcc8004 interacts with the DELLA domain of RGA and might interfere with the GA-induced binding of GID1, a GA receptor, to RGA. The EAR motif was found to be present in a number of plant transcriptional regulators. Thus, our data suggest that bacterial pathogens might have evolved effectors, which probably mimic host components, to initiate disease tolerance and enhance their survival.

  7. Major intrinsic proteins and arsenic transport in plants: new players and their potential role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Jahn, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic and highly abundant metalloid that endangers human health through drinking water and the food chain. The most common forms of As in the environment re arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]. As(V) is a nonfunctional phosphate analog that enters the food chain via plant phosphate transporters. Recently, evidence was provided that uptake of As(III)--the second most abundant As species in soils--is mediated by plant nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), a subfamily of plant major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Specific NIPs are also essential for the uptake of the metalloids boron and silicon and aquaglyceroporins from microbes and mammals were shown to be the major routes of As uptake. Therefore As(III) transport through MIPs is a conserved and ancient feature. In this chapter we summarize the current view on As transport in plants and address the potential physiological significance of As(III) transport through NIPs.

  8. Ecological significance and complexity of N-source preference in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Dev T; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2013-10-01

    Plants can utilize two major forms of inorganic N: NO3(-) (nitrate) and NH4(+) (ammonium). In some cases, the preference of one form over another (denoted as β) can appear to be quite pronounced for a plant species, and can be an important determinant and predictor of its distribution and interactions with other species. In many other cases, however, assignment of preference is not so straightforward and must take into account a wide array of complex physiological and environmental features, which interact in ways that are still not well understood. This Viewpoint presents a discussion of the key, and often co-occurring, factors that join to produce the complex phenotypic composite referred to by the deceptively simple term 'N-source preference'. N-source preference is much more complex a biological phenomenon than is often assumed, and general models predicting how it will influence ecological processes will need to be much more sophisticated than those that have been so far developed.

  9. Bioengineered Plants Can Be a Useful Source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Amjad Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids have proven to be very essential for human health due to their multiple health benefits. These essential fatty acids (EFAs need to be uptaken through diet because they are unable to be produced by the human body. These are important for skin and hair growth as well as for proper visual, neural, and reproductive functions of the body. These fatty acids are proven to be extremely vital for normal tissue development during pregnancy and infancy. Omega-3 fatty acids can be obtained mainly from two dietary sources: marine and plant oils. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5 n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3 are the primary marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids. Marine fishes are high in omega-3 fatty acids, yet high consumption of those fishes will cause a shortage of fish stocks existing naturally in the oceans. An alternative source to achieve the recommended daily intake of EFAs is the demand of today. In this review article, an attempt has, therefore, been made to discuss the importance of omega-3 fatty acids and the recent developments in order to produce these fatty acids by the genetic modifications of the plants.

  10. Non-Edible Plant Oils as New Sources for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rafiqul Islam

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the concern on the availability of recoverable fossil fuel reserves and the environmental problems caused by the use those fossil fuels, considerable attention has been given to biodiesel production as an alternative to petrodiesel. However, as the biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils and animal fats, there are concerns that biodiesel feedstock may compete with food supply in the long-term. Hence, the recent focus is to find oil bearing plants that produce non-edible oils as the feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, two plant species, soapnut (Sapindus mukorossi and jatropha (jatropha curcas, L. are discussed as newer sources of oil for biodiesel production. Experimental analysis showed that both oils have great potential to be used as feedstock for biodiesel production. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME from cold pressed soapnut seed oil was envisaged as biodiesel source for the first time. Soapnut oil was found to have average of 9.1% free FA, 84.43% triglycerides, 4.88% sterol and 1.59% others. Jatropha oil contains approximately 14% free FA, approximately 5% higher than soapnut oil. Soapnut oil biodiesel contains approximately 85% unsaturated FA while jatropha oil biodiesel was found to have approximately 80% unsaturated FA. Oleic acid was found to be the dominant FA in both soapnut and jatropha biodiesel. Over 97% conversion to FAME was achieved for both soapnut and jatropha oil.

  11. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Arcady R; Elena, Santiago F

    2015-02-01

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts.

