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Sample records for plant seismic boreholes

  1. Borehole Summary Report for Core Hole C4998 – Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Garcia, Benjamin J.

    2006-12-15

    Seismic borehole C4998 was cored through the upper portion of the Columbia River Basalt Group and Ellensburg Formation to provide detailed lithologic information and intact rock samples that represent the geology at the Waste Treatment Plant. This report describes the drilling of borehole C4998 and documents the geologic data collected during the drilling of the cored portion of the borehole.

  2. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-02-28

    In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the

  3. Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

    2007-05-11

    In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of

  4. Site response assessment using borehole seismic records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghee; Chang, Chunjoong; Choi, Weonhack [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the Korea Institute of Geology and Mining (KIGAM) have installed and are operating borehole seismometers at a depth of 70∼100 meters for the precise determination of epicenters. Also, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has installed and is operating 2 borehole seismic stations near Weolseong area to observe at a depth of 140 meters seismic activities connected to fault activity. KHNP plans to operate in the second half of 2014 a borehole seismic station for depths less than 300 and 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep strata. As a basic study for analyzing ground motion response characteristics at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in connection with the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the present study examined the background noise response characteristics of the borehole seismic station operated by KHNP. In order to analyze the depth-dependent impact of seismic waves at deeper depths than in Korea, seismic data collected by Japan's KIK-net seismic stations were used and the seismic wave characteristics analyzed by size and depth. In order to analyze the borehole seismic observation data from the seismic station operated by KHNP, this study analyzed the background noise characteristics by using a probability density function.

  5. Site response assessment using borehole seismic records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghee; Chang, Chunjoong; Choi, Weonhack

    2014-01-01

    In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the Korea Institute of Geology and Mining (KIGAM) have installed and are operating borehole seismometers at a depth of 70∼100 meters for the precise determination of epicenters. Also, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has installed and is operating 2 borehole seismic stations near Weolseong area to observe at a depth of 140 meters seismic activities connected to fault activity. KHNP plans to operate in the second half of 2014 a borehole seismic station for depths less than 300 and 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep strata. As a basic study for analyzing ground motion response characteristics at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in connection with the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the present study examined the background noise response characteristics of the borehole seismic station operated by KHNP. In order to analyze the depth-dependent impact of seismic waves at deeper depths than in Korea, seismic data collected by Japan's KIK-net seismic stations were used and the seismic wave characteristics analyzed by size and depth. In order to analyze the borehole seismic observation data from the seismic station operated by KHNP, this study analyzed the background noise characteristics by using a probability density function

  6. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume III P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (III), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 390 to 1220 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 40 ft (later relocated to 27.5 ft due to visibility in borehole after rain) in Borehole C4997, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4997, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  7. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  8. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

  9. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume I P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (I), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4993, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  10. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-07-06

    In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

  11. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume IV S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

    2007-06-06

    In this volume (IV), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4993 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. S-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 370 to 1300 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1200 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Shear (S) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition, a second average shear wave record was recorded by reversing the polarity of the motion of the T-Rex base plate. In this sense, all the signals recorded in the field were averaged signals. In all cases, the base plate was moving perpendicular to a radial line between the base plate and the borehole which is in and out of the plane of the figure shown in Figure 1.1. The definition of “in-line”, “cross-line”, “forward”, and “reversed” directions in items 2 and 3 of Section 2 was based on the moving direction of the base plate. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4993, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas (UT) was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. The Redpath geophone and the UT geophone were properly aligned so that one of the horizontal components in each geophone was aligned with the direction of horizontal shaking of the T-Rex base plate. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows. Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vs Profile at Borehole C4993

  12. Methods for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-02-20

    The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable

  14. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Data pertaining to all the surface boreholes used at the WIPP site for site characterization hydrological testing and resource evaluation exist in numerous source documents. This project was initiated to develop a comprehensive data base that would include the data on all WIPP related surface boreholes from the Atomic Energy Commission, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Energy Research and Development Administration, Department of Energy, and Hydrologic Test Borehole Programs. The data compiled from each borehole includes: operator, permit number, location, total depth, type of well, driller, drilling record, casing record, plugging schedule, and stratigraphic summary. There are six groups of boreholes contained in this data base, they are as follows: Commercially Drilled Potash Boreholes, Energy Department Wells, Geologic Exploration Boreholes, Hydrologic Test Boreholes, Potash Boreholes, and Subsurface Exploration Boreholes. There were numerous references which contained borehole data. In some cases the data found in one document was inconsistent with data in another document. In order to ensure consistency and accuracy in the data base, the same references were used for as many of the boreholes as possible. For example, all elevations and locations were taken from Compilation and Comparison of Test-Hole Location Surveys in the Vicinity of the WIPP Site. SAND 88-1065, Table 3-5. There are some sections where a data field is left blank. In this case, the information was either not applicable or was unavailable.

  15. Crosshole investigations - results from seismic borehole tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihl, J.; Hammarstroem, M.; Ivansson, S.; Moren, P.

    1986-12-01

    The specially developed system for seismic tomography measurements has proved reliable and versatile in field work. The same equipment can be used for measurements from tens of metres up to a distance of 1000 m. The explosive source has proven reliable, in use although time-consuming. It can be used over the full range of distances. The quality of the tomographic analysis is strongly dependent on the areas under study. In homogeneous rock, and at moderate (i.e. up to 200 m) distances, high-precision tomograms can be obtained. On the other hand, if the rock is heterogeneous, and/or the measuring distance large, the many possible solutions make the interpretation difficult. Information from other types of investigations are then usually needed in order to obtain a satisfactory result. Three-dimensional measurements are possible, although time-consuming. (orig./DG)

  16. Borehole Gravity Meter Surveys at the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Jeffrey D.; Mann, Ethan

    2007-04-06

    Microg-LaCoste (MGL) was contracted by Pacfic Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to record borehole gravity density data in 3 wells at the HanfordWaste Treatment Plant (WTP) site. The survey was designed to provide highly accurate density information for use in seismic modeling. The borehole gravity meter (BHGM) tool has a very large depth of investigation (hundreds of feet) compared to other density tools so it is not influenced by casing or near welbore effects, such as washouts.

  17. Construction of System for Seismic Observation in Deep Borehole (SODB) - Overview and Achievement Status of the Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Genyu

    2014-01-01

    The seismic responses of each unit at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP differed greatly during the 2007 Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake; the deep sedimentary structure around the site greatly affected these differences. To clarify underground structure and to evaluate ground motion amplification and attenuation effects more accurately in accordance with deep sedimentary structure, JNES initiated the SODB project. Deployment of a vertical seismometer array in a 3000-meter deep borehole was completed in June 2012 on the premises of NIIT. Horizontal arrays were also placed on the ground surface. Experiences and achievements in the JNES project were introduced, including development of seismic observation technology in deep boreholes, site amplification measurements from logging data, application of borehole observation data to maintenance of nuclear power plant safety, and so on. Afterwards, the relationships of other presentations in this WS, were explained. (authors)

  18. A Fiber-Optic Borehole Seismic Vector Sensor System for Geothermal Site Characterization and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P. [Paulsson, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States); Thornburg, Jon A. [Paulsson, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States); He, Ruiqing [Paulsson, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Seismic techniques are the dominant geophysical techniques for the characterization of subsurface structures and stratigraphy. The seismic techniques also dominate the monitoring and mapping of reservoir injection and production processes. Borehole seismology, of all the seismic techniques, despite its current shortcomings, has been shown to provide the highest resolution characterization and most precise monitoring results because it generates higher signal to noise ratio and higher frequency data than surface seismic techniques. The operational environments for borehole seismic instruments are however much more demanding than for surface seismic instruments making both the instruments and the installation much more expensive. The current state-of-the-art borehole seismic instruments have not been robust enough for long term monitoring compounding the problems with expensive instruments and installations. Furthermore, they have also not been able to record the large bandwidth data available in boreholes or having the sensitivity allowing them to record small high frequency micro seismic events with high vector fidelity. To reliably achieve high resolution characterization and long term monitoring of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites a new generation of borehole seismic instruments must therefore be developed and deployed. To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for EGS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) funded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 to develop a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into ultra-high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed on the DOE funding have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown

  19. Amplification Factors for Spectral Acceleration Using Borehole Seismic Array in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, T. S.; Yih-Min, W.; Chao, W. A.; Chang, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    In order to reduce the noise from surface to get the high-quality seismic recordings, there are 54 borehole seismic arrays have been installed in Taiwan deployed by Central Weather Bureau (CWB) until the end of 2016. Each array includes two force balance accelerometers, one at the surface and other inside the borehole, as well as one broadband seismometer inside the borehole. The downhole instruments are placed at a depth between 120 and 400 m. The background noise level are lower at the borehole stations, but the amplitudes recorded by borehole stations are smaller than surface stations for the same earthquake due to the different geology conditions. Therefore, the earthquake magnitude estimated by borehole station is smaller than surface station. So far, CWB only use the surface stations in the magnitude determination due to this situation. In this study, we investigate the site effects between surface and downhole for borehole seismic arrays. Using the spectral ratio derived by the two-station spectral method as the transfer function, simulated the waveform recorded by borehole stations to the surface stations. In the future, through the transfer function, the borehole stations will be included in the estimation of earthquake magnitude and the results of amplification factors can provide the information of near-surface site effects for the ground motion simulation applications.

  20. Borehole geophysics in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, J.W.; Scott, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Miniaturized borehole geophysical equipment designed for use in ground-water investigations can be adapted to investigations of nuclear power plant sites. This equipment has proved to be of value in preliminary and comprehensive studies of interior basins where thick sequences of Quaternary clastic sediment, occasionally with associated volcanic rocks, pose problems of stratigraphic correlation. The unconsolidated nature of the deposits generally requires that exploratory holes be cased, which ordinarily restricts the borehole geophysical studies to the radiation functions--natural gamma, gamma-gamma, neutron-gamma, and neutron-epithermal neutron logs. Although a single log response may be dominant in a given area, correlations derive from consideration of all log responses as a composite group. Because major correlations usually are based upon subtle differences in the physical properties of the penetrated sediment, high-resolution logging procedures are employed with some sacrifice of the quantitative perameters important to petroleum technology. All geophysical field data are recorded as hard copy and as digital information on punched paper tape

  1. Borehole geophysics in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, J.W.; Scott, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Miniaturized borehole geophysical equipment designed for use in ground-water investigations can be adapted to investigations of nuclear power plant sites. This equipment has proved to be of value in preliminary and comprehensive studies of interior basins where thick sequences of Quaternary clastic sediment, occasionally with associated volcanic rocks, pose problems of stratigraphic correlation. The unconsolidated nature of the deposits generally requires that exploratory holes be cased, which ordinarily restricts the borehole geophysical studies to the radiation functions--natural gamma, gamma-gamma, neutron-gamma, and neutron-epithermal neutron logs. Although a single log response may be dominant in a given area, correlations derive from consideration of all log responses as a composite group. Because major correlations usually are based upon subtle differences in the physical properties of the penetrated sediment, high-resolution logging procedures are employed with some sacrifice of the quantitative parameters important to petroleum technology. All geophysical field data are recorded as hard copy and as digital information on punched paper tape. Digital data are subsequently computer processed and plotted to scales that enhance the stratigraphic data being correlated. Retention of the data in analog format permits rapid review, whereas computer plotting allows playback and detailed examination of log sections and sequences that may be attenuated on hard copy because of the logarithmic nature of the response to the physical property being examined

  2. Methods and apparatus for use in detecting seismic waves in a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B.; Fincke, James R.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2006-05-23

    The invention provides methods and apparatus for detecting seismic waves propagating through a subterranean formation surrounding a borehole. In a first embodiment, a sensor module uses the rotation of bogey wheels to extend and retract a sensor package for selective contact and magnetic coupling to casing lining the borehole. In a second embodiment, a sensor module is magnetically coupled to the casing wall during its travel and dragged therealong while maintaining contact therewith. In a third embodiment, a sensor module is interfaced with the borehole environment to detect seismic waves using coupling through liquid in the borehole. Two or more of the above embodiments may be combined within a single sensor array to provide a resulting seismic survey combining the optimum of the outputs of each embodiment into a single data set.

  3. Seismic Readings from the Deepest Borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolery, Edward W [KY Geological Survey, Univ of KY; Wang, Zhenming [KY Geological Survey, Univ of KY; Sturchio, Neil C [Dept of earth and Env. Sciences, Univ of Ill at Chicago

    2006-03-01

    Since the 1980s, the research associated with the UK network has been primarily strong-motion seismology of engineering interest. Currently the University of Kentucky operates a strong-motion network of nine stations in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. A unique feature of the network is the inclusions of vertical strong-motion arrays, each with one or two downhole accelerometers. The deepest borehole array is 260 m below the surfaces at station VASA in Fulton County, Kentucky. A preliminary surface seismic refraction survey was conducted at the site before drilling the hole at VSAS (Woolery and Wang, 2002). The depth to the Paleozoic bedrock at the site was estimated to be approximately 595 m, and the depth to the first very stiff layer (i.e. Porters Creek Clay) was found to be about 260 m. These depths and stratigraphic interpretation correlated well with a proprietary seismic reflection line and the Ken-Ten Oil Exploration No. 1 Sanger hole (Schwalb, 1969), as well as our experience in the area (Street et al., 1995; Woolery et al., 1999).

  4. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Romanelli, Marco; Barnaba, Carla; Bragato, Pier Luigi; Durì, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of the Ferrara VBB

  5. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaresi, D.; Romanelli, M.; Barnaba, C.; Bragato, P. L.; Durì, G.

    2014-07-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Centre) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data centre in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of North-eastern Italy. The south-western edge of the OGS seismic network (Fig. 1) stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML = 5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on 20 May 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of

  6. Combination of surface and borehole seismic data for robust target-oriented imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; van der Neut, Joost; Arntsen, Børge; Wapenaar, Kees

    2016-05-01

    A novel application of seismic interferometry (SI) and Marchenko imaging using both surface and borehole data is presented. A series of redatuming schemes is proposed to combine both data sets for robust deep local imaging in the presence of velocity uncertainties. The redatuming schemes create a virtual acquisition geometry where both sources and receivers lie at the horizontal borehole level, thus only a local velocity model near the borehole is needed for imaging, and erroneous velocities in the shallow area have no effect on imaging around the borehole level. By joining the advantages of SI and Marchenko imaging, a macrovelocity model is no longer required and the proposed schemes use only single-component data. Furthermore, the schemes result in a set of virtual data that have fewer spurious events and internal multiples than previous virtual source redatuming methods. Two numerical examples are shown to illustrate the workflow and to demonstrate the benefits of the method. One is a synthetic model and the other is a realistic model of a field in the North Sea. In both tests, improved local images near the boreholes are obtained using the redatumed data without accurate velocities, because the redatumed data are close to the target.

  7. Porosity, Fracturing and Alteration of Young Oceanic Crust: New Seismic Analyses at Borehole 504B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, E. P. M.; Hobbs, R. W.; Peirce, C.; Wilson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    DSDP/ODP borehole 504B, drilled 2111 m into 6.9 Ma oceanic crust, provides in-situ core and logging measurements of the lithology, fracturing and porosity of crust originally formed at the Costa Rica Rift and its subsequent alteration by hydrothermal fluids. A recent active seismic survey over the borehole and surrounding area reveals wider spatial variations in velocity that can be related to this porosity and fracturing. Over 10,000 airgun shots were fired in a 30 x 30 km grid over the borehole region, using both high-frequency and low-frequency airgun arrays. The shots were recorded on a 4.5 km-long streamer and 24 ocean-bottom seismographs, each equipped with a three-component geophone and an hydrophone. A vertical hydrophone array recorded the downgoing source wavelet, and underway gravity, magnetic field and multibeam bathymetry data were also recorded. This combined dataset enables the most comprehensive geophysical analysis of this area of crust to date, while the ground-truthing provided by 504B enables us to address the questions of what do the seismic oceanic crustal layers represent and what controls their characteristics as the crust ages? Wide-angle seismic modelling with a Monte Carlo based uncertainty analysis reveals new 2D and 3D Vp and Vs models of the area, which show relatively homogeneous crust around borehole 504B, and place the seismic layer 2B/2C, and seismic layer 2/3 boundaries coincident with fracturing and alteration fronts rather than the lithological boundaries between lavas and dykes, and dykes and gabbros, respectively. Analysis of Poisson's ratio, seismic anisotropy and particle motions reveal patterns in fracturing and porosity across the survey area, and locate possible fossilised hydrothermal circulation cells. These cells appear to have influenced the porosity of the crust through alteration and mineralisation processes, with faults inherited from initial crustal accretion influencing basement topographic highs and providing

  8. Aim and points of this workshop: The 2. Workshop on Seismic Observation in Deep Borehole (SODB) and its Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The achievements of the first WS and the aim of the Second WS were explained. The purposes of this Second WS were: to re-recognize the significance of seismic ground motion evaluation based on newly added deep borehole seismic observation in addition to existing borehole investigation, geological surveys, and geophysical exploration; to acknowledge deep borehole seismic observation and geophysical exploration (hardware) as well as the site characteristic evaluation method (software) required for seismic ground motion evaluation; and to consolidate opinions on multi-purpose application of observation technology and data as well as acknowledge issues to be addressed and technological problems. The final goals of this WS were to clarify items and issues that present challenges for the future based on the discussions in this WS. (author)

  9. High Resolution Vertical Seismic Profile from the Chicxulub IODP/ICDP Expedition 364 Borehole: Wave Speeds and Seismic Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C.; Kofman, R.; Schmitt, D. R.; Lofi, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Christeson, G. L.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    We acquired a closely-spaced vertical seismic profile (VSP) in the Chicxulub K-Pg Impact Crater drilling program borehole to calibrate the existing surface seismic profiles and provide complementary measurements of in situ seismic wave speeds. Downhole seismic records were obtained at spacings ranging from 1.25 m to 5 m along the borehole from 47.5 m to 1325 mwsf (meters wireline below sea floor) (Fig 1a) using a Sercel SlimwaveTM geophone chain (University of Alberta). The seismic source was a 30/30ci Sercel Mini GI airgun (University of Texas), fired a minimum of 5 times per station. Seismic data processing used a combination of a commercial processing package (Schlumberger's VISTA) and MatlabTM codes. The VSP displays detailed reflectivity (Fig. 1a) with the strongest reflection seen at 600 mwsf (280 ms one-way time), geologically corresponding to the sharp contact between the post-impact sediments and the target peak ring rock, thus confirming the pre-drilling interpretations of the seismic profiles. A two-way time trace extracted from the separated up-going wavefield matches the major reflection both in travel time and character. In the granitic rocks that form the peak ring of the Chicxulub impact crater, we observe P-wave velocities of 4000-4500 m/s which are significantly less than the expected values of granitoids ( 6000 m/s) (Fig. 1b). The VSP measured wave speeds are confirmed against downhole sonic logging and in laboratory velocimetry measurements; these data provide additional evidence that the crustal material displaced by the impact experienced a significant amount of damage. Samples and data provided by IODP. Samples can be requested at http://web.iodp.tamu.edu/sdrm after 19 October 2017. Expedition 364 was jointly funded by ECORD, ICDP, and IODP with contributions and logistical support from the Yucatan State Government and UNAM. The downhole seismic chain and wireline system is funded by grants to DRS from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and

  10. Ice drilling for blasting boreholes in deep seismic surveys (JARE-43 by steam type drilling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Watanabe

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A seismic exploration was accomplished in the austral summer of 2001-2002 by the 43rd Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-43 along a profile oblique to that held by JARE-41 on the Mizuho Plateau, East Antarctica. We used a steam type drilling system to obtain seven blasting boreholes. We spent 7 to 8 hours to make an enough depth of the hole for one shot point. The holes were 35 to 40 cm in diameter and 23.5 to 28.7 m in depth. The average drilling speed was 3.25 m/hr.

  11. Borehole Volumetric Strainmeter Calibration From a Nearby Seismic Broadband Array at Etna Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currenti, G.; Zuccarello, L.; Bonaccorso, A.; Sicali, A.

    2017-10-01

    Strainmeter and broadband seismic signals have been analyzed jointly with the aim of calibrating a borehole strainmeter at Etna volcano by using a seismo-geodetic technique. Our results reveal a good coherence between the dynamic strains estimated from seismometer data and strains recorded by a dilatometer in a low-frequency range [0.03-0.06 Hz] at the arrival of teleseismic waves. This significant coherence enabled estimating the calibration coefficient and making a comparison with calibration results derived from other methods. In particular, we verified that the proposed approach provides a calibration coefficient that matches the results obtained from the comparison of the recorded strain both with theoretical strain tides and with normal-mode synthetic straingrams. The approach presented here has the advantage of exploiting recorded seismic data, avoiding the use of computed strain from theoretical models.

  12. Local fluid flow and borehole strain in the South Iceland Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, S.; Segall, P.; Ágústsson, K.; Agnew, D.

    2003-12-01

    Installation of 175 borehole strainmeters is planned for PBO. It is therefore vital to understand the behavior of existing strainmeter installations. We investigate signals recorded by three borehole dilatometers in the south Iceland seismic zone following two Mw6.5 earthquakes in June 2000. Poroelastic relaxation has been documented following these events based on InSAR and water level data [Jónsson et al., 2003, Nature]. According to poroelastic theory for a homogeneous isotropic (unfractured) medium, the anticipated post-seismic volumetric strain has the same sign as the coseismic strain step. For example, coseismic compression results in pore-pressure increases; post-earthquake fluid drainage causes additional compression. However, we find that observed strain changes vary considerably between different instruments after the earthquakes. One instrument (HEL) behaves as expected with transient strain increasing with the same sign as the coseismic strain step. Another instrument (SAU) shows partial strain relaxation, opposite in sign to the coseismic signal. The third (BUR) exhibits complete strain relaxation by 3-4 days after the earthquakes (i.e., BUR does not record any permanent strain). BUR has responded in the same fashion to three different earthquakes and two volcanic eruptions, demonstrating conclusively that the transient response is due to processes local to the borehole. Fluid drainage from cracks can explain these observations. Rapid straining results in compression (extension) of the rock and strainmeter. Fluid filled fractures near the borehole transmit normal stress, due to the relative incompressibility of water. Thus, at short time scales the instrument records a coseismic strain step. With time, however, fluid flows out of (in to) the fractures, and the normal stress transmitted across the fractures decreases (increases). As the stress relaxes the strainmeter expands (contracts), reversing the coseismic strain. Barometric responses are

  13. Seismic Observation in Deep Boreholes and Its Applications - Workshop Proceedings, Niigata Institute of Technology, Kashiwazaki, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    4 was only 70% that of Unit 2 at the same site. Given these circumstances, JNES initiated the 'Observation and Evaluation Study of Ground Motion Amplification' project by drilling a three-kilometer deep borehole on the premises of the Niigata Institute of Technology, which is located near the Kashiwazaki site, and proposed a series of workshops related to deep underground seismic observation and ground motion evaluation to the Seismic Subgroup of the OECD/NEA/IAGE Group at the April 2010 meeting. The first was held from 24-26 November 2010 as part of the first Kashiwazaki International Symposium on seismic safety, and the second was held on 7 to 9 November 2012. In the second WS, 36 papers were presented by the participants from eight countries including two international organizations, and discussed in three sessions (i.e. observation technology, evaluation of the observed seismic motion and the multipurpose use). Regarding the observation technology session, useful lessons-learned in probe development, setup and maintenance under the challenging conditions posed by great depth were described. This information from SAFORD and Kashiwazaki was thought to be particularly valuable for the planning and operation of similar facilities. As for the seismic observations from a deep borehole, it was identified that such observations are very effective for investigation of the earthquake generating process and are important for detailed understanding of the three-dimensional underground structure. There is not yet much experience with observation and application of a deep borehole, and therefore future developments and achievements are expected. The importance of simple ground motion evaluation technology combined with geophysical exploration was also acknowledged. Examples of multipurpose utilization and the advantage of seismic observations in deep boreholes were discussed. Multipurpose use was discussed not only for seismic design and evaluation of nuclear installations

  14. Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

    2006-09-30

    Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to perform high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology has been hampered by the lack of acquisition technology necessary to record large volumes of high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data. This project took aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array has removed the technical acquisition barrier for recording the data volumes necessary to do high resolution 3D VSP and 3D cross-well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that promise to take the gas industry to the next level in their quest for higher resolution images of deep and complex oil and gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the oil or gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of detailed compartmentalization of oil and gas reservoirs. In this project, we developed a 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array that allows for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. This new array has significantly increased the efficiency of recording large data volumes at sufficiently dense spatial sampling to resolve reservoir complexities. The receiver pods have been fabricated and tested to withstand high temperature (200 C/400 F) and high pressure (25,000 psi), so that they can operate in wells up to 7,620 meters (25,000 feet) deep. The receiver array is deployed on standard production or drill tubing. In combination with 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources, the 400

  15. Seismic Travel Time Tomography in Modeling Low Velocity Anomalies between the Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octova, A.; Sule, R.

    2018-04-01

    Travel time cross-hole seismic tomography is applied to describing the structure of the subsurface. The sources are placed at one borehole and some receivers are placed in the others. First arrival travel time data that received by each receiver is used as the input data in seismic tomography method. This research is devided into three steps. The first step is reconstructing the synthetic model based on field parameters. Field parameters are divided into 24 receivers and 45 receivers. The second step is applying inversion process for the field data that consists of five pairs bore holes. The last step is testing quality of tomogram with resolution test. Data processing using FAST software produces an explicit shape and resemble the initial model reconstruction of synthetic model with 45 receivers. The tomography processing in field data indicates cavities in several place between the bore holes. Cavities are identified on BH2A-BH1, BH4A-BH2A and BH4A-BH5 with elongated and rounded structure. In resolution tests using a checker-board, anomalies still can be identified up to 2 meter x 2 meter size. Travel time cross-hole seismic tomography analysis proves this mothod is very good to describing subsurface structure and boundary layer. Size and anomalies position can be recognized and interpreted easily.

  16. First field test of NAPL detection with high resolution borehole seismic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, Jil T.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this field test is to evaluate the detectability of NAPLs by high resolution tomographic borehole seismic imaging. The site is a former Department of Energy (DOE) manufacturing facility in Pinellas County, Florida. Cross-hole seismic and radar measurements were made in a shallow aquifer contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Cone penetration test (CPT) and induction logging were performed for lithology and conductivity, respectively. The main challenge is to distinguish fluid phase heterogeneities from anomalies arising from geologic structure. Our approach is to compare measurements between locations of known contamination with a nearby uncontaminated location of similar lithology where differences in signal transmission may be attributed to fluid phase changes. The CPT data show similar lithologic structure at the locations both within and outside the NAPL-contaminated area. Zones of low seismic amplitude at about 7 m depth appear more extensive in the NAPL-contaminated area. These zones may be the result of fluid phase heterogeneities (NAPL or gas), or they may be due to the lithology, i.e. attenuating nature of the layer itself, or the transition between two distinct layers. The presence of lithologic contrasts, specifically from higher permeability sands to lower permeability silts and clays, also indicate potential locations of NAPL, as they could be flow barriers to downward NAPL migration

  17. Improvement of high resolution borehole seismics. Part 1: Development of processing methods for VSP surveys. Part 2: Piezoelectric signal transmitter for seismic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Heikkinen, P.; Pekonen, S.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the high resolution borehole seismics project has been to improve the reliability and resolution of seismic methods in the particular environment of nuclear waste repository sites. The results obtained, especially the data processing and interpretation methods developed, are applicable also to other geophysical methods (e.g. Georadar). The goals of the seismic development project have been: the development of processing and interpretation techniques for mapping fractured zones, and the design and construction of a seismic source complying with the requirements of repository site characterization programs. Because these two aspects of the work are very different in nature, we have structured the report as two self contained parts. Part 1 describes the development of interpretive techniques. We have used for demonstrating the effect of different methods a VSP data set collected at the SCV site during Stage 1 of the project. Five techniques have been studied: FK-filtering, three versions of Tau-p filtering and a new technique that we have developed lately, Image Space filtering. Part 2 refers to the construction of the piezoelectric source. Earlier results obtained over short distances with low energy piezoelectric transmitters let us believe that the same principle could be applied for seismic signal transmitters, if solutions for higher energy and lower frequency output were found. The instrument which we have constructed is a cylindrical unit which can be placed in a borehole and is able to produce a radial strain when excited axially. The minimum borehole diameter is 56 mm. (au)

  18. Recordings from the deepest borehole in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Woolery, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    The recordings at the deepest vertical strong-motion array (VSAS) from three small events, the 21 October 2004 Tiptonville, Tennessee, earthquake; the 10 February 2005 Arkansas earthquake; and the 2 June 2005 Ridgely, Tennessee, earthquake show some interesting wave-propagation phenomena through the soils: the S-wave is attenuated from 260 m to 30 m depth and amplified from 30 m to the surface. The S-wave arrival times from the three events yielded different shear-wave velocity estimates for the soils. These different estimates may be the result of different incident angles of the S-waves due to different epicentral distances. The epicentral distances are about 22 km, 110 km, and 47 km for the Tiptonville, Arkansas, and Ridgely earthquakes, respectively. These recordings show the usefulness of the borehole strong-motion array. The vertical strong-motion arrays operated by the University of Kentucky have started to accumulate recordings that will provide a database for scientists and engineers to study the effects of the near-surface soils on the strong ground motion in the New Madrid Seismic Zone. More information about the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network can be found at www.uky.edu/KGS/geologichazards. The digital recordings are available at ftp://kgsweb.uky.edu.

  19. Condensed listing of surface boreholes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project through 31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.R.; Aguilar, R.; Mercer, J.W.; Newman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a condensed listing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project surface boreholes drilled for the purpose of site selection and characterization through 31 December 1995. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored the drilling activities, which were conducted primarily by Sandia National Laboratories. The listing provides physical attributes such as location (township, range, section, and state-plane coordinates), elevation, and total borehole depth, as well as the purpose for the borehole, drilling dates, and information about extracted cores. The report also presents the hole status (plugged, testing, monitoring, etc.) and includes salient findings and references. Maps with borehole locations and times-of-drilling charts are included

  20. Seismic reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennart, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The codes and regulations governing Nuclear Power Plant seismic analysis are continuously becoming more stringent. In addition, design ground accelerations of existing plants must sometimes be increased as a result of discovery of faulting zones or recording of recent earthquakes near the plant location after plant design. These new factors can result in augmented seismic design criteria. Seismic reanalysius of the existing Nuclear Power Plant structures and equipments is necessary to prevent the consequences of newly postulated accidents that could cause undue risk to the health or safety of the public. This paper reviews the developments of seismic analysis as applied to Nuclear Power Plants and the methods used by Westinghouse to requalify existing plants to the most recent safety requirements. (author)

  1. Anomalous fluid emission of a deep borehole in a seismically active area of Northern Apennines (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinicke, J.; Italiano, F.; Koch, U.; Martinelli, G.; Telesca, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Miano borehole, 1047 m deep, is located close to the river Parma in the Northern Apennines, Italy. A measuring station has been installed to observe the discharge of fluids continuously since November 2004. The upwelling fluid of this artesian well is a mixture of thermal water and CH 4 as main components. In non-seismogenic areas, a relatively constant fluid emission would be expected, perhaps overlaid with long term variations from that kind of deep reservoir over time. However, the continuous record of the fluid emission, in particular the water discharge, the gas flow rate and the water temperature, show periods of stable values interrupted by anomalous periods of fluctuations in the recorded parameters. The anomalous variations of these parameters are of low amplitude in comparison to the total values but significant in their long-term trend. Meteorological effects due to rain and barometric pressure were not detected in recorded data probably due to reservoir depth and relatively high reservoir overpressure. Influences due to the ambient temperature after the discharge were evaluated by statistical analysis. Our results suggest that recorded changes in fluid emission parameters can be interpreted as a mixing process of different fluid components at depth by variations in pore pressure as a result of seismogenic stress variation. Local seismicity was analyzed in comparison to the fluid physico-chemical data. The analysis supports the idea that an influence on fluid transport conditions due to geodynamic processes exists. Water temperature data show frequent anomalies probably connected with possible precursory phenomena of local seismic events.

  2. Seismic velocities and geologic logs from boreholes at three downhole arrays in San Francisco, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.; Warrick, Richard E.; Liu, Hsi-Ping; Westerlund, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    The Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989 (1704 PST), has reinforced observations made by Wood and others (1908) after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, that poor ground conditions (soft soil) increase the likelihood of shaking damage to structures. Since 1908 many studies (for example Borcherdt, 1970, Borcherdt and Gibbs, 1976, Borcherdt and Glassmoyer, 1992) have shown that soft soils amplify seismic waves at frequencies that can be damaging to structures. Damage in the City of San Francisco from the Loma Prieta earthquake was concentrated in the Marina District, the Embarcadero, and the China Basin areas. Each of these areas, to some degree, is underlain by soft soil deposits. These concentrations of damage raise important questions regarding the amplification effects of such deposits at damaging levels of motion. Unfortunately, no strong-motion recordings were obtained in these areas during the Loma Prieta earthquake and only a limited number (< 10) have been obtained on other soft soil sites in the United States. Consequently, important questions exist regarding the response of such deposits during damaging earthquakes, especially questions regarding the nonlinear soil response. Towards developing a data set to address these important questions, borehole strong-motion arrays have been installed at three locations. These arrays consist of groups of wide-dynamic-range pore-pressure transducers and three-component accelerometers, the outputs of which are recorded digitally. The arrays are designed to provide an integrated set of data on ground shaking, liquifaction-induced ground failure, and structural response. This report describes the detailed geologic, seismic, and material-property determinations derived at each of these sites.

  3. Development and Test of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, Bjorn N.P. [Paulsson, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)

    2015-02-28

    To address the critical site characterization and monitoring needs for CCS programs, US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Paulsson, Inc. in 2010 a contract to design, build and test a fiber optic based ultra-large bandwidth clamped borehole seismic vector array capable of deploying up to one thousand 3C sensor pods suitable for deployment into high temperature and high pressure boreholes. Paulsson, Inc. has completed a design or a unique borehole seismic system consisting of a novel drill pipe based deployment system that includes a hydraulic clamping mechanism for the sensor pods, a new sensor pod design and most important – a unique fiber optic seismic vector sensor with technical specifications and capabilities that far exceed the state of the art seismic sensor technologies. These novel technologies were all applied to the new borehole seismic system. In combination these technologies will allow for the deployment of up to 1,000 3C sensor pods in vertical, deviated or horizontal wells. Laboratory tests of the fiber optic seismic vector sensors developed during this project have shown that the new borehole seismic sensor technology is capable of generating outstanding high vector fidelity data with extremely large bandwidth: 0.01 – 6,000 Hz. Field tests have shown that the system can record events at magnitudes much smaller than M-2.3 at frequencies up to 2,000 Hz. The sensors have also proved to be about 100 times more sensitive than the regular coil geophones that are used in borehole seismic systems today. The fiber optic seismic sensors have furthermore been qualified to operate at temperatures over 300°C (572°F). The fibers used for the seismic sensors in the system are used to record Distributed Temperature Sensor (DTS) data allowing additional value added data to be recorded simultaneously with the seismic vector sensor data.

  4. Investigation on the real-time prediction of ground motions using seismic records observed in deep boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakoshi, H.; Tsuno, S.

    2013-12-01

    The present method of the EEW system installed in the railway field of Japan predicts seismic ground motions based on the estimated earthquake information about epicentral distances and magnitudes using initial P-waves observed on the surface. In the case of local earthquakes beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan Area, however, a method to directly predict seismic ground motions using P-waves observed in deep boreholes could issue EEWs more simply and surely. Besides, a method to predict seismic ground motions, using S-waves observed in deep boreholes and S-wave velocity structures beneath seismic stations, could show planar distributions of ground motions for train operation control areas in the aftermath of earthquakes. This information is available to decide areas in which the emergency inspection of railway structures should be performed. To develop those two methods, we investigated relationships between peak amplitudes on the surface and those in deep boreholes, using seismic records of KiK-net stations in the Kanto Basin. In this study, we used earthquake accelerograms observed in boreholes whose depths are deeper than the top face of Pre-Neogene basement and those on the surface at 12 seismic stations of KiK-net. We selected 243 local earthquakes whose epicenters are located around the Kanto Region. Those JMA magnitudes are in the range from 4.5 to 7.0. We picked the on-set of P-waves and S-waves using a vertical component and two horizontal components, respectively. Peak amplitudes of P-waves and S-waves were obtained using vertical components and vector sums of two horizontal components, respectively. We estimated parameters which represent site amplification factors beneath seismic stations, using peak amplitudes of S-waves observed in the deep borehole and those on the surface, to minimize the residuals between calculations by the theoretical equation and observations. Correlation coefficients between calculations and observations are high values in the range

  5. a Borehole Seismic System for Active and Passive Seimsic Studies to 3 KM at Ptrc's Aquistore Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Nixon, C.; Kofman, R.; White, D. J.; Worth, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have constructed a downhole seismic recording system for application to depths of nearly 3 km and temperatures up to 135 °C at Aquistore, an independent research and monitoring project in which liquid CO2 is being stored in a brine and sandstone water formation. The key component to this system is a set of commercially available slim-hole 3-C sondes carrying 15 Hz geophones deployable in open and cased boreholes with diameters as small as 57 mm. The system is currently hosted on a 4-conductor wireline with digital information streamed to the surface recording unit. We have further incorporated these sondes into a mobile passive monitoring unit that includes a number of redundancies such as a multiple Tbyte network accessible RAID hard-drive system (NAS) and a self-designed uninterruptible power supply. The system can be remotely controlled via the internet. The system is currently deployed covering a range of depths from 2850 m to 2910 m. Ambient temperatures at this depth are approximately 110 °C with onboard tool temperatures running at 115 °C. Data is continuously streamed to the NAS for archiving, approximately 11 GBytes of data is recorded per day at the sampling period of 0.5 ms. The lack of noise at this depth allows short data snippets to be flagged with a simple amplitude threshold criteria. The greatly reduced data volume of the snippets allows for ready access via the internet to the system for ongoing quality control. Spurious events, mostly small amplitude tube waves originating at or near the surface, are readily discounted. Active seismic measurements are carried out simultaneously but these require that an appropriately accurate independent GPS based time synchronization be used. Various experiences with event detection, orientation of sondes using both explosives and seismic vibrator, potential overheating of the surface electronics, and issues related to loss of shore power provide for a detailed case study. Aquistore, managed by the

  6. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The IAEA nuclear safety standards publications address the site evaluation and the design of new nuclear power plants (NPPs), including seismic hazard assessment and safe seismic design, at the level of the Safety Requirements as well as at the level of dedicated Safety Guides. It rapidly became apparent that the existing nuclear safety standards documents were not adequate for handling specific issues in the seismic evaluation of existing NPPs, and that a dedicated document was necessary. This is the purpose of this Safety Report, which is written in the spirit of the nuclear safety standards and can be regarded as guidance for the interpretation of their intent. Worldwide experience shows that an assessment of the seismic capacity of an existing operating facility can be prompted for the following: (a) Evidence of a greater seismic hazard at the site than expected before, owing to new or additional data and/or to new methods; (b) Regulatory requirements, such as periodic safety reviews, to ensure that the plant has adequate margins for seismic loads; (c) Lack of anti-seismic design or poor anti-seismic design; (d) New technical finding such as vulnerability of some structures (masonry walls) or equipment (relays), other feedback and new experience from real earthquakes. Post-construction evaluation programmes evaluate the current capability of the plant to withstand the seismic concern and identify any necessary upgrades or changes in operating procedures. Seismic qualification is distinguished from seismic evaluation primarily in that seismic qualification is intended to be performed at the design stage of a plant, whereas seismic evaluation is intended to be applied after a plant has been constructed. Although some guidelines do exist for the evaluation of existing NPPs, these are not established at the level of a regulatory guide or its equivalent. Nevertheless, a number of existing NPPs throughout the world have been and are being subjected to review of their

  7. Seismic review of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, P.I.; Mayes, R.L.; Jones, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    Because of developments in the fields of earthquake and structural engineering over the last two decades, the codes, standards and design criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and other critical structures have changed substantially. As a result, plants designed only a few years ago do not satisfy the requirements for new plants. Accordingly, the Regulatory Agencies are requiring owners of older Nuclear Power Plants to re-qualify the plants seismically, using codes, standards, analytical techniques and knowledge developed in recent years. Seismic review consists of three major phases: establishing the design and performance criteria, re-qualifying the structures, and re-qualifying the equipment. The authors of the paper have been recently involved in the seismic review of existing nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper is a brief summary of their experiences

  8. Co-seismic strain changes of Wenchuan Mw7. 9 earthquake recorded by borehole strainmeters on Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Guangyu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Co-seismic strain changes of the Wenchuan Mw7. 9 earthquake recorded with three four-component borehole strainmeters showed NW-SE and roughly EW extensions, respectively, at two locations in the interior and northern part of Tibetan plateau, and NS shortening at a location south of the epicenter, in agreement with the tectonic stress field of this region. The observed values of as much as 10−7 are, however, larger than theoretical values obtained with half-space and spherical-earth dislocation theories, implying the existence of other effects, such as local crustal structure and initial stress.

  9. Scientific results from the deepened Lopra-1 borehole, Faroe Islands: Borehole seismic studies of a volcanic succession from the Lopra-1/1A borehole in the Faroe Islands, northern North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowper, David

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Extruded basalt flows overlying sedimentary sequences present a challenge to hydrocarbon exploration using reflection seismic techniques. The Lopra-1/1A re-entry well on the Faroese island of Suðuroy allowed us to study the seismic characteristics of a thick sequence of basalt flows from well logs and borehole seismic recordings. Data acquired during the deepening operation in 1996 are presented here.The re-entry well found that the seismic event at 2340 m, prognosed from the pre-drill Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP as a decrease in impedance, was not base basalt and the deepened well remainedwithin the lower series basalts. Nonetheless, compressional and shear sonic logs and a density log were recorded over the full open hole interval. These allowed a firm tie to be made with the reflectedwavefield from a new VSP. The sonic logs show a compressional to shear wavespeed ratio of 1.84 which is almost constant with depth. Sonic compressional wavespeeds are 3% higher than seismicvelocities, suggesting dispersion in the basalt flows. Azimuthal anisotropy was weakly indicated by the shear sonic log but its orientation is consistent with the directions of mapped master joints in the vicinity of the well.The VSP downgoing compressional wavelet shows good persistence, retaining a dominant period of 28 ms at 3510 m depth. Average vertical velocity is 5248 m/s, higher than previously reported.Attenuation can largely be modelled by geometrical spreading and scattering loss, consistent with other studies. Within the piled flows, the effective Q from scattering is about 35. Elastic layeredmedium modelling shows some hope that a mode-converted shear wave may be observed at moderate offsets. Like its predecessor, the 1996 VSP indicates a decrease in impedance below the final depth ofthe well. However, it is unlikely to be basement or sediment and is probably an event within the volcanic sequence.

  10. Waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) borehole plugging program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, C.L.; Hunter, T.O.

    1979-08-01

    The tests and experiments described attempt to provide a mix of borehole (with limited access) and in-mine (with relatively unlimited access) environments in which assessment of the various issues involved can be undertaken. The Bell Canyon Test provides the opportunity to instrument and analyze a plug in a high pressure region. The Shallow Hole Test permits application of best techniques for plugging and then access to both the top and bottom of the plug for further analysis. The Diagnostic Test Hole permits recovery of bench scale size samples for analysis and establishes an in-borehole laboratory in which to conduct testing and analysis in all strata from the surface into the salt horizon. The additional in mine experiments provide the opportunity to investigate in more detail specific effects on plugs in the salt region and allows evaluation of instrumentation systems

  11. Reduction of seismic response in breeder plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajirian, F.F.; Somes, N.F.; Todeschini, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Thin-walled vessels to be used in the Nuclear Steam Supply Systems (NSSS) of future LMFBR's will be more sensitive to seismic excitation than their equivalents used in conventional LWR plants. Optimization studies of building arrangement have indicated that embedment of future plants may be one feasible strategy for reducing seismic response. This paper presents the results of a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction analysis using the computer program SASSI. Two types of embedded buildings are considered: full embedment of the nuclear island, and embedment of the reactor cavity alone. A comparison, between the response of the embedded structure with that of a plant supported on the surface, indicates that the seismic response at the reactor vessel support ledge can be lowered by embedment of either the entire nuclear island or the reactor cavity alone. This reduction is larger when the plant is embedded in a softer site due to the increased effect of soil-structure interaction

  12. Seismic stops for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloud, R.L.; Leung, J.S.M.; Anderson, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    In the regulated world of nuclear power, the need to have analytical proof of performance in hypothetical design-basis events such as earth quakes has placed a premium on design configurations that are mathematically tractable and easily analyzed. This is particularly true for the piping design. Depending on how the piping analyses are organized and on how old the plant is, there may be from 200 to 1000 separate piping runs to be designed, analyzed, and qualified. In this situation, the development of snubbers seemed like the answer to a piping engineer's prayer. At any place where seismic support was required but thermal motion had to be accommodated, a snubber could be specified. But, as experience has now shown, the program was solved only on paper. This article presents an alternative to conventional snubbers. These new devices, termed Seismic Stops are designed to replace snubbers directly and look like snubbers on the outside. But their design is based on a completely different principle. The original concept has adapted from early seismic-resistant pipe support designs used on fossil power plants in California. The fundamental idea is to provide a space envelope in which the pipe can expand freely between the hot and cold positions, but cannot move outside the envelope. Seismic Stops are designed to transmit any possible impact load, as would occur in an earthquake, away from the pipe itself to the Seismic Stop. The Seismic Stop pipe support is shown

  13. Site study plan for EDBH [Engineering Design Boreholes] seismic surveys, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, H.

    1987-12-01

    This site study plan describes seismic reflection surveys to run north-south and east-west across the Deaf Smith County site, and intersecting near the Engineering Design Boreholes (EDBH). Both conventional and shallow high-resolution surveys will be run. The field program has been designed to acquire subsurface geologic and stratigraphic data to address information/data needs resulting from Federal and State regulations and Repository program requirements. The data acquired by the conventional surveys will be common-depth- point, seismic reflection data optimized for reflection events that indicate geologic structure near the repository horizon. The data will also resolve the basement structure and shallow reflection events up to about the top of the evaporite sequence. Field acquisition includes a testing phase to check/select parameters and a production phase. The field data will be subjected immediately to conventional data processing and interpretation to determine if there are any anamolous structural for stratigraphic conditions that could affect the choice of the EDBH sites. After the EDBH's have been drilled and logged, including vertical seismic profiling, the data will be reprocessed and reinterpreted for detailed structural and stratigraphic information to guide shaft development. The shallow high-resulition seismic reflection lines will be run along the same alignments, but the lines will be shorter and limited to immediate vicinity of the EDBH sites. These lines are planned to detect faults or thick channel sands that may be present at the EDBH sites. 23 refs. , 7 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Seismic instrumentation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, M.

    1983-01-01

    A seismic instrumentation system used in Nuclear Power Plants to monitor the design parameters of systems, structures and components, needed to provide safety to those Plants, against the action of earthquakes is described. The instrumentation described is based on the nuclear standards in force. The minimum amount of sensors and other components used, as well as their general localization, is indicated. The operation of the instrumentation system as a whole and the handling of the recovered data are dealt with accordingly. The various devices used are not covered in detail, except for the accelerometer, which is the seismic instrumentation basic component. (Author) [pt

  15. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants require exceptional safety guarantees which are reflected in a rigorous control of the employed materials, advanced construction technology, sophisticated methods of analysis and consideration of non conventional load cases such as the earthquake loading. In this paper, the current procedures used in the seismic analysis of Nuclear Power Plants are presented. The seismic analysis of the structures has two objectives: the determination of forces in the structure in order to design it against earthquakes and the generation of floor response spectra to be used in the design of mechanical and electrical components and piping systems. (Author) [pt

  16. Using the automized system ''section'' to forecast velocity sections using data on borehole velocity measurement and seismic field prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, M.I.; Gein, F.F.; Zubairov, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    A system of automated processing of seismic data is examined which makes it possible to set up rate functions at arbitrary points of a seismic prospecting section or at points conciding with boreholes in which rate measurements have not been completed. The basis for the forecasting method is data on seismic well logging investigations, seismic prospecting and some indirect observations on sections. The bases of a procedure realizing a forecasting method are set forth, as are those requirements which satisfy the system as a whole. The results of using the ''section'' system in a terrestrial section of Western Siberia are set forth.

  17. Integration of borehole and seismic data to unravel complex stratigraphy: Case studies from the Mannville Group, Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzalejo Silva, Sabrina Ester

    Understanding the stratigraphic architecture of geologically complex reservoirs, such as the heavy oil deposits of Western Canada, is essential to achieve an efficient hydrocarbon recovery. Borehole and 3-D seismic data were integrated to define the stratigraphic architecture and generate 3-dimensional geological models of the Mannville Group in Saskatchewan. The Mannville is a stratigraphically complex unit formed of fluvial to marine deposits. Two areas in west-central and southern Saskatchewan were examined in this study. In west-central Saskatchewan, the area corresponds to a stratigraphically controlled heavy oil reservoir with production from the undifferentiated Dina-Cummings Members of the Lower Cretaceous Mannville Group. The southern area, although non-prospective for hydrocarbons, shares many similarities with time-equivalent strata in areas of heavy oil production. Seismic sequence stratigraphic principles together with log signatures permitted the subdivision of the Mannville into different packages. An initial geological model was generated integrating seismic and well-log data Multiattribute analysis and neural networks were used to generate a pseudo-lithology or gamma-ray volume. The incorporation of borehole core data to the model and the subsequent integration with the lithological prediction were crucial to capture the distribution of reservoir and non-reservoir deposits in the study area. The ability to visualize the 3-D seismic data in a variety of ways, including arbitrary lines and stratal or horizon slicing techniques helped the definition of stratigraphic features such as channels and scroll bars that affect fluid flow in hydrocarbon producing areas. Small-scale heterogeneities in the reservoir were not resolved due to the resolution of the seismic data. Although not undertaken in this study, the resulting stratigraphic framework could be used to help construct a static reservoir model. Because of the small size of the 3-D seismic surveys

  18. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerpinar, A.; Godoy, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in Eastern Europe and in particular WWER type nuclear power plants during the past seven years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on 'Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants'. These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  19. Installation of a very broad band borehole seismic station in Ferrara (Emilia)

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Dall'Olio, Lorella; Rovelli, Antonio; Romanelli, Marco; Barnaba, Carla; Abu Zeid, Nasser

    2012-01-01

    The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) is the Italian agency devoted to monitor in real time the seismicity on the Italian territory. The seismicity in Italy is of course variable in time and space, being also very much dependant on local noise conditions. Specifically, monitoring seismicity in an alluvial basin like the Po one is a challenge, due to consistent site effects induced by soft alluvial deposits and bad coupling with the deep bedrock (Steidl et al., 1996). This...

