WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant secondary metabolites

  1. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed.

  2. Selected Secondary Plant Metabolites for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant metabolites reveal numerous biological activities making them attractive as resource for drug development of human diseases. As the majority of cancer drugs clinically established during the past half century is derived from nature, cancer researchers worldwide try to identify novel natural products as lead compounds for cancer therapy. Natural products are considered as promising cancer therapeutics, either as single agents or in combination protocols, to enhance the antitumor activity of additional therapeutic modalities. Most natural compounds exert pleotrophic effects and modulate various signal transduction pathways. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of action of natural products is expected to open new perspectives in coming years for their use alone or in combination therapies in oncology. Two major strategies to identify novel drug candidates from nature are the bioactivity-guided fractionation of medicinal plant extracts to isolate cytotoxic chemicals and the identification of small molecules inhibiting specific targets in cancer cells. In the present review, we report on our own efforts to unravel the molecular modes of action of phytochemicals in cancer cells and focus on resveratrol, betulinic acid, artesunate, dicentrine and camptothecin derivatives.

  3. Biotechnologically produced secondary plant metabolites for cancer treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkina, Liudmila; Kostyuk, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites of higher plants exert numerous effects on tumorigenesis, on tumor cells in vitro, tumors in experimental animals in vivo, interact with anti-cancer drugs, thus affecting positively or negatively their efficacy, and protect normal tissues of the host organism against adverse effects of anti-cancer therapies. The industrial development of pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products based on secondary plant metabolites is limited due to the following: (i) limited availability of their natural sources, (ii) concern about rare extinguishing plants, (iii) unavoidable contamination of plant extracts with environmental pollutants, (iv) seasonal variations in plant harvesting, (v) poor standardization of the final product due to variable conditions for plant growth, and (vi) difficulties of secondary metabolite extraction from the parts of grown plant. There is now steadily growing interest in the biotechnological approach to produce secondary metabolites using plant cell or plant tissue cultures. In the present review, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and their role(s) in plant physiology will be briefly discussed; the biotechnological approach to active substances production in the plant cell and plant tissue cultures will be described; examples and mechanisms of cancer preventive and anti-cancer action of some biotechnologically produced plant metabolites will be provided; and future perspectives for biotechnologically produced plant-derived substances in the combined protocols for cancer treatment will be suggested.

  4. Current approaches toward production of secondary plant metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sarfaraj Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are the tremendous source for the discovery of new products with medicinal importance in drug development. Today several distinct chemicals derived from plants are important drugs, which are currently used in one or more countries in the world. Secondary metabolites are economically important as drugs, flavor and fragrances, dye and pigments, pesticides, and food additives. Many of the drugs sold today are simple synthetic modifications or copies of the naturally obtained substances. The evolving commercial importance of secondary metabolites has in recent years resulted in a great interest in secondary metabolism, particularly in the possibility of altering the production of bioactive plant metabolites by means of tissue culture technology. Plant cell and tissue culture technologies can be established routinely under sterile conditions from explants, such as plant leaves, stems, roots, and meristems for both the ways for multiplication and extraction of secondary metabolites. In vitro production of secondary metabolite in plant cell suspension cultures has been reported from various medicinal plants, and bioreactors are the key step for their commercial production. Based on this lime light, the present review is aimed to cover phytotherapeutic application and recent advancement for the production of some important plant pharmaceuticals.

  5. Plants and endophytes: equal partners in secondary metabolite production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Well known plant production systems should be re-evaluated due to findings that the interesting metabolite might actually be produced by microbes intimately associated with the plant, so-called endophytes. Endophytes can be bacteria or fungi and they are characterized usually by the feature that they do not cause any harm to the host. Indeed, in some cases, such as mycorrhizal fungi or other growth promoting endophytes, they can be beneficial for the plant. Here some examples are reviewed where the host plant and/or endophyte metabolism can be induced by the other partner. Also, partial or complete biosynthesis pathways for plant secondary metabolites can be attributed to such endophytes. In other cases the host plant is able to metabolize substances from fungal origin. The question of the natural role of such metabolic changes for the endophyte will be briefly touched. Finally, the consequences for the use of plant cultures for secondary metabolite production is discussed.

  6. Coevolution can explain defensive secondary metabolite diversity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Michael P; Fenton, Andy; Jones, Meriel G; Ruxton, Graeme D; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Many plant species produce defensive compounds that are often highly diverse within and between populations. The genetic and cellular mechanisms by which metabolite diversity is produced are increasingly understood, but the evolutionary explanations for persistent diversification in plant secondary metabolites have received less attention. Here we consider the role of plant-herbivore coevolution in the maintenance and characteristics of diversity in plant secondary metabolites. We present a simple model in which plants can evolve to invest in a range of defensive toxins, and herbivores can evolve resistance to these toxins. We allow either single-species evolution or reciprocal coevolution. Our model shows that coevolution maintains toxin diversity within populations. Furthermore, there is a fundamental coevolutionary asymmetry between plants and their herbivores, because herbivores must resist all plant toxins, whereas plants need to challenge and nullify only one resistance trait. As a consequence, average plant fitness increases and insect fitness decreases as number of toxins increases. When costs apply, the model showed both arms race escalation and strong coevolutionary fluctuation in toxin concentrations across time. We discuss the results in the context of other evolutionary explanations for secondary metabolite diversification.

  7. [Bioactive secondary metabolites produced by plants of the genus Physalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, Karolina; Kusiak, Joanna; Stępień, Bartłomiej; Bergier, Katarzyna; Kuźniak, Elżbieta

    2010-12-30

    Plants from the genus Physalis L. (family Solanaceae), native to warm and subtropical regions of Central and South America, are particularly rich in secondary metabolites, e.g.: withanolides, physalins, calystegines, tropane and nortropane alkaloids. Due to the high biological activities of these compounds, in the tropics Physalis plants have been used for centuries as medicinal herbs in the treatment of urinary and skin diseases, gonorrhea, ulcers, sores and as a vermicidal drug. This review describes the main categories of secondary metabolites, their distribution, chemistry, biosynthesis as well as biological activities. Particular attention is given to their potent anticancer activities.

  8. Secondary metabolites in plants: transport and self-tolerance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitan, Nobukazu

    2016-07-01

    Plants produce a host of secondary metabolites with a wide range of biological activities, including potential toxicity to eukaryotic cells. Plants generally manage these compounds by transport to the apoplast or specific organelles such as the vacuole, or other self-tolerance mechanisms. For efficient production of such bioactive compounds in plants or microbes, transport and self-tolerance mechanisms should function cooperatively with the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes. Intensive studies have identified and characterized the proteins responsible for transport and self-tolerance. In particular, many transporters have been isolated and their physiological functions have been proposed. This review describes recent progress in studies of transport and self-tolerance and provides an updated inventory of transporters according to their substrates. Application of such knowledge to synthetic biology might enable efficient production of valuable secondary metabolites in the future.

  9. Medicinal plants: a source of anti-parasitic secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Michael

    2012-10-31

    This review summarizes human infections caused by endoparasites, including protozoa, nematodes, trematodes, and cestodes, which affect more than 30% of the human population, and medicinal plants of potential use in their treatment. Because vaccinations do not work in most instances and the parasites have sometimes become resistant to the available synthetic therapeutics, it is important to search for alternative sources of anti-parasitic drugs. Plants produce a high diversity of secondary metabolites with interesting biological activities, such as cytotoxic, anti-parasitic and anti-microbial properties. These drugs often interfere with central targets in parasites, such as DNA (intercalation, alkylation), membrane integrity, microtubules and neuronal signal transduction. Plant extracts and isolated secondary metabolites which can inhibit protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Trichomonas and intestinal worms are discussed. The identified plants and compounds offer a chance to develop new drugs against parasitic diseases. Most of them need to be tested in more detail, especially in animal models and if successful, in clinical trials.

  10. PECULIARITIES OF SECONDARY METABOLITES BIOSYNTHESIS IN PLANT CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. NOSOV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available metabolites formation in plant cell cultures of Panax spp., (ginsenosides; Dioscorea deltoidea (steroid glycosides; Ajuga reptans, Serratula coronata, Rhaponticum carthamoides (ecdisteroids; Polyscias spp., (triterpene glycosides, Taxus spp. (taxoids, Stevia rebaudiana (diterpene steviol-glycosides, Stephania glabra (alkaloids. They are some regular trends of secondary metabolites synthesis in the plant cell culture:It can be noted the stable synthesis of the compound promoting cell proliferation. Indeed, cell cultures of Dioscorea deltoidea were demonstrated to accumulate only furostanol glycosides, which promoted cell division. Furostanol glycoside content of Dioscorea strain DM-0.5 was up to 6 - 12% by dry biomass.Panax ginseng and P. japonicus plant cell cultures synthesize as minimum seven triterpene glycosides (ginsenosides, the productivity of these compounds was up to 6.0 - 8.0% on dry biomass.By contrast, the detectable synthesis of diterpene steviol-glycosides in cultivated cells of Stevia rebaudiana initiated in the mixotrophic cultures during chloroplast formation only.Despite these differences, or mainly due to them, plant cell cultures have become an attractive source of phytochemicals in alternative to collecting wild plants. It provides a guideline to bioreactor-based production of isoprenoids using undifferentiated plant cell cultures. 

  11. Plant Secondary Metabolites as Rodent Repellents: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sabine C; Stolter, Caroline; Imholt, Christian; Jacob, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The vast number of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) produced by higher plants has generated many efforts to exploit their potential for pest control. We performed a systematic literature search to retrieve relevant publications, and we evaluated these according to PSM groups to derive information about the potential for developing plant-derived rodent repellents. We screened a total of 54 publications where different compounds or plants were tested regarding rodent behavior/metabolism. In the search for widely applicable products, we recommend multi-species systematic screening of PSMs, especially from the essential oil and terpenoid group, as laboratory experiments have uniformly shown the strongest effects across species. Other groups of compounds might be more suitable for the management of species-specific or sex-specific issues, as the effects of some compounds on particular rodent target species or sex might not be present in non-target species or in both sexes. Although plant metabolites have potential as a tool for ecologically-based rodent management, this review demonstrates inconsistent success across laboratory, enclosure, and field studies, which ultimately has lead to a small number of currently registered PSM-based rodent repellents.

  12. Correlation between Plant Secondary Metabolites and Their Antifungal Mechanisms–A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Sara; Jäger, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The search for new antifungal drugs often involves secondary metabolites from plants because of their pharmacological activity against foreign pathogens. Among the modern drugs in use today about 40% are of natural origin. To distinguish the secondary metabolites they can be divided into groups b...... biosynthetic groups of secondary metabolites; the phenolic compounds and the nitrogen containing compounds. Despite this there are correlations between some of the subgroups and their antifungal mechanism of actions....

  13. Whole-plant C allocation priorities: do secondary metabolites and VOCs matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Huang, Jianbei; Forkelova, Lenka; Behrendt, Thomas; Reichelt, Michael; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2017-04-01

    Whole-plant carbon (C) allocation is a critical issue for understanding plant functioning and has been studied for many decades. Plants fix CO2 from the atmosphere and partition the resulting photosynthetic products (carbohydrates) among several functional pools including growth of structural and reproductive biomass, metabolic processes like respiration but also for the synthesis of secondary metabolites promoting defense and communication. Allocation to secondary metabolites is conceptually viewed as a trade-off between growth and defense. Plants either invest carbohydrates to produce biomass which may be lost - at least partially -to herbivory or they increase allocation to secondary metabolites to deter herbivores from consuming existing biomass. While conceptually intuitive, trade-off hypotheses all suffer from one important shortcoming: the whole-plant carbon balance, critical for determining trade-off relationships, is usually unknown. In the research group on Plant Allocation, we manipulate and measure the whole-plant carbon balance in different species and use tracers to investigate carbon fluxes through the plant and into functional allocation pools. Inducing carbon limitation by reducing atmospheric [CO2] allows us to infer allocation priorities. In this presentation I will show several examples of studies on whole-plant carbon allocation patterns in different plant species. These investigations include assessments of different functional pools like growth, storage, secondary metabolites and volatile emissions as well as the underlying phytohormonal patterns and show that allocation to secondary metabolites and volatiles has a high priority in the whole-plant carbon balance.

  14. Plant protein and secondary metabolites influence diet selection in a mammalian specialist herbivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy C. Ulappa; Rick G. Kelsey; Graham G. Frye; Janet L. Rachlow; LIsa A. Shipley; Laura Bond; Xinzhu Pu; Jennifer Sorensen. Forbey

    2014-01-01

    For herbivores, nutrient intake is limited by the relatively low nutritional quality of plants and high concentrations of potentially toxic defensive compounds (plant secondary metabolites [PSMs]) produced by many plants. In response to phytochemical challenges, some herbivores selectively forage on plants with higher nutrient and lower PSM concentrations relative to...

  15. Medicinal plants and secondary metabolites for diabetes mellitus control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bahmani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common and complex problems of modern societies which has caused many economic and social problems. Because diabetes has no definite treatment, the use of traditional medicine seems to be an appropriate solution to control and manage it. Studies revealed that Vaccinium Arctostaphylos L., Securigera securidaca L., Gymnema sylvestre L., Atriplex halimus L., Camellia sinensis L., Ginkgo biloba L., Mamordica charantia L., Citrullus colocynthis (L. Schrad., Allium cepa L., Allium sativum L., Silybum marianum (L., Gaertn and Trigonella foenum graecum L. are effective against diabetes. Flavonoids, quercin, metformin, quinolizidine, anthocyanin, catechin and flavone, phenylpropanoids, lipoic acid and coumarin metabolites were introduced major impact on diabetes. With regard to the study of plants and their metabolites and the mechanisms of their influence, it is clear that these plants have the potential to reduce blood sugar and diabetes and be considered as candidates for preparing new drugs. Combination of plants extracts or their components may also have synergistic effects to better act on diabetes.

  16. A Review on Venom Enzymes Neutralizing Ability of Secondary Metabolites from Medicinal Plants

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    Pushpendra Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Medicinal plants are vital sources of bioactive compounds that are useful for the treatment of patients with snake bites or are indirectly applicable for boosting the effects of conventional serum therapy. These plants are being used traditionally by local healers and tribes for the treatment of patients with snake bites and therefore can be used as an alternative against snake envenomation. Scientifically, using the secondary metabolites of plants to neutralize venom enzymes has an extra benefit of being based on traditional knowledge; also, the use of such metabolites for the treatment of patients with snake bites is cheaper and the treatment can be started sooner. Methods: All the available information on various secondary metabolites exhibiting venom neutralizing ability were collected via electronic search (using Google books, Pubmed, SciFinder, Scirus, Google Scholar, and Web of Science and articles of peer-reviewed journals. Results: Recent interest in different plant has focused on isolating and identifying of different phytoconstituents that exhibit Phospholipase A2 activity and other venom enzyme neutralizing ability. In this support convincing evidence in experimental animal models are available. Conclusion: Secondary metabolites are naturally present, have no side effect, are stable for a long time, can be easily stored, and can neutralize a wide range of snake enzymes, such as phospholipase A2, hyaluronidase, protease, L-amino acid oxidase, 5’nucleotidase, etc. The current review presents a compilation of important plant secondary metabolites that are effective against snake venom due to enzyme neutralization.

  17. Plant Secondary Metabolites in some Medicinal Plants of Mongolia Used for Enhancing Animal Health and Production

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    Makkar, HPS.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels and activities of a number of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs are known to increase in response to increase in stress. The Mongolian plants considered to possess medicinal properties may contain novel compounds since they are exposed to severe conditions; such plants could become good candidates for modern drug discovery programmes. Information on distribution, palatability to livestock and opinion of local people on their nutritive and medicinal values was compiled for 15 plant materials from 14 plant species considered important for medicinal purposes. These plants were evaluated for nutritive value and PSMs: tannins, saponins, lectins, alkaloids and cyanogens. High levels of tannins were found in roots of Bergenia crassifolia and in leaves of B. crassifolia, Vaccinium vitisidaea and Rheum undulatum. High lectin activity (haemagglutination was present in B. crassifolia roots, and leaves of R. undulatum, Iris lacteal and Thymus gobicus contained weak lectin activity. Tanacetum vulgare, Serratula centauroids, Taraxacum officinale and Delphinum elatum leaves contained saponin activity (haemolysis. Alkaloids and cyanogens were not present in any of the samples. The paper discusses the known medicinal uses of these plants in light of the PSMs levels, and identifies plant samples for future applications in human and livestock health, welfare and safety.

  18. Impact of Metals on Secondary Metabolites Production and Plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Morphological changes associated with metal-induced stress were also examined with a scanning electron ... transfers and other essential metabolic processes in plants;3 ... affect the development and health of plants by inhibiting vital.

  19. Production and excretion of secondary metabolites by plant cell cultures of Tagetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    In this thesis, the results are presented of several approaches to improve the production and excretion of thiophenes by cell cultures or hairy roots of Tagetes spp.In chapter one, most of the techniques to improve the production and/or excretion of secondary metabolites with plant cell cultures are

  20. The integrative roles of plant secondary metabolites in natural systems: a synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iason, G.R.; Dicke, M.; Hartley, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites (PSM) such as terpenes and phenolic compounds are known to have numerous ecological roles, notably in defence against herbivores, pathogens and abiotic stresses and in interactions with competitors and mutualists. This book reviews recent developments in the field to prov

  1. Dynamics of plant secondary metabolites and consequences for food chains and community dynamics. Chapter Sixteen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.; Gols, R.; Poelman, E.H.

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites (PSM) such as terpenes and phenolic compounds are known to have numerous ecological roles, notably in defence against herbivores, pathogens and abiotic stresses and in interactions with competitors and mutualists. This book reviews recent developments in the field to prov

  2. The ecology of plant secondary metabolites : from genes to global processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iason, G.R.; Dicke, M.; Hartley, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites (PSM) such as terpenes and phenolic compounds are known to have numerous ecological roles, notably in defence against herbivores, pathogens and abiotic stresses and in interactions with competitors and mutualists. This book reviews recent developments in the field to prov

  3. A Novel Class of Emerging Anticancer Compounds: Oxyprenylated Secondary Metabolites from Plants and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Salvatore; Fiorito, Serena; Epifano, Francesco; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    O-Prenyl secondary metabolites (3,3-dimethylallyl, geranyl-, farnesyl- and related biosynthetic derivatives) represent a class of rarely occurring natural products. In the last two decades such compounds have been found to exert promising and effective pharmacological activities, mainly in terms of anti-cancer properties. To date about 350 oxyprenylated secondary metabolites, the most part of which having a phenylpropanoid or a polyketide core, have been extracted from plants mainly belonging to the Rutaceae, Apiaceae, and Fabaceae families, and from fungi and bacteria. The aim of this comprehensive review is to make a survey of the in so far reported literature citations about O-prenyl secondary metabolites exhibiting in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer properties from phytochemical and pharmacological point of views.

  4. Ecosystem consequences of enhanced solar ultraviolet radiation: secondary plant metabolites as mediators of multiple trophic interactions in terrestrial plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassman, John H

    2004-05-01

    The potential role of ultraviolet-B (UV-B)-induced secondary plant metabolites as mediators of multiple trophic responses in terrestrial ecosystems is considered through review of the major classes of secondary metabolites, the pathways for their biosynthesis, interactions with primary and secondary consumers and known UV effects on their induction. Gross effects of UV-B radiation on plant growth and survival under realistic spectral balances in the field have been generally lacking, but subtle changes in carbon allocation and partitioning induced by UV-B, in particular production of secondary metabolites, can affect ecosystem-level processes. Secondary metabolites are important in plant-herbivore interactions and may affect pathogens. They act as feeding or oviposition deterrents to generalists and nonadapted specialists, but adapted specialists are stimulated to feed by these same compounds, which they detoxify and often sequester for use against their predators. This provides a route for tritrophic effects of enhanced UV-B radiation whereby herbivory may be increased while predation on the herbivore is simultaneously reduced. It is in this context that secondary metabolites may manifest their most important role. They can be the demonstrable mechanism establishing cause and effect at higher trophic levels because the consequences of their induction can be established at all trophic levels.

  5. Nutrient acquisition and secondary metabolites in plant pathogenic fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida

    and infection processes of these two distinct phytopathogens are described with special attention on the importance of uptake and reallocation of nutrients. Nutrient uptake from host plant is crucial for fungi to grow and proliferate and during several developmental processes nutrient reallocation, a mechanism...... called autophagy, is crucial. In this ph.d project autophagy and dipeptide transport in Fg and Bgh is assessed with respect to pathology, developmental processes and mycotoxins production. Several techniques within molecular biology, bioinformatics, microbiology, analytical chemistry and plant pathology...

  6. Regulation and accumulation of secondary metabolites in plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-04

    Jun 4, 2007 ... importance for biological applications: (1) the plant/microbial co-culture system in vitro may be perfectly useful to ... Environmental factors including biotic and abiotic stimuli .... assumed to be a meaningful and effective tool to biotic elicitation ... isoprenoid metabolism through metabolic engineering offers the ...

  7. Dynamic changes in plant secondary metabolites during UV acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hectors, Kathleen; Van Oevelen, Sandra; Geuns, Jan; Guisez, Yves; Jansen, Marcel A K; Prinsen, Els

    2014-10-01

    Plants respond to environmental stress by synthesizing a range of secondary metabolites for defense purposes. Here we report on the effect of chronic ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. In the natural environment, UV is a highly dynamic environmental parameter and therefore we hypothesized that plants are continuously readjusting levels of secondary metabolites. Our data show distinct kinetic profiles for accumulation of tocopherols, polyamines and flavonoids upon UV acclimation. The lipid-soluble antioxidant α-tocopherol accumulated fast and remained elevated. Polyamines accumulated fast and transiently. This fast response implies a role for α-tocopherol and polyamines in short-term UV response. In contrast, an additional sustained accumulation of flavonols took place. The distinct accumulation patterns of these secondary metabolites confirm that the UV acclimation process is a dynamic process, and indicates that commonly used single time-point analyses do not reveal the full extent of UV acclimation. We demonstrate that UV stimulates the accumulation of specific flavonol glycosides, i.e. kaempferol and (to a lesser extent) quercetin di- and triglycosides, all specifically rhamnosylated at position seven. All metabolites were identified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC)-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Some of these flavonol glycosides reached steady-state levels in 3-4 days, while concentrations of others are still increasing after 12  days of UV exposure. A biochemical pathway for these glycosides is postulated involving 7-O-rhamnosylation for the synthesis of all eight metabolites identified. We postulate that this 7-O-rhamnosylation has an important function in UV acclimation.

  8. Secondary Metabolite Localization by Autofluorescence in Living Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Talamond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autofluorescent molecules are abundant in plant cells and spectral images offer means for analyzing their spectra, yielding information on their accumulation and function. Based on their fluorescence characteristics, an imaging approach using multiphoton microscopy was designed to assess localization of the endogenous fluorophores in living plant cells. This method, which requires no previous treatment, provides an effective experimental tool for discriminating between multiple naturally-occurring fluorophores in living-tissues. Combined with advanced Linear Unmixing, the spectral analysis extends the possibilities and enables the simultaneous detection of fluorescent molecules reliably separating overlapping emission spectra. However, as with any technology, the possibility for artifactual results does exist. This methodological article presents an overview of the applications of tissular and intra-cellular localization of these intrinsic fluorophores in leaves and fruits (here for coffee and vanilla. This method will provide new opportunities for studying cellular environments and the behavior of endogenous fluorophores in the intracellular environment.

  9. Glycosyltransferases:key players involved in the modification of plant secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun WANG; Bingkai HOU

    2009-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are members of the multigene superfamily in plants that can transfer single or multiple activated sugars to a range of plant molecules,resulting in the glycosylation of plant compounds.Although the activities of many glycosyltransferases and their products have been recognized for a long time,only in recent years were some glycosyltransferase genes identified and a few functionally characterized in detail.Glycosylation is thought to be one of the most important modification reactions towards plant secondary metabolites,and plays a key role in maintaining cell homeostasis,thus likely participating in the regulation of plant growth,development and in defense responses to stress environments.With advances in plant genome projects and the development of novel technologies in analyzing gene function,significant progress could be made in gaining new insights into the properties and precise biological roles of plant secondary product glycosyltransferases,and the new knowledge will have extensive application prospects in the catalytic synthesis of glycoconjugates and metabolic engineering of crops.In this review,we summarize the current research,highlighting the possible biological roles,of plant secondary metabolite glycosyltransferases and discuss their potential applications as well as aspects to be further studied in the near future.

  10. Role of Cereal Secondary Metabolites Involved in Mediating the Outcome of Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. Du Fall

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cereal crops such as wheat, rice and barley underpin the staple diet for human consumption globally. A multitude of threats to stable and secure yields of these crops exist including from losses caused by pathogens, particularly fungal. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to resist pathogens including programmed cell death responses, the release of pathogenicity-related proteins and oxidative bursts. Another such mechanism is the synthesis and release of secondary metabolites toxic to potential pathogens. Several classes of these compounds have been identified and their anti-fungal properties demonstrated. However the lack of suitable analytical techniques has hampered the progress of identifying and exploiting more of these novel metabolites. In this review, we summarise the role of the secondary metabolites in cereal crop diseases and briefly touch on the analytical techniques that hold the key to unlocking their potential in reducing yield losses.

  11. The regulatory mechanism of fungal elicitor-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis in medical plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xin; Jia, Min; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Cheng-Jian; Rahman, Khalid; Han, Ting; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2017-03-01

    A wide range of external stress stimuli trigger plant cells to undergo complex network of reactions that ultimately lead to the synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites. Accumulation of such metabolites often occurs in plants subjected to stresses including various elicitors or signal molecules. Throughout evolution, endophytic fungi, an important constituent in the environment of medicinal plants, have known to form long-term stable and mutually beneficial symbiosis with medicinal plants. The endophytic fungal elicitor can rapidly and specifically induce the expression of specific genes in medicinal plants which can result in the activation of a series of specific secondary metabolic pathways resulting in the significant accumulation of active ingredients. Here we summarize the progress made on the mechanisms of fungal elicitor including elicitor signal recognition, signal transduction, gene expression and activation of the key enzymes and its application. This review provides guidance on studies which may be conducted to promote the efficient synthesis and accumulation of active ingredients by the endogenous fungal elicitor in medicinal plant cells, and provides new ideas and methods of studying the regulation of secondary metabolism in medicinal plants.

  12. Endophytes as in vitro production platforms of high value plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-11-01

    Many reports have been published on bioprospecting of endophytic fungi capable of producing high value bioactive molecules like, paclitaxel, vincristine, vinblastine, camptothecin and podophyllotoxin. However, commercial exploitation of endophytes for high value-low volume plant secondary metabolites remains elusive due to widely reported genomic instability of endophytes in the axenic culture. While most of the endophyte research focuses on screening endophytes for novel or existing high value biomolecules, very few reports seek to explore the possible mechanisms of production of host-plant associated or novel secondary metabolites in these organisms. With an overview of host-endophyte relationship and its possible impact on the secondary metabolite production potential of endophytes, the review highlights the evidence reported for and against the presence of host-independent biosynthetic machinery in endophytes. The review aims to address the question, why should and how can endophytes be exploited for large scale in vitro production of high value phytochemicals? In this regard, various bioprocess optimization strategies that have been applied to sustain and enhance the product yield from the endophytes have also been described in detail. Further, techniques like mixed fermentation/co-cultivation and use of epigenetic modifiers have also been discussed as potential strategies to activate cryptic gene clusters in endophytes, thereby aiding in novel metabolite discovery and overcoming the limitations associated with axenic culture of endophytes.

  13. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhang; Chris Franco; Chris Curtin; Simon Conn

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature ...

  14. Nitric oxide:A potential key point of the signaling network leading to plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous signaling network of plants plays important roles in mediating the exogenous factor-induced biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plants recently.Numerous studies demonstrated that the main signaling molecules such as salicylic acid(SA),jasmonic acid (JA),reactive oxygen species(ROS),and NO were not only involved in regulating plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis but also interacted to form a complex signaling network by mutual inhibition and/or synergy.The recent progress in the signal network of plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis has been discussed in this paper.Furthermore,we propose a hypothetical model to show that NO might act as a potential molecular switch in the stgnaling network leading to plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  15. Herbal Extracts and Phytochemicals: Plant Secondary Metabolites and the Enhancement of Human Brain Function1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David O.; Wightman, Emma L.

    2011-01-01

    Humans consume a wide range of foods, drugs, and dietary supplements that are derived from plants and which modify the functioning of the central nervous sytem (CNS). The psychoactive properties of these substances are attributable to the presence of plant secondary metabolites, chemicals that are not required for the immediate survival of the plant but which are synthesized to increase the fitness of the plant to survive by allowing it to interact with its environment, including pathogens and herbivorous and symbiotic insects. In many cases, the effects of these phytochemicals on the human CNS might be linked either to their ecological roles in the life of the plant or to molecular and biochemical similarities in the biology of plants and higher animals. This review assesses the current evidence for the efficacy of a range of readily available plant-based extracts and chemicals that may improve brain function and which have attracted sufficient research in this regard to reach a conclusion as to their potential effectiveness as nootropics. Many of these candidate phytochemicals/extracts can be grouped by the chemical nature of their potentially active secondary metabolite constituents into alkaloids (caffeine, nicotine), terpenes (ginkgo, ginseng, valerian, Melissa officinalis, sage), and phenolic compounds (curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, Hypericum perforatum, soy isoflavones). They are discussed in terms of how an increased understanding of the relationship between their ecological roles and CNS effects might further the field of natural, phytochemical drug discovery. PMID:22211188

  16. Chemical profile studies on the secondary metabolites of medicinally important plant Zanthoxylum rhetsa (Roxb.) DC using HPTLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Priya Alphonso; Aparna Saraf

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish the chemical fingerprint of various secondary metabolites of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (Roxb.) DC, a medicinally important plant. Methods: Preliminary phytochemical screening for various secondary metabolites was carried out. HPTLC profiles of various individual secondary metabolites were done and profiles were developed for authentication. Result: The ethanolic extract of the fruit showed the presence of 8 Glycosides, 10 Flavonoids, 6 Essential Oils, 5 Anthraquinones, 9 bitter principles, 7 Coumarins and 8 Terpenoids. Conclusions: The development of such fingerprint for the fruits of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (Roxb.) DC is useful in differentiating the species from the adulterant and also act as biomarker for this plant in the Pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Medicinally important secondary metabolites in recombinant microorganisms or plants: progress in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Holger; Wink, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Plants produce a high diversity of natural products or secondary metabolites which are important for the communication of plants with other organisms. A prominent function is the protection against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens. Some natural products are also involved in defence against abiotic stress, e.g. UV-B exposure. Many of the secondary metabolites have interesting biological properties and quite a number are of medicinal importance. Because the production of the valuable natural products, such as the anticancer drugs paclitaxel, vinblastine or camptothecin in plants is a costly process, biotechnological alternatives to produce these alkaloids more economically become increasingly important. This review provides an overview of the state of art to produce alkaloids in recombinant microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeast. Some progress has been made in metabolic engineering usually employing a single recombinant alkaloid gene. More importantly, for benzylisoquinoline, monoterpene indole and diterpene alkaloids (taxanes) as well as some terpenoids and phenolics the proof of concept for production of complex alkaloids in recombinant Escherichia coli and yeast has already been achieved. In a long-term perspective, it will probably be possible to generate gene cassettes for complete pathways, which could then be used for production of valuable natural products in bioreactors or for metabolic engineering of crop plants. This will improve their resistance against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens.

  18. Endophytic Streptomyces in the traditional medicinal plant Arnica montana L.: secondary metabolites and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardecki, Tina; Brötz, Elke; De Ford, Christian; von Loewenich, Friederike D; Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Merfort, Irmgard

    2015-08-01

    Arnica montana L. is a medical plant of the Asteraceae family and grows preferably on nutrient poor soils in mountainous environments. Such surroundings are known to make plants dependent on symbiosis with other organisms. Up to now only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were found to act as endophytic symbiosis partners for A. montana. Here we identified five Streptomyces strains, microorganisms also known to occur as endophytes in plants and to produce a huge variety of active secondary metabolites, as inhabitants of A. montana. The secondary metabolite spectrum of these strains does not contain sesquiterpene lactones, but consists of the glutarimide antibiotics cycloheximide and actiphenol as well as the diketopiperazines cyclo-prolyl-valyl, cyclo-prolyl-isoleucyl, cyclo-prolyl-leucyl and cyclo-prolyl-phenylalanyl. Notably, genome analysis of one strain was performed and indicated a huge genome size with a high number of natural products gene clusters among which genes for cycloheximide production were detected. Only weak activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was revealed, but the extracts showed a marked cytotoxic activity as well as an antifungal activity against Candida parapsilosis and Fusarium verticillioides. Altogether, our results provide evidence that A. montana and its endophytic Streptomyces benefit from each other by completing their protection against competitors and pathogens and by exchanging plant growth promoting signals with nutrients.

  19. Yield improvement strategies for the production of secondary metabolites in plant tissue culture: silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbouZid, S

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell culture can be a potential source for the production of important secondary metabolites. This technology bears many advantages over conventional agricultural methods. The main problem to arrive at a cost-effective process is the low productivity. This is mainly due to lack of differentiation in the cultured cells. Many approaches have been used to maximise the yield of secondary metabolites produced by cultured plant cells. Among these approaches: choosing a plant with a high biosynthetic capacity, obtaining efficient cell line for growth and production of metabolite of interest, manipulating culture conditions, elicitation, metabolic engineering and organ culture. This article gives an overview of the various approaches used to maximise the production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites in plant cell cultures. Examples of using these different approaches are shown for the production of silymarin from Silybum marianum tissue culture.

  20. Living between two worlds: two-phase culture systems for producing plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sonia; Hossein Mirjalili, Mohammad; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Mazzafera, Paulo; Bonfill, Mercedes

    2013-03-01

    The two-phase culture system is an important in vitro strategy to increase the production of secondary metabolites (SMs) by providing an enhanced release of these compounds from plant cells. Whereas the first phase supports cell growth, the second phase provides an additional site or acts as a metabolic sink for the accumulation of SMs and also reduces feedback inhibition. This review is focused on several aspects of the two-phase culture system and aims to show the diverse possibilities of employing this technique for the in vitro production of SMs from plant cells. Depending on the material used in the secondary phase, two-phase culture systems can be broadly categorised as liquid-liquid or liquid-solid. The choice of material for the second phase depends on the type of compound to be recovered and the compatibility with the other phase. Different factors affecting the efficiency of two-phase culture systems include the choice of material for the secondary phase, its concentration, volume, and time of addition. Factors such as cell elicitation, immobilization, and permeabilization, have been suggested as important strategies to make the two-phase culture system practically reliable on a commercial scale. Since there are many possibilities for designing a two-phase system, more detailed studies are needed to broaden the range of secondary phases compatible with the various plant species producing SMs with potential applications, mainly in the food and pharmacology industries.