  12. Was the Eocene Arctic a Source Area for Exotic Plants and Mammals? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, J. J.; Harrington, G. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    not found in correlative strata of either mid-latitude North America or Europe. Either the Arctic region is a source of some evolutionary novelty, or alternatively it recruited plants directly from Asia. In sum, although the Arctic was undoubtedly en route for terrestrial plants and animals dispersing across Holarctic continents during parts of the Paleogene, evidence from both the Eocene plant and vertebrate communities on Ellesmere Island indicates the Arctic must also be evaluated as a potential source area for exotic taxa.

  13. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research.

  14. Recombinant plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins: current technical and economic bottlenecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabalza, Maite; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Molecular pharming is a cost-effective platform for the production of recombinant proteins in plants. Although the biopharmaceutical industry still relies on a small number of standardized fermentation-based technologies for the production of recombinant proteins there is now a greater awareness of the advantages of molecular pharming particularly in niche markets. Here we discuss some of the technical, economic and regulatory barriers that constrain the clinical development and commercialization of plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. We also discuss strategies to increase productivity and product quality/homogeneity. The advantages of whole plants should be welcomed by the industry because this will help to reduce the cost of goods and therefore expand the biopharmaceutical market into untapped sectors.

  15. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  16. Understanding the plant-pathogen interactions in the context of proteomics-generated apoplastic proteins inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Lee, So Eui; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sangryeol; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sun T

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular space between cell wall and plasma membrane acts as the first battle field between plants and pathogens. Bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes that colonize the living plant tissues are encased in this narrow region in the initial step of infection. Therefore, the apoplastic region is believed to be an interface which mediates the first crosstalk between host and pathogen. The secreted proteins and other metabolites, derived from both host and pathogen, interact in this apoplastic region and govern the final relationship between them. Hence, investigation of protein secretion and apoplastic interaction could provide a better understanding of plant-microbe interaction. Here, we are briefly discussing the methods available for the isolation and normalization of the apoplastic proteins, as well as the current state of secretome studies focused on the in-planta interaction between the host and the pathogen.

  17. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  18. Plant bioreactors for the antigenic hook-associated flgK protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants engineered with genes encoding for the antigenic proteins of various microorganisms have shown to correctly express the proteins that elicit the production of antibodies in mammalian hosts. In livestock, plant-based vaccines could represent an innovative strategy for oral vaccination, especially to prevent infection by enteric pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate tobacco plants as a seedspecific expression system for the production of the flgK flagellar hook-associated protein from a wild type Salmonella typhimurium strain, as a model of an edible vaccine. The flgK gene is the principal component of bacterial flagella and is recognised as virulence factor by the innate immune system. It was isolated from the Salmonella typhimurium strain by PCR. The encoding sequence of flgK was transferred into a pBI binary vector, under control of soybean basic 7S globulin promoter for the seed-specific. Plant transformation was carried out using recombinant EHA 105 Agrobacterium tumefaciens. A transgenic population was obtained made up of independently kanamycin-resistant transgenic plants, which had a similar morphological appearance to the wild-type plants. Molecular analyses of seeds confirmed the integration of the gene and the average expression level of flgK was estimated to be about 0.6 mg per gram of seeds, corresponding to 0.33% of the total amount of soluble protein in tobacco seeds. This study showed that the foreign flgK gene could be stably incorporated into the tobacco plant genome by transcription through the nuclear apparatus of the plant, and that these genes are inherited by the next generation.

  19. APPLICATION OF PLANT GROWTH-PROMOTING RHIZOBACTERIA TO RUNNER BEAN INCREASES SEED CARBOHYDRATE AND PROTEIN YIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Stefan; Neculai Munteanu; Marius Mihasan

    2013-01-01

    The potential of two rhizobacterial strains with plant growth promoting capabilities (mineral phosphate solubilization and IAA production traits) to influence the nutritive value of runner bean grains was assessed on plants cultivated in organic crop system. Seed inoculation with rhizobacterial strains improve the nutritive value of the harvested grains by enhancing the soluble protein content up to 11.97 % and total reducing carbohydrates content up to 28.97%. The number of fractions detecte...