  20. Experimental investigations regarding the use of sand as an inhibitor of air convection in deep seismic boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, L. Gary; Sandoval, Leo; Hutt, Bob

    1998-01-01

    have been plagued by quite high levels of horizontal noise. Therefore, there has been a definite need for a new technique for controlling low level tilt noise in deep boreholes and the use of sand has been under consideration for several years.Figure 1 contains conceptual illustrations of both the conventional holelock installed KS sensor system and the same sensor installed in sand. This figure demonstrates the major differences between the two installation methods. The curved arrows in the borehole on the left in the figure denote possible air convection cells which are believed to be the source of tilt noise in some of the conventional installations. This air motion is eliminated in a sand installation by filling most of the free air volume surrounding the seismometer with sand as shown in the right hand portion of the figure. The sand actually performs two functions; it prevents air motion and provides a remarkably ridgid clamping of the seismometer in the borehole. This report presents the results of quantitative experimental investigations into the effectiveness of controlling low level air convection in seismic borehole installations with sand. The main body of the experimental effort consisted of installing two KS-540001 sensor systems in closely spaced shallow boreholes, allowing the sensors to reach equilibrium operation, and then pouring sand into both boreholes to observe any changes caused by pouring sand into the holes. The hypothesis of the experiment was that the sand would fill up the entire free air volume between the sensor package and the borehole walls thereby preventing movement of the air in the vicinity of the sensor package. The validity of this hypothesis had been qualitatively proven by earlier experiments at ASL and by the sand installations at the IRIS/ASL stations ANMO in 1995 and COLA in 1996. This experiment documents the degree of improved noise levels to be expected if KS instruments are installed in sand instead of in the conventional

  1. Seismic instrumentation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, M.

    1983-07-01

    A seismic instrumentation system used in Nuclear Power Plants to monitor the design parameters of systems, structures and components, needed to provide safety to those plants, against the action of earth quarks is described. The instrumentation is based on the nuclear standards and other components used, as well as their general localization is indicated. The operation of the instrumentation system as a whole and the handling of the recovered data are dealt with accordingly. The accelerometer is described in detail. (Author) [pt

  2. The Application of Borehole Seismic Techniques in Mine Development at the Millennium Uranium Deposit, Northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, G.; O’Dowd, C., E-mail: garnet_wood@cameco.com [Cameco Corporation, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Cosma, C.; Enescu, N. [Vibrometric Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    The Millennium uranium deposit is located within the Athabasca Basin of northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The deposit is situated in metasedimentary rocks, is controlled by multiple sub-vertical faults, and crossfaults and is overlain by over 500 m of intensely altered, porous Manitou Falls group sandstones. The rock quality directly surrounding the deposit is greatly reduced because of alteration and post-Athabasca sandstone structures, which provide conduits for the migration of basinal and meteoric fluids. This leads to significant risk for mine development and shaft sinking, because of the increased potential for water inflow into mine workings. To mitigate the risk involved with mining in such complex geology several projects were proposed as part of a pre-feasibility study. Of these, seismic methods were identified as the best tool to potentially identify alteration and structurally compromised zones. Subsequently, a comprehensive surface and borehole seismic program was completed in an attempt to delineate these engineering hazards and to provide assurance of success of the shaft sinking and mine development. This was the first time a seismic program of this scale was undertaken for geotechnical studies during mine development in the Athabasca Basin. (author)

  3. Role of seismic PRA in seismic safety decisions of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, M.K.; Kennedy, R.P.; Sues, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights the important roles that seismic probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) can play in the seismic safety decisions of nuclear power plants. If a seismic PRA has been performed for a plant, its results can be utilized to evaluate the seismic capability beyond the safe shutdown event (SSE). Seismic fragilities of key structures and equipment, fragilities of dominant plant damage states and the frequencies of occurrence of these plant damage states are reviewed to establish the seismic safety of the plant beyond the SSE level. Guidelines for seismic margin reviews and upgrading may be developed by first identifying the generic classes of structures and equipment that have been shown to be dominant risk contributors in the completed seismic PRAs, studying the underlying causes for their contribution and examining why certain other items (e.g., piping) have not proved to be high-risk-contributors

  4. Construction of System for Seismic Observation in Deep Borehole (SODB) - Development of Multi-depth, High-temperature/pressure resistance seismometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamada, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The development of a high quality system for seismic observation in deep boreholes, the installation process at the NIIT site, and the data sharing plan for this observation were explained. The key points of the development were high temperature resistance (150 degrees Celsius), high pressure resistance (30 MPa), and a high dynamic/wide frequency range seismometer which allows for observation of micro-tremor to strong motions as well as a cascade-connection-type borehole seismometer, which allows multiple probes to be set at several depths in a single borehole. The developed system consists of broadband (0.1-50 Hz) and high dynamic range (up to 1000 gal) seismometer with electronic parts on the ground and only the pendulum part in the borehole (it became a servo-type seismometer). Durability and maintenance may be issues in the future. (author)

  5. Interpretation of Microseismicity Observed From Surface and Borehole Seismic Arrays During Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale - Bedding Plane Slip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, F.; Jechumtalova, Z.; Eisner, L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a geomechanical model explaining microseismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing in shales developed from many datasets acquired with two most common types of seismic monitoring arrays, surface and dual-borehole arrays. The geomechanical model explains the observed source mechanisms and locations of induced events from two stimulated shale reservoirs. We observe shear dip-slip source mechanisms with nodal planes aligned with location trends. We show that such seismicity can be explained as a shearing along bedding planes caused by aseismic opening of vertical hydraulic fractures. The source mechanism inversion was applied only to selected high-quality events with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. We inverted P- and P- and S-wave arrival amplitudes to full-moment tensor and decomposed it to shear, volumetric and compensated linear vector dipole components. We also tested an effect of noise presented in the data to evaluate reliability of non-shear components. The observed seismicity from both surface and downhole monitoring of shale stimulations is very similar. The locations of induced microseismic events are limited to narrow depth intervals and propagate along distinct trend(s) showing fracture propagation in direction of maximum horizontal stress from injection well(s). The source mechanisms have a small non-shear component which can be partly explained as an effect of noise in the data, i.e. events represent shearing on faults. We observe predominantly dip-slip events with a strike of the steeper (almost vertical) nodal plane parallel to the fracture propagation. Therefore the other possible nodal plane is almost horizontal. The rake angles of the observed mechanisms divide these dip-slips into two groups with opposite polarities. It means that we observe opposite movements on the nearly identically oriented faults. Realizing a typical structural weakness of shale in horizontal planes, we interpret observed microseismicity as a result of shearing

  6. Anatomy of the high-frequency ambient seismic wave field at the TCDP borehole.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillers , Gregor; Campillo , Michel; Lin , Y.-Y.; Ma , K.F.; Roux , Philippe

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) installed a vertical seismic array between 950 and 1270 m depth in an active thrust fault environment. In this paper we analyze continuous noise records of the TCDP array between 1 and 16 Hz. We apply multiple array processing and noise correlation techniques to study the noise source process, properties of the propagation medium, and the ambient seismic wave field. Diurnal amplitude and slowness patterns suggest that ...

  7. The multi-parameter borehole system and high resolution seismic studies in the western part of the main Marmara Fault in the frame of MARSITE Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Oguz; Guralp, Cansun; Tunc, Suleyman; Yalcinkaya, Esref

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to install a multi-parameter borehole system and surface array as close to the main Marmara Fault (MMF) in the western Marmara Sea as possible, and measure continuously the evolution of the state of the fault zone surrounding the MMF and to detect any anomaly or change, which may occur before earthquakes by making use of the data from the arrays already running in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea. The multi-parameter borehole system is composed of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor, and incorporate strain meter, tilt meter, and temperature and local hydrostatic pressure measuring devices. The borehole seismic station uses the latest update technologies and design ideas to record "Earth tides" signals to the smallest magnitude -3 events. Additionally, a surface microearthquake observation array, consisting of 8-10 seismometers around the borehole is established to obtain continuous high resolution locations of micro-seismicity and to better understand the existing seismically active structures and their roles in local tectonic settings.Bringing face to face the seismograms of microearthquakes recorded by borehole and surface instruments portrays quite different contents. The shorter recording duration and nearly flat frequency spectrum up to the Nyquist frequencies of borehole records are faced with longer recording duration and rapid decay of spectral amplitudes at higher frequencies of a surface seismogram. The main causative of the observed differences are near surface geology effects that mask most of the source related information the seismograms include, and that give rise to scattering, generating longer duration seismograms. In view of these circumstances, studies on microearthquakes employing surface seismograms may bring on misleading results. Particularly, the works on earthquake physics and nucleation process of earthquakes requires elaborate analysis of tiny events. It is

  8. Safety review for seismic qualification on nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Qingxian

    1995-01-01

    The standards and requirements for seismic qualification of nuclear power plant's component have been fully addressed, including the scope of seismic qualification, the approach and the method of common seismic qualification, the procedure of the seismic tests, and the criteria for the seismic qualification review. The problems discovered in the safety review and the solution for these problems and some other issues are also discussed

  9. Approach for seismic risk analysis for CANDU plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B-S; Kim, T; Kang, S-K [Korea Power Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S-Y; Roh, S-R [Korea Electric Power Corp., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Centre

    1996-12-31

    A seismic risk analysis for CANDU type plants has never been performed. The study presented here suggested that the approach generally applied to LWR type plants could lead to unacceptable result, if directly applied to CANDU plants. This paper presents a modified approach for the seismic risk analysis of CANDU plants. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  10. Seismic verification of nuclear plant equipment anchorage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepiece, M.; Van Vyve, J.

    1991-01-01

    More than 60% of the electrical power of Belgium is generated by seven PWR nuclear power plants. For three of them, the electro-mechanical equipment had to be reassessed after ten years of operation, because the seismic requirements were upgraded from 0.1 g to 0.17 g free field ground acceleration. The seismic requalification of the active equipment was a critical problem as the classical methods were too conservative. The approach based on the use of the past experience on the seismic behavior of nonnuclear equipment, chosen and developed by the SQUG, had to be transposed to the Belgian N.P.P. The decision of the accept-ability of equipment relies heavily on the aseismatic capacity of anchorage. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the procedure and guideline for the demonstration of the aseismatic adequacy of equipment anchorage in a cost-effective and consistent manner, to support the decision by Seismic Review Team. The field inspection procedure to identify the type of fasteners and detect their possible defects and the verification procedure developed to calculate the aseismatic capacity of equipment anchorage on the strength of fasteners, the aseismatic capacity of anchorage and the comparison of the capacity with the demand are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Combined Borehole Seismic and Electromagnetic Inversion For High-Resolution Petrophysical Assessment Of Hydocarbon Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Torres-Verdin; G. Michael Hoversten; Ki Ha Lee; Gregory Newman; Kurt Nihei

    2008-12-31

    This report summarizes the work performed between January 2005 and December 2007, under DOE research contract DE-FC26-04NT15507. The project is was performed by the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering of The University of Texas at Austin and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under the auspices of the National Energy Technology Office (NETL) and the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO). During the three-year project, we developed new methods to combine borehole sonic and electromagnetic (EM) measurements for the improved assessment of elastic and petrophysical properties of rock formations penetrated by a well. Sonic measurements consisted of full waveform acoustic amplitudes acquired with monopole and dipole sources, whereas EM measurements consisted of frequency-domain voltages acquired with multi-coil induction systems. The combination of sonic and EM measurements permitted the joint estimation of elastic and petrophysical properties in the presence of mud-filtrate invasion. It was conclusively shown that the combined interpretation of sonic and EM measurements reduced non-uniqueness in the estimation of elastic and petrophysical properties and improved the spatial resolution of the estimations compared to estimations yielded separately from the two types of measurements. Moreover, this approach enabled the assessment of dynamic petrophysical properties such as permeability, as it incorporated the physics of mud-filtrate invasion in the interpretation of the measurements. The first part of the project considered the development of fast and reliable numerical algorithms to simulate borehole sonic waveforms in 2D, 3D, and radial 1D media. Such algorithms were subsequently used in the quantitative estimation of elastic properties jointly from borehole sonic and EM measurements. In the second part of the project we developed a new algorithm to estimate water saturation, porosity, and dry-rock elastic moduli jointly from borehole sonic and

  12. Inter-source seismic interferometry by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) for borehole sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Romdhane, A.

    2014-01-01

    Seismic interferometry (SI) is usually implemented by crosscorrelation (CC) to retrieve the impulse response between pairs of receiver positions. An alternative approach by multidimensional deconvolution (MDD) has been developed and shown in various studies the potential to suppress artifacts due to

  13. Seismic PRA of a BWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    Since the occurrence of nuclear power plant accidents in the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power station, the regulatory framework on severe accident (SA) has been discussed in Japan. The basic concept is to typify and identify the accident sequences leading to core/primary containment vessel (PCV) damage and to implement SA measures covering internal and external events extensively. As Japan is an earthquake-prone country and earthquakes and tsunami are important natural external events for nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, JNES performed the seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) on a typical nuclear power plant and evaluated the dominant accident sequences leading to core/PCV damage to discuss dominant scenarios of severe accident (SA). The analytical models and the results of level-1 seismic PRA on a 1,100 MWe BWR-5 plant are shown here. Seismic PRA was performed for a typical BWR5 plant. Initiating events with large contribution to core damage frequency are the loss of all AC powers (station blackout) and the large LOCA. The top of dominant accident sequences is the simultaneous occurrence of station blackout and large LOCA. Important components to core damage frequency are electric power supply equipment. It needs to keep in mind that the results are influenced on site geologic characteristic to a greater or lesser. In the process of analysis, issues such as conservative assumptions related to damages of building or structure and success criteria for excessive LOCA are left to be resolved. These issues will be further studied including thermal hydric analysis in the future. (authors)

  14. Establishment of borehole observation system and high resolution seismic studies in the western part of the main Marmara Fault in the frame of MARSite Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, A.; Yalcinkaya, E.; Guralp, C. M.; Tunc, S.; Meral Ozel, N.

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to install a multi-parameter borehole system and surface array as close to the main Marmara Fault (MMF) in the western Marmara Sea as possible, and measure continuously the evolution of the state of the fault zone surrounding the MMF and to detect any anomaly or change which may occur before earthquakes by making use of the data from the arrays already running in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea. The multi-parameter borehole system will be composed of very wide dynamic range and stable borehole (VBB) broad band seismic sensor, and incorporate 3-D strain meter, tilt meter, and temperature and local hydrostatic pressure measuring devices. The borehole seismic station will use the latest update technologies and design ideas to record 'Earth tides' signals to the smallest magnitude -3 events. Bringing face to face the seismograms of microearthquakes recorded by borehole and surface instruments portrays quite different contents. The shorter recording duration and nearly flat frequency spectrum up to the Nyquist frequencies of borehole records are faced with longer recording duration and rapid decay of spectral amplitudes at higher frequencies of a surface seismogram. The main causative of the observed differences are near surface geology effects that mask most of the source related information the seismograms include, and that give rise to scattering, generating longer duration seismograms. In view of these circumstances, studies on microearthquakes employing surface seismograms may bring on misleading results. Particularly, the works on earthquake physics and nucleation process of earthquakes requires elaborate analysis of tiny events. It is obvious from the studies on the nucleation process of the 1999 earthquake that tens of minutes before the major rupture initiate noteworthy microearthquake activity happened. The starting point of the 1999 rupture was a site of swarm activity noticed a few decades prior the main shock

  15. 78 FR 55118 - Seismic Instrumentation for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0202] Seismic Instrumentation for Nuclear Power Plants... Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition,'' Section 3.7.4, ``Seismic Instrumentation.'' DATES: Submit... Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition'' (SRP, from the current Revision 2 to a new Revision 3). The proposed...

  16. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] intermediate scale borehole test: A pretest analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argueello, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element structural analysis of the Intermediate Scale Borehole Test at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been performed. The analysis provides insight into how a relatively new excavation in a creeping medium responds when introduced into an existing pillar which has been undergoing stress redistribution for 5.7 years. The stress field of the volume of material in the immediate vicinity of the borehole changes significantly when the hole is drilled. Closure of the hole is predicted to be larger in the vertical direction than in the horizontal direction, leading to an ovaling of the hole. The relatively high stresses near the hole persist even at the end of the simulation, 2 years after the hole is drilled. 12 ref., 10 figs

  17. Variations in geoacoustic emissions in a deep borehole and its correlation with seismicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Storcheus

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuous geoacoustic emission (GAE measurements were acquired using a three-component geophone placed in a borehole at a depth of near 1000 m at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky starting in August 2000. Using geophones consisting of magneto-elastic crystal ferromagnetic sensors, and installed at such a depth allows measurement of natural geoacoustic background with signal amplitude less than 1×10-4 m/s3 in frequency band from 3 to 1500 Hz. According to the data from a 4-year survey period the characteristics of diurnal geoacoustic variations change before every earthquake with MLH? 5.0 that occurs at a distance of less than 300 km from the observation point or before each earthquake with MLH?5.5 occurring at distance R?550 km from the observation point. The changes in GAE regime correlate with the strongest earthquakes that occurred during survey period. Measurements of the natural electromagnetic field of the Earth were carried out simultaneously with the help of an underground electric antenna. The behavior of GAE in aseismic periods appears to be related to the effect of diurnal variations of the natural electromagnetic field.

  18. Anatomy of the high-frequency ambient seismic wave field at the TCDP borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillers, G.; Campillo, M.; Lin, Y.-Y.; Ma, K.-F.; Roux, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP) installed a vertical seismic array between 950 and 1270 m depth in an active thrust fault environment. In this paper we analyze continuous noise records of the TCDP array between 1 and 16 Hz. We apply multiple array processing and noise correlation techniques to study the noise source process, properties of the propagation medium, and the ambient seismic wave field. Diurnal amplitude and slowness patterns suggest that noise is generated by cultural activity. The vicinity of the recording site to the excitation region, indicated by a narrow azimuthal distribution of propagation directions, leads to a predominant ballistic propagation regime. This is evident from the compatibility of the data with an incident plane wave model, polarized direct arrivals of noise correlation functions, and the asymmetric arrival shape. Evidence for contributions from scattering comes from equilibrated earthquake coda energy ratios, the frequency dependent randomization of propagation directions, and the existence of correlation coda waves. We conclude that the ballistic and scattered propagation regime coexist, where the first regime dominates the records, but the second is weaker yet not negligible. Consequently, the wave field is not equipartitioned. Correlation signal-to-noise ratios indicate a frequency dependent noise intensity. Iterations of the correlation procedure enhance the signature of the scattered regime. Discrepancies between phase velocities estimated from correlation functions and in-situ measurements are associated with the array geometry and its relative orientation to the predominant energy flux. The stability of correlation functions suggests their applicability in future monitoring efforts.

  19. Seismic re-evaluation of French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, R.

    1995-01-01

    After a presentation of the seismic inputs which have been taken into account in the design of the French Nuclear Power Plants, the re-assessed values of these inputs are shown. Some considerations about the specificity of the French PWR program with regard to the standardisation of plants are given together with the present objectives of seismic re-evaluations. Finally the main results of the seismic re-analysis being performed for the Phenix Fast Reactor are considered. (author)

  20. Traveltime and waveform tomography analysis of synthetic borehole seismic data based on the CO2SINK project site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Can; Fan, Wenfang; Juhlin, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Time lapse analysis of seismic data is very important for CO2 storage projects. Therefore, we have tested traveltime and waveform tomography methods to detect velocity changes in a CO2 injection reservoir using synthetic time lapse data. The structural model tested is based on the CO2SINK injection site at Ketzin, Germany where CO2 is being injected at about 630-650 m into a saline aquifer. First, we created synthetic time lapse moving source profiling (MSP) data, also known as walkaway profiling. The velocity model used for modeling was based on well logging and lithological information in the injection borehole. Gassmann fluid substitution was used to calculate the reservoir velocity after injection. In this substitution, we assumed a saturation of CO2 of 30%. The model velocity of the reservoir changed from 2750 m/s (before injection) to 2150 m/s (after injection). A 2D finite difference code available in Seismic Unix (www.cwp.mines.edu) was used. 60 source points were distributed along a surface line. The distance from the injection well was between 150m and 858m, with an interval of 12m. We recorded 21 channels at receiver depths from 470m to 670m, with an interval of 10m. The injection layer was assumed to be between 629m and 650m depth. The wavelet used for the synthetic data was a Gaussian derivative with an average frequency of 60Hz. Then first arrivals were picked on both data sets and used as input data for traveltime tomography. For traveltime tomography, the PS_tomo program was used. Since no data were recorded above 470m, the initial velocity model used above this depth was the true velocity model. Below 470m, the initial velocity model increases linearly from 3000m/s to 3250m/s. After inversion, the reservoir velocity and an anhydrite layer (high velocity layer) can be seen clearly in the final inverted velocity models. Using these velocity models as starting models, we performed waveform tomography in the frequency domain using a program supplied by

  1. Nuclear power plants seismic review programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabanero, J.G.; Jimenez Juan, A.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation deals with seismic design and seismic reevaluation of Spanish operating nuclear power plants. The Spanish NPPs owners Probabilistic seismic hazard study requires an independent and deep review of methodology, modelling techniques, data management and method of eliciting in order to make decision on its acceptability. It reflects the opinion of only one expert tem and it would be necessary to involve more expert opinions to consider the uncertainties. It is proposed to evaluate the probabilistic seismic hazard study and the seismic categorisation

  2. Seismic PSA of nuclear power plants a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, M.; Dubey, P.N.; Reddy, G.R.; Saraf, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2006-07-01

    Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (Seismic PSA) analysis is an external event PSA analysis. The objective of seismic PSA for the plants is to examine the existence of plant vulnerabilities against postulated earthquakes by numerically assessing the plant safety and to take appropriate measures to enhance the plant safety. Seismic PSA analysis integrates the seismic hazard analysis, seismic response analysis, seismic fragility analysis and system reliability/ accident sequence analysis. In general, the plant consists of normally operating and emergency standby systems and components. The failure during an earthquake (induced directly by excessive inertial stresses or indirectly following the failure of some other item) of an operating component will lead to a change in the state of the plant. In that case, various scenarios can follow depending on the initiating event and the status of other sub-systems. The analysis represents these possible chronological sequences by an event tree. The event trees and the associated fault trees model the sub-systems down to the level of individual components. The procedure has been applied for a typical Indian nuclear power plant. From the internal event PSA level I analysis significant contribution to the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found due to the Fire Water System. Hence, this system was selected to establish the procedure of seismic PSA. In this report the different elements that go into seismic PSA analysis have been discussed. Hazard curves have been developed for the site. Fragility curve for the seismically induced failure of Class IV power has been developed. The fragility curve for fire-water piping system has been generated. Event tree for Class IV power supply has been developed and the dominating accident sequences were identified. CDF has been estimated from these dominating accident sequences by convoluting hazard curves of initiating event and fragility curves of the safety systems. (author)

  3. Quantitative elastic migration. Applications to 3D borehole seismic surveys; Migration elastique quantitative. Applications a la sismique de puits 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clochard, V.

    1998-12-02

    3D VSP imaging is nowadays a strategic requirement by petroleum companies. It is used to precise in details the geology close to the well. Because of the lack of redundancy and limited coverage in the data. this kind of technology is more restrictive than surface seismic which allows an investigation at a higher scale. Our contribution was to develop an elastic quantitative imagine (GRT migration) which can be applied to 3 components borehole dataset. The method is similar to the Kirchhoff migration using sophistical weighting of the seismic amplitudes. In reality. GRT migration uses pre-calculated Green functions (travel time. amplitude. polarization). The maps are obtained by 3D ray tracing (wavefront construction) in the velocity model. The migration algorithm works with elementary and independent tasks. which is useful to process different kind of dataset (fixed or moving geophone antenna). The study has been followed with validations using asymptotic analytical solution. The ability of reconstruction in 3D borehole survey has been tested in the Overthrust synthetic model. The application to a real circular 3D VSP shows various problems like velocity model building, anisotropy factor and the preprocessing (deconvolution. wave mode separation) which can destroy seismic amplitudes. An isotropic 3 components preprocessing of the whole dataset allows a better lateral reconstruction. The choice of a big migration aperture can help the reconstruction of strong geological dip in spite of migration smiles. Finally, the methodology can be applied to PS converted waves. (author)

  4. Current USAEC seismic requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The principal seismic and geologic considerations which guide the USAEC in its evaluation of the suitability of proposed sites for nuclear power plants and plant design bases are set forth as design criteria in the AEC regulatory guides. The basic requirements of seismic design and analysis for seismic Category I structures, components, and systems important to public safety have been established in the USAEC regulatory guides and Code of Federal Regulations. It is pointed out that the current state-of-art techniques, best available technology, and additional studies in the field of earthquake engineering can be utilized to resolve seismic concerns. The seismic design requirements for nuclear plants to withstand postulated earthquakes can be standardized and this will be a significant milestone in the continuation of the Nuclear Standardization Program. (author)

  5. Seismic re-evaluation of Heavy Water Plant, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parulekar, Y.M.; Reddy, G.R.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-10-01

    This report deals with seismic re-evaluation of Heavy Water Plant, Kota. Heavy Water Plant, Kota handles considerable amount of H 2 S gas, which is very toxic. During the original design stage as per IS 1893-1966 seismic coefficient for zone-I was zero. Therefore earthquake and its effects were not considered while designing the heavy water plant structures. However as per IS 1893 (1984) the seismic coefficient for zone-I is 0.01 g. Hence seismic re-evaluation of various structures of the heavy water plant is carried out. Analysis of the heavy water plant structures was carried out for self weight, equipment load and earthquake load. Pressure loading was also considered in case of H 2 S storage tanks. Soil structure interaction effect was considered in the analysis. The combined stresses in the structures due to earthquake and dead load were checked with the allowable stresses. (author)

  6. Evaluation and assessment of nuclear power plant seismic methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernreuter, D.; Tokarz, F.; Wight, L.; Smith, P.; Wells, J.; Barlow, R.

    1977-03-01

    The major emphasis of this study is to develop a methodology that can be used to assess the current methods used for assuring the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The proposed methodology makes use of system-analysis techniques and Monte Carlo schemes. Also, in this study, we evaluate previous assessments of the current seismic-design methodology.

  7. Evaluation and assessment of nuclear power plant seismic methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuter, D.; Tokarz, F.; Wight, L.; Smith, P.; Wells, J.; Barlow, R.

    1977-01-01

    The major emphasis of this study is to develop a methodology that can be used to assess the current methods used for assuring the seismic safety of nuclear power plants. The proposed methodology makes use of system-analysis techniques and Monte Carlo schemes. Also, in this study, we evaluate previous assessments of the current seismic-design methodology

  8. Seismic safety of Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive program is underway at Paks NPP for evaluation of the seismic safety and for development of the necessary safety increasing measures. This program includes the following five measures: investigation of methods, regulations and techniques utilized for reassessment of seismic safety of operating NPPs and promoting safety; investigation of earthquake hazards; development of concepts for creating the seismic safety location of earthquake warning system; determination of dynamic features of systems and facilities determined by the concept, and preliminary evaluation of the seismic safety

  9. Seismic qualification method of equipment for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Choi, T.H.; Sulaimana, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Safety related equipment installed in Korean Nuclear Power Plants are required to perform a safety function during and after a seismic event. To accomplish this safety function, they must be seismically qualified in accordance with the intent and requirements of the USNRC Reg. Guide 1.100 Rev. 02 and IEEE Std. 344-1987. This paper defines and summarizes acceptable criteria and procedures, based on the Korean experience, for seismic qualification of purchased equipment to be installed in a nuclear power plant. As such the paper is intended to be a concise reference by equipment designers, architectural engineering company and plant owners in uniform implementation of commitments to nuclear regulatory agencies such as the USNRC or Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) relating to adequacy of seismic Category 1 equipment. Thus, the paper provides the methodologies which can be used for qualifying equipment for safely related service in Nuclear Power Plants in a cost effective manner

  10. Seismic design of nuclear power plants - an assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, G.E.; Ibanez, P.; Smith, C.B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a review and evaluation of the design standards and the analytical and experimental methods used in the seismic design of nuclear power plants with emphasis on United States practice. Three major areas were investigated: (a) soils, siting, and seismic ground motion specification; (b) soil-structure interaction; and (c) the response of major nuclear power plant structures and components. The purpose of this review and evaluation program was to prepare an independent assessment of the state-of-the-art of the seismic design of nuclear power plants and to identify seismic analysis and design research areas meriting support by the various organizations comprising the 'nuclear power industry'. Criteria used for evaluating the relative importance of alternative research areas included the potential research impact on nuclear power plant siting, design, construction, cost, safety, licensing, and regulation. (Auth.)

  11. Upgrading of seismic design of nuclear power plant building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kitada, Yoshio

    1997-03-01

    In Japan seismic design methodology of nuclear power plant (NPP) structures has been established as introduced in the previous session. And yet efforts have been continued to date to upgrade the methodology, because of conservative nature given to the methodology in regard to unknown phenomena and technically-limited modeling involved in design analyses. The conservative nature tends to produce excessive safety margins, and inevitably send NPP construction cost up. Moreover, excessive seismic design can increase the burden on normal plant operation, though not necessarily contributing to overall plant safety. Therefore, seismic engineering has put to many tests and simulation analyses in hopes to rationalize seismic design and enhance reliability of seismic safety of NPPs. In this paper, we describe some studies on structural seismic design of NPP underway as part of Japan`s effort to upgrade existing seismic design methodology. Most studies described here are carried out by NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Company) funded by MITI (the Ministry of International Trade and Industry Japan), though, similar studies with the same motive are also carrying out by nuclear industries such as utilities, NPP equipment and system manufacturers and building constructors. This paper consists of three sections, each introducing studies relating to NPP structural seismic design, new siting technology, and upgrading of the methodology of structural design analyses. (J.P.N.)

  12. Upgrading of seismic design of nuclear power plant building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kitada, Yoshio.

    1997-01-01

    In Japan seismic design methodology of nuclear power plant (NPP) structures has been established as introduced in the previous session. And yet efforts have been continued to date to upgrade the methodology, because of conservative nature given to the methodology in regard to unknown phenomena and technically-limited modeling involved in design analyses. The conservative nature tends to produce excessive safety margins, and inevitably send NPP construction cost up. Moreover, excessive seismic design can increase the burden on normal plant operation, though not necessarily contributing to overall plant safety. Therefore, seismic engineering has put to many tests and simulation analyses in hopes to rationalize seismic design and enhance reliability of seismic safety of NPPs. In this paper, we describe some studies on structural seismic design of NPP underway as part of Japan's effort to upgrade existing seismic design methodology. Most studies described here are carried out by NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Company) funded by MITI (the Ministry of International Trade and Industry Japan), though, similar studies with the same motive are also carrying out by nuclear industries such as utilities, NPP equipment and system manufacturers and building constructors. This paper consists of three sections, each introducing studies relating to NPP structural seismic design, new siting technology, and upgrading of the methodology of structural design analyses. (J.P.N.)

  13. Seismic design criteria for special isotope separation plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrona, M.W.; Wuthrich, S.J.; Rose, D.L.; Starkey, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the seismic criteria for the design of the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) production plant. These criteria are derived from the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders, references and proposed standards. The SIS processing plant consistent of Load Center Building (LCB), Dye Pump Building (DPB), Laser Support Building (LSB) and Plutonium Processing Building (PPB). The facility-use category for each of the SIS building structures is identified and the applicable seismic design criteria and parameters are selected

  14. Seismic response analysis for a deeply embedded nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.W.H.; Chatterjee, M.; Day, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    One of the important aspect of the aseimic design of nuclear power plants is the evaluation of the seismic soil-structure interaction effect due to design earthquakes. The soil-structure interaction effect can initiate rocking and result in different soil motions compared to the free field motions, thus significantly affecting the structural response. Two methods are generally used to solve the seismic soil-structure interaction problems: the direct finite element method (FLUSH) and the substructure or impedance approach. This paper presents the results of the horizontal seismic soil-structure interaction analysis using the impedance aproach and the direct finite element method for a deeply embedded nuclear power plant. (orig.)

  15. Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.

    1994-01-01

    A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves

  16. Seismic margin analysis technique for nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2001-04-01

    In general, the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and the Seismic Margin Assessment(SAM) are used for the evaluation of realistic seismic capacity of nuclear power plant structures. Seismic PRA is a systematic process to evaluate the seismic safety of nuclear power plant. In our country, SPRA has been used to perform the probabilistic safety assessment for the earthquake event. SMA is a simple and cost effective manner to quantify the seismic margin of individual structural elements. This study was performed to improve the reliability of SMA results and to confirm the assessment procedure. To achieve this goal, review for the current status of the techniques and procedures was performed. Two methodologies, CDFM (Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin) sponsored by NRC and FA (Fragility Analysis) sponsored by EPRI, were developed for the seismic margin review of NPP structures. FA method was originally developed for Seismic PRA. CDFM approach is more amenable to use by experienced design engineers including utility staff design engineers. In this study, detailed review on the procedures of CDFM and FA methodology was performed

  17. Seismic qualification for water chillers of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunming

    2005-01-01

    Water chillers are important components of the electric building chilled water system of Nuclear Power Plant. In this article, we describe the seismic qualification methodology. A united method of seismic analysis and experiment testing were applied. Since the seismic classification of the evaporator, condenser and oil separator is 1F, the chillers must satisfy the function criteria. The functional and performance of the control panel were qualified by seismic test. In order to get the seismic time histories of the base of the motor, compressor and control panel, we did time histories analysis for the whole chillers using the seismic acceleration time history of the building floor on which the water chillers was located. Then, these curves were translated into required response spectrum (RRS), which were used by the seismic test of water chillers compressor sets. All passive components, such as evaporator, condenser, oil separator and support, were qualified by seismic stress analysis method. These components were verified to satisfy the standard when they were subjected to the seismic, gravitational, operational pressure and nozzle loads. The Chillers' components were qualified to the specification and the standard. The motor-compressor set and control panel were qualified to the functional and performance criteria. The applied of this methodology qualified the function of the water chillers compressor sets effectively, especially after the aging test. (author)

  18. Seismic safety of Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper contains an overview of the results concerning the following activities: investigation of methods, regulations and techniques for reassessment of seismic safety of operating NPPs and upgrading of safety; investigation of earthquake hazards; development of concept for creation of the seismic safety location of earthquake warning system; determination of dynamic features of systems and facilities determined by the concept and preliminary evaluation of the seismic safety. It is limited on investigation of dynamic features of building structures, the building dynamical experiments and experimental investigation of the equipment

  19. Seismic margins review of nuclear power plants: Fragility aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, M.K.; Hardy, G.S.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The fragility analysis is utilised in the seismic margin review in initial screening of certain components in the plant based on their generically high seismic capacities. A detailed walkdown of the plant is conducted to confirm that the initial screening is valid i.e., the generically high seismic capacity components do not possess any potential weaknesses (e.g., inadequate bracing, inadequate anchorage and potential systems interaction). For the components that are screened in, their seismic capacities are evaluated using either a probabilistic analysis of a deterministic evaluation. Based on a system analysis, the Boolean expressions for critical accident sequences are derived. These Boolean expressions are quantified using the component fragilities and nonseismic unavailabilities of components. The final product is the High Confidence Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity of the plant and the identification of potential seismic vulnerabilities in the plant. The objective of the paper is to describe the application of fragility analysis procedures in the seismic margin review of Maine Yankee and to document the insights obtained in this trial plant review. (orig./HP)

  20. Refer to AP1000 for discussing the betterment of seismic design of internal nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Zhenbang; Zhang Renyan

    2014-01-01

    As a reference technique of AP1000, This paper discussed the betterment of seismic design of nuclear power plant in three ways. (1) Establish design criteria and guidelines for protection from seismic interaction; (2) Nuclear power plant seismic design of eliminating or weaken operation-basis earthquake; (3) Develop the seismic margin analysis (SMA) of the nuclear power plant. These three aspect are frontier technology in internal seismic design of internal nuclear power plant, and also these three technology are related intimately. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on how to determine the ground motion hazards for a plant at a particular site and the potential for surface faulting, which could affect the feasibility of construction and safe operation of a plant at that site. The guidelines and procedures presented in this Safety Guide can appropriately be used in evaluations of site suitability and seismic hazards for nuclear power plants in any seismotectonic environment. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis recommended in this Safety Guide also addresses the needs for seismic hazard analysis of external event PSAs conducted for nuclear power plants. Many of the methods and processes described may also be applicable to nuclear facilities other than power plants. Other phenomena of permanent ground displacement (liquefaction, slope instability, subsidence and collapse) as well as the topic of seismically induced flooding are treated in Safety Guides relating to foundation safety and coastal flooding. Recommendations of a general nature are given in Section 2. Section 3 discusses the acquisition of a database containing the information needed to evaluate and address all hazards associated with earthquakes. Section 4 covers the use of this database for construction of a seismotectonic model. Sections 5 and 6 review ground motion hazards and evaluations of the potential for surface faulting, respectively. Section 7 addresses quality assurance in the evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants

  2. The reevaluation of seismic safety of existing nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Shohei; Kumagai, Chiyoshi; Koshiba, Koremutsu; Kono, Tomonori; Agawa, Kazuyoshi; Kuwata, Kenichiro

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out additional geological surveys in order to enrich our database on geological faults in the vicinity of Shimane Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Prior to additional geological surveys, given the social importance of nuclear power plants, we hypothetically assumed that almost the whole length of an area covered by surveys would be an active fault that must be considered in seismic design, and tried to reevaluate the seismic safety of the NPP by applying an input earthquake ground motion larger than the level at the design stage. As a result, we have confirmed that seismic safety of the NPP can be maintained. This paper describes the method that we employed to reevaluate the seismic safety of Shimane NPP. (author)

  3. Source modelling in seismic risk analysis for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucemen, M.S.

    1978-12-01

    The proposed probabilistic procedure provides a consistent method for the modelling, analysis and updating of uncertainties that are involved in the seismic risk analysis for nuclear power plants. The potential earthquake activity zones are idealized as point, line or area sources. For these seismic source types, expressions to evaluate their contribution to seismic risk are derived, considering all the possible site-source configurations. The seismic risk at a site is found to depend not only on the inherent randomness of the earthquake occurrences with respect to magnitude, time and space, but also on the uncertainties associated with the predicted values of the seismic and geometric parameters, as well as the uncertainty in the attenuation model. The uncertainty due to the attenuation equation is incorporated into the analysis through the use of random correction factors. The influence of the uncertainty resulting from the insufficient information on the seismic parameters and source geometry is introduced into the analysis by computing a mean risk curve averaged over the various alternative assumptions on the parameters and source geometry. Seismic risk analysis is carried for the city of Denizli, which is located in the seismically most active zone of Turkey. The second analysis is for Akkuyu

  4. Ensuring seismic safety of Blahutovice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, V.; David, M.; Hrabe, T.; Simunek, P.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of the seismic and geological survey of the Blahutovice nuclear power plant site. The variants are discussed of laying foundations and securing earthquake protection of the reactor building. The calculations made show that all variants are suitable with respect to seismic effects because the acceleration of seismic vibrations at the foundation slab level reaches the maximum intensity of 8deg MSK 64. The variant envisaging that the reactor building should be supported on spring insulators with viscous dampers is considered most advanced. (J.B.). 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. Seismic fragilities for nuclear power plant risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Ravindra, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic fragilities of critical structures and equipment are developed as families of conditional failure frequency curves plotted against peak ground acceleration. The procedure is based on available data combined with judicious extrapolation of design information on plant structures and equipment. Representative values of fragility parameters for typical modern nuclear power plants are provided. Based on the fragility evaluation for about a dozen nuclear power plants, it is proposed that unnecessary conservatism existing in current seismic design practice could be removed by properly accounting for inelastic energy absorption capabilities of structures. The paper discusses the key contributors to seismic risk and the significance of possible correlation between component failures and potential design and construction errors

  6. Summary report of seismic PSA of BWR model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    This report presents a seismic PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodology developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for evaluating risks of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the results from an application of the methodology to a BWR plant in Japan, which is termed Model Plant'. The seismic PSA procedures developed at JAERI are to evaluate core damage frequency (CDF) and have the following four steps: (1) evaluation of seismic hazard, (2) evaluation of realistic response, (3) evaluation of component capacities and failure probabilities, and (4) evaluation of conditional probability of system failure and CDF. Although these procedures are based on the methodologies established and used in the United States, they include several unique features: (1) seismic hazard analysis is performed with use of available knowledge and database on seismological conditions in Japan; (2) response evaluation is performed with a response factor method which is cost effective and associated uncertainties can be reduced with use of modern methods of design calculations; (3) capacity evaluation is performed with use of test results available in Japan in combination with design information and generic capacity data in the U.S.A.; (4) systems reliability analysis, performed with use of the computer code SECOM-2 developed at JAERI, includes identification of dominant accident sequences, importance analysis of components and systems as well as the CDF evaluation with consideration of the effect of correlation of failures by a newly developed method based on the Monte Carlo method. The effect of correlation has been recognized as an important issue in seismic PSAs. The procedures was used to perform a seismic PSA of a 1100 MWe BWR plant. Results are shown as well as the insights derived and future research needs identified in this seismic PSA. (J.P.N.)

  7. Seismic response analysis of floating nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hideharu; Shiojiri, Hiroo

    1988-01-01

    Since Floating Nuclear Power Plants (FNPs) are considered to be isolated from horizontal seismic motion, it is anticipated to reduce seismic load for plant components and buildings on the barge. On the other hand, barge oscillation and sloshing in the closed basin might be excited by earthquakes, because natural periods of those motions correspond to relatively-long period component (between 2 and 20 seconds) of seismic motion. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate seismic isolation effects and barge oscillation, for the rational design of FNPs. However, there do not exist any reasonable analytical tools which can evaluate seismic response of floating structures in closed basin. The purpose of the present report is to develop a seismic analysis method for FNPs. The proposed method is based on the finite element method, and the formulation includes fluid-structure interaction, water surface wave, buoyancy effect, and non-linear characteristics of mooring system. Response analysis can be executed in both time-domain and frequency-domain. Shaking table tests were conducted to validate the proposed method of analysis. The test results showed significant isolation effect of floating structure, and apparent interaction between the barge and the basin. And 2-D and 3-D frequency domain analyses and the 2-D linear and non-linear time-domain analyses were done and those analyses could simulate the test results well. (author)

  8. Overview of seismic resistant design of Indian Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, G.K.; Hawaldar, R.V.K.P.; Vinod Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Safe operation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is of utmost importance. NPPs consist of various Structure, System and Equipment (SS and E) that are designed to resist the forces generated due to a natural phenomenon like earthquake. An earthquake causes severe oscillatory ground motion of short duration. Seismic resistant design of SS and E calls for evaluation of effect of severe ground shaking for assuring the structural integrity and operability during and after the occurrence of earthquake event. Overall exercise is a multi-disciplinary approach. First of standardized 220 MWe design reactor is Narora Atomic Power Station. Seismic design was carried out as per state of art then, for the first time. The twelve 220 MWe reactors and two 540 MWe reactors designed since 1975 have been seismically qualified for the earthquake loads expected in the region. Seismic design of 700 MWe reactor is under advanced stage of finalization. Seismic re-evaluation of six numbers of old plants has been completed as per latest state of art. Over the years, expertise have been developed at Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, prominent educational institutes, research laboratories and engineering consultants in the country in the area of seismic design, analysis and shake table testing. (author)

  9. Application of Seismic Observation Data in Borehole for the Development of Attenuation Equation of Response Spectra on Bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion data on seismic bedrock is important, but it is very difficult to obtain such data directly. The data from KiK-net and JNES/SODB is valuable and very useful in developing the attenuation relationship of response spectra on seismic bedrock. NIED has approximately 200 observation points on seismic bedrock with S-wave velocity of more than 2000 m/s in Japan. Using data from observation at these points, a Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) is under development. (author)

  10. Seismic alarm system for Ignalina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, M.; Griesser, L.; Austin, G.E.; Tiurin, S.; Kuendig, C.

    2001-01-01

    A seismic alarm system will be installed at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. There are two reactors, both RMBK 1500 MW units. Each reactor is a water cooled, graphite moderated, channel type reactor. INPP has the most advanced version of the RMBK reactor design series. The first and second units of INPP went into service at the end of 1983 and in August 1987 respectively. Their design lifetime is approx. 30 years. The various buildings and plant have been designed for two earthquake levels, that is the design earthquake and the maximum possible earthquake with peak ground accelerations ranging from 1.2% to 10% of the acceleration due to gravity. Certain parts of the buildings and some of the equipment of the first and second units do not comply with Western seismic standards. As seismic strengthening of the existing buildings and equipment is not feasible economically, a reactor protection system based on an earthquake early warning system was recommended. This system essentially consists of six seismic stations encircling INPP at a radial distance of approx. 30 km and a seventh station at INPP. Each station includes three seismic substations each 500 m apart. The ground motion at each station is measured continuously by three accelerometers and one seismometer. Data is transmitted via telemetry to the control centre at INPP. Early warning alarms are generated if a seismic threshold is exceeded. This paper discusses the characteristics of INPP, the seismic alarm system presently under construction and the experience with other early warning and seismic alarm systems. (author)

  11. Seismic assessment of existing nuclear chemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper outlines the generic approach to the seismic assessment of existing structures. It describes the role of the safety case in determining the studies carried out by the functional departments on individual projects. There is an emphasis on the role of existing information and material tests to provide realistic properties for analysis to account for possible degradation effects. Finally, a case study of a concrete containment cell is shown to illustrate the approach. (author)

  12. Specific issues for seismic performance of power plant equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrotzki, Peter [GERB Vibration Control Systems, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Power plant machinery can be dynamically decoupled from the substructure by the effective use of helical steel springs and viscous dampers. Turbine foundations, coal mills, boiler feed pumps and other machine foundations benefit from this type of elastic support systems to mitigate the transmission of operational vibration. The application of these devices may also be used to protect against earthquakes and other catastrophic events, i.e. airplane crash, of particular importance in nuclear facilities. This article illustrates basic principles of elastic support systems and applications on power plant equipment and buildings in medium and high seismic areas. Spring damper combinations with special stiffness properties are used to reduce seismic acceleration levels of turbine components and other safety or non-safety related structures. For turbine buildings, the integration of the turbine sub-structure into the machine building can further reduce stress levels in all structural members. The application of this seismic protection strategy for a spent fuel storage tank in a high seismic area is also discussed. Safety in nuclear facilities is of particular importance and recent seismic events and the resulting damage in these facilities again brings up the discussion. One of the latest events is the 2007 Chuetsu earthquake in Japan. The resulting damage in the Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant can be found in several reports, e.g. in Yamashita. (orig.)

  13. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurpinar, A.; Godoy, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in WWER type nuclear power plants during the past five years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on B enchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants . These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  14. Consideration of higher seismic loads at existing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebig, J.; Pellissetti, M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of advancement of methods in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, plenty of existing plants face higher seismic loads as an obligation from the national authorities. In case of such obligations safety related structures and equipment have to be reevaluated or requalified for the increased seismic loads. The paper provides solutions for different kinds of structures and equipment inside the plant, avoiding cost intensive hardware exchange. Due to higher seismic loads different kinds of structures and equipment inside a plant have to be reevaluated. For civil structures, primary components, mechanical components, distribution lines and electrical and I&C equipment different innovative concepts will be applied to keep structures and equipment qualified for the higher seismic loads. Detailed analysis, including the modeling of non-linear phenomena, or minor structural upgrades are cost competitive, compared to cost intensive hardware exchanges. Several case studies regarding the re-evaluation and requalification of structures and equipment due to higher seismic loads are presented. It is shown how the creation of coupled finite element models and the consistent propagation of acceleration time histories through the soil, building and primary circuit lead to a significant load reduction Electrical and I&C equipment is reinforced by smart upgrades which increase the natural equipment frequencies. Therefore for all devices inside the cabinets the local acceleration will not increase and the seismic qualification will be maintained. The case studies cover both classical deterministic and probabilistic re-evaluations (fragility analysis). Furthermore, the substantial benefits of non-linear limit load evaluation, such as push-over analysis of buildings and limit load analysis of fuel assemblies, are demonstrated. (Author)

  15. Study on design method for seismically isolated FBR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Kazuta; Yabana, Shuichi; Ohtori, Yasuki; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Sawada, Yoshihiro; Shiojiri; Hiroo; Mazda, Taiji

    1998-01-01

    CRIEPI conducted 'Demonstration test on FBR seismic isolation system' from 1987 to 1996 under contract with Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan. In the demonstration test, base isolation technologies are prepared and demonstrated to apply to FBR and the design guidelines are proposed. In this report overall contents of the design guidelines entitled Design guidelines for seismically base isolated FBR plants' are included. The design guidelines, as a rule, are limited to apply to FBR plants where entire reactor building is isolated in the horizontal direction using laminated rubber bearings as isolators. The design guidelines and its concepts, however, will be useful for the development of similar guidelines for other isolation systems using different type of isolation methods and other nuclear facilities. The design guidelines consist of three parts and appendices. The first part is 'Policy for Safety Design of Base Isolated FBR Plants' specifying the principles and the requirements in the planning and the design for the safety of base isolated FBR plants. The second part is Policy for Seismic Design of Base Isolated FBR' describing the principles and the requirements in the seismic design and the evaluation of safety for base isolated FBR plants. The third part is 'Design Methods for Seismic Isolated FBR Plants' detailing the methods, procedures and parameters to be used in the design and the evaluation of safety fro base isolated FBR plants. In appendices examples of design procedures for base isolated reactor building and laminated rubber bearings as well as various test data on laminated rubber bearings, etc. are shown. (author)

  16. Seismic isolation of plants at risk of a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    More and more devastating earthquakes struck every year our planet. Many of these, though occurring in areas considered at high risk of earthquakes, far exceed the levels required by law. The industrial plants subjected to risk of severe accident, in particular petrochemical and nuclear power plants, are particularly exposed to this risk because of the number and the complexity of the structures and critical components of which they are composed. For this type of structures, anti-seismic techniques able to provide complete protection, even in case of unforeseen events, are needed. Seismic isolation is certainly the most promising technology of modern antiseismic as it allows not only to significantly reduce the dynamic load acting on the structures in case of seismic attack, but to provide safety margins against violent earthquakes, exceeding the assumed maximum design limit. [it

  17. New developments in seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anesa, Franco; Vavassori, Maurizio [Instrumentation and Systems Department, ISMES, Bergamo (Italy); Casirati, Mario [Dynamic Department, ISMES, Bergamo (Italy)

    1988-07-01

    In the present article, new trends and development of ISMES techniques and methods relating to the seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants, are described. The experience gained in this field is described, and particular attention is paid to the new trend in surveys and instrumentation design criteria (from both the hardware and software point of view). (author)

  18. New developments in seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anesa, Franco; Vavassori, Maurizio; Casirati, Mario

    1988-01-01

    In the present article, new trends and development of ISMES techniques and methods relating to the seismic surveillance of nuclear power plants, are described. The experience gained in this field is described, and particular attention is paid to the new trend in surveys and instrumentation design criteria (from both the hardware and software point of view). (author)

  19. Borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, H.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous ground water investigations have been accomplished by means of borehole logging. Borehole logging can be applied to establish new water recovery wells, to control the existing water producing wells and source areas and to estimate ground water quality. (EG)

  20. Seismic capacities of existing nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Narver, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The paper presents a discussion of the more important conservatisms and some of the results obtained when this methodology has been applied to various nuclear plants. Results are shown for both BWR and PWR plants, on both rock and soil sites, and for plants and soil sites, and for plants that were designed in the late 1960s to plants that have yet to load fuel. Safe shutdown earthquake design levels of 0.1 g to 0.25 g were used for these plants. Overall median structural factors of safety for the lowest significant seismic failure capacity at each plant ranged from 3.5 to 8.5. The lowest containment-related failure capacity at each plant ranged from 4.6 to 31. The types of failure corresponding to each safety factor are also tabulated. (orig./HP)

  1. Seismic design features of the ACR Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgohary, M.; Saudy, A.; Aziz, T.

    2003-01-01

    Through their worldwide operating records, CANDU Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have repeatedly demonstrated safe, reliable and competitive performance. Currently, there are fourteen CANDU 6 single unit reactors operating or under construction worldwide. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Advanced CANDU Reactor - the ACR. - is the genesis of a new generation of technologically advanced reactors founded on the CANDU reactor concept. The ACR is the next step in the evolution of the CANDU product line. The ACR products (ACR-700 and ACR-1000) are based on CANDU 6 (700 MWe class) and CANDU 9 (900 MWe class) reactors, therefore continuing AECL's successful approach of offering CANDU plants that appeal to a broad segment of the power generation market. The ACR products are based on the proven CANDU technology and incorporate advanced design technologies. The ACR NPP seismic design complies with Canadian standards that were specifically developed for nuclear seismic design and also with relevant International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Design Standards and Guides. However, since the ACR is also being offered to several markets with many potential sites and different regulatory environments, there is a need to develop a comprehensive approach for the seismic design input parameters. These input parameters are used in the design of the standard ACR product that is suitable for many sites while also maintaining its economic competitiveness. For this purpose, the ACR standard plant is conservatively qualified for a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) with a peak horizontal ground acceleration of 0.3g for a wide range of soil/rock foundation conditions and Ground Response Spectra (GRS). These input parameters also address some of the current technical issues such as high frequency content and near field effects. In this paper, the ACR seismic design philosophy and seismic design approach for meeting the safety design requirements are reviewed. Also the seismic design

  2. Destructiveness criteria for seismic risk evaluation of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saragoni, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Two criteria of destructiveness for seismic risk evaluation of nuclear power plant are presented. The first one is a simple linear criterion that allows to compute average response spectra in terms of earthquake accelerogram characteristics. The second defines the destructiveness potential factor P D which measures the capacity of earthquake to produce nonlinear damage. This second criterion that shows large differences of destructiveness capacity for earthquake accelerograms of different seismic environment, specially between subductive and transcursive, is strongly recommended. (author). 8 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab

  3. Seismic qualification of PWR plant auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Tsai, N.C.

    1983-08-01

    The NRC Standard Review Plan specifies that the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a safeguard system that functions in the event of a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) to remove the decay heat via the steam generator. Only recently licensed PWR plants have an AFW system designed to the current Standard Review Plan specifications. The NRC devised the Multiplant Action Plan C-14 in order to make a survey of the seismic capability of the AFW systems of operating PWR plants. The purpose of this survey is to enable the NRC to make decisions regarding the need of requiring the licensees to upgrade the AFW systems to an SSE level of seismic capability. To implement the first phase of the C-14 plan, the NRC issued a Generic Letter (GL) 81-14 to all operating PWR licensees requesting information on the seismic capability of their AFW systems. This report summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's efforts to assist the NRC in evaluating the status of seismic qualification of the AFW systems in 40 PWR plants, by reviewing the licensees' responses to GL 81-14

  4. Seismic considerations in the design of atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, A.S.; Chandrasekaran, A.R.; Thakkar, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    A seismic design is one of the most important factors for the safety of nuclear power plants constructed in seismic areas. The various considerations in the design of atomic power plant structures and components to achieve high degree (near absolute) of safety during future probable earthquakes is described as follows: (a) determination of design earthquake parameters for SSE and OBE (b) fixing time history accelerograms and acceleration response spectra (c) mathematical modelling of the reactor building considering soil-structure interaction (d) deciding allowable stresses, damping factors and serviceability limits like drift, displacements and crack widths (e) tests for determining stiffness and damping characteristics of components in-situ before commissioning of plant. The main questions that arise under various items requiring further research investigations or development work are pointed out for discussion. (author)

  5. Seismic evaluation and strengthening of Bohunice nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipp, J.G.; Short, S.A.; Grief, T.; Borov, V.; Kuzma, J.