  1. Anti-parasitic effects of plant secondary metabolites on swine nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, A.R.; Pena-Espinoza, Miguel Angel; Fryganas, Christos

    -control options are required. We present results from a comprehensive in vitro screen of plant secondary metabolites (PSM) from diverse plant sources on the economically important pig parasites Ascaris chlamydiae and Oesophagostomum dentatum . We focused on two PSM classes commonly found in natural diets......Organic production presents challenges to animal health and productivity. In organic pig production, animals must have access to outdoor pastures which increases exposure to gastrointestinal parasites. Moreover, the routine use of synthetic anti-parasitic drugs is not allowed. Thus, novel parasite...... – condensed tannins (CT) and sesquiterpene lactones (SL). Different CT-types were purified from various plant sources to reflect their diversity; SL were purified from forage chicory. These PSM were tested in inhibition assays of worm motility and migratory ability. CT had potent activity against A. suum...

  2. [Repellent and antifeedant effect of secondary metabolites of non-host plants on Plutella xylostella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Hou, Youming; Yang, Guang; You, Minsheng

    2004-03-01

    Based on the theory of co-evolution between plants and phytophagous insects, the repellent and antifeedant effect of secondary metabolites of non-host plants on diamondback moth(DBM) Plutella xylostella was studied, aimed at finding out the oviposition repellents and antifeedants of insect pests. When the ethanol extracts(Etho Exts) of Bauhinia variegata, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Euphorbia hirta, Duranta repens, Zanthoxylum bungeanum, Magnolia grandiflora, and Nicotiana tabacum were applied respectively, the oviposition repellent rates were all over 80.00%; while after forty-eight hours treatment with the Etho Exts of Euphorbia pulcherrima, Broussonetia papyrifera, Artemisia argyi, Camellia oleifera, Salix babylonica, Euphorbia hirta, Bauhinia variegata, and Setaria viridisa, the antifeedant rates of DBM larvae were all more than 80.00%.

  3. Snake venom induced local toxicities: plant secondary metabolites as an auxiliary therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Hemshekhar, M; Sunitha, K; Thushara, R M; Jnaneshwari, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2013-01-01

    Snakebite is a serious medical and socio-economic problem affecting the rural and agricultural laborers of tropical and sub-tropical region across the world leading to high morbidity and mortality. In most of the snakebite incidences, victims usually end up with permanent tissue damage and sequelae with high socioeconomic and psychological impacts. Although, mortality has been reduced markedly due to anti-venom regimen, it is associated with several limitations. Snake venom metalloprotease, hyaluronidase and myotoxic phospholipase A2 are the kingpins of tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation. Thus, inhibition of these enzymes is considered to be the rate limiting step in the management of snakebite. Unfortunately, tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation persists even after the administration of anti-venom. At present, inhibitors from snake serum and plasma, several synthetic compounds and their analogs have been demonstrated to possess anti-snake venom activities, but the use of plant metabolites for this purpose has an added advantage of traditional knowledge and will make the treatment cheaper and more accessible to the affected population. Therefore, the clinical and research forums are highly oriented towards plant metabolites and interestingly, certain phytochemicals are implicated as the antibody elicitors against venom toxicity that can be exploited in designing effective anti-venoms. Based on these facts, we have made an effort to enlist plant based secondary metabolites with antiophidian abilities and their mechanism of action against locally acting enzymes/toxins in particular. The review also describes their functional groups responsible for therapeutic beneficial and certainly oblige in designing potent inhibitors against venom toxins.

  4. An RNA isolation system for plant tissues rich in secondary metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Pardeep K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary metabolites are reported to interfere with the isolation of RNA particularly with the recipes that use guanidinium-based salt. Such interference was observed in isolation of RNA with medicinal plants rheum (Rheum australe and arnebia (Arnebia euchroma. A rapid and less cumbersome system for isolation of RNA was essential to facilitate any study related to gene expression. Findings An RNA isolation system free of guanidinium salt was developed that successfully isolated RNA from rheum and arnebia. The method took about 45 min and was successfully evaluated on twenty one tissues with varied secondary metabolites. The A260/280 ratio ranged between 1.8 - 2.0 with distinct 28 S and 18 S rRNA bands visible on a formaldehyde-agarose gel. Conclusions The present manuscript describes a rapid protocol for isolation of RNA, which works well with all the tissues examined so far. The remarkable feature was the success in isolation of RNA with those tissues, wherein the most commonly used methods failed. Isolated RNA was amenable to downstream applications such as reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, differential display (DD, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH library construction, and northern hybridization.

  5. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  6. An invasive plant promotes its arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses and competitiveness through its secondary metabolites: indirect evidence from activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongge; Tang, Jianjun; Leng, Dong; Hu, Shuijin; Yong, Jean W H; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites released by invasive plants can increase their competitive ability by affecting native plants, herbivores, and pathogens at the invaded land. Whether these secondary metabolites affect the invasive plant itself, directly or indirectly through microorganisms, however, has not been well documented. Here we tested whether activated carbon (AC), a well-known absorbent for secondary metabolites, affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses and competitive ability in an invasive plant. We conducted three experiments (experiments 1-3) with the invasive forb Solidago canadensis and the native Kummerowia striata. Experiment 1 determined whether AC altered soil properties, levels of the main secondary metabolites in the soil, plant growth, and AMF communities associated with S. canadensis and K. striata. Experiment 2 determined whether AC affected colonization of S. canadensis by five AMF, which were added to sterilized soil. Experiment 3 determined the competitive ability of S. canadensis in the presence and absence of AMF and AC. In experiment 1, AC greatly decreased the concentrations of the main secondary metabolites in soil, and the changes in concentrations were closely related with the changes of AMF in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 2, AC inhibited the AMF Glomus versiforme and G. geosporum but promoted G. mosseae and G. diaphanum in the soil and also in S. canadensis roots. In experiment 3, AC reduced S. canadensis competitive ability in the presence but not in the absence of AMF. Our results provided indirect evidence that the secondary metabolites (which can be absorbed by AC) of the invasive plant S. canadensis may promote S. canadensis competitiveness by enhancing its own AMF symbionts.

  7. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    My program examines the plant secondary metabolites (i.e. phenolics) important for human health, and which impart the organoleptic properties that are quality indicators for fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions; a...

  8. EXTRACTION AND ANTIMICROBIAL POTENTIAL OF SECONDARY PLANT METABOLITES FROM ARTABOTRYS HEXAPETALUS (LINN. F. BHANDARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Sowjanya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants are the important sources for several drugs. In recent years many drug formulations are based on plant products. The present study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potentials of leaves of Artabotrys hexapetalus Linn. belonging to the family Annonaceae. It is widely distributed throughout the southern part of the Asia and china. In the present study, methanolic extracts of leaves of Artabotrys hexapetalus Linn was evaluated for potential antimicrobial activity against medically important bacterial and fungal strains. The antimicrobial activity was determined in the extracts using agar well diffusion method. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of extracts (25, 50, 75 and 100 μg/ml of Artabotrys hexapetalus were tested against ten human pathogenic bacteria; and four fungal strains. The results revealed that the remarkable inhibition of the microbial growth was shown against the tested organisms. Phytochemical analysis of the plant was also carried out. The microbial activity of the Artabotrys hexapetalus was due to the presence of various secondary metabolites. Hence, this plant can be further studied to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as lead molecules in the development of new pharmaceutically important compounds.

  9. Tools of pathway reconstruction and production of economically relevant plant secondary metabolites in recombinant microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziggel, Clarissa; Schäfer, Holger; Wink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites exhibit a variety of biological activities and therefore serve as valuable therapeutics or flavoring compounds. However, the small amounts isolated from plants often cannot meet market demands. This led to the exploration of other, more profitable methods for their production, including plant cell culture systems, chemical synthesis and biotechnological production in microbial hosts. The biotechnological production can be pursued by reconstructing metabolic pathways in selected microbial systems. But due to their complexity, most of these pathways are not completely understood and require the expression of a multitude of genes in a foreign organism. Recently, next generation sequencing data and advances in gene silencing in plants allowed the elucidation of some biosynthetic pathways in more detail. Thus, the de novo production of some natural products, including morphine, strictosidine, artemisinin, taxol(®) and resveratrol, in extensively engineered microbial hosts has become feasible. This review highlights the reconstruction of these pathways, missing pieces and novel techniques employed. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Protective effect of secondary plant metabolites from Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. against carbofuran induced damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanjukta; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh; Ghosh, Santinath; Dhar, Pubali

    2013-12-01

    Plausible interactions between food contaminants and natural constituents in vivo and protective effect of polyphenols present in I. aquatica against carbofuran toxicity in Charles Foster rats were evaluated. Determinations based on antioxidant enzyme activities showed significant alterations in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in tissues (liver and brain) and plasma of pesticide treated group while polyphenolic extracts from I. aquatica (IAE) attenuated their activities when given alongwith carbofuran. IAE decreased enhanced lipid peroxidation levels in plasma and erythrocyte membrane and cholesterol levels in brain and plasma. IAE also minimized histopathological degenerative changes produced by carbofuran. While single cell gel electrophoresis showed that secondary metabolites in leafy vegetables produced a combinatorial effect with pesticide at cellular level, DNA fragmentation level in bone marrow cells showed a decline in the IAE treated rats. Food safety adversely affected by various chemical contaminants can be retained by plant polyphenols and secondary plant constituents that can be found together in bolus. Therefore, the present study gives an insight into the protective role of naturally found polyphenols against pesticide toxicity.

  11. Studies on interactions between plant secondary metabolites and glutathione transferase using fluorescence quenching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Cheng, Xinsheng; Wang, Chuanqin; Xue, Zechun; Yang, Liwen; Xi, Zheng

    2007-04-01

    The interactions between plant secondary metabolites (tannic acid, rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin) and glutathione transferase (GST) were investigated by fluorescence and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Intrinsic fluorescence of GST was measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan (Trp) residues and quenching constants were determined using the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding affinity was found to be strongest for tannic acid and ranked in the order tannic acid>rutin>cinnamic acid>catechin. The pH values in the range of 6.7-7.9, except for tannic acid, did not affect significantly the affinity of rutin, cinnamic acid and catechin with GST. Results showed that the fluorescence quenching of GST was a static_quenching. Fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy suggested that only the tannic acid changed the microenvironment of the Trp residues. Furthermore, the number of binding sites and binding constants at different pH values showed that tannic acid had strongest affinity towards GST and hydrogen bonding played an important role in the affinity between GST and the metabolites.

  12. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites.

  13. Physiological and biochemical effect of neem and other Meliaceae plants secondary metabolites against Lepidopteran insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil-Nathan eSengottayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This review described the physiological and biochemical effects of various secondary metabolites from Meliaceae against major Lepidopteran insect pest including, Noctuidae and Pyralidae. The biochemical effect of major Meliaceae secondary metabolites were discussed more in this review. Several enzymes based on food materials have critical roles in nutritional indices (food utilization of the insect pest population. Several research work has been referred and the effect of Meliaceae secondary metabolites on feeding parameters of insects by demonstrating food consumption, approximate digestibility of consumed food, efficiency of converting the ingested food to body substance, efficiency of converting digested food to body substance and consumption index was reviewed in detail. Further how the digestive enzymes including a-Amylases, α and β- glucosidases (EC 3.2.1.1, lipases (EC 3.1.1 Proteases, serine, cysteine, and aspartic proteinases affected by the Meliaceae secondary metabolites was reviewed. Further effect of Meliaceae secondary metabolites on detoxifying enzymes have been found to react against botanical insecticides including general esterases (EST, glutathione S-transferase (GST and phosphatases was reviewed. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP, E.C.3.1.3.1 and acid phosphatase (ACP, E.C.3.1.3.2 are hydrolytic enzymes, which hydrolyze phosphomonoesters under alkaline or acid conditions, respectively. These enzymes were affected by the secondary metabolites treatment. The detailed mechanism of action was further explained in this review. Acethylcholine esterase (AChE is a key enzyme that terminates nerve impulses by catalyzing the hydrolysis of neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, in the nervous system of various organisms. How the AChE activity was altered by the Meliaceae secondary metabolites reviewed in detail.

  14. Effects of bacterial inoculants on the indigenous microbiome and secondary metabolites of chamomile plants

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    Ruth eSchmidt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-associated bacteria fulfil important functions for plant growth and health of their host. However, our knowledge about the impact of bacterial treatments on the host’s microbiome and physiology is limited. The present study was conducted to assess the impact of bacterial inoculants on the microbiome of chamomile plants Chamomilla recutita (L. Rauschert grown in a field under organic management in Egypt. Chamomile seedlings were inoculated with three indigenous Gram-positive strains (Streptomyces subrutilus Wbn2-11, Bacillus subtilis Co1-6, Paenibacillus polymyxa Mc5Re-14 from Egypt and three European Gram-negative strains (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18 already known for their beneficial plant-microbe interaction. Molecular fingerprints of 16S rRNA gene as well as real-time PCR analyses did not show statistically significant differences for all applied bacterial antagonists compared to the control. In contrast, a pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed significant differences in the community structure of bacteria between the treatments. These differences could be clearly shown by a shift within the community structure and corresponding beta-diversity indices. Moreover, B. subtilis Co1-6 and P. polymyxa Mc5Re-14 showed an enhancement of the bioactive secondary metabolite apigenin-7-O-glucoside. This indicates a possible new function of bacterial inoculants: to interact with the plant microbiome as well as with the plant metabolome.

  15. Use of Ultrasonication Technology for the Increased Production of Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Mohidul; Bashir, Tufail; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-06-23

    Plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) provide taste, color, odor, and resistance to plants, and they are also used to treat cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Synthesis of PSMs in plants is stimulated in response to different forms of external stress. Use of ultrasonication (US) to clean or decontaminate fruits and vegetables leads to physical stress that finally results in the accumulation of PSMs. US can stimulate accumulation of taxol, ginsenoside saponins, shikonin, and resveratrol, e.g., up to 319-fold increase of resveratrol synthesis has been observed in grape due to US. US also increases carotenoids, total phenolics, and isoflavonoids accumulation. Furthermore, US shows synergistic effects in PSMs synthesis-when combined with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA). It has been observed that US stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which then upregulates expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), resulting in the synthesis of PSMs. In this review, we summarize the effects of US, as a physical stress, to maximize the accumulation of PSMs in crop produce and in cell cultures.

  16. In vitro Applications for the Increasing of Root-Related Secondary Metabolite Production in Medicinal Plants and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunhan Demirci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites, gaining importance in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, perfumery, food industry and agrarian struggle, are synthesized in different organs such as root, leaves, shoot and seed in plants. These compounds are defined as “light in bulk” because of the low synthesis rate but “high in value” because of the wide range of applications, activities and economic values. Obtaining of the secondary metabolites found in roots by conventional methods is based on dismantling of these plants from the nature or the cultural field and isolating by the different methods. Detachment of plants from nature causes the loss of genetic resources. And it has some difficulties as the challenges and differences in terrain and climate conditions, low metabolite yield and quality and more labor. Thus a new approaches is needed to enable more economic, higher metabolite yield and quality compared to the conventional methods. Therefore, in vitro techniques have gained importance. With this review, it was aimed to inform in vitro applications used to increase root-related secondary metabolites production in order to guide future researches.

  17. Cross-talk between signaling pathways: the link between plant secondary metabolite production and wounding stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo-Velázquez, Daniel A; González-Agüero, Mauricio; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2015-02-25

    Plants subjected to wounding stress produce secondary metabolites. Several of these metabolites prevent chronic diseases and can be used as colorants, flavors, and as antimicrobials. This wound-induced production of plant secondary metabolites is mediated by signaling-molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA). However, their specific role and interactions that modulate the wound-respond in plants is not fully understood. In the present study, a subtractive cDNA library was generated, to better understand the global response of plants to wounding stress. Carrot (Daucus carota) was used as a model system for this study. A total of 335 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequences were obtained. ESTs sequences with a putative identity showed involvement in stress-signaling pathways as well as on the primary and secondary metabolism. Inhibitors of ROS biosynthesis, ET action, and JA biosynthesis alone and in combination were applied to wounded-carrots in order to determine, based on relative gene expression data, the regulatory role of ET, JA, and ROS on the wound-response in plants. Our results demonstrate that ROS play a key role as signaling-molecules for the wound-induced activation of the primary and secondary metabolism whereas ET and JA are essential to modulate ROS levels.

  18. Effects of Plant Secondary Metabolites on Methane Production and Fermentation Parameters in In vitro Ruminal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Giuburunca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fermentation process is of concern worldwide for its contribution to global warming. It is known that ruminant animals, due to natural fermentation process contribute substantially to the increase in methane production. Methanogenesis process represents besides its contribution to greenhouse gases emissions an energy loss to the animal. To reduce ruminal methane productions in an ecologically and sustainable way, many attempts have been initiated, such as: uses of chemicals additives or ionophore antibiotics, defaunation process or immunization against ruminal methanogenesis. In the last years, a new strategy has been evaluated whether plant secondary metabolites can be used as natural additives to reduce ruminal methane emissions. The present study has been conducted to investigate the effects of trans-cinnamic, caffeic, p-coumaric acids and catechin hydrate, four plant secondary metabolites (PSMs on methane production and fermentation in in vitro ruminal cultures. The four PSMs were added anaerobically in a 6 mM concentration to 100 ml serum bottles containing 500 mg grass hay as a substrate, 10 ml rumen fluid collected from a fistulated sheep before morning feeding and 40 ml 141 DSM culture medium. The bottles were incubated at 39 ̊C. After 24 h, the following variables were measured: total gas volume, pH, methane and volatile fatty acids (VFAs production. The results showed that caffeic (p = 0.058 and p-coumaric (p = 0.052 acids tended to decrease methane production in comparison to control but the decrease was not statistic significantly at α= 0.05. The other two PSMs had no significant effect on methane production. Addition of PSMs did not affected the total gas volume, the pH and VFAs profile (P>0.05 in relation to the control (no PSM added. In conclusion, caffeic and p-coumaric acids in 6 mM concentration showed some promising effects for decreasing ruminal methane emissions without affecting ruminal fermentation parameters but

  19. Multivariate analyses of NP-TLC chromatographic retention data for grouping of structurally-related plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, Eman

    2016-09-01

    The chromatographic behavior of 28 plant secondary metabolites belonging to four chemically similar classes (alkaloids, flavonoids, flavone glycosides and sesquiterpenes) was studied by normal-phase thin-layer chromatography (NP-TLC) under 5 different chromatographic systems commonly used in plant drug analysis with the aim to explore whether the retention properties of these metabolites can determine the chemical group they belong to. The use of RM values as the retention parameter is implemented as a relatively new approach in plant analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering heat maps and discriminant analysis (DA), were used for statistical evaluation of the chromatographic data and extraction of similarities between chemically related compounds. The twenty eight metabolites were classified into four groups by principal component analysis. The heat map of hierarchical clustering revealed that all metabolites were clustered into four groups, except for caffeine, while linear discriminant analysis showed that 96.4% of metabolites are predicted correctly as the groupings identified by chemical class in original and cross-validated data. The main advantage of the approach described in current paper is its simplicity which can assist with preliminary identification of metabolites in complex plant extracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization of Glycyrrhiza glabra roots enhances plant biomass, phosphorus uptake and concentration of root secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongLing LIU; Yong TAN; Monika NELL; Karin ZITTER-EGLSEER; Chris WAWSCRAH; Brigitte KOPP; ShaoMing WANG; Johannes NOVAK

    2014-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi penetrate the cortical cells of the roots of vascular plants, and are widely distributed in soil. The formation of these symbiotic bodies accelerates the absorption and utilization of min-eral elements, enhances plant resistance to stress, boosts the growth of plants, and increases the survival rate of transplanted seedlings. We studied the effects of various arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi on the growth and devel-opment of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). Several species of AM, such as Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices, and a mixture of fungi (G. mosseae, G. intraradices, G. cladoideum, G. microagregatum, G. caledonium and G. etunica-tum) were used in our study. Licorice growth rates were determined by measuring the colonization rate of the plants by the fungi, plant dry biomass, phosphorus concentration and concentration of secondary metabolites. We estab-lished two cloned strains of licorice, clone 3 (C3) and clone 6 (C6) to exclude the effect of genotypic variations. Our results showed that the AM fungi could in fact increase the leaf and root biomass, as well as the phosphorus con-centration in each clone. Furthermore, AM fungi significantly increased the yield of certain secondary metabolites in clone 3. Our study clearly demonstrated that AM fungi play an important role in the enhancement of growth and development of licorice plants. There was also a significant improvement in the secondary metabolite content and yield of medicinal compounds from the roots.

  1. Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites from wild growing and micropropagated plants of Renealmia alpinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Cortés, Natalie; Benjumea, Dora; Osorio, Edison; León, Francisco; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Renealmia alpinia is native to the American continent and can be found from Mexico to Brazil, and in the Caribbean islands. It is known as “matandrea” in Colombia, and it has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat painful diseases and ailments. Based on its traditional uses, it is of interest to evaluate the pharmacologic effects of this plant and its secondary metabolites. Materials and methods Methanol and aqueous extracts of wild and micropropagated R. alpinia (leaves) were obtained and chemically compared by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC). The antinociceptive activity of these extracts was examined using an in vivo assay (Siegmund test). Additionally, the dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia was fractionated and pure compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods. The structure elucidation of isolated compounds was performed by NMR experiments and spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. Purified compounds were evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity for opioids and cannabinoids receptors. Results The dichloromethane extract of the plant’s aerial part afforded sinostrobin (1), naringenin 7,4′-dimethyl ether (2), 2′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone (3), 4-methoxy-6-(2-phenylethenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (4), naringenin 7-methyl ether (5) and 3,5-heptanediol, 1,7-diphenyl (6), which were isolated using chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were established by physical and spectroscopic techniques. The antinociceptive effects observed in mice by extracts of wild and micropropagated plants were similar. The compounds isolated from R. alpinia do not show affinity to opioid or cannabinoid receptors. Conclusion Aqueous and methanol extracts of R. alpinia provide antinociceptive and analgesic effects in an in vivo model. These results contribute additional insight as to why this plant is traditionally used for pain management. Also, this is the first

  2. Minerals salt composition and secondary metabolites of Euphorbia hirta Linn., an antihyperglycemic plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N′Guessan Bra Yvette Fofie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical study and research on acute toxicity were performed on the aerial parts (leaves and stems of Euphorbia hirta Linn. The phytochemical screening and chromatography revealed the presence of saponin, sterol, terpene, alkaloids, polyphenols, tannins and flavonoids and especially mucilage. The evaluation of total polyphenols and total flavonoids gave 120.97 ± 7.07 gallic acid equivalents (GAE mg/g (mg of GAE/g of extract of dry extract and 41.4 ± 0.5 mg quercetin equivalent per gram (QE/g (mg of QE/g of plant extract of dry extract respectively. The physicochemical study revealed moisture content of 7.73% ± 0.00%, total ash 7.48% ± 0.03%. Sulfuric ash 9.05% ± 0.01%, hydrochloric acid insoluble ash of 0.8% ± 0.02%. The search for minerals salt revealed the presence of Cr, Zn, K, Ca and Mg having an important role in glucose metabolism. The acute toxicity study showed that the toxic dose may be above 3000 mg/kg. The results of these studies indicate that extracts from the leaves and stem of E. hirta Linn. contains trace elements and minerals salt and bioactive secondary metabolites which explain their therapeutic uses for treating diabetes mellitus.

  3. Minerals salt composition and secondary metabolites of Euphorbia hirta Linn., an antihyperglycemic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvette Fofie, N'Guessan Bra; Sanogo, Rokia; Coulibaly, Kiyinlma; Kone-Bamba, Diénéba

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemical study and research on acute toxicity were performed on the aerial parts (leaves and stems) of Euphorbia hirta Linn. The phytochemical screening and chromatography revealed the presence of saponin, sterol, terpene, alkaloids, polyphenols, tannins and flavonoids and especially mucilage. The evaluation of total polyphenols and total flavonoids gave 120.97 ± 7.07 gallic acid equivalents (GAE) mg/g (mg of GAE/g of extract) of dry extract and 41.4 ± 0.5 mg quercetin equivalent per gram (QE/g) (mg of QE/g of plant extract) of dry extract respectively. The physicochemical study revealed moisture content of 7.73% ± 0.00%, total ash 7.48% ± 0.03%. Sulfuric ash 9.05% ± 0.01%, hydrochloric acid insoluble ash of 0.8% ± 0.02%. The search for minerals salt revealed the presence of Cr, Zn, K, Ca and Mg having an important role in glucose metabolism. The acute toxicity study showed that the toxic dose may be above 3000 mg/kg. The results of these studies indicate that extracts from the leaves and stem of E. hirta Linn. contains trace elements and minerals salt and bioactive secondary metabolites which explain their therapeutic uses for treating diabetes mellitus.

  4. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature indicated that most of the R&D work was devoted predominantly to studies at an empirical level. A rational approach to molecular plant cell bioprocessing based on the fundamental understanding of metabolic pathways and their regulations is urgently required to stimulate further advances; however, the strategies and technical framework are still being developed. It is the aim of this review to take a step forward in framing workable strategies and technologies for molecular plant cell-based bioprocessing. Using anthocyanin biosynthesis as a case study, an integrated postgenomic approach has been proposed. This combines the functional analysis of metabolic pathways for biosynthesis of a particular metabolite from profiling of gene expression and protein expression to metabolic profiling. A global correlation not only can thus be established at the three molecular levels, but also places emphasis on the interactions between primary metabolism and secondary metabolism; between competing and/or complimentary pathways; and between biosynthetic and post-biosynthetic events.

  5. To Stretch the Boundary of Secondary Metabolite Production in Plant Cell-Based Bioprocessing: Anthocyanin as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Franco, Chris; Curtin, Chris; Conn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    Plant cells and tissue cultures hold great promise for controlled production of a myriad of useful secondary metabolites on demand. The current yield and productivity cannot fulfill the commercial goal of a plant cell-based bioprocess for the production of most secondary metabolites. In order to stretch the boundary, recent advances, new directions and opportunities in plant cell-based bioprocessing, have been critically examined for the 10 years from 1992 to 2002. A review of the literature indicated that most of the R&D work was devoted predominantly to studies at an empirical level. A rational approach to molecular plant cell bioprocessing based on the fundamental understanding of metabolic pathways and their regulations is urgently required to stimulate further advances; however, the strategies and technical framework are still being developed. It is the aim of this review to take a step forward in framing workable strategies and technologies for molecular plant cell-based bioprocessing. Using anthocyanin biosynthesis as a case study, an integrated postgenomic approach has been proposed. This combines the functional analysis of metabolic pathways for biosynthesis of a particular metabolite from profiling of gene expression and protein expression to metabolic profiling. A global correlation not only can thus be established at the three molecular levels, but also places emphasis on the interactions between primary metabolism and secondary metabolism; between competing and/or complimentary pathways; and between biosynthetic and post-biosynthetic events.

  6. Host plant secondary metabolite profiling shows a complex, strain-dependent response of maize to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Azospirillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Vincent; Bertrand, Cédric; Bellvert, Floriant; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Bally, René; Comte, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Most Azospirillum plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) benefit plant growth through source effects related to free nitrogen fixation and/or phytohormone production, but little is known about their potential effects on plant physiology. These effects were assessed by comparing the early impacts of three Azospirillum inoculant strains on secondary metabolite profiles of two different maize (Zea mays) cultivars. After 10d of growth in nonsterile soil, maize methanolic extracts were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and secondary metabolites identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Seed inoculation resulted in increased shoot biomass (and also root biomass with one strain) of hybrid PR37Y15 but had no stimulatory effect on hybrid DK315. In parallel, Azospirillum inoculation led to major qualitative and quantitative modifications of the contents of secondary metabolites, especially benzoxazinoids, in the maize plants. These modifications depended on the PGPR strain×plant cultivar combination. Thus, Azospirillum inoculation resulted in early, strain-dependent modifications in the biosynthetic pathways of benzoxazine derivatives in maize in compatible interactions. This is the first study documenting a PGPR effect on plant secondary metabolite profiles, and suggests the establishment of complex interactions between Azospirillum PGPR and maize. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  7. Heavy metals in contaminated environment: Destiny of secondary metabolite biosynthesis, oxidative status and phytoextraction in medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari Lajayer, Behnam; Ghorbanpour, Mansour; Nikabadi, Shahab

    2017-11-01

    Contamination of soils, water and air with toxic heavy metals by various human activities is a crucial environmental problem in both developing and developed countries. Heavy metals could be introduced into medicinal plant products through contaminated environment (soil, water and air resources) and/or poor production practices. Growing of medicinal plants in heavy metal polluted environments may eventually affect the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, causing significant changes in the quantity and quality of these compounds. Certain medicinal and aromatic plants can absorb and accumulate metal contaminants in the harvestable foliage and, therefore, considered to be a feasible alternative for remediation of polluted sites without any contamination of essential oils. Plants use different strategies and complex arrays of enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defense systems to cope with overproduction of ROS causes from the heavy metals entered their cells through foliar and/or root systems. This review summarizes the reports of recent investigations involving heavy metal accumulation by medicinal plants and its effects on elicitation of secondary metabolites, toxicity and detoxification pathways, international standards regarding in plants and plant-based products, and human health risk assessment of heavy metals in soil-medicinal plants systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial activity and characterization of secondary metabolites isolated from mangrove plant Avicennia officinalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valentin Bhimba B; J Meenupriya; Elsa Lycias Joel; D Edaya Naveena; Suman kumar; M Thangaraj

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore antibacterial activity and characterization of secondary metabolites isolated from mangrove plant Avicennia officinalis (A. officinalis). Methods:In the present study the leaf extracts of A. officinalis were examined for its antibacterial potential using five different solvents against some reference strains of human pathogenic bacteria for the crude extract. Maximum activity was observed for ethyl acetate and hence different concentrations like 15μL, 25μL, and 50μL of ethyl extracts was checked for its antibacterial activity. Partial purification of crude extract was carried by column chromatography and fractions were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify compounds. Results:The crude ethyl acetate extracts of A. officinalis showed remarkable antibacterial activity with zones of inhibition of 13 mm against Eschericia coli (E. coli) and 11 mm against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Fraction 13 (ethyl acetate÷methanol=8÷2) as the most potent one against with the minimal inhibitory concentration of 30 mm against E. coli and 25 mm against S. aureus. The GC-MS resultsof active column fraction (F13) revealed that the active principals were a mixture of hydroxy-4 methoxybenzoic acid, diethyl phthalate, oleic acid. Conclusions:The leaf extracts with proven antibacterial effects can clearly be directed towards cancer treatment as to inhibiting cancer cell growth. The limited number of test organisms owes to a constraint of resource. So, the effect of strong bursts of leaf extracts on human pathogenic bacteria should further be tested on a wide range of test organisms.

  9. Secondary metabolites in bryophytes: an ecological aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chun-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2009-03-01

    Bryophytes frequently grow in an unfavorable environment as the earliest land plants, and inevitably biosynthesize secondary metabolites against biotic or abiotic stress. They not only defend against the plant competition, microbial attack, and insect or animal predation, but also function in UV protection, drought tolerance, and freezing survival. This review covers the ecological aspect of secondary metabolites in bryophytes and is taxonomically presented according to the ecological significances.

  10. Interactions between erythromycin, flunixin meglumine, levamisole and plant secondary metabolites towards bovine gastrointestinal motility-in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, M; Chłopecka, M; Dziekan, N; Karlik, W

    2017-09-14

    Continued ingestion of plant secondary metabolites by ruminants can provoke pharmacological interactions with pharmaceutical agents used in animals. As some drugs and phytocompounds affect smooth muscle activity, the aim of this study was to verify the possible interaction between selected pharmaceutical agents and plant secondary metabolites towards bovine gastrointestinal motility. The interactions between phytocompounds-apigenin, quercetin, hederagenin, medicagenic acid-and medicines-erythromycin, flunixin meglumine and levamisole-were evaluated on bovine isolated abomasal and duodenal specimens obtained from routinely slaughtered cows. The obtained results confirmed the contractile effect of all three drugs used solely. Hederagenin and medicagenic acid (0.001 μM) enhanced the contractile effect of levamisole. Hederagenin additionally increased the impact of erythromycin. Both saponins (100 μM) showed synergistic effects with all tested pharmaceuticals. Apigenin and quercetin (0.001 μM) intensified the contractile response induced by erythromycin and levamisole. Moreover, both flavonoids (100 μM) showed an antagonistic interaction with all tested drugs which in that situation were devoid of the prokinetic effect. To conclude, plant metabolic metabolites such as saponins and flavonoids are potent modifiers of the effect of drugs towards gut motility. The synergy observed between phytocompounds and selected medicines can be beneficial in the treatment of cows with hypomotility disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Musilova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes.

  12. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  13. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-07-29

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the "secondary compound hypothesis" and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes.

  14. 植物次生代谢物多样性的基因组学基础%Genomics Grand for Diversified Plant Secondary Metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin FANG; Chang-Qing YANG; Yu-Kun WEI; Qi-Xia MA; Lei YANG; Xiao-Ya CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Plants can generate an overwhelming variety of structurally diversified organic compounds called secondary metabolites. These compounds usually perform interesting biological activities and important functions in influencing interactions between plants and other organisms. They are also widely utilized as pharmaceuticals, insecticides,dyes, flavors and fragrances. Plant genome sequencing, transcriptome and metabolome analyses have provided huge amounts of data to explain the great diversity of secondary metabolites. This knowledge in turn will help us better understand their ecological role and is a creating novel tool for genetic engineering of plant secondary metabolism.

  15. Influence of plant secondary metabolites on in vitro oxidation of methyl ferulate with cell wall peroxidases from lupine apoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Łukasz; Wojtaszek, Przemysław; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Ionically bound cell wall peroxidases (POXs) were liberated to intercellular washing fluids (IWFs) and isolated together with other proteins and metabolites present in the apoplast of white lupine (Lupinus albus L. var. Bac) root. After separation of proteins from low molecular weight compounds, activity of peroxidases was monitored in in vitro experiments. Oxidation of methyl ferulate with H2O2 was studied in multi-component mixtures of plant metabolites. Secondary metabolites identified in IWFs or other natural products playing important roles in different physiological processes were applied as modifiers of the dehydrodimerization process during oxidation reactions performed in vitro. These were isoflavones and their conjugates, lupanine representing quinolizidine alkaloids synthesized in lupine, or other natural products such as quercetin, ascorbic, and salicylic acid. The influence of these substances on the oxidation kinetics of methyl ferulate was monitored with liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (LC/UV), and identification of compounds was confirmed with the liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) system. On the basis of data collected, it was possible to reveal changes in the activities of cell wall POXs. Application of the LC system permitted us to monitor, independently, quantitative changes of two or more reaction products in the mixtures. In multi-component combinations, oxidation yields of methyl ferulate by POXs were modified depending on the actual composition of the reaction mixture. We conclude that various classes of plant secondary metabolites can modify the yield of methyl ferulate oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of POX, due to interactions with the enzyme's active site (genistein) or radical scavenging properties of metabolites present in the reaction mixture.