  20. Transport proteins regulate the flux of metabolites and cofactors across the membrane of plants peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eLinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In land plants, peroxisomes play key roles in various metabolic pathways, including the most prominent examples lipid mobilization and photorespiration. Given the large number of substrates that are exchanged across the peroxisomal membrane, a wide spectrum of metabolite and cofactor transporters is required and need to be efficiently coordinated. These peroxisomal transport proteins are a perquisite for metabolic reactions inside plant peroxisomes and the entire peroxisomal permeome is closely linked to the adaption of photosynthetic organisms during land plant evolution to fulfill and optimize their new metabolic demands in cells, tissues, and organs. This review assesses for the first time the distribution of these peroxisomal transporters within the algal and plant species underlining their evolutionary relevance. Despite the importance of peroxisomal transporters, the majority of these proteins, however, are still unknown at the molecular level in plants as well as in other eukaryotic organisms. Up to date, four transport proteins have been recently identified and functionally characterized in Arabidopsis so far: One transporter for the import of fatty acids and three carrier proteins for the uptake of the cofactors ATP and NAD into plant peroxisomes. The transport of the three substrates across the peroxisomal membrane is essential for the degradation of fatty acids and fatty acids-related compounds via β-oxidation. This metabolic pathway plays multiple functions for growth and development in plants that has been crucial for during land plant evolution. Here, we describe the current state of their physiological roles in Arabidopsis and discuss novel features in their putative transport mechanisms.

  1. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors.

  2. Identiifcation of the Regulator of G-Protein Signaling Protein Responsive to Plant Hormones and Abiotic Stresses in Brassica napus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun; ZHU Xia; ZHU Xiao-bin; YU Yi-fan; GE Hui-min; GAO Yong; LIANG Jian-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling proteins (RGS) accelerate the rate of GTP hydrolysis by Gαproteins, thus acting as negative regulators of G-protein signaling. Studies on Arabidopsis and soybean have proven that RGS proteins are physiologically important in plants and contribute to the signaling pathways regulated by different stimuli. Brassica napus is an important agriculturally relevant plant, the wildly planted oilseed rape in the world, which possesses an identiifed Gα, Gβand Gγsubunits. In the present study, we identiifed and characterized a Brassica napus RGS gene, BnRGS1, which contained an open reading frame of 1 380 bp encoding a putative 52.6 kDa polypeptide of 459 amino acids, within seven putative transmembrane domains in the N-terminal and RGS box in the C-terminal. BnRGS1 is located on the membrane in onion epidermal cells and tobacco leaves, and interacts with BnGA1 in the mating-based split-ubiquitin system. The expression levels of BnRGS1 were quite different in different tissues and developmental stages, and induced by abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The effects of gibberellin (GA3) and brassinolide (BR) on the expression of BnRGS1 were irregular under the concentrations tested. Moreover, the transcript level of BnRGS1 was also induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG), whereas remained little changed by 200 mmol L-1 NaCl. These results suggested that the BnRGS1 may be involved in B. napus response to plant hormone signaling and abiotic stresses.

  3. Pentacyclic Triterpene Distribution in Various Plants – Rich Sources for a New Group of Multi-Potent Plant Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Armin Scheffler; Laszczyk, Melanie N.; Holger Trojan; Thomas Kopp; Sebastian Jäger

    2009-01-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenes are secondary plant metabolites widespread in fruit peel, leaves and stem bark. In particular the lupane-, oleanane-, and ursane triterpenes display various pharmacological effects while being devoid of prominent toxicity. Therefore, these triterpenes are promising leading compounds for the development of new multi-targeting bioactive agents. Screening of 39 plant materials identified triterpene rich (> 0.1% dry matter) plant parts. Plant materials with high triterp...