    2001-01-01

    A seismic assessment and strengthening investigation is being performed for selected structures at the Bohunice V1 Nuclear Power Plant in Slovakia. Structures covered in this paper include the reactor building complex and the emergency generator station. The emergency generator station is emphasized in the paper as work is nearly complete while work on the reactor building complex is ongoing at this time. Seismic evaluation and strengthening work is being performed by a cooperative effort of Siemens and EQE along with local contractors. Seismic input is the interim Review Level Earthquake (horizontal peak ground acceleration of 0.3 g). The Bohunice V1 reactor building complex is a WWER 4401230 nuclear power plant that was originally built in the mid-1970s but had extensive seismic upgrades in 1991. Siemens has performed three dimensional dynamic analyses of the reactor building complex to develop seismic demand in structural elements. EQE is assessing seismic capacities of structural elements and developing strengthening schemes, where needed. Based on recent seismic response analyses for the interim Review Level Earthquake which account for soil-structure interaction in a rigorous manner, the 1991 seismic upgrade has been found to be inadequate in both member/connection strength and in providing complete load paths to the foundation. Additional strengthening is being developed. The emergency generator station was built in the 1970s and is a two-story unreinforced brick masonry (URM) shear wall building above grade with a one story reinforced concrete shear wall basement below grade. Seismic analyses and testing of the URM walls has been performed to assess the need for building strengthening. Required structural strengthening for in-plane forces consists of revised and additional vertical steel framing and connections, stiffening of horizontal roof bracing, and steel connections between the roof and supporting walls and pointing of two interior transverse URM

  6. Seismic fragility of ventilation stack of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefedov, S.S.; Yugai, T.Z.; Kalinkin, I.V.; Vizir, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    Fragility study of safety related elements is necessary step in seismic PSA of nuclear power plant (NPP). In present work fragility was analyzed after the example of the ventilation stack of NPP. Ventilation stack, considered in present work, is a separately erected construction with height of 100 m made of cast-in-place reinforced concrete. In accordance with IAEA terminology fragility of element is defined as conditional probability of its failure at given level of seismic loading. Failure of a ventilation stack was considered as development of the plastic hinge in some section of a shaft. Seismic ground acceleration a, which corresponds to failure, could be defined as limit seismic acceleration of ventilation stack [a]. Limit seismic acceleration [a] was considered as random value. Sources of its variation are connected with stochastic nature of factors determining it (properties of construction materials, soils etc.), and also with uncertainties of existing analytical techniques. Random value [a] was assumed to be distributed lognormally. Median m[a] and logarithmically standard deviation β of this distribution were defined by 'scaling method' developed by R.P. Kennedy et al. Using this values fragility curves were plotted for different levels of confidence probability. (author)

  7. Handbook of nuclear power plant seismic fragilities, Seismic Safety Margins Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cover, L.E.; Bohn, M.P.; Campbell, R.D.; Wesley, D.A.

    1983-12-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has a gola to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. As part of this program, calculations of the seismic risk from a typical commercial nuclear reactor were made. These calculations required a knowledge of the probability of failure (fragility) of safety-related components in the reactor system which actively participate in the hypothesized accident scenarios. This report describes the development of the required fragility relations and the data sources and data reduction techniques upon which they are based. Both building and component fragilities are covered. The building fragilities are for the Zion Unit 1 reactor which was the specific plant used for development of methodology in the program. Some of the component fragilities are site-specific also, but most would be usable for other sites as well

  8. Predicting elastic properties of porous fluid-filled rocks by inverting the BGG equation: Applications to seismic and borehole data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, A.K.; Wu, J.

    2000-01-01

    Two of the needed elastic parameters for predicting velocities in porous, fluid-filled rocks, the bulk modulus of the empty, porous rock and the shear modulus of the rock, are very difficult to obtain in situ. A novel modeling approach is developed by inverting the Biot-Geertsma-Gassmann (BGG) and shear-wave equations to generate values for the bulk and shear moduli, respectively, by using available velocity and porosity data obtained from borehole logs and/or cores from water/brine-saturated rocks. These values of bulk and shear moduli, along with reasonable in-situ estimates of rock-matrix and fluid parameters generated from the Batzle-Wang formulation, are then used to predict compressional and shear-wave velocities, compressional-shear wave ratios, and reflection coefficients at the interfaces between host rocks and fluid-saturated rocks, either fully or partially saturated with hydrocarbons or water, as a function of depth and/or porosity

  9. Novel seismic instrumentation for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolleter, W.; Savary, C.

    1998-01-01

    Conforming to the latest issues of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide, a novel hardware and software solution for seismic instrumentation is presented. Both instrumentation and PC-based data evaluation software for post-earthquake actions are type-tested and approved by the German TUeV. Reference installations replacing obsolete analog instrumentation were successfully completed and are presented. The instrumentation consists of highly linear, solid-state capacitive accelerometers as well as digital recorders storing the signals from the sensors in situ. These recorders are linked in a star-topology network to a central unit that permanently communicates with them via fiber-optic cable or current-loop links. The central unit is responsible for alerting and synchronizes all recorders which otherwise act autonomously. Data evaluation is handled by a PC-based software package. It includes automatic data evaluation after earthquakes (batch mode), interactive data evaluation software for detailed data analysis, and software tools for remote operation, maintenance and data storage. (author)

  10. Theoretical seismic analysis of butterfly valve for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Uk; Ahn, Jun Tae; Han, Seung Ho; Lee, Kyung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Valves are one of the most important components of a pipeline system in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to ensure their structural safety under seismic loads. A crucial aspect of structural safety verification is the seismic qualification, and therefore, an optimal shape design and experimental seismic qualification is necessary in case the configuration of the valve parts needs to be modified and their performance needs to be improved. Recently, intensive numerical analyses have been preformed before the experimental verification in order to determine the appropriate design variables that satisfy the performance requirements under seismic loads. In this study, static and dynamic numerical structural analyses of a 200A butterfly valve for a nuclear power plant were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. The result of static analysis considering an equivalent static load under SSE condition gave an applied stress of 135MPa. In addition, the result of dynamic analysis gave an applied stress of 183MPa, where the CQC method using response spectrums was taken into account. These values are under the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and therefore, its structural safety satisfies the requirements of KEPIC MFA

  11. Theoretical seismic analysis of butterfly valve for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Uk; Ahn, Jun Tae; Han, Seung Ho [Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Chul [Dukwon Valve Co., Ltd., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Valves are one of the most important components of a pipeline system in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to ensure their structural safety under seismic loads. A crucial aspect of structural safety verification is the seismic qualification, and therefore, an optimal shape design and experimental seismic qualification is necessary in case the configuration of the valve parts needs to be modified and their performance needs to be improved. Recently, intensive numerical analyses have been preformed before the experimental verification in order to determine the appropriate design variables that satisfy the performance requirements under seismic loads. In this study, static and dynamic numerical structural analyses of a 200A butterfly valve for a nuclear power plant were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. The result of static analysis considering an equivalent static load under SSE condition gave an applied stress of 135MPa. In addition, the result of dynamic analysis gave an applied stress of 183MPa, where the CQC method using response spectrums was taken into account. These values are under the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and therefore, its structural safety satisfies the requirements of KEPIC MFA.

  12. Seismic evaluation of non-seismically designed existing Magnox nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunar, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The philosophy and method adopted for the seismic assessment of three existing Magnox nuclear stations in the United Kingdom are presented in this paper. The plants were not seismically designed. The particular procedures that were applied were tailored to suit the difficulties of lack of data which is somewhat inevitable for plants designed and built about 25 to 30 years ago. Special procedures included on-site testing with a portable shake table, low vibration testing using a structural dynamics analyser, and on-site inspections. The low vibration testing was most invaluable in detecting differences between 'as-built' conditions and the engineering drawings. From the point of view of economics, this was more effective than conducting full structural surveys to determine the as-built conditions. The testing results also provided confidence in the answers from numerical models. The philosophy adopted for the Magnox reactors in the seismic assessment was to determine what peak ground accelerations the sites can sustain and then evaluate the chances of exceeding the ground accelerations over the remaining lifetime of the plants. The peak ground acceleration for each site was determined on the basis of the criteria of safe shutdown and prevention of significant off-site radiological exposure

  13. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants - EDF's philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coladant, C.

    1989-01-01

    The elastomer bearing pads used since 1963 as supports for prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) was quickly chosen by Electricite de France (ED) to improve the capability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) to withstand strong earthquakes and to reduce the seismic loads on structures and equipment. The standardized units for 900 and 1,300 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants have moderate seismic design loads of 0.2 and 0.15 g, respectively. These design loads were exceeded by the site dependent spectra of Cruas (France) and Koeberg (South Africa). To keep the plant design unchanged and to take the advantages of standardization, these units were put on laminated bearings with or without sliding plates. For the future French 1,500 MW(e) fast breeder reactors (FBRs), which are more sensitive to seismic loads, the base isolation is considered by EDF at the beginning of the design, even for low ground motions of 0.1 g. The buildings are placed on laminated bearings while the reactor block is supported by springs and dampers. The isolated plant has identical costs as a conventional design such as SPX1 at Creys-Malville

  14. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants using sliding isolation bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish

    Nuclear power plants (NPP) are designed for earthquake shaking with very long return periods. Seismic isolation is a viable strategy to protect NPPs from extreme earthquake shaking because it filters a significant fraction of earthquake input energy. This study addresses the seismic isolation of NPPs using sliding bearings, with a focus on the single concave Friction Pendulum(TM) (FP) bearing. Friction at the sliding surface of an FP bearing changes continuously during an earthquake as a function of sliding velocity, axial pressure and temperature at the sliding surface. The temperature at the sliding surface, in turn, is a function of the histories of coefficient of friction, sliding velocity and axial pressure, and the travel path of the slider. A simple model to describe the complex interdependence of the coefficient of friction, axial pressure, sliding velocity and temperature at the sliding surface is proposed, and then verified and validated. Seismic hazard for a seismically isolated nuclear power plant is defined in the United States using a uniform hazard response spectrum (UHRS) at mean annual frequencies of exceedance (MAFE) of 10-4 and 10 -5. A key design parameter is the clearance to the hard stop (CHS), which is influenced substantially by the definition of the seismic hazard. Four alternate representations of seismic hazard are studied, which incorporate different variabilities and uncertainties. Response-history analyses performed on single FP-bearing isolation systems using ground motions consistent with the four representations at the two shaking levels indicate that the CHS is influenced primarily by whether the observed difference between the two horizontal components of ground motions in a given set is accounted for. The UHRS at the MAFE of 10-4 is increased by a design factor (≥ 1) for conventional (fixed base) nuclear structure to achieve a target annual frequency of unacceptable performance. Risk oriented calculations are performed for

  15. Seismic vulnerability assessment of chemical plants through probabilistic neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, T.; Ceravolo, R.; De Stefano, A.; Genovese, C.; Sabia, D.

    2002-01-01

    A chemical industrial plant represents a sensitive presence in a region and, in case of severe damage due to earthquake actions, its impact on social life and environment can be devastating. From the structural point of view, chemical plants count a number of recurrent elements, which are classifiable in a discrete set of typological families (towers, chimneys, cylindrical or spherical or prismatic tanks, pipes etc.). The final aim of this work is to outline a general procedure to be followed in order to assign a seismic vulnerability estimate to each element of the various typological families. In this paper, F.E. simulations allowed to create a training set, which has been used to train a probabilistic neural system. A sample application has concerned the seismic vulnerability of simple spherical tanks

  16. Seismic design criteria and their application to major hazard plant within the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.A.H.G.

    1982-12-01

    The nature of seismic motions and the implications are briefly described and the development of seismic design criteria for nuclear power plants in various countries is described including possible future developments. The seismicity of the United Kingdom is briefly reviewed leading to the present position on seismic design criteria for nuclear power plants within the United Kingdom. Damage from past destructive earthquakes is reviewed and the existing codes of practice and standards are described. Finally the effect of earthquakes on major hazard plant is discussed in general terms including the seismic analysis of a typical plant item. (author)

  17. Instrumentation development for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) borehole plugging program (BHP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, C.W.

    1979-11-01

    This report discusses the instrumentation development needs of the borehole testing program as it now exists. Although requirements may change as the program progresses, the items indicated are basic to any borehole plugging program. Instrumentation is discussed both for the plug environment and for the plug itself. For the plug environment, a probe for measuring the disturbed region and a coordinate logging tool are required. For the plug itself, instrumentation includes measurements above, within, and below the plug. Instrumentation for most measurements above the plug is currently available; for measurements within and below the plug, however, further development is required. Specifically, resistivity, induction, and acoustic probes; an in situ stressmeter; and a hardwire, feedthrough system need to be developed

  18. Seismic effects on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borea, A.L.; Meek, J.L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper sets out to discuss the problems related to the design of the nuclear power plant structure for transient loads that may be experienced from ground motions. It recognizes that ground motion may be experienced from several sources such as nearby explosion, forced vibration, from machinery or from an earthquake. In the first instance of an explosion, there is a need to study the basic wave propagation problem and to obtain expressions for ground motion and acceleration at a distance from the disturbing force. In this the importance of foundation material is stressed. The natural phenomena of the earthquake is also considered. Features associated with attempts to define a suitable basic earthquake - its magnitude, its probability of occurrence, etc. are discussed. Speculation is made as to the probability of earthquake in Australia. The end product of all such investigation is the study of the power plant structures themselves, under the influence of the dynamic forces. This may be undertaken on the crude basis of spectral analysis or by more refined finite element models using a specified earthquake as input. Here emphasis is placed on necessity to include the interaction between foundation and structure as well as accurate modelling of the structure itself. (author)

  19. Seismic analysis and testing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed in this guide: General Recommendations for seismic classification, loading combinations and allowable limits; seismic analysis methods; implications for seismic design; seismic testing and qualification; seismic instrumentation; modelling techniques; material property characterization; seismic response of soil deposits and earth structures; liquefaction and ground failure; slope stability; sloshing effects in water pools; qualification testing by means of the transport vehicle

  20. Alternate seismic support for pipeline systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthumani, K.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Sathish Kumar, K.; Sreekala, R.; Rama Rao, G.V.; Reddy, G.R.; Parulekar, Y.M.

    2008-01-01

    Failure free design of supporting systems for pipe lines carrying highly toxic or radioactive liquids at very high temperature is an important issue in the safety aspect for a nuclear power plant installation which is a key topic for researchers all around the world. Generally, these pipeline systems are designed to be held rigid by conventional snubber supports for protection from earthquakes. The piping design must balance seismic deformations and other deformations due to thermal effect. A rigid pipeline system using conventional snubber supports always leads to an increase in thermal stresses; hence a rational seismic design for pipeline supporting systems becomes essential. Contrary to this rigid design, it is possible to design a flexible pipeline system and to decrease the seismic response by increasing the damping through the use of passive energy absorbing elements, which dissipate vibration energy. This paper presents the experimental and analytical studies carried out on modeling yielding type elasto-plastic passive energy-absorbing elements to be used in a passive energy-dissipating device for the control of large seismic deformations of pipelines subjected to earthquake loading. (author)

  1. An efficient sequential strategy for realizing cross-gradient joint inversion: method and its application to 2-D cross borehole seismic traveltime and DC resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ji; Zhang, Haijiang

    2018-05-01

    Cross-gradient joint inversion that enforces structural similarity between different models has been widely utilized in jointly inverting different geophysical data types. However, it is a challenge to combine different geophysical inversion systems with the cross-gradient structural constraint into one joint inversion system because they may differ greatly in the model representation, forward modelling and inversion algorithm. Here we propose a new joint inversion strategy that can avoid this issue. Different models are separately inverted using the existing inversion packages and model structure similarity is only enforced through cross-gradient minimization between two models after each iteration. Although the data fitting and structural similarity enforcing processes are decoupled, our proposed strategy is still able to choose appropriate models to balance the trade-off between geophysical data fitting and structural similarity. This is realized by using model perturbations from separate data inversions to constrain the cross-gradient minimization process. We have tested this new strategy on 2-D cross borehole synthetic seismic traveltime and DC resistivity data sets. Compared to separate geophysical inversions, our proposed joint inversion strategy fits the separate data sets at comparable levels while at the same time resulting in a higher structural similarity between the velocity and resistivity models.

  2. Level-1 seismic probabilistic risk assessment for a PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Keisuke; Nishio, Masahide; Fujimoto, Haruo; Ichitsuka, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, revised Seismic Design Guidelines for the domestic light water reactors was published on September 19, 2006. These new guidelines have introduced the purpose to confirm that residual risk resulting from earthquake that exceeds the design limit seismic ground motion (Ss) is sufficiently small, based on the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) method, in addition to conventional deterministic design base methodology. In response to this situation, JNES had been working to improve seismic PRA (SPRA) models for individual domestic light water reactors. In case of PWR in Japan, total of 24 plants were grouped into 11 categories to develop individual SPRA model. The new regulatory rules against the Fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plants' severe accidents occurred on March 11, 2011, are going to be enforced in July 2013 and utilities are necessary to implement additional safety measures to avoid and mitigate severe accident occurrence due to external events such as earthquake and tsunami, by referring to the results of severe accident study including SPRA. In this paper a SPRA model development for a domestic 3-loop PWR plant as part of the above-mentioned 11 categories is described. We paid special attention to how to categorize initiating events that are specific to seismic phenomena and how to confirm the effect of the simultaneous failure probability calculation model for the multiple components on the result of core damage frequency evaluation. Simultaneous failure probability for multiple components has been evaluated by power multiplier method. Then tentative level-1 seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) has been performed by the developed SPSA model with seismic hazard and fragility data. The base case was evaluated under the condition with calculated fragility data and conventional power multiplier. The difference in CDF between the case of conventional power multiplier and that of power multiplier=1 (complete dependence) was estimated to be

  3. Shaking table test study on seismic performance of dehydrogenation fan for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kaiyan; Shi Weixing; Cao Jialiang; Wang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Seismic performance of the dehydrogenation fan for nuclear power plants was evaluated based on the shaking table test of earthquake simulation. Dynamic characteristics including the orthogonal tri-axial fundamental frequencies and equivalent damping ratios were measured by the white noise scanning method. Artificial seismic waves were generated corresponding to the floor acceleration response spectra for nuclear power plants. Furthermore, five OBE and one SSE shaking table tests for dehydrogenation fan were performed by using the artificial seismic waves as the seismic inputs along the orthogonal axis simultaneity. Operating function of dehydrogenation fan was monitored and observed during all seismic tests, and performance indexes of dehydrogenation fan were compared before and after seismic tests. The results show that the structural integrity and operating function of the dehydrogenation fan are perfect during all seismic tests; and the performance indexes of the dehydrogenation fan can remain consistent before and after seismic tests; the seismic performance of the dehydrogenation fan can satisfy relevant technical requirements. (authors)

  4. Seismic effects on technological equipment and systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masopust, R.; Pecinka, L.; Podrouzek, J.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of problems related to the construction of nuclear power plants with regard to seismic resistance. Sei--smic resistance of technological equipment is evaluated by experimental trials, calculation or the combination of both. Existing and future standards are given for the given field. The Czechoslovak situation is discussed as related to the construction of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Procedures for testing seismic resistance, types of tests and methods of simulating seismic excitation are described. Antiseismic measures together with structural elements for limiting the seismic effects on technological equipment and nuclear power plant systems are summed up on the basis of foreign experience. (E.F.)

  5. Seismic fragility levels of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic fragility levels of safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment used in nuclear power plants are discussed. The fragility level is defined as the vibration level corresponding to initiation of equipment malfunctions. The test response spectrum is used as a measure of this vibration level. The fragility phenomenon of an equipment is represented by a number of response spectra corresponding to various failure modes. Analysis methods are described for determination of the fragility level by use of existing test data. Useful conversion factors are tabulated to transform test response spectra from one damping value to another. Results are presented for switch-gears and motor control centers. The capacity levels of these equipment assemblies are observed to be limited by malfunctioning of contactors, motor starters, relays and/or switches. The applicability of the fragility levels, determined in terms of test response spectra, to Seismic Margin Studies and Probabilistic Risk Assessments is discussed and specific recommendations are provided

  6. Seismic monitoring of the Creys-Malville plant - Problems raised by the seismic behaviour of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descleve, P.; Barrau, P.

    1988-01-01

    CREYS-MALVILLE reached full power in December 1986 and is presently the largest sodium cooled reactor in operation. Well established procedures of safety evaluation have been used for the design but for a large size reactor special attention must be paid to the effects of seismic disturbances. This paper describes the seismic protection and monitoring system of the plant, the core behaviour which is specific to fast reactors and the test performed to verify the analyses. Finally the seismic impact on the construction can be established as an indication for future plants. (author)

  7. Borehole Seismology: Fundamentals and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnhoff, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Because boring in itself is very expensive and instrumentation is required to endure high temperatures and pressures, deep borehole observation was accompanied by an economic risk. However, it has great advantages with respect to micro-earthquake observation, which is enriched with a short period vibration signal, because deep borehole observation greatly reduces short period noise. These kind advantages were explained by referring to the relationship between earthquake size and frequency range. Examples of seismic observation in a borehole in a geothermal field in El Salvador and a CO 2 confinement project in the western part of Canada were introduced. (authors)

  8. IVO participation in IAEA benchmark for VVER-type nuclear power plants seismic analysis and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varpasuo, P.

    1997-12-01

    This study is a part of the IAEA coordinated research program 'Benchmark study for the Seismic Analysis and Testing of VVER Type NPPs'. The study reports the numerical simulation of the blast test for Paks and Kozloduy nuclear power plants beginning from the recorded free-field response and computing the structural response at various points inside the reactor building. The full-scale blast tests of the Paks and Kozloduy NPPs took place in December 1994 and in July 1996. During the tests the plants operated normally. The instrumentation for the tests consisted of 52 recording channels with 200 Hz sampling rate. Detonating 100 kg charges in 50-meter deep boreholes at 2.5-km distance from the plant carried out the blast tests. The 3D structural models for both reactor buildings were analyzed in the frequency domain. The number of modes extracted in both cases was about 500 and the cut-off frequency was 25 Hz. In the response history run the responses of the selected points were evaluated. The input values for response history run were the three components of the excitation, which were transformed from time domain to the frequency domain with the aid of Fourier transform. The analysis was carried out in frequency domain and responses were transferred back to time domain with inverse Fourier transform. The Paks and Kozloduy blast tests produced a wealth of information on the behavior of the nuclear power plant structures excited by blast type loads containing also the low frequency wave train if albeit with small energy content. The comparison of measured and calculated results gave information about the suitability of the selected analysis approach for the investigated blast type loading

  9. Study of seismic design bases and site conditions for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of four topics pertinent to the seismic design of nuclear power plants: Design accelerations by regions of the continental United States; review and compilation of design-basis seismic levels and soil conditions for existing nuclear power plants; regional distribution of shear wave velocity of foundation materials at nuclear power plant sites; and technical review of surface-founded seismic analysis versus embedded approaches

  10. Study of seismic design bases and site conditions for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of four topics pertinent to the seismic design of nuclear power plants: Design accelerations by regions of the continental United States; review and compilation of design-basis seismic levels and soil conditions for existing nuclear power plants; regional distribution of shear wave velocity of foundation materials at nuclear power plant sites; and technical review of surface-founded seismic analysis versus embedded approaches.

  11. 3. General principles of assessing seismic resistance of technological equipment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The evaluation of the seismic resistance of technological equipment is performed by computation, experimental trial, possibly by combining both methods. Existing and prepared standards in the field of seismic resistance of nuclear power plants are mentioned. Accelerograms and response spectra of design-basis earhtquake and maximum credible earthquake serve as the basic data for evaluating seismic resistance. The nuclear power plant in Mochovce will be the first Czechoslovak nuclear power plant with so-called partially seismic design. The problem of dynamic interaction of technological equipment and nuclear power plant systems with a bearing structure is discussed. (E.F.)

  12. Improving our understanding of the evolution of mountain belts via the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project: Results from seismic investigations and plans for the 2.5 km deep COSC-2 borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlin, C.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Buske, S.; Giese, R.; Hedin, P.; Lorenz, H.

    2017-12-01

    Mountain belts (orogens) have influenced, and do influence, geological processes and climatic conditions considerably, perhaps more than any other natural phenomenon. The Alpine-Himalayan mountain belt is the prime example of a collisional orogen today. However, research in an active orogen is mostly constrained to observe and interpret the expression of processes at the surface, while the driving processes act at depth, often at mid-crustal levels (20 km) and deeper. About 440 million years ago, an orogen comparable in dimension and tectonic setting to today's Alpine-Himalayan orogen was developing in what is western Scandinavia today. Since then, erosion has removed much of the overburden and exposed the deep interior of the orogen, facilitating direct observation of rocks that are deep in the crust in modern orogens. In the COSC project we study how large rock volumes (allochthons) were transported during the collision of two continents and the associated deformation. The emplacement of high-grade metamorphic allochthons during orogeny has been the focus of COSC-1 research, centered on a 2.5 km deep fully cored borehole drilled in the summer of 2014 through the lower part of the high-grade Seve Nappe Complex near the town of Åre in western Sweden. The planned COSC-2 borehole (also fully cored to 2.5 km) will complement the COSC-1 borehole and allow a 5 km deep tectonostratigraphic column of the Caledonides to be constructed. The rock volume in the proximity of the COSC-2 borehole will be imaged with a combination of very-high and high-resolution geophysical experiments, such as a combination of high frequency seismics; zero offset and walk-away vertical seismic profiling (VSP); and a sparse 3D coverage around the drill site combined with 2D seismic profiles of several kilometers length in different directions. Downhole geophysical logging will provide additional information on the in-situ rock physical properties. Data from surface surveys will be calibrated

  13. Methods for seismic analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.

    1990-01-01

    The seismic analysis of a complex structure, such as a nuclear power plant, is done in various steps. An overview of the methods, used in each of these steps will be given in the following chapters: Seismic analysis of the buildings taking into account structures with important mass or stiffness. The input to the building analysis, called ground motion, is described by an accelerogram or a response spectra. In this step, soil structure interaction has to be taken into account. Various methods are available: Impedance, finite element. The response of the structure can be calculated by spectral method or by time history analysis; advantages and limitations of each method will be shown. Calculation of floor response spectrum which are the data for the equipment analysis. Methods to calculate this spectrum will be described. Seismic analysis of the equipments. Presentation of the methods for both monosupported and multisupported equipment will be given. In addition methods to analyse equipments which present non-linearities associated to the boundary conditions such as impacts, sliding will be presented. (author). 30 refs, 15 figs

  14. Strategy for seismic upgrading of chemical plant taking productivity as criterion of judgment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, M.; Kase, T.; Yashiro, H.; Fukushima, S.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic upgrading and modification of existing chemical plant facilities have been performed by means of a procedure of the Seismic Design Code and Guidelines of High-pressure Gas Facilities in Japan. Main purpose of this seismic design code is to ensure public safety at seismic events. From the viewpoints of seismic risk of corporate management, CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and productivity of the plants are also important for seismic assessment. In this paper, authors proposed strategy for seismic assessment to select appropriate pre-earthquake upgrading and modification considering productivity of plants based on fault tree analysis. This assessment will enable to select weak damage modes and to allocate countermeasure cost optimally to the selected damage modes. (authors)

  15. Seismic Barrier Protection of Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-14

    structures , earthquake mitigation I. Introduction Damage caused by earthquakes to critical structures such as nuclear power plants, regional hospitals...the seismic power drop in dB to magnitude drop using the seismic moment magnitude scale, Mw. In figures 5 and 6, the V-trench structure as modeled...representing geological media and V-shaped muffler borehole / trench component structures . Bottom: In this simple analysis, the power drop observed

  16. Seismic re-evaluation of Mochovce nuclear power plant. Seismic reevaluation of civil structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podrouzek, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this contribution, an overview of seismic design procedures used for reassessment of seismic safety of civil structures at the Mochovce NPP in Slovak Republic presented. As an introduction, the objectives, history, and current status of seismic design of the NPP have been explained. General philosophy of design methods, seismic classification of buildings, seismic data, calculation methods, assumptions on structural behavior under seismic loading and reliability assessment were described in detail in the subsequent section. Examples of calculation models used for dynamic calculations of seismic response are given in the last section. (author)

  17. Borehole Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature derived from boreholes drilled into the Earth crust. Parameter keywords describe what was measured in this data set. Additional summary...

  18. Analysis of borehole inclusion stress measurement concepts proposed for use in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being developed in southeastern New Mexico by the United States Department of Energy as a research and development (RandD) facility to demonstrate the safe disposal in salt of radioactive wastes resulting from defense activities. As part of the WIPP RandD program, a series of in situ tests will be performed to determine the behavior of drifts and storage rooms in the creeping salt medium. Data obtained in these tests will be used to evaluate and improve numerical models used to compute the structural response of these drifts and rooms. Stress has been proposed as one of the parameters to be measured in the tests, and borehole inclusion stressmeters have been included in the instrumentation package

  19. Assessment of seismic damages in nuclear power plant buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corsanego, A.; DelGrosso, A.; Ferro, G.

    1987-01-01

    Performance of nuclear power plant sites, buildings and components is in today's practice continuously evaluated by means of monitoring systems composed by a variety of instruments, allowing records of the most significant behavioral parameters to be gathered by electronic data acquisition equipment. A great emphasis has been devoted in recent years to the development of ''intelligent'' monitoring systems able to perform interpretation of the response of structures and components automatically, only requiring human intervention and sophisticated data processing techniques when degradation of the safety margins is likely to have been produced. Such computerized procedures can be formulated through logic or algorithmic processes and normally are consistently based upon simplified, heuristic behavioral models and probabilistic reasoning schemes. This paper is devoted to discuss the development of an algorithmic procedure intended for automatic, real-time interpretation of the recorded response of nuclear power plant buildings and foundations during seismic events

  20. Methodological approach for the seismic backfitting of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, P.; Muzzi, F.; Ruggieri, G.; Zola, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of the assessment of the seismic adequacy of the operating Nuclear Power Plants in East Europe, the main problem to match with is the difficulty to work about already existing plants. Moreover consolidated standards and procedures for seismic design, verification and qualification exist for new structures and equipment, then the extension to operating plants requires a lot of engineering judgement. The paper highlights the importance of: identification of seismic safety related systems and components; site specific seismic input definition in agreement with international standards; computation of seismic loads accounting for soil-structure interaction and appropriate structural modelling; overall stability verification of the plant (soil bearing capacity, soil liquefaction, sliding, overturning); ductility effects in evaluation of seismic protection; engineering process for the qualification of components and systems and walkdown procedures and identification of remedial measures (easy fixes and complex fixes). Some examples are reported referred to the more recent ISMES activities in the field

  1. Borehole-explosion and air-gun data acquired in the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), southern California: description of the survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Elizabeth J.; Fuis, Gary S.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Kell, Annie M.; Kent, Graham; Driscoll, Neal W.; Goldman, Mark; Reusch, Angela M.; Han, Liang; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Criley, Coyn J.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Slayday-Criley, Coye J.; Murphy, Janice M.; Jensen, Edward G.; McClearn, Robert; Ferguson, Alex J.; Butcher, Lesley A.; Gardner, Max A.; Emmons, Iain; Loughran, Caleb L.; Svitek, Joseph R.; Bastien, Patrick C.; Cotton, Joseph A.; Croker, David S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Harder, Steven H.; Rosa, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    earthquake energy can travel through the sediments. All of these factors determine how hard the earth will shake during a major earthquake. If we can improve on our understanding of how and where earthquakes will occur, and how strong their resultant shaking will be, then buildings can be designed or retrofitted accordingly in order to resist damage and collapse, and emergency plans can be adequately prepared. In addition, SSIP will investigate the processes of rifting and magmatism in the Salton Trough in order to better understand this important plate-boundary region. The Salton Trough is a unique rift in that subsidence is accompanied by huge influxes of infilling sediment from the Colorado River. Volcanism that accompanies the subsidence here is muted by these influxes of sediment. The Salton Trough, in the central part of the Imperial Valley, is apparently made up of entirely new crust: young sediment in the upper crust and basaltic intrusive rocks in the mid-to-lower crust (Fuis and others, 1984). Similar to the ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scans performed by the medical industry, seismic imaging is a collection of techniques that enable scientists to obtain a picture of what is underground. The petroleum industry routinely uses these techniques to search for oil and gas at relatively shallow depths; however, the scope of this project demanded that we image as much as 30 km into the Earth’s crust. This project generated and recorded seismic waves, similar to sound waves, which move downward into the Earth and are bent (refracted) or echoed (reflected) back to the surface. SSIP acquired data in a series of intersecting lines that cover key areas of the Salton Trough. The sources of sound waves were detonations (shots) in deep boreholes, designed to create energy equivalent to magnitude 1–2 earthquakes. The study region routinely experiences earthquakes of these magnitudes, but earthquakes are not located in such a way as to permit us to create the

  2. Seismic reassessment of the structures of the Tihange 1 nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, J D [TRACTEBEL, Brussels (Belgium)

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes the assumptions and methods which were used for the initial seismic design of the first nuclear unit built at Tihange. After the description of the criteria and methods which were used for the seismic reassessment of this plant ten years after completion, it reports the special assumptions and the results of some special analyses that had to be made to justify the seismic safety of the structures of the plant.

  3. Guideline for the seismic technical evaluation of replacement items for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.P.; Cushing, R.W.; Johnson, H.W.; Abeles, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    Seismic qualification for equipment originally installed in nuclear power plants was typically performed by the original equipment suppliers or manufactures (OES/OEM). Many of the OES/OEM no longer maintain quality assurance programs with adequate controls for supplying nuclear equipment. Utilities themselves must provide reasonable assurance in the continued seismic adequacy of such replacement items. This guideline provides practical, cost-effective techniques which can be used to provide reasonable assurance that replacement items will meet seismic performance requirements necessary to maintain the seismic design basis of commercial nuclear power plants. It also provides a method for determining when a seismic technical evaluation of replacement items (STERI) is required as part of the procurement process for spare and replacement items. Guidance on supplier program requirements necessary to maintain continued seismic adequacy and on documentation of maintaining required seismic adequacy is also included

  4. Influence of the crustal and subcrustal Vrancea seismic sources on Cernavoda nuclear power plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmureanu, Gheorghe; Popescu, Emilia; Mircea Radulian

    2002-01-01

    The basis of the seismic hazard assessment in different geographical regions with dense-populated areas and strategic objectives (dams, nuclear power plants, etc.) is the study of seismicity of the seismogenic sources which affect these sites. The purpose of this paper is to provide a complete set of information relative to the Vrancea seismic source (in the crust and the intermediate depth domains) that is fundamental for the seismic hazard evaluation at Cernavoda nuclear power plant site. The analysis that we propose has to deal with the following items: (1) geometrical definition of the seismic sources; (2) setting the earthquake catalog associated to each seismic source; (3) estimation of the maximum possible magnitude; (4) estimation of the frequency - magnitude relationship; (5) computation of the distribution function for focal distance; (6) correlation between focal depth and magnitude; (7) attenuation law. We discuss also the implications of the model parameters on the seismic hazard level. (authors)

  5. Methodology and results of the seismic probabilistic safety assessment of Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaut, M.K.; Monette, P.; Campbell, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    A seismic IPEEE (Individual Plant Examination for External Events) was performed for the Krsko plant. The methodology adopted is the seismic PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). The Krsko NPP is located on a medium to high seismicity site. The PSA study described here includes all the steps in the PSA sequence, i.e. reassessment of the site hazard, calculation of plant structures response including soil-structure interaction, seismic plant walkdowns, probabilistic seismic fragility analysis of plant structures and components, and quantification of seismic core damage frequency (CDF). Also relay chatter analysis and soil stability studies were performed. The seismic PSA described here is limited to the analysis of CDF (level I PSA). The subsequent determination and quantification of plant damage states, containment behaviour and radioactive releases to the outside (level 2 PSA) have been performed for the Krsko NPP but are not further described in this paper. The results of the seismic PSA study indicate that, with some upgrades suggested by the PSA team, the seismic induced CDF is comparable to that of most US and Western Europe NPPs. (author)

  6. A review of procedures available to seismically requalify operating nuclear plant structures, equipment and distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that the loads and procedures used to seismically qualify nuclear power plant structures and components have changed dramatically during the past 15 to 20 years. In this paper, the various methods available to seismically qualify or requalify structures and components in operating nuclear power plants are identified and the advantages and disadvantages of each briefly summarized. (orig.)

  7. Design requirements, criteria and methods for seismic qualification of CANDU power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Duff, C.G.

    1979-10-01

    This report describes the requirements and criteria for the seismic design and qualification of systems and equipment in CANDU nuclear power plants. Acceptable methods and techniques for seismic qualification of CANDU nuclear power plants to mitigate the effects or the consequences of earthquakes are also described. (auth)

  8. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the Component Fragility Research Program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, BNL is involved in establishing seismic fragility levels for various nuclear power plant equipment by identifying, collecting and analyzing existing test data from various sources. In Phase I of this program, BNL has reviewed approximately seventy test reports to collect fragility or high level test data for switchgears, motor control centers and similar electrical cabinets, valve actuators and numerous electrical devices of various manufacturers and models. This report provides an assessment and evaluation of the data collected in Phase I. The fragility data for medium voltage and low voltage switchgears and motor control centers are analyzed using the test response spectra (TRS) as a measure of the fragility level. The analysis reveals that fragility levels can best be described by a group of TRS curves corresponding to various failure modes. The lower-bound curve indicates the initiation of malfunctioning or structural damage; whereas, the upper-bound curve corresponds to overall failure of the equipment based on known failure modes. High level test data for some components are included in the report. These data indicate that some components are inherently strong and do not exhibit any failure mode even when tested at the vibration limit of a shake table. The common failure modes are identified in the report. The fragility levels determined in this report have been compared with those used in the PRA and Seismic Margin Studies. It appears that the BNL data better correlate with the HCLPF (High Confidence of a Low Probability of Failure) level used in Seismic Margin Studies and can improve this level as high as 60% for certain applications. Specific recommendations are provided for proper application of BNL fragility data to other studies

  9. Horizontal and vertical seismic isolation of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonomou, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a study for the horizontal and vertical seismic isolation of a nuclear power plant with a base isolation system, developed by the author, called the Alexisismon. This system -- which comprises different schemes for horizontal or vertical or both horizontal and vertical isolation -- is a linear system based on the principle of separation of functions. That is, horizontal and vertical isolation are realized through different components and act independently from each other. As far as horizontal isolation is concerned, the role of transmitting vertical loads is uncoupled from the role of inducing horizontal restoring forces so that both functions can be performed without instability. It is possible either to provide both horizontal and vertical isolation to the whole nuclear plant or to isolate the whole plant horizontally and to provide vertical isolation to sensitive and costly equipment only. When the fundamental period of the plant or equipment is 2 seconds and when the vertical displacements are of the order of + or - 20 inches, the structure or equipment are protected against earthquakes up to 1.10 and 1.30 g for actual and 0.60 and 1.50 g for artificial accelerograms. In both cases all the isolation elements behave elastically up to these acceleration limits as well as the superstructure and equipment

  10. Seismic qualification of equipment in operating nuclear power plants: Unresolved Safety Issue A-46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.Y.

    1987-02-01

    The margin of safety provided in existing nuclear power plant equipment to resist seismically induced loads and perform their intended safety functions may vary considerably, because of significant changes in design criteria and methods for the seismic qualification of equipment over the years. Therefore, the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants must be reassessed to determine whether requalification is necessary. The objective of technical studies performed under the Task Action Plan A-46 was to establish an explicit set of guidelines and acceptance criteria to judge the adequacy of equipment under seismic loading at all operating plants, in lieu of requiring qualification to the current criteria that are applied to new plants. This report summarizes the work accomplished on USI A-46. In addition, the collection and review of seismic experience data and existing seismic test data are presented. Staff assessment of work accomplished under USI A-46 leads to the conclusion that the use of seismic experience data provides the most reasonable alternative to current qualification criteria. Consideration of seismic qualification by use of experience data was a specific task in USI A-46. Several other A-46 tasks serve to support the use of an experienced data base. The principal technical finding of USI A-46 is that seismic experience data, supplemented by existing seismic test data, applied in accordance with the guidelines developed, can be used to verify the seismic adequacy of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear plants. Explicit seismic qualification should be required only if seismic experience data or existing test data on similar components cannot be shown to apply

  11. Unresolved Safety Issue A-46 - seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.

    1985-01-01

    Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants was designated as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) in December, 1980. The USI A-46 program was developed in early 1981 to investigate the adequacy of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating plants to withstand a safe shutdown earthquake. The approach taken was to develop viable, cost effective alternatives to current seismic qualification licensing requirements which could be applied to operating nuclear power plants. The tasks investigated include: (1) identification of seismic sensitive systems and equipment; (2) assessment of adequacy of existing seismic qualification methods; (3) development and assessment of in-situ test procedures to assist in qualification of equipment; (4) seismic qualification of equipment using seismic experience data; and (5) development of methods to generate generic floor response spectra. Progress to date and plans for completion of resolution are reported

  12. Seismic scoping evaluation of high level liquid waste tank vaults at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, P.S.; Uldrich, E.D.; McGee, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    A seismic scoping evaluation of buried vaults enclosing high level liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been performed. The objective of this evaluation was to scope out which of the vaults could be demonstrated to be seismically adequate against the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE). Using approximate analytical methods, earthquake experience data, and engineering judgement, this study determined that one vault configuration would be expected to meet ICPP seismic design criteria, one would not be considered seismically adequate against the SSE, and one could be shown to be seismically adequate against the SSE using nonlinear analysis

  13. 3-D pneumatic seismic isolation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beliaev, V.S.; Vinogradov, V.V.; Kostarev, V.V.; Kuzmitchev, V.P.; Privalov, S.A.; Siro, V.A.; Krylova, I.N.; Dolgaya, A.A.; Uzdin, A.M.; Vasiliev, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the work carried at the Russian Federation Research Center of Fundamental Engineering (RCFE), in development of innovative pneumatic multicomponent low-frequency seismic isolation bearings for advanced nuclear power plants.This device incorporates both supporting spherical elements, which provide displacements in the horizontal direction, and pneumatic dampers with rubber diaphragms for displacement in the vertical direction. To decrease the relative displacements of the isolated object the system uses viscoelastic dampers. Damping devices had been specially elaborated for the reactor building seismic isolation system as a result of substantial advances in the design and operation of the HD-type hydrodampers, created at the CKTI VIBROSEISM. The procedures developed have been used for comparison of the test and computer data on model isolated steel structure (MISS) and isolated rigid mass (IRM) isolators produced by ENEA and KAERI. Most recent work has concentrated on the development of mathematical models of isolators and isolated nuclear structures. Force-deformation characteristics of the HDRB model had been calculated on the basis of a special method of non-linear elastic theory using the continual transformations method. (author)

  14. Seismic assessment and upgrading of Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, K.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive programme for seismic assessment and upgrading is currently in progress at Hungary's Paks NPP. The re-evaluation of the site seismic hazard had been already completed. The technology of safe shut down and heat removal is established and the systems and structures relevant for seismic safety are identified. A seismic instrumentation is installed. The pre-earthquake preparedness and post-earthquake actions are elaborated. The methods for seismic capacity assessment are selected. The seismic capacity evaluation and the design of upgrading measures are currently in progress. The easy to perform upgrading covering the most urgent measures had been already performed. (author)

  15. Seismic design of a uranium conversion plant building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, O.J.M.; Botelho, C.L.A.; Braganca, A. Jr.; C. Santos, S.H. de.

    1992-01-01

    The design of facilities with small radioactive inventory has been traditionally performed following the usual criteria for industrial buildings. In the last few years, more stringent criteria have been adopted in new nuclear facilities in order to achieve higher standards for environmental protection. In uranium conversion plants, the UF 6 (uranium hexafluoride) production step is the part of the process with the highest potential for radioactivity release to the environment because of the operations performed in the UF 6 desublimers and cylinder filling areas as well as UF 6 distillation facilities, when they are also required in the process. This paper presents the design guidelines and some details of the seismic resistance design of a UF 6 production building to be constructed in Brazil

  16. Seismic design criteria for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrone, A.; Bitner, J.L.; Sigal, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    The general criteria for seismic resistant design for structures, systems and components of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are presented and discussed. Site dependency of the maximum ground accelerations for the Operating Basis Earthquake and the Safe Shutdown Earthquake is described from the viewpoint of historical records and geological and seismological studies for the CRBRP site. The respective ground response spectra are derived by normalization of the latest AEC Regulatory standard shapes to these maximum ground accelerations. Modeling and analytical techniques and requirements are given. In addition, loading conditions and categories, loading combinations, earthquake direction effects and allowable damping values are defined. A discussion of the testing criteria which considers both single and multiple frequency test motions, and basic test procedures for single frequency sine beat testing is presented. (U.S.)

  17. Seismic fragility analyses of nuclear power plant structures based on the recorded earthquake data in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joe, Yang Hee; Cho, Sung Gook

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces an improved method for evaluating seismic fragilities of components of nuclear power plants in Korea. Engineering characteristics of small magnitude earthquake spectra recorded in the Korean peninsula during the last several years are also discussed in this paper. For the purpose of evaluating the effects of the recorded earthquake on the seismic fragilities of Korean nuclear power plant structures, several cases of comparative studies have been performed. The study results show that seismic fragility analysis based on the Newmark's spectra in Korea might over-estimate the seismic capacities of Korean facilities. (author)

  18. Assessment of the impact of degraded shear wall stiffnesses on seismic plant risk and seismic design loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klamerus, E.W.; Bohn, M.P.; Johnson, J.J.; Asfura, A.P.; Doyle, D.J.

    1994-02-01

    Test results sponsored by the USNRC have shown that reinforced shear wall (Seismic Category I) structures exhibit stiffnesses and natural frequencies which are smaller than those calculated in the design process. The USNRC has sponsored Sandia National Labs to perform an evaluation of the effects of the reduced frequencies on several existing seismic PRAs in order to determine the seismic risk implications inherent in these test results. This report presents the results for the re-evaluation of the seismic risk for three nuclear power plants: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, and Arkansas Nuclear One -- Unit 1 (ANO-1). Increases in core damage frequencies for seismic initiated events at Peach Bottom were 25 to 30 percent (depending on whether LLNL or EPRI hazard curves were used). At the ANO-1 site, the corresponding increases in plant risk were 10 percent (for each set of hazard curves). Finally, at Zion, there was essentially no change in the computed core damage frequency when the reduction in shear wall stiffness was included. In addition, an evaluation of deterministic ''design-like'' structural dynamic calculations with and without the shear stiffness reductions was made. Deterministic loads calculated for these two cases typically increased on the order of 10 to 20 percent for the affected structures

  19. Seismic design of nuclear power plants - where are we now?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesset, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The lack of any significant activity in the design and construction of new nuclear power plants over the last 10 years has resulted in a corresponding lull in the basic academic research carried out in this field. Whilst some work is still going on related to the evaluation of existing plants or to litigation over some of them (including some that never became operational) most of it is of a very applied nature and little basic research is being conducted at present. However, research on earthquake engineering in general, as applied to buildings, bridges, lifelines, dams and other constructed facilities has continued. This paper attempts to look at some of the areas where there were major uncertainties in the seismic design of nuclear power plants (selection of the design earthquake and its characteristics, evaluation of soil effects and soil structure interactions, dynamic analysis and design of the structures), the progress that has been made in these areas, and the remaining issues in need of further research. (orig.)

  20. Seismic design of nuclear power plants. Where are we now?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesset, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The lack of any significant activity in the design and construction of new nuclear power plants over the last ten years has resulted in a corresponding lull in the basic academic research carried out in this field. While some work is still going on related to the evaluation of existing plants or to litigation over some of them (including some that never became operational) most of it is of a very applied nature and little basic research is being conducted at present. Yet research on earthquake engineering in general, as applied to buildings, bridges, lifelines, dams and other constructed facilities has continued. This paper attempts to look at some of the areas where there were major uncertainties in the seismic design of nuclear power plants (selection of the design earthquake and its characteristics, evaluation of soil effects and soil structure interactions, dynamic analysis and design of the structures), the progress that has been made in these areas, and the remaining issues in need of further research. (author)

  1. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Takehito

    1997-01-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  2. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Takehito [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  3. Development of fragility descriptions of equipment for seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, G.S.; Campbell, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear power plant for postulated hazard requires the development of fragility relationships for the plants' safety related equipment. The objective of this paper is to present some general results and conclusions concerning the development of these seismic fragility levels. Participation in fragility-related research and experience gained from the completion of several PRA studies of a variety of nuclear power plants have provided much insight as to the most vulnerable equipment and the most efficient use of resources for development of fragilities. Plants studied had seismic design bases ranging from very simple equivalent static analysis for some of the earlier plants to state-of-the-art complex multimode dyanamic analyses for plants currently under construction. Increased sophistication and rigor in seismic qualification of equipment has resulted for the most part in increased seismic resistance. The majority of equipment has been found, however, to possess more than adequate resistance to seismic loading regardless of the degree of sophistication utilized in design as long as seismic loading was included in the design process. This paper presents conclusions of the authors as to which items of equipment typically require an individual ''plant-specific'' fragility analysis and which can be treated in a generic fashion. In addition, general conclusions on the relative seismic capacity levels and most frequent failure modes are summarized for generic equipment groups

  4. Seismic structural fragility investigation for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. Seismic safety margins research program (phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1981-10-01

    An evaluation of the seismic capacity of the essential structures for the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was conducted as part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The structures included the reactor containment building, the turbine/auxiliary building, and the crib house (intake structure). The evaluation was devoted to seismically induced failures rather than those resulting from combined Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) or other extreme load combinations. The seismic loads used in the investigation were based on elastic analyses. The loads for the reactor containment and turbine/auxiliary buildings were developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory using time history analyses. The loads used for the crib house were the original seismic design loads developed by Sargent and Lundy. No non-linear seismic analyses were conducted. The seismic capacity of the structures accounted for the actual concrete and steel material properties including the aging of the concrete. Median centered properties were used throughout the evaluation including levels of damping considered appropriate for structures close to collapse as compared to the more conservative values used for design. The inelastic effects were accounted for using ductility modified response spectrum techniques based on system ductility ratios expected for structures near collapse. Sources of both inherent randomness and uncertainties resulting from lack of knowledge or approximations in analytical modelling were considered in developing the dispersion of the structural dynamic characteristics. Coefficients of variation were developed assuming lognormal distributions for all variables. The earthquake levels for many of the seismically induced failure modes are so high as to be considered physically incredible. (author)

  5. Seismic design and qualification for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This safety guide, which supplements the IAEA Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP); Design (IAEA Safety Series No.50-C-D (Rev.1)), forms part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes and Guides relating to land based stationary thermal neutron power plants. The present Guide was originally issued in 1979 as Safety Guide 50-SG-S2 within the series of NUSS guides for the siting of NPP, extending seismic considerations from Safety Guide 50-SG-S1 into the design and verification field. During the revision phase in 1988-1990, this emphasis on design aspects was confirmed and consequently the Guides have been reclassified as a design Guide with the corresponding identification number 50-SG-D15. The general character of the Guide has not been changed an it still relates strongly to 50-SG-S1, which gives guidance on how to determine design basis ground motion for a NPP at a given site

  6. Geologic and well-construction data for the H-10 borehole complex near the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.G.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The H-10 borehole complex, a group of three closely spaced boreholes, is located 4 miles southeast of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in west-central Lea County, New Mexico. The holes were drilled during August and October 1979 to obtain geologic and hydrologic data to better define the regional ground-water-flow system. The geologic data presented in this report are part of a site-characterization study for the possible storage of defense-associated radioactive wastes within salt beds of the Salado Formation of Permian age. The geologic data include detailed descriptions of cores, cuttings, and geophysical logs. Each borehole was designed to penetrate a distinct water-bearing zone: H-10a (total depth 1318 feet) was completed just below the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation of Permian age; H-10b (total depth 1398 feet) was completed just below the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation; and H-10c (total depth 1538 feet) was completed below the Rustler Formation-Salado Formation contact. The geologic units penetrated in borehole H-10c are surficial alluvium and eolian sand of Holocene age (0 to 5 feet); the Mescalero caliche (5 to 9 feet) and the Gatuna Formation (9 to 90 feet) of Pleistocene age: formations in the Dockum Group (Chinle Formation, 90 to 482 feet and Santa Rosa Sandstone, 482 to 658 feet) of Late Triassic age; and the Dewey Lake Red Beds (658 to 1204 feet), the Rustler Formation (1204 to 1501 feet), and part of the Salado Formation (1501 to 1538 feet), all of Permian age. The sections of the Rustler and Salado Formations penetrated by borehole H-10c are complete and contain little or no evidence of dissolution of halite and associated rocks, indicating that the eastward-moving dissolution within the Rustler or on top of the Salado, found west of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, has not reached the H-10 site

  7. Integrated structural design of nuclear power plants for high seismic areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    A design approach which structurally interconnects NPP buildings to be located in high seismic areas is described. The design evolution of a typical 600 MWe steel cylindrical containment PWR is described as the plant is structurally upgraded for higher seismic requirements, while maintaining the original plant layout. The plant design is presented as having separate reactor building and auxiliary structures for a low seismic area (0.20 g) and is structurally combined at the foundation for location in a higher seismic area (0.30 g). The evolution is completed by a fully integrated design which structurally connects the reactor building and auxiliary structures at superstructure elevations as well as foundation levels for location in very severe seismic risk areas (0.50 g). (orig.)