  16. Determining larval host plant use by a polyphagous lepidopteran through analysis of adult moths for plant secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert G; Head, Graham; Mierkowski, Mary

    2007-06-01

    Many polyphagous insect species are important economic pests on one or more of their crop hosts. For most important insect pests, the common crop hosts are well-known, but knowledge of weedy and unmanaged hosts is limited. Furthermore, the relative contribution of different hosts to local and regional populations has rarely been ascertained because this requires having some way to determine which plant hosts are the source of the adult moths observed ovipositing in a crop field at a given place and time. One way of determining the larval host of polyphagous pest species is to analyze for several plant-derived chemicals that are each specific to a different small set of related plant species and are preserved in detectable amounts in adult moths. In this paper, we describe novel methods for analyzing adults of the polyphagous lepidopteran, the tobacco budworm (TBW) Heliothis virescens (F.), for plant secondary metabolites, specifically cotinine and gossypol, which are diagnostic for larval feeding on tobacco and cotton, respectively. Cotinine was extracted from individual TBW moths with acetic acid and methanol, then concentrated and analyzed directly by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The same moths then were analyzed for bound gossypol by creating a Schiff's base that used aniline, and the resulting dianilino-gossypol complex was quantified using high pressure chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) as the detector. Based on analysis of standards, the detection limit for the cotinine was less than 1.5 ppb by dry weight. Comparable standards were not available for the gossypol derivative so a quantitative limit of detection could not be calculated. When TBW moths reared on known hosts were analyzed for gossypol and/or cotinine, all of the moths reared on tobacco or cotton were correctly identified, although some false positives were recorded with the gossypol method. Analysis of TBW moths of various ages and at various

  17. Antifungal activity of secondary plant metabolites from potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.): Glycoalkaloids and phenolic acids show synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Maldonado, A F; Schieber, A; Gänzle, M G

    2016-04-01

    To study the antifungal effects of the potato secondary metabolites α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and caffeic acid, alone or combined. Resistance to glycoalkaloids varied among the fungal species tested, as derived from minimum inhibitory concentrations assays. Synergistic antifungal activity between glycoalkaloids and phenolic compounds was found. Changes in the fluidity of fungal membranes caused by potato secondary plant metabolites were determined by calculation of the generalized polarization values. The results partially explained the synergistic effect between caffeic acid and α-chaconine and supported findings on membrane disruption mechanisms from previous studies on artificial membranes. LC/MS analysis was used to determine variability and relative amounts of sterols in the different fungal species. Results suggested that the sterol pattern of fungi is related to their resistance to potato glycoalkaloids and to their taxonomy. Fungal resistance to α-chaconine and possibly other glycoalkaloids is species dependent. α-Chaconine and caffeic acid show synergistic antifungal activity. The taxonomic classification and the sterol pattern play a role in fungal resistance to glycoalkaloids. Results improve the understanding of the antifungal mode of action of potato secondary metabolites, which is essential for their potential utilization as antifungal agents in nonfood systems. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Influence of plant growth regulators on callus mediated regeneration and secondary metabolites synthesis in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Banerjee, Debarupa; Ghosh, Moumita; Pradhan, Prakash; Gupta, Namrata Shanu; Acharya, Krishnendu; Banerjee, Maitreyi

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal, is an important medicinal plant being the source of extremely important compounds like withanolides and withaferin. Influence of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) were evaluated for induction of callus, callus mediated regeneration and production of secondary metabolites in them. Explants for callusing were collected from plants grown in vitro and maximum callusing (98 %) was obtained on MS medium supplemented with a combination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) (0.5 mg l(-1)) and kinetin (KN) (0.2 mg l(-1)). Among different types of calli, best shoot regeneration was observed on green, compact calli produced on MS medium with a combination of 6-benzylamino purine (BAP) and indole butyric acid (IBA). MS medium supplemented with BAP (2 mg l(-1)) showed highest frequency (98 %) of shoot bud regeneration. The micro-shoots were efficiently rooted on MS media supplemented with 0.5 mg l(-1) IBA. Rooted plants were transferred to soil-vermi-compost (1:3; w/w) medium in greenhouse for acclimatization. Presence of withanolide A and withaferin A in calli was validated through high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). It was interesting to observe that the PGRs showed significant influence on the secondary metabolites production in callus and 2,4-D having the least effect. Histological studies revealed the origin of shoot tip in the callus during regeneration.

  19. Bioactive secondary metabolites from Nigrospora sp. LLGLM003, an endophytic fungus of the medicinal plant Moringa oleifera Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J H; Zhang, Y L; Wang, L W; Wang, J Y; Zhang, C L

    2012-05-01

    An endophytic fungus was isolated from the root of the medicinal plant Moringa oleifera Lam. Based on analyzing the rDNA sequence, the fungus was identified as Nigrospora sp. This is the first report of the isolation of endophytic Nigrospora from M. oleifera. By bioassay-guided fractionation, four antifungal secondary metabolites were isolated from liquid cultures of the fungus Nigrospora sp. LLGLM003, and their chemical structures were determined to be griseofulvin (1), dechlorogriseofulvin (2), 8-dihydroramulosin (3) and mellein (4) on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. Compound 2, 3 and 4 were isolated from Nigrospora sp. for the first time. In vitro antifungal assay showed that griseofulvin displayed clear inhibition of the growth of 8 plant pathogenic fungi. Dechlorogriseofulvin and mellein exhibited only weak antifungal activities, whereas 8-dihydroramulosin displayed no antifungal activities.

  20. Plantas medicinais: fatores de influência no conteúdo de metabólitos secundários Medicinal plants: factors of influence on the content of secondary metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Gobbo-Neto; Lopes, Norberto P.

    2007-01-01

    Since secondary metabolites represent a chemical interface between plants and surrounding environment, their syntheses are frequently affected by environmental conditions. Thus, variations in the total content and/or of the relative proportions of secondary metabolites in plants can take place. We review the main environmental factors that can streamline or alter the production or concentration of secondary metabolites in plants. How seasonality, circadian rhythm, developmental stage and age,...

  1. Effect of Glomus mosseae and plant growth promoting rhizomicroorganisms (PGPR's on growth, nutrients and content of secondary metabolites in Begonia malabarica Lam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel Selvaraj

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Begonia malabarica Lam. (Begoniaceae is one of the important medicinal plants whose main secondary metabolites are luteolin, quercetin and β-sitosterol. The leaves are used for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, diarrhoea, blood cancer and skin diseases. A study was undertaken to determine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus, Glomus mosseae, and some plant growth promoting rhizomicro-organisms (PGPR's on the growth, biomass, nutrients, and content of secondary metabolites of B. malabarica plant under green house conditions. Various plant growth parameters (total plant biomass, mycorrhizal parameter, shoot and root phosphorus, mineral content (potassium, iron, zinc, and copper, and secondary metabolites (total phenols, ortho-dihydroxy phenols, tannins, flavonoids, and alkaloids were determined and found to vary with different treatments. Among all the treatments, plants inoculated with 'microbial consortium' consisting of Glomus mosseae + Bacillus coagulans + Trichoderma viride performed better than with other treatments or uninoculated control plants. The results of this experiment clearly indicated that inoculation of B. malabarica with G. mosseae along with PGPR's enhanced its growth, biomass yield, nutrients and secondary metabolites.

  2. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Tilmann; Kim, Hyun Uk

    2016-01-01

    . In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http...

  3. Discoloured seeds of amaranth plant infected by Alternaria alternata: physiological, histopathological alterations and fungal secondary metabolites associated or registered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelting María Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the aspects of discolouration that could influence both the production and consumption of amaranth were analyzed with the objectives to identify the presence of Alternaria alternata on seeds, to analyze possible changes in the anatomy of seed tissues and to detect the presence of fungal secondary metabolites. Component plating, histopathological and mycological analyses on discoloured seeds allowed i location of propagules of A. alternata in all seminal components; ii observation of hypertrophies in perisperm and embryo and iii determination of several fungal secondary metabolites, mainly high concentrations of tenuazonic acid. To our knowledge, the information presented in this paper, related to physiological, histopathological changes and fungal secondary metabolites on discoloured seeds of (Amaranthus mantegazzianus syn. A. caudatus subsp. mantegazzianus (Pass Hanelt affected by A. alternata, is the first worldwide record.

  4. SECONDARY METABOLITE OF Aspergillus fumigatus, ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI OF THE MEDICINAL PLANT Garcinia griffithii

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    Tri Indah

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The endophytic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated from the tissues of the fruits of Garcinia griffithii. The fungalstrain was identified from the colony, and it was characteristic of cell morphology. The ethyl acetate extracts derivedfrom fungus cultures showed major spots on TLC under UV light, which was continued to the isolation of thesecondary metabolites. The structure of the isolated compound was elucidated on the basis of NMR analyses (1H-NMR,13C-NMR, HMQC, HMBC and H-H COSY. The compounds were identified as: 4,6-dihydroxy, 3,8a-dimethyl-1-oxo-5-(3’-oxobutan-2’-yl-1,4,4a,5,6,8a-hexahydronaphthalen-2-yl-1”,2”-dimethyl-5”-(2”’-methylprop-1”’-enylcyclopentanecarboxylate.

  5. Recent advances in plant biotechnology and genetic engineering for production of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludko, Y V

    2010-01-01

    For a long time people are using plants not only as crop cultures but also for obtaining of various chemicals. Currently plants remain one of the most important and essential sources of biologically active compounds in spite of progress in chemical or microbial synthesis. In our review we compare potentials and perspectives of modern genetic engineering approaches for pharmaceutical biotechnology and give examples of actual biotechnological systems used for production of several promising natural compounds: artemisinin, paclitaxel and scopolamine.

  6. Antioxidant activity and concentration of secondary metabolites in the plant parts of Euphorbia cyparissias L.

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    Stanković Milan S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a screening of nine different extracts from the plant parts (leaves, flowers and stems of Euphorbia cyparissias for total phenolic content, concentration of flavonoids and in vitro antioxidant activity. Main reason for this study is the determination of these parameters and their variability among plant parts and plant extracts obtained by different solvents, respectively. Obtained amounts for total phenolic content ranged from 10.76 to 40.72 mg GA/g. The concentration of flavonoids varied from 34.32 to 134.34 mg Ru/g. The IC50 values of antioxidant activity varied from 88.48 to 2891.08 μg/ml. Results obtained from the different plant parts were of uneven value. Great variability of the studied parameters was observed when comparing the effectiveness of the used solvents. The acetone extracts from stems contain the greatest concentrations of phenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, and showed high antioxidant activity. According to our research, plant parts from E. cyparissias can be regarded as promising candidates for natural plant sources with high value of biological compounds.

  7. Convergently Evolved Toxic Secondary Metabolites in Plants Drive the Parallel Molecular Evolution of Insect Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschenka, Georg; Wagschal, Vera; von Tschirnhaus, Michael; Donath, Alexander; Dobler, Susanne

    2017-08-01

    Natural selection imposed by natural toxins has led to striking levels of convergent evolution at the molecular level. Cardiac glycosides represent a group of plant toxins that block the Na,K-ATPase, a vital membrane protein in animals. Several herbivorous insects have convergently evolved resistant Na,K-ATPases, and in some species, convergent gene duplications have also arisen, likely to cope with pleiotropic costs of resistance. To understand the genetic basis and predictability of these adaptations, we studied five independent lineages of leaf-mining flies (Diptera: Agromyzidae). These flies have colonized host plants in four botanical families that convergently evolved cardiac glycosides of two structural types: cardenolides and bufadienolides. We compared each of six fly species feeding on such plants to a phylogenetically related but nonadapted species. Irrespective of the type of cardiac glycoside in the host plant, five out of six exposed species displayed substitutions in the cardiac glycoside-binding site of the Na,K-ATPase that were previously described in other insect orders; in only one species was the gene duplicated. In vitro assays of nervous tissue extractions confirmed that the substitutions lead to increased resistance of the Na,K-ATPase. Our results demonstrate that target site insensitivity of Na,K-ATPase is a common response to dietary cardiac glycosides leading to highly predictable amino acid changes; nonetheless, convergent evolution of gene duplication for this multifunctional enzyme appears more constrained.

  8. Two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography in the analysis of secondary plant metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Lukasz; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    2009-02-13

    Drugs, derived from medicinal plants, have been enjoying a renaissance in the last years. It is due to a great pharmacological potential of herbal drugs, as many natural compounds have been found to exhibit biological activity of wide spectrum. The introduction of whole plants, plant extracts, or isolated natural compounds has led to the need to create the analytical methods suitable for their analysis. The identification of isolated substances is relatively an easy task, but the analysis of plant extracts causes a lot of problems, as they are usually very complex mixtures. Chromatographic methods are one of the most popular techniques applied in the analysis of natural mixtures. Unfortunately the separation power of traditional, one-dimensional techniques, is usually inadequate for separation of more complex samples. In such a case the use of multidimensional chromatography is advised. Planar chromatography gives the possibility of performing two-dimensional separations with the use of one adsorbent with two different eluents or by using bilayer plates or graft thin-layer chromatography (TLC) technique; combinations of different multidimensional techniques are also possible. In this paper, multidimensional planar chromatographic methods, commonly applied in the analysis of natural compounds, were reviewed. A detailed information is given on the methodology of performing two-dimensional separations on one adsorbent, on bilayer plates, with the use of graft TLC and hyphenated methods. General aspects of multidimensionality in liquid chromatography are also described. Finally a reader will find a description of variable two-dimensional methods applied in the analysis of compounds, most commonly encountered in plant extracts. This paper is aimed to draw attention to the potential of two-dimensional planar chromatography in the field of phytochemistry. It may be useful for those who are interested in achieving successful separations of multicomponent mixtures by means

  9. Trypanocidal activity of a new pterocarpan and other secondary metabolites of plants from Northeastern Brazil flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Nashira Campos; Espíndola, Laila Salmen; Santana, Jaime Martins; Veras, Maria Leopoldina; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Pinheiro, Sávio Moita; de Araújo, Renata Mendonça; Lima, Mary Anne Sousa; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha

    2008-02-15

    Two hundred fifteen compounds isolated from plants of Northeastern Brazil flora have been assayed against epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, using the tetrazolium salt MTT as an alternative method. Eight compounds belonging to four different species: Harpalyce brasiliana (Fabaceae), Acnistus arborescens and Physalis angulata (Solanaceae), and Cordia globosa (Boraginaceae) showed significant activity. Among them, a novel and a known pterocarpan, a chalcone, four withasteroids, and a meroterpene benzoquinone were the represented chemical classes.

  10. Non-self recognition, transcriptional reprogramming, and secondary metabolite accumulation during plant/pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlbrock, Klaus; Bednarek, Pawel; Ciolkowski, Ingo; Hamberger, Björn; Heise, Andreas; Liedgens, Hiltrud; Logemann, Elke; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Schmelzer, Elmon; Somssich, Imre E; Tan, Jianwen

    2003-11-25

    Disease resistance of plants involves two distinct forms of chemical communication with the pathogen: recognition and defense. Both are essential components of a highly complex, multifaceted defense response, which begins with non-self recognition through the perception of pathogen-derived signal molecules and results in the production, inter alia, of antibiotically active compounds (phytoalexins) and cell wall-reinforcing material around the infection site. To elucidate the molecular details and the genomic basis of the underlying chains of events, we used two different experimental systems: suspension-cultured cells of Petroselinum crispum (parsley) and wild-type as well as mutant plants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Particular emphasis was placed on the structural and functional identification of signal and defense molecules, and on the mechanisms of signal perception, intracellular signal transduction and transcriptional reprogramming, including the structural and functional characterization of the responsible cis-acting gene promoter elements and transacting regulatory proteins. Comparing P. crispum and A. thaliana allows us to distinguish species-specific defense mechanisms from more universal responses, and furthermore provides general insights into the nature of the interactions. Despite the complexity of the pathogen defense response, it is experimentally tractable, and knowledge gained so far has opened up a new realm of gene technology-assisted strategies for resistance breeding of crop plants.

  11. Secondary metabolites and phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes as influenced under supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation in Withania somnifera Dunal, an indigenous medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takshak, Swabha; Agrawal, S B

    2014-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of supplemental ultraviolet B (3.6 kJ m(-2)day(-1) above ambient) radiation on secondary metabolites and phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes of Withania somnifera under field conditions at 40, 70, and 100 days after transplantation. Secondary metabolites' (alkaloids, anthocyanins, carotenoids, flavonoids, lignin, phytosterols, saponins, and tannins) concentrations were analysed at the end of the treatments. Activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) were also determined. In treated plants, secondary metabolite-concentrations generally increased (higher concentrations being recorded in roots compared to leaves). Anomalies were recorded for lycopene in roots and phytosterols in leaves (all sampling ages); β-carotene declined in leaves at third sampling age. s-UV-B-treated plants depicted decrease in withanolide A content with concomitant increase in withaferin A (two major alkaloids analysed by HPLC) compared to their respective controls. Phenylpropanoid pathway enzyme-activities increased in leaves and roots under s-UV-B treatment, the latter showing greater increase. The study concludes that s-UV-B is a potent factor in increasing the concentrations of secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic pathway enzymes in W. somnifera.

  12. Plantas medicinais: fatores de influência no conteúdo de metabólitos secundários Medicinal plants: factors of influence on the content of secondary metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gobbo-Neto

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since secondary metabolites represent a chemical interface between plants and surrounding environment, their syntheses are frequently affected by environmental conditions. Thus, variations in the total content and/or of the relative proportions of secondary metabolites in plants can take place. We review the main environmental factors that can streamline or alter the production or concentration of secondary metabolites in plants. How seasonality, circadian rhythm, developmental stage and age, temperature, water availability, UV radiation, soil nutrients, altitude, atmospheric composition and tissue damage influence secondary metabolism are discussed.

  13. Anti-parasitic effects of plant secondary metabolites on swine nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, A.R.; Pena-Espinoza, Miguel Angel; Fryganas, Christos

    Organic production presents challenges to animal health and productivity. In organic pig production, animals must have access to outdoor pastures which increases exposure to gastrointestinal parasites. Moreover, the routine use of synthetic anti-parasitic drugs is not allowed. Thus, novel parasite...... extract showed potent inhibition of A. suum larval migration (EC50 value of 42 μg/ml) and was also active against larval and adult stages of O. dentatum. Electron microscopy demonstrated significant structural damage to the cuticle and digestive tissues in nematodes exposed to PSM. Plants rich in PSM...

  14. Investigating anti-parasitic effects of plant secondary metabolites: effects on swine nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew; Pena-Espinoza, Miguel Angel; Fryganas, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Organic and outdoor animal production presents challenges to animal health and productivity. In organic pig production, animals must have access to outdoor pastures which increases exposure to pathogens such as gastrointestinal nematodes. Moreover, the routine use of synthetic anti-parasitic drugs....... Electron microscopy confirmed direct structural damage in nematodes exposed to the purified molecules. Therefore, plants rich in PSM such as CT and SL show promise as natural anthelmintics against two highly prevalent swine parasites. Experiments to determine in vivo efficacy and the mechanisms...

  15. Dung-inhabiting fungi: a potential reservoir of novel secondary metabolites for the control of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrocco, Sabrina

    2016-04-01

    Coprophilous fungi are a large group of saprotrophic fungi mostly found in herbivore dung. The number of these fungi undergoing investigation is continually increasing, and new species and genera continue to be described. Dung-inhabiting fungi play an important ecological role in decomposing and recycling nutrients from animal dung. They produce a large array of bioactive secondary metabolites and have a potent enzymatic arsenal able to utilise even complex molecules. Bioactive secondary metabolites are actively involved in interaction with and defence against other organisms whose growth can be inhibited, resulting in an enhanced ecological fitness of producer strains. Currently, these antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites are of interest in medicine in particular, while very little information is available concerning their potential use in agriculture. This review introduces the ecology of dung-inhabiting fungi, with particular emphasis on the production of antibiotic compounds as a means to compete with other microorganisms. Owing to the fast pace of technological progress, new approaches to predicting the biosynthesis of bioactive metabolites are proposed. Coprophilous fungi should be considered as elite candidate organisms for the discovery of novel antifungal compounds, above all in view of their exploitation for crop protection. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Secondary Metabolites and Bioactivity of the Endophytic Fungus Phomopsis theicola from Taiwanese endemic plant

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    Yi Hsiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new cytochalasan named as phomocytochalasin (1, together with five previously identified compounds, cytochalasin H, cytochalasin N, RKS-1778, dankasterone B, cyclo(L-Ile-L-Leu, were isolated from the solid fermentate of Phomopsis theicola BCRC 09F0213, an endophytic fungus isolated from the leaves of an endemic Formosan plant Litsea hypophaea Hayata . The structure of the new compound was established by spectroscopic methods, including UV, IR, HR-ESIMS, and extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR techniques. Among the isolates, cytochalasin N showed NO inhibitory activity with IC 50 values of 77.8 μM . Cytochalasin H showed the progesterone receptor (PR antagonism with the IC 50 value of 1.42 μM.

  17. The mouthparts enriched odorant binding protein 11 of the alfalfa plant bug Adelphocoris lineolatus displays a preferential binding behaviour to host plant secondary metabolites

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    Liang eSun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins (OBPs are proposed to be directly required for odorant discrimination and represent potential interesting targets for pest control. In the notoriously agricultural pest Adelphocoris lineolatus, our previous functional investigation of highly expressed antennal OBPs clearly supported this viewpoint, whereas the findings of the current study by characterizing of AlinOBP11 rather indicated that OBP in hemipterous plant bugs might fulfill a different and tantalizing physiological role. The phylogenetic analysis uncovered that AlinOBP11 together with several homologous bug OBP proteins are potential orthologs, implying they could exhibit a conserved function. Next, the results of expression profiles solidly showed that AlinOBP11 was predominantly expressed at adult mouthparts, the most important gustatory organ of Hemiptera mirid bug. Finally, a rigorously selective binding profile was observed in the fluorescence competitive binding assay, in which recombinant AlinOBP11 displayed much stronger binding abilities to non-volatile secondary metabolite compounds than the volatile odorants. These results reflect that AlinOBP11, even its orthologous proteins across bug species, could be associated with a distinctively conserved physiological role such as a crucial carrier for non-volatiles host secondary metabolites in gustatory system.

  18. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1 as a source of potent antibiotics and other secondary metabolites for biocontrol of plant pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brans Alain

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytopathogenic fungi affecting crop and post-harvested vegetables are a major threat to food production and food storage. To face these drawbacks, producers have become increasingly dependent on agrochemicals. However, intensive use of these compounds has led to the emergence of pathogen resistance and severe negative environmental impacts. There are also a number of plant diseases for which chemical solutions are ineffective or non-existent as well as an increasing demand by consumers for pesticide-free food. Thus, biological control through the use of natural antagonistic microorganisms has emerged as a promising alternative to chemical pesticides for more rational and safe crop management. Results The genome of the plant-associated B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 was sample sequenced. Several gene clusters involved in the synthesis of biocontrol agents were detected. Four gene clusters were shown to direct the synthesis of the cyclic lipopeptides surfactin, iturin A and fengycin as well as the iron-siderophore bacillibactin. Beside these non-ribosomaly synthetised peptides, three additional gene clusters directing the synthesis of the antibacterial polyketides macrolactin, bacillaene and difficidin were identified. Mass spectrometry analysis of culture supernatants led to the identification of these secondary metabolites, hence demonstrating that the corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters are functional in strain GA1. In addition, genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis and export of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin were highlighted. However, only its chlorinated derivative, chlorotetaine, could be detected in culture supernatants. On the contrary, genes involved in ribosome-dependent synthesis of bacteriocin and other antibiotic peptides were not detected as compared to the reference strain B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42. Conclusion The production of all of these antibiotic compounds highlights B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 as

  19. [Bioactivity of endophytic actinomycetes from medicinal plants and secondary metabolites from strain D62].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Wen; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2007-10-01

    It is believed that genetic recombination of the endophytes with the hosts that occurred in evolutionary time could result in some endophytes producing certain phytochemical originally characteristic of the host. Based on this widely accepted hypothesis, there have been increasing research efforts focused on screening for novel natural products from endophytes. In this study, antimicrobial and antitumor activities of 165 actinomycetes isolated from medicinal plants collected from Xishuangbanna were tested by agar diffusion method and WST-8 assay respectively. The results showed that over 42% of the isolates exhibited antagonism against pathogenic strains, and 54.5% displayed excellent inhibition against mouse melanoma cell line B16 or/and human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. These results are superior to those of soil actinomycetes, indicating tremendous potential of endophytic of actinomycetes for exploration. Six compounds that had both antimicrobial and antitumor activities were separated and purified from isolate Streptomyces sp. D62 by resin adsorption, silica-gel column and sephadex chromatography, etc. On the basis of spectral analyses, they were identified as antimycin A4a (1), antimycin A7a (2), antimycin A2a (3), antimycin A1a (4), 10-hydroxy-10-methyl-dodec-2-en-1,4-olide (5) and 6-(2-(4-aminophenyl)-2-oxoethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-tetrahydropyran-2-one(6), with the last one defined as a novel compound. Based on all these results, it is convinced that endophytic actinomycetes are a promising resource for bioactive natural product discovery.

  20. Influence of Growth Regulators on Secondary Metabolites of Medicinally Important Oil Yielding Plant Simarouba glauca DC. under Water Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awate P.D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One year old seedlings of Simarouba glauca were subjected to water stress for 4, 8, 12 and 16 days. The foliar sprays of 50 ppm salicylic acid (SA and 10 ppm Putriscine, Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA and Abscisic acid (ABA were applied before and after water stress. It was observed that polyphenols, tannins, alkaloid and flavonoid contents were increased with increasing water stress treatments. Foliar applications of growth regulators ameliorate water stress and exhibits induction of secondary metabolites like coumarins, sterols, xanthoproteins, cardiac glycosides and saponins. It was also noticed that foliar application of SA, GABA, ABA considerably increases all these secondary metabolites which will help to improve the medicinal potential of Simarouba glauca under water stressed condition.

  1. Metabolomics by Proton High-Resolution Magic-Angle-Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Tomato Plants Treated with Two Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Pierluigi; Vinale, Francesco; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Pascale, Alberto; Lorito, Matteo; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    Trichoderma fungi release 6-pentyl-2H-pyran-2-one (1) and harzianic acid (2) secondary metabolites to improve plant growth and health protection. We isolated metabolites 1 and 2 from Trichoderma strains, whose different concentrations were used to treat seeds of Solanum lycopersicum. The metabolic profile in the resulting 15 day old tomato leaves was studied by high-resolution magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy directly on the whole samples without any preliminary extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) of HRMAS NMR showed significantly enhanced acetylcholine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content accompanied by variable amount of amino acids in samples treated with both Trichoderma secondary metabolites. Seed germination rates, seedling fresh weight, and the metabolome of tomato leaves were also dependent upon doses of metabolites 1 and 2 treatments. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy was proven to represent a rapid and reliable technique for evaluating specific changes in the metabolome of plant leaves and calibrating the best concentration of bioactive compounds required to stimulate plant growth.

  2. Energetic costs and implications of the intake of plant secondary metabolites on digestive and renal morphology in two austral passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Gonzalo; Ríos, Juan Manuel; Maldonado, Karin; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Seed-eating birds have a diet of high nutritional value; however, they must cope with plant secondary metabolites (PSM). We postulated that the detoxification capacity of birds is associated with a metabolic cost, given that the organs responsible for detoxification significantly contribute to energetic metabolism. We used an experimental approach to assess the effects of phenol-enriched diets on two passerines with different feeding habits: the omnivorous rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) and the granivorous common diuca-finch (Diuca diuca). The birds were fed with one of three diets: control diet, supplemented with tannic acid, or supplemented with Opuntia ficus-indica phenolic extract (a common food of the sparrow but not the finch). After 5 weeks of exposure to the diets, we measured basal metabolic rates (BMR), energy intake, glucuronic acid output and digestive and kidney structure. In both species, detoxification capacity expressed as glucuronic acid output was higher in individuals consuming phenol-enriched diets compared to the control diet. However, whereas sparrows increase energy intake and intestinal mass when feeding on phenol-enriched diets, finches had lower intestinal mass and energy intake remains stable. Furthermore, sparrows had higher BMR on phenol-enriched diets compared to the control group, whereas in the finches BMR remains unchanged. Interspecific differences in response to phenols intake may be determined by the dietary habits of these species. While both species can feed on moderate phenolic diets for 5 weeks, energy costs may differ due to different responses in food intake and organ structure to counteract the effects of PSM intake.

  3. Research progress in microbial transformation of plant secondary metabolite%微生物转化植物次生代谢产物研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹宇; 马堃; 尹冬梅

    2013-01-01

    植物次生代谢产物具有许多重要的生理功能,它的微生物转化成为近年来的研究热点.本文综述了植物次生代谢产物的种类和功能以及微生物转化植物次生代谢产物的类型和特点,展望了微生物转化技术在生物活性物质生产和医药保健品研发等领域的广阔应用前景.%The plant secondary metabolites has many important physiological functions and its microbial transformation has become a hot research topic in this field in recent years.In this paper,several species and function of plant secondary metabolite had been summarized.Meanwhile,various types and characteristics of microbial transformation of plant secondary metabolite had been introduced.Moreover,it was predicted that microbial transformation would have wide application prospect in production of bioactive substances and development of pharmaceuticals and health foods.

  4. Effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on secondary metabolites in forage plants and potential consequences for multiple trophic responses involving mammalian herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thines, Nicole J.; Bassman, John H.; Shipley, Lisa A.; Slusser, James R.

    2004-10-01

    Herbivores represent the interface between primary production and higher trophic levels. The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on microbes, invertebrate herbivores, and detritivores has received limited study in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, although direct effects (e.g. melanoma, cataracts) on mammals have been documented, indirect effects (e.g., resulting from changes in plant chemistry) of enhanced UV-B on mammalian herbivores have not been evaluated. Although the diet of mammalian herbivores has little effect on nutritional quality for their associated predators, to the extent changes in plant chemistry affect aspects of population dynamics (e.g., growth, fecundity, densities), higher trophic levels can be affected. In this study, different forage species of varying inherent levels of key secondary metabolites are being grown in the field under either ambient or ambient plus supplemental UV-B radiation simulating a 15% stratospheric ozone depletion for Pullman, Washington. At various time intervals, foliage is being sampled and analyzed for changes in secondary metabolites and other attributes. Using controlled feeding trials, changes in plant secondary metabolites are being related to preference and digestibility in specialist and generalist mammalian hindgut herbivores, digestion in ruminants and non-ruminants, and to selected aspects of population dynamics in mammalian herbivores. Results suggest how UV-B-induced changes in plant secondary chemistry affect animal nutrition, and thus animal productivity in a range of mammalian herbivores. Reductions in palatability and digestibility of plant material along with reductions in fecundity and other aspects of population dynamics could have significant economic ramifications for farmers, ranchers and wildlife biologists.

  5. Genetically engineering Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 for the sustainable production of the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Dan; Daddy, Soumana; He, Qingfang

    2014-07-01

    p-Coumaric acid is the precursor of phenylpropanoids, which are plant secondary metabolites that are beneficial to human health. Tyrosine ammonia lyase catalyzes the production of p-coumaric acid from tyrosine. Because of their photosynthetic ability and biosynthetic versatility, cyanobacteria are promising candidates for the production of certain plant metabolites, including phenylpropanoids. Here, we produced p-coumaric acid in a strain of transgenic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis 6803). Whereas a strain of Synechocystis 6803 genetically engineered to express sam8, a tyrosine ammonia lyase gene from the actinomycete Saccharothrix espanaensis, accumulated little or no p-coumaric acid, a strain that both expressed sam8 and lacked slr1573, a native hypothetical gene shown here to encode a laccase that oxidizes polyphenols, produced ∼82.6 mg/L p-coumaric acid, which was readily purified from the growth medium.

  6. [Actinomycetes from mangrove and their secondary metabolites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kui

    2013-11-04

    Mangroves are woody plants located in tropical and subtropical intertidal coastal regions. Driven by the discovery of novel natural products from marine environment, mangrove is becoming a hot spot for actinomycetes resources collection and secondary metabolites (natural products) identification as well as their biosynthesis mechanism investigation. Salinaspora A produced by a Salinispora strain isolated from Bahamas mangrove environment, is in the first clinical trial. Till the time of writing this paper, 24 genera of 11 families and 8 suborders under the actinomycetale have been reported from mangrove, among which 3 are new genera, and 31 are new species. At the same time, secondary metabolites were identified from the mangrove actinomycetes culture, including alkanoids and quinines, azalomycins, antimycins, bezamides and quinazolines, divergolides, indole derivatives, kandenols, macrocyclic dilactones, and the attractive structures, such as the Streptocarbazoles, the multicyclic indolsesquiterpenes, and xiamycin presented unique structures. Their biosynthetic mechanism has also been investigated. Most of the metabolites were isolated from streptomycetes, with a few from Micromonospora and Saccharopolyspora.

  7. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, M.; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, C.; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Kollner, T.G.; Vogel, H.; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A.M.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Preite, V.; Gershenzon, J.; Erb, M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivor

  8. Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans, a halotolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, improves yield and content of secondary metabolites in Bacopa monnieri (L.) Pennell under primary and secondary salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Nidhi; Yadav, Deepti; Barnawal, Deepti; Maji, Deepamala; Kalra, Alok

    2013-02-01

    Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri), an integral component of Indian Ayurvedic medicine system, is facing a threat of extinction owing to the depletion of its natural populations. The present study investigates the prospective of exploitation of halotolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in utilising the salt stressed soils for cultivation of B. monnieri. The effects of two salt tolerant PGPR, Bacillus pumilus (STR2) and Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans (STR36) on the growth and content of bacoside-A, an important pharmaceutical compound in B. monnieri, were investigated under primary and secondary salinity conditions. The herb yields of un-inoculated plants decreased by 48 % under secondary salinization and 60 % under primary salinization than the non salinised plants. Among the rhizobacteria treated plants, E. oxidotolerans recorded 109 and 138 %, higher herb yield than non-inoculated plants subjected to primary and secondary salinity respectively. E. oxidotolerans inoculated plants recorded 36 and 76 % higher bacoside-A content under primary and secondary salinity respectively. Higher levels of proline content and considerably lower levels of lipid peroxidation were noticed when the plants were inoculated with PGPR under all salinity regimes. From the results of this investigation, it can be concluded that, the treatments with salt tolerant PGPR can be a useful strategy in the enhancement of biomass yield and saponin contents in B. monnieri, as besides being an eco-friendly approach; it can also be instrumental in cultivation of B. monnieri in salt stressed environments.