  4. NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets insoluble ubiquitinated protein aggregates in plant stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Plant autophagy plays an important role in delaying senescence, nutrient recycling, and stress responses. Functional analysis of plant autophagy has almost exclusively focused on the proteins required for the core process of autophagosome assembly, but little is known about the proteins involved in other important processes of autophagy, including autophagy cargo recognition and sequestration. In this study, we report functional genetic analysis of Arabidopsis NBR1, a homolog of mammalian autophagy cargo adaptors P62 and NBR1. We isolated two nbr1 knockout mutants and discovered that they displayed some but not all of the phenotypes of autophagy-deficient atg5 and atg7 mutants. Like ATG5 and ATG7, NBR1 is important for plant tolerance to heat, oxidative, salt, and drought stresses. The role of NBR1 in plant tolerance to these abiotic stresses is dependent on its interaction with ATG8. Unlike ATG5 and ATG7, however, NBR1 is dispensable in age- and darkness-induced senescence and in resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen. A selective role of NBR1 in plant responses to specific abiotic stresses suggest that plant autophagy in diverse biological processes operates through multiple cargo recognition and delivery systems. The compromised heat tolerance of atg5, atg7, and nbr1 mutants was associated with increased accumulation of insoluble, detergent-resistant proteins that were highly ubiquitinated under heat stress. NBR1, which contains an ubiquitin-binding domain, also accumulated to high levels with an increasing enrichment in the insoluble protein fraction in the autophagy-deficient mutants under heat stress. These results suggest that NBR1-mediated autophagy targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates most likely derived from denatured or otherwise damaged nonnative proteins generated under stress conditions.

  5. A primary sequence analysis of the ARGONAUTE protein family in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rodriguez-Leal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA (sRNA-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  6. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  7. Conservation and divergence of plant LHP1 protein sequences and expression patterns in angiosperms and gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hexin; Zheng, Zhengui; Grey, Paris H; Li, Yuhua; Oppenheimer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Floral transition is a critical and strictly regulated developmental process in plants. Mutations in Arabidopsis LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (AtLHP1)/TERMINAL FLOWER 2 (TFL2) result in early and terminal flowers. Little is known about the gene expression, function and evolution of plant LHP1 homologs, except for Arabidopsis LHP1. In this study, the conservation and divergence of plant LHP1 protein sequences was analyzed by sequence alignments and phylogeny. LHP1 expression patterns were compared among taxa that occupy pivotal phylogenetic positions. Several relatively conserved new motifs/regions were identified among LHP1 homologs. Phylogeny of plant LHP1 proteins agreed with established angiosperm relationships. In situ hybridization unveiled conserved expression of plant LHP1 in the axillary bud/tiller, vascular bundles, developing stamens, and carpels. Unlike AtLHP1, cucumber CsLHP1-2, sugarcane SoLHP1 and maize ZmLHP1, rice OsLHP1 is not expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the OsLHP1 transcript level is consistently low in shoots. "Unequal crossover" might have contributed to the divergence in the N-terminal and hinge region lengths of LHP1 homologs. We propose an "insertion-deletion" model for soybean (Glycine max L.) GmLHP1s evolution. Plant LHP1 homologs are more conserved than previously expected, and may favor vegetative meristem identity and primordia formation. OsLHP1 may not function in rice SAM during floral induction.

  8. Heat shock protein 90 in plants: molecular mechanisms and roles in stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao-Shi; Li, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Yang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lian-Cheng; Ma, You-Zhi

    2012-11-23

    The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  9. Heat Shock Protein 90 in Plants: Molecular Mechanisms and Roles in Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Zhi Ma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 family mediates stress signal transduction, and plays important roles in the control of normal growth of human cells and in promoting development of tumor cells. Hsp90s have become a currently important subject in cellular immunity, signal transduction, and anti-cancer research. Studies on the physiological functions of Hsp90s began much later in plants than in animals and fungi. Significant progress has been made in understanding complex mechanisms of HSP90s in plants, including ATPase-coupled conformational changes and interactions with cochaperone proteins. A wide range of signaling proteins interact with HSP90s. Recent studies revealed that plant Hsp90s are important in plant development, environmental stress response, and disease and pest resistance. In this study, the plant HSP90 family was classified into three clusters on the basis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structure, and biological functions. We discuss the molecular functions of Hsp90s, and systematically review recent progress of Hsp90 research in plants.

  10. The Use of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as Green and Red/Far-Red Light Sources in Plant Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The use of green, red, and far-red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for plant physiological studies is outlined and evaluated. Indicates that LED lamps have the advantage over conventional light sources in that they are lightweight, low-cost, portable, easily constructed, and do not require color filters. (Author/DH)

  11. Yield and financial performance estimates of four elite loblolly pine seed sources planted in the Western Gulf Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Blazier; A. Gordon Holley

    2015-01-01

    Eastern seed sources of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) have been planted in the Western Gulf region for nearly three decades because they often have higher growth rates than local seed sources. However, productivity gains for eastern families are sometimes offset by poorer survival rates relative to local families.