  8. Seismic design of equipment and piping systems for nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minematsu, Akiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    The philosophy of seismic design for nuclear power plant facilities in Japan is based on 'Examination Guide for Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities: Nuclear Power Safety Committee, July 20, 1981' (referred to as 'Examination Guide' hereinafter) and the present design criteria have been established based on the survey of governmental improvement and standardization program. The detailed design implementation procedure is further described in 'Technical Guidelines for Aseismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants, JEAG4601-1987: Japan Electric Association'. This report describes the principles and design procedure of the seismic design of equipment/piping systems for nuclear power plant in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  9. Seismic design of equipment and piping systems for nuclear power plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minematsu, Akiyoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    The philosophy of seismic design for nuclear power plant facilities in Japan is based on `Examination Guide for Seismic Design of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities: Nuclear Power Safety Committee, July 20, 1981` (referred to as `Examination Guide` hereinafter) and the present design criteria have been established based on the survey of governmental improvement and standardization program. The detailed design implementation procedure is further described in `Technical Guidelines for Aseismic Design of Nuclear Power Plants, JEAG4601-1987: Japan Electric Association`. This report describes the principles and design procedure of the seismic design of equipment/piping systems for nuclear power plant in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  10. Seismic margin analysis for Kashiwazaki Kariwa ABWR plant considering the Niigataken Chuetsu-oki earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Nagasawa, Kazuyuki; Kawamura, Shinichi; Ueki, Takashi; Higuchi, Tomokazu; Sakaki, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Seismic Margin Analysis (SMA) study was conducted for Kashiwazaki Kariwa (KK) ABWR representative plant (unit 6). Considering that the installation behaved in a safe manner during and after the Niigataken Chuetsu-oki (NCO) Earthquake which significantly exceeded the level of the seismic input taken into account in the design of the plant, the study to find out how much margin the ABWR plant had toward the same seismic motion was conducted. In this study fragility analyses were conducted for SSCs that were included in the accident sequences and that were considered to have relatively small margin taking EPRI margin analysis method into consideration. In order to calculate plant level seismic margin Min-Max method was adopted. As the result of this study, the plant level High Confidence Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) acceleration for unit 6 was calculated more than tripled NCO earthquake motion. (author)

  11. Seismic stress of plants and equipment in nuclear power station construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampe, E.; Schwarz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability of floor spectra for designing components of nuclear power plants taking into account seismic effects is discussed. Methods for the determination of seismic floor excitation and various kinds of floor spectra are presented. As an example the floor spectra method is applied to containment buildings

  12. A framework of risk-informed seismic safety evaluation of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Sakagami, M.; Hirano, M.; Shiba, M.

    2001-01-01

    A framework of risk-informed seismic design and safety evaluation of nuclear power plants is under consideration in Japan so as to utilize the progress in the seismic probabilistic safety assessment methodology. Issues resolved to introduce this framework are discussed after the concept, evaluation process and characteristics of the framework are described. (author)

  13. The Role of Tectonic and Seismicity in Siting of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aziz, M.A.H.

    2008-01-01

    The site selection for the a nuclear power plant (NPP) is controlled by many criteria. One of the most important criterion is the tectonic and seismicity of the site and its surroundings. Since, it is preferable the site in concern is characterized by low tectonic and low seismicity to avoid the damage effects associated with the occurrence of destructive earthquakes. The investigation of the tectonic and seismicity maps of egypt has been carried out to candidate potential areas or sites for nuclear power plant installation from seismicity point of view. Also, the design basis ground motion in terms of peak ground acceleration and response spectra of some of the potential sites are defined through the conduct of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis The study revealed that although there is no criterion to exclude areas of high tectonic and high seismicity as potential sites for nuclear power plant installation but, it is preferable avoiding such areas. This is attributed to the critical seismic curve that characterizes such areas and is required high seismic design levels to resist the destructive vibratory ground motion associated with the expected earthquake. Consequently, the required high seismic design levels will have a negative impact on the economic cost of the facility compared with that built in low and moderate seismic areas. Hence, areas like the gulf of suez, the northern part of the Red Sea and the southern part of Sinai Peninsula should be avoided as potential sites for NPP from the tectonic and seismicity point of view. On the other hand, areas like Nile delta and its valley, the Northern and Southern parts of Western desert and the central and southern parts of the Eastern Desert should be candidate as potential sites on condition, the other criteria meet the IAEA's regulations. Also, the seismic hazard curve of the Northwest littoral zone reflects low design basis ground motion values compared with the Nile delta region

  14. Seismic investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrows, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Evaporite rocks in the Delaware Basin in southeastern New Mexico are being investigated as a possible site for nuclear waste disposal. Seismic studies have been conducted to establish seismic design criteria and to investigate relations between seismicity and geologic structures. In the initial phase of this study, historical and available seismic data were interpreted with respect to geology. Local instrumentation became available in 1974 when New Mexico Tech installed and began operating a seismic station in the area. Data and interpretation for 1974 through 1979 have been published. In 1980 seismic monitoring of the Northern Delaware Basin was extended to include a six station network of self-contained radio-telemetered seismometers. 9 references, 13 figures

  15. Structure and Stratigraphy of the Rift Basins in the Northern Gulf of California: Results from Analysis of Seismic Reflection and Borehole Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, A.; González, M.; Helenes, J.; García, J.; Aragón, M.; Carreño, A.

    2008-12-01

    The northern Gulf of California contains two parallel, north-south trending rift basin systems separated by a basement-high. The interpretation of several exploration wells, and ~4500 km of seismic reflection data from PEMEX (Mexican national oil company) indicate that the tectonically active basins to the west (Wagner- Consag and Upper Delfin basins) may have initiated synchronously with the now abandoned Tiburón- Tepoca-Altar basins to the east in the Sonora margin. In both basin systems the lower sequence (A) is marine mudstone-siltstone, has parallel reflectors and a largely uniform thickness that reaches up to1.5 km, and gradually pinches out toward the lateral margins. This suggests that the unit was deposited prior to their segmentation by transtensional faulting. Marine microfossils from borehole samples from sequence A in the Tiburón and Consag basins indicates middle Miocene (>11.2 Ma) proto-Gulf conditions. Sequence B conformably overlies sequence A, and is characterized by up to 2 km growth strata with a fanning geometry that show a clear genetic relationship to the major transtensional faults that control the segmentation of the two basin systems. Sequence C in the Tiburón and Tepoca basins is comparatively thin (<800 m) and includes several unconformities, but is much less affected by faulting. In contrast, sequence C in the active Wagner, Consag and Upper Delfin basin is a much thicker (up to 2 km) growth sequence with abundant volcanic intrusions. Marked variations in sequence C in the different basin systems clearly demonstrate a major westward shift of deformation and subsidence at this time. The modern depocenter in Wagner-Consag basins is controlled by the Consag and Wagner faults, which trend parallel to the north ~20 km apart, and show opposite normal offset. These two faults merge at an oblique angle (70°-50°, respectively) into the Cerro Prieto transform fault to the north and likely accommodate an important amount of dextral shear. To

  16. Seismic margin reviews of nuclear power plants: Identification of important functions and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassinos, P.G.; Moore, D.L.; Amico, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The results from the review of the seven utility-sponsored seismic PRAs plus the Zion SSMRP have been used to develop some insights regarding the importance of various systems and functions to seismic margins. By taking this information and combining it with the fragility insights we can develop some functional/systemic screening guideline for margin studies. This screening approach will greatly reduce the scope of the analysis. It is possible only to come to conclusions regarding the importance of plant systems and safety functions for PWRs, for which six plants were studied. For PWRs, it is possible to categorize plant safety functions as belonging to one of two groups, one of which is important to the assessment of seismic margins and one of which is not. The important functional group involves only two functions that must be considered for estimating seismic margin. These two functions are shutting down the nuclear reaction and providing cooling to the reactor core in the time period immediately following the seismic event (that is, the injection phase or pre-residual heat removal time period). It is possible to reasonably estimate the seismic margin of the plant by performing a study only involving the analysis of the plant systems and structure which are required in order to perform the two functions. Such analysis must include an assessment of a complete set of seismic initiating events. (orig./HP)

  17. The benefits and problems of base seismic isolation for LMFBR reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an approach to aseismic design has gained increasing interest as a viable and efficient engineering solution to earthquake ground motion both within and outside of the nuclear field. Seismic isolation design is fundamentally different from conventional design practice. In the conventional approach, seismic loads are resisted by making the structures, equipment, piping, and associated supports strong enough to resist seismic loads and to provide high levels of ductility. The use of seismic isolation approaches the problem by decoupling the structure (and its contents) from the seismic input resulting from ground shaking. Because LMFBR systems operate at virtually atmospheric pressure, vessels, piping, and associated components tend to be quite thin-walled. The problem is that these thin-walled items have little inherent resistance to earthquake effects and are vulnerable to seismic load effects. As a result, earthquake loads have an even greater influence on LMR designs than they already are in LWR plants. The potential benefits of seismic isolation for an LMR plant are considerable, including minimization of high-cost commodities such as stainless steel, large reductions in internal equipment loads, increased margins of safety for beyond-design-basis loads, and enhancement of plant standardization design. There are, of course, a number of issues and concerns in the use of seismic isolation for a nuclear power plant. These issues cover a number of items such as the lack of experience in actual earthquakes, effects of long-period ground motion, effect of vertical loads, traveling waves, and other related concerns. This paper presents an evaluation of the benefits and problems in the use of seismic isolation in LMR plants. 12 refs, 7 figs

  18. Estimating of seismic return periods in Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores R, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    The study of seismic risk in the site of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant and surroundings was made considering the different periods of seismic return and the probability of occurrence in distinct time intervals (50, 75, 100, 125, 150 years) starting with the distribution of first type of extreme values of Gumbel (G1), the value used for the assessment of lifetime of lump was 50 years, and the rest of the periods are used to evaluate temporary nuclear cemeteries, it is to say for reducing the radioactivity of burned fuel assemblies. The seismic data belongs to the seismicity catalog (1920-1982) elaborated around the site, which average magnitude was 5 in the Richter Scale and are considered as shallow and are located in the Continental crust of North American shelf, and are induced by the pressure of the cocos shelf, being 36 % of the seismic movements of intermediate value and two seismic movements of deep value. (Author)

  19. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps from three seismic reflection surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Data interpretations will be the subject of subsequent reports

  20. Seismic analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Service Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York: documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Davito, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    This material was generated as part of a seismic case review of the NFS Reprocessing Plant. This study is documented in UCRL-52266. The material is divided into two parts: mathematical model information, and ultimate load calculations and comparisons

  1. Geologic and well-construction data for the H-10 borehole complex near the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J.G.; Drellack, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    The H-10 borehole complex, a group of three closely spaced boreholes, is located 3 1/2 miles southeast of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in west-central Lea County, New Mexico. The geological data presented in this report are part of a site-characterization study for the possible storage of defense-associated radioactive wastes within salt beds of the Salado Formation of Permian age. Each borehole was designated to penetrate a distinct water-bearing zone: H-10a (total depth 1 ,318 feet) was completed just below the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation of Permian age; H-10b (total depth 1 ,398 feet) was completed just below the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation; and H-10c (total depth 1,538 feet) was completed below the Rustler Formation-Salado Formation contact. The geologic units penetrated in borehole H-10c are surficial alluvium and eolian sand of Holocene age (0-5 feet); the Mescalero caliche (5-9 feet) and the Gatuna Formation (9-90 feet) of Pleistocene age; formation in the Dockum Group (Chinle Formation, 90-482 feet and Santa Rosa Sandstone, 482-658 feet) of Late Triassic age; and the Dewey Lake Red Beds (658-1,204 feet), the Rustler Formation (1,204-1,501 feet), and part of the Salado Formation (1,501-1,538 feet), all of Permian age. The sections of the Rustler and Salado Formations penetrated by borehole H-10c are complete and contain little or no evidence of dissolution of halite and associated rocks, indicating that the eastward-moving dissolution on top of the Salado, found just to the west of the WIPP site, has not reached the H-10 site. (USGS)

  2. Siting of nuclear desalination plants in Saudi Arabia: A seismic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aljohani, M.S.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F.; Almarshad, A.I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the selection criteria generally and seismic criteria specifically to select a suitable site in Saudi Arabia for a nuclear desalination plant. These criteria include geological, meteorological, cooling water supply discharge, transport infrastructure, population, electric grid, water network capacity, environmental impact and airport movement. The seismicity of the Arabian peninsula for the locations of seismic activity along the Red Sea and the Arabian Gulf coastlines from 1973 to 2000 was studied carefully. This study included towns and locations along the east and west coastlines and their distances from the seismic event site. The results showed that Rabigh City along the west coast of Saudi Arabia is a good site to build a nuclear desalination plant. This is because of the following reasons: good seismic stability; good weather statistics; no flooding; mild wave conditions; good supply and discharge; good transportation infrastructure; low population area; very close to the huge electric grid. (author)

  3. Seismic fragility analyses of nuclear power plant structures based on the recorded earthquake data in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Gook; Joe, Yang Hee

    2005-01-01

    By nature, the seismic fragility analysis results will be considerably affected by the statistical data of design information and site-dependent ground motions. The engineering characteristics of small magnitude earthquake spectra recorded in the Korean peninsula during the last several years are analyzed in this paper. An improved method of seismic fragility analysis is evaluated by comparative analyses to verify its efficiency for practical application to nuclear power plant structures. The effects of the recorded earthquake on the seismic fragilities of Korean nuclear power plant structures are also evaluated from the comparative studies. Observing the obtained results, the proposed method is more efficient for the multi-modes structures. The case study results show that seismic fragility analysis based on the Newmark's spectra in Korea might over-estimate the seismic capacities of Korean facilities

  4. Seismic fragility analyses of nuclear power plant structures based on the recorded earthquake data in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Gook [Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, University of Incheon, 177 Dohwa-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sgcho@incheon.ac.kr; Joe, Yang Hee [Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, University of Incheon, 177 Dohwa-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-01

    By nature, the seismic fragility analysis results will be considerably affected by the statistical data of design information and site-dependent ground motions. The engineering characteristics of small magnitude earthquake spectra recorded in the Korean peninsula during the last several years are analyzed in this paper. An improved method of seismic fragility analysis is evaluated by comparative analyses to verify its efficiency for practical application to nuclear power plant structures. The effects of the recorded earthquake on the seismic fragilities of Korean nuclear power plant structures are also evaluated from the comparative studies. Observing the obtained results, the proposed method is more efficient for the multi-modes structures. The case study results show that seismic fragility analysis based on the Newmark's spectra in Korea might over-estimate the seismic capacities of Korean facilities.

  5. The impact of seismically-induced relay chatter on nuclear plant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bley, D.C.; McIntyre, T.J.; Smith, B.; Kassawara, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic scheme for analyzing the impact of relay chatter that is amenable to both PRA analysis and seismic margins analysis. It uses knowledge of the systems engineering of the plant to bound the scope of the problem to a tractable size and has been applied to both the Diablo Canyon PRA and the EPRI seismic margines program trial evaluation at the Catawba Nuclear Power Plant. It has also been coordinated with similar EPRI-sponsored work on relay functionality for the Seismic Qualification Utility Group. (orig./HP)

  6. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants using elastomeric bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish

    Seismic isolation using low damping rubber (LDR) and lead-rubber (LR) bearings is a viable strategy for mitigating the effects of extreme earthquake shaking on safety-related nuclear structures. Although seismic isolation has been deployed in nuclear structures in France and South Africa, it has not seen widespread use because of limited new build nuclear construction in the past 30 years and a lack of guidelines, codes and standards for the analysis, design and construction of isolation systems specific to nuclear structures. The nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011 has led the nuclear community to consider seismic isolation for new large light water and small modular reactors to withstand the effects of extreme earthquakes. The mechanical properties of LDR and LR bearings are not expected to change substantially in design basis shaking. However, under shaking more intense than design basis, the properties of the lead cores in lead-rubber bearings may degrade due to heating associated with energy dissipation, some bearings in an isolation system may experience net tension, and the compression and tension stiffness may be affected by the horizontal displacement of the isolation system. The effects of intra-earthquake changes in mechanical properties on the response of base-isolated nuclear power plants (NPPs) were investigated using an advanced numerical model of a lead-rubber bearing that has been verified and validated, and implemented in OpenSees and ABAQUS. A series of experiments were conducted at University at Buffalo to characterize the behavior of elastomeric bearings in tension. The test data was used to validate a phenomenological model of an elastomeric bearing in tension. The value of three times the shear modulus of rubber in elastomeric bearing was found to be a reasonable estimate of the cavitation stress of a bearing. The sequence of loading did not change the behavior of an elastomeric bearing under cyclic tension, and there was no

  7. Approaches that use seismic hazard results to address topics of nuclear power plant seismic safety, with application to the Charleston earthquake issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, R.T.; McGuire, R.K.; Toro, G.R.; Stepp, J.C.; Cornell, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Plant seismic safety indicators include seismic hazard at the SSE (safe shut-down earthquake) acceleration, seismic margin, reliability against core damage, and reliability against offsite consequences. This work examines the key role of hazard analysis in evaluating these indicators and in making rational decisions regarding plant safety. The paper outlines approaches that use seismic hazard results as a basis for plant seismic safety evaluation and applies one of these approaches to the Charleston earthquake issue. This approach compares seismic hazard results that account for the Charleston tectonic interpretation, using the EPRI-Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) methodology, with hazard results that are consistent with historical tectonic interpretations accepted in regulation. Based on hazard results for a set of 21 eastern U.S. nuclear power plant sites, the comparison shows that no systematic 'plant-to-plant' increase in hazard accompanies the Charleston hypothesis; differences in mean hazards for the two interpretations are generally insignificant relative to current uncertainties in seismic hazard. (orig.)

  8. Seismic-load-induced human errors and countermeasures using computer graphics in plant-operator communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    This paper remarks the importance of seismic load-induced human errors in plant operation by delineating the characteristics of the task performance of human beings under seismic loads. It focuses on man-machine communication via multidimensional data like that conventionally displayed on large panels in a plant control room. It demonstrates a countermeasure to human errors using a computer graphics technique that conveys the global state of the plant operation to operators through cartoon-like, colored graphs in the form of faces that, with different facial expressions, show the plant safety status. (orig.)

  9. Probability problems in seismic risk analysis and load combinations for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, L.L.

    1983-01-01

    This workshop describes some probability problems in power plant reliability and maintenance analysis. The problems are seismic risk analysis, loss of load probability, load combinations, and load sharing. The seismic risk problem is to compute power plant reliability given an earthquake and the resulting risk. Component survival occurs if its peak random response to the earthquake does not exceed its strength. Power plant survival is a complicated Boolean function of component failures and survivals. The responses and strengths of components are dependent random processes, and the peak responses are maxima of random processes. The resulting risk is the expected cost of power plant failure

  10. A basis for standardized seismic design (SSD) for nuclear power plants/critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P.; Bellini, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    US Nuclear Power Plants (NPP's) are designed, engineered and constructed to stringent standards. Their seismic adequacy is assured by compliance with regulatory standards and demonstrated by both probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) and seismic margin studies. However, present seismic siting criteria requires improvement. Proposed changes to siting criteria discussed here will provide a predictable licensing process and a stable regulatory environment. Two recent state-of-the-art studies evaluate the seismic design for all eastern US (EUS) NPP'S: a Lawrence Livermore National Labs study (LLNL, 1989) funded by the NRC and similar research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, 1989) supported by the utilities. Both confirm that Appendix A 10CFR Part 100 has not provided consistent seismic design levels for all sites. Standardized Seismic Design (SSD) uses a probabilistic framework to accommodate alternative deterministic interpretations. It uses seismic hazard input from EPRI or LLNL to produce consistent bases for future seismic design. SSD combines deterministic and probabilistic insights to provide a comprehensive approach for determining a future site's acceptable seismic design basis

  11. An assessment of seismic margins in nuclear plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Jaquay, K.R.; Chokshi, N.C.; Terao, D.

    1995-01-01

    Interim results of an ongoing program to assist the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing regulatory positions on the seismic analyses of piping and overall safety margins of piping systems are reported. Results of reviews of previous seismic testing, primarily the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/NRC Piping and Fitting Dynamic Reliability Program, and assessments of the ASME Code, Section III, piping seismic design criteria as revised by the 1994 Addenda are reported. Major issues are identified herein only. Technical details are to be provided elsewhere. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs

  12. Design and commissioning of the Seismicity Network of Darkhovein Nuclear Power Plant (IR360)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aram, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The study of micro seismicity and monitoring the micro seismic for the purpose of surveying the existing faults treatments and recognition of blind faults and other active tectonic structures in various phases of constructing the important structures, specially nuclear power plants, is unavoidable. According to IAEA safety guides and US-NRC regulatory guides, suitable instrumentation must be provided so that the seismic response of nuclear power plant features importantly from the safety point of view. According to R.G. 1.165 seismic monitoring by a network of seismic stations in the site area should be established as soon as possible after the site selection. Also, it is necessary to shutdown the nuclear power plant if vibratory ground motion exceeds the operating basis earthquake. The current research demonstrates the field works and studies for locating the local seismograph network in Darkhovein nuclear power plant. After the official studies and the primary visit of the old seismograph stations it was found that the mentioned network doesn't cover completely the geological structures around the power plant. Therefore, new locations have been introduced through the field investigation and computational methods of optimization. In positioning the new stations, places with the least amount of noise and the best coverage for seismic sources were selected. The modeling with considering an imaginative station at the selected places shows that the thresholds of the complete records of earthquakes around Darkhovein site is under the magnitude 1 (about 0.8).

  13. Research program for seismic qualification of nuclear plant electrical and mechanical equipment. Task 4. Use of fragility in seismic design of nuclear plant equipment. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kana, D.D.; Pomerening, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Research Program for Seismic Qualification of Nuclear Plant Electrical and Mechanical Equipment has spanned a period of three years and resulted in seven technical summary reports, each of which have covered in detail the findings of different tasks and subtasks, and have been combined into five NUREG/CR volumes. Volume 4 presents study of the use of fragility concepts in the design of nuclear plant equipment and compares the results of state-of-the-art proof testing with fragility testing

  14. The Ventersdorp Contact Reef model in the Kloof Gold Mine as derived from 3D seismics, geological mapping and exploration borehole datasets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Manzi, MSD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A model of the Ventersdorp Contact Reef (VCR) orebody at Kloof Gold Mine was derived by integrating 3D reflection seismic data with information derived from underground mine mapping and exploration drilling. The study incorporated the depth...

  15. Seismic re-evaluation of piping systems of heavy water plant, Kota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Rajesh; Soni, R.S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-05-01

    Heavy Water Plant, Kota is the first indigenous heavy water plant built in India. The plant started operation in the year 1985 and it is approaching the completion of its originally stipulated design life. In view of the excellent record of plant operation for the past so many years, it has been planned to carry out various exercises for the life extension of the plant. In the first stage, evaluation of operation stresses was carried out for the process critical piping layouts and equipment, which are connected with 25 process critical nozzle locations, identified based on past history of the plant performance. Fatigue life evaluation has been carried out to fmd out the Cumulative Usage Factor, which helps in arriving at a decision regarding the life extension of the plant. The results of these exercises have been already reported separately vide BARC/200I /E/O04. In the second stage, seismic reevaluation of the plant has been carried out to assess its ability to maintain its integ:rity in case of a seismic event. The aim of this exercise is to assess the effects of the maximum probable earthquake at the plant site on the various systems and components of the plant. This exercise is further aimed at ensuring the adequacy of seismic supports to maintain the integrity of the system in case of a seismic event and to suggest some retrofitting measures, if required. Seismic re-evaluation of the piping of Heavy Water Plant, Kota has been performed taking into account the interaction effects from the connected equipment. Each layout has been qualified using the latest provisions of ASME Code Section III, Subsection ND wherein the earthquake loading has been considered as a reversing dynamic load. The maximum combined stresses for all the layouts due to pressure, weight and seismic loadings have been found to be well within the code allowable limit. Therefore, it has been concluded that during a maximum probable seismic event, the possibility of pipe rupture can be safely

  16. Seismic isolation floor and vibration control equipment for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, H.; Fujimoto, S.; Aida, Y.; Miyano, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a seismic isolation floor to improve protection against earthquakes for process computer systems, and a magnetic dynamic damper to reduce the mechanical vibrations of piping systems and pumps in nuclear power plants. Seismic excitation tests of the seismic isolation floor, on which process computer systems were installed, were performed using large earthquake simulators. The test results proved that the seismic isolation floor significantly reduced seismic forces. To control mechanical vibrations, a magnetic dynamic damper was designed using permanent magnets. This magnetic dynamic damper does not require mechanical springs, dampers and supports in the floors and walls of the building. Vibration tests using a rotating machine model confirmed that the magnetic dynamic damper effectively controlled vibrations in such a rotating machine model. (author)

  17. Seismic evaluation of commercial plutonium fabrication plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuter, D.L.; Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    This report is an overview of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's seismic assessment of six commercial plutonium fabrication plants licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before September 2, 1971. The seismic assessment generally has three parts: (1) documentation of the structural condition of each facility and its critical equipment; (2) characterization of the seismic hazard (i.e., determination of peak ground acceleration vs return period for each site); and (3) evaluation of seismic capacity to determine ground motion levels at which critical structures and equipment fail. The failure evaluation used structural capacities of median-centered strength characteristics of the as-built configurations from (1) and seismic hazard input from (2). Results of the assessment were partial input for an overall natural risks study by the NRC

  18. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented

  19. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented.

  20. Geologic and well-construction data for the H-8 borehole complex near the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J.G.; Drellack, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The H-8 complex, a group of three closely-spaced boreholes, is located 9 miles south of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site in southeastern Eddy County, New Mexico. The holes were drilled during July, August, and September of 1979 to obtain geologic and hydrologic data to better define the regional ground-water-flow system. The geologic data presented in this report are part of a site-characterization study for the possible disposal of defense-associated radioactive wastes within salt beds of the Salado Formation of Permian age. The geologic data include detailed descriptions of cores, cuttings, and geophysical logs. Each borehole was designed to penetrate a distinct water-bearing zone: H-8a (total depth 505 feet) was completed just below the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation of Permian Age; H-8b (total depth 624 feet) was completed just belows the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation; and H-8c (total depth 808 feet) was completed just below the Rustler Formation-Salado Formation contact. The geologic units penetrated in borehole H-8c are surficial alluvium and eolian sand of Holocene age (0-4 feet); the Mescalero caliche (4-10 feet) and Gatuna Formation (10-153 feet) , both of Pleistocene age; and the Dewey Lake Red Beds (153-399 feet), the Rustler Formation (399-733 feet), and part of the Salado Formation penetrated by borehole H-8c is composed of residue from dissolution of halite and associated rocks, and the hydration of anhydrite to gypsum, indicating that the eastward-moving dissolution front on top of the Salado, found just to the west of the WIPP site, has reached the H-8 site. (USGS)

  1. Geologic and well-construction data for the H-9 borehole complex near the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, southeastern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drellack, S.L.; Wells, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The H-9 complex, a group of three closely spaced boreholes, is located 5.5 miles south of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in east-central Eddy County, New Mexico. The holes were drilled during July, August, and September 1979 to obtain geologic and hydrologic data to better define the regional ground-water-flow system. The geologic data presented in this report are part of a site-characterization study for the possible storage of defense-associated radioactive wastes within salt beds of the Salado Formation of Permian age. The geologic data include detailed descriptions of cores, cuttings, and geophysical logs. Each borehole was designed to penetrate a distinct water-bearing zone: H-9a (total depth 559 feet) was completed just below the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation; H-9b (total depth 708 feet) was completed just below the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation; H-9c (total depth 816 feet) was completed below the Rustler Formation-Salado Formation contact. The geologic units penetrated in borehole H-9c are eolian sand of Holocene age (0-5 feet); the Gatuna Formation of Pleistocene age; (5-25 feet); and the Dewey Lake Red Beds (25-455 feet), the Rustler Formation (455.791 feet), and part of the Salado Formation (791-816 feet), all of Permian age. Three sections (494-501 feet, 615-625 feet, 692-712 feet) in the Rustler Formation penetrated by borehole H-9c are composed of remnant anhydrite (locally altered to gypsum) and clay and silt residue from the dissolution of much thicker seams of argillaceous and silty halite. This indicates that the eastward-moving dissolution within the Rustler Formation, found just to the west of the WIPP site, is present at the H-9 site. (USGS)

  2. Comments on the seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarics, A G [29 Winward Road, Belvedere, CA 94920 (United States); Kelly, J M [Earthquake Engineering Research Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Csorba, E M [Technical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-03-01

    After the break-up of the Soviet Union, ten countries in Eastern Europe inherited Soviet-designed nuclear power plants which were constructed without adequate provisions to resist earthquake-generated lateral forces. An earthquake at their locations could seriously damage these plants and could result in Chernobyl-like consequences on the environment. There is an ongoing program to reinforce these plants using conventional piecemeal methods. A newly developed seismic protection strategy called 'base isolation' or 'seismic isolation', widely used in the United States to retrofit existing buildings, is recommended as an economical, technically superior, and more effective solution - where applicable - to make these nuclear power plants capable of resisting seismic forces. (author)

  3. Comments on the seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarics, A.G.; Kelly, J.M.; Csorba, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    After the break-up of the Soviet Union, ten countries in Eastern Europe inherited Soviet-designed nuclear power plants which were constructed without adequate provisions to resist earthquake-generated lateral forces. An earthquake at their locations could seriously damage these plants and could result in Chernobyl-like consequences on the environment. There is an ongoing program to reinforce these plants using conventional piecemeal methods. A newly developed seismic protection strategy called 'base isolation' or 'seismic isolation', widely used in the United States to retrofit existing buildings, is recommended as an economical, technically superior, and more effective solution - where applicable - to make these nuclear power plants capable of resisting seismic forces. (author)

  4. Experience with seismic instrumentation and real earthquake data at nuclear power plant Beznau Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahgal, S.; Tinic, S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the aspects of design specification, bid evaluation and, seismic criteria used for the generation of seismic alarms etc. The paper also describes how the recorded data is utilized to check the various assumptions made in conjunction with the seismic plant design and seismic load generation. Out of some 8 seismic events registered so far only one event had the maximum recorded acceleration of approximately 28% of OBE Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA). From the real earthquakes experienced and the in-situ free-field ground accelerations recorded, the free-field response spectra were calculated. The calculated spectra are compared to the Regulatory Guide 1.60 Design Response Spectra scaled linearly to the site peak ground acceleration. The free field data recording units on the weathered rock and at the top of the soil provided a real data to calculate the site amplification factors. The in-situ amplification calculated is then compared to that used in the seismic design. The recorded acceleration time history at various plant grades were used to generate response spectra. The calculated response spectra were in turn compared to the spectra used in the seismic design. (authors)

  5. Seismic analysis of the reactor coolant system of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Sollogoub, P.

    1986-01-01

    For safety considerations, seismic analyses are performed of the Reactor Coolant System (R.C.S.) of PWR Plants. After a brief description of the R.C.S. and R.C.S. operation, the paper presents the two types of analysis used to determine the effect of earthquake on the R.C.S.: modal spectral analysis and nonlinear time history analysis. The paper finally shows how seismic loadings are combined with other types of loadings and illustrates how the consideration of seismic loads affects R.C.S. design [fr

  6. Analysis of parameter uncertainties in the assessment of seismic risk for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucemen, S.M.

    1981-04-01

    Probabilistic and statistical methods are used to develop a procedure by which the seismic risk at a specific site can be systematically analyzed. The proposed probabilistic procedure provides a consisted method for the modelling, analysis and updating of uncertainties that are involved in the seismic risk analysis for nuclear power plants. Methods are proposed for including these uncertainties in the final value of calculated risks. Two specific case studies are presented in detail to illustrate the application of the probabilistic method of seismic risk evaluation and to investigate the sensitivity of results to different assumptions

  7. Seismic fragility analysis of the block masonry wall in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z-L.; Pandey, M.D.; Xie, X-C.

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of seismic fragility of a structure is an integral part in the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Analysis (SPRA). The block masonry wall, a commonly used barrier in nuclear power plants, is fairly vulnerable to failure under an earthquake. In practice, the seismic fragility of block walls is commonly evaluated using a simple deterministic approach called Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method. This paper presents a more formal fragility analysis of a block wall based on rigorous probabilistic methods and the accuracy of the CDFM method is evaluated by comparison to the more rigorous FA method. (author)

  8. Recommended research program for improving seismic safety of light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Recommendations are presented for research areas concerned with seismic safety. These recommendations are based on an analysis of the answers to a questionnaire which was sent to over 80 persons working in the area of seismic safety of nuclear power plants. In addition to the answers of the 55 questionnaires which were received, the recommendations are based on ideas expressed at a meeting of an ad hoc group of professionals formed by Sandia, review of literature, current research programs, and engineering judgement

  9. Probabilistic assessment of the seismic hazard for eastern United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savy, J.; Bernreuter, D.; Mensing, R.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the seismic hazard characterization of the Eastern US project, for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was to develop a methodology and data bases to estimate the seismic hazard at all the plant sites east of the Rocky Mountains. A summary of important conclusions reached in this multi year study is presented in this paper. The magnitude and role of the uncertainty in the hazard estimates is emphasized in regard of the intended final use of the results

  10. Life-cycle cost assessment of seismically base-isolated structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hao; Weng, Dagen; Lu, Xilin; Lu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The life-cycle cost of seismic base-isolated nuclear power plants is modeled. • The change law of life-cycle cost with seismic fortification intensity is studied. • The initial cost of laminated lead rubber bearings can be expressed as the function of volume. • The initial cost of a damper can be expressed as the function of its maximum displacement and tonnage. • The use of base-isolation can greatly reduce the expected damage cost, which leads to the reduction of the life-cycle cost. -- Abstract: Evaluation of seismically base-isolated structural life-cycle cost is the key problem in performance based seismic design. A method is being introduced to address the life-cycle cost of base-isolated reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Each composition of life-cycle cost is analyzed including the initial construction cost, the isolators cost and the excepted damage cost over life-cycle of the structure. The concept of seismic intensity is being used to estimate the expected damage cost, greatly simplifying the calculation. Moreover, French Cruas nuclear power plant is employed as an example to assess its life-cycle cost, compared to the cost of non-isolated plant at the same time. The results show that the proposed method is efficient and the expected damage cost is enormously reduced because of the application of isolators, which leads to the reduction of the life-cycle cost of nuclear power plants

  11. Harmonizing seismic hazard assessments for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallard, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Even a cursory comparison between maps of global seismicity and NPP earthquake design levels reveals many inconsistencies. While, in part, this situation reflects the evolution in understanding of seismic hazards, mismatches can also be due to ongoing differences in the way the hazards are assessed and in local regulatory requirements. So far, formal international consensus has only been able to encompass broad principles, such as those recently recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and even these can raise many technical issues, particularly relating to zones of diffuse seismicity. In the future, greater harmonisation in hazard assessments and, to some extent, in earthquake design levels could emerge through the more widespread use of probabilistic methods. International collaborative ventures and joint projects will be important for resolving anomalies in the existing databases and their interpretations, and for acquiring new data, but to achieve their ideal objectives, they will need to proceed in clearly defined stages. (author)

  12. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Yang Heui; Shin, Hyun Mok [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-12-15

    The most part of the nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea are more than 20 years old and obviously we cannot pretend that their original performance is actually maintained. In addition, earthquake occurrences show an increasing trend all over the world, and Korea can no more be considered as a zone safe from earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  13. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Ho Hyun; Cho, Yang Hui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Some of nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea have been passed about 20 years after construction. Moreover, in the case of KORI I the service year is over 20 years, so their abilities are different from initial abilities. Also, earthquake outbreak increase, our country is not safe area for earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  14. Methods used to seismically upgrade. The safety related components of Belgian plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafaille, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Belgian nuclear power amounts to about 6,000 MW, generated by seven plants that started operation as early as 1967. The latest plant started in 1985. Some of these plants were designed with no seismic requirements whatsoever. Even for those that had seismic requirements at the design stage, seismic demand was raised after design had been frozen (late during construction or at the 10 years revision). As a consequence all the plants had to undergo, to a variable extent, a seismic reevaluation and/or backfitting. Civil structures were concerned as well as electro-mechanical equipment and piping systems. The present paper deals with the mechanical aspect of the problem (equipment and piping). In order to minimize hardware modifications, advanced analytical techniques were used throughout the process, starting with the elaboration of a site specific spectrum, and using a full soil-structure interaction in order to get as 'realistic' as possible floor response spectra. In some instances, non linear elasto-plastic time history analysis was performed on piping-systems in order to qualify them without hardware modifications. In other cases a 'Load Coefficient Method' was used. Sometimes stresses or displacements taken from the original stress reports and scaled by comparison of applicable spectra, allowed to assess the seismic validity of the system under investigation. Seismic acceptability of installed active equipment is more difficult to demonstrate, as this is usually done by testing. This problem is a generic issue in the US, identified under the label USI-A-46 (Unresolved Safety Issue). It is treated by. a group of Utilities (SQUG = Seismic Qualification Utilities Group). The Belgian Utility is member of that group since 1985. The application of this program is starting in the US. SQUG methodology has been applied to three Belgian plants starting in 1988 and is now completed. The required fixes are being implemented. Experience gained in the process has been applied

  15. Seismic margin assessment of spanish nuclear power plants: a perspective from industry and regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Monge, Juan; Beltran, Francisco; Sanchez-Cabanero, Jose G.

    2001-01-01

    The worldwide experience with probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) of nuclear power plants shows that the risk derived from earthquakes can be a significant contributor to core damage frequency in some instances. As a consequence, no severe accident safety assessment can be considered complete without giving, due consideration to seismic risk. This fact has been recognized by some regulators. in particular, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), who has included seismic risk assessment in its severe accident policy. The NRC severe accident policy was adopted by the Spanish nuclear regulator. the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN). As a result. all plants in Spain were asked to perform a seismic risk analysis according to Supplements No. 4 and 5 of Generic Letter 88-20 and NUREG-1407, which included the containment failure analysis. At present in Spain there arc nine operating reactors at seven sites: six Westinghouse-PWR, two GE-BWR and one Siemens/KW U-PWR. The vintages are very different: the oldest plant started commercial operation in 1968 and the most recent, in 1988. In this framework, the Spanish Owners Group (SOG) proposed to CSN in 1994 to carry out the seismic risk analysis of the plants using seismic margin methodologies. This kind of methods requires, as a starting point, the definition of a seismic margin earthquake (SNIE), also called review level earthquake (RLL). For this purpose, tile SOG sponsored a general Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) for the seven Spanish sites. The results of this PSHA were used by the SOG to define tile RLE and the scope of the study for each plant (binning of plants). The proposal was submitted to the CSN for evaluation. The CSN evaluation was based on the NRC practical experience and was helped by the technical advise of US Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The review showed that the uncertainties on seismic hazard had not been fully captured and that it would have been justified to consider a

  16. Consideration on the relation between dynamic seismic motion and static seismic coefficient for the earthquake proof design of slope around nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Kazuta

    1986-01-01

    When the large cutting slopes are constructed closed to around nuclear power plants, it is important to evaluate the stability of the slopes during the strong earthquake. In the evaluation, it may be useful to clarify relationship between the static seismic coefficient and dynamic seismic force corresponded to the basic seismic motion which is specified for designing the nuclear power facilities. To investigate this relation some numerical analyses are conducted in this paper. As the results, it is found that dynamic forces considering the amplified responses of the slopes subjected to the basic seismic motion with a peak acceleration of 500 gals at the toe of the slopes, are approximately equal to static seismic force which generates in the slopes when the seismic coefficients of k = 0.3 is applied. (author)

  17. Seismic wave attenuation from borehole and surface records in the top 2.5 km beneath the city of Basel, Switzerland

    KAUST Repository

    Bethmann, Falko

    2012-08-01

    We investigate attenuation (Q−1) of sediments of 2.5–3.5km thickness underneath the city of Basel, Switzerland. We use recordings of 195 induced events that were obtained during and after the stimulation of a reservoir for a Deep Heat Mining Project in 2006 and 2007. The data set is ideally suited to estimate Q as all events are confined to a small source volume and were recorded by a dense surface network as well as six borehole sensors at various depths. The deepest borehole sensor is positioned at a depth of 2.7km inside the crystalline basement at a mean hypocentral distance of 1.8km. This allows us to measure Q for frequencies between 10 and 130 Hz. We apply two different methods to estimate Q. First, we use a standard spectral ratio technique to obtain Q, and as a second measure we estimate Q in the time domain, by convolving signals recorded by the deepest sensor with a Q operator and then comparing the convolved signals to recordings at the shallower stations. Both methods deliver comparable values for Q. We also observe similar attenuation for P- and S- waves (QP∼QS). As expected, Q increases with depth, but with values around 30–50, it is low even for the consolidated Permian and Mesozoic sediments between 500 and 2700 m.

  18. Some experience from seismic check-ups of components of Mochovce nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masopust, R.

    1987-01-01

    The first Czechoslovak nuclear power plant with the so-called partial anti-seismic design will be built in Mochovce. The evaluation of seismic resistance is prescribed only for equipment and systems which secure the safe reactor shutdown, the withdrawal of residual heat and prevent uncontrolled release of radioactivity into the environment. The following variants were compared in the calculation analysis of the primary loop of the WWER-440 reactor for the Mochovce nuclear power plant: the seismically unsecured loop of a usual design for WWER-440 nuclear power plants, the loop provided with mechanical or hydraulic dampers and the loop provided with viscose shock absorbers. The tests showed that technically most suitable is the use of viscose shock absorbers which do not completely block the movement of the system during the earthquake but absorb it intensively. The viscose shock absorbers are also much cheaper than the dampers. Briefly described is experience with the experimental evaluation of the seismic resistance of components of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Great difficulty was encountered by the non-existence in Czechoslovakia of a seismic table allowing simultaneous excitation in the vertical and horizontal directions. (Z.M.). 18 refs

  19. Safety Characterization of the Technological Development Plant at Hontomín. Risk Structures: 2. Wells and Boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recreo, F.; Eguilior, S.; Hurtado, A.

    2015-01-01

    Safe storage of CO2 required to guarantee the formation’s caprock seal capacity for CO2 storage during the time in which the CO2 will remain in supercritical state before moving to dissolved phase CO2aq:. Structures such as wells and boreholes affecting storage and caprock formations may play a relevant role in the behavior of the CO2 plume and act as preferential leakage paths violating the integrity of the seal rock. Although the geological history of the storage complex in cases such as depleted oil or gas fields, preferably, allow to assume a priori that the geological medium can reasonably ensure their confining role during the required time, i.e., a «long term» time period for the effective contribution of CCS to the mitigation of climate change (> 10.000 years), it is not possible to make an equivalent prognosis with regard to the behaviour of deep wells and boreholes without having a detailed knowledge of the aging process and of the mechanical and chemical aggression of its components. In any case, always will remain a high level of uncertainty to be integrated in the analysis to assess the security of the storage complex. Therefore, the integrity of the components of deep wells and boreholes that may affect both caprock seal and storage formations, both mechanically and chemically, plays an important role in the chain of elements that contribute to CO2 geological storage long-term safety, hence the importance of its study and integration. An approach to degradation processes of the components of injection and abandoned wells that can act as preferential leakage paths of CO2, consists of the decomposition of the storage system in a components and processes integrated network to estimate their interaction conditional probabilities. This report analyzes these processes, the security and operational requirements of deep wells and boreholes as well as its componentes failure scenarios

  20. Integration of 2D and 3D reflection seismic data with deep boreholes in the Kevitsa Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, northern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Emilia; Malehmir, Alireza; Voipio, Teemu; Wijns, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Kevitsa is a large disseminated sulphide Ni-Cu-PGE deposit hosted by the Kevitsa mafic-ultramafic intrusion in northern Finland and dated as about 2.06 Ga old. The Geological Survey of Finland first discovered the Kevitsa deposit in 1987. Open pit mining by Kevitsa Mining Oy/First Quantum Minerals Ltd. commenced in June 2012. The final pit depth is planned to be 550-600 m. The estimated ore reserves of the Kevitsa intrusion are about 240 million tones (using a nickel cut-off grade of 0.1%). The expected life-of-mine is 20-30 years. More than 400 hundred holes have been drilled in the Kevitsa area, but most are concentrated close to the known deposit and do not provide a comprehensive understanding of the extent of the intrusion. The basal contact of the intrusion is penetrated by only about 30 drill holes, most of which are shallow. A better knowledge of the geometry of the intrusion would provide a framework for near-mine and deep exploration in the area. An exact knowledge on the basal contact of the intrusion would also provide an exploration target for the contact-type mineralization that is often more massive and richer in Ni-Cu. In December 2007, a series of 2D reflection seismic profiles was acquired in the Kevitsa area. It consisted of four connected survey lines between 6 and 11 km long. In 2010, the initial positive results of the 2D seismic survey led Kevitsa Mining Oy/First Quantum Minerals Ltd. to initiate a 3D reflection seismic survey. The 3D seismic survey is limited to the closer vicinity of the known deposit, while the 2D seismic survey was designed to provide a more regional view of the Kevitsa intrusive complex. The main aims of the 2D and 3D seismic surveys were to delineate the shape and extent of the ore-bearing Kevitsa intrusion and the geometry of some of the host rock and surrounding units, and extract information about the larger-scale structures and structures important for mine-planning purposes. The 2D and 3D seismic data were used to

  1. Evaluation of seismic margins for an in-plant piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    Earthquake experience as well as experiments indicate that, in general, piping systems are quite rugged in resisting seismic loadings. Therefore there is a basis to hold that the seismic margin against pipe failure is very high for systems designed according to current practice. However, there is very little data, either from tests or from earthquake experience, on the actual margin or excess capacity (against failure from seismic loading) of in-plant piping systems. Design of nuclear power plant piping systems in the US is governed by the criteria given in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B ampersand PV) Code, which assure that pipe stresses are within specified allowable limits. Generally linear elastic analytical methods are used to determine the stresses in the pipe and forces in pipe supports. The objective of this study is to verify that piping designed according to current practice does indeed have a large margin against failure and to quantify the excess capacity for piping and dynamic pipe supports on the basis of data obtained in a series of high-level seismic experiments (designated SHAM) on an in-plant piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Germany. Note that in the present context, seismic margin refers to the deterministic excess capacities of piping or supports compared to their design capacities. The excess seismic capacities or margins of a prototypical in-plant piping system and its components are evaluated by comparing measured inputs and responses from high-level simulated seismic experiments with design loads and allowables. Large excess capacities are clearly demonstrated against pipe and overall system failure with the lower bound being about four. For snubbers the lower bound margin is estimated at two and for rigid strut supports at five. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Bayesian methodology for generic seismic fragility evaluation of components in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Campbell, R.D.; Ravindra, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    Bayesian methodology for updating the seismic fragility of components in nuclear power plants is presented. The generic fragility data which have been evaluated based on the past SPSAs are combined with the seismic experience data. Although the seismic experience is limited to the acceleration range below the median capacity of the components, it has been found that the evidence is effective to update the fragility tail. In other words, the uncertainty of the fragility is reduced although the median capacity itself is not modified to a great extent. The annual frequency of failure is also reduced as a result of the updating of the fragility tail. The PDF of the seismic capacity is handled in discrete form, which enables the use of arbitrary type of prior distribution. Accordingly, the Log-N prior can be used which is consistent with the widely used fragility model. For evaluating posterior fragility parameters (A m and B U ), two methods have been proposed. Furthermore, it has been found that the importance of evidence used in the Bayesian methodology can be quantified by the entropy of the evidence. Only the events with high entropy need to be considered in the Bayesian updating of the fragility. The currently available seismic experience database for typical components can be utilized to develop the fragility tail which is contributive to the seismically-induced failure frequency. The combined use of generic fragility and seismic experience data, with the aid of Bayesian methodology, provides refined generic fragility curves which are useful for SPSA studies. (author)

  3. Development of seismic damage assessment system for nuclear power plant structures in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Chang-Hun; Lee, Sung-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Ryoung; Koh, Hyun-Moo; Cho, HoHyun

    2003-01-01

    A seismic damage assessment system that analyses in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and the damage level of power plant structures has been developed. The system consists of three parts: a 3-D inelastic seismic analysis, a damage assessment using a damage index based on the previous 3-D analysis, and a 3-D graphic representation. PSC containment structures are modelled by finite shell elements using layered method and analysis is performed by means of time history inelastic seismic analysis method, which takes into account material nonlinearities. HHT-α, one kind of direct integration method, is adopted for the seismic analysis. Two damage indices at finite element and structural levels are applied for the seismic damage assessment. 3-D graphical representation of dynamic responses and damage index expedites procedure for evaluating the damage level. The developed system is now being installed at the Earthquake Monitoring Center of KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) to support site inspections after an earthquake occurrence, and decisions about effective emergency measures, repair and operations of the plant. (author)

  4. Regulatory application of seismic experience data for nuclear power plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Ying [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-03-01

    On the basis of its review and evaluation (Reference 3) of the SQUG GIP (Reference 2) and on the basis of the differences between current seismic qualification requirements and the criteria and procedures provided in the GIP, the NRC staff does not consider the USI A-46 methodology given in the GIP to be a `seismic qualification` procedure. Rather, the staff considers the GIP methodology to be a seismic adequacy verification procedure, which was developed on the basis of generic equipment earthquake experience data, supplemented by generic equipment test data. The implementation of the GIP approach for USI A-46 plants provides safety enhancement, in certain aspects, beyond the original licensing bases. Therefore, the GIP methodology is an acceptable evaluation method, for USI A-46 plants only, to verify the seismic adequacy of the safe-shutdown equipment installed in the NPPs in the United States. With the new development in the experience-based approach for seismic qualification of equipment currently underway in the U.S. nuclear industry, there is a potential for future regulatory application of an experience-based approach as a seismic qualification method for certain selected equipment installed in NPPs in the United States. However, industry`s use of the experience-based approach will be dependent on the submittal and staff approval of this approach. (J.P.N.)

  5. Assessing seismic adequacy of existing nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, V.; Vinogradov, V.; Privalov, S.; Shishenin, V.