  9. Secondary Metabolites from Rubiaceae Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Martins

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes some characteristics of the Rubiaceae family pertaining to the occurrence and distribution of secondary metabolites in the main genera of this family. It reports the review of phytochemical studies addressing all species of Rubiaceae, published between 1990 and 2014. Iridoids, anthraquinones, triterpenes, indole alkaloids as well as other varying alkaloid subclasses, have shown to be the most common. These compounds have been mostly isolated from the genera Uncaria, Psychotria, Hedyotis, Ophiorrhiza and Morinda. The occurrence and distribution of iridoids, alkaloids and anthraquinones point out their chemotaxonomic correlation among tribes and subfamilies. From an evolutionary point of view, Rubioideae is the most ancient subfamily, followed by Ixoroideae and finally Cinchonoideae. The chemical biosynthetic pathway, which is not so specific in Rubioideae, can explain this and large amounts of both iridoids and indole alkaloids are produced. In Ixoroideae, the most active biosysthetic pathway is the one that produces iridoids; while in Cinchonoideae, it produces indole alkaloids together with other alkaloids. The chemical biosynthetic pathway now supports this botanical conclusion.

  10. Secondary metabolites of cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akio; Kajiyama, Shin-Ichiro

    1998-03-01

    Cyanobacteria attracted much attention recently because of their secondary metabolites with potent biological activities and unusual structures. This paper reviews some recent studies on the isolation, structural, elucidation and biological activities of the bioactive compounds from cyanobacteria Nostoc species.

  11. Secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KELECOM ALPHONSE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available After 40 years of intensive research, chemistry of marine natural products has become a mature field. Since 1995, there are signals of decreased interest in the search of new metabolites from traditional sources such as macroalgae and octocorals, and the number of annual reports on marine sponges stabilized. On the contrary, metabolites from microorganisms is a rapidly growing field, due, at least in part, to the suspicion that a number of metabolites obtained from algae and invertebrates may be produced by associated microorganisms. Studies are concerned with bacteria and fungi, isolated from seawater, sediments, algae, fish and mainly from marine invertebrates such as sponges, mollusks, tunicates, coelenterates and crustaceans. Although it is still to early to define tendencies, it may be stated that the metabolites from microorganisms are in most cases quite different from those produced by the invertebrate hosts. Nitrogenated metabolites predominate over acetate derivatives, and terpenes are uncommon. Among the latter, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and carotenes have been isolated; among nitrogenated metabolites, amides, cyclic peptides and indole alkaloids predominate.

  12. Secondary metabolites: applications on cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, S; Scrano, L; Bonomo, M G; Salzano, G; Bufo, S A

    2013-01-01

    Biological sciences and related bio-technology play a very important role in research projects concerning protection and preservation of cultural heritage for future generations. In this work secondary metabolites of Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola (Bga) ICMP 11096 strain and crude extract of glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae plants, were tested against a panel of microorganisms isolated from calcarenite stones of two historical bridges located in Potenza and in Campomaggiore (Southern Italy). The isolated bacteria belong to Bacillus cereus and Arthrobacter agilis species, while fungi belong to Aspergillus, Penicillium, Coprinellus, Fusarium, Rhizoctonio and Stemphylium genera. Bga broth (unfiltered) and glycoalkaloids extracts were able to inhibit the growth of all bacterial isolates. Bga culture was active against fungal colonies, while Solanaceae extract exerted bio-activity against Fusarium and Rhizoctonia genera.

  13. Diversity of secondary metabolites from Genus Artocarpus (Moraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIEFMAN HAKIM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hakim A. 2010. The diversity of secondary metabolites from Genus Artocarpus (Moraceae. Nusantara Bioscience 2:146-156. Several species of the Artocarpus genus (Moraceae have been investigated their natural product. The secondary metabolites successfully being isolatad from Artocarpus genus consist of terpenoid, flavonoids, stilbenoid, arylbenzofuran, neolignan, and adduct Diels-Alder. Flavonoid group represent the compound which is the most found from Artocarpus plant. The flavonoids compound which are successfully isolated from Artocarpus plant consist of the varied frameworks like chalcone, flavanone, flavan-3-ol, simple flavone, prenylflavone, oxepinoflavone, pyranoflavone, dihydrobenzoxanthone, furanodihydrobenzoxanthone, pyranodihydrobenzoxanthone, quinonoxanthone, cyclopentenoxanthone, xanthonolide, dihydroxanthone.

  14. Secondary metabolite profiling of Alternaria dauci, A. porri, A. solani, and A. tomatophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Dongo, Anita; Pryor, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    Chemotaxonomy (secondary metabolite profiling) has been shown to be of great value in the classification and differentiation in Ascomycota. However, few studies have investigated the use of metabolite production for classification and identification purposes of plant pathogenic Alternaria species...

  15. Lichen secondary metabolites affect growth of Physcomitrella patens by allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Michal; Antreich, Sebastian J; Bačkor, Martin; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Lang, Ingeborg

    2017-05-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites can function as allelochemicals and affect the development and growth of neighboring bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, microorganisms, and even other lichens. Lichen overgrowth on bryophytes is frequently observed in nature even though mosses grow faster than lichens, but there is still little information on the interactions between lichens and bryophytes.In the present study, we used extracts from six lichen thalli containing secondary metabolites like usnic acid, protocetraric acid, atranorin, lecanoric acid, nortistic acid, and thamnolic acid. To observe the influence of these metabolites on bryophytes, the moss Physcomitrella patens was cultivated for 5 weeks under laboratory conditions and treated with lichen extracts. Toxicity of natural mixtures of secondary metabolites was tested at three selected doses (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 %). When the mixture contained substantial amounts of usnic acid, we observed growth inhibition of protonemata and reduced development of gametophores. Significant differences in cell lengths and widths were also noticed. Furthermore, usnic acid had a strong effect on cell division in protonemata suggesting a strong impact on the early stages of bryophyte development by allelochemicals contained in the lichen secondary metabolites.Biological activities of lichen secondary metabolites were confirmed in several studies such as antiviral, antibacterial, antitumor, antiherbivore, antioxidant, antipyretic, and analgetic action or photoprotection. This work aimed to expand the knowledge on allelopathic effects on bryophyte growth.

  16. Secondary metabolites from Eremostachys laciniata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calis, Ihsan; Güvenc, Aysegül; Armagan, Metin;

    2008-01-01

    From the aerial parts of Eremostachys laciniata (Lamiaceae), a new acidic iridoid glucoside, 5-desoxysesamosidic acid (1) was isolated in addition to thirteen known iridoid glucosides, 5-desoxysesamoside (2), sesamoside (3), 6β-hydroxy-7-epi-loganin (4), chlorotuberoside (5), 5-deoxypulchelloside...... elucidated from spectroscopic (UV, IR, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and ESI-MS evidence, as well as from their specific optical rotation. The presence of these metabolites of three different classes strongly supports the close relationship of the genera Eremostachys and Phlomis.......), and forsythoside B (18), and five flavone derivatives, luteolin (19), luteolin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (20), luteolin 7-O-(6''-O-β-D-apiofuranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (21), apigenin 7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22), and apigenin 7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (23). The structures of the metabolites were...

  17. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of plant growth regulators on accumulation of secondary metabolites of medicinal plants%植物生长调节剂对药用植物次生代谢物积累的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马琳; 郜玉钢; 臧埔; 张连学

    2016-01-01

    植物生长调节剂不仅能调节药用植物生长,还可对药用植物次生代谢进行调控,能够影响酚类、萜类和含氮化合物等多种药用活性成分在植物体内的合成.本文综述了国内外对植物生长调节剂影响药用植物次生代谢产物积累的研究进展,旨在为药用植物活性成分积累调控提供参考和依据.%Plant growth regulators could regulate the growth of medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites.The synthesis of medicinal active ingredients such as phenols,terpenoids and nitrogen compounds in plants can be affected by plant growth regulators.To provide references and basis for regulation of accumulations of active ingredients in medicinal plants,effects of plant growth regulators on secondary metabolites were reviewed in this paper.

  19. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase: The application of a plant secondary metabolite enzyme in biocatalytic chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kerstin; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2016-09-10

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid synthase (THCAS) from the secondary metabolism of Cannabis sativa L. catalyzes the oxidative formation of an intramolecular CC bond in cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) to synthesize Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA), which is the direct precursor of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Aiming on a biotechnological production of cannabinoids, we investigated the potential of the heterologously produced plant oxidase in a cell-free system on preparative scale. THCAS was characterized in an aqueous/organic two-liquid phase setup in order to solubilize the hydrophobic substrate and to allow in situ product removal. Compared to the single phase aqueous setup the specific activity decreased by a factor of approximately 2 pointing to a substrate limitation of CBGA in the two-liquid phase system. However, the specific activity remained stable for at least 3h illustrating the benefit of the two-liquid phase setup. In a repeated-batch setup, THCAS showed only a minor loss of specific activity in the third batch pointing to a high intrinsic stability and high solvent tolerance of the enzyme. Maximal space-time-yields of 0.121gL(-1)h(-1) were reached proving the two-liquid phase concept suitable for biotechnological production of cannabinoids.

  20. Importance of Secondary Metabolites for Leaf Beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. EKİZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae are one of the most diverse families of herbivorous insects. Many of them are important agricultural pests and cause remarkable loss of crop and money as well. Plant leaves and roots are primary food source of both larva and adults of leaf beetles. Plants produce many secondary metabolites in reaction to herbivore insects. It is a well-known phenomenon that quantity and variety of secondary metabolites in plant leaves may change in response to insect attacks. Herbivore insects have to deal with such defensive secondary chemicals and overcome either by detoxifying or storing them. Accordingly, many specialist herbivores coevolved with their host plant. Certain phenolic glycosides may reduce leaf beetle feeding. Condensed tannins are anti-herbivore defenses against leaf chewing beetles, including leaf beetles. Flavonoid compounds are feeding deterrents for many flea leaf beetles. Cinnamic acid derivatives are other known feeding deterrents for leaf beetles. Secondary metabolites quantity and nutritional quality of host plants are not only important for feeding but also for providing enemy-free space and suitable oviposition sites.

  1. The Membrane Gradostat Reactor: Secondary metabolite production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-05-16

    May 16, 2007 ... gies are now well accepted and cost effective (Wiesner and Chellam ... uce these secondary metabolites continuously were .... and ammonium sources in the feed and permeates reco- .... when the solutions were fed through the lumen of the .... Progress from batch culture to a membrane bioreactor for the.

  2. Defence strategies adopted by the medicinal plant Coleus forskohlii against supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation: Augmentation of secondary metabolites and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takshak, Swabha; Agrawal, S B

    2015-12-01

    Supplementary ultraviolet-B (ambient+3.6  kJ m(-2) day(-1)) induced changes on morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics (specifically the defence strategies: UV-B protective compounds and antioxidants) of Coleus forskohlii were investigated under field conditions at 30, 60, and 90 days after transplantation. Levels of secondary metabolites increased under s-UV-B stress; flavonoids and phenolics (primary UV-B screening agents) were recorded to be higher in leaves which are directly exposed to s-UV-B. This was also verified by enhanced activities of phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes: phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR). Antioxidants, both enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and superoxide dismutase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) also increased in the treated organs of the test plant, higher contents being recorded in roots except for ascorbic acid. On the contrary, protein and chlorophyll content (directly implicated in regulating plant growth and development) declined under s-UV-B. These alterations in plant biochemistry led the plant to compromise on its photosynthate allocation towards growth and biomass production as evidenced by a reduction in its height and biomass. The study concludes that s-UV-B is a potent stimulating factor in increasing the concentrations of defense compounds and antioxidants in C. forskohlii to optimize its performance under stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes.

  4. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants.

  5. Discovering the secondary metabolite potential encoded within entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Donna M; Donzelli, Bruno G G; Krasnoff, Stuart B; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2014-10-01

    This highlight discusses the secondary metabolite potential of the insect pathogens Metarhizium and Beauveria, including a bioinformatics analysis of secondary metabolite genes for which no products are yet identified.

  6. Deep Sea Actinomycetes and Their Secondary Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Hong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea is a unique and extreme environment. It is a hot spot for hunting marine actinomycetes resources and secondary metabolites. The novel deep sea actinomycete species reported from 2006 to 2016 including 21 species under 13 genera with the maximum number from Microbacterium, followed by Dermacoccus, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora, and one novel species for the other 9 genera. Eight genera of actinomycetes were reported to produce secondary metabolites, among which Streptomyces is the richest producer. Most of the compounds produced by the deep sea actinomycetes presented antimicrobial and anti-cancer cell activities. Gene clusters related to biosynthesis of desotamide, heronamide, and lobophorin have been identified from the deep sea derived Streptomyces.

  7. UV-B Induced Changes in the Secondary Metabolites of Morus alba L. Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Wei Zhang; Jing-Kui Tian; Run-Ze Chen; Lei Cui; Hong-Wei Fu; Lin Zhang; Ming-Yao Sun; Xi-Da Gu

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is harmful to plants and human beings. Many secondary metabolites, like flavonoids, alkaloids, and lignin, are UV-B absorbing compounds, which can protect the genetic material of plants. Furthermore, they are active components of herbal drugs. UV-B radiation can activate the self-protective secondary metabolism system. The results of this paper provide a method to induce bioactive secondary metabolites from mulberry leaves (Morus alba L.) by UV-B irradiation in ...

  8. Magnetic Nanosystem for Cancer Therapy Using Oncocalyxone A, an Antitomour Secondary Metabolite Isolated from a Brazilian Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma L. G. Lemos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the investigation and development of a novel magnetic drug delivery nanosystem (labeled as MO-20 for cancer therapy. The drug employed was oncocalyxone A (onco A, which was isolated from Auxemma oncocalyx, an endemic Brazilian plant. It has a series of pharmacological properties: antioxidant, cytotoxic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and antiplatelet. Onco A was associated with magnetite nanoparticles in order to obtain magnetic properties. The components of MO-20 were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, TEM and Magnetization curves. The MO-20 presented a size of about 30 nm and globular morphology. In addition, drug releasing experiments were performed, where it was observed the presence of the anomalous transport. The results found in this work showed the potential of onco A for future applications of the MO-20 as a new magnetic drug release nanosystem for cancer treatment.

  9. USING IN VITRO-METHODS FOR PROPAGATION AND PRODUCING SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM EUROPEAN PENNYROYAL PLANTS (MENTHA PULEGIUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. MOUBARAK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available European pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L. is the best source of essential oils and natural antioxidants. The main component of the essential oil is pulegone, which can be a precursor for the synthesis of menthol and menthofuran.The aim of this research is to develop technology in vitro cultivation of European pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L. to increase the essential oil content. In this research we used the various varieties and the primary explants obtained from plantlets for the induction of callus formation and somatic organogenesis in European pennyroyal plants varieties Pennyroyal and Sonia.Best response for seeds sterilization was got by using the sodium hypochlorite for 10-15 minutes.Murashige and Skoog basal medium was used for induction of morphogenesis. Using the lamina explants of Pennyroyal stem organogenesis was obtained in one modification of the ½ MS medium supplemented by 0.5 mg/l kinetin + 1 mg/l NAA - and amounted to 20%.In the variety Sonia stem organogenesis was not received on any medium modification. Petioles as explants gave no stem organogenesis on any medium modification. Nodes as explants showed stem organogenesis on all medium modifications, its effectiveness ranged between 60% and 100 %. In the variety Sonia stem organogenesis had frequency from 33 % to 100% on most medium modifications. When we used internodes explants of both varieties stem organogenesis was obtained only on MS medium supplemented by 0.5 mg/l BAP + 1 mg/l NAA, and amounted to 20%.For the induction of root organogenesis we can recommend a medium with half mineral content on MS medium supplemented by kinetin as cytokinin and NAA as auxin. Regenerates of the variety Pennyroyal developed visually better than ones of the variety Sonia. Thus for the variety Pennyroyal we can recommend MS as the mineral basic, and for the variety Sonia - ½ MS.

  10. 植物次生代谢产物及影响其积累的因素研究综述%Review of Plant Secondary Metabolites and the Factors that Influence Its Accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孥彦; 周晓东; 楼浙辉; 肖相元

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play an important role in many aspects of plant life activities. There is a great variety of its kind. The present researches mainly focus on terpenoids, phenolics, nitric organic compounds, alkynes, organic acids, etc. The synthesis and accumulation of plant secondary metabolites are not only controlled by genetic, but also infected by the tree-age and seasons (the growth stages of tree). The growth of the same kind of plant that comes from different provenances is different. Light intensity, light quality, temperature, moisture, nutrients and other environmental factors also play a momentous influence on the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites. Studying the influence of these factors to the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites provide a guidance to the cultivation measures to improve their production. At the same time, it will help ease the contradiction between the limited production of plant secondary metabolites and the growing demands by human beings.%植物次生代谢产物在植物生命活动的许多方面均起着重要作用。其种类繁多,目前研究主要集中于萜类、酚类、含氮有机物以及炔类、有机酸等。次生代谢产物的合成和积累受遗传(基因)控制,受树龄、季节(生长发育阶段)的影响,不同种源的同一植物在相同的环境下生长也存在差异,光照强度、光质、温度、水分、养分等环境因子亦会对次生代谢产物的积累产生重要影响。研究这些因素对植物次生代谢产物积累的影响,对为提高其产量而进行的栽培措施具有指导意义,有助于缓解有限的次生代谢物产量与人类越来越大的需求之间的矛盾。

  11. The use of secondary metabolite profiling in chemotaxonomy of filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Andersen, Birgitte; Thrane, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    -directed compounds. Chemotaxonomy is traditionally restricted to comprise fatty acids, proteins, carbohydrates, or secondary metabolites, but has sometimes been defined so broadly that it also includes DNA sequences. It is not yet possible to use secondary metabolites in phylogeny, because of the inconsistent...... distribution throughout the fungal kingdom. However, this is the very quality that makes secondary metabolites so useful in classification and identification. Four groups of organisms are particularly good producers of secondary metabolites: plants, fungi, lichen fungi, and actinomycetes, whereas yeasts......, protozoa, and animals are less efficient producers. Therefore, secondary metabolites have mostly been used in plant and fungal taxonomy, whereas chemotaxonomy has been neglected in bacteriology. Lichen chemotaxonomy has been based on few biosynthetic families (chemosyndromes), whereas filamentous fungi...

  12. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Fungal Endophytes of Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierle, Andrea A; Stierle, Donald B

    2015-10-01

    This is a review of bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from conifer-associated endophytic fungi from 1990-2014. This includes compounds with antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activity towards human cancer cell lines, and activity against either plant pathogens or plant insect pests. Compounds that were originally reported without associated activity were included if other studies ascribed activity to these compounds. Compounds were not included if they were exclusively phytotoxic or if they were isolated from active extracts but were not determined to be the active component of that extract.

  13. New Secondary Metabolites from Quercus coccifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Şöhretoğlu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three new secondary metabolites kermesoside (1, cocciferoside (2 and (--8-chlorocatechin (3, were isolated from the the stems with barks of Quercus coccifera along with five known phenolic compounds, 3-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-propan-1-one (4 and 3-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl-propan-1-one (5, trans-resveratrol-3-O-β-glucopyranoside (6 lyoniresinol-9-O-β-xylopyranoside (7, lyoniresinol-9-O-β-glucopyranoside (8. The structure elucidation of the isolated compounds was performed by spectroscopic methods (UV, 1D- and 2D- NMR and HR-MS.

  14. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  15. The root endophyte fungus Piriformospora indica leads to early flowering, higher biomass and altered secondary metabolites of the medicinal plant, Coleus forskohlii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aparajita; Kamal, Shwet; Shakil, Najam Akhtar; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf; Dua, Meenakshi; Tuteja, Narendra; Johri, Atul Kumar; Varma, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of plant probiotic fungus Piriformospora indica on the medicinal plant C. forskohlii. Interaction of the C. forskohlii with the root endophyte P. indica under field conditions, results in an overall increase in aerial biomass, chlorophyll contents and phosphorus acquisition. The fungus also promoted inflorescence development, consequently the amount of p-cymene in the inflorescence increased. Growth of the root thickness was reduced in P. indica treated plants as they became fibrous, but developed more lateral roots. Because of the smaller root biomass, the content of forskolin was decreased. The symbiotic interaction of C. forskohlii with P. indica under field conditions promoted biomass production of the aerial parts of the plant including flower development. The plant aerial parts are important source of metabolites for medicinal application. Therefore we suggest that the use of the root endophyte fungus P. indica in sustainable agriculture will enhance the medicinally important chemical production.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in 207 isolates of Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium species are known for their ability to produce secondary metabolites (SMs), including plant hormones, pigments, mycotoxins, and other compounds with potential agricultural, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological impact. Understanding the distribution of SM biosynthetic gene clusters across th...

  17. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  18. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. França

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of genes related to secondary metabolism was extracted from the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database and was used to investigate both the gene expression pattern of key enzymes regulating the main biosynthetic secondary metabolism pathways and the major classes of metabolites involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental and developmental cues. The SUCEST database was constructed with tissues in different physiological conditions which had been collected under varied situation of environmental stress. This database allows researchers to identify and characterize the expressed genes of a wide range of putative enzymes able to catalyze steps in the phenylpropanoid, isoprenoid and other pathways of the special metabolic mechanisms involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental changes. Our results show that sugarcane cDNAs encoded putative ultra-violet induced sesquiterpene cyclases (SC; chalcone synthase (CHS, the first enzyme in the pathway branch for flavonoid biosynthesis; isoflavone synthase (IFS, involved in plant defense and root nodulation; isoflavone reductase (IFR, a key enzyme in phenylpropanoid phytoalexin biosynthesis; and caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of lignin cell wall precursors. High levels of CHS transcripts from plantlets infected with Herbaspirillum rubri or Gluconacetobacter diazotroficans suggests that agents of biotic stress can elicit flavonoid biosynthesis in sugarcane. From this data we have predicted the profile of isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in sugarcane and pointed the branches of secondary metabolism activated during tissue-specific stages of development and the adaptive response of sugarcane to agents of biotic and abiotic stress, although our assignment of enzyme function should be confirmed by careful biochemical and genetic supporting evidence.Este trabalho foi realizado com os objetivos de gerar uma coleção de genes

  19. How planting configuration influences plant secondary metabolites and total N in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theories suggest that incorporating alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.; Alf) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.; BFT) into endophyte-infected tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceas Schreb.; E+TF) pasturelands may improve livestock production. We investigated how planting configuration might influence p...

  20. Hybrid isoprenoid secondary metabolite production in terrestrial and marine actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Kelley A; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-12-01

    Terpenoids are among the most ubiquitous and diverse secondary metabolites observed in nature. Although actinomycete bacteria are one of the primary sources of microbially derived secondary metabolites, they rarely produce compounds in this biosynthetic class. The terpenoid secondary metabolites that have been discovered from actinomycetes are often in the form of biosynthetic hybrids called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs). HIs include significant structural diversity and biological activity and thus are important targets for natural product discovery. Recent screening of marine actinomycetes has led to the discovery of a new lineage that is enriched in the production of biologically active HI secondary metabolites. These strains represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and provide unique opportunities to study the evolutionary history and ecological functions of an unusual group of secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Compost stability assessment using a secondary metabolite: geosmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Imai, T; Ukita, M; Sekine, M; Higuchi, T

    2004-11-01

    Composting is a process involved not only in transformation of organic matter (OM), but also for transition of the microbial community. Microorganisms can directly provide important information on the stages and characteristics of composting. This paper was aimed at characterizing compost stability by a microbial secondary metabolite, geosmin, which is a volatile compound presenting an earthy smell. Since secondary metabolite production is dependent on the nutrient state of microorganisms, its production in association with physical and chemical parameters was monitored in the laboratory-scale and plant-scale composting processes. The results showed that the peaked geosmin liberation was consistent with stable state of composting indicated by the ambient temperature achieved, a slightly alkaline product and steady states of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), N and P contents and OM degradation in the laboratory-scale experiment. It was also in accordance with the stability identified by the facilities and CO2 respiration rate in the plant-scale composting. In addition, the production of geosmin was correlated with the C/N ratio for the solid sample. These results demonstrated that geosmin levels could be used as an index for the compost stability assessment in different composting processes with various organic solid wastes.

  2. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Plant Extracts and Plant Secondary Metabolites on Chronic Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Aging: A Mechanistic and Empirical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Christina; Timmer, Jorinde; Stough, Con

    2017-01-01

    Advances in healthcare have considerably improved the life expectancy of the human population over the last century and this has brought about new challenges. As we live longer the capacity for cognitive aging increases. Consequently, it has been noted that decline in cognitive performance in the elderly in domains of reasoning, problem solving skills, attention, processing speed, working memory and episodic memory is a significant societal problem. Despite the enormity of this issue there are relatively few interventions for cognitive aging. This may be due to our current state of knowledge on biological factors that underpin cognitive aging. One of the biological contributors to cognitive aging is chronic neuroinflammation. This review will provide an overview of the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in chronic neuroinflammation and how neuroinflammation may be related to age-associated cognitive decline. Plant based extracts including herbal and nutritional supplements with anti-inflammatory properties will be examined in relation to their utility in treating age-related cognitive decline. Plant based extracts in particular offer interesting pharmacological properties that may be quickly utilized to prevent cognitive aging.

  3. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Plant Extracts and Plant Secondary Metabolites on Chronic Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Aging: A Mechanistic and Empirical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kure, Christina; Timmer, Jorinde; Stough, Con

    2017-01-01

    Advances in healthcare have considerably improved the life expectancy of the human population over the last century and this has brought about new challenges. As we live longer the capacity for cognitive aging increases. Consequently, it has been noted that decline in cognitive performance in the elderly in domains of reasoning, problem solving skills, attention, processing speed, working memory and episodic memory is a significant societal problem. Despite the enormity of this issue there are relatively few interventions for cognitive aging. This may be due to our current state of knowledge on biological factors that underpin cognitive aging. One of the biological contributors to cognitive aging is chronic neuroinflammation. This review will provide an overview of the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in chronic neuroinflammation and how neuroinflammation may be related to age-associated cognitive decline. Plant based extracts including herbal and nutritional supplements with anti-inflammatory properties will be examined in relation to their utility in treating age-related cognitive decline. Plant based extracts in particular offer interesting pharmacological properties that may be quickly utilized to prevent cognitive aging. PMID:28344556

  4. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  5. Small RNA sequencing for secondary metabolite analysis in Persicaria minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Fatah A. Samad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Persicaria minor (kesum is an important medicinal plant and commonly found in southeast countries; Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, and Vietnam. This plant is enriched with a variety of secondary metabolites (SMs, and among these SMs, terpenoids are in high abundance. Terpenoids are comprised of many valuable biomolecules which have well-established role in agriculture and pharmaceutical industry. In P. minor, for the first time, we have generated small RNAs data sets, which can be used as tool in deciphering their roles in terpenoid biosynthesis pathways. Fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum was used as elicitor to trigger SMs biosynthesis in P. minor. Raw reads and small RNA analysis data have already been deposited at GenBank under the accessions; SRX2645684 (Fusarium-treated, SRX2645685 (Fusarium-treated, SRX2645686 (mock-infected, and SRX2645687 (mock-infected.

  6. Secondary metabolites of endophytic Xylaria species with potential applications in medicine and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Rubalcava, Martha Lydia; Sánchez-Fernández, Rosa Elvira

    2017-01-01

    Fungal endophytes are important sources of bioactive secondary metabolites. The genus Xylaria Hill (ex Schrank, 1789, Xylariaceae) comprises various endophytic species associated to both vascular and non vascular plants. The secondary metabolites produced by Xylaria species include a variety of volatile and non-volatile compounds. Examples of the former are sesquiterpenoids, esters, and alcohols, among others; and of the latter we find terpenoids, cytochalasins, mellein, alkaloids, polyketides, and aromatic compounds. Some of these metabolites have shown potential activity as herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides; others possess antibacterial, antimalarial, and antifungal activities, or α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Thus metabolites from Xylaria are promising compounds for applications in agriculture for plague control as biopesticides, and biocontrol agents; and in medicine, for example as drugs for the treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases. This review seeks to show the great value of the secondary metabolites of Xylaria, particularly in the agriculture and medicine fields.

  7. Hairy root culture for mass-production of high-value secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell cultivations are being considered as an alternative to agricultural processes for producing valuable phytochemicals. Since many of these products (secondary metabolites) are obtained by direct extraction from plants grown in natural habitat, several factors can alter their yield. The use of plant cell cultures has overcome several inconveniences for the production of these secondary metabolites. Organized cultures, and especially root cultures, can make a significant contribution in the production of secondary metabolites. Most of the research efforts that use differentiated cultures instead of cell suspension cultures have focused on transformed (hairy) roots. Agrobacterium rhizogenes causes hairy root disease in plants. The neoplastic (cancerous) roots produced by A. rhizogenes infection are characterized by high growth rate, genetic stability and growth in hormone free media. These genetically transformed root cultures can produce levels of secondary metabolites comparable to that of intact plants. Hairy root cultures offer promise for high production and productivity of valuable secondary metabolites (used as pharmaceuticals, pigments and flavors) in many plants. The main constraint for commercial exploitation of hairy root cultivations is the development and scaling up of appropriate reactor vessels (bioreactors) that permit the growth of interconnected tissues normally unevenly distributed throughout the vessel. Emphasis has focused on designing appropriate bioreactors suitable to culture the delicate and sensitive plant hairy roots. Recent reactors used for mass production of hairy roots can roughly be divided as liquid-phase, gas-phase, or hybrid reactors. The present review highlights the nature, applications, perspectives and scale up of hairy root cultures for the production of valuable secondary metabolites.

  8. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meret Huber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg. decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha, and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground.

  9. A Latex Metabolite Benefits Plant Fitness under Root Herbivore Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Meret; Epping, Janina; Schulze Gronover, Christian; Fricke, Julia; Aziz, Zohra; Brillatz, Théo; Swyers, Michael; Köllner, Tobias G; Vogel, Heiko; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Robert, Christelle A M; Verhoeven, Koen; Preite, Veronica; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce large amounts of secondary metabolites in their shoots and roots and store them in specialized secretory structures. Although secondary metabolites and their secretory structures are commonly assumed to have a defensive function, evidence that they benefit plant fitness under herbivore attack is scarce, especially below ground. Here, we tested whether latex secondary metabolites produced by the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) decrease the performance of its major native insect root herbivore, the larvae of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha), and benefit plant vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Across 17 T. officinale genotypes screened by gas and liquid chromatography, latex concentrations of the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G) were negatively associated with M. melolontha larval growth. Adding purified TA-G to artificial diet at ecologically relevant concentrations reduced larval feeding. Silencing the germacrene A synthase ToGAS1, an enzyme that was identified to catalyze the first committed step of TA-G biosynthesis, resulted in a 90% reduction of TA-G levels and a pronounced increase in M. melolontha feeding. Transgenic, TA-G-deficient lines were preferred by M. melolontha and suffered three times more root biomass reduction than control lines. In a common garden experiment involving over 2,000 T. officinale individuals belonging to 17 different genotypes, high TA-G concentrations were associated with the maintenance of high vegetative and reproductive fitness under M. melolontha attack. Taken together, our study demonstrates that a latex secondary metabolite benefits plants under herbivore attack, a result that provides a mechanistic framework for root herbivore driven natural selection and evolution of plant defenses below ground.

  10. Comparison of the selected secondary metabolite content present in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of the selected secondary metabolite content present in the ... and gravimetric methods, to the effect of quantitative comparison of their phenolic, ... The extracts were also qualitatively analyzed so as to evaluate the presence of ...

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  12. Secondary metabolites of slime molds (myxomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembitsky, Valery M; Rezanka, Tomás; Spízek, Jaroslav; Hanus, Lumír O

    2005-04-01

    The compounds reported from the slime molds (myxomycetes) species are described. Almost 100 natural compounds including their chemical structures and biological activities are described in this review article. Only metabolites with a well-defined structure are included.

  13. Antibacterial activity of secondary metabolites isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... The metabolites were determined and extracted for GC analysis using the method of ... Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Bioactive ..... Ostry V (2008). Alternaria mycotoxins: an overview of chemical.

  14. Secondary Metabolites from the Root of Aralia echinocaulis Hand. -Mazz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunz hi Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The root of Aralia echinocaulis Hand. -Mazz. ( Araliaceae, are used as traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in China. A phytochemical investigation was carried out to this herb, and obtained twelve secondary metabolites, i.e., syringin (1, adenosine (2, saccharose (3, araliasaponin VII (4, araliasaponin VI (5, araliasaponin XI V (6, araliasaponin XVI (7, syringaresino l (8, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (9, coniferaldehyde (10, isovanillin (11 and β -sitosterol (12 . Their structures were determined mainly by comprehensive analyses of 1 H and 13 C NMR spectrum and comparison with available literature data or the authentic compounds . To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report that all of compounds have been isolated from the titled plant, and syringin should be one of the major active constituents of A. echinocaulis for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Secondary Metabolites of Astragalus cruciatus Link. and Their Chemotaxonomic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassila Benchadi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In continuation of our chemical studies on the secondary metabolites of Algerian saharan species, we report on the isolation, from the methanol extract of the whole plant Astragalus cruciatus Link. , of seven known compounds including two saponins named azukisaponin V (1 and astragaloside VIII (2, four flavonoids called narcissin (3, nicotiflorin (4, kaempferol 3-O- α -L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 ¦ 4- α -L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 ¦ 6-β-D-glucopyranoside (5 and 5,7,2’-trihydroxyflavone (6 and one phytosterol glycoside, daucosterol (7. All the isolated compounds were characterized by using spectroscopic methods especially 1D and 2D NMR and ESI mass spectrometry and comparison with literature data . The chemotaxonomic and systematic characters of the genus Astragalus are summarized in this study to show its interesting chemodiversity throughout the world, as well as to establish the chemotaxonomical classification of this genus.

  16. Characterization of secondary metabolites of an endophytic fungus from Curcuma wenyujin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jvfen; Qi, Ningbo; Wang, Suping; Gadhave, Kiran; Yang, Shulin

    2014-11-01

    Endophytic fungi are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and they produce a variety of secondary metabolites to protect plant communities and to show some potential for human use. However, secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi in the medicinal plant Curcuma wenyujin are sparsely explored and characterized. The aim of this study was to characterize the secondary metabolites of an active endophytic fungus. M7226, the mutant counterpart of endophytic fungus EZG0807 previously isolated from the root of C. wenyujin, was as a target strain. After fermentation, the secondary metabolites were purified using a series of purification methods including thin layer chromatography, column chromatography with silica, ODS-C18, Sephadex LH-20, and macroporous resin, and were analyzed using multiple pieces of data (UV, IR, MS, and NMR). Five compounds were isolated and identified as curcumin, cinnamic acid, 1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone, gibberellic acid, and kaempferol. Interestingly, curcumin, one of the main active ingredients of C. wenyujin, was isolated as a secondary metabolite from a fungal endophyte for the first time.