  12. Technical advance: identification of plant actin-binding proteins by F-actin affinity chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Brady, S. R.; Kovar, D. R.; Staiger, C. J.; Clark, G. B.; Roux, S. J.; Muday, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins that interact with the actin cytoskeleton often modulate the dynamics or organization of the cytoskeleton or use the cytoskeleton to control their localization. In plants, very few actin-binding proteins have been identified and most are thought to modulate cytoskeleton function. To identify actin-binding proteins that are unique to plants, the development of new biochemical procedures will be critical. Affinity columns using actin monomers (globular actin, G-actin) or actin filaments (filamentous actin, F-actin) have been used to identify actin-binding proteins from a wide variety of organisms. Monomeric actin from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyl tissue was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and shown to be native and competent for polymerization to actin filaments. G-actin, F-actin and bovine serum albumin affinity columns were prepared and used to separate samples enriched in either soluble or membrane-associated actin-binding proteins. Extracts of soluble actin-binding proteins yield distinct patterns when eluted from the G-actin and F-actin columns, respectively, leading to the identification of a putative F-actin-binding protein of approximately 40 kDa. When plasma membrane-associated proteins were applied to these columns, two abundant polypeptides eluted selectively from the F-actin column and cross-reacted with antiserum against pea annexins. Additionally, a protein that binds auxin transport inhibitors, the naphthylphthalamic acid binding protein, which has been previously suggested to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, was eluted in a single peak from the F-actin column. These experiments provide a new approach that may help to identify novel actin-binding proteins from plants.

  13. A survey of PPR proteins identifies DYW domains like those of land plant RNA editing factors in diverse eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Schallenberg-Rüdinger, Mareike; Lenz, Henning; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Gott, Jonatha M.; Knoop, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat modules of PPR proteins are key to their sequence-specific binding to RNAs. Gene families encoding PPR proteins are greatly expanded in land plants where hundreds of them participate in RNA maturation, mainly in mitochondria and chloroplasts. Many plant PPR proteins contain additional carboxyterminal domains and have been identified as essential factors for specific events of C-to-U RNA editing, which is abundant in the two endosymbiotic plant organelles. Among th...

  14. Direct anthelmintic effects of condensed tannins from diverse plant sources against Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew R; Fryganas, Christos; Ramsay, Aina; Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2014-01-01

    Ascaris suum is one of the most prevalent nematode parasites in pigs and causes significant economic losses, and also serves as a good model for A. lumbricoides, the large roundworm of humans that is ubiquitous in developing countries and causes malnutrition, stunted growth and compromises immunity to other pathogens. New treatment options for Ascaris infections are urgently needed, to reduce reliance on the limited number of synthetic anthelmintic drugs. In areas where Ascaris infections are common, ethno-pharmacological practices such as treatment with natural plant extracts are still widely employed. However, scientific validation of these practices and identification of the active compounds are lacking, although observed effects are often ascribed to plant secondary metabolites such as tannins. Here, we extracted, purified and characterised a wide range of condensed tannins from diverse plant sources and investigated anthelmintic effects against A. suum in vitro. We show that condensed tannins can have potent, direct anthelmintic effects against A. suum, as evidenced by reduced migratory ability of newly hatched third-stage larvae and reduced motility and survival of fourth-stage larvae recovered from pigs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that CT caused significant damage to the cuticle and digestive tissues of the larvae. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the strength of the anthelmintic effect is related to the polymer size of the tannin molecule. Moreover, the identity of the monomeric structural units of tannin polymers may also have an influence as gallocatechin and epigallocatechin monomers exerted significant anthelmintic activity whereas catechin and epicatechin monomers did not. Therefore, our results clearly document direct anthelmintic effects of condensed tannins against Ascaris and encourage further in vivo investigation to determine optimal strategies for the use of these plant compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of