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays Russia's specialists perform a huge amount of works to revaluate the NPP safety. These works are certain to include refinement of NPP safety assessment under the effects of specific dynamic loads, earthquake effects included. It should be noted, that a number of Russian NPPs now in operation had been designed either with no account of these loads, or under the requirements which are underestimated as compared with the modern requirements on the external load composition and rate. Revaluation of NPP seismic safety is based on the results of the works taken under orderly sequence on assessment of (1) seismic input and ground effects; (2) structure response and state; (3) equipment and pipelines response and state. The paper considers the methods of NPP structures response and state assessment. Therewith we assume that ground motion predicted behavior at the construction basement has been preset for the SSE and OBE conditions and the effects of soil-structure interaction, including the situation of possible soft soil liquefaction. Necessity to determine both the reaction of a construction and its state as a whole as well as its elements reaction, to evaluate their bearing capacity and destruction zones formation makes it necessary to make up a detailed structural model, which is usually a finite element one. Since seismic revaluation is to be performed for the existing structures, characteristics of which can substantially differ from the design ones, revealing the actual state of this structures becomes critical. If the real values of physical and mechanical properties of the structure materials, connections of elements etc. are used as initial data in a structural model this permits to increase the design assessment credibility and reliability substantially. The paper analyzes the results of determining these initial assessments while inspecting several Russian NPPs on the basis of a 'combined' method. This method is realized at two consecutive stages. The

  6. Seismic risk control of nuclear power plants using seismic protection systems in stable continental regions: The UK case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel-Vera, Carlos, E-mail: cbmedel@uc.cl; Ji, Tianjian, E-mail: tianjian.ji@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Strategies to reduce seismic risk for nuclear power stations in the UK are analysed. • Efficiency of devices to reduce risk: viscous-based higher than hysteretic-based. • Scenario-based incremental dynamic analysis is introduced for use in nuclear stations. • Surfaces of seismic unacceptable performance for nuclear stations are proposed. - Abstract: This article analyses three different strategies on the use of seismic protection systems (SPS) for nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the UK. Such strategies are based on the experience reported elsewhere of seismically protected nuclear reactor buildings in other stable continental regions. Analyses are conducted using an example of application based on a 1000 MW Pressurised Water Reactor building located in a representative UK nuclear site. The efficiency of the SPS is probabilistically assessed to achieve possible risk reduction for both rock and soil sites in comparison with conventionally constructed NPPs. Further analyses are conducted to study how the reduction of risk changes when all controlling scenarios of the site are included. This is done by introducing a scenario-based incremental dynamic analysis aimed at the generation of surfaces for unacceptable performance of NPPs as a function of earthquake magnitude (M{sub w}) and distance-to-site (R{sub epi}). General guidelines are proposed to potentially use SPS in future NPPs in the UK. Such recommendations can be used by the British nuclear industry in the future development of 12 new reactors to be built in the next two decades to generate 16 GWe of new nuclear capacity.

  7. A random probabilistic approach to seismic nuclear power plant analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    A probabilistic method for the seismic analysis of structures which takes into account the random nature of earthquakes and of the soil parameter uncertainties is presented in this paper. The method was developed combining elements of the theory of perturbations, the Random vibration theory and the complex response method. The probabilistic method is evaluated by comparing the responses of a single degree of freedom system computed with this approach and the Monte Carlo method. (orig.)

  8. Review of Seismic Evaluation Methodologies for Nuclear Power Plants Based on a Benchmark Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Niigataken-chuetsu-oki (NCO) earthquake (Mw = 6.6) occurred on 16 July 2007 and affected the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa (K-K) NPP in Japan. Although there was significant loss of main shock data due to transmission problems, a significant number of instruments were still able to measure the acceleration at different locations in soil (boreholes) and in structures at the K-K NPP during the main shock and the aftershocks. The availability of all these instrumental data provided an excellent background for initiating a benchmarking exercise known as the KAshiwazaki-Kariwa Research Initiative for Seismic Margin Assessment (KARISMA). The main objective of the KARISMA benchmark exercise is to study a comparison between analytical seismic response versus real response of selected structure, system and components (SSCs) of K-K NPP Unit 7. The KARISMA benchmark exercise includes benchmarking the analytical tools and numerical simulation techniques used for predicting seismic response of NPP structures (in linear and non-linear ranges), site response, soil-structure interaction phenomena, seismic response of piping systems, 'sloshing' in the spent fuel pool and buckling of tanks. The benchmark is primarily based on data provided by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). It is not linked to the seismic re-evaluation of K-K NPP carried out by TEPCO. Twenty-one organizations, comprising researchers, operating organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and technical support organizations from 14 countries, participated in the benchmarking exercises. This publication, including a CD-ROM, summarizes the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the K-K NPP reactor building (including static and modal analyses of the fixed base model, soil column analyses, analyses of the soil-structure models and margin assessment of the K-K NPP reactor building), the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the residual heat removal piping system (including

  9. Seismic qualification of equipment in operating nuclear power plants. Unresolved safety issue A-46, draft report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.Y.

    1985-08-01

    The margin of safety provided in existing nuclear power plant equipment to resist seismically induced loads and perform their intended safety functions may vary considerably, because of significant changes in design criteria and methods for the seismic qualification of equipment over the years. Therefore, the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants should be reassessed to determine whether requalification is necessary. The objective of technical studies performed under the Task Action Plan A-46 was to establish an explicit set of guidelines and acceptance criteria to judge the adequacy of equipment under seismic loading at all operating plants, in lieu of requiring qualification to the current criteria that are applied to new plants. This report summarizes the work accomplished on USI A-46 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its contractors, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In addition, the collection and review of seismic experience data by the Seismic Qualification Utility Group and the review and recommendations of a group of seismic consultants, the Senior Seismic Review Advisory Panel, are presented. Staff assessment of work accomplished under USI A-46 leads to the conclusion that the use of seismic experience data provides the most reasonable alternative to current qualification criteria. Consideration of seismic qualification by use of experience data was a specific task in USI A-46. Several other A-46 tasks serve to support the use of an experience data base

  10. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 2. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this TCM are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. This volume includes presentations of the member states describing the practical approach to evaluation of seismic equipment of the existing NPPs, validation of innovative systems for earthquake protection; seismic re-evaluation of the NPPs, seismic regulations and safety standards; and other activities related to seismic safety in Member States

  11. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 2. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this TCM are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. This volume includes presentations of the member states describing the practical approach to evaluation of seismic equipment of the existing NPPs, validation of innovative systems for earthquake protection; seismic re-evaluation of the NPPs, seismic regulations and safety standards; and other activities related to seismic safety in Member States.

  12. Program outline of seismic fragility capacity tests on nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijima, T.; Abe, H.; Fujita, T.

    2004-01-01

    A seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is an available method to evaluate residual risk of nuclear plant that is designed with definitive seismic design condition. Seismic fragility capacity data are necessary for seismic PSA, but we don't have sufficient data of active components of nuclear plants in Japan. This paper describes a plan of seismic fragility capacity tests on nuclear power plant equipment. The purpose of those tests is to obtain seismic fragility capacity of important equipment from a safety design point of view. And the equipment for the fragility capacity tests were selected considering effect on core damage frequency (CDF) that was evaluated by our preliminary seismic PSA. Consequently horizontal shaft pump, electric cabinets, Control Rod Drive system (CRD system) of BWR and PWR plant and vertical shaft pump were selected. The seismic fragility capacity tests are conducted from phase-1 to phase-3, and horizontal shaft pump and electric cabinets are tested on phase-1. The fragility capacity test consists of two types of tests. One is actual equipment test and another is element test. On actual equipment test, a real size model is tested with high-level seismic motion, and critical acceleration and failure mode are investigated. Regarding fragility test phase-1, we selected typical type horizontal shaft pump and electric cabinets for the actual equipment test. Those were Reactor Building Closed Cooling Water (RCW) Pump and eight kinds of electric cabinets such as relay cabinet, motor control center. On the test phase-1, maximum input acceleration for the actual equipment test is intended to be 6-G-force. Since the shaking table of TADOTSU facility did not have capability for high acceleration, we made vibration amplifying system. In this system, amplifying device is mounted on original shaking table and it moves in synchronization with original table. The element test is conducted with many samples and critical acceleration, median and

  13. Borehole Muon Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Kouzes, R.; Lintereur, A.; Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Varner, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have spurred investigation into carbon sequestration methods. One of the possibilities being considered, storing super-critical CO2 in underground reservoirs, has drawn more attention and pilot projects are being supported worldwide. Monitoring of the post-injection fate of CO2 is of utmost importance. Generally, monitoring options are active methods, such as 4D seismic reflection or pressure measurements in monitoring wells. We propose here to develop a 4-D density tomography of subsurface CO2 reservoirs using cosmic-ray muon detectors deployed in a borehole. Muon detection is a relatively mature field of particle physics and there are many muon detector designs, though most are quite large and not designed for subsurface measurements. The primary technical challenge preventing deployment of this technology in the subsurface is the lack of miniaturized muon-tracking detectors capable of fitting in standard boreholes and that will resist the harsh underground conditions. A detector with these capabilities is being developed by a collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Current simulations based on a Monte Carlo modeling code predict that the incoming muon angle can be resolved with an error of approximately two degrees, using either underground or sea level spectra. The robustness of the design comes primarily from the use of scintillating rods as opposed to drift tubes. The rods are arrayed in alternating layers to provide a coordinate scheme. Preliminary testing and measurements are currently being performed to test and enhance the performance of the scintillating rods, in both a laboratory and a shallow underground facility. The simulation predictions and data from the experiments will be presented.

  14. Borehole geophysical investigations of Lavia deep testhole, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saksa, Pauli

    1985-02-01

    According to the Goverment's decision in principle in 1983 Industrial Power Company Ltd (TVO) is making preparations for all the steps of final disposal of the spent fuel produced by its power plants. Before the actual site investigation phase, TVO drilled a deep borehole in Lavia, Western Finland. The borehole is used during 1984-85 for testing investigation techniques and methods used for bedrock characterization. Borehole geophysical loggings performed in Lavia consisted of galvanic electrical, transient electromagnetic, radiometric, temperature, seismic and magnetic msurements. This composite survey provided both lithological and structural information of rock mass. The neutron-neutron, density, natural gamma radiation and susceptibility methods characterized rock type. Fracturing and its type could be interpreted most effectively with resistivity, acoustic P-wave velocity and density logs. Temperature and tube-wave measurements revealed several fractured zones related to possible water flow in rock. Lavia investigations indicated that a high quality of instrumentation and careful calibration are necessary for site investigations. The large amount of log data also requires efficient data collection and processing systems both in the field and laboratory. (author)

  15. The seismic fragility analysis for multi-story steel structure in CANDU nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, K.H.; Lee, B.S.; Kang, S-K.

    1996-01-01

    The Wolsong Unit 2 is a CANDU-6 type plant and is being constructed in the Wolsong site, where Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) was determined to be 0.2g. A seismic PSA for Wolsong Unit 2 is being performed as one of the conditions for the Construction Permit. One of the issues in the seismic PSA is the availability of the seismically non-qualified systems, which are located in the Turbine Building(T/B). Thus, the seismic fragility analysis for the T/B was performed to estimate the operability of the systems. The design seismic loads for the building were based on a ground response spectrum scaled down from the DBE to horizontal peak ground acceleration (pga) of 0.05g. The seismic fragility analysis for the building was performed using a factor of the safety method. It is estimated that the most critical failure is that of masonry walls and its High Confidence and Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity is 0.13g. The critical failure mode of the structure is identified to be tensile yielding failure of grip angle, and its HCLPF capacity is 0.34g. (author)

  16. Deterministic and probabilistic approach to determine seismic risk of nuclear power plants; a practical example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano Pena, A.; Lopez Arroyo, A.; Roesset, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The probabilistic and deterministic approaches for calculating the seismic risk of nuclear power plants are both applied to a particular case in Southern Spain. The results obtained by both methods, when varying the input data, are presented and some conclusions drawn in relation to the applicability of the methods, their reliability and their sensitivity to change

  17. Armenian nuclear power plant: US NRC assistance programme for seismic upgrade and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Perkins, K.; Jo, J.; Carew, J.; Ramsey, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (US NRC) technical support program activities associated with the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) safety upgrade. The US NRC program, integrated within the overall IAEA-led initiative for safety re-evaluation of the WWER plants, has as its main thrust the technical support to the Armenian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ANRA) through close collaboration with the scientific staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Several major technical areas of support to ANRA form the basis of the NRC program. These include the seismic re-evaluation and upgrade of the ANPP, safety evaluation of critical systems, and the generation of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Specifically, the seismic re-evaluation of the ANPP is part of a broader activity that involves the re-assessment of the seismic hazard at the site, the identification of the Safe Shutdown Equipment at the plant and the evaluation of their seismic capacity, the detailed modeling and analysis of the critical facilities at ANPP, and the generation of the Floor Response Spectra (FRS). Based on the new spectra that incorporate all new findings (hazard, site soil, structure, etc.), the overall capacity of the main structures and the seismic capacity of the critical systems are being re-evaluated. In addition, analyses of critical safe shutdown systems and safe shutdown processes are being performed to ensure both the capabilities of the operating systems and the enhancement of safety due to system upgrades. At present, one of the principal goals of the US NRC's regulatory assistance activities with ANRA is enhancing ANRA's regulatory oversight of high-priority safety issues (both generic and plant-specific) associated with operation of the ANPP. As such, assisting ANRA in understanding and assessing plant-specific seismic and other safety issues associated with the ANPP is a high priority given the ANPP's being located in a seismically active area

  18. Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

  19. Seismic sensitivity study of a generic CANDU nuclear power plant: Soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.S.S.; Duff, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    The seismic sensitivity and capability study for a generic CANDU Plant is part of an overall development program of design standardization. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the sensitivities of structural responses and floor response spectra (FRS) to variations of structural and soil parameters. In the seismic design standardization, a wide range of soil conditions is considered and the envelopes of the resulting site spectra (soil-structure interaction effect) are then used for the design of the generic plant. The nuclear island structures considered herein have different relative stiffness and one of them has two layout/structure schemes: one is relatively flexible and the other is moderately stiff. In the preliminary phase of the seismic sensitivity study presented hereby, the soil-structure interaction seismic analysis is based on the half-space modelling (soil-spring lumped-mass) method and the response spectrum method for the seismic responses. Distinct patterns and sensitivity of the site spectrum analysis for structure schemes of different relative stiffness and for different structural elevations are observed and discussed. (orig.)

  20. Seismic assessment of Kozloduy VVER 440, Model 230 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, P.; Baltus, R.; Yanev, P.; Campbell, R.

    1991-01-01

    Excluding system design deficiency relative to US and Western Europe standards, it was found that the plant has many seismic vulnerabilities similar to those that existed in many of the US plants prior to about 1979 when the Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated. The primary coolant system has been substantially upgraded after the 1977 Vrancea earthquake. Other upgrades have been made to weak elements in the ECCS and electrical systems. There are still a number of components that could likely survive the currently defined Safe Shutdown Earthquake of 0.1 g but which would not meet current design standards. Many of the weakest components could be upgraded at a moderate cost to withstand a seismic event exceeding 0.1 g. Current studies of the site seismicity lean toward a higher peak ground acceleration and increased amplification of building motion, thus backfits that have been accomplished may become marginal for newly defined loads. However the proper consideration of soil structure interaction and detailed structural analysis using less conservative modeling assumptions, could mitigate the impact of increasing the seismic input and limit the amount of reinforcement required. In the interim, substantial improvements to seismic safety could be accomplished by simple, inexpensive modifications to equipment anchorage and some achievable improvements to connection detail of the precast concrete structures. (author)

  1. Development of seismic design method for free standing rack and applicability to Japanese nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Yu; Taniguchi, Katsuhiko; Kishimoto, Junichi; Iwasaki, Akihisa; Nekomoto, Yoshitsugu; Kuga, Tohru; Kameyama, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    Free standing racks which are not anchored to the pool floor nor walls have never been adopted in Japan. Under an earthquake, behaviors of free standing racks are nonlinear and involve a complex combination of motions (sliding, rocking, and twisting) and impacts between a fuel assembly and the fuel cell walls and between a pit floor and rack pedestals. To predict a seismic response of free standing racks, the seismic analysis requires careful considerations of these complex phenomena (sliding, rocking, and twisting), fluid coupling effects and frictional effects. We carried out seismic experiments on the full-scale rack model in both water and dry conditions and obtained the fundamental data about behavior of free standing racks (sliding, and rocking motions). We have developed the nonlinear dynamic analysis method to predict seismic response of free standing racks utilizing the full-scale test result and verified the analysis evaluation method of free standing rack by comparison between analysis results and experimental data. Furthermore, we applied the seismic design method to the free standing rack in the Japanese nuclear plant (Mihama nuclear power station Unit 3), and verified that the free standing rack was applicable to Japanese nuclear plant. (author)

  2. Methods and benefits of experimental seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This study reviews experimental techniques, instrumentation requirements, safety considerations, and benefits of performing vibration tests on nuclear power plant containments and internal components. The emphasis is on testing to improve seismic structural models. Techniques for identification of resonant frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, are discussed. The benefits of testing with regard to increased damping and more accurate computer models are oulined. A test plan, schedule and budget are presented for a typical PWR nuclear power plant

  3. Methods and benefits of experimental seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This study reviews experimental techniques, instrumentation requirements, safety considerations, and benefits of performing vibration tests on nuclear power plant containments and internal components. The emphasis is on testing to improve seismic structural models. Techniques for identification of resonant frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, are discussed. The benefits of testing with regard to increased damping and more accurate computer models are oulined. A test plan, schedule and budget are presented for a typical PWR nuclear power plant.

  4. Seismic PSA method for multiple nuclear power plants in a site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakata, Tadakuni [Nuclear Safety Commission, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    The maximum number of nuclear power plants in a site is eight and about 50% of power plants are built in sites with three or more plants in the world. Such nuclear sites have potential risks of simultaneous multiple plant damages especially at external events. Seismic probabilistic safety assessment method (Level-1 PSA) for multi-unit sites with up to 9 units has been developed. The models include Fault-tree linked Monte Carlo computation, taking into consideration multivariate correlations of components and systems from partial to complete, inside and across units. The models were programmed as a computer program CORAL reef. Sample analysis and sensitivity studies were performed to verify the models and algorithms and to understand some of risk insights and risk metrics, such as site core damage frequency (CDF per site-year) for multiple reactor plants. This study will contribute to realistic state of art seismic PSA, taking consideration of multiple reactor power plants, and to enhancement of seismic safety. (author)

  5. Japan's international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Akira

    1997-01-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  6. Japan`s international cooperation programs on seismic safety of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Akira [Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    MITI is promoting many international cooperation programs on nuclear safety area. The seismic safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is a one of most important cooperation areas. Experts from MITI and related organization join the multilateral cooperation programs carried out by international organization such as IAEA, OECD/NEA etc. MITI is also promoting bilateral cooperation programs such as information exchange meetings, training programs and seminars on nuclear safety with several countries. Concerning to the cooperation programs on seismic safety of NPPs such as information exchange and training, MITI shall continue and expand these programs. (J.P.N.)

  7. Active seismic response control systems for nuclear power plant equipment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobori, Takuji; Kanayama, Hiroo; Kamagata, Shuichi

    1989-01-01

    To sustain severe earthquake ground motion, a new type of anti-seismic structure is proposed, called a Dynamic Intelligent Building (DIB) system, which is positioned as an active seismic response controlled the structure. The structural concept starts from a new recognition of earthquake ground motion, and the structural natural frequency is actively adjusted to avoid resonant vibration, and similarly the external counter-force cancels the resonant force which comes from the dynamic structural motion energy. These concepts are verified using an analytical simulator program. The advanced application of the DIB system, is the Active Supporting system and the Active Stabilizer system for nuclear power plant equipment facilities. (orig.)

  8. Analytical investigation of the influence of soil on tanks for seismic analysis of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Wright, J.T.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    When seismically designing equipment, such as ground supported tanks of nuclear power plants, the free field response spectra are normally applied to a model having a fixed base. The consideration of soil structure interaction, which routinely has been applied to nuclear power plant building structures constructed on the soil surface, has not normally been applied to equipment. In this study, the effect of soil structure interaction on seismic response of tanks will be evaluated as a function of soil surface stiffness and depth using the calculated soil stiffness equations developed by H. Tajimi. The authors investigated the influence of the soil properties and composition represented as soil springs which depend on the soil conditions (shear modulus, density, Poisson's ratio) and the depth of soil surface. The results of this study are presented in the form of graphs which may be used to identify the range of soil parameters which have a significant effect on the seismic response of typical nuclear power plant tanks. A typical example to express the influence of the soil surface for seismic response and vibrational characteristics is presented. (orig./HP)

  9. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to: operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. The CARES program is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis. The basic modules of the system are associated with capabilities for static, seismic and nonlinear analyses. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the Seismic Module of CARES version 1.0. In Section 2 a description of the Seismic Module is provided. The methodologies and computational procedures thus far implemented into the Seismic Module are described in Section 3. Finally, a complete demonstration of the computational capability of CARES in a typical soil-structure interaction analysis is given in Section 4 and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 5 refs., 4 figs

  10. Integrated software system for seismic evaluation of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.L.

    1993-01-01

    The computer software CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) was developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It represents an effort to utilize established numerical methodologies commonly employed by industry for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities and incorporates them into an integrated computer software package operated on personal computers. CARES was developed with the objective of including all aspects of seismic performance evaluation of nuclear power structures. It can be used to evaluate the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies used for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants by various utilities. CARES has a modular format, each module performing a specific type of analysis. The seismic module integrates all the steps of a complete seismic analysis into a single package with many user-friendly features such as interactiveness and quick turnaround. Linear structural theory and pseudo-linear convolution theory are utilized as the bases for the development with a special emphasis on the nuclear regulatory requirements for structural safety of nuclear plants. The organization of the seismic module is arranged in eight options, each performing a specific step of the analysis with most of input/output interfacing processed by the general manager. Finally, CARES provides comprehensive post-processing capability for displaying results graphically or in tabular form so that direct comparisons can be easily made. (author)

  11. Radiation borehole logging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, A.; Mathew, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of obtaining an indication of the diameter of a borehole is described. The method comprises subjecting the walls of the borehole to monoenergetic gamma radiation and making measurements of the intensity of gamma radiation backscattered from the walls. The energy of the radiation is sufficiently high for the shape to be substantially independent of the density and composition of the borehole walls

  12. Considerations on safety against seismic excitations in the project of reactor auxiliary building and control building in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.H.C.; Castro Monteiro, I. de

    1986-01-01

    The seismic requests to be considered in the project of main buildings of a nuclear power plant are discussed. The models for global seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures, as well as models for global strength distribution are presented. The models for analysing reactor auxiliary building and control building, which together with the reactor building and turbine building form the main energy generation complex in a nuclear power plant, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Reliability of the seismic characteristics in the nuclear power plant location; Pouzdanost seizmickih karakteristika pri lociranju nuklearne elektrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsicanin, B [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1982-07-01

    Seismic characteristics for a nuclear power plant location are partly obtained from the analysis of past earthquakes. Data from older history concern damages, the newer data are in the form of seismic records. These two sources are often had to correlate, and the data dissipation is very large. Therefore these, rather unreliable data are not a convenient base for the precise anti-seismic analysis. A redistribution of efforts in order to get more reliable basic data seems necessary. (author)

  14. Seismic re-evaluation of the Tarapur atomic power plants 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingole, S.M.; Kumar, B.S.; Gupta, S.; Singh, U.P.; Giridhar, K.; Bhawsar, S.D.; Samota, A.; Chhatre, A.G.; Dixit, K.B.; Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Two Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of 210 MWe each at Tarapur Atomic Power Station, Units-1 and 2 (TAPS-1-2) were commissioned in the year 1969. The safety related civil structures at TAPS had been designed for a seismic coefficient of 0.2 g and other structures for 0.1 g. The work of seismic re-evaluation of the TAPS-1-2 has been taken up in the year 2002. As two new Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) plants of 540 MWe each, Tarapur Atomic Power Project Units-3 and 4 (TAPP-3-4), are coming up in the vicinity of TAPS-1-2, detailed geological and seismological studies of the area around TAPS-1-2 are available. The same free-field ground motion as generated for TAPP-3-4 has been used for TAPS-1-2. The seismic re-evaluation of the plant has been performed as per the procedure given in IAEA, Safety Reports Series entitled 'Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants', and meeting the various codes and standards, viz., ASME, ASCE, IEEE standards etc. The Safety Systems (SS) and Safety Support Systems (SSS) are qualified by adopting detailed analysis and testing methods. The equipment in the SS and SSS have been qualified by conducting a walk-down as per the procedure given in Generic Implementation Procedure, Dept. of Energy (GIP--DOE), USA. The safety systems include the systems required for safe shutdown of the plant, one chain of decay heat removal and containment of activity. The safety support systems viz., Electrical, Instrumentation and Control and systems other than SS and SSS have been qualified by limited analysis, testing and mostly by following the procedure of walk-down. The paper brings out the details of the work accomplished during seismic re-evaluation of the two units of BWR at Tarapur. (authors)

  15. Anti-seismic analysis for air storage tank used in the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Jun; Ren Xin; Feng Ping

    2011-01-01

    This text calculates and analyses the structure of the air storage tank used for the SBO diesel generator set of Taishan nuclear power plant through finite element method, and simply introduces the mechanical modeling, loading condition and seismic response spectrum analyzing method for the structure, then get the natural frequency, vibration mode and response under seismic load of the structure through calculation. Evaluate the stress under the combined load such as gravity, internal stress, earthquake of the structure according to RCCM. The result shows that the structure intensity of the air storage tank meets the requirements of the specification. The calculating result gives the accordance for the seismic design of the air storage tank. (authors)

  16. A seismic analysis of nuclear power plant components subjected to multi-excitations of earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Gunyasu, K.

    1977-01-01

    In this analysis, the modal analysis methods are used to determine the seismic responses of structural systems instead of the direct integration method. These results have been compared with some kinds of other analytical methods, and investigated the accuracy of numerical results of these analysis, applying to such components as Reactor Pressure Vessel and Reactor Internals of an actual plant. The results of this method of analysis are summarized as follows: (1) one of the seismic analysis methods concerning systems subjected to multi-excitations of earthquakes has been presented to the conference of JSME. Although the analytical theory presented to that conference is correct, it has a serious problem about the accuracy of numerical results. This computer program and theory cannot be used practically due to the time necessary to calculate. However, the method described in this paper overcomes those serious problems stated above and has no problem about the computer time and precision. So, it is possible to apply this method to the seismic design of an actual nuclear power plant practically. (2) The feed back effects of the seismic responses of Reactor Internals to Reactor Building are considered so small that we can separate the model of Reactor Internals from Reactor Building. (3) The results of seismic response of Reactor Internals are fairly consistent with those obtained from the model coupled with Reactor Building. (4) This analysis method can be extended to the model of Reactor Internals subjected to more than two random excitations of earthquakes. (5) It is possible that this analysis method is also applied to the seismic analysis of such three-dimensional systems as piping systems subjected to multi-excitations of earthquakes

  17. Borehole closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    Constitutive law parameters are determined from salt behavior characterization experiments. The results are applied to predict creep (time-dependent) closure of boreholes in salt specimens subjected to various loading configurations. Rheological models (linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and viscoplastic models), empirical models, and physical theory models have been formulated from the results of uniaxial creep tests, strain and stress rate controlled uniaxial tests, constant strain rate triaxial tests, cyclic loading tests, and seismic velocity measurements. Analytical solutions for a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal and external pressures and for a circular hole in an infinite plate subjected to a biaxial or uniaxial stressfield have been derived from each of the linear viscoelastic models and from one of the empirical laws. The experimental results indicate that the salt samples behave as an elastic-viscoplastic material. The elastic behavior tends to be linear and time-independent. The plastic deformation is time-dependent. The stress increment to strain rate increment ratio gradually decreases as the stress level increases. The transient potential creep law seems to give the simplest satisfactory governing equation describing the viscoplastic behavior of salt during the transient phase. 204 refs., 27 figs., 29 tabs

  18. Seismic re-evaluation of piping systems of heavy water plant, Kota

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, R; Soni, R S; Venkat-Raj, V

    2002-01-01

    Heavy Water Plant, Kota is the first indigenous heavy water plant built in India. The plant started operation in the year 1985 and it is approaching the completion of its originally stipulated design life. In view of the excellent record of plant operation for the past so many years, it has been planned to carry out various exercises for the life extension of the plant. In the first stage, evaluation of operation stresses was carried out for the process critical piping layouts and equipment, which are connected with 25 process critical nozzle locations, identified based on past history of the plant performance. Fatigue life evaluation has been carried out to fmd out the Cumulative Usage Factor, which helps in arriving at a decision regarding the life extension of the plant. The results of these exercises have been already reported separately vide BARC/200I /E/O04. In the second stage, seismic reevaluation of the plant has been carried out to assess its ability to maintain its integ:rity in case of a seismic e...

  19. Confirmation of the seismic resistance of nuclear power plant equipment after assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaznovsky, P. S.; Kaznovsky, A. P.; Saakov, E. S.; Ryasnyj, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the natural frequencies and damping decrements of nuclear power plant equipment can only be determined experimentally and directly at the power generation units (reactors) of nuclear power plants under real disassembly conditions for the equipment, piping network, thermal insulation, etc. A computational experimental method is described in which the natural frequencies and damping decrements are determined in the field and the seismic resistance is reevaluated using these values. This method is the basis of the standards document “Methods for confirming the dynamic characteristics of systems and components of the generating units of nuclear power plants which are important for safety” prepared and introduced in 2012.

  20. Seismic assessment and upgrading of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katona, T; Kostov, M

    1997-03-01

    The basic findings of the seismic re-qualification programmes going on recently at all VVER plants in Eastern Europe can be summarised. The problems of the seismic safety have to be solved taking into account the general concept of the nuclear safety enhancement of the units. There are cases where the system improvements lead to better and more effective solution of the problem than the structural upgrading. The equipment and piping of the primary system have sufficient capacity. The viscous dampers are considered usually for the upgrading. The equipment anchorage especially the electrical and I and C equipment anchorage have to be upgraded. There are general consideration for replacement of the hydraulic snubbers by viscous dampers in the primary circuit of the VVER 440/V230. The considerations are not only because of the better seismic behaviour but mainly because of the better operational performance. There is relatively good seismic instrumentation at the plants considered. The definition of the scram level of the units not designed for an OBE is an essential problem. More effort needed for the definition of this level on the basis of re-evaluation experience of the plant equipment and after the proper definition of post-earthquake activities. The seismic re-evaluation and re-qualification of the VVER units is a general safety issue in Easter European countries. This rather complex problem can be solved adopting the experience, methods and requirements of western countries and taking into account the design features of the VVER units as well as the as built and as it is conditions. (J.P.N.)

  1. Seismic assessment and upgrading of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, T.; Kostov, M.

    1997-01-01

    The basic findings of the seismic re-qualification programmes going on recently at all VVER plants in Eastern Europe can be summarised. The problems of the seismic safety have to be solved taking into account the general concept of the nuclear safety enhancement of the units. There are cases where the system improvements lead to better and more effective solution of the problem than the structural upgrading. The equipment and piping of the primary system have sufficient capacity. The viscous dampers are considered usually for the upgrading. The equipment anchorage especially the electrical and I and C equipment anchorage have to be upgraded. There are general consideration for replacement of the hydraulic snubbers by viscous dampers in the primary circuit of the VVER 440/V230. The considerations are not only because of the better seismic behaviour but mainly because of the better operational performance. There is relatively good seismic instrumentation at the plants considered. The definition of the scram level of the units not designed for an OBE is an essential problem. More effort needed for the definition of this level on the basis of re-evaluation experience of the plant equipment and after the proper definition of post-earthquake activities. The seismic re-evaluation and re-qualification of the VVER units is a general safety issue in Easter European countries. This rather complex problem can be solved adopting the experience, methods and requirements of western countries and taking into account the design features of the VVER units as well as the as built and as it is conditions. (J.P.N.)

  2. Criteria for seismic evaluation and potential design fixes for WWER type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose for this document is to provide a criteria for the seismic evaluation and development of potential design fixes for structures, systems and components for the WWER type Nuclear power plants. The design fixes are divided into two categories, detailed and easy fixes. Detailed fixes are typically applicable to building structures, components for which there is little or no seismic capacity information, large tanks and vital systems and components which make up the reactor cooling system and components which perform support or auxiliary functions. In case of the design of 'easy fixes', the criteria presented may be used for both the seismic design as well as for the evaluation of structures, systems and components to which easy fix design applies. Easy fixes are situations where seismic capacities of structures, systems and components can be significantly increased with relatively minor, inexpensive fixes usually associated with anchorage modification of safety related structures, systems and components or those that could interact with safety related structures, systems and components. Often these fixes can be accomplished while the plant is in operation

  3. Earthquake response spectra for seismic design of nuclear power plants in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bommer, Julian J.; Papaspiliou, Myrto; Price, Warren

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Seismic design of UK nuclear power plants usually based on PML response spectra. → We review derivation of PML spectra in terms of earthquake data used and procedure. → The data include errors and represent a small fraction of what is now available. → Seismic design loads in current practice are derived as mean uniform hazard spectra. → The need to capture epistemic uncertainty makes use of single equation indefensible. - Abstract: Earthquake actions for the seismic design of nuclear power plants in the United Kingdom are generally based on spectral shapes anchored to peak ground acceleration (PGA) values obtained from a single predictive equation. Both the spectra and the PGA prediction equation were derived in the 1980s. The technical bases for these formulations of seismic loading are now very dated if compared with the state-of-the-art in this field. Alternative spectral shapes are explored and the options, and the associated benefits and challenges, for generating uniform hazard response spectra instead of fixed shapes anchored to PGA are discussed.

  4. Criteria for seismic evaluation and potential design fixes for WWER type nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J D [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The purpose for this document is to provide a criteria for the seismic evaluation and development of potential design fixes for structures, systems and components for the WWER type Nuclear power plants. The design fixes are divided into two categories, detailed and easy fixes. Detailed fixes are typically applicable to building structures, componentsfor which there is little or no seismic capacity information, large tanks and vital systems and components which make up the reactor cooling system and components which perform support or auxiliary functions. In case of the design of 'easy fixes', the criteria presented may be used for both the seismic design as well as for the evaluation of structures, systems and components to which easy fix design applies. Easy fixes are situations where seismic capacities of structures, systems and components can be significantly increased with relatively minor, inexpensive fixes usually associated with anchorage modification of safety related structures, systems and components or those that could interact with safety related structures, systems and components. Often these fixes can be accomplished while the plant is in operation.

  5. Seismically induced common cause failures in PSA of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a research project on the seismically induced common cause failures in nuclear power plants performed for Toshiba Corp. is described. The objective of this research was to develop the procedure for estimating the common cause failure probabilities of different nuclear power plant components using the combination of seismic experience data, the review of sources of dependency, sensitivity studies and engineering judgement. The research project consisted of three tasks: the investigation of damage instances in past earthquakes, the analysis of multiple failures and their root causes, and the development of the methodology for assessing seismically induced common cause failures. The details of these tasks are explained. In this paper, the works carried out in the third task are described. A methodology for treating common cause failures and the correlation between component failures is formulated; it highlights the modeling of event trees taking into account common cause failures and the development of fault trees considering the correlation between component failures. The overview of seismic PSA, the quantification methods for dependent failures and Latin Hypercube sampling method are described. (K.I.)

  6. Seismic assessment of Kozloduy WWER-440, model 230 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, P.; Baltus, R.; Yanev, P.; Campbell, R.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary report is given of the findings of an IAEA sponsored walkdown of the WWER-440, model 230 at Kozloduy, in May 1991. The scope of the IAEA mission was to determine the lower bound seismic capacity of the plant and to make recommendations for improvements to increase the earthquake resistance. The methodology utilized in the assessment is that used for evaluation of the seismic margin in U.S. nuclear power plants subjected to earthquakes beyond their design basis. Included in the assessment is the establishment of a safe shutdown path which would include the capacity to mitigate a small break in the primary system, performance of a walkdown of the safe shutdown path and calculation of the high-confidence-of-low-probability-of-failure (HCLPF) of the safe shutdown path. Excluding system design deficiency relative to U.S. and Western Europe standards, it was found that the plant has many seismic vulnerabilities similar to those that existed in many of the U.S. plants prior to about 1979 when the Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated. (Z.S.) 1 tab., 1 fig

  7. Exploratory borehole Leuggern. Working program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    An extensive geophysical borehole logging programme will serve to verify the results of the core analysis and complement the core data. Numerous borehole logs are to be registered with different types of tools. These allow one to determine various parameters essential for the full description of the rock sequences penetrated. A first category of logs enables the petrographical identification of the different rock types and indicates porous zones that are either water- or hydrocarbon-bearing. A second category provides data e.g. on the degree of pore and fracture fill, rock density and rock temperature, natural gamma radiation and rock-mechanical properties. Other logs measure strike and dip of the sedimentary layers and the position of rock fractures. A fourth category provides information on the diameter and the deviation of the borehole, the quality of casing cementations and the position of casing joints. In addition, well shooting surveys will supply exact values of seismic velocities for the various rock units; data that are needed for the depth correction of the reflection profiles from Nagra's regional seismic network. With numerous hydrological tests ranging from a production tests of the Muschelkalk and Buntsandstein aquifers to labelled slug-tests in low-permeability crystalline sections, the hydraulic conditions of deep groundwater flow will be investigated. The recovered water samples will undergo full physical and geochemical analysis. Furthermore, their isotope content is to be measured in order to estimate the age of the various formation waters and their time of residence in the subsurface. To round off the scientific investigations, a series of rock-mechanical and geotechnical laboratory tests will provide characteristic values to be applied eventually in the design and construction of shafts and caverns for an underground repository

  8. New seismic array solution for earthquake observations and hydropower plant health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonovskaya, Galina N.; Kapustian, Natalya K.; Moshkunov, Alexander I.; Danilov, Alexey V.; Moshkunov, Konstantin A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the novel fusion of seismic safety monitoring data of the hydropower plant in Chirkey (Caucasus Mountains, Russia). This includes new hardware solutions and observation methods, along with technical limitations for three types of applications: (a) seismic monitoring of the Chirkey reservoir area, (b) structure monitoring of the dam, and (c) monitoring of turbine vibrations. Previous observations and data processing for health monitoring do not include complex data analysis, while the new system is more rational and less expensive. The key new feature of the new system is remote monitoring of turbine vibration. A comparison of the data obtained at the test facilities and by hydropower plant inspection with remote sensors enables early detection of hazardous hydrodynamic phenomena.

  9. The role of IAEA in the seismic assessment and upgrading of existing NPPs. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerpinar, A; Godoy, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (IAEA). Div. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    1997-03-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in Eastern Europe and in particular WWER type nuclear power plants during the past seven years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on `Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants`. These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  10. The role of IAEA in the seismic assessment and upgrading of existing NPPs. Seismic safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerpinar, A.; Godoy, A.; . Div. of Nuclear Installation Safety)

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work performed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of safety reviews and applied research in support of programmes for the assessment and enhancement of seismic safety in Eastern Europe and in particular WWER type nuclear power plants during the past seven years. Three major topics are discussed; engineering safety review services in relation to external events, technical guidelines for the assessment and upgrading of WWER type nuclear power plants, and the Coordinated Research Programme on 'Benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type nuclear power plants'. These topics are summarized in a way to provide an overview of the past and present safety situation in selected WWER type plants which are all located in Eastern European countries. Main conclusion of the paper is that although there is now a thorough understanding of the seismic safety issues in these operating nuclear power plants, the implementation of seismic upgrades to structures, systems and components are lagging behind, particularly for those cases in which the re-evaluation indicated the necessity to strengthen the safety related structures or install new safety systems. (author)

  11. Nuclear power plant of Fessenheim: evaluation of the seismic risk; Centrale Nucleaire de Fessenheim: appreciation du risque sismique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The seismic risk taken into account during the sizing of the nuclear power plant of Fessenheim seems to have been under evaluated at this time. The revaluation of the seismic risk, as proposed, until this day by EDF in order to the third ten-year visit of the power plant, planned for 2009, leads to a significant under evaluation of the risk and then is not acceptable. The present expertise details point by point the weaknesses of these revaluation. The power plant has been sized in an elastic manner that is generally strongly for the safety side. It is imperative to proceed the most quickly as possible to a deep control of the seismic resistance of the power plant of Fessenheim and then after having proceeded to a revision of the seismic risk in taking into account the actual knowledge in this field. (N.C.)

  12. A sensitivity study of seismic structure-soil-structure interaction problems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthees, W.; Magiera, G.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the interaction effects of adjacent structures of nuclear power plants caused by horizontal seismic excitation has been performed. The key structural and soil parameters for linear and for nonlinear behaviour were varied within their applicable bandwidth. It has been shown that the interaction phenomena can contribute to the response of structures to such a large extent that it cannot be disregarded. (orig.)

  13. Experience with nonuniform damping in the seismic analysis of nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, B.V.; Julyk, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Individual components of nuclear power plants may exhibit pronounced differences in damping magnitude. Various methods for accounting for nonuniform damping in a structural model are reviewed and evaluated. The methods are compared by solving a beam/pipe model subjected to a typical seismic ground motion. A two-degree-of-freedom variable damping parameter study is also presented. Based upon the experience of evaluating and applying the available methods, application guidelines are presented

  14. Seismic analysis of structures of nuclear power plants by Lanczos mode superposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, A.L.G.A.; Alves, J.L.D.; Landau, L.; Lima, E.C.P. de; Ebecken, N.F.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Lanczos Mode Superposition Method is applied in the seismic analysis of nuclear power plants. The coordinate transformation matrix is generated by the Lanczos algorithm. It is shown that, through a convenient choice of the starting vector of the algorithm, modes with participation factors are automatically selected. It is performed the Response Spectra analysis of a typical reactor building. The obtained results are compared with those determined by the classical aproach stressing the remarkable computer effectiveness of the proposed methodology. (Author) [pt

  15. Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Murray, R.C.; Arthur, D.F.; Feng, W.W.; Wight, L.H.; Zaslawsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Currently, no guidelines exist for choosing methods of structural analysis to evaluate the seismic hazard of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. This study examines available methods and their applicability to fuel reprocessing plant structures. The results of this study should provide a basis for establishing guidelines recommending methods of seismic analysis for evaluating future fuel reprocessing plants. The approach taken is: (1) to identify critical plant structures and place them in four categories (structures at or near grade; deeply embedded structures; fully buried structures; equipment/vessels/attachments/piping), (2) to select a representative structure in each of the first three categories and perform static and dynamic analysis on each, and (3) to evaluate and recommend method(s) of analysis for structures within each category. The Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant is selected as representative of future commercial reprocessing plants. The effect of site characteristics on the structural response is also examined. The response spectra method of analysis combined with the finite element model for each category is recommended. For structures founded near or at grade, the lumped mass model could also be used. If a time history response is required, a time-history analysis is necessary. (U.S.)

  16. Estimation of seismic return periods in the Laguna Verde nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores R, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The study of seismic risk in the area of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant (PNLV) and its surroundings, one carries out estimating the different return periods and the occurrence probability in different intervals of time (5, 75, 100, 125, 150 years starting from the distribution of first type of Gumbel (G1) of extreme values (Burton, 1986), the value that was used to evaluate the useful life of the PNLV was of 50 years, the other periods will be occupy to evaluate 'temporal' nuclear cemeteries, that is to say for diminish the radioactive activity of the fuel assemblies already burned in the reactor pool or in a near place to the place. The seismic data that were used for the analysis were of the seismic catalog that it was elaborated from (1920-1982), around the place whose seismic half magnitude was of 5 grades Richter and a depth 65 km, these earthquakes are classified as shallow earthquakes, which are located in the continental plaque of North-America, these they are induced by the efforts of push of the plaque of Cocos, existing 36% of intermediate and 2 of deep earthquakes. (Author)

  17. Analysis of Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction for a Nuclear Power Plant (HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of nuclear power plants (NPPs to seismic events is affected by soil-structure interactions (SSI. In the present paper, a finite element (FE model with transmitting boundaries is used to analyse the SSI effect on the response of NPP buildings subjected to vertically incident seismic excitation. Analysis parameters that affect the accuracy of the calculations, including the dimension of the domain and artificial boundary types, are investigated through a set of models. A numerical SSI analysis for the 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Test Reactor (HTR-10 under seismic excitation was carried out using the developed model. The floor response spectra (FRS produced by the SSI analysis are compared with a fixed-base model to investigate the SSI effect on the dynamic response of the reactor building. The results show that the FRS at foundation level are reduced and those at higher floor levels are altered significantly when taking SSI into account. The peak frequencies of the FRS are reduced due to the SSI, whereas the acceleration at high floor levels is increased at a certain frequency range. The seismic response of the primary system components, however, is reduced by the analysed SSI for the HTR-10 on the current soil site.

  18. Developments of borehole strain observation outside China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱泽华; 石耀霖

    2004-01-01

    Borehole strain observation is playing an increasingly important role in the study on the crustal movements. It hasbeen used by many countries such as China, USA, Japan, Peru, Australia, South Africa, Iceland and Italy, in research fields of plate tectonics, earthquake, volcanic eruption, dam safety, oil field subsidence, mining collapse andso on. Borehole strainmeter has been improved rapidly and tends to get more and more components included inone probe. Based on observations by this kind of instruments, studies on seismic strain step, slow earthquake,earthquake precursor and volcanic eruption forecasting have made remarkable achievements. In the coming years,borehole strain observation is going to become one major geodetic means, together with GPS and InSAR.

  19. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarm, M.; Boccio, J.; Farahzad, P.

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified

  20. Soil–structure interaction analyses to locate nuclear power plant free-field seismic instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, James J., E-mail: jasjjoh@aol.com [James J. Johnson and Associates, Alamo, CA (United States); Ake, Jon P. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Maslenikov, Oleg R. [James J. Johnson and Associates, Alamo, CA (United States); Kenneally, Roger M. [Consultant, Seminole, FL (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Determine the location of seismic instrumentation so that recorded motion will be free-field motion. • Certified Designs of nuclear island for AP1000 and EPR; ABWR Reactor Building were analyzed. • Three site conditions and multiple recorded time histories were considered. • Instrumentation located 1-diameter from the edge of structure/foundation is adequate. • Acceptance criteria were probability of non-exceedance of response spectra values. - Abstract: The recorded earthquake ground motion at the nuclear power plant site is needed for several purposes. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.12, Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation for Earthquakes, NRC (1997a), describes acceptable instrumentation to meet the requirements in NRC's regulations pertaining to earthquake engineering criteria for nuclear power plants. The ground motion data recorded by the free-field seismic instrumentation are used to compare the actual earthquake motion at the site with the design input motion. The result of the comparison determines if the Operating Basis Earthquake ground motion (OBE) has been exceeded and plant shutdown is required per the guidance in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.166, Pre-Earthquake Planning and Immediate Nuclear Power Plant Operator Postearthquake Actions, NRC (1979b). The free-field is defined as a location on the ground surface or in the site soil column that is sufficiently distant from the site structures to be essentially unaffected by the vibration of the site structures.

  1. The problem of ensuring the seismic stability of atomic electric power plant equipment and ways of solving it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaznovskii; Filippov, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    By seismic stability the authors mean the ability of the equipment and buildings to retain certain properties when subjected to seismic loads: leakproofness, strength, the absence of any residual changes of shape, which interfere with normal operation, ability to be repaired, nuclear and radiation safety. The latter requirement is the main thing which differentiates atomic electric power plants from other constructions, including other power-generation plants. Whereas, for example, an accident in the event of an earthquake in a thermal electric power plant can be regarded as a local accident, and the measures to ensure seismic stability are determined by economic factors and safety requirements for the operating staff, to ensure the seismic stability of an AES it is essential to take account in the first instance of the possibility of dangerous radiation effects both in the AES and in the vast area around it

  2. Probabilistic seismic safety study of an existing nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Cornell, C.A.; Kaplan, S.; Perla, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of an overall safety study of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant. The earthquake hazard was considered as an initiating event that could result in radioactive release from the site as a result of core melt. The probability of earthquake initiated releases were compared with the probability of releases due to other initiating events. Three steps are necessary to evaluate the probability of earthquake initiated core melt. (1) estimate the ground motion (peak ground acceleration) and uncertainty in this estimate as functions of annual probability of occurrence; (2) estimate the conditional probability of failure and its uncertainty for structures, equipment, piping, controls, etc., as functions of ground acceleration; and (3) combine these estimates to obtain probabilities of earthquake induced failure and uncertainties in such estimates to be used in event trees, system models, and fault trees for evaluating the probability of earthquake induced core melt. This paper concentrates on the first two steps with emphasis on step 2. The major difference between the work presented and previous papers is the development and use of uncertainty estimates for both the ground motion probability estimates and the conditional probability of failure estimates. (orig.)

  3. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components (Phase II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Pepper, S.E.

    1990-02-01

    As part of the Component Fragility Program which was initiated in FY 1985, three additional equipment classes have been evaluated. This report contains the fragility results and discussions on these equipment classes which are switchgear, I and C panels and relays. Both low and medium voltage switchgear assemblies have been considered and a separate fragility estimate for each type is provided. Test data on cabinets from the nuclear instrumentation/neutron monitoring system, plant/process protection system, solid state protective system and engineered safeguards test system comprise the BNL data base for I and C panels (NSSS). Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of switchgear and I ampersand C panels, and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been evaluated for estimating the respective probabilistic fragility levels which are expressed in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient, a randomness coefficient and an HCLPF value. Due to a wide variation of relay design and the fragility level, a generic fragility level cannot be established for relays. 7 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs

  4. The numerical computation of seismic fragility of base-isolated Nuclear Power Plants buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotti, Federico; Domaneschi, Marco; De Grandis, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Seismic fragility of structural components in base isolated NPP is computed. • Dynamic integration, Response Surface, FORM and Monte Carlo Simulation are adopted. • Refined approach for modeling the non-linearities behavior of isolators is proposed. • Beyond-design conditions are addressed. • The preliminary design of the isolated IRIS is the application of the procedure. -- Abstract: The research work here described is devoted to the development of a numerical procedure for the computation of seismic fragilities for equipment and structural components in Nuclear Power Plants; in particular, reference is made, in the present paper, to the case of isolated buildings. The proposed procedure for fragility computation makes use of the Response Surface Methodology to model the influence of the random variables on the dynamic response. To account for stochastic loading, the latter is computed by means of a simulation procedure. Given the Response Surface, the Monte Carlo method is used to compute the failure probability. The procedure is here applied to the preliminary design of the Nuclear Power Plant reactor building within the International Reactor Innovative and Secure international project; the building is equipped with a base isolation system based on the introduction of High Damping Rubber Bearing elements showing a markedly non linear mechanical behavior. The fragility analysis is performed assuming that the isolation devices become the critical elements in terms of seismic risk and that, once base-isolation is introduced, the dynamic behavior of the building can be captured by low-dimensional numerical models

  5. Evaluation of seismic stability of nuclear power plants on weathered soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Nobuhide; Nishi, Koichi; Honsho, Shizumitsu

    1991-01-01

    Soft rocks such as weathered rocks or low cemented sedimentary rocks spread all over the country. If it is possible to construct nuclear power plants on such soft rocks, there will be more available sites for nuclear power plants. The investigation on the following research items was carried out. (1) Geological survey and the application of test methods on soft rocks. (2) Methods and application of laboratory and in-situ tests on soft rocks. (3) Response analysis of a reactor building and foundation ground during earthquake. (4) Stability analysis of soft rock ground as the foundation of a nuclear power plant regarding both earthquake and long-term settlement. From the results of the investigation, it became evident that the seismic stability of a nuclear power plant on weathered soft rocks can be assured enough. (author)

  6. Uses of probabilistic estimates of seismic hazard and nuclear power plants in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, L.

    1983-01-01

    The use of probabilistic estimates is playing an increased role in the review of seismic hazard at nuclear power plants. The NRC Geosciences Branch emphasis has been on using these estimates in a relative rather than absolute manner and to gain insight on other approaches. Examples of this use include estimates to determine design levels, to determine equivalent hazard at different sites, to help define more realistic seismotectonic provinces, and to assess implied levels of acceptable risk using deterministic methods. Increased use of probabilistic estimates is expected. Probabilistic estimates of seismic hazard have a potential for misuse, however, and their successful integration into decision making requires they not be divorced from physical insight and scientific intuition

  7. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (II) Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of intensity- and time-based seismic risk assessments of a sample nuclear power plant (NPP) to demonstrate the risk-assessment methodology proposed in its companion paper. The intensity-based assessments include three sets of sensitivity studies to identify the impact of the following factors on the seismic vulnerability of the sample NPP, namely: (1) the description of fragility curves for primary and secondary components of NPPs, (2) the number of simulations of NPP response required for risk assessment, and (3) the correlation in responses between NPP components. The time-based assessment is performed as a series of intensity-based assessments. The studies illustrate the utility of the response-based fragility curves and the inclusion of the correlation in the responses of NPP components directly in the risk computation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (I) Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    A new procedure for probabilistic seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is proposed. This procedure modifies the current procedures using tools developed recently for performance-based earthquake engineering of buildings. The proposed procedure uses (a) response-based fragility curves to represent the capacity of structural and nonstructural components of NPPs, (b) nonlinear response-history analysis to characterize the demands on those components, and (c) Monte Carlo simulations to determine the damage state of the components. The use of response-rather than ground-motion-based fragility curves enables the curves to be independent of seismic hazard and closely related to component capacity. The use of Monte Carlo procedure enables the correlation in the responses of components to be directly included in the risk assessment. An example of the methodology is presented in a companion paper to demonstrate its use and provide the technical basis for aspects of the methodology. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. System seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type LMFBR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.C.; Wu, T.S.; Cha, B.K.; Burelbach, J.; Seidensticker, R.