  17. Elicitation Based Enhancement of Secondary Metabolites in Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum Hairy Root Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum are well-known medicinally important plants contained important alkaloids in their different parts. Elicitation of these alkaloids is important because of associated pharmaceutical properties. Targeted metabolites were ajmaline and ajmalicine in R. serpentina; solasodine and α-solanine in S. khasianum. Objective: Enhancement of secondary metabolites through biotic and abiotic elicitors in hairy root cultures of R. serpentina and S. khasia...

  18. Elevated CO2 affects secondary metabolites in Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Liu, Tuo; Huang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    Secondary metabolites play important roles in plant interactions with the environment. The co-occurrence of heavy metal contamination of soils and rising atmospheric CO2 has important effects on plant. It is important to explore the ways in which production of plant secondary metabolites is affected by heavy metals under elevated atmospheric CO2. We examined the effects of elevated CO2 on secondary metabolite contents in Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings grown in Cd- and lead (Pb)-contaminated soils. The increase in secondary metabolites was greater under Cd + Pb exposure than under exposure to individual metals regardless of elevated CO2 with the exception of condensed tannins in leaves and total alkaloids in stems. Except for phenolic compounds and condensed tannins, elevated CO2 was associated with increased secondary metabolite contents in leaves and stems of plants exposed to Cd, Pb, and Cd + Pb compared to plants exposed to ambient CO2 + metals. Changes in saponins in leaves and alkaloids in stems were greater than changes in the other secondary metabolites. Significant interactive effects of CO2, Cd, and Pb on secondary metabolites were observed. Saponins in leaves and alkaloids in stems were more sensitive than other secondary metabolites to elevated CO2 + Cd + Pb. Elevated CO2 could modulate plant protection and defense mechanisms in R. pseudoacacia seedlings exposed to heavy metals by altering the production of secondary metabolites. The increased Cd and Pb uptake under elevated CO2 suggested that R. pseudoacacia may be used in the phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils under global environmental scenarios.

  19. Seasonal variations in nutrients and secondary metabolites in semi-arid savannas depend on year and species

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scogings, PF

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Semi-arid savannas are characterised by alternating wet and dry seasons and large inter-annual rainfall fluctuations that affect plant growth. Carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSMs) vary inversely with growth and nutrients because...

  20. Using Molecular Networking for Microbial Secondary Metabolite Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Purves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The oceans represent an understudied resource for the isolation of bacteria with the potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. In particular, actinomyces are well known to produce chemically diverse metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. This study characterised spore-forming bacteria from both Scottish and Antarctic sediments to assess the influence of isolation location on secondary metabolite production. Due to the selective isolation method used, all 85 isolates belonged to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, with the majority of isolates belonging to the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. Based on morphology, thirty-eight isolates were chosen for chemical investigation. Molecular networking based on chemical profiles (HR-MS/MS of fermentation extracts was used to compare complex metabolite extracts. The results revealed 40% and 42% of parent ions were produced by Antarctic and Scottish isolated bacteria, respectively, and only 8% of networked metabolites were shared between these locations, implying a high degree of biogeographic influence upon secondary metabolite production. The resulting molecular network contained over 3500 parent ions with a mass range of m/z 149–2558 illustrating the wealth of metabolites produced. Furthermore, seven fermentation extracts showed bioactivity against epithelial colon adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds from these understudied locations.

  1. Using Molecular Networking for Microbial Secondary Metabolite Bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Kevin; Macintyre, Lynsey; Brennan, Debra; Hreggviðsson, Guðmundur Ó; Kuttner, Eva; Ásgeirsdóttir, Margrét E; Young, Louise C; Green, David H; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; Duncan, Katherine R

    2016-01-08

    The oceans represent an understudied resource for the isolation of bacteria with the potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. In particular, actinomyces are well known to produce chemically diverse metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. This study characterised spore-forming bacteria from both Scottish and Antarctic sediments to assess the influence of isolation location on secondary metabolite production. Due to the selective isolation method used, all 85 isolates belonged to the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, with the majority of isolates belonging to the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces. Based on morphology, thirty-eight isolates were chosen for chemical investigation. Molecular networking based on chemical profiles (HR-MS/MS) of fermentation extracts was used to compare complex metabolite extracts. The results revealed 40% and 42% of parent ions were produced by Antarctic and Scottish isolated bacteria, respectively, and only 8% of networked metabolites were shared between these locations, implying a high degree of biogeographic influence upon secondary metabolite production. The resulting molecular network contained over 3500 parent ions with a mass range of m/z 149-2558 illustrating the wealth of metabolites produced. Furthermore, seven fermentation extracts showed bioactivity against epithelial colon adenocarcinoma cells, demonstrating the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive compounds from these understudied locations.

  2. Novel Approach to Classify Plants Based on Metabolite-Content Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites are bioactive substances with diverse chemical structures. Depending on the ecological environment within which they are living, higher plants use different combinations of secondary metabolites for adaptation (e.g., defense against attacks by herbivores or pathogenic microbes. This suggests that the similarity in metabolite content is applicable to assess phylogenic similarity of higher plants. However, such a chemical taxonomic approach has limitations of incomplete metabolomics data. We propose an approach for successfully classifying 216 plants based on their known incomplete metabolite content. Structurally similar metabolites have been clustered using the network clustering algorithm DPClus. Plants have been represented as binary vectors, implying relations with structurally similar metabolite groups, and classified using Ward’s method of hierarchical clustering. Despite incomplete data, the resulting plant clusters are consistent with the known evolutional relations of plants. This finding reveals the significance of metabolite content as a taxonomic marker. We also discuss the predictive power of metabolite content in exploring nutritional and medicinal properties in plants. As a byproduct of our analysis, we could predict some currently unknown species-metabolite relations.

  3. Novel Approach to Classify Plants Based on Metabolite-Content Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Huang, Ming; Nishioka, Takaaki; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are bioactive substances with diverse chemical structures. Depending on the ecological environment within which they are living, higher plants use different combinations of secondary metabolites for adaptation (e.g., defense against attacks by herbivores or pathogenic microbes). This suggests that the similarity in metabolite content is applicable to assess phylogenic similarity of higher plants. However, such a chemical taxonomic approach has limitations of incomplete metabolomics data. We propose an approach for successfully classifying 216 plants based on their known incomplete metabolite content. Structurally similar metabolites have been clustered using the network clustering algorithm DPClus. Plants have been represented as binary vectors, implying relations with structurally similar metabolite groups, and classified using Ward's method of hierarchical clustering. Despite incomplete data, the resulting plant clusters are consistent with the known evolutional relations of plants. This finding reveals the significance of metabolite content as a taxonomic marker. We also discuss the predictive power of metabolite content in exploring nutritional and medicinal properties in plants. As a byproduct of our analysis, we could predict some currently unknown species-metabolite relations.

  4. Comparative metabolic profiling reveals secondary metabolites correlated with soybean salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Yanming; Lam, Hon-Ming; Cai, Zongwei; Guo, Dianjing

    2008-12-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV-ESI-MS) and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) analysis methods were used for metabolic profiling and simultaneous identification of isoflavonoids and saponins in soybean seeds. Comparative targeted metabolic profiling revealed marked differences in the metabolite composition between salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant soybean varieties. Principle component analysis clearly demonstrated that it is possible to use secondary metabolites, for example, isoflavones and saponins, to discriminate between closely related soybean genotypes. Genistin and group B saponins were identified as the key secondary metabolites correlated with salt tolerance. These individual metabolites may provide additional insight into the salt tolerance and adaptation of plants.

  5. 内生菌与药用植物的关系及对次生代谢产物的影响%The Role of Endophytes in Medical Plants and the Effect of Endophytes on Secondary Metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏宝阳; 曹亮; 李顺祥; 黄丹; 周晋; 虢小翊

    2011-01-01

    内生菌与其宿主药用植物在长期协同进化过程中形成了互惠共生关系.在介绍内生菌与药用植物有效成分积累的关系及内生菌对药用植物次生代谢产物影响机制的基础上,探讨了内生菌对药用植物生长、抗逆性、道地性的影响,提出了当前药用植物内生菌研究中存在的问题与对策.%Endophyte and its host medicinal plants formed a mutually beneficial symbiotic relationship in the long-term co-evolution process. This paper reviewed the relationship between endophyte and the accumulation of active ingredients, and the effect mechanism of endophyte to secondary metabolites in medicinal plants. The principle of endophyte to the growth, stress resistance and genuineness of medicinal plants were discussed. The main problems and countermeasures were provided too.

  6. Secondary metabolite profiling of Alternaria dauci, A. porri, A. solani, and A. tomatophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Dongo, Anita; Pryor, Barry M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotaxonomy (secondary metabolite profiling) has been shown to be of great value in the classification and differentiation in Ascomycota. However, few studies have investigated the use of metabolite production for classification and identification purposes of plant pathogenic Alternaria species. The purpose of the present study was to describe the methodology behind metabolite profiling in chemotaxonomy using A. dauci, A. porri, A. solani, and A. tomatophila strains as examples of the group. The results confirmed that A. dauci, A. solani, and A. tomatophila are three distinct species each with their own specific metabolite profiles, and that A. solani and A. tomatophila both produce altersolanol A, altertoxin I, and macrosporin. By using automated chemical image analysis and other multivariate statistic analyses, three sets of species-specific metabolites could be selected, one each for A. dauci, A. solani, and A. tomatophila.

  7. Mining Bacterial Genomes for Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Martina; Spohn, Marius; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    With the emergence of bacterial resistance against frequently used antibiotics, novel antibacterial compounds are urgently needed. Traditional bioactivity-guided drug discovery strategies involve laborious screening efforts and display high rediscovery rates. With the progress in next generation sequencing methods and the knowledge that the majority of antibiotics in clinical use are produced as secondary metabolites by bacteria, mining bacterial genomes for secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity is a promising approach, which can guide a more time and cost-effective identification of novel compounds. However, what sounds easy to accomplish, comes with several challenges. To date, several tools for the prediction of secondary metabolite gene clusters are available, some of which are based on the detection of signature genes, while others are searching for specific patterns in gene content or regulation.Apart from the mere identification of gene clusters, several other factors such as determining cluster boundaries and assessing the novelty of the detected cluster are important. For this purpose, comparison of the predicted secondary metabolite genes with different cluster and compound databases is necessary. Furthermore, it is advisable to classify detected clusters into gene cluster families. So far, there is no standardized procedure for genome mining; however, different approaches to overcome all of these challenges exist and are addressed in this chapter. We give practical guidance on the workflow for secondary metabolite gene cluster identification, which includes the determination of gene cluster boundaries, addresses problems occurring with the use of draft genomes, and gives an outlook on the different methods for gene cluster classification. Based on comprehensible examples a protocol is set, which should enable the readers to mine their own genome data for interesting secondary metabolites.

  8. The secondary metabolite bioinformatics portal: Computational tools to facilitate synthetic biology of secondary metabolite production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann Weber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are among the most important sources of lead molecules for drug discovery. With the development of affordable whole-genome sequencing technologies and other ‘omics tools, the field of natural products research is currently undergoing a shift in paradigms. While, for decades, mainly analytical and chemical methods gave access to this group of compounds, nowadays genomics-based methods offer complementary approaches to find, identify and characterize such molecules. This paradigm shift also resulted in a high demand for computational tools to assist researchers in their daily work. In this context, this review gives a summary of tools and databases that currently are available to mine, identify and characterize natural product biosynthesis pathways and their producers based on ‘omics data. A web portal called Secondary Metabolite Bioinformatics Portal (SMBP at http://www.secondarymetabolites.org is introduced to provide a one-stop catalog and links to these bioinformatics resources. In addition, an outlook is presented how the existing tools and those to be developed will influence synthetic biology approaches in the natural products field.

  9. The Use of Secondary Metabolites Heracleum Sosnowskyi Manden in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. BUDARIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The composition of secondary metabolites Heracleum sosnowskyi include: tannins, essential oils, furanocoumarin and other agent. The greatest interest is the phenolic compounds coumarin furanocoumarin order which is known for their photosensitizing effect. Coumarins are part of hogweed. The greatest number of different kinds of coumarin was found in fruit. Researchers from the Far Eastern Branch of the RAS have been identified series of angelicin furocoumarins (sfondin, angelicin and psoralenum (bergapten, xanthotoxin, oksikumarina umbeliferon furocoumarins. In our research we have identified the influence of active substances hogweed on growth and development of different groups of plants.So experiment with biotest Heracleum sosnowskyi sap (with concentration are 1:1, 1:4, 1:16, and control - H2O stimulates energy germination of pea seeds (Vicia sativa L. - 6%, wheat (Triticum aestivum L. - 1,2%, barley (Hordeum vulgare L. - 5%, and tutsan (Hypéricum perforátum L. - 3,5% at a concentration of 1:16. The same concentration has an inhibitory effect on radish (Raphanus sativus L., chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L. and oregano (Oríganum vulgáre L..In the experiment on the effect of active substances contained in the soil under hogweed (the control is the soil where wasn’t Heracleum sosnowskyi we observed a stimulatory effect on plant growth and development of wild camomile. So biometric indicators chamomile plants was grown in the A1 horizon (topsoil differ significantly in all indicators of underlying horizons and from controls.So Heracleum sosnowskyi possessing high photosensitizing effect due to content in the bergapten, psoralen, xanthotoxin can be used for medicine along with Ammi majus as the raw material for the preparation of herbal remedies in dermatology. Also in our studies we have shown the use of active substances hogweed in agriculture as regulators growth of some plant species: camomile, wheat, pea, barley, tutsan.

  10. Accurate prediction of secondary metabolite gene clusters in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Klitgaard, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Biosynthetic pathways of secondary metabolites from fungi are currently subject to an intense effort to elucidate the genetic basis for these compounds due to their large potential within pharmaceutics and synthetic biochemistry. The preferred method is methodical gene deletions to identify suppo...... used A. nidulans for our method development and validation due to the wealth of available biochemical data, but the method can be applied to any fungus with a sequenced and assembled genome, thus supporting further secondary metabolite pathway elucidation in the fungal kingdom....

  11. Secondary metabolites as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors: A new era towards designing of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Baikar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, terpenoids, polyphenols and quinones are produced by the plants. These metabolites can be utilized as natural medicines for the reason that they inhibit the activity of DNA topoisomerase which are the clinical targets for anticancer drugs. DNA topoisomerases are the cellular enzymes that change the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Synthetic drugs as inhibitors of topoisomerases have been developed and used in the clinical trials but severe side effects are a serious problem for them therefore, there is a need for the development of novel plant-derived natural drugs and their analogs which may serve as appropriate inhibitors with respect to drug designing. The theme for this review is how secondary metabolites or natural products inactivate the action of DNA topoisomerases and open new avenues towards isolation and characterization of compounds for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  12. What roles do fungal secondary metabolites play in interactions between Ascochyta fungi and cool season food legumes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal plant pathogens produce many secondary metabolites including many that are toxic to plants (phytotoxins). Some of these phytotoxins are host-selective (toxic only to particular genotypes of host plants) and required for pathogenicity, while many others are non host-selective and toxic to many...

  13. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium corylophilum isolated from damp buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, David R; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Indoor exposure to the spores and mycelial fragments of fungi that grow on damp building materials can result in increased non-atopic asthma and upper respiratory disease. The mechanism appears to involve exposure to low doses of fungal metabolites. Penicillium corylophilum is surprisingly common in damp buildings in USA, Canada and western Europe. We examined isolates of P. corylophilum geographically distributed across Canada in the first comprehensive study of secondary metabolites of this fungus. The sesquiterpene phomenone, the meroterpenoids citreohybridonol and andrastin A, koninginin A, E and G, three new alpha pyrones and four new isochromans were identified from extracts of culture filtrates. This is the first report of koninginins, meroterpenoids and alpha pyrones from P. corylophilum. These secondary metabolite data support the removal of P. corylophilum from Penicillium section Citrina and suggest that further taxonomic studies are required on this species.

  14. Secondary metabolites from polar fractions of Piper umbellatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabopda, Turibio Kuiate; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Ngadjuic, Bonaventure Tchaleu; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2012-05-01

    Seven known secondary metabolites were isolated from the methanol extract of the branches of Piper umbellatum. The identification of these compounds was mainly achieved by 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and FAB-MS. Among them, the known cepharadiones A and B can be considered aschemotaxonomic markers of the genus Piper.

  15. Simple Method for Enhanced Production of Secondary Metabolites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iict

    2013-04-10

    Apr 10, 2013 ... media supplemented with 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) (9.0 µM) and benzyl amino purine .... and secondary metabolite content was obtained in MS .... Food. 28:45-53. Vanisree M, Lee CY, Lo SH, Nalawade SM, Lin CY, ...

  16. Genomic Analysis of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its production of secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity displayed among strains. Certain st...

  17. Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Sponge Genus Phyllospongia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Dong, Menglian; Wang, Hong; Crews, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    Phyllospongia, one of the most common marine sponges in tropical and subtropical oceans, has been shown to be a prolific producer of natural products with a broad spectrum of biological activities. This review for the first time provides a comprehensive overview of secondary metabolites produced by Phyllospongia spp. over the 37 years from 1980 to 2016. PMID:28067826

  18. Biologically active secondary metabolites from Asphodelus microcarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Mohammed M; Ma, Guoyi; El-Hela, Atef A; Mohammad, Abd-Elsalam I; Kottob, Saeid; El-Ghaly, Sayed; Cutler, Stephen J; Ross, Samir A

    2013-08-01

    Bioassay guided fractionation of the ethanolic extract of Asphodelus microcarpus Salzm.et Vivi (Asphodelaceae) resulted in the isolation of one new metabolite, 1,6-dimethoxy-3-methyl-2-naphthoic acid (1) as well as nine known compounds: asphodelin (2), chrysophanol (3), 8-methoxychrysophanol (4), emodin (5), 2-acetyl-1,8-dimethoxy-3-methylnaphthalene (6), 10-(chrysophanol-7'-yl)-10-hydroxychrysophanol-9-anthrone (7), aloesaponol-III-8-methyl ether (8), ramosin (9) and aestivin (10). The compounds were identified by 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. Compounds 3, 6 and 10 were isolated for the first time from this species. Compounds 3 and 4 showed moderate to weak antileishmanial activity with IC50 values of 14.3 and 35.1 microg/mL, respectively. Compound 4 exhibited moderate antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with an IC50 value of 15.0 microg/mL, while compounds 5, 7 and 10 showed good to potent activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with IC50 values of 6.6, 9.4 microg/mL and 1.4 microg/mL respectively. Compounds 5, 8 and 9 displayed good activity against S. aureus with IC50 values of 3.2, 7.3 and 8.5 microg/mL, respectively. Compounds 7 and 9 exhibited a potent cytotoxic activity against leukemia LH60 and K562 cell lines. Compound 10 showed potent antimalarial activities against both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum with IC50 values in the range of 0.8-0.7 microg/mL without showing any cytotoxicity to mammalian cells.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of NO Inducing Gene Expression and Secondary Metabolites in Plant%一氧化氮对植物细胞基因表达和代谢产物合成的影响机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张会巍; 曾凡锁; 詹亚光

    2012-01-01

    As a gaseous signal molecule, nitric oxide (NO) has a variety of physiological functions in plants. Many researchers have carried out extensive research on NO, it reveals that molecular mechanisms in the process of development and metabolism in plant. At the 9ame time, many studies have shown that both endogenous and exogenous NO make plant tissues or suspension cell change on the transcriptional level. High-throughput gene expression, such as transcription analysis provides strong evidence for signal pathway. In this article, we mainly reported the synthesis pathway of NO and discussed the secondary metabolites and programmed cell death, in which the changes of NO-dependent corresponding gene and protein. So it reveals that NO is an important signal molecule in plants and have a high research value.%一氧化氮(NO)作为一种气体信号分子,在植物体内具有多种生理功能,许多研究逐步揭示了NO在植物发育、新陈代谢和疾病响应等方面的分子机制.内源和外源NO都可以使植物组织或悬浮细胞基因表达发生变化,高通量的基因表达的研究,如转录分析等,为信号网络通路分析提供了有力的证据.我们简要综述了NO的合成途径,并讨论了次生代谢产物及细胞程序性死亡过程中依赖NO调控的相应基因及蛋白的变化,揭示了NO是一种重要的植物信号分子,有较高的研究价值.

  20. UV-B induced changes in the secondary metabolites of Morus alba L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xi-Da; Sun, Ming-Yao; Zhang, Lin; Fu, Hong-Wei; Cui, Lei; Chen, Run-Ze; Zhang, Da-Wei; Tian, Jing-Kui

    2010-04-27

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is harmful to plants and human beings. Many secondary metabolites, like flavonoids, alkaloids, and lignin, are UV-B absorbing compounds, which can protect the genetic material of plants. Furthermore, they are active components of herbal drugs. UV-B radiation can activate the self-protective secondary metabolism system. The results of this paper provide a method to induce bioactive secondary metabolites from mulberry leaves (Morus alba L.) by UV-B irradiation in vitro. Five significantly different chromatographic peaks were found by HPLC fingerprint after induction, from which two active compounds were identified: One was chalcomoracin, a natural Diels-Alder type adduct with antibacterial activity; the other one was moracin N, which is a precursor of chalcomoracin. Their contents were 0.818 mg/g and 0.352 mg/g by dry weight, respectively.

  1. UV-B Induced Changes in the Secondary Metabolites of Morus alba L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation is harmful to plants and human beings. Many secondary metabolites, like flavonoids, alkaloids, and lignin, are UV-B absorbing compounds, which can protect the genetic material of plants. Furthermore, they are active components of herbal drugs. UV-B radiation can activate the self-protective secondary metabolism system. The results of this paper provide a method to induce bioactive secondary metabolites from mulberry leaves (Morus alba L. by UV-B irradiation in vitro. Five significantly different chromatographic peaks were found by HPLC fingerprint after induction, from which two active compounds were identified: One was chalcomoracin, a natural Diels-Alder type adduct with antibacterial activity; the other one was moracin N, which is a precursor of chalcomoracin. Their contents were 0.818 mg/g and 0.352 mg/g by dry weight, respectively.

  2. Ultrasound-induced physiological effects and secondary metabolite (saponin) production in Panax ginseng cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Wu, J; Ho, K P; Qi, S

    2001-08-01

    This work was aimed at the effects of ultrasound (US) on the growth and secondary metabolite biosynthesis of cultured plant cells. Suspension cultures of Panax ginseng cells were exposed to US at power density below 82 mW/cm3 for short periods of time (1-4 min) in a US bath (38.5-kHz fixed frequency and 810 W maximum peak power). Under most exposure conditions, US stimulated the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, the ginsenoside saponins of ginseng cells, increasing the total saponin content of the cell by up to 75%. The growth and viability of ginseng cells were usually depressed immediately after the exposure to US, but recovered gradually to levels similar to those of a normal culture in a few days, with virtually no net loss of biomass yield at the end of the culture period. At some lower US doses, sonicated cultures could even reach slightly higher biomass yields than that of normal cultures. The effects of US on cell growth and secondary metabolite yield showed a significant correlation with the total US energy emitted (i.e., the product of US power and exposure time). Mechanical stress and microstreaming induced by acoustic cavitation were considered as the most possible causes of the various physiological effects of US on ginseng cells. In particular, the stimulation of secondary metabolite production by US may be a result of US-induced plant cell defense response.

  3. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite profiling in plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terskikh, Victor; Kermode, Allison R

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been successfully applied to profile a variety of primary and secondary metabolites in whole intact plant seeds in vivo. The nondestructive nature of NMR spectroscopy allows direct metabolic studies to be performed on the same seed throughout a given physio-logical process or key lifecycle transition, such as dormancy breakage, germination, and early postgerminative growth. Multinuclear NMR is capable of evaluating seed quality by assessing nondestructively nutrient reserves and seed protectants at seed maturity and to further monitor reserve mobilization following germination, which is critical for seedling emergence. In this chapter, we illustrate the use of several in vivo NMR techniques for metabolite profiling in seeds. Importantly, some of these methods have potential for the screening of single seeds or seed populations to identify seedlots with compromised viability either due to developmental problems or as a result of deterioration during prolonged storage.

  4. Growth under elevated air temperature alters secondary metabolites in Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y H; Jia, X; Wang, W K; Liu, T; Huang, S P; Yang, M Y

    2016-09-15

    Plant secondary metabolites play a pivotal role in growth regulation, antioxidant activity, pigment development, and other processes. As the global climate changes, increasing atmospheric temperatures and contamination of soil by heavy metals co-occur in natural ecosystems, which alters the pH of rhizosphere soil and influences the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Elevated temperatures in combination with heavy metals are expected to affect plant secondary metabolites, but this issue has not been extensively examined. Here, we investigated secondary metabolites in Robiniapseudoacacia seedlings exposed to elevated temperatures using a passive warming device in combination with Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils. Heavy metals significantly stimulated the accumulation of saponins, phenolic compounds, and flavonoids in leaves and stems; alkaloid compounds increased in leaves and decreased in stems, and condensed tannins fluctuated. Elevated temperatures, alone and in combination with Cd and Pb, caused increases in secondary metabolites in the plant tissues. Phenolic compounds showed the greatest changes among the secondary metabolites and significant interactive effects of temperature and metals were observed. These results suggest that slightly elevated temperature could enhance protective and defense mechanisms of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings exposed to heavy metals by stimulating the production of secondary metabolites.

  5. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    -defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity......Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well...

  6. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM).

  7. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well......-defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity...

  8. QUANTIFICATION OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY METABOLITES FROM LEAVES AND STEM BARK OF COCHLOSPERMUM RELIGIOSUM (L ALSTON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasikala A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical constituents are responsible for medicinal activity of plant species. Hence the present study quantification of primary and secondary metabolites from leaves and stem bark of Cochlospermum religiosum was carried out. The results showed that the leaf was rich in chlorophylls followed by lipids, proteins and carbohydrates whereas in stem bark highest amount found in chlorophylls followed by carbohydrates, proteins and lipids of primary metabolites. Cochlospermum religiosum leaf was rich in phenols followed by alkaloids, flavonoids and tannins whereas in stem bark highest amount found in phenols followed by flavonoids, alkaloids and tannins of secondary metabolites. The results suggest that phytochemical properties for curing various ailments and possess potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and leads to the isolation of new and novel compounds.

  9. Maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and induction of cytoprotectants and secondary metabolites in alachlor-treated GmGSTU4-overexpressing tobacco plants, as resolved by metabolomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissoudis, Christos; Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Flemetakis, Emmanouil; Madesis, Panagiotis; Labrou, N.E.; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Nianiou-Obeidat, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Herbicides are an invaluable tool for agricultural production scaling up. However, their continuous and intensive use has led to an increased incidence of herbicide resistant weeds and environmental pollution. Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) are tightly connected with crop and weed herbicid

  10. Ecologically relevant UV-B dose combined with high PAR intensity distinctly affect plant growth and accumulation of secondary metabolites in leaves of Centella asiatica L. Urban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viola; Albert, Andreas; Barbro Winkler, J; Lankes, Christa; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2013-10-05

    We investigated the effects of environmentally relevant dose of ultraviolet (UV)-B and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) on saponin accumulation in leaves on the example of Centella asiatica L. Urban. For this purpose, plants were exposed to one of four light regimes i.e., two PAR intensities with or without UV-B radiation. The experiment was conducted in technically complex sun simulators under almost natural irradiance and climatic conditions. As observed, UV-B radiation increased herb and leaf production as well as the content of epidermal flavonols, which was monitored by non-destructive fluorescence measurements. Specific fluorescence indices also indicate an increase in the content of anthocyanins under high PAR; this increase was likewise observed for the saponin concentrations. In contrast, UV-B radiation had no distinct effects on saponin and sapogenin concentrations. Our findings suggest that besides flavonoids, also saponins were accumulated under high PAR protecting the plant from oxidative damage. Furthermore, glycosylation of sapogenins seems to be important either for the protective function and/or for compartmentalization of the compounds. Moreover, our study revealed that younger leaves contain higher amounts of saponins, while in older leaves the sapogenins were the most abundant constituents. Concluding, our results proof that ambient dose of UV-B and high PAR intensity distinctly affect the accumulation of flavonoids and saponins, enabling the plant tissue to adapt to the light conditions.

  11. Identification, quantification, spatiotemporal distribution and genetic variation of major latex secondary metabolites in the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Meret; Triebwasser-Freese, Daniella; Reichelt, Michael; Heiling, Sven; Paetz, Christian; Chandran, Jima N; Bartram, Stefan; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Erb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The secondary metabolites in the roots, leaves and flowers of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale agg.) have been studied in detail. However, little is known about the specific constituents of the plant's highly specialized laticifer cells. Using a combination of liquid and gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, we identified and quantified the major secondary metabolites in the latex of different organs across different growth stages in three genotypes, and tested the activity of the metabolites against the generalist root herbivore Diabrotica balteata. We found that common dandelion latex is dominated by three classes of secondary metabolites: phenolic inositol esters (PIEs), triterpene acetates (TritAc) and the sesquiterpene lactone taraxinic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester (TA-G). Purification and absolute quantification revealed concentrations in the upper mgg(-1) range for all compound classes with up to 6% PIEs, 5% TritAc and 7% TA-G per gram latex fresh weight. Contrary to typical secondary metabolite patterns, concentrations of all three classes increased with plant age. The highest concentrations were measured in the main root. PIE profiles differed both quantitatively and qualitatively between plant genotypes, whereas TritAc and TA-G differed only quantitatively. Metabolite concentrations were positively correlated within and between the different compound classes, indicating tight biosynthetic co-regulation. Latex metabolite extracts strongly repelled D. balteata larvae, suggesting that the latex constituents are biologically active. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Crop-ecology and nutritional variability influence growth and secondary metabolites of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Probir Kumar; Kumar, Rajender; Guleria, Vipan; Mahajan, Mitali; Prasad, Ramdeen; Pathania, Vijaylata; Gill, Baljinder Singh; Singh, Devinder; Chand, Gopi; Singh, Bikram; Singh, Rakesh Deosharan; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh

    2015-02-27

    Plant nutrition and climatic conditions play important roles on the growth and secondary metabolites of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni); however, the nutritional dose is strongly governed by the soil properties and climatic conditions of the growing region. In northern India, the interactive effects of crop ecology and plant nutrition on yield and secondary metabolites of stevia are not yet properly understood. Thus, a field experiment comprising three levels of nitrogen, two levels of phosphorus and three levels of potassium was conducted at three locations to ascertain whether the spatial and nutritional variability would dominate the leaf yield and secondary metabolites profile of stevia. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that the applications of 90 kg N, 40 kg P2O5 and 40 kg K2O ha-1 are the best nutritional conditions in terms of dry leaf yield for CSIR-IHBT (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research- Institute Himalayan Bioresource Technology) and RHRS (Regional Horticultural Research Station) conditions. The spatial variability also exerted considerable effect on the leaf yield and stevioside content in leaves. Among the three locations, CSIR-IHBT was found most suitable in case of dry leaf yield and secondary metabolites accumulation in leaves. The results suggest that dry leaf yield and accumulation of stevioside are controlled by the environmental factors and agronomic management; however, the accumulation of rebaudioside-A (Reb-A) is not much influenced by these two factors. Thus, leaf yield and secondary metabolite profiles of stevia can be improved through the selection of appropriate growing locations and proper nutrient management.

  13. Secondary metabolites from three Florida sponges with antidepressant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowska, Anna J; Rao, Karumanchi V; Childress, Suzanne; El-Alfy, Abir; Matsumoto, Rae R; Kelly, Michelle; Stewart, Gina S; Sufka, Kenneth J; Hamann, Mark T

    2008-02-01

    Brominated indole alkaloids are a common class of metabolites reported from sponges of the order Verongida. Herein we report the isolation, structure determination, and activity of metabolites from three Florida sponges, namely, Verongula rigida (order Verongida, family Aplysinidae), Smenospongia aurea, and S. cerebriformis (order Dictyoceratida, family Thorectidae). All three species were investigated chemically, revealing similarities in secondary metabolites. Brominated compounds, as well as sesquiterpene quinones and hydroquinones, were identified from both V. rigida and S. aurea despite their apparent taxonomic differences at the ordinal level. Similar metabolites found in these distinct sponge species of two different genera provide evidence for a microbial origin of the metabolites. Isolated compounds were evaluated in the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) and the chick anxiety-depression continuum model. Among the isolated compounds, 5,6-dibromo- N,N-dimethyltryptamine ( 1) exhibited significant antidepressant-like action in the rodent FST model, while 5-bromo- N,N-dimethyltryptamine ( 2) caused significant reduction of locomotor activity indicative of a potential sedative action. The current study provides ample evidence that marine natural products with the diversity of brominated marine alkaloids will provide potential leads for antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs.

  14. Secondary Metabolites from Inula britannica L. and Their Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Ha Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Inula britannica L., family Asteraceae, is used in traditional Chinese and Kampo Medicines for various diseases. Flowers or the aerial parts are a rich source of secondary metabolites. These consist mainly of terpenoids (sesquiterpene lactones and dimmers, diterpenes and triterpenoids and flavonoids. The isolated compounds have shown diverse biological activities: anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and hepatoprotective activities. This review provides information on isolated bioactive phytochemicals and pharmacological potentials of I. britannica.

  15. Bioactive secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Chaetomium sp. isolated from Salvia officinalis growing in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebel R.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the chemical investigation and cytotoxic activity of the secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Chaetomium sp. isolated from Salvia officinalis growing in Morocco. This plant was collected from the Beni-Mellal Mountain in Morocco and belongs to the Lamiaceae family and is named in Morocco “Salmia”. The endophytic fungus Chaetomium sp. was isolated from the tissues of the stem of this plant. The fungal strain was identified by PCR. The crude organic extract of the fungal strain was proven to be active when tested for cytotoxicity against L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Chemical investigation of the secondary metabolites showed that cochliodinol is the main component beside isocochliodinol. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined on the basis of NMR analysis (1H, 13C, COSY and HMBC as well as by mass spectrometry using ESI (Electron Spray Ionisation as source.