  15. Direct anthelmintic effects of condensed tannins from diverse plant sources against Ascaris suum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available Ascaris suum is one of the most prevalent nematode parasites in pigs and causes significant economic losses, and also serves as a good model for A. lumbricoides, the large roundworm of humans that is ubiquitous in developing countries and causes malnutrition, stunted growth and compromises immunity to other pathogens. New treatment options for Ascaris infections are urgently needed, to reduce reliance on the limited number of synthetic anthelmintic drugs. In areas where Ascaris infections are common, ethno-pharmacological practices such as treatment with natural plant extracts are still widely employed. However, scientific validation of these practices and identification of the active compounds are lacking, although observed effects are often ascribed to plant secondary metabolites such as tannins. Here, we extracted, purified and characterised a wide range of condensed tannins from diverse plant sources and investigated anthelmintic effects against A. suum in vitro. We show that condensed tannins can have potent, direct anthelmintic effects against A. suum, as evidenced by reduced migratory ability of newly hatched third-stage larvae and reduced motility and survival of fourth-stage larvae recovered from pigs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that CT caused significant damage to the cuticle and digestive tissues of the larvae. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the strength of the anthelmintic effect is related to the polymer size of the tannin molecule. Moreover, the identity of the monomeric structural units of tannin polymers may also have an influence as gallocatechin and epigallocatechin monomers exerted significant anthelmintic activity whereas catechin and epicatechin monomers did not. Therefore, our results clearly document direct anthelmintic effects of condensed tannins against Ascaris and encourage further in vivo investigation to determine optimal strategies for the use of these plant compounds for the prevention and

  16. Risk factors during construction of power plants using renewable energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nefedova Lyudmila Veniaminovna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider main characteristics of modern development of renewable energy sources (RES. It is dedicated that there are some technical and economic barriers to the widespread use of renewable energy. For example, RES are inconstancy in time and space and have low density of energy flow. High capital intensity and cost price, long-term construction, a considerable degree of different kinds of risk, lack of competitiveness with hydrocarbon species generation in the existing regulatory environment are also inherent to RES. The role of the regulatory framework is shown according to perspective plans of construction of power plants using renewable energy sources. The main requirements which are applied to measures of state support of construction industry of renewable energy development are formulated. Current condition of construction industry of RES in Russia is assessed. The problems of risks which arise during construction of renewable energy facilities according to results of practical use of RES are discussed. And it is rather important to use stage assessment for the construction phase of the project during risk analysis of construction of alternative energy sources. The main groups of RES risks are described. The importance of regulatory and resource risks for effective development of renewable energy in Russia according to the method of strategic planning with the identification of the adverse effects of gradation factors are determined. The analysis of financial risks types and methods of its management during construction power generation projects based on different types of renewable energy resources are made. In the end of the article the authors make a conclusion, that the development of projects for the construction of power plants with the use of innovative technical solutions to ensure minimal risks to the environment and safe operation in various climatic conditions is a priority.

  17. Walnut Staminate Flowers Can Be Explored as a Supplementary Plant Oil Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Fossil fuel is currently the major energy source driving global socio-economy, but its stock is being heavily depleted due to increasing anthropogenic activities worldwide. There are also concerns regarding the burning of fossil fuels, which contributes to global climate warming and air pollution. As such, the development of biodiesel as a non-toxic, biodegradable, and renewable alternative energy source using oil crops such as soybean and rapeseed has quickly emerged in the West countries. However, the production of oil crops in China is far from sufficient to meet the demands of the country's population of 1.3 billion, and increasing oil crop production is inhibited by a severe shortage of agricultural land, which currently averages 0.2 acre per person and, as such, is less than half the world average. The current national policy in China regarding land use is more towards revering cultivated lands in ravins and hills to forestry, which presents an ideal opportunity to further develop plantations of walnut (Juglans regia L.) trees, a plant that is tolerant to drought and infertile soils and has a high oil content. Study in this paper shows that one ament of walnut staminate flowers produces about 0.168 g dry pollen, and the dry pollen contained 49.67% oil. Based on this discovery, oil yield obtained from staminate flowers is estimated to reach 6.95% of that from walnut nuts. Thus walnut staminate flower is suggested to explore as supplementary plant oil source, and has a great opportunity to utilize as a biodiesel feedstock.