    1984-01-01

    The system seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant is presented. In this primary system, the reactor core is supported in a way which differs significantly from that used in previous designs. The analytical model developed for this study is a three-dimensional finite element model including one-half of the primary system cut along the plane of symmetry. The model includes the deck and deck mounted components,the reactor vessel, the core support structure, the core barrel, the radial neutron shield, the redan, and the conical support skirt. The sodium contained in the primary system is treated as a lumped mass appropriately distributed among various components. The significant seismic behavior as well as the advantages of this primary system design are discussed in detail

  10. Some considerations on the seismic stability of large slopes surrounding the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki

    1982-01-01

    As a series of the research on the seismic stabilities of a large scale slope surrounding the Nuclear Power Plant, the numerical simulation and analytical stability calculation are conducted in order to clarify the applicability of static stability evaluation method (conventional circular arc slip method, static non-linear F.E. analysis) and dynamic one (2-dimensional dynamic F.E. analysis). The discussions on these slope stability methods are done and the followings are clarified, i) The results of numerical simulation by dynamic F.E. analysis concerning the response property and the failure mode are qualitatively corresponded with the behaviour of dynamic failure test. ii) From the results of static and dynamic stability analysis, it is concluded that the conventional circular arc slip method gives the severest evaluation for slope stability. iii) It is proposed that the seismic coefficient for static slope stability analysis should be used the value of the equivalent instant acceleration. (author)

  11. Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Haynes, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.15 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g. 13 refs., 13 figs

  12. Seismically-induced soil amplification at the DOE Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.W.; Hynes, M.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    A site-specific earthquake site response (soil amplification) study is being conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). This study is pursuant to an upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report in accordance with requirements specified by DOE. The seismic hazard at PGDP is dominated by the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Site-specific synthetic earthquake records developed by others were applied independently to four soil columns with heights above baserock of about 325 ft. The results for the 1000-year earthquake event indicate that the site period is between 1.0 and 1.5 sec. Incident shear waves are strongly amplified at periods of motion greater than 0.3 sec. The peak free-field horizontal acceleration, occurring at very low periods, is 0.28 g

  13. New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

  14. Potential seismic structural failure modes associated with the Zion Nuclear Plant. Seismic safety margins research program (Phase I). Project VI. Fragilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The Zion 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant consists of a number of structures. The most important of these from the viewpoint of safety are the containment buildings, the auxiliary building, the turbine building, and the crib house (or intake structure). The evaluation of the potential seismic failure modes and determination of the ultimate seismic capacity of the structures is a complex undertaking which will require a large number of detailed calculations. As the first step in this evaluation, a number of potential modes of structural failure have been determined and are discussed. The report is principally directed towards seismically induced failure of structures. To some extent, modes involving soil foundation failures are discussed in so far as they affect the buildings. However, failure modes involving soil liquefaction, surface faulting, tsunamis, etc., are considered outside the scope of this evaluation

  15. Application of Nonlinear Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis for Identification of Seismic Margins at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, Amit H.; Seo, Jungil; Coleman, Justin Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) methods and approaches at nuclear power plants (NPP) were first developed in the 1970s and aspects of them have matured over time as they were applied and incrementally improved. SPRA provides information on risk and risk insights and allows for some accounting for uncertainty and variability. As a result, SPRA is now used as an important basis for risk-informed decision making for both new and operating NPPs in the US and in an increasing number of countries globally. SPRAs are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in some instances the current SPRA approach contains large uncertainties, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). INL has an advanced SPRA research and development (R&D) activity that will identify areas in the calculation process that contain significant uncertainties. One current area of focus is the use of nonlinear soil-structure interaction (NLSSI) analysis methods to accurately capture: 1) nonlinear soil behavior and 2) gapping and sliding between the NPP and soil. The goal of this study is to compare numerical NLSSI analysis results with recorded earthquake ground motions at Fukushima Daichii (Great Tohuku Earthquake) and evaluate the sources of nonlinearity contributing to the observed reduction in peak acceleration. Comparisons are made using recorded data in the free-field (soil column with no structural influence) and recorded data on the NPP basemat (in-structure response). Results presented in this study should identify areas of focus for future R&D activities with the goal of minimizing uncertainty in SPRA calculations. This is not a validation activity since there are too many sources of uncertainty that a numerical analysis would need

  16. Seismic protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, R.

    1988-01-01

    To ensure that a nuclear reactor or other damage-susceptible installation is, so far as possible, tripped and already shut down before the arrival of an earthquake shock at its location, a ring of monitoring seismic sensors is provided around it, each sensor being spaced from it by a distance (possibly several kilometres) such that (taking into account the seismic-shock propagation velocity through the intervening ground) a shock monitored by the sensor and then advancing to the installation site will arrive there later than a warning signal emitted by the sensor and received at the installation, by an interval sufficient to allow the installation to trip and shut down, or otherwise assume an optimum anti-seismic mode, in response to the warning signal. Extra sensors located in boreholes may define effectively a three-dimensional (hemispherical) sensing boundary rather than a mere two-dimensional ring. (author)

  17. Evaluation of cross borehole tests at selected wells in the Maynardville Limestone and Copper Ridge Dolomite at the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevenell, L.A.; McMaster, B.W.; Desmarais, K.M.

    1995-05-01

    Several waste disposal sites are located on or adjacent to the karstic Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant. These formations receive contaminants from nearby disposal sites, and transport of these contaminants through the formations can be quite rapid due to the karst flow system. Groups of wells, aligned perpendicular to strike, were drilled to investigate the characteristics of the Cmn, and these wells are identified as Pickets. In order to evaluate transport processes through the karst aquifer, the formations must be characterized. As one component of this characterization effort, cross borehole tests were conducted where water was injected into one well at a site, and water level responses were monitored in nearby wells to determine the directions in which quick flow is more dominant. The ultimate objective of the studies of the Cmn is to characterize the hydrologic characteristics of the karst aquifer and to identify the generalized configuration of the conduit systems and portions subject to a significant quick flow component (i.e., higher hydraulic conductivity zones). The resultant conceptual model will be useful in constructing numerical models to be used to predict flow paths

  18. Seismic stability evaluation using 2-D FEM analysis for modeling nuclear power plants sited on gravel soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iba, T.; Konno, T.; Irino, K.; Hama, I.; Oguro, E.; Iizuka, S.; Enami, A.

    1995-01-01

    Throughout Europe and the United States, many nuclear power plants have been built on Quaternary deposit sites. While in Japan, all nuclear power plants have been built at rock sites primarily to maintain a high seismic resistivity. However, as more nuclear power plants are planned for the future, it has become necessary to develop new siting technology from the stand point of expanding the available range of site selection and effective utilization of land. A draft on guidelines of the seismic design for siting on Quaternary deposits is being carried out with a purpose to ensure proper design and construction for such sites. (author). 10 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Survey of seismic fragilities used in PRA studies of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, seismic PRA studies have been performed on a large number of nuclear power plants in the USA. This paper presents a summary of a survey on fragility databases and the range of evaluated fragility values of various equipment categories based on past PRAs. The survey includes the use of experience data, the interpretations of available test data, and the quantification of uncertainties. The surveyed fragility databases are limited to data available in the public domain such as NUREG reports, conference proceedings and other publicly available reports. The extent of the availability of data as well as limitations are studied and tabulated for various equipment categories. The survey of the fragility values in past PRA studies includes not only the best estimate values, but also the dominant failure modes and the estimated uncertainty levels for each equipment category. The engineering judgments employed in estimating the uncertainty in the fragility values are also studied. This paper provides a perspective on the seismic fragility evaluation procedures for equipment in order to clearly identify the engineering analysis and judgment used in past seismic PRA studies

  20. Evaluation of response factors for seismic probabilistic safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, K.; Abe, K.; Muramatsu, K.; Itoh, M.; Kohno, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a method for evaluating 'response factors' of components in nuclear power plants for use in a seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The response factor here is a measure of conservatism included in response calculations in seismic design analysis of components and is defined as a ratio of conservative design resonse to actual response. This method has the following characteristic features: (1) The components are classified into several groups based on the differences in their location and in the vibration models used in design response analyses; (2) the response factors are decomposed into subfactors corresponding to the stages of the seismic response analyses in the design practices; (3) the response factors for components are calculated as products of subfactors; (4) the subfactors are expressed either as a single value or as a function of parameters that influence the response of components. This paper describes the outline of this method and results from an application to a sample problem in which response factors were quantified for examples of components selected from the groups. (orig.)

  1. Seismic analysis and structure capacity evaluation of the Belene nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Campbell, R.D.; Baltus, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The seismic analysis and structure capacity evaluation of the Belene Nuclear Power Plant, a two-unit WWER 1000, was performed. The principal objective of the study was to review the major aspects of the seismic design including ground motion specification, foundation concept and materials, and the Unit I main reactor building structure response and capacity. The main reactor building structure /foundation/soil were modeled and analyzed by a substructure approach to soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis. The elements of the substructure approach, implemented in the family of computer programs CLASSI, are: Specification of the free-field ground motion; Modeling the soil profile; SSI parameters; Modeling the structure; SSI-response analyses. Each of these aspects is discussed. The Belene Unit 1 main reactor building structure was evaluated to verify the seismic design with respect to current western criteria. The structural capacity evaluation included criteria development, element load distribution analysis, structural element selection, and structural element capacity evaluation. Equipment and commodity design criteria were similarly reviewed and evaluated. Methodology results and recommendations are presented. (author)

  2. Study of seismic design bases for nuclear power plants in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintzer, F.C.; Yanev, P.I.; Gotschall, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of topics pertinent to establishing design basis seismic events and soil conditions for deployment of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor - Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (HTGR-SC/C) System. Generalized design ground accelerations and soil shear wave velocities are presented by regions of the continental United States. Design basis accelerations and soil conditions for existing nuclear power plants are summarized. Finally, analytical approaches to assess soil-structure interaction, including the effects of embedment, are reviewed

  3. Seismic analysis procedures for the plutonium processing building of the Special Isotope Separation Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.P.; Tajirian, F.F.; Todeschini, R.A.A.; Dahlke, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology for the seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the Plutonium Processing Building (PPB) which is part of the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) Production Plant. The PPB consists of two structures, the enclosure building and the optics/separator area. These are founded on two independent foundations which are supported on the surface of a soil medium consisting of gravel overlying basalt. The PPB is classified as a safety related structure and is required to withstand the effects of a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE)

  4. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plants facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Graves, H.

    1990-01-01

    The program CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) is an integrated computational system being developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is specifically designed to be a personal computer (PC) operated package which may be used to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies used for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES is structured in a modular format. Each module performs a specific type of analysis i.e., static or dynamic, linear or nonlinear, etc. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the Seismic Module of CARES

  5. A regulatory view of the seismic re-evaluation of existing nuclear power plants in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkester, J.E.; Bradford, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the background to the seismic re-evaluation of existing nuclear power plants in the United Kingdom. Nuclear installations in this country were not designed specifically to resist earthquakes until the nineteen-seventies, although older plants were robustly constructed. The seismic capability of these older installations is now being evaluated as part of the periodic safety reviews which nuclear licensees are required to carry out. The regulatory requirements which set the framework for these studies are explained and the approaches being adopted by the licensees for their assessment of the seismic capability of existing plants are outlined. The process of hazard appraisal is reported together with a general overview of UK seismicity. The paper then discusses the methodologies used to evaluate the response of plant to the hazard. Various other types of nuclear installation besides power plants are subject to licensing in the UK and the application of seismic evaluation to some of these is briefly described. Finally the paper provides some comments on future initiatives and possible areas of development. (author)

  6. Training for the seismic qualification utility group (SQUG) generic implementation procedure (GIP) for verification of seismic effects on nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffstall, R.E.; Smith, N.P.; Baker, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Resolution of USI A-46 was accomplished May, 1992 with the issuance of the SER for the GIP, Revision 2. The implementation of the resolution for the SQUG plants will be completed by 1996. Both the USNRC and the SQUG utilities have expended considerable resources to effect a common understanding that the effort has been worth the price. The Training Program developed to ensure that the efforts expended by the SQUG was indeed worth the price will be a major contributor in the success of the implementation. All of the older nuclear power plants in the United States now have an alternative standard to determine seismic resistance using experience data- a standard against which they can be evaluated and found seismically adequate to achieve and maintain a safe and reliable shutdown when subjected to strong motion earthquakes

  7. Performance of MarSite Multi parameter Borehole Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralp, Cansun; Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present two year results obtained from the integrated multiparameter borehole system at Marsite. The very broad band (VBB) system have been operating since installation in November 2014; one year in a water filled borehole and one year in a dry Borehole. from January 2016. The real time data has been available to the community. The two Borehole environments are compared showing the superior performance of dry borehole environ- ment compared to water filled for a very broad band (VBB) seismometer. The practical considerations applied in both borehole installations are compared and the best borehole practical installation techniques are presented and discussed. The data is also compared with a surface 120 second broad band sensor and the seismic arrays with in MarSite region. The very long term performance, (one year data in a dry hole) of the VBB Borehole seismometer and the Dilatometer will be presented The high frequency performance of the VBB seismometer which extends to 150 Hz and the dilatometer are compared characterizing the results from the dilatometer.

  8. Linearized inversion frameworks toward high-resolution seismic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2016-01-01

    installed along the earth surface or down boreholes. Seismic imaging is a powerful tool to map these reflected and scattered energy back to their subsurface scattering or reflection points. Seismic imaging is conventionally based on the single

  9. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  10. Seismic analysis with FEM for fuel transfer system of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiaofeng; Liu Pengliang; Bi Xiangjun; Ji Shunying

    2012-01-01

    In the PWR nuclear power plant, the function of the fuel transfer system (FTS) is to transfer the fuel assembly between the reactor building and the fuel building. The seismic analysis of the transfer system structure should be carried out to ensure the safety under OBE and SSE. Therefore, the ANASYS 12.0 software is adopted to construct the finite element analysis model for the fuel transfer system in a million kilowatt nuclear power plant. For the various configurations of FTS in the operating process, the stresses of the main structures, such as the transfer tube, fuel assembly container, fuel conveyor car, lifting frame in the reactor building, lifting frame in the fuel building, support and guide structure of conveyor car and the lifting frame in both buildings, are computed. The stresses are combined with the method of square root of square sum (SRSS) and assessed under various seismic conditions based on RCCM code, the results of the assessment satisfy the code. The results show that the stresses of the fuel transfer system structure meet the strength requirement, meanwhile, it can withstand the earthquake well. (authors)

  11. Seismic proving tests on the reliability for large components and equipment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Tokue; Tanaka, Nagatoshi

    1988-01-01

    Since Japan has destructive earthquakes frequently, the structural reliability for large components and equipment of nuclear power plants are rigorously required. They are designed using sophisticated seismic analyses and have not yet encountered a destructive earthquake. When nuclear power plants are planned, it is very important that the general public understand the structural reliability during and after an earthquake. Seismic Proving Tests have been planned by Ministry of International Trade and Industry (Miti) to comply with public requirement in Japan. A large-scale high-performance vibration table was constructed at Tasted Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NU PEC), in order to prove the structural reliability by vibrating the test model (of full scale or close to the actual size) in the condition of a destructive earthquake. As for the test models, the following four items were selected out of large components and equipment important to the safety: Reactor Containment Vessel; Primary Coolant Loop or Primary Loop Recirculation System; Reactor Pressure Vessel; and Reactor Core Internals. Here is described a brief of the vibration table, the test method and the results of the tests on PWR Reactor Containment Vessel and BWR Primary Loop Recirculation System (author)

  12. Regulatory analysis for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.Y.; Anderson, N.R.

    1987-02-01

    The margin of safety provided in existing nuclear power plant equipment to resist seismically induced loads and perform required safety functions may vary considerably, because of significant changes in design criteria and methods for the seismic qualification of equipment over the years. Therefore, the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants must be reassessed to determine whether requalification is necessary. The objective of technical studies performed under Task Action Plan A-46 was to establish an explicit set of guidelines and acceptance criteria to judge the adequacy of equipment under seismic loading at all operating plants, in lieu of requiring these plants to meet the criteria that are applied to new plants. This report presents the regulatory analysis for Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46. It includes: Statement of the Problem; the Objective of USI A-46; a Summary of A-46 Tasks; a Proposed Implementation Procedure; a Value-Impact Analysis; Application of the Backfit Rule; 10 CFR 50.109; Implementation; and Operating Plants To Be Reviewed to USI A-46 Requirements

  13. A personal computer code for seismic evaluations of nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Graves, H.

    1991-01-01

    In the process of review and evaluation of licensing issues related to nuclear power plants, it is essential to understand the behavior of seismic loading, foundation and structural properties and their impact on the overall structural response. In most cases, such knowledge could be obtained by using simplified engineering models which, when properly implemented, can capture the essential parameters describing the physics of the problem. Such models do not require execution on large computer systems and could be implemented through a personal computer (PC) based capability. Recognizing the need for a PC software package that can perform structural response computations required for typical licensing reviews, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored the development of a PC operated computer software package CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) system. This development was undertaken by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) during FY's 1988 and 1989. A wide range of computer programs and modeling approaches are often used to justify the safety of nuclear power plants. It is often difficult to assess the validity and accuracy of the results submitted by various utilities without developing comparable computer solutions. Taken this into consideration, CARES is designed as an integrated computational system which can perform rapid evaluations of structural behavior and examine capability of nuclear power plant facilities, thus CARES may be used by the NRC to determine the validity and accuracy of analysis methodologies employed for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES has been designed to operate on a PC, have user friendly input/output interface, and have quick turnaround. This paper describes the various features which have been implemented into the seismic module of CARES version 1.0

  14. Effects of Moat Wall Impact on the Seismic Response of Base Isolated Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jung Han; Mosqueda, Gilberto; Sarebanhab, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to examine the effects of impact on the response of seismically isolated NPPs and identify characteristics of the isolation hardware and hard stop that minimize these effects. Considering variable distances to the hard stop and properties of the moat wall, the amplification in response is reported for acceleration and floor spectral accelerations at different points along the height of a NPP containment structure. Base isolation can be an effective strategy to protect critical facilities such as Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from the damaging effects of horizontal earthquake ground shaking. To be effective in reducing accelerations and deformations of the structure above, the seismic isolation bearings can be subjected to large displacements. In the case of an extreme earthquake, bearing displacements need to be limited by a hard stop in order to prevent failure of the bearings. Impact to the hard stop, which is often the moat wall at the basement level, is also of significant concern due to the potential for increased transfer of forces and amplification in response of the structural system, piping and other contents. However, the consequences of impact or factors important to mitigate its effects are not very well understood. The main findings of this study are related to modeling of NPP with moat wall in OpenSees and LSDyna as well as observations resulting from the parametric study of the performance of the NPP under different intensity levels of seismic excitations for different properties of the moat wall and bearings. • Variation in the isolator properties should be considered when examining seismic pounding. For BDBE even, 58.5 % cases result to the impact for lower bound properties while this value was 5.5 % for upper bound properties. Since the impact results are dependent to the assumed bearing properties, a better range of properties can be obtained from experimental testing of the bearing under large shear strains.

  15. CARES-ESTSC, Seismic Structure Safety Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Miller, C.A.; Heymsfield, E.; Yang, A.

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CARES, Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures, was developed for NRC staff use to determine the validity and accuracy of the analysis methods used by various utilities for structural safety evaluations of nuclear power plants. CARES is organized in a modular format with the basic modules of the system performing static, seismic, and nonlinear analysis. In this release, only the seismic module is implemented. This module defines the design seismic criteria at a given site, evaluates the free-field motion, and computes the structural response and floor response spectra including soil-structure interaction. The eight options in CARES currently are: a general manager for the seismic module, deconvolution analysis, structural data preparation for soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis, input motion preparation for SSI analysis, SSI analysis, earthquake simulations/data, PSD (Power Spectral Density) related acceleration time history/spectra analysis, and plot generation. 2 - Method of solution: The seismic module works in the frequency domain. Earthquake motion simulation is based on the fundamental property that any periodic function can be expanded in a series of sinusoidal waves. The computer uses a random number generator to produce strings of phase angles with uniform distribution in the 0-2 pi range. Then, a linear correction procedure due to Scanlon and Sacks is employed to derive an adjusted array of amplitudes. The acceleration ensemble is subsequently modified by a deterministic intensity function composed of three segments: an initial buildup, a stationary duration, and exponential steady decay. A parabolic correction procedure outlined by Jennings and Housner is applied to the acceleration ensemble to bring the end velocity of the ground motion to zero. The soil-structure system is represented by a three-dimensional lumped parameter type model. The structural model is built up from three

  16. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two

  17. Drilling, logging, and testing information from borehole UE-25 UZ number-sign 16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamir, F.; Thordarson, W.; Kume, J.; Rousseau, J.; Cunningham, D.M. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole UE-25 UZ number-sign 16 is the first of two boreholes that may be used to determine the subsurface structure at Yucca Mountain by using vertical seismic profiling. This report contains information collected while this borehole was being drilled, logged, and tested from May 27, 1992, to April 22, 1994. It does not contain the vertical seismic profiling data. This report is intended to be used as: (1) a reference for drilling similar boreholes in the same area, (2) a data source on this borehole, and (3) a reference for other information that is available from this borehole. The reference information includes drilling chronology, equipment, parameters, coring methods, penetration rates, completion information, drilling problems, and corrective actions. The data sources include lithology, fracture logs, a list of available borehole logs, and depths at which water was recorded. Other information is listed in an appendix that includes studies done after April 22, 1994

  18. Borehole temperature variability at Hoher Sonnblick, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Georg; Schöner, Wolfgang; Prinz, Rainer; Pfeiler, Stefan; Reisenhofer, Stefan; Riedl, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The overarching aim of the project 'Atmosphere - permafrost relationship in the Austrian Alps - atmospheric extreme events and their relevance for the mean state of the active layer (ATMOperm)' is to improve the understanding of the impacts of atmospheric extreme events on the thermal state of the active layer using a combined measurement and modeling approach as the basis for a long-term monitoring strategy. For this purpose, the Sonnblick Observatory at the summit of Hoher Sonnblick (3106 m.a.s.l) is particularly well-suited due to its comprehensive long-term atmospheric and permafrost monitoring network (i.a. three 20 m deep boreholes since 2007). In ATMOperm, a robust and accurate permanent monitoring of active layer thickness at Hoher Sonnblick will be set up using innovative monitoring approaches by automated electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The ERT monitoring is further supplemented by additional geophysical measurements such as ground penetrating radar, refraction seismic, electromagnetic induction and transient electromagnetics in order to optimally complement the gained ERT information. On the other hand, atmospheric energy fluxes over permafrost ground and their impact on the thermal state of permafrost and active layer thickness with a particular focus on atmospheric extreme events will be investigated based on physically-based permafrost modeling. For model evaluation, the borehole temperature records will play a key role and, therefore, an in-depth quality control of the borehole temperatures is an important prerequisite. In this study we will show preliminary results regarding the borehole temperature variability at Hoher Sonnblick with focus on the active layer. The borehole temperatures will be related to specific atmospheric conditions using the rich data set of atmospheric measurements of the site in order to detect potential errors in the borehole temperature measurements. Furthermore, we will evaluate the potential of filling gaps in

  19. Seismic PSA implementation standards by AESJ and the utilization of the advanced safety examination guideline for seismic design for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Katsumi; Hibino, Kenta

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Safety Examination Guideline for Seismic Design for Nuclear Power Plant (the advanced safety examination guideline) was worked out on September 19, 2006. In this paper, a summary of the method of probability theory in the advanced safety examination guideline and the Seismic PSA Implementation Standards is stated. On utilization of the probability theory for the advanced safety examination guideline, the uncertainty resulting from the process of the decision of the basic design earthquake ground motion (Ss) is stated to be considered using the proper method. The references of the extra probability for evaluation of earthquake hazard and combination of the working load and the earthquake load are stated. Definition, evaluation method and effort to lower the 'residual risks', and relation between the residual risks and the extra probability of Ss are described. A summary of the earthquake-resistant design for nuclear power facilities is explained by the old guideline. (S.Y.)

  20. Status for seismic design requirements of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamental purpose for the aseismic design of the nuclear power plants is to protect the inhabitants near the plant from radiation accidents during and after earthquake vibrations. In order to achieve the above purpose, the following considerations have been made. All buidlings, structures, system and components are classified into three Classes A, B and C according to their degree of importance for plant safety, and are designed to meet the requirements specified for each class, respectively. Magnitude and epicenter of the design basis earthquake are determined based upon seismological and geological investigations and observation of ground motion in the site, and the maximum ground acceleration which could be expected can be calculated empirically. With respect to time history waves, more than three are selected referring to dynamic characteristic of base rock in the site, observed ground motion records in the site or other strong motion seismographs.The figures of horizontal seismic coefficients to be used in determining design forces on Class A buildings and structures are 3 Co (where Co. is as defined in the Japan Building Standard Law). On the other hand the horizontal design force should not be less than those determined as the results of the dynamic analyses based on DEGM (Design Earthquake Ground Motion). The figures of horizontal seismic coefficient and forces for Class A system and components are usually determined based on the dynamic analyses for DEGM. The buildings and structures treated as an elastic column system with masses, and the bottom mass is supported by elastic springs representing the soil-foundation interaction characteristics. DEGM is used as the input disturbance in the dynamic response analysis, and the model analysis or time history method is worked out. System and components are modeled as elastic bars with lumped masses of 3 dimensional degree of freedom, and the response analysis is carried out using floor respone spectra

  1. On the evolution of the regulatory guidance for seismic qualification of electric and active mechanical equipment for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Ching Hang; Chen, Pei-Ying

    2009-01-01

    All electric and active mechanical equipment important to safety for nuclear power plants must be seismically qualified by testing, analysis, or combined analysis and testing. The general requirements for seismic qualification of electric and active mechanical equipment in nuclear power plants are delineated in Appendix S, 'Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,' to Title 10, Part 50, 'Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,' of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50), item 52.47(20) of 10 CFR 52.47, 'Contents of Applications; Technical Information,' and Appendix A, 'Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,' to 10 CFR Part 100, 'Reactor Site Criteria.' The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Revision 2 of Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.100, 'Seismic Qualification of Electric and Mechanical for Nuclear Power Plants' in 1988, which endorsed, with restrictions, exceptions, and clarifications, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Standard 344-1987 'IEEE Recommended Practice for Seismic Qualification of Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations,' for use in seismic qualification of both electric and mechanical equipment. In 2008, the staff at the NRC drafted Revision 3 of RG 1.100 to endorse, with restrictions, exceptions, and clarifications, the IEEE Std 344-2004 and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) QME-1-2007 'Qualification of Active Mechanical Equipment Used in Nuclear Power Plants.' IEEE Std 344-2004 was an update of Std 344-1987 and ASME QME-1-2007 was an update of QME-1-2002. The major changes in IEEE Std 344-2004 and ASME QME-1-2007 include the update and expansion of criteria and procedures describing the use of experience data as a method for seismic qualification of Class 1E electric equipment (including I and C components) as well as active mechanical equipment. In this paper, the staff will compare the draft Revision 3 to

  2. Review of structure damping values for elastic seismic analysis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, P.S.; Steele, L.K.; Johnson, J.J.; Mensing, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    Current US Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidance on structure damping values for elastic seismic design analysis of nuclear power plants are contained in Regulatory Guide 1.61 (R.G. 1.61). The objectives of the study described in this report are to investigate the adequacy of R.G1.61 structure damping values based on currently available data, and to recommend revisions to R.G. 1.61 as appropriate. Measured structure damping values, and associated structure, foundation, excitation, and input/response parameters, were collected and compiled. These data were analyzed to identify the parameters that significantly influence structure damping and to quantify structure damping in terms of these parameters. Based on this study, current R.G. 1.61 damping values for structure design are either adequate, or require only minor revision, depending on the structure material. More explicit guidance on structure damping values for seismic analysis to determine input to equipment has been prepared, along with other recommendations to improve the applicability of R.G. 1.61

  3. Installation of borehole seismometer for earthquake characteristics in deep geological environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Hee; Choi, Weon Hack; Cho, Sung Il; Chang, Chun Joong [KHNP CRI, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Deep geological disposal is currently accepted as the most appropriate method for permanently removing spent nuclear fuel from the living sphere of humans. For implementation of deep geological disposal, we need to understand the geological changes that have taken place over the past 100,000 years, encompassing active faults, volcanic activity, elevation, ubsidence, which as yet have not been considered in assessing the site characteristics for general facilities, as well as to investigate and analyze the geological structures, fracture systems and seismic responses regarding deep geological environment about 500 meters or more underground. In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) have installed the deep borehole earthquake observatory at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep geological environment on June, 2014 in Andong area. This paper will show the status of deep borehole earthquake observatory and the results of background noise response characteristics of these deep borehole seismic data as a basic data analysis. We present here the status of deep borehole seismometer installation by KHNP. In order to basic data analysis for the borehole seismic observation data, this study shows the results of the orientation of seismometer and background noise characteristics by using a probability density function. Together with the ground motion data recorded by the borehole seismometers can be utilized as basic data for seismic response characteristics studies with regard to spent nuclear fuel disposal depth and as the input data for seismic hazard assessment that

  4. Generation of floor spectra compatible time histories for equipment seismic qualification in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyu, Y.-S.; Luh, Gary G.; Blum, Arie

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a procedure for generating floor response spectra compatible time histories used for equipment seismic qualification in nuclear power plants. From the 84th percentile power spectrum density function of an earthquake ensemble of four randomly generated time history motions, a statistically equivalent time history can be obtained by converting the power spectrum density function from the frequency domain into the time domain. With minor modification, if needed, the converted time history will satisfy both the spectral and the power spectrum density enveloping criteria, as required by the USNRC per Revision 2 of the Standard Review Plan, Section 3.7.1. Step-by-step generating procedures and two numerical examples are presented to illustrate the applications of the methodology. (author)

  5. Combination of torsional, rotational and translational responses in the seismic analysis of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrone, A.

    1979-01-01

    A particular type of seismic analysis performed on the Nuclear Island Buildings (NIB) complex of a nuclear power plant and the methods developed to combine torsional, rotational and translational responses are described. The NIB complex analyzed consists of various buildings supported on a common foundation mat and tied together from the underground foundation to the roof levels. Three independent building mathematical models were used for the three components of the earthquake with a lumped-mass method utilizing direct integration of the coupled equations of motion. The input ground acceleration time histories were based on three 20 s long statistically independent records whose normalized response spectra enveloped those of Regulatory Guide 1.60. A linear stochastic model was used to generate these records which simulated strong motion earthquakes. Due to site characteristics, the soil material properties were calculated considering different ranges of soil moduli below and above the foundation. (orig.)

  6. Combination of torsional, rotational and translational responses in the seismic analysis of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrone, A.; Sigal, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    A particular type of seismic analysis performed on the Nuclear Island Buildings (NIB) complex of a nuclear power plant and the methods developed to combine torsional, rotational and translational responses are described. The NIB complex analyzed consists of various buildings supported on a common foundation mat and tied together from the underground foundation to the roof levels. Three independent building mathematical models were used for the three components of the earthquake with a lumped-mass method utilizing direct integration of the coupled equations of motion. The input ground acceleration time histories were based on three 20 s long statistically independent records whose mormalized response spectra enveloped those of Regulatory Guide 1.60. A linear stochastic model was used to generate these records which simulated strong motion earthquakes. Due to site characteristics, the soil material properties were calculated considering different ranges of soil moduli below and above the foundation

  7. Seismic tests on a reduced scale mock-up of a reprocessing plant cooling pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, J.C.; Gantenbein, F.; Lebelle, M.

    1995-01-01

    In conjunction with COGEMA and SGN, CEA has launched an important research program to validate the reprocessing plant cooling pond calculation mainly for the effect of the racks on the fluid-pond interaction. The paper presents the tests performed on a reduced scale mock-up (scale 1/5). The tests are composed by: -random excitations at very low excitation level to measure the natural frequencies, especially the first sloshing mode frequency; -sinusoidal tests to measure the damping; -seismic tests performed with 3 different time reduction scales (1, 1/5, 1/√5) and 3 different synthetic accelerograms. Two types of simplified model with added masses and finite element model were developed. Comparisons of measured and calculated pressure fields against the panels will be presented. The measured frequencies, obtained during tests, are in good agreement with Housner's results. (authors). 2 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Seismic design criteria used for electrical raceway systems in commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, P.B.; Manrique, M.A.; Nelson, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the seismic design approaches, relevant technical issues and criteria used over the years for design of electrical raceway systems at commercial nuclear power plant facilities. The approaches used for design and endorsed by the NRC can be seen to be quite varied. In recent years, considerably more rigor has been required for raceway design, as well as for the level of design basis documentation produced. However, there has also been a willingness by the NRC to accept rational approaches based on testing, analytical results or experience data, provided proper justification is given. Such rational approaches can simplify the significant task of analysis, design and construction of miles of raceways and thousands of raceway supports. Summarizing past practice and identifying relevant technical issues are an important first step in formalizing up-to-date criteria for new raceway designs

  9. Validation needs of seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods applied to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    An effort to validate seismic PRA methods is in progress. The work concentrates on the validation of plant response and fragility estimates through the use of test data and information from actual earthquake experience. Validation needs have been identified in the areas of soil-structure interaction, structural response and capacity, and equipment fragility. Of particular concern is the adequacy of linear methodology to predict nonlinear behavior. While many questions can be resolved through the judicious use of dynamic test data, other aspects can only be validated by means of input and response measurements during actual earthquakes. A number of past, ongoing, and planned testing programs which can provide useful validation data have been identified, and validation approaches for specific problems are being formulated

  10. Probabilistic seismic safety assessment of a CANDU 6 nuclear power plant including ambient vibration tests: Case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nour, Ali [Hydro Québec, Montréal, Québec H2L4P5 (Canada); École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C3A7 (Canada); Cherfaoui, Abdelhalim; Gocevski, Vladimir [Hydro Québec, Montréal, Québec H2L4P5 (Canada); Léger, Pierre [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C3A7 (Canada)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • In this case study, the seismic PSA methodology adopted for a CANDU 6 is presented. • Ambient vibrations testing to calibrate a 3D FEM and to reduce uncertainties is performed. • Procedure for the development of FRS for the RB considering wave incoherency effect is proposed. • Seismic fragility analysis for the RB is presented. - Abstract: Following the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan there is a worldwide interest in reducing uncertainties in seismic safety assessment of existing nuclear power plant (NPP). Within the scope of a Canadian refurbishment project of a CANDU 6 (NPP) put in service in 1983, structures and equipment must sustain a new seismic demand characterised by the uniform hazard spectrum (UHS) obtained from a site specific study defined for a return period of 1/10,000 years. This UHS exhibits larger spectral ordinates in the high-frequency range than those used in design. To reduce modeling uncertainties as part of a seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), Hydro-Québec developed a procedure using ambient vibrations testing to calibrate a detailed 3D finite element model (FEM) of the containment and reactor building (RB). This calibrated FE model is then used for generating floor response spectra (FRS) based on ground motion time histories compatible with the UHS. Seismic fragility analyses of the reactor building (RB) and structural components are also performed in the context of a case study. Because the RB is founded on a large circular raft, it is possible to consider the effect of the seismic wave incoherency to filter out the high-frequency content, mainly above 10 Hz, using the incoherency transfer function (ITF) method. This allows reducing significantly the non-necessary conservatism in resulting FRS, an important issue for an existing NPP. The proposed case study, and related methodology using ambient vibration testing, is particularly useful to engineers involved in seismic re-evaluation of

  11. Seismic response prediction for cabinets of nuclear power plants by using impact hammer test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Ki Young [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Gook Cho, Sung [JACE KOREA, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Cui, Jintao [Department of Civil Engineering, Kunsan National University, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dookie, E-mail: kim2kie@kunsan.ac.k [Department of Civil Engineering, Kunsan National University, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    An effective method to predict the seismic response of electrical cabinets of nuclear power plants is developed. This method consists of three steps: (1) identification of the earthquake-equivalent force based on the idealized lumped-mass system of the cabinet, (2) identification of the state-space equation (SSE) model of the system using input-output measurements from impact hammer tests, and (3) seismic response prediction by calculating the output of the identified SSE model under the identified earthquake-equivalent force. A three-dimensional plate model of cabinet structures is presented for the numerical verification of the proposed method. Experimental validation of the proposed method is carried out on a three-story frame which represents the structure of a cabinet. The SSE model of the frame is accurately identified by impact hammer tests with high fitness values over 85% of the actual frame characteristics. Shaking table tests are performed using El Centro, Kobe, and Northridge earthquakes as input motions and the acceleration responses are measured. The responses of the model under the three earthquakes are predicted and then compared with the measured responses. The predicted and measured responses agree well with each other with fitness values of 65-75%. The proposed method is more advantageous over other methods that are based on finite element (FE) model updating since it is free from FE modeling errors. It will be especially effective for cabinet structures in nuclear power plants where conducting shaking table tests may not be feasible. Limitations of the proposed method are also discussed.

  12. Borehole television survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    The borehole television survey can provide a measure of the orientation, depth, width and aperture of any planar discontinuity intersected by a borehole and a technique is in an advanced stage of development by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) to make such measurements. Much of its practical application to date has been in crystalline rocks (plutons) at research areas pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Disposal Program in Canada. It also has many other engineering applications where bedrock stability is of particular concern. The equipment required to carry out the survey can be readily transported by two panel trucks with trailers. The components consist of a camera probe, control unit, cable storage reel, cable drive, video-tape recorder, TV monitor and two electrical generators. An inclined planar structure intersected by a borehole appears as an elliptical trace on the wall of the borehole. Such an intersection line shows on the TV monitor as a sinusoidal curve with a high point and a low point as the camera rotates through an angle of 360 degrees. The azimuth of the low point, measured by a compass in the camera probe, represents the direction of the dip of the planar structure. The angle of dip is measured midway between the high and low points or is computed from the maximum-to-minimum distance of the sinusoid and the hole diameter. These observations provide the true orientation of the planar structure if the borehole is vertical. However, if the borehole is inclined, direct observations will only provide the apparent orientation. The true orientation must thus be obtained either by means of stereographic projection or spherical trigonometry. A computer program has been written to calculate the true orientation from the apparent orientation. In the field, observation data are recorded directly on a data record sheet for keypunching and input into the computer

  13. Seismic qualification of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidebrecht, A.C.; Tso, W.K.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the seismic qualification of equipment located in CANDU nuclear power plants. It is particularly concerned with the evaluation of current seismic qualification requirements, the development of a suitable methodology for the seismic qualification of safety systems, and the evaluation of seismic qualification analysis and testing procedures

  14. Resistance and resilience of tundra plant communities to disturbance by winter seismic vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, N.A.; Raynolds, M.K.; Jorgenson, J.C.; DuBois, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of winter seismic exploration on arctic tundra were evaluated on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, four to five growing seasons after disturbance. Plant cover, active layer depths, and track depression were measured at plots representing major tundra plant communities and different levels of initial disturbance. Results are compared with the initial effects reported earlier. Little resilience was seen in any vegetation type, with no clearly decreasing trends in community dissimilarity. Active layer depths remained greater on plots in all nonriparian vegetation types, and most plots still had visible trails. Decreases in plant cover persisted on most plots, although a few species showed recovery or increases in cover above predisturbance level. Moist sedge-shrub tundra and dryas terraces had the largest community dissimilarities initially, showing the least resistance to high levels of winter vehicle disturbance. Community dissimilarity continued to increase for five seasons in moist sedge-shrub tundra, with species composition changing to higher sedge cover and lower shrub cover. The resilience amplitude may have been exceeded on four plots which had significant track depression

  15. The impact of relay chatter on the availability of plant systems following a seismic event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.G.K.; Su, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    In performing a risk analysis of a nuclear power plant, one of the most important factors in determining the availability of those systems required to safely shut down the plant is the impact of common cause failures resulting from such events as fire, flooding or earthquakes. In the latter case it is particularly important to do a thorough analysis of the effects of the earthquake for plants built in zones of high seismicity such as the western United States, Japan or Taiwan. Much work has been done on the susceptibility of components to gross failure but little on the possibilities of relay chatter leading to the unavailability of many systems as the result of lock out of pumps or the changed status of valves. In this paper the authors look at the potential for electrical breaker failure and found that it is possible for a significant number of breakers supplying emergency pumps to be locked out following earthquakes such that the only other failure may well have been a loss of offsite power due to failure of switchyard insulators. They also identified the potential for individual valve operation within a system as the result of relay chatter, and the impact on the overall system availability. Finally they show how this can be incorporated into the quantification of the overall impact of the earthquake

  16. Measuring depth in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of determining the depth of rock strata and other features of a borehole. It may be employed with particular advantage when access to the top of the borehole is difficult, for example in underwater operations. A radioactive marker, such as a source of gamma rays, is positioned near the top of the riser of a sub-sea wellhead structure. A radiation detector is lowered between the marker and a radioactive stratum and the length of line supplied is measured on the floating platform. This enables the depth of the stratum to be measured irrespective of tidal variations of the height of the platform. (U.K.)

  17. Deep boreholes; Tiefe Bohrloecher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracke, Guido [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit gGmbH Koeln (Germany); Charlier, Frank [NSE international nuclear safety engineering gmbh, Aachen (Germany); Geckeis, Horst [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung; and others

    2016-02-15

    The report on deep boreholes covers the following subject areas: methods for safe enclosure of radioactive wastes, requirements concerning the geological conditions of possible boreholes, reversibility of decisions and retrievability, status of drilling technology. The introduction covers national and international activities. Further chapters deal with the following issues: basic concept of the storage in deep bore holes, status of the drilling technology, safe enclosure, geomechanics and stability, reversibility of decisions, risk scenarios, compliancy with safe4ty requirements and site selection criteria, research and development demand.

  18. Onshore and offshore seismic and lithostratigraphic analysis of a deeply incised Quaternary buried valley system in the Northern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiving, S.J.; Aleid Bosch, J.H.; Ebbing, J.H.J.; Mesdag, C.S.; Westerhoff, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic data (onshore and offshore), geophysical borehole data as well as detailed lithofacies from airlift boreholes were acquired in northern Netherlands on and around the island of Ameland. Marine and land seismic data combined with information from land boreholes have been

  19. Borehole DC-12 hydrostratigraphic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    This hydrostratigraphic chart identifies the basic stratigraphy and preliminary hydrologic testing results for Borehole DC-12. This borehole was cored through the Saddle Mountains and Wanapum basalt formations and into the Grande Ronde. Selected zones were hydrologically tested during coring

  20. Borehole DC-14 hydrostratigraphic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    This hydrostratigraphic chart identifies the basic stratigraphy and preliminary hydrologic testing results for Borehole DC-14. This borehole was cored through the Saddle Mountains and Wanapum basalt formations and into the Grande Ronde. Selected zones were hydrologically tested during coring

  1. Borehole DC-15 hydrostratigraphic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    This hydrostratigraphic chart identifies the basic stratigraphy and preliminary hydrologic testing results for Borehole DC-15. This borehole was cored through the Saddle Mountains and Wanapum basalt formations and into the Grande Ronde. Selected zones were hydrologically tested during coring

  2. Seismic Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  3. Approach of seismic upgrading in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Because guide for reviewing seismic design of nuclear power reactor facilities was reworked in 2006, we formulated new Design Base Seismic Motion Ss, and we are doing evaluation of seismic safety (back-check). In Japan, depending on aseismatic importance, equipments are classified into S-class, B-class and C-class. For S-class equipments, we evaluate it on the basis of new Ss, and do seismic upgrading. For B-class and C-class equipments, we do seismic upgrading voluntarily on the basis of the experiences of the Niigataken Chuetsu-Oki (NCO) Earthquake. (author)

  4. Borehole logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    A radioactive borehole logging tool employs an epithermal neutron detector having a neutron counter surrounded by an inner thermal neutron filter and an outer thermal neutron filter. Located between the inner and outer filters is a neutron moderating material for extending the lifetime of epithermal neutrons to enhance the counting rate of such epithermal neutrons by the neutron counter

  5. Geophysical borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, D.; Barton, K.J.; Hearn, K.

    1981-08-01

    Most of the available literature on geophysical borehole logging refers to studies carried out in sedimentary rocks. It is only in recent years that any great interest has been shown in geophysical logging in boreholes in metamorphic and igneous rocks following the development of research programmes associated with geothermal energy and nuclear waste disposal. This report is concerned with the programme of geophysical logging carried out on the three deep boreholes at Altnabreac, Caithness, to examine the effectiveness of these methods in crystalline rock. Of particular importance is the assessment of the performance of the various geophysical sondes run in the boreholes in relation to the rock mass properties. The geophysical data can be used to provide additional in-situ information on the geological, hydrogeological and engineering properties of the rock mass. Fracturing and weathering in the rock mass have a considerable effect on both the design parameters for an engineering structure and the flow of water through the rock mass; hence, the relation between the geophysical properties and the degree of fracturing and weathering is examined in some detail. (author)

  6. Effect of foundation embedment on the seismic response of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Thompson, R.W.; Charman, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of soil-structure interaction during seismic events upon the dynamic response of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor plant (HTGR) have been investigated for both surface-founded and embedded basemats. The influence from foundation embedment has been quantitatively assessed through a series of theoretical studies on plants of various sizes. The surface-founded analyses were performed using frequency-independent soil impedance parameters, while the embedded plant analyses utilized finite element models simulated on the FLUSH computer program. The seismic response of the surface-founded plants has been used to establish the standard-site design in-structure response spectra. These analyses were performed by using the linear modal formulation based on conventional soil stiffness and damping values. They serve as reference solutions to which the response data of the corresponding embedded plants are compared. In these comparison studies the responses of embedded plants were generally found to be lower than those of the corresponding surface-founded plants. Additional studies on the surface-founded plants have recently been performed by considering inelastic soil behavior. These inelastic solutions, which treat the soil as an elasto-plastic medium exhibiting hysteretic unloading-reloading characteristics in time, have reduced the response of surface-founded plants. Numerical results are presented in terms of in-structure response spectra along with other pertinent seismic load data at key levels of the plant. Analysis techniques for future studies using viscoelastic halfspace representation and inelastic finite element modeling for soil are also discussed

  7. Cleaning of boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautio, T.; Alaverronen, M.; Lohva, K.; Teivaala, V.

    2004-09-01

    In terms of long-term safety it is a risk that the boreholes can eventually function as short-circuits between the repository and ground surface. Therefore sealing of investigation boreholes is an important issue for the long- term safety of high-level nuclear waste repositories. In order to seal a borehole properly, the conditions of the borehole have to meet certain predetermined requirements. One of the requirements is that no instruments or materials endangering the plugging operation or the long-term function of the sealing materials, are allowed to be left in the borehole. Sometimes drilling equipment will be left in the hole or it cannot be recovered from the hole with the given constraints of time, cost and resources in spite of attempts. Additionally various measurements may be carried out in the holes after the drilling has been completed and measuring devices may get stuck in holes. Consequently cleaning of the borehole is carried out as an essential activity before sealing can be implemented. There are two common reasons identified for the drill strings to get stuck in holes. First the drill string may get stuck due to acute drilling problems. The second case is where rods are left as casing in a hole either based on the structure of the upper part of the hole or in order to support the hole. To remove the drilling or measuring equipment lost in a borehole, special techniques and professional skill must be applied. Removing measuring equipment from a hole is often demanding and time consuming work. A vital part of the cleaning operation is planning the work in advance. In order to make the plan and to select the suitable methods it is important to know the condition of the stuck material. It is also important to know the exact depth where the equipment are stuck and to have an estimate of the reasons why they have got stuck. It is also very important to know the correct dimensions of the equipment or drill string before commencing the cleaning work

  8. Basic data report for borehole Cabin Baby-1 deepening and hydrologic testing. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.; Hassinger, B.W.; Klaiber, J.A.

    1983-12-01

    Borehole Cabin Baby-1 was originally drilled to a depth of 4159.0 feet below kelly bushing (8.0 feet above ground surface) in 1974 and 1975 as a ''wildcat'' hydrocarbon exploratory well. Control of the borehole was given to the US Department of Energy (DOE) after it was found to be a ''dry hole''. Cabin Baby-1 was reentered, deepened, and hydrologically tested in August and September 1983. The well is located in Section 5, T23S, R31E, just outside the limit of WIPP Zone III, approximately 2.5 miles south of the WIPP exploratory shaft. The deepening and testing of Cabin Baby-1 was undertaken for several reasons: to provide data on the hydrologic properties, including hydrostatic head potential of selected permeable zones in the Bell Canyon Formation; to provide representative fluid samples from selected permeable zones in the Bell Canyon Formation for determination of fluid composition and density; and to define further the stratigraphy of the upper Bell Canyon Formation at the Cabin Baby-1 location. The borehole was deepened from the previous total depth to a new depth of 4298.6 feet below kelly bushing by continuous coring. Field operations related to deepening and logging of the borehole began August 12, 1983 and were completed August 30, 1983. Hydrologic testing activities began August 30, 1983 and were completed September 29, 1983. Drill-stem tests were conducted in four zones in the Bell Canyon Formation, and one test of the Salado Formation was performed. Fluid samples were collected from the Hays and Olds sandstones of the Bell Canyon Formation

  9. Application of the SSMRP methodology to the seismic risk at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Shieh, L.C.; Wells, J.E.

    1983-11-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) has the goal of developing a fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The risk analysis included a detailed seismological evaluation of the region around Zion, Illinois, which provided the earthquake-hazard function and a randomized set of 180 time histories (having peak ground acceleration values up to 1.8 g). These time histories were used as input for dynamic structural response calculations for four different Zion buildings. Detailed finite-element models of the buildings were used. Calculated time histories at piping support points were then used to determine moments throughout critical piping systems. Twenty separate piping models were analyzed. Finally, the responses of piping and safety system components within the buildings were combined with probabilistic failure criteria and event-tree/fault-tree models of the plant safety systems to produce an estimate of the frequency of core melt and radioactive release due to earthquakes

  10. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures

  11. Seismic analysis and testing of clay tile walls at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    The recent DOE 6430.1A General Design Criteria has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and, hence, safety of both new and old facilities to natural phenomenon hazards such as earthquakes and high winds. In order to meet the criteria, an existing unreinforced clay time wall, which is an integral part of a new facility being placed in an old building, has been evaluated for resistance to seismic events. Part I of this paper consists of the analytical studies. The facility was mathematically modeled and analyzed using a finite element program. The material properties used in the analysis are based exclusively on data available in the current engineering literature for masonry blocks and walls. The results of the analysis conclude that the wall is adequate to meet the seismic requirements per the new criteria, but the results of the testing program described in Part II will eventually need to be incorporated into the analysis. Part II documents the results of a testing program to obtain material properties of the masonry and verify the values used in the analysis of Part I. The fact that most of the available testing data is on brick and concrete block and that the condition of the walls throughout the plants is suspect led to the testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar joint shear strength of existing 12-inch walls, (2) compression strength, (3) tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels taken from the existing walls. The test results at this time are fairly inconclusive and have high standard deviations. The testing program is ongoing and is currently being expanded

  12. Seismic safety margins research program. Phase I final report - Plant/site selection and data collection (Project I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, T.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Project I of Phase I of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) comprised two parts: the selection of a representative nuclear power plant/site for study in Phase I and the collection of data needed by the other SSMRP projects. Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in Zion, Illinois, was selected for the SSMRP Phase I studies. Unit 1 of the Zion plant has been validated as a good choice for the Phase I study plant. Although no single nuclear power plant can represent all such plants equally well, selection criteria were developed to maximize the generic implications of Phase I of the SSMRP. On the basis of the selection criteria, the Zion plant and its site were found to be reasonably representative of operating and future plants with regard to its nuclear steam supply system; the type of containment structure (prestressed concrete); its electrical capacity (1100 MWe); its location (the Midwest); the peak seismic acceleration used for design (0.17g); and the properties of the underlying soil (the low-strain shear-wave velocity is 1650 ft/s in a 50- to 100-ft-thick layer of soil overlying sedimentary bedrock). (author)

  13. Neutron borehole logging correction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a method and apparatus is disclosed for logging earth formations traversed by a borehole in which an earth formation is irradiated with neutrons and gamma radiation produced thereby in the formation and in the borehole is detected. A sleeve or shield for capturing neutrons from the borehole and producing gamma radiation characteristic of that capture is provided to give an indication of the contribution of borehole capture events to the total detected gamma radiation. It is then possible to correct from those borehole effects the total detected gamma radiation and any earth formation parameters determined therefrom

  14. Continuous monitoring of volcanoes with borehole strainmeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn

    Monitoring of volcanoes using various physical techniques has the potential to provide important information about the shape, size and location of the underlying magma bodies. Volcanoes erupt when the pressure in a magma chamber some kilometers below the surface overcomes the strength of the intervening rock, resulting in detectable deformations of the surrounding crust. Seismic activity may accompany and precede eruptions and, from the patterns of earthquake locations, inferences may be made about the location of magma and its movement. Ground deformation near volcanoes provides more direct evidence on these, but continuous monitoring of such deformation is necessary for all the important aspects of an eruption to be recorded. Sacks-Evertson borehole strainmeters have recorded strain changes associated with eruptions of Hekla, Iceland and Izu-Oshima, Japan. Those data have made possible well-constrained models of the geometry of the magma reservoirs and of the changes in their geometry during the eruption. The Hekla eruption produced clear changes in strain at the nearest instrument (15 km from the volcano) starting about 30 minutes before the surface breakout. The borehole instrument on Oshima showed an unequivocal increase in the amplitude of the solid earth tides beginning some years before the eruption. Deformational changes, detected by a borehole strainmeter and a very long baseline tiltmeter, and corresponding to the remote triggered seismicity at Long Valley, California in the several days immediately following the Landers earthquake are indicative of pressure changes in the magma body under Long Valley, raising the question of whether such transients are of more general importance in the eruption process. We extrapolate the experience with borehole strainmeters to estimate what could be learned from an installation of a small network of such instruments on Mauna Loa. Since the process of conduit formation from the magma sources in Mauna Loa and other

  15. Evolution of seismic monitoring systems of nuclear power plants. Improvements and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabanero, J. G.; Jimenez Juan, A.