  16. Spectral effects of supplementary lighting on the secondary metabolites in roses, chrysanthemums, and campanulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the light spectrum on photosynthesis, growth, and secondary metabolites Rosa hybrida ‘Scarlet’, Chrysanthemum morifolium ‘Coral Charm’, and Campanula portenschlagiana ‘BluOne’ were grown at 24/18 ◦C day/night temperature under purpose-built LED arrays yielding...... approximately 200 mol m−2 s−1 at plant height for 16 h per day. The four light treatments were (1) 40% Blue/60% Red, (2) 20% Blue/80% Red, (3) 100% Red, and (4) 100% White (Control). The plant height was smallest in 40% Blue/60% Red in roses and chrysanthemums, while the biomass was smallest in the white...... the stomatal conductance though net photosynthesis was unaffected, indicating excess stomatal conductance in some treatments. With higher blue light ratio all phenolic acids and flavonoids increased. In view of the roles of these secondary metabolites as antioxidants, anti-pathogens, and light protectants, we...

  17. Unraveling the efficient applications of secondary metabolites of various Trichoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Chetan; Mishra, Sandhya; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Surya Pratap; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2014-01-01

    Recent shift in trends of agricultural practices from application of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides to organic farming has brought into focus the use of microorganisms that carryout analogous function. Trichoderma spp. is one of the most popular genera of fungi commercially available as a plant growth promoting fungus (PGPF) and biological control agent. Exploitation of the diverse nature of secondary metabolites produced by different species of Trichoderma augments their extensive utility in agriculture and related industries. As a result, Trichoderma has achieved significant success as a powerful biocontrol agent at global level. The endorsement of Trichoderma spp. by scientific community is based on the understanding of its mechanisms of action against a large set of fungal, bacterial and in certain cases viral infections. However, it is still an agnostic view that there could be any single major mode of operation, although it is argued that all mechanisms operate simultaneously in a synchronized fashion. The central idea behind this review article is to emphasize the potentiality of applications of target specific secondary metabolites of Trichoderma for controlling phytopathogens as a substitute of commercially available whole organism formulations. With the aim to this point, we have compiled an inclusive list of secondary metabolites produced by different species of Trichoderma and their applications in diverse areas with the major emphasis on agriculture. Outlining the importance and diverse activities of secondary metabolites of Trichoderma besides its relevance to agriculture would generate greater understanding of their other important and beneficial applications apart from target specific biopesticides.

  18. Identification of wild chamomile species and secondary metabolites in Bushehr province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Kohanmoo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chamomile is medicinal and hygienic plants which have anti -inflammatory and anti-spasmodic characteristics. Its secondary metabolites (and etc. were varied by biodiversity and environmental effect. There is little information about the wild chamomile in natural habitats of the Bushehr province. In this study, different chamomile species were selected for essential oil content and active substances. Material and methods: In this field study, several samples of chamomile from different natural habitats were collected and screened for extraction of essential oil and secondary metabolites. The essential oil and methanolic extract were prepared by water distillation liquid and flask reflux condenser stirrer, respectively these were determined by the United States and Iran pharmacopeia methods. Essential oil and methanolic extract were analyzed by GC/Mass and HPLC devices, respectively. Results: Four species, Anthemis pseudocotula, Anthemis austro-iranica, Matricaria recotita and Matricaria aurea were indicated based on screening methods. Matricaria species was observed to have essential oil and beneficiary secondary metabolites, but were not observed to be present in Anthemis species. Results of the chemical analysis showed that, Matricaria species contained Essential oil (0.6 %, Apigenin 7-Glycoside (0.62%, Chamazulen (5.5% and other substances such as derivatives of Bisabolole , Bisaboleneand Farenzene. Conclusion: Two species of wild chamomiles, Matricaria recotita and Matricaria aurea, were found in Bushehr province containing significant amount of essential oil and secondary metabolites such as Chamazulen, -αBisabolole and Apigenin. Thus these species can be cultivated for commercial proposes.

  19. The past, present and future of secondary metabolite research in the Dothideomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muria-Gonzalez, Mariano Jordi; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Breen, Susan; Solomon, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    The Dothideomycetes represents a large and diverse array of fungi in which prominent plant pathogens are over-represented. Species within the Cochliobolus, Alternaria, Pyrenophora and Mycosphaerella (amongst others) all cause diseases that threaten food security in many parts of the world. Significant progress has been made over the past decade in understanding how some of these pathogens cause disease at a molecular level. It is reasonable to suggest that much of this progress can be attributed to the increased availability of genome sequences. However, together with revealing mechanisms of pathogenicity, these genome sequences have also highlighted the capacity of the Dothideomycetes to produce an extensive array of secondary metabolites, far greater than originally thought. Indeed, it is now clear that we appear to have only scratched the surface to date in terms of the identification of secondary metabolites produced by these fungi. In the first half of this review, we examine the current status of secondary metabolite research in the Dothideomycetes and highlight the diversity of the molecules discovered thus far, in terms of both structure and biological activity. In the second part of this review, we survey the emerging techniques and technologies that will be required to shed light on the vast array of secondary metabolite potential that is encoded within these genomes. Experimental design, analytical chemistry and synthetic biology are all discussed in the context of how they will contribute to this field.

  20. Bryozoans, the remedy hidden treasures of oceans: secondary metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhosean Mohebbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bryozoans, commonly known as “moss animals”, are typically aquatic, filter feeding, sessile, colonial marine animals. Although, they are a rich resource of new bioactive secondary metabolites, but studies on their secondary metabolite have been neglected. Although over 8000 species are known, the lowest numbers of novel compounds were isolated from the phylum Bryozoa. In addition, presently nothing is recognized regarding the origin of the bioactive compounds isolated by bryozoans. At present nothing is known regarding the origin of the natural products isolated by bryozoans. The most famous of compounds obtained from these organisms are macrolide lactones of Bryostatins. They are potent modulators of protein kinase C. The amazing compounds such as Flustramines, Hinckdentine, Convolutamines, Kororamides, Chatellines, Chartellamides, Convolutamines, Convolutamidines, euthyroideone, amathaspiramide, lutamides, Volutamides, tambjamines, Phidolopins, and dozens of other compounds with different biological properties have been obtained. Very few studies have been done on these treasures in the sea depth, and more studies need to be done on them for access to their secondary metabolites.

  1. A combined genetic and multi medium approach revels new secondary metabolites in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    Secondary metabolites are a diverse group of metabolites which serve as important natural sources of drugs for treating diseases. The availability of full genome sequences of several filamentous fungi has revealed a large genetic potential for production of secondary metabolites that are not obse......Secondary metabolites are a diverse group of metabolites which serve as important natural sources of drugs for treating diseases. The availability of full genome sequences of several filamentous fungi has revealed a large genetic potential for production of secondary metabolites...

  2. Metabolite Profiles in Various Plant Organs of Justicia gendarussa Burm.f. and Its in Vitro Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrayoni, Putu; Purwanti, Diah Intan; Wongso, Suwidji; Prajogo, Bambang E W; Indrayanto, Gunawan

    2016-04-13

    Metabolite profiles of plant organs and their in vitro cultures of Justicia gendarussa have been studied by using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time-of-Flight-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Qtof-MS). Samples of leaves, stems, roots, and shoot cultures showed similar patterns of metabolites, while samples of root cultures gave very different profiles. Concentrations of secondary metabolites in shoot cultures were relatively low compared to those in the leaves and roots of the plants. The results suggested that secondary metabolites in J. gendarussa were biosynthetized in the leaves, then transported to the roots.

  3. Natural plant genetic engineer Agrobacterium rhizogenes: role of T-DNA in plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sheela

    2012-03-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes is a natural plant genetic engineer. It is a gram-negative soil bacterium that induces hairy root formation. Success has been obtained in exploring the molecular mechanisms of transferred DNA (T-DNA) transfer, interaction with host plant proteins, plant defense signaling and integration to plant genome for successful plant genetic transformation. T-DNA and corresponding expression of rol genes alter morphology and plant host secondary metabolism. During transformation, there is a differential loss of a few T-DNA genes. Loss of a few ORFs drastically affect the growth and morphological patterns of hairy roots, expression pattern of biosynthetic pathway genes and accumulation of specific secondary metabolites.

  4. Amino Acid and Secondary Metabolite Production in Embryogenic and Non-Embryogenic Callus of Fingerroot Ginger (Boesenbergia rotunda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Lee Mei Ng

    Full Text Available Interest in the medicinal properties of secondary metabolites of Boesenbergia rotunda (fingerroot ginger has led to investigations into tissue culture of this plant. In this study, we profiled its primary and secondary metabolites, as well as hormones of embryogenic and non-embryogenic (dry and watery callus and shoot base, Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry together with histological characterization. Metabolite profiling showed relatively higher levels of glutamine, arginine and lysine in embryogenic callus than in dry and watery calli, while shoot base tissue showed an intermediate level of primary metabolites. For the five secondary metabolites analyzed (ie. panduratin, pinocembrin, pinostrobin, cardamonin and alpinetin, shoot base had the highest concentrations, followed by watery, dry and embryogenic calli. Furthermore, intracellular auxin levels were found to decrease from dry to watery calli, followed by shoot base and finally embryogenic calli. Our morphological observations showed the presence of fibrils on the cell surface of embryogenic callus while diphenylboric acid 2-aminoethylester staining indicated the presence of flavonoids in both dry and embryogenic calli. Periodic acid-Schiff staining showed that shoot base and dry and embryogenic calli contained starch reserves while none were found in watery callus. This study identified several primary metabolites that could be used as markers of embryogenic cells in B. rotunda, while secondary metabolite analysis indicated that biosynthesis pathways of these important metabolites may not be active in callus and embryogenic tissue.

  5. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony eChamoun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction four and five days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s (DKPs cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile, ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia four days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated one day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism four and five days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogues, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles.

  6. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Rony; Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction 4 and 5 days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s) (DKPs) cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu)/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile), ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia 4 days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated 1 day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism 4 and 5 days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogs, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles. PMID:25972848

  7. Effects of plants containing secondary compounds and plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanapat, Metha; Kongmun, Pongthon; Poungchompu, Onanong; Cherdthong, Anusorn; Khejornsart, Pichad; Pilajun, Ruangyote; Kaenpakdee, Sujittra

    2012-03-01

    A number of experiments have been conducted to investigate effects of tropical plants containing condensed tannins and/or saponins present in tropical plants and some plant oils on rumen fermentation and ecology in ruminants. Based on both in vitro and in vivo trials, the results revealed important effects on rumen microorganisms and fermentation including methane production. Incorporation and/or supplementation of these plants containing secondary metabolites have potential for improving rumen ecology and subsequently productivity in ruminants.

  8. Biotechnological and industrial significance of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered to be a rich source of novel metabolites of a great importance from a biotechnological and industrial point of view. Some cyanobacterial secondary metabolites (CSMs), exhibit toxic effects on living organisms. A diverse range of these cyanotoxins may have ecological roles as allelochemicals, and could be employed for the commercial development of compounds with applications such as algaecides, herbicides and insecticides. Recently, cyanobacteria have become an attractive source of innovative classes of pharmacologically active compounds showing interesting and exciting biological activities ranging from antibiotics, immunosuppressant, and anticancer, antiviral, antiinflammatory to proteinase-inhibiting agents. A different but not less interesting property of these microorganisms is their capacity of overcoming the toxicity of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) by means of UV-absorbing/screening compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and scytonemin. These last two compounds are true 'multipurpose' secondary metabolites and considered to be natural photoprotectants. In this sense, they may be biotechnologically exploited by the cosmetic industry. Overall CSMs are striking targets in biotechnology and biomedical research, because of their potential applications in agriculture, industry, and especially in pharmaceuticals.

  9. Combinatorial biosynthesis of medicinal plant secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Koulman, Albert; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial biosynthesis is a new tool in the generation of novel natural products and for the production of rare and expensive natural products. The basic concept is combining metabolic pathways in different organisms on a genetic level. As a consequence heterologous organisms provide precursors

  10. Combinatorial biosynthesis of medicinal plant secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Koulman, Albert; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial biosynthesis is a new tool in the generation of novel natural products and for the production of rare and expensive natural products. The basic concept is combining metabolic pathways in different organisms on a genetic level. As a consequence heterologous organisms provide precursors

  11. A breath fungal secondary metabolite signature to diagnose invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sophia; Thomas, Horatio R; Daniels, S David; Lynch, Robert C; Fortier, Sean M; Shea, Margaret M; Rearden, Preshious; Comolli, James C; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M

    2014-12-15

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains a leading cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients, in part due to the difficulty of diagnosing this infection. Using thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we characterized the in vitro volatile metabolite profile of Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common cause of IA, and other pathogenic aspergilli. We prospectively collected breath samples from patients with suspected invasive fungal pneumonia from 2011 to 2013, and assessed whether we could discriminate patients with proven or probable IA from patients without aspergillosis, as determined by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group consensus definitions, by direct detection of fungal volatile metabolites in these breath samples. The monoterpenes camphene, α- and β-pinene, and limonene, and the sesquiterpene compounds α- and β-trans-bergamotene were distinctive volatile metabolites of A. fumigatus in vitro, distinguishing it from other pathogenic aspergilli. Of 64 patients with suspected invasive fungal pneumonia based on host risk factors, clinical symptoms, and radiologic findings, 34 were diagnosed with IA, whereas 30 were ultimately diagnosed with other causes of pneumonia, including other invasive mycoses. Detection of α-trans-bergamotene, β-trans-bergamotene, a β-vatirenene-like sesquiterpene, or trans-geranylacetone identified IA patients with 94% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 81%-98%) and 93% specificity (95% CI, 79%-98%). In patients with suspected fungal pneumonia, an Aspergillus secondary metabolite signature in breath can identify individuals with IA. These results provide proof-of-concept that direct detection of exogenous fungal metabolites in breath can be used as a novel, noninvasive, pathogen-specific approach to identifying the precise microbial cause of pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

  12. Metabolomic tools for secondary metabolite discovery from marine microbial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, Lynsey; Zhang, Tong; Viegelmann, Christina; Martinez, Ignacio Juarez; Cheng, Cheng; Dowdells, Catherine; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadam; Gernert, Christine; Hentschel, Ute; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie

    2014-06-05

    Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR 1H and correlation spectroscopy (COSY) were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening.

  13. Metabolomic Tools for Secondary Metabolite Discovery from Marine Microbial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey Macintyre

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrate-associated symbiotic bacteria produce a plethora of novel secondary metabolites which may be structurally unique with interesting pharmacological properties. Selection of strains usually relies on literature searching, genetic screening and bioactivity results, often without considering the chemical novelty and abundance of secondary metabolites being produced by the microorganism until the time-consuming bioassay-guided isolation stages. To fast track the selection process, metabolomic tools were used to aid strain selection by investigating differences in the chemical profiles of 77 bacterial extracts isolated from cold water marine invertebrates from Orkney, Scotland using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Following mass spectrometric analysis and dereplication using an Excel macro developed in-house, principal component analysis (PCA was employed to differentiate the bacterial strains based on their chemical profiles. NMR 1H and correlation spectroscopy (COSY were also employed to obtain a chemical fingerprint of each bacterial strain and to confirm the presence of functional groups and spin systems. These results were then combined with taxonomic identification and bioassay screening data to identify three bacterial strains, namely Bacillus sp. 4117, Rhodococcus sp. ZS402 and Vibrio splendidus strain LGP32, to prioritize for scale-up based on their chemically interesting secondary metabolomes, established through dereplication and interesting bioactivities, determined from bioassay screening.

  14. Understanding Boswellia papyrifera tree secondary metabolites through bark spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans

    2015-07-01

    Decision makers are concerned whether to tap or rest Boswellia Papyrifera trees. Tapping for the production of frankincense is known to deplete carbon reserves from the tree leading to production of less viable seeds, tree carbon starvation and ultimately tree mortality. Decision makers use traditional experience without considering the amount of metabolites stored or depleted from the stem-bark of the tree. This research was designed to come up with a non-destructive B. papyrifera tree metabolite estimation technique relevant for management using spectroscopy. The concentration of biochemicals (metabolites) found in the tree bark was estimated through spectral analysis. Initially, a random sample of 33 trees was selected, the spectra of bark measured with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) spectrometer. Bark samples were air dried and ground. Then, 10 g of sample was soaked in Petroleum ether to extract crude metabolites. Further chemical analysis was conducted to quantify and isolate pure metabolite compounds such as incensole acetate and boswellic acid. The crude metabolites, which relate to frankincense produce, were compared to plant properties (such as diameter and crown area) and reflectance spectra of the bark. Moreover, the extract was compared to the ASD spectra using partial least square regression technique (PLSR) and continuum removed spectral analysis. The continuum removed spectral analysis were performed, on two wavelength regions (1275-1663 and 1836-2217) identified through PLSR, using absorption features such as band depth, area, position, asymmetry and the width to characterize and find relationship with the bark extracts. The results show that tree properties such as diameter at breast height (DBH) and the crown area of untapped and healthy trees were strongly correlated to the amount of stored crude metabolites. In addition, the PLSR technique applied to the first derivative transformation of the reflectance spectrum was found to estimate the

  15. New Benzoxazine Secondary Metabolites from an Arctic Actinomycete

    OpenAIRE

    Kyuho Moon; Chan-Hong Ahn; Yoonho Shin; Tae Hyung Won; Keebeom Ko; Sang Kook Lee; Ki-Bong Oh; Jongheon Shin; Seung-Il Nam; Dong-Chan Oh

    2014-01-01

    Two new secondary metabolites, arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromophore-V (2), were isolated along with C-1027 chromophore-III and fijiolides A and B (3–5) from a culture of an Arctic marine actinomycete Streptomyces strain. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated through NMR, mass, UV, and IR spectroscopy. The hexose moieties in 1 were determined to be d-glucose from a combination of acid hydrolysis, derivatization, and gas chromatographic analyses. Arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromo...

  16. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  17. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum). The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol) and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines). Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites. PMID:22852578

  18. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid; Ali; Khan; Nafees; Bacha; Bashir; Ahmad; Ghosia; Lutfullah; Umar; Farooq; Russell; John; Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites.Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions.The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques,for example,homologous and heterologous expressions.This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites:also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  19. Fungi as chemical industries and genetic engineering for the production of biologically active secondary metabolites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abid Ali Khan; Nafees Bacha; Bashir Ahmad; Ghosia Lutfullah; Umar Farooq; Russell John Cox

    2014-01-01

    Fungi is somewhere in between the micro and macro organisms which is a good source of producing biologically active secondary metabolites. Fungi have been used as tool for producing different types of secondary metabolites by providing different nutrients at different laboratory conditions. The fungi have been engineered for the desired secondary metabolites by using different laboratory techniques, for example, homologous and heterologous expressions. This review reported how the fungi are used as chemical industry for the production of secondary metabolites and how they are engineered in laboratory for the production of desirable metabolites;also the biosynthetic pathways of the bio-organic-molecules were reported.

  20. Plant Secondary Compounds in Small Ruminant Feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravador, Rufielyn Sungcaya

    oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids, which is vulnerable to oxidation, and from the associated deterioration of meat colour and proteins, thus antioxidants are crucial in preserving the nutritive value and extending the shelf life of the meat. The increasing costs of feedstuffs for livestock led...... evaluated. These plant-derived materials contain considerable amounts of secondary bioactive metabolites, which affect the fatty acid composition and/or act as antioxidants. Hence, it was hypothesized that at appropriate levels of inclusion in to the lamb diets, these feedstuffs would not negatively affect...... animal health and productivity, and would represent a strategy to naturally produce a healthy and oxidatively stable meat. In the first study (Experiment 1), Comisana male lambs were fed for 60 days: a conventional cereal-based concentrate diet, or concentrates in which 24% or 35% dried citrus pulp...

  1. Changing trends in biotechnology of secondary metabolism in medicinal and aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sumit G; Mahajan, Vidushi; Bedi, Yashbir S

    2015-02-01

    Medicinal and aromatic plants are known to produce secondary metabolites that find uses as flavoring agents, fragrances, insecticides, dyes and drugs. Biotechnology offers several choices through which secondary metabolism in medicinal plants can be altered in innovative ways, to overproduce phytochemicals of interest, to reduce the content of toxic compounds or even to produce novel chemicals. Detailed investigation of chromatin organization and microRNAs affecting biosynthesis of secondary metabolites as well as exploring cryptic biosynthetic clusters and synthetic biology options, may provide additional ways to harness this resource. Plant secondary metabolites are a fascinating class of phytochemicals exhibiting immense chemical diversity. Considerable enigma regarding their natural biological functions and the vast array of pharmacological activities, amongst other uses, make secondary metabolites interesting and important candidates for research. Here, we present an update on changing trends in the biotechnological approaches that are used to understand and exploit the secondary metabolism in medicinal and aromatic plants. Bioprocessing in the form of suspension culture, organ culture or transformed hairy roots has been successful in scaling up secondary metabolite production in many cases. Pathway elucidation and metabolic engineering have been useful to get enhanced yield of the metabolite of interest; or, for producing novel metabolites. Heterologous expression of putative plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes in a microbe is useful to validate their functions, and in some cases, also, to produce plant metabolites in microbes. Endophytes, the microbes that normally colonize plant tissues, may also produce the phytochemicals produced by the host plant. The review also provides perspectives on future research in the field.

  2. The Effects of Plant Secondary Compounds on Herbivorous Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oğuzhan Yanar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed mechanical and chemical defense strategies that are effective against herbivores. Plants contain chemicals that are known as secondary metabolites (allelochemical and these chemicals do not directly involve in organisms’ reproduction and growth, on the other hand, they affect survival, growth and behavior of species. These compounds usually take ecological tasks and plants use these compounds against diseases, parasites, and predators for interspecies competition. It is known through the observations on feeding of herbivorous insects that these compounds act as deterrent chemicals or they are toxic against them. Feeding is one of the most fundamental and the most important behaviors for herbivorous insects. Even though host plant preference of herbivores is partially depend on nutrients, this behavior greatly depends on secondary chemistry of plants. Effects of secondary compounds on herbivorous insects can be positive or negative.

  3. Quantitative changes of secondary metabolites of Matricaria chamomilla by abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasová, Adriana; Repcák, Miroslav; Pastírová, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The responses of young plants of diploid and tetraploid Matricaria chamomilla cultivars to abiotic stress were studied. The course of quantitative changes of main leaf secondary metabolites was evaluated within an interval from 6 h before to 54 h after spraying the leaf rosettes with aqueous CuCl2 solution. The content of herniarin in the treated plants rose approximately 3 times, simultaneously with a decline of its precursor (Z)- and (E)-2-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-methoxycinnamic acid. The highest amounts of umbelliferone in stressed plants exceeded 9 times and 20 times those observed in control plants of the tetraploid and diploid cultivar, respectively. Due to stress the concentration of ene-yne-dicycloether in leaves decreased by more than 40%. The pattern of quantity changes of the examined compounds in tetraploid and diploid plants was similar.

  4. DNA interaction with saffron's secondary metabolites safranal, crocetin, and dimethylcrocetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, Charalabos D; Tarantilis, Petros A; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Polissiou, Moschos G

    2007-01-01

    Saffron comes from the dried red stigmas of the Crocus sativus L. flower. Except for its use in cooking and in traditional medicine, it has numerous applications as an antitoxic, antioxidant, and anticancer agent due to its secondary metabolites and their derivatives (safranal, crocins, crocetin, dimethylcrocetin). However, there has been no information on the interactions of these secondary metabolites with individual DNA at molecular level. This study was designed to examine the interaction of safranal, crocetin (CRT), and dimethylcrocetin (DMCRT) with calf-thymus DNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various drug/DNA(phosphate) molar ratios from 1/48 to 1/2. FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopic methods are used to determine the drug binding sites, the binding constants, and the effects of carotenoids and safranal complexation on the stability and conformation of DNA duplex. Both intercalative and external binding modes were observed, with overall binding constants K(safranal) = 1.24 x 10(3) M(-1), K(CRT) = 6.2 x 10(3) M(-1) and K(DMCRT) = 1.85 x 10(5) M(-1) A partial B- to A-DNA transition occurs at high carotenoids and safranal concentrations.

  5. Accurate prediction of secondary metabolite gene clusters in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mikael R; Nielsen, Jakob B; Klitgaard, Andreas; Petersen, Lene M; Zachariasen, Mia; Hansen, Tilde J; Blicher, Lene H; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Larsen, Thomas O; Nielsen, Kristian F; Mortensen, Uffe H

    2013-01-02

    Biosynthetic pathways of secondary metabolites from fungi are currently subject to an intense effort to elucidate the genetic basis for these compounds due to their large potential within pharmaceutics and synthetic biochemistry. The preferred method is methodical gene deletions to identify supporting enzymes for key synthases one cluster at a time. In this study, we design and apply a DNA expression array for Aspergillus nidulans in combination with legacy data to form a comprehensive gene expression compendium. We apply a guilt-by-association-based analysis to predict the extent of the biosynthetic clusters for the 58 synthases active in our set of experimental conditions. A comparison with legacy data shows the method to be accurate in 13 of 16 known clusters and nearly accurate for the remaining 3 clusters. Furthermore, we apply a data clustering approach, which identifies cross-chemistry between physically separate gene clusters (superclusters), and validate this both with legacy data and experimentally by prediction and verification of a supercluster consisting of the synthase AN1242 and the prenyltransferase AN11080, as well as identification of the product compound nidulanin A. We have used A. nidulans for our method development and validation due to the wealth of available biochemical data, but the method can be applied to any fungus with a sequenced and assembled genome, thus supporting further secondary metabolite pathway elucidation in the fungal kingdom.

  6. Secondary Metabolites and Bioactivity of Hyophila involuta (Hook Jaeg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos M. MAKINDE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical screening of Hyophila involuta collected from the Biological Garden of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, was carried out to investigate the presence or absence of some secondary metabolites and its antibiotic potentials, using different extracts (with acetone and ethanol on selected organisms. The extracts obtained were screened for the presence of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, anthraquinones, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, phlobatanins, saponins, steroids, tannins, triterpenes and xanthoproteins. Antimicrobial activity of the extracts was carried out on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus flavus and Candida albicans. Only acetone extract tested positive for the presence of flavonoids, while alkaloids and cardiac glycosides were detected present in both the acetone and ethanolic extracts. Flavonoids were detected present only in the acetone extract. Saponins were detected present only in the ethanolic extract. The extracts (acetone and ethanolic showed significant activity on Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus flavus. The results obtained from this study indicated that H. involuta has medicinally important compounds, having therapeutic potential from which effective antimicrobial medicine can be sourced.

  7. Secondary Metabolites Production by Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrios-González, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial secondary metabolites are useful high value products with an enormous range of biological activities. Moreover, the past two decades have been a phase of rapid discovery of new activities and development of major compounds for use in different industrial fields, mainly pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food, agriculture and farming. Many of these metabolites could be produced advantageously in industry by solid–state fermentation (SSF. Two types of SSF can be distinguished, depending on the nature of the solid phase used: 1 Solid cultures of one support-substrate phase in which solid phase is constituted by a material that assumes, simultaneously, the functions of support and of nutrients source; and 2 Solid cultures of two substrate-support phases: solid phase is constituted by an inert support impregnated with a liquid medium. Besides good production performance, two phases systems have provided a convenient model for basic studies. Studies in our laboratory, as well as in others, have shown that physiology of idiophase (production phase in SSF share several similarities with the physiology in liquid medium, so similar strategies must be adapted for efficient production processes. However, our studies indicate the need to develop special strains for SSF since overproducing strains, generated for liquid fermentation, cannot be relied upon to perform well in SSF. On the other hand, there are important parameters, specific for SSF, that have to be optimized (pretreatment, initial moisture content, medium concentration and aeration. Respiration studies of secondary metabolites SSF, performed in our laboratory, have shown more subtle aspects of efficient production in SSF. This indicates that there are certain particularities of physiology in SSF that represent the point that needs a better understanding, and that promise to generate knowledge that will be the basis for efficient processes development and control strategies, as well as for

  8. Nutrient and secondary metabolite concentrations in a savanna are independently affected by large herbivores and shoot growth rate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scogings, PF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-based secondary metabolites (CBSMs) such as tannins are assumed to function as plant defences against herbivores. CBSMs are thought to be inversely related to growth rate and nutrient concentrations because a physiological trade-off exists...

  9. Insights into the mechanisms of Promysalin, a secondary metabolite with genus-specific antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promysalin, a secondary metabolite produced by Pseudomonas putida RW10S1, has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Pseudomonas sp., including both human and plant pathogens. Promysalin induces swarming and biofilm formation in the producing species, and inhibits growth of susceptible sp...

  10. Development of fungal cell factories for the production of secondary metabolites: Linking genomics and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Christian Nielsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The genomic era has revolutionized research on secondary metabolites and bioinformatics methods have in recent years revived the antibiotic discovery process after decades with only few new active molecules being identified. New computational tools are driven by genomics and metabolomics analysis, and enables rapid identification of novel secondary metabolites. To translate this increased discovery rate into industrial exploitation, it is necessary to integrate secondary metabolite pathways in the metabolic engineering process. In this review, we will describe the novel advances in discovery of secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi, highlight the utilization of genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs in the design of fungal cell factories for the production of secondary metabolites and review strategies for optimizing secondary metabolite production through the construction of high yielding platform cell factories.

  11. Produção de metabólitos secundários em cultura de células e tecidos de plantas: o exemplo dos gêneros Tabernaemontana e Aspidosperma Production of plant secondary metabolites in plant cell and tissue culture: the example of Tabernaemontana and Aspidosperma genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Fumagali

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos dos metabólitos secundários de plantas se desenvolveram aceleradamente nos últimos 50 anos. Estes compostos são conhecidos por desempenharem um papel importante na adaptação das plantas aos seus ambientes e também representam uma fonte importante de substâncias farmacologicamente ativas. As técnicas de cultura de células de plantas iniciaramse na década de 1960 como uma possível ferramenta para estudar e produzir os metabólitos secundários de plantas. O uso de cultura de células de planta para a produção de substâncias de interesse contribuiu grandemente para avanços em diversas áreas da fisiologia e bioquímica vegetal. Diferentes estratégias, usando sistemas de cultura in vitro, foram estudadas com o objetivo de aumentar a produção de metabólitos secundários. As plantas dos gêneros Aspidosperma e Tabernaemontana são importantes fontes de alcalóides indólicos biologicamente ativos, sendo que no Brasil existe um número considerável de espécies destes gêneros. As culturas de células de Aspidosperma e Tabernaemontana foram iniciadas há pelo menos 16 anos, as quais produzem um grande número de alcalóides, o que estimulou o desenvolvimento de diversas técnicas para sua produção, extração e identificação.Studies on plant secondary metabolites have been increasing over the last 50 years. These compounds are known to play a major role in the adaptation of plants to their environment and an important source of active pharmaceuticals. Plant cell culture technologies were introduced at the end of the 1960s as a possible tool for both studying and producing plant secondary metabolites. Different strategies, using in vitro systems, have been extensively studied with the objective of improving the production of secondary plant compounds. The Aspidosperma and Tabernaemontana genera are an important source of biologically active alkaloids and in Brazil there is a considerable number of species of these

  12. Production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina by Camellia sinensis L suspension culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutini, Sodiq, Mochamad; Muslihatin, Wirdhatul; Indra, Mochamad Rasjad

    2017-06-01

    Bioactive trimethyl xanthina can be obtained from the plant Camellia sinensis L. To obtain bioactive plant of which there are several hurdles for instance to wait up to five years to be harvested, also it needs land at a certain height from the sea level. Therefore, the production of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina need to be developed with suspense culture techniques. The purpose of this study obtained the production of bioactive trimethyl xanthina way culturally suspense in large scale with a relatively short time, potentially as anti-oxidants. Research methods include: (1) initiation of callus from pieces of leaves, shoots the youngest of the plant Camellia sinensis L in the media MS with the optimization of the addition of growth regulators, (2) the subculture of callus on media and plant growth regulator that is equal to the stage of initiation, (3) initiation of suspension culture using explants of callus Camellia sinensis L, (4) Analysis of secondary metabolites trimethyl xanthina growth in suspension culture, (5) the isolation and identification of trimethyl xanthina qualitatively and quantitatively using thin layer chromatography/high performance chromatography column. The results of the study suspension cultures containing bioactive trimethyl xanthina candidates that can be used as an antioxidant.

  13. Metabolic engineering with systems biology tools to optimize production of prokaryotic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Lee, Sang Yup;

    2016-01-01

    for the optimal production of various prokaryotic secondary metabolites: native versus heterologous hosts (e.g., Escherichia coli) and rational versus random approaches. This comparative analysis is followed by discussions on systems biology tools deployed in optimizing the production of secondary metabolites....... The potential contributions of additional systems biology tools are also discussed in the context of current challenges encountered during optimization of secondary metabolite production....

  14. Elicitation Based Enhancement of Secondary Metabolites in Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum Hairy Root Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mrinalini; Sharma, Swati; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum are well-known medicinally important plants contained important alkaloids in their different parts. Elicitation of these alkaloids is important because of associated pharmaceutical properties. Targeted metabolites were ajmaline and ajmalicine in R. serpentina; solasodine and α-solanine in S. khasianum. Objective: Enhancement of secondary metabolites through biotic and abiotic elicitors in hairy root cultures of R. serpentina and S. khasianum. Materials and Methods: In this report, hairy root cultures of these two plants were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation by optimizing various parameters as age of explants, duration of preculture, and co-cultivation period. NaCl was used as abiotic elicitors in these two plants. Cellulase from Aspergillus niger was used as biotic elicitor in S. khasianum and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in R. serpentina. Results: First time we have reported the effect of biotic and abiotic elicitors on the production of important metabolites in hairy root cultures of these two plants. Ajmalicine production was stimulated up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of NaCl after 1 week of treatment. Ajmaline concentration was also increased 2.9-fold at 100 mg/l dose of mannan after 1 week. Solasodine content was enhanced up to 4.0-fold and 3.6-fold at 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, respectively, after 6 days of treatments. Conclusion: This study explored the potential of the elicitation strategy in A. rhizogenes transformed cell cultures and this potential further used for commercial production of these pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites. SUMMARY Hairy roots of Rauwolfia serpentina were subjected to salt (abiotic stress) and mannan (biotic stress) treatment for 1 week. Ajmaline and ajmalicine secondary metabolites were quantified before and after stress treatmentAjmalicine yield was enhanced up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of Na

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of plant metabolites in brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Ric C H; Schipper, Bert; Hall, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    The Brassicaceae family comprises a variety of plant species that are of high economic importance as -vegetables or industrial crops. This includes crops such as Brassica rapa (turnip, Bok Choi), B. oleracea (cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.), and B. napus (oil seed rape), and also includes the famous genetic model of plant research, Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Brassicaceae plants contain a large variety of interesting secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonoids. These metabolites are also of particular importance due to their proposed positive effects on human health. Next to these well-known groups of phytochemicals, many more metabolites are of course also present in crude extracts prepared from Brassica and Arabidopsis plant material.High-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), especially if combined with a high mass resolution instrument such as a QTOF MS, is a powerful approach to separate, detect, and annotate metabolites present in crude aqueous-alcohol plant extracts. Using an essentially unbiased procedure that takes into account all metabolite mass signals from the raw data files, detailed information on the relative abundance of hundreds of both known and, as yet, unknown semipolar metabolites can be obtained. These comprehensive metabolomics data can then be used to, for instance, identify genetic markers regulating metabolic composition, determine effects of (a)biotic stress or specific growth conditions, or establish metabolite changes occurring upon food processing or storage.This chapter describes in detail a procedure for preparing crude extracts and performing comprehensive HPLC-QTOF MS-based profiling of semi-polar metabolites in Brassicaceae plant material. Compounds present in the extract can be (partially or completely) annotated based on their accurate mass, their MS/MS fragments and on other specific chemical characteristics such as retention time and UV

  16. [Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in lichens of different taxonomic groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P

    2014-01-01

    Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in 22 lichen species of the families Parmeliaceae, Nephromataceae, Umbilicariaceae, Ramalinaceae, Cladoniaceae, Peltigeraceae, and Teloschistaceae were identified determined by enzyme immunoassay enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The following mycotoxins were identified found in these lichens in a broad concentration range with a frequency of 70-100%: sterigmatocystin (7-2090 ng/g), alternariol (20-6460 ng/g), and emodin (45-94500 ng/g). Mycophenolic acid frequently occurred in 19 lichen species; citrinin, in 17 species; diacetoxyscirpenol, in 11 species; cyclopiazonic acid, in 10 species; and zearalenone, in 9 species. PR toxin was regularly detected in three lichen species; deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A, in two species; and T-2 toxin and ergot alkaloids, in one species. Aflatoxin B1 was detected in only six species with a frequency of 2-42%, whereas roridin A was identified present in 10% of Hypogymnia physodes samples.