  18. Multivariate statistical assessment of heavy metal pollution sources of groundwater around a lead and zinc plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Abbas Ali

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The contamination of groundwater by heavy metal ions around a lead and zinc plant has been studied. As a case study groundwater contamination in Bonab Industrial Estate (Zanjan-Iran for iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead content was investigated using differential pulse polarography (DPP. Although, cobalt, copper and zinc were found correspondingly in 47.8%, 100.0%, and 100.0% of the samples, they did not contain these metals above their maximum contaminant levels (MCLs. Cadmium was detected in 65.2% of the samples and 17.4% of them were polluted by this metal. All samples contained detectable levels of lead and iron with 8.7% and 13.0% of the samples higher than their MCLs. Nickel was also found in 78.3% of the samples, out of which 8.7% were polluted. In general, the results revealed the contamination of groundwater sources in the studied zone. The higher health risks are related to lead, nickel, and cadmium ions. Multivariate statistical techniques were applied for interpreting the experimental data and giving a description for the sources. The data analysis showed correlations and similarities between investigated heavy metals and helps to classify these ion groups. Cluster analysis identified five clusters among the studied heavy metals. Cluster 1 consisted of Pb, Cu, and cluster 3 included Cd, Fe; also each of the elements Zn, Co and Ni was located in groups with single member. The same results were obtained by factor analysis. Statistical investigations revealed that anthropogenic factors and notably lead and zinc plant and pedo-geochemical pollution sources are influencing water quality in the studied area.

  19. Multivariate statistical assessment of heavy metal pollution sources of groundwater around a lead and zinc plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Abbas Ali; Yaftian, Mohammad Reza; Parizanganeh, Abdolhossein

    2012-12-17

    The contamination of groundwater by heavy metal ions around a lead and zinc plant has been studied. As a case study groundwater contamination in Bonab Industrial Estate (Zanjan-Iran) for iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead content was investigated using differential pulse polarography (DPP). Although, cobalt, copper and zinc were found correspondingly in 47.8%, 100.0%, and 100.0% of the samples, they did not contain these metals above their maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Cadmium was detected in 65.2% of the samples and 17.4% of them were polluted by this metal. All samples contained detectable levels of lead and iron with 8.7% and 13.0% of the samples higher than their MCLs. Nickel was also found in 78.3% of the samples, out of which 8.7% were polluted. In general, the results revealed the contamination of groundwater sources in the studied zone. The higher health risks are related to lead, nickel, and cadmium ions. Multivariate statistical techniques were applied for interpreting the experimental data and giving a description for the sources. The data analysis showed correlations and similarities between investigated heavy metals and helps to classify these ion groups. Cluster analysis identified five clusters among the studied heavy metals. Cluster 1 consisted of Pb, Cu, and cluster 3 included Cd, Fe; also each of the elements Zn, Co and Ni was located in groups with single member. The same results were obtained by factor analysis. Statistical investigations revealed that anthropogenic factors and notably lead and zinc plant and pedo-geochemical pollution sources are influencing water quality in the studied area.

  20. Subtilases - versatile tools for protein turnover, plant development, and interactions with the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Andreas; Stintzi, Annick; Graff, Lucile

    2012-05-01

    Subtilases (SBTs) constitute a large family of serine peptidases. They are commonly found in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, with many more SBTs in plants as compared to other organisms. The expansion of the SBT family in plants was accompanied by functional diversification, and novel, plant-specific physiological roles were acquired in the course of evolution. In addition to their contribution to general protein turnover, plant SBTs are involved in the development of seeds and fruits, the manipulation of the cell wall, the processing of peptide growth factors, epidermal development and pattern formation, plant responses to their biotic and abiotic environment, and in programmed cell death. Plant SBTs share many properties with their bacterial and mammalian homologs, but the adoption of specific roles in plant physiology is also reflected in the acquisition of unique biochemical and structural features that distinguish SBTs in plants from those in other organisms. In this article we provide an overview of the earlier literature on the discovery of the first SBTs in plants, and highlight recent findings with respect to their physiological relevance, structure and function.

  1. Interaction of a plant pseudo-response regulator with a calmodulin-like protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perochon, Alexandre; Dieterle, Stefan; Pouzet, Cecile; Aldon, Didier; Galaud, Jean-Philippe [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France); Ranty, Benoit, E-mail: ranty@scsv.ups-tlse.fr [UMR 5546 CNRS/Universite Toulouse 3, Pole de Biotechnologie vegetale, BP 42617 Auzeville, 31326 Castanet-Tolosan cedex (France)

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} The pseudo-response regulator PRR2 specifically binds CML9, a calmodulin-like protein {yields} The intera