    2010-01-01

    The II. NN. Spanish have a seismic monitoring system (SVS) covering two objectives relevant to nuclear security: determining earthquake leave operation, and specific data that serve to limit or reduce the uncertainties associated with the seismic source, the site and design. Since its construction, the major SVS II. NN. have been equipped with the best time of seismic instrumentation to record earthquakes strong, but with limited resolution for recording in the free field and appropriately moderate earthquakes.

  16. Armenia nuclear power plant. Overview of the present situation and its seismic safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, A.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation covers the problems of seismic safety of the two Armenian WWER type NPPs in the context of the energy situation in Armenia. Since the seismicity of the region is hazardous the upgrading of the seismic level is necessary and is considered feasible. A more complete and systematic approach to this problem is required. In this regard recommendations for seismic and site related safety which should be implemented are cited in the paper and a two phase approach is proposed in view of IAEA Safety Codes and Safety Guides

  17. Directional borehole antenna - Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, L.

    1992-02-01

    A directional antenna has been developed for the borehole radar constructed during phase 2 of the Stripa project. The new antenna can determine the azimuth of a strong reflector with an accuracy of about 3 degrees as confirmed during experiments in Stripa, although the ratio of borehole diameter to wavelength is small, about 0.03. The antenna synthesizes the effect of a loop antenna rotating in the borehole from four signals measured in turn by a stationary antenna. These signals are also used to calculate an electric dipole signal and a check sum which is used to examine the function of the system. The theory of directional antennas is reviewed and used to design an antenna consisting of four parallel wires. The radiation pattern of this antenna is calculated using transmission line theory with due regard to polarization, which is of fundamental importance for the analysis of directional data. In particular the multipole expansion of the field is calculated to describe the antenna radiation pattern. Various sources of error, e.g. the effect of the borehole, are discussed and the methods of calibrating the antenna are reviewed. The ambiguity inherent in a loop antenna can be removed by taking the phase of the signal into account. Typical reflectors in rock, e.g. fracture zones an tunnels, may be modelled as simple geometrical structures. The corresponding analysis is described and exemplified on measurements from Stripa. Radar data is nowadays usually analyzed directly on the computer screen using the program RADINTER developed within the Stripa project. An algorithm for automatic estimation of the parameters of a reflector have been tested with some success. The relation between measured radar data and external coordinates as determined by rotational indicators is finally expressed in terms of Euler angles. (au)

  18. Single-borehole techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.; Moser, H.; Trimborn, P.

    1978-01-01

    Proceeding on the theoretical considerations and on the experience and practice derived from laboratory and field testing, a system consisting of tracer injection units, detector units, measuring probe units and packers is presented, from which the different borehole probes required can be combined. A couple of examples of recent applications shows the position of the Single-Borehole Techniques with respect to the traditional methods used for the measurement of the ground-water flow. A confrontation of the permeabilities of different aquifers consents, both on the basis of the Single-Borehole Techniques as by pumping experiments, the determination of the reliability of the Point-Dilution-Method. The Point-Dilution-Method is giving information about the vertical and horizontal distribution of the permeabilities in an aquifer. By measuring the vertical current in two karst wells, the tributary horizons of a well have been determined, which gave valuable information for the subsequent well construction. Local leakages could be detected by measuring the vertical flow rate through observation wells arranged along a grout curtain erected on both sides of the retaining barrage of the Keban dam. (orig.) [de

  19. Borehole disposal design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANDRIAMAROLAHY, J.N.

    2007-01-01

    In Madagascar, the sealed radioactive sources are used in several socioeconomic sectors such as medicine, industry, research and agriculture. At the end of their useful lives, these radioactive sources become radioactive waste and can be still dangerous because they can cause harmful effects to the public and the environment. This work entitled 'Borehole disposal design concept' consists in putting in place a site of sure storage of the radioactive waste, in particular, sealed radioactive sources. Several technical aspects must be respected to carry out such a site like the geological, geomorphologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, meteorological and demographic conditions. This type of storage is favorable for the developing countries because it is technologically simple and economic. The cost of construction depends on the volume of waste to store and the depth of the Borehole. The Borehole disposal concept provides a good level of safety to avoid the human intrusion. The future protection of the generations against the propagation of the radiations ionizing is then assured. [fr

  20. Nonlinear seismic soil-structure interaction analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, J.K.; Setlur, A.V.; Pathak, D.V.

    1977-01-01

    The heterogeneous and nonlinear soil medium and the detailed three-dimensional structure are synthesized to determine the seismic response to soil-structure systems. The approach is particularly attractive in a design office environment since it: a) leads to interactive motion at the soil-structure interface; b) uses existing public domain programs such as SAPIV, LUSH and FLUSH with marginal modifications; and c) meets current regulatory requirements for soil-structure interaction analysis. Past methods differ from each other depending on the approach adopted for soil and structure representations and procedures for solving the governing differential equations. Advantages and limitations of these methods are reviewed. In the current approach, the three-dimensional structure is represented by the dynamic characteristics of its fixed base condition. This representation is ideal when structures are designed to be within elastic range. An important criterion is the design of the nuclear power plant structures. Model damping coefficients are varied to reflect the damping properties of different structural component materials. The detailed structural model is systematically reduced to reflect important dynamic behavior with simultaneous storing of intermediate information for retrieval of detailed structural response. Validity of the approach has been established with simple numerical experiments. (Auth.)

  1. Observations on some current issues pertaining to nuclear power plant seismic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper the author addresses some of those areas in which it is believed major research and development should be undertaken in the years immediately ahead if significant advances in earthquake engineering especially applicable to nuclear power plant design are to be achieved. From the standpoint of excitation (loading) the paper dwells extensively on concepts of so-called effective acceleration, with some comments also given on response spectra and modifications thereto. In the areas of resistance of structures attention is devoted to the topics of damping, ductility (energy absorption), and associated margins of strength to resist overloading. The need for developing comprehensive field measurement programs of ground and structural response throughout the world is cited. Future progress in earthquake engineering hinges in large part on developing a confirmatory basis for the technology, partly through continuing developments of analysis techniques and corresponding laboratory testing, but most importantly field observations in actual earthquakes which can be interpreted rationally to lend verification and support to the theoretical and design bases. Finally, the important topic of equipment seismic resistance is singled out for attention. (orig.)

  2. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Characterization and Design Parameters for the Sites of the Nuclear Power Plants of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savy, J.B.; Foxall, W.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), under the auspices of the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP) is supporting in-depth safety assessments (ISA) of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union for the purpose of evaluating the safety and upgrades necessary to the stock of nuclear power plants in Ukraine. For this purpose the Hazards Mitigation Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been asked to assess the seismic hazard and design parameters at the sites of the nuclear power plants in Ukraine. The probabilistic seismic hazard (PSH) estimates were updated using the latest available data and knowledge from LLNL, the U.S. Geological Survey, and other relevant recent studies from several consulting companies. Special attention was given to account for the local seismicity, the deep focused earthquakes of the Vrancea zone, in Romania, the region around Crimea and for the system of potentially active faults associated with the Pripyat Dniepro Donnetts rift. Aleatory (random) uncertainty was estimated from the available data and the epistemic (knowledge) uncertainty was estimated by considering the existing models in the literature and the interpretations of a small group of experts elicited during a workshop conducted in Kiev, Ukraine, on February 2-4, 1999

  3. Research borehole drilling activity for boreholes DH-18, DH-19, DC-12, DC-13, DC-14, DC-15, and deepening of existing borehole DC-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This report is an environmental evaluation of the impacts of proposed borehole drilling activities at the Hanford Site, northwest of Richland, Washington. The proposed action is to drill six research boreholes ranging in depth from 137 to 1372 meters (m) [250 to 4500 +- feet (ft)]. In addition, an existing borehole (DC-7) will be extended from 1249 to 1524 m (4099 to 5000 +- ft). The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) borehole drilling activities is to collect data on in situ rock formations that are considered potentialy suitable for nuclear waste repositories. The technical program efforts necessary to identify and qualify specific underground waste facility sites in candidate rock formations include geologic and hydrologic studies (seismicity and tectonics, rock structure and stratigraphy, lithology, etc.). Borehole drilling is an integral part of the geological studies and is essential to a thorough understanding of potentially suitable geologic formations. The purpose of the proposed drilling activities is to obtain data for evaluating Columbia River basalts that are being evaluated by the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program to determine their suitability potential for nuclear waste repositories. Unavoidable impact to the environment is limited primarily to the clearing of land needed for access and drilling operations. Considerations exercised during site preparation, drilling, and subsequent site restoration will limit modification of the natural environment to the minimum required for accomplishment of test objectives

  4. Reserve seismic capacity determination of a nuclear power plant braced frame with piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has been asked by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to investigate the inelastic behavior of a representative non-category I structure to determine the amount of reserve seismic capacity that is available beyond elastic design levels. This reserve capacity can be an important consideration when evaluating the ability of existing structures to withstand upgraded seismic hazards. (orig.)

  5. An experimental investigation for scalability of the seismic response of microconcrete model nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Dove, R.C.; Dunwoody, W.E.; Farrar, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the results from tests including reduced stiffnesses found in the prototype and 1/4 scale model, implications of the test results on the validity of past tests, and implications of these results from the 1986 tests on the seismic behavior of actual Seismic Category I Structures and their attached equipment. (orig./HP)

  6. Development of a seismic source model for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of nuclear power plant sites in Switzerland: the view from PEGASOS Expert Group 4 (EG1d)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemer, S.; Garcia-Fernandez, M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2009-01-01

    We present a seismogenic source model for site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard assessment at the sites of Swiss nuclear power plants. Our model is one of four developed in the framework of the PEGASOS project; it contains a logic tree with nine levels of decision-making. The two primary sources of input used in the areal zonation developed by us are the historical and instrumental seismicity record and large-scale geological/rheological units. From this, we develop a zonation of six macro zones, refined in a series of seven decision steps up to a maximum of 13 zones. Within zones, activity rates are either assumed homogeneous or smoothed using a Gaussian kernel with width of 5 or 15 km. To estimate recurrence rate, we assume a double truncated Gutenberg-Richter law, and consider five models of recurrence parameters with different degrees of freedom. Models are weighted in the logic tree using a weighted Akaike score. The maximum magnitude is estimated following the EPRI approach. We perform extensive sensitivity analyses in rate and hazard space in order to assess the role of de-clustering, the completeness model, quarry contamination, border properties, stationarity, regional b-value and magnitude-dependent hypocentral depth. (author)

  7. Development of a seismic source model for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment of nuclear power plant sites in Switzerland: the view from PEGASOS Expert Group 4 (EG1d)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemer, S. [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Garcia-Fernandez, M. [Spanish Council for Scientific Research, Museum of Natural History, Dept. of Volcanology and Geophysics, Madrid (Spain); Burg, J.-P. [Institute of Geology, ETH Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    We present a seismogenic source model for site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard assessment at the sites of Swiss nuclear power plants. Our model is one of four developed in the framework of the PEGASOS project; it contains a logic tree with nine levels of decision-making. The two primary sources of input used in the areal zonation developed by us are the historical and instrumental seismicity record and large-scale geological/rheological units. From this, we develop a zonation of six macro zones, refined in a series of seven decision steps up to a maximum of 13 zones. Within zones, activity rates are either assumed homogeneous or smoothed using a Gaussian kernel with width of 5 or 15 km. To estimate recurrence rate, we assume a double truncated Gutenberg-Richter law, and consider five models of recurrence parameters with different degrees of freedom. Models are weighted in the logic tree using a weighted Akaike score. The maximum magnitude is estimated following the EPRI approach. We perform extensive sensitivity analyses in rate and hazard space in order to assess the role of de-clustering, the completeness model, quarry contamination, border properties, stationarity, regional b-value and magnitude-dependent hypocentral depth. (author)

  8. Digital signal processing of data from borehole creep closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Patrick, W.C.; Duplancic, N.

    1987-01-01

    Digital signal processing, a technique commonly used in the fields of electrical engineering and communication technology, has been successfully used to analyze creep closure data obtained from a 0.91 m diameter by 5.13 deep borehole in bedded salt. By filtering the ''noise'' component of the closure data from a test borehole, important data trends were made more evident and average creep closure rates were able to be calculated. This process provided accurate estimates of closure rates that are used in the design of lined boreholes in which heat-generating transuranic nuclear wastes are emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  9. Statistical analysis of the variation of floor vibrations in nuclear power plants subject to seismic loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jussila, Vilho [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Kemistintie 3, 02230 Espoo (Finland); Li, Yue [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Fülöp, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.fulop@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Kemistintie 3, 02230 Espoo (Finland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Floor flexibility plays a non-negligible role in amplifying horizontal vibrations. • COV of in-floor horizontal and vertical acceleration are 0.15–0.25 and 0.25–0.55. • In-floor variation of vibrations is higher in lower floors. • Floor spectra from limited nodes underestimates vibrations by a factor of 1.5–1.75. - Abstract: Floor vibration of a reactor building subjected to seismic loads was investigated, with the aim of quantifying the variability of vibrations on each floor. A detailed 3D building model founded on the bedrock was excited simultaneously in three directions by artificial accelerograms compatible with Finnish ground response spectra. Dynamic simulation for 21 s was carried out using explicit time integration. The extracted results of the simulation were acceleration in several floor locations, transformed to pseudo-acceleration (PSA) spectra in the next stage. At first, the monitored locations on the floors were estimated by engineering judgement in order to arrive at a feasible number of floor nodes for post processing of the data. It became apparent that engineering judgment was insufficient to depict the key locations with high floor vibrations, which resulted in un-conservative vibration estimates. For this reason, a more systematic approach was later considered, in which nodes of the floors were selected with a more refined grid of 2 m. With this method, in addition to the highest PSA peaks in all directions, the full vibration distribution in each floor can be determined. A statistical evaluation of the floor responses was also carried out in order to define floor accelerations and PSAs with high confidence of non-exceedance. The conclusion was that in-floor variability can be as high as 50–60% and models with sufficiently dense node grids should be used in order to achieve a realistic estimate of floor vibration under seismic action. The effects of the shape of the input spectra, damping, and flexibility of the

  10. Statistical analysis of the variation of floor vibrations in nuclear power plants subject to seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jussila, Vilho; Li, Yue; Fülöp, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Floor flexibility plays a non-negligible role in amplifying horizontal vibrations. • COV of in-floor horizontal and vertical acceleration are 0.15–0.25 and 0.25–0.55. • In-floor variation of vibrations is higher in lower floors. • Floor spectra from limited nodes underestimates vibrations by a factor of 1.5–1.75. - Abstract: Floor vibration of a reactor building subjected to seismic loads was investigated, with the aim of quantifying the variability of vibrations on each floor. A detailed 3D building model founded on the bedrock was excited simultaneously in three directions by artificial accelerograms compatible with Finnish ground response spectra. Dynamic simulation for 21 s was carried out using explicit time integration. The extracted results of the simulation were acceleration in several floor locations, transformed to pseudo-acceleration (PSA) spectra in the next stage. At first, the monitored locations on the floors were estimated by engineering judgement in order to arrive at a feasible number of floor nodes for post processing of the data. It became apparent that engineering judgment was insufficient to depict the key locations with high floor vibrations, which resulted in un-conservative vibration estimates. For this reason, a more systematic approach was later considered, in which nodes of the floors were selected with a more refined grid of 2 m. With this method, in addition to the highest PSA peaks in all directions, the full vibration distribution in each floor can be determined. A statistical evaluation of the floor responses was also carried out in order to define floor accelerations and PSAs with high confidence of non-exceedance. The conclusion was that in-floor variability can be as high as 50–60% and models with sufficiently dense node grids should be used in order to achieve a realistic estimate of floor vibration under seismic action. The effects of the shape of the input spectra, damping, and flexibility of the

  11. Estimation of seismic return periods in the Laguna Verde nuclear plant; Estimacion de periodos de retorno sismico en la PNLV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores R, J.H

    1992-01-15

    The study of seismic risk in the area of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant (PNLV) and its surroundings, one carries out estimating the different return periods and the occurrence probability in different intervals of time (5, 75, 100, 125, 150 years starting from the distribution of first type of Gumbel (G1) of extreme values (Burton, 1986), the value that was used to evaluate the useful life of the PNLV was of 50 years, the other periods will be occupy to evaluate 'temporal' nuclear cemeteries, that is to say for diminish the radioactive activity of the fuel assemblies already burned in the reactor pool or in a near place to the place. The seismic data that were used for the analysis were of the seismic catalog that it was elaborated from (1920-1982), around the place whose seismic half magnitude was of 5 grades Richter and a depth 65 km, these earthquakes are classified as shallow earthquakes, which are located in the continental plaque of North-America, these they are induced by the efforts of push of the plaque of Cocos, existing 36% of intermediate and 2 of deep earthquakes. (Author)

  12. Estimation of seismic return periods in the Laguna Verde nuclear plant; Estimacion de periodos de retorno sismico en la PNLV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores R, J H

    1992-01-15

    The study of seismic risk in the area of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant (PNLV) and its surroundings, one carries out estimating the different return periods and the occurrence probability in different intervals of time (5, 75, 100, 125, 150 years starting from the distribution of first type of Gumbel (G1) of extreme values (Burton, 1986), the value that was used to evaluate the useful life of the PNLV was of 50 years, the other periods will be occupy to evaluate 'temporal' nuclear cemeteries, that is to say for diminish the radioactive activity of the fuel assemblies already burned in the reactor pool or in a near place to the place. The seismic data that were used for the analysis were of the seismic catalog that it was elaborated from (1920-1982), around the place whose seismic half magnitude was of 5 grades Richter and a depth 65 km, these earthquakes are classified as shallow earthquakes, which are located in the continental plaque of North-America, these they are induced by the efforts of push of the plaque of Cocos, existing 36% of intermediate and 2 of deep earthquakes. (Author)

  13. Borehole Plugging-Materials Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulick, C.W. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    This report discusses the background and first year's results of the grouting materials development program for plugging boreholes associated with the Nuclear Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The grouts are to be pumpable, impermeable, and durable for many thousands of years. The work was done at the Concrete Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES), Vicksburg, Mississippi. The workability, strength, porosity, bonding, expansion, and permeability data are summarized and discussed. The work is continuing at WES

  14. Selecting the seismic HRA approach for Savannah River Plant PRA revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papouchado, K.; Salaymeh, J.

    1993-10-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) has prepared a level I probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), Rev. 0 of reactor operations for externally-initiated events including seismic events. The SRS PRA, Rev. 0 Seismic HRA received a critical review that expressed skepticism with the approach used for human reliability analysis because it had not been previously used and accepted in other published PRAs. This report provides a review of published probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), the associated methodology guidance documents, and the psychological literature to identify parameters important to seismic human reliability analysis (HRA). It also describes a recommended approach for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) PRA. The SRS seismic event PRA performs HRA to account for the contribution of human errors in the accident sequences. The HRA of human actions during and after a seismic event is an area subject to many uncertainties and involves significant analyst judgment. The approach recommended by this report is based on seismic HRA methods and associated issues and concerns identified from the review of these referenced documents that represent the current state-of-the- art knowledge and acceptance in the seismic HRA field

  15. Application of bounding spectra to seismic design of piping based on the performance of above ground piping in power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    This report extends the potential application of Bounding Spectra evaluation procedures, developed as part of the A-46 Unresolved Safety Issue applicable to seismic verification of in-situ electrical and mechanical equipment, to in-situ safety related piping in nuclear power plants. The report presents a summary of earthquake experience data which define the behavior of typical U.S. power plant piping subject to strong motion earthquakes. The report defines those piping system caveats which would assure the seismic adequacy of the piping systems which meet those caveats and whose seismic demand are within the bounding spectra input. Based on the observed behavior of piping in strong motion earthquakes, the report describes the capabilities of the piping system to carry seismic loads as a function of the type of connection (i.e. threaded versus welded). This report also discusses in some detail the basic causes and mechanisms for earthquake damages and failures to power plant piping systems

  16. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Jansen, G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole. 5 claims, 1 figure

  17. Test and evaluation about damping characteristics of hanger supports for nuclear power plant piping systems (Seismic Damping Ratio Evaluation Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, H.; Ito, A.; Tanaka, K.; Niino, T.; Gotoh, N.

    1981-01-01

    Generally, damping phenomena of structures and equipments is caused by very complex energy dissipation. Especially, as piping systems are composed of many components, it is very difficult to evaluate damping characteristics of its system theoretically. On the other hand, the damping value for aseismic design of nuclear power plants is very important design factor to decide seismic response loads of structures, equipments and piping systems. The very extensive studies titled SDREP (Seismic Damping Ratio Evaluation Program) were performed to establish proper damping values for seismic design of piping as a joint work among a university, electric companies and plant makers. In SDREP, various systematic vibration tests were conducted to investigate factors which may contribute to damping characteristics of piping systems and to supplement the data of the pre-operating tests. This study is related to the component damping characteristics tests of that program. The object of this study is to clarify damping characteristics and mechanism of hanger supports used in piping systems, and to establish the evaluation technique of dispersing energy at hanger support points and its effect to the total damping ability of piping system. (orig./WL)

  18. Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1 and 2). Proposed modifications to increase the seismic capability of equipment and main structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez Villalobos, A.; Monette, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    Within the framework of the European Community's PHARE Programme of improvement to facilities, their operating systems, equipment and buildings of the Kozloduy NPP in Bulgaria, plant safety during seismic events is considered to be an issue of overriding importance, especially in view of the earthquakes the region suffered during the last decade. Westinghouse Energy Systems International (WESI) and Empresarios Agrupados (EA) have initiated an intensive programme for physical upgrading of equipment with a view to augmenting its seismic capability and, at the same time, to studying design modifications in the diesel-generator buildings, pump house and main building structures (turbines, electrical building). The implementation of these modifications requires an in situ inspection of the real conditions of the various elements, analyses, conceptual design and detail engineering, all of which has to be done in short periods of time using resources available at the plant. This activity is performed by the companies mentioned above, with the collaboration of two engineering companies, Energoproekt of Bulgaria and INITEC of Spain. This paper describes the activities developed and the treatment given to the various aspects of improvement of the seismic capability of equipment and structures. (author)

  19. Comparison of ex-USSR norms and current international practice in design of seismic resistant nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptenbuchner, B.; David, M.

    1995-01-01

    Seismic hazard has been estimated according to ex-USSR norms in the original designs of WWER type Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) in former Soviet Union as well as in all former east European countries. For some steps of the design the national standards has been also taken into account. The original ex-USSR norms and instructions has been several times changed and improved during the time. This contribution is dealing with the development of ex-USSR norms and regulations with the aim to recognise some most important differentiations in comparison with corresponding western or international ones from point of view of civil structures. The understanding of relations of these documents is very important for seismic qualification and upgrading of WWER-type, NPPs. The main Soviet/Russian Standards and Regulations related to the seismic design and qualification of NPP structures as SNiP II-A.12-69, VSN 15-78, SNiP II-7-81, PiNAE G-7-002-86, NTD SEV etc. have been taken into consideration and compared with western or international standards as IAEA 50-SG-S1, IAEA 50-SG-D15, KTA 2201.1-6, ASCE 4-86 etc. The numerical examples of structural seismic qualification has been elaborated according to different standards for better understanding and in order to determine the degree of safety referring to corresponding standards. The authors has tried also to take into account the way of application of ex-USSR norms. The comparison of different norms and regulations has been analysed and corresponding conclusions and recommendations have been derived. These conclusions and recommendations can be helpful by the seismic qualification and upgrading of WWER-type NPPs. (author)

  20. Seismic reflection data report: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hern, J.L.; Powers, D.W.; Barrows, L.J.

    1978-12-01

    Three seismic reflection (Vibroseis) surveys conducted from 1976 through 1978 by Sandia Laboratories to support investigations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described. Volume I describes the purpose, field parameters, and data processing parameters. Volume II contains uninterpreted processed lines and shotpoint maps. Data interpretations will be the subject of the subsequent reports. The data collected during these three surveys total 77 line miles; 72 line miles of this are on or very near the WIPP site. The first of the surveys (1976 SAN) covered 25 line miles and was conducted similarly to previous petroleum industry surveys in the area. 1976 SAN supplemented existing petroleum industry data. The two subsequent surveys (1977 X and 1978 Y) used shorter geophone spacings (110'), higher signal frequencies (up to 100 Hz), and higher data sampling rates (2 ms.) to better define the shallow zone (less than 4000') of primary interest. 1977 X contained 47 line miles on or near the WIPP site and over several structural features northwest of the site. 1978 Y contains 5 line miles over a one square mile area near the center of the WIPP site. These data show increasing discrimination of shallow reflectors as data collection parameters were modified. Data tables of recording and processing parameters are included. A fourth Vibroseis survey was conducted at the WIPP site in 1978 by Grant Geophysical Company for Bechtel; the data are not in final form and are not included. Petroleum industry data and an inconclusive weight-drop survey, conducted in 1976, are also not included in this report

  1. Seismic and wind upgrade of buildings 707A and 779 at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, S.V.; Hom, S.; McGovern, L.J.; Terkun, V.

    1991-01-01

    The structural upgrade of two existing facilities at the US Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant site has recently been completed. Two existing critical buildings were strengthened to enable them to withstand the design basis earthquake (DBE) forces and the design basis wind (DBW) forces without breach of containment. These buildings were constructed in the 1960s, with minimal seismic considerations. Building 707A is a two-story structure of precast concrete elements with cast-in-place topping slabs with 27,000 sq. feet of floor space. Building 779 is a two-story original structure and several additions, with floor space of 64,000 sq. feet. The original structure consists of cast-in-place concrete with masonry infill shear walls. The additions are primarily precast concrete with unreinforced masonry infill walls. The DBE was the maximum credible event with a magnitude of 6.0 occurring 16 miles from the site. The evaluation criteria was generated spectra at bedrock with a horizontal zero period acceleration of 0.14g. Bedrock-to-ground soil amplification factors were used to evaluate the buildings. The buildings were also required to withstand the DBW of 161 mph. Because of constraints associated with working inside, the structural upgrades were mostly confined to exterior work. The modifications utilized the existing roof and floor diaphragms, and primarily consisted of large exterior concrete buttresses and associated steel chords and collectors. A system of steel strongbacks was also used in some locations. Connections between precast elements of Building 707A had to be strengthened for ductility and shear transfer. The significance of this work is the successful implementation of a highly complex and comprehensive design retrofit of two very critical and important facilities, allowing for continued operation and minimal impact, and using practical and overall cost-effective strengthening schemes

  2. Seismic analysis of Industrial Waste Landfill 4 at Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This calculation was to seismically evaluate Landfill IV at Y-12 as required by Tennessee Rule 1200-1-7-04(2) for seismic impact zones. The calculation verifies that the landfill meets the seismic requirements of the Tennessee Division of Solid Waste, ''Earthquake Evaluation Guidance Document.'' The theoretical displacements of 0.17 in. and 0.13 in. for the design basis earthquake are well below the limiting seimsic slope stability design criteria. There is no potential for liquefaction due to absence of chohesionless soils, or for loss or reduction of shear strength for the clays at this site as result of earthquake vibration. The vegetative cover on slopes will most likely be displaced and move during a large seismic event, but this is not considered a serious deficiency because the cover is not involved in the structural stability of the landfill and there would be no release of waste to the environment

  3. Seismic strengthening of nuclear power plants V1-V2 structures in Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.

    1993-01-01

    The structural upgrading of main buildings of Bohunice NPP units V1 and V2 is described in this presentation. Design criteria for structural upgrading are included. Since the seismic upgrading of the existing NPP is usually very complicated and expensive task, designer is obliged to find the optimal solution between the economics and reliability of the upgrading. The assistance of IAEA missions during the process of Bohunice seismic upgrading is considered very fruitful

  4. Development, Dedication and Application of an Automatic Seismic Trip System for Nuclear Power Plants of Taiwan Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Hsin-kai; Lee, Chung-lin; Chen, Chang-kuo; Hsu, Yao-tung; Shyu, Shian-shing

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the setups of Automatic Seismic Trip System (ASTS), including development, dedication and implementation, for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). The purposed ASTS was designed to trip the reactor when big earthquake occurs. These ASTS were classified as class 1E equipment. They were developed and dedicated for safety applications in accordance with IEEE 323-1983, IEEE 344-1987, IEEE 383-1974 and Reg. Guide 1.180 R1. In order to meet the technical specification required by TPC, three sub-units in the ASTS were developed: Earthquake sensors: Kinemetrices FBA-23 triaxial accelerometers are selected since they were successfully used in Taiwan for seismic monitoring for more than 10 years. Signal conditioning module: It is designed to reduce noise from motion accelerometer (FBA-23) and then transmit seismic signal to the set-point and trip unit via instrument amplify circuit, 0.1 to 10Hz band pass filter circuit, absolute-value converter and voltage to current converter. Trip control module: after comparing the seismic signal level and set-point, the result will decide whether to drive the output relay or not. The output relay is used as the interface between ASTS and the reactor protection system in NPP. For the commercial grade item dedication for safety application, five processes were conducted. Those processes are Seismic test: to use plant specific required response spectrum (RRS), the test required spectrum should envelop RRS: Seismic auto-trip accuracy test: must not trip when filtered PA below set point minus 0.05g, and must trip when filtered PA exceeds set point over 0.05g. Trip signals occurred within 10 second interval are considered as same events: NEMA4 water proof test for sensor box: Anti-radiation test: 8.76x100 rads over 40 years: EMI/EMC test: follow RG 1.180 requirement. The ASTS were installed in three NPPs, six units in total, without connection to RPS in 2006. After one year reliable operation, the

  5. Uemachi flexure zone investigated by borehole database and numeical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Takemura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Uemachi fault zone extending north and south, locates in the center of the Osaka City, in Japan. The Uemachi fault is a blind reverse fault and forms the flexure zone. The effects of the Uemachi flexure zone are considered in constructing of lifelines and buildings. In this region, the geomorphological survey is difficult because of the regression of transgression. Many organizations have carried out investigations of fault structures. Various surveys have been conducted, such as seismic reflection survey in and around Osaka. Many borehole data for construction conformations have been collected and the geotechnical borehole database has been constructed. The investigation with several geological borehole data provides the subsurface geological information to the geotechnical borehole database. Various numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the growth of a blind reverse fault in unconsolidated sediments. The displacement of the basement was given in two ways. One is based on the fault movement, such as dislocation model, the other is a movement of basement block of hanging wall. The Drucker-Prager and elastic model were used for the sediment and basement, respectively. The simulation with low and high angle fault movements, show the good agree with the actual distribution of the marine clay inferred from borehole data in the northern and southern Uemachi fault flexure zone, respectively. This research is partly funded by the Comprehensive Research on the Uemachi Fault Zone (from FY2010 to FY2012) by The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

  6. Borehole DC-6 hydrostratigraphic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, R.E.

    1981-09-01

    This hydrostratigraphic chart for Borehole DC-6 identifies the basic stratigraphy and preliminary hydrologic test results. This borehole was cored for obtaining stratigraphic data and only that portion within the Grande Ronde formation remains open for hydrologic testing. The upper two formations were cased and cemented off

  7. Instantaneous response spectrum in seismic testing of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrone, A.

    1977-01-01

    Seismic response spectra, as used in seismic analyses, give the maximum responses of single degree of freedom oscillators without consideration of the different time in the seismic time history at which each of the maximum responses occur. For response spectrum seismic analysis, the use of time-independent maximum responses is appropriate. The time dependece is considered in a statistical manner, for multi-degree of freedom systems, usually by combining the modal effects by the square root of the sum of the squares. For seismic testing of electrical equipment. IEEE Std. 344-1975 makes use of the response spectrum to define the input motion of the shake table. One of the basic requirements is that the test response spectrum (TRS) that is, the response spectrum produced by the shake table motion, should envelop the required response spectrum (RRS) calculated from the building analysis at the support point of the equipment being tested. This paper presents the concept of instantaneous response spectrum (IRS) as the response of single degree of freedom oscillators at a particular time. It demonstrates that a shake table random motion whose standard TRS envelops the RRS does not necessarily satisfy the enveloping requirement instantaneously. (Auth.)

  8. Deep Borehole Field Test Laboratory and Borehole Testing Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); MacKinnon, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gardner, W. Payton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sevougian, S. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jang, Je-Hun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stein, Emily R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daley, Tom [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) of high-level radioactive wastes has been considered an option for geological isolation for many years (Hess et al. 1957). Recent advances in drilling technology have decreased costs and increased reliability for large-diameter (i.e., ≥50 cm [19.7”]) boreholes to depths of several kilometers (Beswick 2008; Beswick et al. 2014). These advances have therefore also increased the feasibility of the DBD concept (Brady et al. 2009; Cornwall 2015), and the current field test design will demonstrate the DBD concept and these advances. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013) specifically recommended developing a research and development plan for DBD. DOE sought input or expression of interest from States, local communities, individuals, private groups, academia, or any other stakeholders willing to host a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT). The DBFT includes drilling two boreholes nominally 200m [656’] apart to approximately 5 km [16,400’] total depth, in a region where crystalline basement is expected to begin at less than 2 km depth [6,560’]. The characterization borehole (CB) is the smaller-diameter borehole (i.e., 21.6 cm [8.5”] diameter at total depth), and will be drilled first. The geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, geomechanical and thermal testing will take place in the CB. The field test borehole (FTB) is the larger-diameter borehole (i.e., 43.2 cm [17”] diameter at total depth). Surface handling and borehole emplacement of test package will be demonstrated using the FTB to evaluate engineering feasibility and safety of disposal operations (SNL 2016).

  9. Numerical Study on the Seismic Performance of a Steel–Concrete Hybrid Supporting Structure in Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical investigation on the seismic performance of a steel–concrete hybrid structure consisting of reinforced concrete (RC tubular columns and steel braced truss with A-shaped steel frames, which is a novel supporting structural system to house air-cooled condensers (ACC in large-capacity thermal power plants (TPPs. First, the finite element (FE modeling approach for this hybrid structure using the software ABAQUS was validated by a range of pseudo-dynamic tests (PDTs performed on a 1/8-scaled sub-structure. The failure process, lateral displacement responses, changing rules of dynamic characteristic parameters and lateral stiffness with increase of peak ground acceleration (PGA were presented here. Then, nonlinear time-history analysis of the prototype structure was carried out. The dynamic characteristics, base shear force, lateral deformation capacity, stiffness deterioration and damage characteristics were investigated. Despite the structural complexity and irregularity, both experimental and numerical results indicate that the overall seismic performance of this steel–concrete hybrid supporting structure meets the seismic design requirements with respect to the high-intensity earthquakes.

  10. Structural analysis of the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant subjected to the design basis accident and seismic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Daniel; Codina, Ramón H.; Curadelli, Oscar; Martínez, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Structural analysis of CAREM-25 NPP is presented. • Full 3D numerical model was developed. • Transient thermal and static structural analyses were performed. • Modeling guidelines for numerical structural analysis of NPP are recommended. • Envelope condition of DBA dominates the structural behavior. - Abstract: In this paper, a numerical study about the structural response of the Argentine nuclear power plant CAREM-25 subjected to the design basis accident (DBA) and seismic loads is presented. Taking into account the hardware capabilities available, a full 3D finite element model was adopted. A significant part of the building was modeled using more than 2 M solid elements. In order to take into account the foundation flexibility, linear springs were used. The springs and the model were calibrated against a greater model used to study the soil-structure interaction. The structure was subjected to the DBA and seismic loads as combinations defined by ASME international code. First, a transient thermal analysis was performed with the conditions defined by DBA and evaluating the time history of the temperature of the model, each 1 h until 36 h. The final results of this stage were considered as initial conditions of a static structural analysis including the pressure defined by DBA. Finally, an equivalent static analysis was performed to analyze the seismic response considering the design basis spectra for the site. The different loads were combined and the abnormal/extreme environmental combination was the most unfavorable for the structure, defining the design.

  11. Evaluation and summary of seismic response of above ground nuclear power plant piping to strong motion earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the observations and experience which has been developed relative to the seismic behavior of above-ground, building-supported, industrial type piping (similar to piping used in nuclear power plants) in strong motion earthquakes. The paper also contains observations regarding the response of piping in experimental tests which attempted to excite the piping to failure. Appropriate conclusions regarding the behavior of such piping in large earthquakes and recommendations as to future design of such piping to resist earthquake motion damage are presented based on observed behavior in large earthquakes and simulated shake table testing

  12. The Seismic Analysis of 800kV Gas Insulated Switchgear (GIS) for the Dangjin Thermal Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, I.H.; Song, W.P.; Kweon, K.Y. [Hyosung Corporation (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    800kV GIS (Gas Insulated Switchgear) which was first developed in korea at Dec. 1998 and is going to be installed in the dangjin thermal plant. We checked the stability of 800kV GIS under seismic load. pro-ENGINEER and PATRAN were used for modeling exactly 800kV GIS geometry. The 800kV GIS was modeled as shell elements for the enclosures and beam elements for the conductors and the support insulators. (author). 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Combined effects of traveling seismic waves and soil nonlinearity on nuclear power plant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.H.; Charman, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of ground motion nonuniformity on the seismic input have been actively studied in recent years by considering the passage of traveling seismic waves. These studies gave rise to a new class of soil-structure interaction problems in which the seismic input is modified as a result of the spatial variations of ground motion. The phenomena were usually studied by using the elastic half-space simulation or discrete spring-models for modeling the soil medium. Finite element methods were also used recently on a limited scope. Results obtained from these investigations are often manifested by an attenuation of translational excitation along with an addition of rotational ground motion input. The decrease in structural response resulting from the input loss in the translational component was often insignificant since the response reduction tends to be offset by the effects from rotational input. The traveling wave effects have, so far, been investigated within the framework of linear theory with soil nonlinearity ignored. Conversely, the incorporation of soil nonlinearity in soil-structure interaction analyses has been done without including wave effect. Seismic analyses considering the hysteretic behavior of soil have been performed using highly idealized models for steady-state solution. More elaborate nonlinear seismic models deal with only the strain-dependent soil modulus rather than the transient unloading-reloading type of hysteretic characteristics of soil under a time-function input of earthquake trace. Apparently, the traveling wave effect and soil nonlinearity have been separately treated in the past. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that these two major effects can be combined in one model such that the influence of wave passage is reflected through the hysteretic behavior of soil particles, and thereby achieving significant reduction in seismic loads. (orig./RW)

  14. Development of a Lunar Borehole Seismometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, P. R.; Siegler, M.; Malin, P. E.; Passmore, K.; Zacny, K.; Avenson, B.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.; Nagihara, S.

    2017-12-01

    Nearly all seismic stations on Earth are buried below the ground. Burial provides controlled temperatures and greater seismic coupling at little cost. This is also true on the Moon and other planetary bodies. Burial of a seismometer under just 1 meter of lunar regolith would provide an isothermal environment and potentially reduce signal scattering noise by an order of magnitude. Here we explain how we will use an existing NASA SBIR and PIDDP funded subsurface heat flow probe deployment system to bury a miniaturized, broadband, optical seismometer 1 meter below the lunar surface. The system is sensitive, low mass and low power. We believe this system offers a compelling architecture for NASA's future seismic exploration of the solar system. We will report on a prototype 3-axis, broadband seismometer package that has been tested under low pressure conditions in lunar-regolith simulant. The deployment mechanism reaches 1m depth in less than 25 seconds. Our designed and tested system: 1) Would be deployed at least 1m below the lunar surface to achieve isothermal conditions without thermal shielding or heaters, increase seismic coupling, and decrease noise. 2) Is small (our prototype probe is a cylinder 50mm in diameter, 36cm long including electronics, potentially as small as 10 cm with sensors only). 3) Is low-mass (each sensor is 0.1 kg, so an extra redundancy 4-component seismograph plus 1.5 kg borehole sonde and recorder weighs less than 2 kg and is feasibly smaller with miniaturized electronics). 4) Is low-power (our complete 3-sensor borehole seismographic system's power consumption is about half a Watt, or 7% of Apollo's 7.1 W average and 30% of the InSight SEIS's 1.5W winter-time heating system). 5) Is broadband and highly sensitive (the "off the shelf" sensors have a wide passband: 0.005-1000 Hz - and high dynamic range of 183 dB (or about 10-9g Hz-1/2, with hopes for simple modifications to be at least an order of magnitude better). Burial also aids the

  15. Seismic effects on the reliability of polar cranes for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.; Friedrich, H.; Knoefel, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements of nuclear safety reactor components have to be designed aseismically. A model for studying simulated seismic effects on the reliability of containment equipment polar cranes is presented. Based on this model vertical and horizontal motions of the crane are investigated. Emphasis is laid on non-linearities caused by malfunctions such as lift of the crane from the runaway, lift of the trolley from the beams, slackening of the ropes as well as sliding of blocked track wheels. Seismic excitations are simulated by computer produced accelerograms

  16. NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] 51 seismic hole histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report is a compilation of data from fifty-one shallow boreholes drilled within the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands. The boreholes were drilled to determine the alluvial thickness and subsurface structure. Once drilled the boreholes were used to emplace explosive charges of three seismic refraction surveys conducted in 1981, 1983 and 1984. The information presented in this report includes location maps, daily activities and reviews of hole condition

  17. Evaluation of geophysical borehole studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotzen, O.; Duran, O.; Magnusson, K.Aa.

    Four studies concerning geophysical investigations and TV inspection in boreholes in connection with KBS studies at Finnsjoe, Karlshamn, Kraakemaala and Stripa and PRAV's studies at Studsvik have been evaluated. This has led to proposals concerning the choice of instruments and methods for future studies and a review of future work required. The evaluation has shown that the following borehole measurements are of primary interest in the continued work: Determinations of temperature and resistivity of the borehole liquid, resistance and resistivity measurements, SP, Sonic, Caliper and VLF. TV inspection, IP and gamma-gamma should also be included in the arsenal of available test methods.(author)

  18. Downhole television (DHTV) applications in borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, C.L.; Statler, R.D.; Peterson, E.W.

    1980-05-01

    The Borehole Plugging (BHP) Program is a part of the Sandia experimental program to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Sandia BHP program is an Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI)-funded program designed to provide inputs to the generic plugging program while simultaneously acquiring WIPP-specific data. For this reason a close liaison is maintained between the Sandia WIPP project and the ONWI generic program. Useful technology developed within the Sandia BHP to support WIPP is made available and considered for further development and application to the generic Borehole Plugging and Repository Sealing Program at ONWI. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the usefulness of downhole television (DHTV) observations of a borehole to plan plugging operations. An indication of the wellbore conditions observed is provided. The equipment and setup procedure used in the evaluation of AEC-7 for the Bell Canyon test series are illustrated. A sequence of pictures at various depths as the DHTV rig is lowered through the wellbore is presented. Sample photographs taken with both dry and underwater lamps for illumination are included. The caliper logs for the same depth are included for comparison. General comments are provided on the illustrations

  19. Some considerations for establishing seismic design criteria for nuclear plant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is providing assistance to the U.S. NRC in developing regulatory positions on the seismic analysis of piping. As part of this effort, ETEC previously performed reviews of the ASME Code, Section III piping seismic design criteria as revised by the 1994 Addenda. These revised criteria were based on evaluations by the ASME Special Task Group on Integrated Piping Criteria (STGIPC) and the Technical Core Group (TCG) of the Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) of the earlier joint Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/NRC Piping ampersand Fitting Dynamic Reliability (PFDR) program. Previous ETEC evaluations reported at the 23rd WRSM of seismic margins associated with the revised criteria are reviewed. These evaluations had concluded, in part, that although margins for the timed PFDR tests appeared acceptable (>2), margins in detuned tests could be unacceptable (<1). This conclusion was based primarily on margin reduction factors (MRFs) developed by the ASME STGIPC and ARC/TCG from realistic analyses of PFDR test 36. This paper reports more recent results including: (1) an approach developed for establishing appropriate seismic margins based on PRA considerations, (2) independent assessments of frequency effects on margins, (3) the development of margins based on failure mode considerations, and (4) the implications of Code Section III rules for Section XI

  20. Containment performance evaluation for the GESSAR-II plant for seismic initiating events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.K.; Chu, T.; Ludewig, H.; Pratt, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    As a part of the overall effort undertaken by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to review the GESSAR-II probabilistic risk assessment, an independent containment performance evaluation was performed using the containment event tree approach. This evaluation focused principally on those accident sequences which are initiated by seismic events. This paper reports the findings of this study. 1 ref

  1. Summary of the seismic analyses of the Nuclear Fuel Services Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endebrock, E.G.

    1978-03-01

    Results are presented from the seismic investigations of the Nuclear Fuel Services Fuel Reprocessing Plant conducted by the Chemical Plants Division of Dravo Corporation (CPD), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). Results of the different analytical procedures are summarized. The LASL studies showed that structural distress would initially occur in two places, the building piles and the walls of the Mechanical Crane Room. This structural distress would occur at 0.14 g. The LLL investigation showed that the Liquid Waste Cell and the General Purpose Cell would start to show structural distress at 0.09g, and that lateral pile distress would begin at 0.11g

  2. Drilling a borehole for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    Boreholes were drilled along the earlier proposed line of the LEP tunnel under the Jura to find out the conditions likely to be encountered during the construction of the LEP tunnel (Annual Report 1981 p. 106, Fig. 10).

  3. Seismic measures and defence in depth of nuclear power plant. Lessons learned from the great east Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro

    2011-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred in March 11, 2011 brought about severe accident at nuclear power plant, which gave significant lessons to nuclear experts concerned with safety measures. Concepts of defence in depth was basic philosophy to assure safety of nuclear power plant even against uncertainties exceeding design basis. This concept consisted of prevention, monitoring, and action to mitigate consequences of failures such as a series of physical barriers between the reactor core and the environment, which were called multiple safety systems, each with backup and designed to accommodate human error. As for natural disaster, depth of recognition of characteristic of natural phenomena and its effect and engineering judgment was of prime importance. Different waveforms of ground motion at Fukushima and Onagawa at the Great East Japan Earthquake showed that design ground motion should have large uncertainties. To cope with uncertainties of ground motion, robust seismic measures based on experience were such as design of static seismic intensity and rigid structure of natural period less than 0.1 sec. As for tsunami, defence in depth measures were prepared for the cooling of reactor core, spent fuel and related electric generation equipment with taking into account 1) time lag between tsunami generation and arrival, 2) tsunami affected area could be limited by coastal levee or anti-inundation measure, 3) system redundancy could be assured by different locations of equipments and 4) repair works could be done by shipment of replacement equipment from outside due to limitation of affected regional area. Success examples of Onagawa, Tokai unit 2, Fukushima Daiichi unit 6 and Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plants could suggest definite tsunami defence in depth measures. Containment vent system as final heat sink and emergency condenser as reactor core cooling at outage should be properly utilized for Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Optimal organization of structural analysis and site inspection for the seismic requalification of the nuclear power plant of Paks, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregonese, R.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis described in this report deals with a numerical procedure aimed at the assessment of a methodology for the optimal organization of data collection, in a contest of seismic requalification of structures and components of existing nuclear power stations (NPPs). The activity has been carried out in the frame of IAEA benchmark study for the seismic analysis of existing Nuclear Power Plants. This study starts from the assumption that seismic qualification of existing NPPs usually has to be carried out even in lack of sufficient data on structural behaviour and site conditions. In this framework, the organization of the analysis possibly requires a special approach, based on reliability analysis, able to give the distributions of dependent structural variables. This result can in fact be used in iterative updating of the analysis, leading at last at a required uncertainty target level for the structural evaluation. Therefore, the global uncertainty can be reduced by the reduction of the uncertainties of the variables that affect most the structural behaviour: the proposed procedure is able to drive this process in an optimal way. The analysis manager can therefore organize additional experimental inspections (for example in geotechnics, geophysics, structural behaviour)and data collections with the confidence of a minimum effort required for the prescribed target in terms of seismic safety. The procedure presented in this report has quite a general application following the general description is provided; therefore the example test has been chosen for the Paks NPP in Hungary, where a seismic requalification is in progress. To this aim, in the following specific reference will be made to the variables of interest for the on going job, namely: the probability distribution of some structural parameters, such as acceleration or shear force in critical points, giving a global overview on the reliability of structural calculations; the sensitivity coefficient

  5. France's seismic zoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadioun, B.

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the seismic hazard in France in relation to nuclear plant siting, the CEA, EDF and the BRGM (Mine and Geology Bureau) have carried out a collaboration which resulted in a seismic-tectonic map of France and a data base on seismic history (SIRENE). These studies were completed with a seismic-tectonic zoning, taking into account a very long period of time, that enabled a probabilistic evaluation of the seismic hazard in France, and that may be related to adjacent country hazard maps

  6. Original seismic and similar severe external loading design basis for WWER type nuclear power plants in Czech and Slovak Republics and actual issues of their upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masopust, R.

    1993-01-01

    The WWER type NPPs located in Czech and Slovak republics have many seismic vulnerabilities similar to those recognized in many of the US NPPs prior to late seventies. They are mostly caused by underestimation of these problems in the design phases, sometimes due to inadequate performance and poor quality of works and some incompatibilities between the original Russian design and current international design bases and safety requirements. It is believed that the structures and equipment of these NPPs can be seismically upgraded at a moderate cost. It is also believed that the IAEA Benchmark study for seismic analysis and testing of WWER NPPs will develop recommendations to effective seismic upgrading of the existing plants

  7. A new seismic station in Romania the Bucovina seismic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigore, Adrian; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Ghica, Daniela; Popa, Mihaela; Rizescu, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a new seismic monitoring station, the Bucovina Seismic Array, has been established in the northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania. The array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 short-period and one broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km area. On July 24, 2002 the official Opening Ceremony of Bucovina Seismic Array took place in the area near the city of Campulung Moldovenesc in the presence of Romanian Prime Minister, Adrian Nastase. Starting with this date, the new seismic monitoring system became fully operational by continuous recording and transmitting data in real-time to the National Data Center of Romania, in Bucharest and to the National Data Center of USA, in Florida. Bucovina Seismic Array, added to the present Seismic Network, will provide much better seismic monitoring coverage of Romania's territory, on-scale recording for weak-to-strong events, and will contribute to advanced seismological studies on seismic hazard and risk, local effects and microzonation, seismic source physics, Earth structure. (authors)

  8. Research and development studies on plant and core seismic behaviour for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Castoldi, A.; Muzzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the main features and results of the numerical and experimental studies that were carried out by ENEA in co-operation with ANSALDO and ISMES for the seismic verification of the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility. More precisely, the paper focuses on the wide-ranging research and development programme that has been performed (and recently completed) on the reactor building, the reactor-block, the main vessel, the core and the shutdown system. The needs of these detailed studies are stressed and the feed-backs on the design, necessary to satisfy the seismic safety requirements, are recalled. The general validity of the analyses in the framework of the research and development activities for nuclear reactors is also pointed out. (orig.)