  17. Secondary metabolite arsenal of an opportunistic pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignell, Elaine; Cairns, Timothy C; Throckmorton, Kurt; Nierman, William C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-12-05

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a versatile fungus able to successfully exploit diverse environments from mammalian lungs to agricultural waste products. Among its many fitness attributes are dozens of genetic loci containing biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) producing bioactive small molecules (often referred to as secondary metabolites or natural products) that provide growth advantages to the fungus dependent on environment. Here we summarize the current knowledge of these BGCs-18 of which can be named to product-their expression profiles in vivo, and which BGCs may enhance virulence of this opportunistic human pathogen. Furthermore, we find extensive evidence for the presence of many of these BGCs, or similar BGCs, in distantly related genera including the emerging pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causative agent of white-nose syndrome in bats, and suggest such BGCs may be predictive of pathogenic potential in other fungi.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'.

  18. Microbial biosynthesis of secondary metabolites involved in biocontrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Olsson, Stefan

    effective and safe strategies to overcome current constraints. The Greenlandic soil-bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 is a promising biocontrol agent that has previously been shown to produce bioactive compounds against fungal pathogens1,2. Genome sequencing and analysis of In5 identified large...... secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. A combination of random and targeted mutagenesis, together with MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry, linked two non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) designated nunapeptin and nunamycin respectively, to antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium...... aphanidermatum and Fusarium graminearum1, 2. In order to unravel the complex genetic regulation of these large NRP synthetase gene clusters, antisense RNAs (asRNAs) and CRISPR/Cas9 based systems are being tested and developed as tools to target transcripts of interest and elucidate gene function3, 4...

  19. New Benzoxazine Secondary Metabolites from an Arctic Actinomycete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuho Moon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new secondary metabolites, arcticoside (1 and C-1027 chromophore-V (2, were isolated along with C-1027 chromophore-III and fijiolides A and B (3–5 from a culture of an Arctic marine actinomycete Streptomyces strain. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated through NMR, mass, UV, and IR spectroscopy. The hexose moieties in 1 were determined to be d-glucose from a combination of acid hydrolysis, derivatization, and gas chromatographic analyses. Arcticoside (1 and C-1027 chromophore-V (2, which have a benzoxazine ring, inhibited Candida albicans isocitrate lyase. Chromophore-V (2 exhibited significant cytotoxicity against breast carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells and colorectal carcinoma cells (line HCT-116, with IC50 values of 0.9 and 2.7 μM, respectively.

  20. New benzoxazine secondary metabolites from an arctic actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyuho; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Shin, Yoonho; Won, Tae Hyung; Ko, Keebeom; Lee, Sang Kook; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Nam, Seung-Il; Oh, Dong-Chan

    2014-04-30

    Two new secondary metabolites, arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromophore-V (2), were isolated along with C-1027 chromophore-III and fijiolides A and B (3-5) from a culture of an Arctic marine actinomycete Streptomyces strain. The chemical structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated through NMR, mass, UV, and IR spectroscopy. The hexose moieties in 1 were determined to be d-glucose from a combination of acid hydrolysis, derivatization, and gas chromatographic analyses. Arcticoside (1) and C-1027 chromophore-V (2), which have a benzoxazine ring, inhibited Candida albicans isocitrate lyase. Chromophore-V (2) exhibited significant cytotoxicity against breast carcinoma MDA-MB231 cells and colorectal carcinoma cells (line HCT-116), with IC₅₀ values of 0.9 and 2.7 μM, respectively.

  1. Bioactive secondary metabolites from symbiotic marine dinoflagellates: symbiodinolide and durinskiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Masaki; Ohno, Osamu; Han, Chunguang; Uemura, Daisuke

    2010-04-01

    Symbiotic relationships play critical roles in marine ecosystems. Among symbionts, marine dinoflagellates have attracted the attention of natural products chemists, biologists, and ecologists, since they are rich sources of unique bioactive secondary metabolites. The polyol compound symbiodinolide, which was isolated from the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., exhibits significant voltage-dependent N-type Ca(2+) channel-opening activity and may serve as a defense substance to prevent digestion of the host animals. Durinskiols are also unique long carbon-chain polyol compounds that were isolated from the dinoflagellate Durinskia sp. We found a selective cleavage reaction of allylic 1,2-diol using an olefin metathesis catalyst, and developed a fluorescent-labeling method for MS/MS analysis to achieve the structural elucidation of huge polyol compounds. This review highlights recent advances in structural and biological studies on symbiodinolide, durinskiols, and related polyol compounds.

  2. Ecotype variability in growth and secondary metabolite profile in Moringa oleifera: impact of sulfur and water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Nadja; Ulrichs, Christian; Schreiner, Monika; Arndt, Nick; Schmidt, Reinhard; Mewis, Inga

    2015-03-25

    Moringa oleifera is widely cultivated in plantations in the tropics and subtropics. Previous cultivation studies with M. oleifera focused primarily only on leaf yield. In the present study, the content of potentially health-promoting secondary metabolites (glucosinolates, phenolic acids, and flavonoids) were also investigated. Six different ecotypes were grown under similar environmental conditions to identify phenotypic differences that can be traced back to the genotype. The ecotypes TOT4880 (origin USA) and TOT7267 (origin India) were identified as having the best growth performance and highest secondary metabolite production, making them an ideal health-promoting food crop. Furthermore, optimal cultivation conditions-exemplarily on sulfur fertilization and water availability-for achieving high leaf and secondary metabolite yields were investigated for M. oleifera. In general, plant biomass and height decreased under water deficiency compared to normal cultivation conditions, whereas the glucosinolate content increased. The effects depended to a great extent on the ecotype.

  3. Metabolomics and Cheminformatics Analysis of Antifungal Function of Plant Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Cuperlovic-Culf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. Partial resistance to FHB of several wheat cultivars includes specific metabolic responses to inoculation. Previously published studies have determined major metabolic changes induced by pathogens in resistant and susceptible plants. Functionality of the majority of these metabolites in resistance remains unknown. In this work we have made a compilation of all metabolites determined as selectively accumulated following FHB inoculation in resistant plants. Characteristics, as well as possible functions and targets of these metabolites, are investigated using cheminformatics approaches with focus on the likelihood of these metabolites acting as drug-like molecules against fungal pathogens. Results of computational analyses of binding properties of several representative metabolites to homology models of fungal proteins are presented. Theoretical analysis highlights the possibility for strong inhibitory activity of several metabolites against some major proteins in Fusarium graminearum, such as carbonic anhydrases and cytochrome P450s. Activity of several of these compounds has been experimentally confirmed in fungal growth inhibition assays. Analysis of anti-fungal properties of plant metabolites can lead to the development of more resistant wheat varieties while showing novel application of cheminformatics approaches in the analysis of plant/pathogen interactions.

  4. Regulatory cross talk and microbial induction of fungal secondary metabolite gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nützmann, Hans-Wilhelm; Schroeckh, Volker; Brakhage, Axel A

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well-known producers of a wealth of secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Many of these compounds such as penicillin, cyclosporine, or lovastatin are of great importance for human health. Genome sequences of filamentous fungi revealed that the encoded potential to produce secondary metabolites is much higher than the actual number of compounds produced during cultivation in the laboratory. This finding encouraged research groups to develop new methods to exploit the silent reservoir of secondary metabolites. In this chapter, we present three successful strategies to induce the expression of secondary metabolite gene clusters. They are based on the manipulation of the molecular processes controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and the simulation of stimulating environmental conditions leading to altered metabolic profiles. The presented methods were successfully applied to identify novel metabolites. They can be also used to significantly increase product yields.

  5. Spectral effects of supplementary lighting on the secondary metabolites in roses, chrysanthemums, and campanulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-10-15

    To investigate the effect of the light spectrum on photosynthesis, growth, and secondary metabolites Rosa hybrida 'Scarlet', Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Coral Charm', and Campanula portenschlagiana 'BluOne' were grown at 24/18°C day/night temperature under purpose-built LED arrays yielding approximately 200 μmol m(-2)s(-1) at plant height for 16 h per day. The four light treatments were (1) 40% Blue/60% Red, (2) 20% Blue/80% Red, (3) 100% Red, and (4) 100% White (Control). The plant height was smallest in 40% Blue/60% Red in roses and chrysanthemums, while the biomass was smallest in the white control in roses and in 100% Red in chrysanthemums. The total biomass was unaffected by the spectrum in campanulas, while the leaf area was smallest in the 40% Blue/60% Red treatment. In 100% Red curled leaves and other morphological abnormalities were observed. Increasing the blue to red ratio increased the stomatal conductance though net photosynthesis was unaffected, indicating excess stomatal conductance in some treatments. With higher blue light ratio all phenolic acids and flavonoids increased. In view of the roles of these secondary metabolites as antioxidants, anti-pathogens, and light protectants, we hypothesize that blue light may predispose plants to better cope with stress.

  6. Mass spectrometry imaging of plant metabolites--principles and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnholt, Nanna; Li, Bin; D'Alvise, Janina; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Covering: up to the end of 2013 New mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are gaining importance in the analysis of plant metabolite distributions, and significant technological improvements have been introduced in the past decade. This review provides an introduction to the different MSI techniques and their applications in plant science. The most common methods for sample preparation are described, and the review also features a comprehensive table of published studies in MSI of plant material. A number of significant works are highlighted for their contributions to advance the understanding of plant biology through applications of plant metabolite imaging. Particular attention is given to the possibility for imaging of surface metabolites since this is highly dependent on the methods and techniques which are applied in imaging studies.

  7. Biosynthesis-Based Quantitative Analysis of 151 Secondary Metabolites of Licorice To Differentiate Medicinal Glycyrrhiza Species and Their Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Chen, Kuan; Wang, Ying; Ji, Shuai; Feng, Jin; Li, Kai; Lin, Yan; Ye, Min

    2017-03-07

    Secondary metabolites are usually the bioactive components of medicinal plants. The difference in the secondary metabolisms of closely related plant species and their hybrids has rarely been addressed. In this study, we conducted a holistic secondary metabolomics analysis of three medicinal Glycyrrhiza species (G. uralensis, G. glabra, and G. inflata), which are used as the popular herbal medicine licorice. The Glycyrrhiza species (genotype) for 95 batches of samples were identified by DNA barcodes of the internal transcribed spacer and trnV-ndhC regions, and the chemotypes were revealed by LC/UV- or LC/MS/MS-based quantitative analysis of 151 bioactive secondary metabolites, including 17 flavonoid glycosides, 24 saponins, and 110 free phenolic compounds. These compounds represented key products in the biosynthetic pathways of licorice. For the 76 homozygous samples, the three Glycyrrhiza species showed significant biosynthetic preferences, especially in coumarins, chalcones, isoflavanes, and flavonols. In total, 27 species-specific chemical markers were discovered. The 19 hybrid samples indicated that hybridization could remarkably alter the chemical composition and that the male parent contributed more to the offspring than the female parent did. This is hitherto the largest-scale targeted secondary metabolomics study of medicinal plants and the first report on uniparental inheritance in plant secondary metabolism. The results are valuable for biosynthesis, inheritance, and quality control studies of licorice and other medicinal plants.

  8. Secondary effects of glyphosate on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate is a unique herbicide with interesting secondary effects. Unfortunately, some have assumed that the secondary effects that occur in glyphosate-susceptible plants treated with glyphosate, such as altered mineral nutrition, reduced phenolic compound production and pathogen resistance, also ...

  9. [Therapeutic potential of secondary metabolites produced in the hairy roots cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Łucka, Marta; Szemraj, Janusz; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2015-05-04

    Plants have always been a source of many valuable substances for humans. Growing advancement of methods of modern biotechnology, combined with genetic engineering techniques, gradually increase the variety of compounds obtained, the number of plant species used and the production efficiency. Consequently, there is an undebatable interest in biotechnological production of such compounds, especially those pharmacologically active, that can be used in treatment of neoplastic, viral, and many other types of diseases. Most of these compounds represent a diverse group of secondary metabolites. One of the effective ways of obtaining such molecules is the utilization of hairy roots cultures. The advantages of such systems make them an attractive method of obtaining important plant-derived compounds, creating an interesting alternative to other methods, including the cell suspension cultures or expensive chemical syntheses.

  10. Tilting Plant Metabolism for Improved Metabolite Biosynthesis and Enhanced Human Benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhekumthetho Ncube

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The immense chemical diversity of plant-derived secondary metabolites coupled with their vast array of biological functions has seen this group of compounds attract considerable research interest across a range of research disciplines. Medicinal and aromatic plants, in particular, have been exploited for this biogenic pool of phytochemicals for products such as pharmaceuticals, fragrances, dyes, and insecticides, among others. With consumers showing increasing interests in these products, innovative biotechnological techniques are being developed and employed to alter plant secondary metabolism in efforts to improve on the quality and quantity of specific metabolites of interest. This review provides an overview of the biosynthesis for phytochemical compounds with medicinal and other related properties and their associated biological activities. It also provides an insight into how their biosynthesis/biosynthetic pathways have been modified/altered to enhance production.

  11. Sulfate Metabolites of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl in Whole Poplar Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2012-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3) has been proven to be transformed into hydroxylated metabolites of PCB3 (OH-PCB3s) in whole poplar plants in our previous work. However, hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs, including OH-PCB3s, as the substrates of sulfotransferases have not been studied in many organisms including plants in vivo. Poplar (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) was used to investigate the further metabolism from OH-PCB3s to PCB3 sulfates because it is a model plant and one that is frequently...

  12. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Kocev, Dragi; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The food- and airborne fungal genus Wallemia comprises seven xerophilic and halophilic species: W. sebi, W. mellicola, W. canadensis, W. tropicalis, W. muriae, W. hederae and W. ichthyophaga. All listed species are adapted to low water activity and can contaminate food preserved with high amounts of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known to support the production of secondary metabolites, supplemented with different concentrations of NaCl, glucose and MgCl2. In more than two hundred extracts approximately one hundred different compounds were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Although the genome data analysis of W. mellicola (previously W. sebi sensu lato) and W. ichthyophaga revealed a low number of secondary metabolites clusters, a substantial number of secondary metabolites were detected at different conditions. Machine learning analysis of the obtained dataset showed that NaCl has higher influence on the production of secondary metabolites than other tested solutes. Mass spectrometric analysis of selected extracts revealed that NaCl in the medium affects the production of some compounds with substantial biological activities (wallimidione, walleminol, walleminone, UCA 1064-A and UCA 1064-B). In particular an increase in NaCl concentration from 5% to 15% in the growth media increased the production of the toxic metabolites wallimidione, walleminol and walleminone. PMID:28036382

  13. Quantitative analysis of plant secondary metabolites in wild Nostoc commune Vauch%野生地木耳中次生代谢产物含量测定与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张士振; 季添英; 冯小妹; 朱晨曦; 尹华宝; 黄训端; 尤硕愚

    2014-01-01

    测定了野生地木耳(Nostoc commune Vauch.)中次生代谢产物含量,并与4种常见食用菌藻黑木耳(Auricu-laria auricular-judae)、银耳( Tremella fuciformis)、紫菜( Porphyra)、海带( Laminaria japonica)进行比较分析,总酚、总黄酮和缩合单宁含量测定采用分光光度法,总生物碱含量测定采用高效液相色谱法( HPLC )。结果显示,野生地木耳中总酚含量为24.255 mg/g ±1.631 mg/g,总黄酮含量为5.741 mg/g ±0.239 mg/g,总生物碱含量为0.768 mg/g ±0.073 mg/g,缩合单宁含量为0.069 mg/g ±0.009 mg/g。4种食用菌藻中次生代谢产物含量范围为:总酚(5.520~62.326 mg/g)、总黄酮(0.847~7.010 mg/g)、总生物碱(0.408~4.132 mg/g)、缩合单宁(0.063~0.233 mg/g);比较分析结果显示,野生地木耳次生代谢产物中的总酚和总黄酮物质含量较高,且总酚是主要次生代谢产物,缩合单宁与总生物碱含量较低;总酚含量约为黑木耳和银耳的2倍、紫菜的6倍;总黄酮含量约为黑木耳的7倍,银耳的3倍。%This experiment determined the contents of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs)in wild Nostoc commune Vauch., and ana-lyzed the differences of the PSMs contents among wild Nostoc commune Vauch., Auricularia auricular-judae, Tremella fuciformis, Por-phyra and Laminaria japonica.The contents of condensed tannins , total polyphenol and flavonoids in wild Nostoc commune Vauch. were tested by UV-VIS spectrophotometer , and the contents of total alkaloids were quantified by high performance liquid chromatogra -phy ( HPLC) .The results showed that the content of total polyphenol was 24.255 mg/g ±1.631 mg/g, the total flavonoids was 5.741 mg/g ±0.239 mg/g, the total alkaloids was 0.768 mg/g ±0.073 mg/g and the condensed tannins was 0.069 mg/g ±0.009 mg/g in air-dry of wild Nostoc commune Vauch.The content range of several kinds of PSMs in daily edible fungoids and

  14. Screening of secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes of marine actinomycetes isolated from Trabzon (Black Sea sea sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Özcan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, active secondary metabolite production capacity of actinomycete isolates obtained from Trabzon (Black Sea sea sediments was investigated by molecular techniques. Totaly 24 actinomycetes were investigated by PCR based on the presence of secondary metabolite biosynthesis genes PKS / NRPS. According to the PCR results, 25 and 58% of actinomycetes obtained from Trabzon sea sediments were found to contain PKS-NRPS and only NRPS gene regions, respectively. When PCR data were evaluated, it was found that the production of the peptide form active secondary metabolite of the isolates by non-ribosomal way was higher than that of the secondary metabolite production by the PKS pathway. In addition, it has been determined that Black Sea marine sediments have high potential for active secondary metabolite production.

  15. Antimicrobial secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsules and egg masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaviarasan T; Siva Sankar R; Yogamoorthi A

    2012-01-01

    Marine organisms have attracted special attention in the last three decades for their ability to produce interesting pharmacological active compounds. Even though all marine organisms have the potential to produce antimicrobial secondary metabolites, the gastropod has the vital sources of secondary metabolites particularly their egg capsule which has the promising antimicrobial secondary metabolites. In the present review, we intend to focus on marine secondary metabolites from marine gastropod egg capsule. The following compounds i.e. Kabiramid C, Aplysianin E, Aplysianin A, Thisaplysianin E and Tyrian purple have been documented in egg capsule of various gastropod and most of the antimicrobial secondary metabolites have not been isolated from the egg capsule because of the odious, and complex chemical structure. Stability of the compounds is unknown.

  16. Effects of space flight on DNA mutation and secondary metabolites of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) seeds were flown on a recoverable satellite for 18 days(the average radiation dose in the flight recovery module was 0.102 mGy/d, the distance from flight apogee to earth was 350 km, gravity 10-6). After returning to earth, the seeds were germinated and grown to maturity. The parallel ground-based seeds were also planted under the same conditions. The leaves of licorice were used for inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis and the two main secondary me-tabolites in one-year-old roots were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Among 22 random primers used in this experiment, 6 primers generated different DNA band types. Analysis of HPLC showed that the content of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and liquiritin (LQ) in the roots from seeds flown in space was respectively 2.19, 1.18 times higher than that of the control group. The results demonstrated that the extraterrestrial environment induced mutagenic effects on licorice and affected its secondary metabolites. These changes indicated that extraterrestrial orbit is possible means of breeding of licorice so as to preserve this endangered medicinal plant.

  17. Effects of space flight on DNA mutation and secondary metabolites of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO WenYuan; LI KeFeng; YAN Shuo; GAO XiuMei; HU LiMin

    2009-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) seeds were flown on a recoverable satellite for 18 days(the average radiation dose in the flight recovery module was 0.102 mGy/d, the distance from flight apogee to earth was 350 km, gravity 10~(-6)). After returning to earth, the seeds were germinated and grown to maturity. The parallel ground-based seeds were also planted under the same conditions. The leaves of licorice were used for inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis and the two main secondary metabolites in one-year-old roots were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).Among 22 random primers used in this experiment, 6 primers generated different DNA band types. Analysis of HPLC showed that the content of glycyrrhizic acid (GA) and liquiritin (LQ) in the roots from seeds flown in space was respectively 2.19, 1.18 times higher than that of the control group. The results demonstrated that the extraterrestrial environment induced mutagenic effects on licorice and affected its secondary metabolites. These changes indicated that extraterrestrial orbit is possible means of breeding of licorice so as to preserve this endangered medicinal plant.

  18. Production of Secondary Metabolites in Extreme Environments: Food- and Airborne Wallemia spp. Produce Toxic Metabolites at Hypersaline Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jančič, Sašo; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Kocev, Dragi

    2016-01-01

    The food- and airborne fungal genus Wallemia comprises seven xerophilic and halophilic species: W. sebi, W. mellicola, W. canadensis, W. tropicalis, W. muriae, W. hederae and W. ichthyophaga. All listed species are adapted to low water activity and can contaminate food preserved with high amounts...... of salt or sugar. In relation to food safety, the effect of high salt and sugar concentrations on the production of secondary metabolites by this toxigenic fungus was investigated. The secondary metabolite profiles of 30 strains of the listed species were examined using general growth media, known...... higher influence on the production of secondary metabolites than other tested solutes. Mass spectrometric analysis of selected extracts revealed that NaCl in the medium affects the production of some compounds with substantial biological activities (wallimidione, walleminol, walleminone, UCA 1064-A...

  19. Root secreted metabolites and proteins are involved in the early events of plant-plant recognition prior to competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayakar V Badri

    Full Text Available The mechanism whereby organisms interact and differentiate between others has been at the forefront of scientific inquiry, particularly in humans and certain animals. It is widely accepted that plants also interact, but the degree of this interaction has been constricted to competition for space, nutrients, water and light. Here, we analyzed the root secreted metabolites and proteins involved in early plant neighbor recognition by using Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 ecotype (Col as our focal plant co-cultured in vitro with different neighbors [A. thaliana Ler ecotype (Ler or Capsella rubella (Cap]. Principal component and cluster analyses revealed that both root secreted secondary metabolites and proteins clustered separately between the plants grown individually (Col-0, Ler and Cap grown alone and the plants co-cultured with two homozygous individuals (Col-Col, Ler-Ler and Cap-Cap or with different individuals (Col-Ler and Col-Cap. In particularly, we observed that a greater number of defense- and stress-related proteins were secreted when our control plant, Col, was grown alone as compared to when it was co-cultured with another homozygous individual (Col-Col or with a different individual (Col-Ler and Col-Cap. However, the total amount of defense proteins in the exudates of the co-cultures was higher than in the plant alone. The opposite pattern of expression was identified for stress-related proteins. These data suggest that plants can sense and respond to the presence of different plant neighbors and that the level of relatedness is perceived upon initial interaction. Furthermore, the role of secondary metabolites and defense- and stress-related proteins widely involved in plant-microbe associations and abiotic responses warrants reassessment for plant-plant interactions.

  20. Antifouling Activity of Secondary Metabolites Isolated from Chinese Marine Organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yong Xin

    2013-04-25

    Biofouling results in tremendous economic losses to maritime industries around the world. A recent global ban on the use of organotin compounds as antifouling agents has further raised demand for safe and effective antifouling compounds. In this study, 49 secondary metabolites, including diterpenoids, steroids, and polyketides, were isolated from soft corals, gorgonians, brown algae, and fungi collected along the coast of China, and their antifouling activity was tested against cyprids of the barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite. Twenty of the compounds were found to inhibit larval settlement significantly at a concentration of 25 μg ml-1. Two briarane diterpenoids, juncin O (2) and juncenolide H (3), were the most promising non-toxic antilarval settlement candidates, with EC50 values less than 0.13 μg ml-1 and a safety ratio (LC50/EC50) higher than 400. A preliminary structure-activity relationships study indicated that both furanon and furan moieties are important for antifouling activity. Intriguingly, the presence of hydroxyls enhanced their antisettlement activity. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  1. Variability of non-polar secondary metabolites in the red alga Portieria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payo, Dioli Ann; Colo, Joannamel; Calumpong, Hilconida; de Clerck, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Possible sources of variation in non-polar secondary metabolites of Portieria hornemannii, sampled from two distinct regions in the Philippines (Batanes and Visayas), resulting from different life-history stages, presence of cryptic species, and/or spatiotemporal factors, were investigated. PCA analyses demonstrated secondary metabolite variation between, as well as within, five cryptic Batanes species. Intraspecific variation was even more pronounced in the three cryptic Visayas species, which included samples from six sites. Neither species groupings, nor spatial or temporal based patterns, were observed in the PCA analysis, however, intraspecific variation in secondary metabolites was detected between life-history stages. Male gametophytes (102 metabolites detected) were strongly discriminated from the two other stages, whilst female gametophyte (202 metabolites detected) and tetrasporophyte (106 metabolites detected) samples were partially discriminated. These results suggest that life-history driven variations, and possibly other microscale factors, may influence the variation within Portieria species.

  2. Variability of Non-Polar Secondary Metabolites in the Red Alga Portieria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier de Clerck

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Possible sources of variation in non-polar secondary metabolites of Portieria hornemannii, sampled from two distinct regions in the Philippines (Batanes and Visayas, resulting from different life-history stages, presence of cryptic species, and/or spatiotemporal factors, were investigated. PCA analyses demonstrated secondary metabolite variation between, as well as within, five cryptic Batanes species. Intraspecific variation was even more pronounced in the three cryptic Visayas species, which included samples from six sites. Neither species groupings, nor spatial or temporal based patterns, were observed in the PCA analysis, however, intraspecific variation in secondary metabolites was detected between life-history stages. Male gametophytes (102 metabolites detected were strongly discriminated from the two other stages, whilst female gametophyte (202 metabolites detected and tetrasporophyte (106 metabolites detected samples were partially discriminated. These results suggest that life-history driven variations, and possibly other microscale factors, may influence the variation within Portieria species.

  3. Chitosan and grape secondary metabolites: A proteomics and metabolomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavaresco Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a polysaccharide obtained by deacetylation of chitin, and it is involved in defence mechanisms of plants toward diseases. In the present work, V. vinifera L. cv. Ortrugo, grafted on 420A rootstock was grown in pot and treated, at veraison, by 0.03% chitosan solution at cluster level. Just before the treatment (T0 and 24 hours (T1, 48 hours (T2, 72 hours (T3 and 10 days (T4 later, the concentration of stilbenic compounds was detected, and at T1 proteomics and metabolomics analyses were done. Proteomics relies on the analysis of the complete set of proteins existing in a given substrate, while metabolomics relies on the analyses of the complete set of metabolites in a given substrate. The treatment improved the stilbene concentration over the control at T1. Proteomic analysis showed that superoxide dismutase (SOD and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL were overexpressed in the treated grapes. SOD is known to be an enzyme active against reactive oxygen species (ROS while PAL is a key enzyme in the phenylpropanoids pathway. Metabolomics analysis highlighted the positive role of the treatment in improving the triperpenoid concentration (betulin, erythrodiol, uvaol, oleanolate; these compounds are known to be effective against microbes, insects and fungi.

  4. Gut passage and secondary metabolites alter the source of post-dispersal predation for bird-dispersed chili seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Evan C; Haak, David C; Levey, Douglas J; Tewksbury, Joshua J

    2016-07-01

    Plants can influence the source and severity of seed predation through various mechanisms; the use of secondary metabolites for chemical defense, for example, is well documented. Gut passage by frugivores can also reduce mortality of animal-dispersed seeds, although this mechanism has gained far less attention than secondary metabolites. Apart from influencing the severity of seed predation, gut passage may also influence the source of seed predation. In Bolivia, we compared impacts of these two mechanisms, gut passage and secondary metabolites, on the source of seed predation in Capsicum chacoense, a wild chili species that is polymorphic for pungency (individual plants either produce fruits and seeds containing or lacking capsaicinoids). Using physical exclosures, we isolated seed removal by insects, mammals, and birds; seeds in the trials were from either pungent or non-pungent fruits and were either passed or not passed by seed-dispersing birds. Pungency had little influence on total short-term seed removal by animals, although prior work on this species indicates that capsaicin reduces mortality caused by fungi at longer time scales. Gut passage strongly reduced removal by insects, altering the relative impact of the three predator types. The weak impact of pungency on short-term predation contrasts with previous studies, highlighting the context dependence of secondary metabolites. The strong impact of gut passage demonstrates that this mechanism alone can influence which seed predators consume seeds, and that impacts of gut passage can be larger than those of secondary metabolites, which are more commonly acknowledged as a defense mechanism.

  5. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by the Oak Pathogen Diplodia corticola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Linaldeddu, Benedetto Teodoro; Cimmino, Alessio; D'Amico, Wanda; Scanu, Bruno; Evidente, Marco; Tuzi, Angela; Evidente, Antonio

    2016-01-13

    Three new lactones and a new fatty acid ester, named sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C, respectively, were isolated from Diplodia corticola, together with sphaeropsidins A and C, diplopyrone, diplobifuranylones A and B, diplofuranone A, and the (S,S)-enantiomer of sapinofuranone B. Sapinofuranones C and D, diplopyrone B, and diplobifuranylone C were characterized as (5S)-5-((1,S-1,6-dihydroxyhexa-2,4-dienyl)-dihydrofuran-2-one, 4,5-dihydroxy-deca-6,8-dienoic acid methyl ester, (5S)-5-hydroxy-6-(penta-1,3-dienyl)-5,6-dihydro-pyran-2-one, and 5'-((1R)-1-hydroxyethyl)-2',5'-dihydro-2H-[2,2']bifuranyl-5-one by spectroscopic and chemical methods, respectively. The relative configuration of sapinofuranone C was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis, whereas its absolute configuration was determined by applying the advanced Mosher's method to its 11-O-p-bromobenzoyl derivative. The same method was used to assign the absolute configuration to C-5 of diplopyrone B and to that of the hydroxyethyl of the side chain of diplobifuranylone C, respectively. The metabolites isolated were tested at 1 mg/mL on leaves of cork oak, grapevine cv. 'Cannonau', and tomato using the leaf puncture assay. They were also tested on tomato cuttings at 0.2, 0.1, and 0.05 mg/mL. Each compound was tested for zootoxic activity on Artemia salina L. larvae. The efficacy of sapinofuranone C and diplopyrone B on three plant pathogens, namely, Athelia rolfsii, Fusarium avenaceum, and Phytophthora nicotianae was also evaluated. In all phytotoxic assays only diplopyrone B was found to be active. It also showed strong inhibition on the vegetative growth of A. rolfsii and P. nicotianae. All metabolites were inactive in the assay performed for the zootoxic activity (A. salina) even at the highest concentration used (200 μg/mL). Diplopyrone B showed a promising antioomycete activity for the control of Phytophthora spp. also taking into account the absence of zootoxic activity.