  9. Some considerations on the seismic stability of large slopes surrounding the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Imaide, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    As a part of the researches with regard to the seismic stability of large scale slope, the authors have carried out the model test, in which the static failure has been generated by inclining the slope model. In this report, the results of static inclination tests of slope model are described and discussions are done from viewpoints of, 1. the mechanical behaviours and failure state of slope during the inclination test, 2. comparison between the results obtained by the static failure test (that is, inclination test) and those of another report with regard to the dynamic failure test which had been performed using the shaking table, and the relationship between an equivalent seismic coefficient obtained by static failure test and acceleration by dynamic failure test, 3. relationship between the failure state of inclination test and the factor of convensional circular arc slip method. (author)

  10. Seismic capacities of masonry walls at the big rock point nuclear generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, D.A.; Bunon, H.; Jenkins, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation to determine the ability of selected concrete block walls in the vicinity of essential equipment to withstand seismic excitation was conducted. The seismic input to the walls was developed in accordance with the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) site-specific response spectra for the site. Time-history inputs to the walls were determined from the response of the turbine building complex. Analyses were performed to determine the capacities of the walls to withstand both in-plane and transverse seismic loads. Transverse load capacities were determined from time-history analyses of nonlinear two-dimensional analytical models of the walls. Separate inputs were used at the tops and bottoms of the walls to reflect the amplification through the building. The walls were unreinforced vertically with one exception, and have unsupported heights as high as 20'-8''. Also, cantilever walls as high as 11'-2'' were included in the evaluation. Factors of safety based on stability of the walls were determined for the transverse response, and on code allowable stresses (Reference 1) for the in-plane response

  11. Analysis and evaluation of seismic response of reactor building for Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongcheng; China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company, Shenzhen; Li Zhongxian

    2005-01-01

    Daya Bay NPP has been operating safely and stably over 10 years since 1994, and its' seismic analysis of nuclear island was in accordance with the approaches in RCC-G standard for the model M310, in which the Simplified Impedance Matrix Method (SIMM) was employed for the consideration of SSI. Thanks to the rapid progress being made in upgrading the evaluation technology and the capability of data processing systems, methods and software tools for the SSI analysis have experienced significant development all over the world. Focused on the model of reactor building of the Daya Bay NPP, in his paper the more sophisticated 3D half-space continuum impedance method based on the Green functions is used to analyze the functions of the soil, and then the seismic responses of the coupled SSI system are calculated and compared with the corresponding design values. It demonstrates that the design method provides a set of conservatively safe results. The conclusions from the study is hopefully to provide some important references to the assessment of seismic safety margin for the operating NPPs. (authors)

  12. Working program for deep borehole investigations. HDB-6,7,8, borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Kazuharu; Ishii, Eiichi; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Sasaki, Manabu; Kunimaru, Takanori; Eki, Nobuhiro; Matsui, Hiroya

    2003-08-01

    optimized program for deep borehole (HDB-6, 7, 8) investigations has been drawn-up. This program addresses the general issues and provides input to the subsequent investigation programs and design for the shaft and experimental drifts. This document mainly describes the planned working program for the HDB-6, 7, 8 borehole investigations including associated laboratory programs during and after drilling. The working program is divided into the following investigation fields: borehole drilling geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry, rock mechanics and long-term monitoring. Post-HDB borehole investigations; a VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) survey are planned in the surface-based investigations phase. (author)

  13. Proposed Construction of Boulder Seismic Station Monitoring Sites, Boulder, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    boreholes at the Boulder Seismic Station for research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) as part of the U.S. Nuclear Treaty monitoring...14 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Location of the proposed Boulder Seismic Station, borehole locations and associated buffers...juncture of Spring Creek and Scab Creek Road (Figure 1). Currently, the Boulder Seismic Station has a 13-element array of seismometers on the property

  14. Comparison of seismic isolation concepts for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiojiri, H.; Mazda, T.; Kasai, H.; Kanda, J.N.; Kubo, T.; Madokoro, M.; Shimomura, T.; Nojima, O.

    1989-01-01

    This paper seeks to verify the reliability and effectiveness of seismic isolation for FBR. Some results of the preliminary study of the program are described. Seismic isolation concepts and corresponding seismic isolation devices were selected. Three kinds of seismically-isolated FBR plant concepts were developed by applying promising seismic isolation concepts to the non-isolated FBR plant, and by developing plant component layout plans and building structural designs. Each plant was subjected to seismic response analysis and reduction in the amount of material of components and buildings were estimated for each seismic isolation concepts. Research and development items were evaluated

  15. The seismic assessment of wheeled vehicle type equipment (e.g. emergency power supply vehicle) against severe accident for nuclear power plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takuya; Mitsuzawa, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Hasebe, Motohiko; Imamura, Ryutaro; Tomitani, Yuji; Ueyama, Ippei; Kawamoto, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    After the events at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, the equipment to mitigate the effects of severe accidents has been installed in the domestic nuclear power plants. From the viewpoint of convenience for installation, etc., a number of industry standard-based wheeled vehicle type equipment has been placed. On the other hand, the new regulations require the equipment for severe accidents to withstand the Design Basis Earthquake. Therefore, the seismic qualification is essential item for wheeled vehicle type equipment according to the regulatory requirement. At that time, compared to the traditional safety-related equipment, there was not enough knowledge of seismic evaluation for vehicle type equipment. This paper reports the overview of wheeled vehicle type equipment and the seismic qualification by test. (author)

  16. Seismic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollogoub, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    This lecture deals with: qualification methods for seismic testing; objectives of seismic testing; seismic testing standards including examples; main content of standard; testing means; and some important elements of seismic testing

  17. Borehole logging in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, N.H.

    1992-01-01

    The ultimate objective of exploration by drilling as far as Atomic Minerals Division is concerned is to locate the ore zone in the subsurface, draw samples and analyze them for their metal content. The presence of the ore zone is also indicated by gamma-ray logging of the borehole. A gamma-ray detector is lowered in the borehole and precise depth and grade of the ore zone is established. This helps the geologist in correlating the ore horizon with the surface outcrop or the ore zone intercepted in adjoining boreholes and in deciding about further drilling and location of boreholes. Most commonly, total gamma measurements are made although some units capable of measuring the gamma-ray spectrum are also in use. It is possible to know if the mineralization is due to uranium without waiting for the laboratory results. The present write up gives a brief account of the principles, equipment and methods of borehole gamma-ray logging including density and self-potential logging. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs

  18. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components (Phase 2): A fragility handbook on eighteen components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1991-06-01

    Fragility estimates of seven equipment classes were published in earlier reports. This report presents fragility analysis results from eleven additional equipment categories. The fragility levels are expressed in probabilistic terms. For users' convenience, this concluding report includes a summary of fragility results of all eighteen equipment classes. A set of conversion factors based on judgment is recommended for use of the information for early vintage equipment. The knowledge gained in conducting the Component Fragility Program and similar other programs is expected to provide a new direction for seismic verification and qualification of equipment. 15 refs., 12 tabs

  19. Commissioning of qualification of structures, systems and components for seismic and environmental loads of CIRENE nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, A.; Gatti, F.; Muzzi, F.; Zola, M.; De Pasquali, F.

    1993-01-01

    On behalf of the Italian National Electricity Board (ENEL) concerning the commissioning of qualification of structures, systems and components of CIRENE NPP, ISMES performed a technical surveillance on the documentation concerning the environmental and seismic qualification of the safety related systems and experimental activities (dynamic and static tests) on plant buildings. The aims of the work were: - the evaluation of the qualification carried out (by test, by analysis, by combination of analysis and test) on the equipment and system, compared with the requirements of the ENEL technical specifications and the most recent international regulations; - the experimental determination of modal quantities (frequencies, damping, mode shapes) of the structures and, in the case of reactor building, the complex impedance of the soil for supporting the analytical work. The present paper deals with the criteria, the system and the results concerning the technical surveillance and with the characteristics and the results of the experimental tests

  20. Seismic analysis of two 1050 mm diameter heavy water upgrading towers for 235 MWe Kaiga Atomic Power Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, R.S.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.; Narwaria, Suresh; Vardarajan, T.G.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    This report deals with the analysis carried out for the evaluation of earthquake induced stresses and deflections in two 1050 mm diameter heavy water upgrading towers for Kaiga Atomic Power Plant Site. The analysis of upgrading tower has been carried out for two mutually perpendicular horizontal excitations and one vertical excitation applied simultaneously. The upgrading towers have been analysed using beam model taking into account soil-structure interaction. Response spectrum analysis has been carried out using site spectra for 235 MWe Kaiga reactor site. The seismic analysis has been performed for both the towers with supporting structure along with concrete pedestals and raft foundation. The towers have been checked for its stability due to compressive stresses to avoid buckling so that the nearby safety related structures are not geopardised in the event of safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) loading. (author). 14 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs

  1. Study of observed microearthquakes at Masada Deep Borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, A.; Malin, P. E.

    2017-12-01

    Seismological measurements, conducted at great depths of several hundred of meters or even a few km, can provide useful information that one cannot get while conducting the measurements on the surface. We take advantage of Masada Deep borehole (MDBI), an abandoned oil well, for the installation of a seismometer at a large depth of 1,256 m (1,516 bsl). The station is located in the near vicinity of the East Masada fault, part of the Western Boundary Fault of the Dead Sea basin. We present seismic observations of microearthquakes which occurred along the Dead Sea fault (DSF). Many of them were not recorded by the Israel Seismic Network (ISN). The quiet site of the station has an obvious advantage in detection and identification of earthquakes and explosions. For example, the station detects about 30% more quarry explosions as compared to observations of the ISN. We demonstrate that borehole seismograms are clearer than the on-surface observations of nearby seismometer. We lowered the magnitude scale of observed events down to about M≈-3. Many of the earthquakes, sometimes clusters, occurred underneath the MDBI at depths of 10-25 km, having special signature. Using the cross-correlation technique we present several series of seismic activity either underneath the station or along the DSF. Frequency-magnitude relationship, known also as Gutenberg-Richter relationship, is somewhat higher than the determined value for the whole Dead Sea Fault.

  2. Seismic soil–structure interaction analysis of a nuclear power plant building founded on soil and in degraded concrete stiffness condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, Reza V.; Dessalegn, Tewodros M.; Vaidya, Nishikant R.; Bazan-Zurita, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three dimensional finite element modeling of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) building founded on soil is described. • A simplified technique to consider degraded stiffness of concrete members in seismic analysis of NPP buildings is presented. • The effect of subsurface profiles on the seismic response of a NPP building is investigated. - Abstract: This study describes three-dimensional (3-D) finite element (FE) modeling and seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Diesel Generator Building (DGB) that is founded on soil in degraded concrete stiffness condition. A new technique is presented that uses two horizontal and vertical FE models to consider the concrete stiffness reduction of NPP buildings subjected to orthogonal ground motion excitations, in which appropriate stiffness reduction factors, based on the input motion orientation, are applied. Seismic SSI analysis is performed for each model separately, and dynamic responses are calculated in the three global directions. The results of the analysis for the two FE models are then combined, using the square-root-of-the-sum-of-squares (SRSS) combination rule. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to investigate the subsurface profile effect on the In-Structure (acceleration) Response Spectra (ISRS) of the building when subjected to site-specific Foundation Input Response Spectra (FIRS) that exhibit high spectral amplifications in the high-frequency range. The sensitivity analysis considers three strain-compatible subsurface profiles that represent Lower-Bound (LB), Best-Estimate (BE), and Upper-Bound (UB) conditions at the DGB site. The sensitivity analysis results indicate that the seismic response of the DGB founded on soil highly depends on the subsurface profile; i.e., each of the LB, BE, and UB subsurface profiles can maximize building seismic response when subjected to FIRS that exhibit high spectral amplifications in the high-frequency range

  3. The ICDP Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project: preliminary overview of borehole geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Douglas R.; Liberty, Lee M.; Kessler, James E.; Kuck, Jochem; Kofman, Randolph; Bishop, Ross; Shervais, John W.; Evans, James P.; Champion, Duane E.

    2012-01-01

    Hotspot: The Snake River Geothermal Drilling Project was undertaken to better understand the geothermal systems in three locations across the Snake River Plain with varying geological and hydrological structure. An extensive series of standard and specialized geophysical logs were obtained in each of the wells. Hydrogen-index neutron and γ-γ density logs employing active sources were deployed through the drill string, and although not fully calibrated for such a situation do provide semi-quantitative information related to the ‘stratigraphy’ of the basalt flows and on the existence of alteration minerals. Electrical resistivity logs highlight the existence of some fracture and mineralized zones. Magnetic susceptibility together with the vector magnetic field measurements display substantial variations that, in combination with laboratory measurements, may provide a tool for tracking magnetic field reversals along the borehole. Full waveform sonic logs highlight the variations in compressional and shear velocity along the borehole. These, together with the high resolution borehole seismic measurements display changes with depth that are not yet understood. The borehole seismic measurements indicate that seismic arrivals are obtained at depth in the formations and that strong seismic reflections are produced at lithological contacts seen in the corresponding core logging. Finally, oriented ultrasonic borehole televiewer images were obtained over most of the wells and these correlate well with the nearly 6 km of core obtained. This good image log to core correlations, particularly with regards to drilling induced breakouts and tensile borehole and core fractures will allow for confident estimates of stress directions and or placing constraints on stress magnitudes. Such correlations will be used to orient in core orientation giving information useful in hydrological assessments, paleomagnetic dating, and structural volcanology.

  4. Rubber bearing and bitumen infill support system for seismic protection of nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    The prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCPV) for the AGR is of cylindrical type. The whole of the reactor primary circuit is contained within the PCPV vault and includes the reactor core and support structures, boilers and gas circulators. The PCPV is essentially free standing on its foundation raft. In order to transmit gravitational and seismic loads between the PCPV and the foundation raft, a support system is used which consists of concentric rings of neoprene pads and a thin annulus of bitumen infill. In order to assess the importance of both stiffness and damping of the PCPV support system on the overall AGR response, detailed parametric studies were carried out using time-history dynamic analysis in conjunction with the modal superposition technique. The effects of both stiffness and damping are compared in terms of the maximum dynamic response (maximum accelerations and maximum relative displacements) and also floor response spectra at various locations on the nuclear island. It is clearly apparent from these investigations that for an appropriate range of structures on the nuclear island (such as the PCPV and its internals), greater reduction in seismic loading can be achieved by proper selection of stiffnesses and damping of the PCPV support system without resorting to strengthening techniques. (orig./HP)

  5. Impacting effects of seismic loading in feeder pipes of PHWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1996-01-01

    The core of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) consists of a large number of fuel channels. These fuel channels are connected to the feeder pipes through which the heavy water flows and transports heat from the reactor core to the steam generators. The feeder pipes are several hundreds in number. They run close to each other with small gaps and have several bends. Thus they represent a complex piping system. Under seismic loading, the adjacent feeder pipes may impact each other. In this paper a simplified procedure has been established to assess such impacting effects. The results of the proposed analysis include bending moment and impact force, which provide the stresses due to impacting effects. These results are plotted in nondimensional form so that they could be utilized for any set of feeder pipes. The procedure used for studying the impacting effects includes seismic analysis of individual feeder pipes without impacting effects, selection of pipes for impact analysis, and estimating their maximum impact velocity. Based on the static and dynamic characteristics of the selected feeder pipes, the maximum bending moment, impact force, and stresses are obtained. The results of this study are useful for quick evaluation of the impacting effects in feeder pipes

  6. Stratigraphy of the Harwell boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallois, R.W.; Worssam, B.C.

    1983-12-01

    Seven boreholes, five of them partially cored, were drilled at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell as part of a general investigation to assess the feasibility of storing low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in underground cavities. Two of the deeper boreholes were almost wholly cored to provide samples for hydrogeological, hydrochemical, mineralogical, geochemical, geotechnical, sedimentological and stratigraphical studies to enable variations in lithology and rock properties to be assessed, both vertically and laterally, and related to their regional geological setting. This report describes the lithologies, main faunal elements and stratigraphy of the Cretaceous, Jurassic, Triassic and Carboniferous sequences proved in the boreholes. More detailed stratigraphical accounts of the late Jurassic and Cretaceous sequences will be prepared when current studies of the faunal assemblages are complete. (author)

  7. Location Capability and Site Characterization Installing a Borehole VBB Seismometer: the OGS Experience in Ferrara (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaresi, D.; Barnaba, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Centre) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 19 very sensitive broad band and 17 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS CRS data centre in Udine. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara and to the deployment of a temporary seismographic network consisting of eight portable seismological stations, to record the local earthquakes that occurred during the seismic sequence. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate seismic site responses in the area. We will introduce details of the Ferrara VBB borehole station and the OGS temporary seismographic network configuration and installation. We will then illustrate the location capability performances, and finally we will shortly describe seismic site characterization with surface/borehole comparisons in terms of seismic noise, site amplification and resonance frequencies.

  8. Utility service entrance in boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This study evaluates alternatives for utility service entrances to the repository. We determined the requirements for a repository utility supply. These requirements were defined as safety, maintainability, flexibility, reliability, cost efficiency, voltage regulation, and simplicity of operation. The study showed that repository shafts can best satisfy all requirements for location of the utility supply without the use of borehole penetrations into the repository. It is recommended that the shafts be utilized for utility distribution to the repository, and that the current NWTS program position to minimize the number of boreholes penetrating the repository horizon be maintained. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Radiometric calipers for borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbucinski, J.; Wylie, A.W.; Jarrett, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Two versions of a radiometric-type caliper for measuring borehole diameter are described. One, based on the bow-spring principle, is suitable for percussion (exploration) drill holes. The other, which utilizes hemispherical wall contactors actuated by springs, is suitable for blast holes. Both utilize low-power radioactive sources and employ a scintillation detector to measure the 'inverse-square law' response of the device to changes in borehole radius. The performance of the device is examined and examples of its use are illustrated. (author)

  10. Seismic evaluation of existing nuclear power plants and other facilities V. 1. Proceedings of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this Tcm are: to review the IAEA Safety Report on Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in order to achieve a consensus among Member States on this matter and to discuss the outlines of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on specific topics related to this subject. Today the nuclear industry relies much more on existing facilities than on the design of new ones. Nevertheless it appears that safety evaluation against external hazards is not a decreasing activity. The reason being that maintaining an acceptable level of nuclear safety requires periodic re-assessments of facilities, either because of modifications of the environment due to human activity or because of new data or new approaches in the assessment of natural hazards. In this regard, seismic re-evaluation has increasingly become a key issue for several existing nuclear facilities, including not only nuclear power plants but also other plants of the fuel cycle, as well as research reactors or laboratories. The IAEA has already supported development of engineering practices in this field by managing a Co-ordinated Research Programme, launched in 1992, on a Benchmark Study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER 1000 type NPPs. It is now proposed to investigate other aspects of this issue. Many of these facilities were built according to older standards which did not take into account seismic hazard. Consequently, the seismic re-evaluation of existing facilities is a real challenge for earthquake engineers. In most of the cases, it is impossible to re-evaluate according to the up to date standards because entering these standards implies that some design rules are met, what is generally not the case for older facilities. In the best cases some rules exist for non nuclear buildings. In order to achieve a consensus on this matter, the IAEA intends to edit a Safety Report on 'Seismic Evaluation of existing NPPs'. The TCM will offer the opportunity to review the draft of

  11. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 5B. Experience data. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on the effects of Armenia earthquakes on selected power, industry and commercial facilities and seismic functional qualification of active mechanical and electrical components tested on shaking table

  12. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  13. Burar seismic station: evaluation of seismic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Popa, Mihaela

    2005-01-01

    A new seismic monitoring system, the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR), has been established since July 2002, in the Northern part of Romania, in a joint effort of the Air Force Technical Applications Center, USA, and the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP), Romania. The small-aperture array consists of 10 seismic sensors (9 vertical short-period and one three-component broad band) located in boreholes and distributed in a 5 x 5 km 2 area. At present, the seismic data are continuously recorded by the BURAR and transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Center in Bucharest and National Data Center of the USA, in Florida. Based on the BURAR seismic information gathered at the National Data Center, NIEP (ROM N DC), in the August 2002 - December 2004 time interval, analysis and statistical assessments were performed. Following the preliminary processing of the data, several observations on the global performance of the BURAR system were emphasized. Data investigation showed an excellent efficiency of the BURAR system particularly in detecting teleseismic and regional events. Also, a statistical analysis for the BURAR detection capability of the local Vrancea events was performed in terms of depth and magnitude for the year 2004. The high signal detection capability of the BURAR resulted, generally, in improving the location solutions for the Vrancea seismic events. The location solution accuracy is enhanced when adding BURAR recordings, especially in the case of low magnitude events (recorded by few stations). The location accuracy is increased, both in terms of constraining hypocenter depth and epicentral coordinates. Our analysis certifies the importance of the BURAR system in NIEP efforts to elaborate seismic bulletins. Furthermore, the specific procedures for array data processing (beam forming, f-k analysis) increase significantly the signal-to-noise ratio by summing up the coherent signals from the array components, and ensure a better accuracy

  14. Seismic and dynamic qualification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on seismic effects on nuclear power plants. Topics considered at the conference included seismic qualification of equipment, multifrequency test methodologies, damping in piping systems, the amplification factor, thermal insulation, welded joints, and response factors for seismic risk analysis of piping

  15. Study on seismic reliability for foundation grounds and surrounding slopes of nuclear power plants. Proposal of evaluation methodology and integration of seismic reliability evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Yasuki; Kanatani, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes an evaluation methodology of annual probability of failure for soil structures subjected to earthquakes and integrates the analysis system for seismic reliability of soil structures. The method is based on margin analysis, that evaluates the ground motion level at which structure is damaged. First, ground motion index that is strongly correlated with damage or response of the specific structure, is selected. The ultimate strength in terms of selected ground motion index is then evaluated. Next, variation of soil properties is taken into account for the evaluation of seismic stability of structures. The variation of the safety factor (SF) is evaluated and then the variation is converted into the variation of the specific ground motion index. Finally, the fragility curve is developed and then the annual probability of failure is evaluated combined with seismic hazard curve. The system facilitates the assessment of seismic reliability. A generator of random numbers, dynamic analysis program and stability analysis program are incorporated into one package. Once we define a structural model, distribution of the soil properties, input ground motions and so forth, list of safety factors for each sliding line is obtained. Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS), Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS), point estimation method (PEM) and first order second moment (FOSM) implemented in this system are also introduced. As numerical examples, a ground foundation and a surrounding slope are assessed using the proposed method and the integrated system. (author)

  16. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  17. Research contract: Seismic stability of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe. Final report. From 15 April 1998 to 15 April 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriashvili, Y.

    1999-01-01

    General scientific scope of the presented program is assessment of stability and functionality of the nuclear power plants with RBMK type reactors in relation to External Evens including following: seismic capacity of structures, equipment and distribution systems; capacity of structures for impact type loading; capacity of structures for blast type loading. For the analyses only structures, equipment and distribution systems which are responsible for safety shutdown path are used. Since 1980 Atomenergoproject has been participated in development and carrying out the Research Program related to investigation of seismic stability of RBMK NPPs. This investigation was done for Smolensk and Kursk NPPs. It is known that the design basis of seismic analyses is investigation of dynamic characteristic (main frequencies and main modes) of structures, equipment and distribution systems. Therefore the assessment of capacity of structures and systems can be based on the results of seismic stability investigations. In the present final report some main results of dynamic analyses reactor building, electrical buildings, storage building, pipe lines, separators, electrical equipment, etc. are described. On the basis of the data site seismological investigation, calculations and different type of testing structures and equipment it was accepted, that the RBMK NPP is the Seismic Stability NPP up to 6 intensity by MSK64 scale. The results of calculation and testing investigations can be use for the dynamic analyses on the external events blast and impact loading. Using the results the probability analysis should be done

  18. A novel muon detector for borehole density tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Alain; Kouzes, Richard T.; Yamaoka, Jared; Rowe, Charlotte; Guardincerri, Elena; Durham, J. Matthew; Morris, Christopher L.; Poulson, Daniel C.; Plaud-Ramos, Kenie; Morley, Deborah J.; Bacon, Jeffrey D.; Bynes, James; Cercillieux, Julien; Ketter, Chris; Le, Khanh; Mostafanezhad, Isar; Varner, Gary; Flygare, Joshua; Lintereur, Azaree T.

    2017-04-01

    Muons can be used to image the density of materials through which they pass, including geological structures. Subsurface applications of the technology include tracking fluid migration during injection or production, with increasing concern regarding such timely issues as induced seismicity or chemical leakage into aquifers. Current density monitoring options include gravimetric data collection and active or passive seismic surveys. One alternative, or complement, to these methods is the development of a muon detector that is sufficiently compact and robust for deployment in a borehole. Such a muon detector can enable imaging of density structure to monitor small changes in density - a proxy for fluid migration - at depths up to 1500 m. Such a detector has been developed, and Monte Carlo modeling methods applied to simulate the anticipated detector response. Testing and measurements using a prototype detector in the laboratory and shallow underground laboratory demonstrated robust response. A satisfactory comparison with a large drift tube-based muon detector is also presented.

  19. Seismic response of a nuclear power plant in the presence of a waterproof lining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesi, C.; Mitsopoulou, E.

    1981-01-01

    In the presence of a high water table level or of a deeply embedded foundation a waterproof lining is generally requested. If this lies between two plane surfaces of concrete, a severe earthquake is likely to provoke relative displacements. Thus the lining may break and displacements may be too large for complying with the requirements of pipes, tunnels or adjacent structures. Though, a favourable result is also expected: a reduction of the structure accelerations. The present paper deals with the evaluation of these relative displacements and of the acceleration reduction. The friction properties of linings are studied experimentally and a relative velocity-shear friction relationship is deduced. With reference to this the behaviour of a simple structure is analyzed under seismic excitations - artificial accelerograms and strong motion records - characterized by a noticeable content of medium-low frequency components. The main result is that for a ground acceleration greater than 0.3/0.4 g the sliding is an efficient mechanism to reduce inertia forces (a reduction of about 25% for a ground acceleration of 0.5 g is expected). On the other hand the maximum displacement of the structure from its initial position, in the examined case, is no more than 2 cm, and for this range of values the technological problem of the integrity of the liner is under control. (orig.)

  20. SITE-2, Power Plant Siting, Cost, Environment, Seismic and Meteorological Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, N.A.; Habegger, L.J.; King, R.F.; Hoover, L.J.; Clark, N.A.; Cobian, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SITE2 is designed to (1) screen candidate energy facility sites or areas within an electric utility region, based on the region's physical and socioeconomic attributes, the planned facility's characteristics, and impact assessments, and (2) evaluate the cumulative regional impacts associated with alternate energy supply options and inter-regional energy import/export practices, specifically, comparison of different energy technologies and their regional distribution in clustered or dispersed patterns. 2 - Method of solution: The SITE2 methodology is based on the quantification of three major site-related vectors. A cost vector is determined which identifies site-specific costs, such as transmission costs, cooling costs as related to water availability, and costs of specific controls needed to protect the surrounding environment. An impact vector is also computed for each potential site, using models of health and environmental impacts incurred in areas adjacent to the site. Finally, a site attribute vector is developed which reflects such characteristics as population, seismic conditions, meteorology, land use, and local ecological systems. This vector can be used to eliminate certain sites because of their inability to satisfy specific constraints. These three vectors can be displayed as density maps and combined in a simple overlay approach, similar to that developed by I. L. McHarg in reference 2, to identify candidate sites. Alternatively, the vector elements can be computationally combined into a weighted sum to obtain quantitative indicators of site suitability

  1. SITE-2, Power Plant Siting, Cost, Environment, Seismic and Meteorological Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigerio, N A [Environmental Impact Studies, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Habegger, L J; King, R F; Hoover, L J [Energy and Environmental Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Clark, N A [Applied Mathematics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cobian, J M [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60201 (United States)

    1977-08-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SITE2 is designed to (1) screen candidate energy facility sites or areas within an electric utility region, based on the region's physical and socioeconomic attributes, the planned facility's characteristics, and impact assessments, and (2) evaluate the cumulative regional impacts associated with alternate energy supply options and inter-regional energy import/export practices, specifically, comparison of different energy technologies and their regional distribution in clustered or dispersed patterns. 2 - Method of solution: The SITE2 methodology is based on the quantification of three major site-related vectors. A cost vector is determined which identifies site-specific costs, such as transmission costs, cooling costs as related to water availability, and costs of specific controls needed to protect the surrounding environment. An impact vector is also computed for each potential site, using models of health and environmental impacts incurred in areas adjacent to the site. Finally, a site attribute vector is developed which reflects such characteristics as population, seismic conditions, meteorology, land use, and local ecological systems. This vector can be used to eliminate certain sites because of their inability to satisfy specific constraints. These three vectors can be displayed as density maps and combined in a simple overlay approach, similar to that developed by I. L. McHarg in reference 2, to identify candidate sites. Alternatively, the vector elements can be computationally combined into a weighted sum to obtain quantitative indicators of site suitability.

  2. Artificial Water Reservoir Triggered Earthquakes at Koyna, India: Completion of the 3 km deep Pilot Borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, H. K.; Tiwari, V. M.; Satyanarayana, H.; Roy, S.; Arora, K.; Patro, P. K.; Shashidhar, D.; Mallika, K.; Akkiraju, V.; Misra, S.; Goswami, D.; Podugu, N.; Mishra, S.

    2017-12-01

    Koyna, near the west coast of India is the most prominent site of artificial water reservoir triggered seismicity (RTS). Soon after the impoundment of the Koyna Dam in 1962, RTS was observed. It has continued till now. It includes the largest RTS earthquake M 6.3 on December 10, 1967; 22 M≥5.0, and thousands of smaller earthquakes. The entire earthquake activity is limited to an area of about 30 km x 20 km, with most focal depths being within 6 km. There is no other earthquake source within 50 km of the Koyna Dam. An ICDP Workshop held in March 2011 found Koyna to be the most suitable site to investigate reservoir- triggered seismicity (RTS) through deep drilling. Studies carried out in the preparatory phase since 2011 include airborne magnetic and gravity-gradient surveys, MT surveys, drilling of 9 boreholes going to depths of 1500 m and logging, heat flow measurements, seismological investigations including the deployment of six borehole seismometers, and LiDAR. The Second ICDP Workshop held during 16- 18 May 2014, reviewed the progress made and detailed planning of putting the borehole observatory was discussed. The site of a 3 km deep pilot borehole was debated and among the 5 possible location. Based on the seismic activity and logistics the location of the first Pilot Borehole has been finalized and the drilling started on the 21st December 2016. The 3000 m deep borehole was completed on 11th June 2017. The basement was touched at 1247 m depth and there were no sediments below basalt. Several zones with immense fluid losses were encountered. Geophysical Logging has been completed. Cores were recovered from 1269, 1892 and 2091 depths. The cores are 9 m long and with 4 inches diameter. The core recovery is almost 100%. In-situ stress measurements have been conducted at depths of 1600 m onwards.

  3. Methodologies for rapid evaluation of seismic demand levels in nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, M.; Asfura, A.; Mukhim, G.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for rapid assessment of both acceleration spectral peak and 'zero period acceleration' (ZPA) values for virtually any major structure in a nuclear power plant is presented. The methodology is based on spectral peak and ZPA amplification factors, developed from regression analyses of an analytical database. The developed amplification factors are applied to the plant's design ground spectrum to obtain amplified response parameters. A practical application of the methodology is presented. This paper also presents a methodology for calculating acceleration response spectrum curves at any number of desired damping ratios directly from a single known damping ratio spectrum. The methodology presented is particularly useful and directly applicable to older vintage nuclear power plant facilities (i.e. such as those affected by USI A-46). The methodology is based on principles of random vibration theory. The methodology has been implemented in a computer program (SPECGEN). SPECGEN results are compared with results obtained from time history analyses. (orig.)

  4. Experimental investigation into the seismic behavior of nuclear power plant shear wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenneally, R.M.; Burns, J.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plant structures are designed to resist large earthquakes. However, as new data are obtained on earthquake activity throughout the United States, plant design earthquake levels have increased. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring an analytical-experimental research program to obtain information on the strucutral response of nuclear power plant shear wall strucutres subjected to earthquake motions within and beyond their design basis. Using different size scale models constructed with microconcrete and prototypical concrete this research has demonstrated consistent results for measured values of stiffness at load levels within the design basis. Furthermore, the values are well below the theoretical stiffnesses calculated from an uncracked cross-section strength-of-materials approach. Current program emphasis is to assess the credibility of previous experimental work by beginning to resolve the 'stiffness difference' issue. (orig.)

  5. Seismic Barrier Protection of Critical Infrastructure from Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We observe that such barrier structures reduce seismic wave powers by 10 – 40 dB that would otherwise reach the foundation location. Moreover, the... structure composed of opposing boreholes or trenches to mitigate seismic waves from diffracting and traveling in the vertical plane. Computational...seismic wave propagation models suggest that air or fluid filled subsurface V- shaped muffler structures are critical to the redirection and self

  6. Evaluation of seismic input for nuclear power plants; Evaluacion del input sismico para plantas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saragoni, G. R.

    2012-07-01

    The accident that affected the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 11th 2011 was the result of the Tohoku earthquake (Japan), the fifth largest ever registered in the world. The characteristics of the event will be a subject for study by the nuclear and seismology communities for many years to come. (Author)

  7. Preliminary perspectives gaines from individual plant examination of external events (IPEEE) seismic and fire submittal review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.T.; Connell, E.; Chokshi, N.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated Individual plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) program, every operating nuclear power reactor in the United States has performed an assessment of severe accident due to external events. This paper provides a summary of the preliminary insights gained through the review of 24 IPEEE submittals

  8. Seismic response of a sliding polar crane for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieck, P.; Schlund, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the analysis, the bridge crane design is mathematically modeled in the vertical and lateral directions. The bridge crane system is postulated to vibrate in a linear-elastic fashion, until the dynamic reactions occurring at the crane wheel/support interface exceed the available resisting friction, at which time sliding is initiated. Sliding is postulated to continue until the relative velocity of the crane and supporting structure is zero, at which time a linear-elastic vibration mode is again developed. The analysis considers the variation in static and dynamic coefficients of friction and the variation of available friction resistance due to the crane vertical response. The initiation of sliding is modeled as an instantaneous event requiring a redescription of the crane system physical properties and coordinate system. Transfer from the vibrating system to the sliding system is governed by maintaining conservation of energy. Seismic excitation is defined using design floor response spectra appropriate for the crane system location. The design spectra are decomposed into a spectrum of acceleration time history harmonic motions which, when applied to a spectrum of single degree-of-freedom damped spring-mass oscillators, redevelops the original design spectra. The spectrum of acceleration times histories is used as base excitation to the mathematical model. Analytical results include sliding displacements and velocities, number of time sliding occurs, cumulative sliding displacements, and system kinetic and potential energy. A description of the crane system configuration and the development of the effective mass and stiffness values used in the analysis of the vibrating and sliding systems is presented. The equations of motions coupling the horizontal and vertical responses during the vibrating and sliding phases are presented. A discussion evaluating the applicability of the results, and how the results can be used for design, is also presented. (orig.)

  9. Seismic Energy Generation and Partitioning into Various Regional Phases from Different Seismic Sources in the Middle East Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-20

    a), a 3C SP seismic station (b) and a sensor BlastMateIII, Oron quarry (c)............................... 9 Figure 7. Seismic Array MMAI (AS49) of... seismic stations of Jordan network at distance range 22-285 km (a), and at IMS array MMAI (AS49) at 350 km, BP filtered 2-8 Hz (b...sites and portable stations, inserts show detailed location of the tripartite array elements (st.6) and configuration of the explosion boreholes and

  10. Automated borehole gravity meter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenhiser, Th.V.; Wirtz, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    An automated borehole gravity meter system for measuring gravity within a wellbore. The gravity meter includes leveling devices for leveling the borehole gravity meter, displacement devices for applying forces to a gravity sensing device within the gravity meter to bring the gravity sensing device to a predetermined or null position. Electronic sensing and control devices are provided for (i) activating the displacement devices, (ii) sensing the forces applied to the gravity sensing device, (iii) electronically converting the values of the forces into a representation of the gravity at the location in the wellbore, and (iv) outputting such representation. The system further includes electronic control devices with the capability of correcting the representation of gravity for tidal effects, as well as, calculating and outputting the formation bulk density and/or porosity

  11. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  12. Research program for seismic qualification of nuclear plant electrical and mechanical equipment. Task 3. Recommendations for improvement of equipment qualification methodology and criteria. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kana, D.D.; Pomerening, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    The Research Program for Seismic Qualification of Nuclear Plant Electrical and Mechanical Equipment has spanned a period of three years and resulted in seven technical summary reports, each of which covered in detail the findings of different tasks and subtasks, and have been combined into five NUREG/CR volumes. Volume 3 presents recommendations for improvement of equipment qualification methodology and procedural clarification/modification. The fifth category identifies issues where adequate information does not exist to allow a recommendation to be made

  13. An evaluation of methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays, and ducts in ALWR plants by use of experience data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kana, D.D.; Kennedy, R.P.; Schiff, A.J.

    1997-07-01

    Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) has developed a methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays and ducts in Advanced Light Water Reactor plants. A Panel (members of which acted as individuals) supported by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has evaluated this methodology. The review approach and observations are included in this report. In general, the Panel supports the ARC methodology with some exceptions and provides recommendations for further improvements. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  14. An evaluation of methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays, and ducts in ALWR plants by use of experience data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kana, D.D.; Kennedy, R.P.; Schiff, A.J.

    1997-07-01

    Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) has developed a methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays and ducts in Advanced Light Water Reactor plants. A Panel (members of which acted as individuals) supported by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has evaluated this methodology. The review approach and observations are included in this report. In general, the Panel supports the ARC methodology with some exceptions and provides recommendations for further improvements. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  15. What should be learned from the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake to formulate the standard seismic motion of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozu, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Although inter plate earthquake is also taken into account in the formulation of standard seismic motion of a nuclear power plant, the lessons of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake are not fully utilized in the evaluation of the strong motion record. This paper discussed the following three points. (1) During the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, sharp pulses generated from a narrow area (SPGA: strong motion pulse generation area) on the fault plane determined the maximum amplitude of the earthquake ground motion at the nuclear power plant. (2) In order to accurately calculate this pulse, the current SMGA model is insufficient. (3) The seismic motion evaluated on the assumption that the SPGA is close to a nuclear power plant can exceed the assumption made by power companies. From the studies so far, it is clear that the current SMGA model cannot accurately calculate pulse waves with a time width of 1 to 2 seconds that is technically important, and its causes are clear. For this reason, the SMGA model is not suitable as a seismic source model for establishing the standard seismic motion of a nuclear power plant. It is necessary to have a model that can reproduce the earthquake ground motion due to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake, in an accuracy of SPGA model or higher. Pulse waves with a time width of 1 to 2 seconds that simultaneously bring about large accelerations and speeds are likely accompany plasticization and cause major damage. (A.O.)

  16. Exploratory boreholes Juchlistock-Grimsel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Keusen, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    The aim of the investigation was the completion of missing geological, hydrogeological and rock-mechanical data about a suitable site for the intended Nagra rock laboratory at Grimsel. To this aim, 6 horizontal boreholes of 100 m length and 86 mm diameter were drilled. The cores, extracted practically without loss, and mechanical data for the main investigation was an extensive evaluation of the lithographic discontinuities and anisotropies, because they are the main determinant of the hydrogeological conditions of the locality. The area is dominated by granites and granodiorite which are of variable biotite content, lamprophyres and aplites. The largest part of the investigated mountain region consists of compact unclefted rock. 478 of the 600 bore meters, i.e. about 80 % of the drilled mountain, have no open clefts. Only 22 of the 600 bore meters (3.6 %0 contain more than five clefts per meter, at which the open clefts in the boreholes SB1 and SB5 appear more frequently. At the remaining exploratory boreholes in 90 % of the mountain ther are no open clefts. 15 refs., 52 figs., 15 tabs

  17. Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring

  18. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components: Phase 2, Motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Pepper, S.E.

    1987-12-01

    In Phase I of the Component Fragility Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a procedure to establish the seismic fragility of nuclear power plant equipment by use of existing test data and demonstrated its application by considering two equipment pieces. In Phase II of the program, BNL has collected additional test data, and has further advanced and is applying the methodology to determine the fragility levels of selected essential equipment categories. The data evaluation of four equipment families, namely, motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply has been completed. Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of each equipment class and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been analyzed for determination of the respective probabilistic fragility levels. To this end, a single g-value has been selected to approximately represent the test vibration level and a statistical analysis has been performed with the g-values corresponding to a particular failure mode. The zero period acceleration and the average spectral acceleration over a frequency range of interest are separately used as the single g-value. The resulting parameters are presented in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient and a randomness coefficient. Ultimately, each fragility level is expressed in terms of a single descriptor called an HCLPF value corresponding to a high (95%) confidence of a low (5%) probability of failure. The important observations made in the process of data analysis are included in this report

  19. Investigations of dynamic interactions coupled by soil between neighbouring nuclear power plants of high mass in case of seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthees, W.; Magiera, G.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the interaction effects for adjacent structures of nuclear power plants i.e. for main buildings and auxiliary buildings has been performed due to horizontal seismic excitation. An interaction measuring rule for response spectra has been defined as the ratio of amplitude of response calculated inclusive the auxiliary building to the amplitude calculated without the auxiliary building in respect to the proper eigen-frequencies. The calculations of the three-dimensional effects are approximated with the program FLUSH. The accuracy of the achievable response herewith calculated is proven in comparison with other suitable methods. The interaction measuring rule is determined by a parameter investigation including the mathematical model consisting of the soil, the main building, and the auxiliary building. The following assumptions are asserted: 1. the soil characteristics are temporarily constant. Ignorance of the accuracy of the realistic i.e. stress depending soil values is encountered by variation of the decisive characteristics within their applicable band-width. 2. The fineness of the mathematical-mechanical modelling for the structural systems i.e. the number of the degrees of freedom is limited to a minimum. Attention is hereby paid that the eigen-frequencies of the main building as well as the eigen-frequencies of the layered soil system in the range of 0 to 10 Hz are computed with sufficient accuracy. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Russian regulatory approaches to seismic design and seismic analysis of NPP piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaliberda, Y.V.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of Russian regulatory approaches to seismic design and seismic analysis of NPP piping. The paper is focused on categorization and seismic analysis of nuclear power plant items (piping, equipment, supports, valves, but not building structures). The paper outlines the current seismic recommendations, corresponding methods with the examples of calculation models. The paper considers calculation results of the mechanisms of dynamic behavior and the problems of developing a rational and economical approaches to seismic design and seismic protection. (author)

  1. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  2. Seismic design spectra for nuclear power plants, state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalopoulos, A.P.; Shukla, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The State-of-the-Art of nuclear power plant design involves the use of design response spectra together with a modal analysis of a mathematical idealization of the actual structure. The design response spectra give the maximum response to ground shaking for a family of single degree-of-freedom viscously damped oscillators. These spectra are usually described as an accelerogram giving ground acceleration as a function of time. The definition of a 'standard' design response spectra is reviewed and illustrated by data relevant to 'hard' or rock sites. Finally, the paper recommends a set of design response spectra applicable to rock sites

  3. Damping values for nuclear power plant piping during seismic events and fluid-induced transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    For several years the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in efforts to establish best-estimate damping values for use in the dynamic analysis of nuclear power plant piping systems. Data from a number of piping vibration tests conducted at facilities worldwide (including the INEL) have been collected, evaluated, reported, and placed in a nuclear piping data bank at the INEL. These data are being used to justify changes in allowable damping values for use in nuclear piping design, thus making piping systems safer, less costly, and easier to inspect and maintain

  4. Work program. Borehole PPG-1 and seismical velocity profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The topic of this report is to give the detailed work program of the foreseen drillings and to describe the investigations and measurements connected with it. It is based on the results of the advertisements and commission's negotiations as well as on the discussions with cantonal and communal authorities. The aim of the work is primarily the judgement of the geological and hydrogeological forecasts which have led to the choice of the area Piz Pian Grand as a potential site. 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Review of revised Japanese seismic guidelines for Nuclear Power Plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.

    1987-01-01

    Development of aseismic design for nuclear power plants in Japan has evolved roughly in three stages. The first phase, which continued by 1978, was a period progressive development when design for each siteplant has referred to designs of predecessor plants and have added the latest knowledge and experience in that time. The second phase from issuance of 'Regulatory Guide for Aseismic Design of Nuclear Power Reactor Facilities' (1978, revised in 1981), or 1978 to 1986, was a period when the application of customary conservative design method was continued, while standardization of the aseismic design technology have been proceded. It is in this phase when new knowledge was accumulated by aseismic proof studies. The third phase represents a transient period to rational design when the conservative aseismic design technology has been reviewed due to the new knowledge and revision of the above JEAG guideline has progressed for incorporation in design, and ont the other hand by-laws of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry are being provided. In this report a review is given of aseismic design and its guideline after the second phase onward and an overview of the revised JEAG - Recent Aseismic Design Method - and the by-laws including rationalization of aseismic design technology

  6. Seismic investigation of the Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endebrock, E.G.; Bartholomew, R.J.; Bennett, J.G.; Brasier, R.I.; Corcoran, W.F.

    1978-03-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the earthquake level at which the Nuclear Fuel Service, Inc., Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York, could first experience a predefined structural failure. The effort was divided into tasks of evaluating soil-structure interaction, determining overall facility motion, and analyzing the substructures. The analysis included using two- and three-dimensional finite element computer codes. Shear wall failure, cell flexural failure (beam action), and foundation (pile) failure were identified as possible structural failure types. The cells that contain radioactive materials and that are required to confine such materials during an earthquake should remain intact up to 0.20 g's. At the same loading, the piles supporting the confinement cells could undergo displacements sufficient to cause fracture of piping between nonmonolithically connected cells

  7. New experiences in borehole dilution techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umesh Chandra

    1977-01-01

    A study of filtration rate and direction of groundwater flow was made at various depths in borehole using bromine-82 as groundwater tracer. The filtration rates were found to vary along the depth of borehole. Vertical flow in the borehole was observed in an alluvial aquifer even after sealing the borehole by rubber packers. The filtration rates, obtained without the packer at various depths, were much less than those obtained with packer. Microscopic hydrological information was obtained around the borehole which was useful in planning a drainage system in the area. A depth was located in the borehole where vertical flow was in opposite directions. At another depth a zone of horizontal flow was observed where vertical flow was in opposite directions. The improved instrumentation used rendered the field work extremely easy quick and readily reproducible. (author)

  8. NCSRR digital seismic network in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldea, A.; Albota, E.; Demetriu, S.; Poiata, N.; Kashima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Digital seismic instrumentation donated by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) to the National Center for Seismic Risk Reduction (NCSRR, Romania) allowed the installation in 2003 of a new Romanian seismic network. In 2005-2006 the network was developed by investments from NCSRR within the budget ensured by Ministry of Transports, Construction and Tourism (MTCT). The NCSRR seismic network contains three types of instrumentation: (i) free-field stations - outside the capital city Bucharest (8 accelerometers), (ii) instrumented buildings - in Bucharest (5 buildings), and (iii) stations with free-field and borehole sensors - in Bucharest (8 sites with ground surface sensor and sensors in 15 boreholes with depths up to 153 m). Since its installation, the NCSRR network recorded more than 170 seismic motions from 26 earthquakes with moment magnitudes ranging from 3.2 to 6.0. The seismic instrumentation was accompanied by investigations of ground conditions and site response: PS logging tests, single-station and array microtremor measurements. The development of seismic monitoring in Romania is a major contribution of JICA Project, creating the premises for a better understanding and modelling of earthquake ground motion, site effects and building response. (authors)

  9. Compressive and Shear Wave Velocity Profiles using Seismic Refraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziman, M; Hazreek, Z A M; Azhar, A T S; Haimi, D S

    2016-01-01

    Seismic refraction measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine soil profile. Meanwhile, the borehole technique is an established way to identify the changes of soil layer based on number of blows penetrating the soil. Both techniques are commonly adopted for subsurface investigation. The seismic refraction test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment compared to borehole technique. The soil velocities of compressive wave and shear wave derived from the seismic refraction measurements can be directly utilised to calculate soil parameters such as soil modulus and Poisson’s ratio. This study investigates the seismic refraction techniques to obtain compressive and shear wave velocity profile. Using the vertical and horizontal geophones as well as vertical and horizontal strike directions of the transient seismic source, the propagation of compressive wave and shear wave can be examined, respectively. The study was conducted at Sejagung Sri Medan. The seismic velocity profile was obtained at a depth of 20 m. The velocity of the shear wave is about half of the velocity of the compression wave. The soil profiles of compressive and shear wave velocities were verified using the borehole data and showed good agreement with the borehole data. (paper)

  10. Structural Safety Analysis Based on Seismic Service Conditions for Butterfly Valves in a Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Uk Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  11. Instantaneous response spectrum in seismic testing of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrone, A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of instantaneous response spectrum (IRS) as the response of single degree of freedom oscillators at a particular time. It demonstrates that a shake table random motion whose standard TRS envelops the RRS does not necessarily satisfy the enveloping requirement instantaneously. That is, any one (or more) instantaneous required response spectrum (IRRS) is not enveloped by any instantaneous test response spectrum (ITRS). Response spectra from different time histories, including single frequency sine beat motion used in resonance testing, are compared for enveloping with maximum response and with the actual response at particular times. These comparisons are given for the enveloping of RRS and IRRS derived with a time history response calculated at a particular building elevation of a nuclear power plant. For the test motion, several of the most severe ITRS derived with a modified EL Centro motion and with a sine beat motion with ten cycles per beat were used. It is shown that although the TRS with the modified EL Centro motion enveloped the given RRS, the selected modified EL Centro ITRS did not envelop the corresponding IRRS. With the sine beat motion, even though the TRS did not fully envelop the given RRS, the resulting sine beat ITRS did not require a larger factor for full IRRS enveloping than those of the modified EL Centro motion

  12. Cement thickness measurements in cased boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, J.S.; Schuster, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for logging a borehole having solid matter along at least a portion of the wall thereof. Gamma radiation is emitted from the borehole into the surrounding media, and the amount of radiation which returns to the borehole is measured by three detectors located at different distances from the source of radiation, so as to be primarily sensitive to radiation which has respectively penetrated to three different depths in the surrounding media. The thickness of the solid matter on the borehole wall is then determined from the three gamma radiation measurements

  13. The sonic borehole logging tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1990-09-01

    This report deals with the sonic borehole tool. First a review of the various elastic wave types is given and velocity values of compressional waves in various materials listed. Next follows a discussion of 3 models for the relation between transit time and porosity, and a comparison between the 3 models is made. The design of sonic tools is described including their geometry. The path of the sonic signals is discussed. Also the effect of environmental factors on the results of the tools are considered. Finally a number of applications are described. In two appendices the mechanics of deformable bodies and formulas for the velocity of sound are reviewed. (author)

  14. A multi-scale case study of natural fracture systems in outcrops and boreholes with applications to reservoir modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal-van Koppen, J.K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Fractured reservoirs are notoriously difficult to characterize because the resolution of seismic data is too low to detect fractures whereas borehole data is detailed but sparse. Therefore, outcrops can be of great support in gaining knowledge of the three-dimensional geometry of fracture networks,

  15. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction due to base slab uplift on the seismic response of an HTGR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Short, S.A.; Wesley, D.A.; Lee, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    The importance of the nonlinear soil-structure interaction effects resulting from substantial base slab uplift occurring during a seismic excitation are evaluated. The structure considered consisted of the containment building and prestressed concrete reactor vessel for a typical HTGR plant. A simplified dynamic mathematical model was utilized consisting of a conventional lumped mass structure with soil-structure interaction accounted for by translational and rotational springs whose properties are determined by elastic half space theory. Three different site soil conditions (a rock site, a moderately stiff soil and a soft soil site) and two levels of horizontal ground motion (0.3g and 0.5g earthquakes) were considered. It may be concluded that linear analysis can be used to conservatively estimate the important behavior of the base slab, even under conditions of substantial base slab uplift. For all cases investigated, linear analysis resulted in higher base overturning moments, greater toe pressures, and greater heel uplift distances than nonlinear analyses. It may also be concluded that the nonlinear effect of uplift does not result in any significant lengthening of the fundamental period of the structure. Also, except in the short period region only negligible differences exist between instructure response spectra based on linear analysis and those based on nonlinear analysis. Finally, for sites in which soil-structure interaction is not significant, as for the rock site, the peak structural response at all locations above the base mat are not significantly influenced by the nonlinear effects of base slab uplift. However, for the two soil sites, the peak shears and moments are, in a few instances, significantly different between linear and nonlinear analyses

  16. Working material. IAEA seismic safety of nuclear power plants. International workshop on lessons learned from strong earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The International Workshop on Lessons Learned from Strong Earthquake was held at Kashiwazaki civic plaza, Kashiwazaki, Niigata-prefecture, Japan, for three days in June 2008. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP (KK-NPP) is located in the city of Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, and owned and operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Ltd. (TEPCO). After it experienced the Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake in July 2007, IAEA dispatched experts' missions twice and held technical discussions with TEPCO. Through such activities, the IAEA secretariat and experts obtained up-dated information of plant integrity, geological and seismological evaluation and developments of the consultation in the regulatory framework of Japan. Some of the information has been shared with the member states through the reports on findings and lessons learned from the missions to Japan. The international workshop was held to discuss and share the information of lessons learned from strong earthquakes in member states' nuclear installations. It provided the opportunity for participants from abroad to share the information of the