  6. A comparative study of conventional and supercritical fluid extraction methods for the recovery of secondary metabolites from Syzygium campanulatum Korth#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Abdul Hakeem; Hamil, Mohammad Shahrul Ridzuan; Laghari, Madeeha; Rithwan, Fahim; Zhari, Salman; Saeed, Mohammed Ali Ahmed; Ismail, Zhari; Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium campanulatum Korth is a plant, which is a rich source of secondary metabolites (especially flavanones, chalcone, and triterpenoids). In our present study, three conventional solvent extraction (CSE) techniques and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) techniques were performed to achieve a maximum recovery of two flavanones, chalcone, and two triterpenoids from S. campanulatum leaves. Furthermore, a Box-Behnken design was constructed for the SFE technique using pressure, temperature, and particle size as independent variables, and yields of crude extract, individual and total secondary metabolites as the dependent variables. In the CSE procedure, twenty extracts were produced using ten different solvents and three techniques (maceration, soxhletion, and reflux). An enriched extract of five secondary metabolites was collected using n-hexane:methanol (1:1) soxhletion. Using food-grade ethanol as a modifier, the SFE methods produced a higher recovery (25.5%‒84.9%) of selected secondary metabolites as compared to the CSE techniques (0.92%‒66.00%). PMID:27604860

  7. Biosynthesis of fluorinated secondary metabolites by Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, K A; Hamilton, J T; Bowden, R D; O'Hagan, D; Dasaradhi, L; Amin, M R; Harper, D B

    1995-06-01

    The biosynthesis of organofluorine compounds by Streptomyces cattleya NRRL 8057 was examined using 19F NMR spectroscopy. The organism produced 1.2 mM fluoroacetate and 0.5 mM 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites when cultured for 28 d on a chemically defined medium containing 2 mM fluoride. Cell suspensions from batch cultures harvested at the growth maximum of 4 d were not capable of fluoride uptake or fluorometabolite biosynthesis, but by 6 d had developed an efficient fluoride-uptake system and biosynthesized the two fluorometabolites in almost equal proportions. As the harvest age increased, the proportion of fluoroacetate to 4-fluorothreonine formed by cell suspensions rose progressively so that 16-d-old cells showed a ratio of 76:26 for the two compounds. Fluoride uptake and fluorometabolite production by cell suspensions were highly dependent on pH, with both processes showing a maximum rate at pH 6.0 but declining rapidly at higher pH values. This decrease was particularly marked in the case of fluoroacetate biosynthesis which was barely detectable at pH 7.5. Fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine showed only low levels of interconversion by cell suspensions, suggesting that the carbon skeleton of neither was derived by metabolism of the other. The limited interconversion observed is explicable in terms of a small degree of biological defluorination occurring with each compound, followed by reincorporation of the resulting fluoride ion into the organic form by the active fluorinating system, a phenomenon also noted on incubation of cell suspensions with a number of other fluorinated biochemical intermediates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Secondary Metabolites from Leaves of Manilkara subsericea (Mart.) Dubard

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Fernanda Borges; Fernandes, Caio Pinho; Romao, Wanderson; Vanini, Gabriela; Costa, Helber Barcelos; França, Hildegardo Seibert; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Carvalho, José Carlos Tavares; Falcão, Deborah Quintanilha; Rocha, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Manilkara subsericea (Sapotaceae) is a species widely spread in the sandbanks of Restinga de Jurubatiba National Park (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). It is commonly known as “maçaranduba”, “maçarandubinha” and “guracica”, being used in this locality as food, and timber. However, M. subsericea remains almost unexplored regarding its chemical constituents, including secondary metabolites from the leaves. Objective: Identify the chemical constituents from the leaves of M. subsericea. Materials and Methods: Leaves were macerated with ethanol (96% v/v), and dried crude ethanolic extract was sequentially washed with the organic solvents in order to obtain an ethyl acetate fraction. Substances from this fraction were identified by different techniques, such as negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Fresh leaves from M. subsericea were also submitted to hydrodistillation in order to obtain volatile substances, which were identified by gas chromatograph coupled to mass spectrometer. Results: NMR1H and 13C spectra allowed for the identification of the compounds myricetin, quercetin, and kaempferol from the ethyl acetate fraction. The negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry mass spectrum also revealed the presence in this fraction of a polyhydroxytriterpene acid (pomolic acid), and some flavonoids, such as quercitrin, and myricitrin. In all 34 volatile compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and long chain hydrocarbons. Conclusion: This study describes the first reports concerning the phytochemical information about leaves from M. subsericea. SUMMARY Manilkara subsericea fruits proved to be a rich source of triterpenes. However, no phytochemical studies were carried out with leaves. Thus, we described identification of volatile substances from its essential oils, in addition to

  9. Antidiabetic potential and secondary metabolites screening of mangrove gastropod Cerithidea obtusa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reni Tri Cahyani; Sri Purwaningsih; Azrifitria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effects of Cerithidea obtusa extract as antidiabetic and to screen the secondary metabolites presence. Methods: Antidiabetic activity of Cerithidea obtusa extract was measured in vitro usingα-glucosidase inhibition method. Whereas, secondary metabolites screening was measured qualitatively. Results: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 36.40 mg/mL). However, the control drug acarbose had significantly higher antidiabetic activity (IC50 = 0.32 mg/mL). Secondary metabolites screening showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, triterpenoids and saponins. Conclusions: The methanol extract had antidiabetic activity and the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and triterpenoids might contribute to the activity.

  10. Tropical biodiversity: has it been a potential source of secondary metabolites useful for medicinal chemistry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valli, Marilia; Pivatto, Marcos; Danuello, Amanda; Castro-Gamboa, Ian; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Cavalheiro, Alberto Jose; Araujo, Angela Regina; Furlan, Maysa; Lopes, Marcia Nasser; Bolzani, Vanderlan da Silva, E-mail: bolzaniv@iq.unesp.br [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Organica

    2012-07-01

    The use of natural products has definitely been the most successful strategy in the discovery of novel medicines. Secondary metabolites from terrestrial and marine organisms have found considerable use in the treatment of numerous diseases and have been considered lead molecules both in their natural form and as templates for medicinal chemistry. This paper seeks to show the great value of secondary metabolites and emphasize the rich chemical diversity of Brazilian biodiversity. This natural chemical library remains understudied, but can be a useful source of new secondary metabolites with potential application as templates for drug discovery. (author)

  11. Roles for glutathione transferases in plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, David P; Skipsey, Mark; Edwards, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) are classified as enzymes of secondary metabolism, but while their roles in catalysing the conjugation and detoxification of herbicides are well known, their endogenous functions are largely obscure. Thus, while the presence of GST-derived S-glutathionylated xenobiotics have been described in many plants, there is little direct evidence for the accumulation of similarly conjugated natural products, despite the presence of a complex and dichotomous metabolic pathway which processes these reaction products. The conservation in glutathione conjugating and processing pathways, the co-regulation of GSTs with inducible plant secondary metabolism and biochemical studies showing the potential of these enzymes to conjugate reactive natural products are all suggestive of important endogenous functions. As a framework for addressing these enigmatic functions we postulate that either: (a) the natural reaction products of GSTs are unstable and undergo reversible S-glutathionylation; (b) the conjugation products of GSTs are very rapidly processed to derived metabolites; (c) GSTs do not catalyse conventional conjugation reactions but instead use glutathione as a cofactor rather than co-substrate; or (d) GSTs are non-catalytic and function as transporter proteins for secondary metabolites and their unstable intermediates. In this review, we describe how enzyme biochemistry and informatics are providing clues as to GST function allowing for the critical evaluation of each of these hypotheses. We also present evidence for the involvement of GSTs in the synthesis of sulfur-containing secondary metabolites such as volatiles and glucosinolates, and the conjugation, transport and storage of reactive oxylipins, phenolics and flavonoids.

  12. Gibberellic acid increases secondary metabolite production in Echinacea purpurea hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Bilal H; Stiles, Amanda R; Saxena, Praveen K; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-12-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA(3)) is reported to have diverse effects on hairy root cultures of many plant species; therefore, the effects of GA(3) on the growth, secondary metabolite production (caffeic acid derivatives and lignin), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, and free radical scavenging activity of light-grown Echinacea purpurea L. hairy roots were investigated. Eight concentrations of GA(3), ranging from 0.005 to 1.0 μM, were added to shake flask cultures. The moderate GA(3) concentration, 0.025 μM, resulted in the highest concentrations of cichoric acid, caftaric acid, and chlorogenic acid, as well as increased PAL activity, cell viability, and free radical scavenging activity, while higher and lower GA(3) concentrations resulted in reduced levels compared to the control (lacking GA(3)). The moderate GA(3) concentration also affected root morphogenesis; supplementation with 0.025 μM GA(3) resulted in the development of thick, dense, purple-colored roots, while roots exposed to the higher and lower concentrations of GA(3) were thin and off-white. This study demonstrates that supplementation with GA(3) may be an excellent strategy to optimize the production of secondary metabolites from E. purpurea hairy root cultures; however, the GA(3) concentration is a critical factor.

  13. Bioreactor production of secondary metabolites from cell cultures of periwinkle and sandalwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluri, Jagan V

    2009-01-01

    A bench-top bioreactor allowing continuous extraction of secondary metabolites is designed for Catharanthus roseus L. (G.) Don (periwinkle) and Santalum album L. (sandalwood) plant cell suspensions. Periwinkle cell cultures are exposed to biotic elicitors (Aspergillus niger, crude chitin) and abiotic elicitors (mannitol, methyl jasmonate) to induce alkaloid production. Whereas most of the biotic elicitors are effective when added on day 15 of culture, the abiotic elicitors are effective when added on day 20. The use of trans-cinnamic acid, an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, results in significant increase in the alkaloid production of periwinkle cell cultures. Exposure of the cells to mannitol-induced osmotic stress produced marked increment in the total alkaloid production. When biotic and abiotic stress treatments are applied sequentially, an additive effect in alkaloid accumulation is observed. Although no essential oils are detected, secondary metabolites in the form of phenolics are produced by the sandalwood cell cultures in the bioreactor environment. The use of morphologic modification such as organ cultures and transformed cultures is believed to be required for both production and storage of essential oil constituents in sandalwood. The present chapter demonstrates that periwinkle and sandalwood cell suspensions could be developed and successfully cultured in a modified air-lift bioreactor. The exploitation of variant cell strains and biotransformation of added precursors can certainly improve the use of periwinkle and sandalwood cell cultures for the bioproduction of desired compounds.

  14. Metabolomics and bioanalysis of terpenoid derived secondary metabolites : Analysis of Cannabis sativa L. metabolite production and prenylases for cannabinoid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid research has gained a renenewed interest by both the public and scientist. Focus is mainly directed to the medicinal activities, as reported for various cannabinoid structures. This thesis focusses on prenyl-derived secondary metabolites with main focus on cannabinoids. Firstly the produ

  15. Fungal endophytes - secret producers of bioactive plant metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, A H; Debbab, A; Proksch, P

    2013-07-01

    The potential of endophytic fungi as promising sources of bioactive natural products continues to attract broad attention. Endophytic fungi are defined as fungi that live asymptomatically within the tissues of higher plants. This overview will highlight the uniqueness of endophytic fungi as alternative sources of pharmaceutically valuable compounds originally isolated from higher plants, e.g. paclitaxel, camptothecin and podophyllotoxin. In addition, it will shed light on the fungal biosynthesis of plant associated metabolites as well as new approaches developed to improve the production of commercially important plant derived compounds with the involvement of endophytic fungi.

  16. Antioxidant Secondary Metabolites in Cereals: Potential Involvement in Resistance to Fusarium and Mycotoxin Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vessela eATANASOVA-PENICHON

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rot and Fusarium Head Blight are major diseases affecting European cereals. These diseases are mainly caused by fungi of the Fusarium genus, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides. These Fusarium species pose a serious threat to food safety because of their ability to produce a wide range of mycotoxins, including type B trichothecenes and fumonisins. Many factors such as environmental, agronomic or genetic ones may contribute to high levels of accumulation of mycotoxins in the grain and there is an urgent need to implement efficient and sustainable management strategies to reduce mycotoxin contamination. Actually, fungicides are not fully efficient to control the mycotoxin risk. In addition, because of harmful effects on human health and environment, their use should be seriously restricted in the near future. To durably solve the problem of mycotoxin accumulation, the breeding of tolerant genotypes is one of the most promising strategies for cereals. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to both Fusarium and mycotoxin contamination will shed light on plant-pathogen interactions and provide relevant information for improving breeding programs. Resistance to Fusarium depends on the plant ability in preventing initial infection and containing the development of the toxigenic fungi while resistance to mycotoxin contamination is also related to the capacity of plant tissues in reducing mycotoxin accumulation. This capacity can result from two mechanisms: metabolic transformation of the toxin into less toxic compounds and inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. This last mechanism involves host metabolites able to interfere with mycotoxin biosynthesis. This review aims at gathering the latest scientific advances that support the contribution of grain antioxidant secondary metabolites to the mechanisms of plant resistance to Fusarium and mycotoxin accumulation.

  17. Antioxidant Secondary Metabolites in Cereals: Potential Involvement in Resistance to Fusarium and Mycotoxin Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Barreau, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rot and Fusarium Head Blight are major diseases affecting European cereals. These diseases are mainly caused by fungi of the Fusarium genus, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides. These Fusarium species pose a serious threat to food safety because of their ability to produce a wide range of mycotoxins, including type B trichothecenes and fumonisins. Many factors such as environmental, agronomic or genetic ones may contribute to high levels of accumulation of mycotoxins in the grain and there is an urgent need to implement efficient and sustainable management strategies to reduce mycotoxin contamination. Actually, fungicides are not fully efficient to control the mycotoxin risk. In addition, because of harmful effects on human health and environment, their use should be seriously restricted in the near future. To durably solve the problem of mycotoxin accumulation, the breeding of tolerant genotypes is one of the most promising strategies for cereals. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to both Fusarium and mycotoxin contamination will shed light on plant-pathogen interactions and provide relevant information for improving breeding programs. Resistance to Fusarium depends on the plant ability in preventing initial infection and containing the development of the toxigenic fungi while resistance to mycotoxin contamination is also related to the capacity of plant tissues in reducing mycotoxin accumulation. This capacity can result from two mechanisms: metabolic transformation of the toxin into less toxic compounds and inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. This last mechanism involves host metabolites able to interfere with mycotoxin biosynthesis. This review aims at gathering the latest scientific advances that support the contribution of grain antioxidant secondary metabolites to the mechanisms of plant resistance to Fusarium and mycotoxin accumulation. PMID:27148243

  18. Importance and Implications of the Production of Phenolic Secondary Metabolites by Endophytic Fungi: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros de Carvalho, Patrícia Lunardelli; Silva, Eliane de Oliveira; Chagas-Paula, Daniela Aparecida; Hortolan Luiz, Jaine Honorata; Ikegaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    In the natural products research, a valuable approach is the prospection of uncommon sources and unexplored habitat. Special attention has been given to endophytic fungi because of their ability to produce new and interesting secondary metabolites, which have several biological applications. The endophytes establish exclusive symbiotic relationships with plants and the metabolic interactions may support the synthesis of some similar valuables compounds. Among secondary metabolites, phenol-derived structures are responsible for several bioactivities such as antioxidant, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, among others. Phenolic compounds might be biosynthesized from the shikimate pathway. Although shikimic acid is a common precursor in plants, it is described as rare in microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review about phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi and a comparison has been made with those produced by the plant host. This review covers 124 phenolic secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi. Considering the data analyzed by us, only seven of such compounds were isolated from fungi and from their hosts. These observations claim for more attention to phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi with a view to understand the real importance of these compounds to endophytes survival.

  19. Multicomponent Analysis of the Differential Induction of Secondary Metabolite Profiles in Fungal Endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Menéndez, Víctor; Pérez-Bonilla, Mercedes; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Martín, Jesús; Muñoz, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Tormo, José R; Genilloud, Olga

    2016-02-18

    Small molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC) and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors are commonly used to perturb the production of fungal metabolites leading to the induction of the expression of silent biosynthetic pathways. Several reports have described the variable effects observed in natural product profiles in fungi treated with HDAC and DNMT inhibitors, such as enhanced chemical diversity and/or the induction of new molecules previously unknown to be produced by the strain. Fungal endophytes are known to produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites (SMs) involved in their adaptation and survival within higher plants. The plant-microbe interaction may influence the expression of some biosynthetic pathways, otherwise cryptic in these fungi when grown in vitro. The aim of this study was to setup a systematic approach to evaluate and identify the possible effects of HDAC and DNMT inhibitors on the metabolic profiles of wild type fungal endophytes, including the chemical identification and characterization of the most significant SMs induced by these epigenetic modifiers.

  20. Multicomponent Analysis of the Differential Induction of Secondary Metabolite Profiles in Fungal Endophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor González-Menéndez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Small molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitors are commonly used to perturb the production of fungal metabolites leading to the induction of the expression of silent biosynthetic pathways. Several reports have described the variable effects observed in natural product profiles in fungi treated with HDAC and DNMT inhibitors, such as enhanced chemical diversity and/or the induction of new molecules previously unknown to be produced by the strain. Fungal endophytes are known to produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites (SMs involved in their adaptation and survival within higher plants. The plant-microbe interaction may influence the expression of some biosynthetic pathways, otherwise cryptic in these fungi when grown in vitro. The aim of this study was to setup a systematic approach to evaluate and identify the possible effects of HDAC and DNMT inhibitors on the metabolic profiles of wild type fungal endophytes, including the chemical identification and characterization of the most significant SMs induced by these epigenetic modifiers.

  1. Release of resource constraints allows greater carbon allocation to secondary metabolites and storage in winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianbei; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Forkelová, Lenka; Hartmann, Henrik

    2016-12-23

    The atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2 ]) is rapidly increasing, and this may have substantial impact on how plants allocate metabolic resources. A thorough understanding of allocation priorities can be achieved by modifying [CO2 ] over a large gradient, including low [CO2 ], thereby altering plant carbon (C) availability. Such information is of critical importance for understanding plant responses to global environmental change. We quantified the percentage of daytime whole-plant net assimilation (A) allocated to night-time respiration (R), structural growth (SG), nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and secondary metabolites (SMs) during 8 weeks of vegetative growth in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) growing at low, ambient and elevated [CO2 ] (170, 390 and 680 ppm). R/A remained relatively constant over a large gradient of [CO2 ]. However, with increasing C availability, the fraction of assimilation allocated to biomass (SG + NSC + SMs), in particular NSC and SMs, increased. At low [CO2 ], biomass and NSC increased in leaves but decreased in stems and roots, which may help plants achieve a functional equilibrium, that is, overcome the most severe resource limitation. These results reveal that increasing C availability from rising [CO2 ] releases allocation constraints, thereby allowing greater investment into long-term survival in the form of NSC and SMs.

  2. Effect of Competition on the Production and Activity of Secondary Metabolites in Aspergillus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary metabolites are of intense interest to humans due to their pharmaceutical and/or toxic properties. Aspergillus species secrete these metabolites by themselves and in the presence of other fungal species. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among different Aspergillu...

  3. Orthogonal Analysis Underscores the Relevance of Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Licorice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmler, Charlotte; Nikolić, Dejan; Lankin, David C; Yu, Yang; Friesen, J Brent; van Breemen, Richard B; Lecomte, Alicia; Le Quémener, Céline; Audo, Grégoire; Pauli, Guido F

    2014-08-22

    Licorice botanicals are produced from the roots of Glycyrrhiza species (Fabaceae), encompassing metabolites of both plant and rhizobial origin. The composition in both primary and secondary metabolites (1°/2°Ms) reflects the physiologic state of the plant at harvest. Interestingly, the relative abundance of 1°Ms vs 2°Ms in licorice extracts remains undetermined. A centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) method was developed to purify liquiritin derivatives that represent major bioactive 2°Ms and to concentrate the polar 1°Ms from the crude extract of Glycyrrhiza uralensis. One objective was to determine the purity of the generated reference materials by orthogonal UHPLC-UV/LC-MS and qHNMR analyses. The other objectives were to evaluate the presence of 1°Ms in purified 2°Ms and define their mass balance in a crude botanical extract. Whereas most impurities could be assigned to well-known 1°Ms, p-hydroxybenzylmalonic acid, a new natural tyrosine analogue, was also identified. Additionally, in the most polar fraction, sucrose and proline represented 93% (w/w) of all qHNMR-quantified 1°Ms. Compared to the 2°Ms, accounting for 11.9% by UHPLC-UV, 1°Ms quantified by qHNMR defined an additional 74.8% of G. uralensis extract. The combined orthogonal methods enable the mass balance characterization of licorice extracts and highlight the relevance of 1°Ms, and accompanying metabolites, for botanical quality control.

  4. Effect of Deltamethrin on the Main Secondary Metabolites in Tea Plant(Camellia sinensis)%喷施溴氰菊酯对茶树主要特征性次生代谢物含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋正中; 盛亮; 邓威威; 杨云秋; 韦朝领; 张正竹

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different concentration of deltamethrin on the main secondary metabolites in tea leaves. The results showed after spraying deltamethrin at three concentrations for two days, the polyphenols in leaves was significantly lower than controls. In the higher deltamethrin concentration treatment, the larger reduction was happened. However, the maximum drops in recommended concentrations group and low concentrations group (19.4% and 20.3%) were both happened on the 8th day after spraying. For the theanine analysis, treatment after 2 to 8 days, theanine in the leaves of the 3 Treatment groups were obviously lower than that of the control group. Also theanine reached at the maximum drops(22.3% and 18.3%) on the 8th day after spraying both in the high and low concentrations group. At last, in the 2-day-treatment and 4-day-treatment, the content of caffeine went up remarkably in low concentrations group. However, the content of caffeine in the tea leaves was obviously lower than that of control group which was found both in the high concentrations group and recommended concentrations group. In general, three main secondary metabolites were shown little changes in different concentrations compared with the control group treatment after 10 days.%研究了不同浓度溴氰菊酯对茶树叶片中主要特征性次生代谢物含量的影响以及时间效应.结果表明:处理后2d,3种浓度的处理皆引起茶多酚含量显著低于对照,且随着处理浓度的增加降低幅度愈大,处理后8d,低浓度和推荐浓度处理的叶片降低幅度均达到最大,分别为19.4%和20.3%;喷施后2-8 d,3种浓度处理皆导致茶氨酸含量明显低于对照,低浓度和高浓度组均是在处理后8d降低幅度最大,分别达到18.3%和22.3%;喷施后2d和4d,低浓度的处理诱导咖啡碱含量显著升高,而推荐浓度与高浓度的处理却导致咖啡碱含量显著低于对照;在处理后10d,

  5. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) for direct visualization of plant metabolites in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, Drew; Lee, Young-Jin; Chapman, Kent D

    2016-02-01

    Direct visualization of plant tissues by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has revealed key insights into the localization of metabolites in situ. Recent efforts have determined the spatial distribution of primary and secondary metabolites in plant tissues and cells. Strategies have been applied in many areas of metabolism including isotope flux analyses, plant interactions, and transcriptional regulation of metabolite accumulation. Technological advances have pushed achievable spatial resolution to subcellular levels and increased instrument sensitivity by several orders of magnitude. It is anticipated that MALDI-MSI and other MSI approaches will bring a new level of understanding to metabolomics as scientists will be encouraged to consider spatial heterogeneity of metabolites in descriptions of metabolic pathway regulation.

  6. In silico prediction and characterization of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Timothy; Meyer, Vera

    2017-08-17

    Fungal pathogens of plants produce diverse repertoires of secondary metabolites, which have functions ranging from iron acquisition, defense against immune perturbation, to toxic assaults on the host. The wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici causes Septoria tritici blotch, a foliar disease which is a significant threat to global food security. Currently, there is limited knowledge of the secondary metabolite arsenal produced by Z. tritici, which significantly restricts mechanistic understanding of infection. In this study, we analyzed the genome of Z. tritici isolate IP0323 to identify putative secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters, and used comparative genomics to predict their encoded products. We identified 32 putative secondary metabolite clusters. These were physically enriched at subtelomeric regions, which may facilitate diversification of cognate products by rapid gene rearrangement or mutations. Comparative genomics revealed a four gene cluster with significant similarity to the ferrichrome-A biosynthetic locus of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, suggesting this siderophore is deployed by Z. tritici to acquire iron. The Z. tritici genome also contains several isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters, including one with high similarity to a carotenoid/opsin producing locus in several fungi. Furthermore, we identify putative phytotoxin biosynthetic clusters, suggesting Z. tritici can produce an epipolythiodioxopiperazine, and a polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide with predicted structural similarities to fumonisin and the Alternaria alternata AM-toxin, respectively. Interrogation of an existing transcriptional dataset suggests stage specific deployment of numerous predicted loci during infection, indicating an important role of these secondary metabolites in Z. tritici disease. We were able to assign putative biosynthetic products to numerous clusters based on conservation amongst other fungi. However, analysis of the majority of secondary

  7. Primary, Secondary Metabolites, H2O2, Malondialdehyde and Photosynthetic Responses of Orthosiphon stimaneus Benth. to Different Irradiance Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The resource availability hypothesis predicts an increase in the allocation to secondary metabolites when carbon gain is improved relative to nutrient availability, which normally occurs during periods of low irradiance. The present work was carried out to confirm this hypothesis by investigating the effects of decreasing irradiance on the production of plant secondary metabolites (flavonoids and phenolics in the herbal plant Orthosiphon stamineus, and to characterize this production by carbohydrate, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels, net photosynthesis, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N. Four levels of irradiance (225, 500, 625 and 900 µmol/m2/s were imposed onto two-week old seedlings for 12 weeks in a randomized complete block design experiment. Peak production of total flavonoids, phenolics, soluble sugar, starch and total non-structural carbohydrate ocurred under low irradiance of 225 µmol/m2/s, and decreased with increasing irradiance. The up-regulation of secondary metabolites could be explained by the concomitant increases in H2O2 and MDA activities under low irradiance. This condition also resulted in enhanced C/N ratio signifying a reduction in nitrogen levels, which had established significant negative correlations with net photosynthesis, total biomass and total chlorophyll content, indicating the possible existence of a trade-off between growth and secondary metabolism under low irradiance with reduced nitrogen content. The competition between total chlorophyll and secondary metabolites production, as exhibited by the negative correlation coefficient under low irradiance, also suggests a sign of gradual switch of investment from chlorophyll to polyphenols production.

  8. HPTLC Fingerprints of Various Secondary Metabolites in the Traditional Medicinal Herb Hypochaeris radicata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamuna Senguttuvan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to elucidate the various secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenoids in the methanolic leaf and root extracts of Hypochaeris radicata, a most important traditional medicinal plant species in Nilgiris, the Western Ghats, India, using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC. This study was carried out using CAMAG HPTLC system equipped with LINOMAT 5 applicator, TLC scanner 3, Reprostar 3, and winCATS 1.3.4 software. A comprehensive assortment of phytoconstituents in methanolic extracts through HPTLC fingerprinting profiles displayed the existence of alkaloids (3 in leaf and 1 in root extract, flavonoids (4 in leaf extract and 5 in root extract, glycosides (1 in leaf extract and 3 in root extract, saponins (1 in root extract, and terpenoids (1 in leaf and root extracts, resp.. The current study overlays boulevard for H. radicata to provide a direction for further exploration in precluding communicable and noncommunicable ailments.

  9. Altitudinal variation of secondary metabolite profiles in flowering heads of Matricaria chamomilla cv. BONA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzera, Markus; Guggenberger, Manuela; Stuppner, Hermann; Zidorn, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The altitudinal variation of the contents of secondary metabolites in flowering heads of Matricaria chamomilla L. (Asteraceae) was assessed. Plants of M. chamomilla cultivar BONA were grown in nine experimental plots at altitudes between 590 and 2,230 m at Mount Patscherkofel near Innsbruck/Austria. The amounts of flavonoids and phenolic acids were quantified by HPLC/DAD. For both flavonoids and phenolic acids positive (r = 0.559 and 0.587) and statistically significant (both p < 0.001) correlations with the altitude of the growing site were observed. The results are compared to previous results on Arnica montana L. cv. ARBO. Moreover, various ecological factors, which change with the altitude of the growing site, are discussed as potential causes for the observed variation.

  10. Secondary Metabolites from Halostachys caspica and Their Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianglin Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine secondary metabolites have been isolated from the aerial parts of Halostachys caspica C. A. Mey. (Chenopodiaceae. By means of physicochemical and spectrometric analysis, they were identified as betaine (1, diphenylamine (2, benzyl-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, β-sitosterol (4, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzoic acid (5, 4-hydroxy benzoic acid (6, 2-hydroxy benzoic acid (7, 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzoic acid (8, and 3,4-dihydroxy benzeneacrylic acid (9. All compounds were isolated from this plant species for the first time. They were screened to exhibit antimicrobial and antioxidant activities to some extent except for the compounds 1 and 3. The results indicated that the isolated phenol acids and diphenylamine (2 could be the main bioactive components in the crude ethanol extract of H. caspica.

  11. SECONDARY METABOLITE FROM ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI Aspergillus niger OF THE STEM BARK OF KANDIS GAJAH (Garcinia griffithii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia griffithii are known as kandis gajah including the Garcinia genus. This plant has been traditionally used by local communities Sarasah Bonta, Lembah Arau, West Sumatra, to treat various diseases including gout. Aspergillus niger was isolated from the tissues of the stem bark of Garcinia griffithii. The fungi strain was identified base on colony and cell morphology characteristic. Aspergillus niger cultured in media 5L Potatos Dextose Broth (PDB for 8 weeks and filtered. Media that already contains secondary metabolites are partitioned using ethyl acetate solvent in 5 L (twice, followed by evaporation. Furthermore, the extract is separated by chromatographic techniques to obtain a pure compound of white crystal. The molecular structures of isolated compounds are determined by spectroscopic methods including IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HMQC, HMBC, and COSY. The compound was determined as phenolic (1.

  12. Engineered Streptomyces avermitilis host for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene cluster for secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Mamoru; Komatsu, Kyoko; Koiwai, Hanae; Yamada, Yuuki; Kozone, Ikuko; Izumikawa, Miho; Hashimoto, Junko; Takagi, Motoki; Omura, Satoshi; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-07-19

    An industrial microorganism, Streptomyces avermitilis, which is a producer of anthelmintic macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, has been constructed as a versatile model host for heterologous expression of genes encoding secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Twenty of the entire biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites were successively cloned and introduced into a versatile model host S. avermitilis SUKA17 or 22. Almost all S. avermitilis transformants carrying the entire gene cluster produced metabolites as a result of the expression of biosynthetic gene clusters introduced. A few transformants were unable to produce metabolites, but their production was restored by the expression of biosynthetic genes using an alternative promoter or the expression of a regulatory gene in the gene cluster that controls the expression of biosynthetic genes in the cluster using an alternative promoter. Production of metabolites in some transformants of the versatile host was higher than that of the original producers, and cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters in the original producer were also expressed in a versatile host.

  13. Secondary metabolites and insecticidal activity of Anemone pavonina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varitimidis, Christos; Petrakis, Panos V; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of the crude extracts of the leaves and flowers of Anemone pavonina were evaluated on Pheidole pallidula ants and showed significant levels of activity. Bioassay-guided fractionations led to the isolation of the butenolide ranunculin (1) as the active principle. Chemical investigations of the extracts showed them to contain as major components the sitosterol glycopyranoside lipids 2-5 and the glycerides 6-8. The structures of the metabolites were elucidated, following acetylation and hydrolysis of the natural products, by interpretation of their NMR and mass spectral data. The uncommon lipid metabolites 2-8 were isolated for the first time from the genus Anemone and this is the first report of insecticidal activity of the Anemone metabolite ranunculin against ants.

  14. The Ecological Role of Volatile and Soluble Secondary Metabolites Produced by Soil Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Song, Chunxu; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Vos, Michiel; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-12-27

    The rich diversity of secondary metabolites produced by soil bacteria has been appreciated for over a century, and advances in chemical analysis and genome sequencing continue to greatly advance our understanding of this biochemical complexity. However, we are just at the beginning of understanding the physicochemical properties of bacterial metabolites, the factors that govern their production and ecological roles. Interspecific interactions and competitor sensing are among the main biotic factors affecting the production of bacterial secondary metabolites. Many soil bacteria produce both volatile and soluble compounds. In contrast to soluble compounds, volatile organic compounds can diffuse easily through air- and gas-filled pores in the soil and likely play an important role in long-distance microbial interactions. In this review we provide an overview of the most important soluble and volatile classes of secondary metabolites produced by soil bacteria, their ecological roles, and their possible synergistic effects.

  15. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet–liquid microjunction–surface sampling probe (droplet–LMJ–SSP) was coupled with UPLC–PDA–HRMS–MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet–LMJ–SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture. PMID:26192135

  16. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Vincent P; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2015-08-28

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metabolites, such as differentiating isomers. To overcome this, the droplet-liquid microjunction-surface sampling probe (droplet-LMJ-SSP) was coupled with UPLC-PDA-HRMS-MS/MS, thus providing separation, retention times, MS data, and UV/vis data used in traditional dereplication protocols. By capturing these mutually supportive data, the identity of secondary metabolites can be confidently and rapidly assigned in situ. Using the droplet-LMJ-SSP, a protocol was constructed to analyze the secondary metabolite profile of fungal cultures without any sample preparation. The results demonstrate that fungal cultures can be dereplicated from the Petri dish, thus identifying secondary metabolites, including isomers, and confirming them against reference standards. Furthermore, heat maps, similar to mass spectrometry imaging, can be used to ascertain the location and relative concentration of secondary metabolites directly on the surface and/or surroundings of a fungal culture.

  17. Plant Bioactive Metabolites and Drugs Produced by Endophytic Fungi of Spermatophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Nicoletti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that plant-based ethnomedicine represented the foundation of modern pharmacology and that many pharmaceuticals are derived from compounds occurring in plant extracts. This track still stimulates a worldwide investigational activity aimed at identifying novel bioactive products of plant origin. However, the discovery that endophytic fungi are able to produce many plant-derived drugs has disclosed new horizons for their availability and production on a large scale by the pharmaceutical industry. In fact, following the path traced by the blockbuster drug taxol, an increasing number of valuable compounds originally characterized as secondary metabolites of plant species belonging to the Spermatophyta have been reported as fermentation products of endophytic fungal strains. Aspects concerning sources and bioactive properties of these compounds are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Effects of UV-B on secondary metabolites of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) grown in controlled environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechner, Melissa L; Albright, Louis D; Weston, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    The medicinal plant industry is under increasing scrutiny due to wide variance in active ingredient (AI) concentration from values claimed on labels. Reasons for this disparity include environmental and genotypic variation which influence AI concentration. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is a popular herbal remedy which also exhibits marked variance in AI concentration among products. This study evaluated concentration changes of three biologically active metabolites of H. perforatum after exposure to UV light while plants were still vegetative. Treatments were performed with 55-day-old plants grown under 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1) PAR for 16 h a day. Three UV light treatments were evaluated: a single dose, a daily dose and an increasing daily dose. Concentrations of hyperforin, pseudohypericin and hypericin were monitored for 7 days after each treatment. A daily dose and an increasing daily dose did not produce significantly greater increases in secondary metabolites compared to single dose treatments. These results suggest the small but significant transient metabolite concentration increases in H. perforatum can be induced by UV light exposure. Information from this study can be useful in optimizing total biomass and metabolite production in controlled environments.

  19. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Sulyok, Michael; Täubel, Martin; Vishwanath, Vinay; Krop, Esmeralda; Borràs-Santos, Alicia; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Krska, Rudolf; Larsson, Lennart

    2012-08-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of these compounds in relation to moisture damage and dampness in buildings. This study conducted in the context of the HITEA project (Health Effects of Indoor Pollutants: Integrating microbial, toxicological and epidemiological approaches) aimed at providing systematic information on the prevalence of microbial secondary metabolites in a large number of school buildings in three European countries, considering both buildings with and without moisture damage and/or dampness observations. In order to address the multitude and diversity of secondary metabolites a large number of more than 180 analytes was targeted in settled dust and surface swab samples using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) based methodology. While 42%, 58% and 44% of all samples collected in Spanish, Dutch and Finnish schools, respectively, were positive for at least one of the metabolites analyzed, frequency of detection for the individual microbial secondary metabolites - with the exceptions of emodin, certain enniatins and physcion - was low, typically in the range of and below 10% of positive samples. In total, 30 different fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites were found in the samples. Some differences in the metabolite profiles were observed between countries and between index and reference school buildings. A major finding in this study was that settled dust derived from moisture damaged, damp schools contained larger numbers of microbial secondary metabolites at higher levels compared to respective dust samples from schools not affected by moisture damage and dampness. This observation was true for schools in each of the three countries, but became statistically significant only

  20. Bioactive secondary metabolites with multiple activities from a fungal endophyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogner, C.W.; Kamdem, R.S.; Stichtermann, G.; Matthäus, C.; Hölscher, D.; Popp, J.; Proksch, P.; Grundler, F.M.; Schouten, A.

    2017-01-01

    In order to replace particularly biohazardous nematocides, there is a strong drive to finding natural product-based alternatives with the aim of containing nematode pests in agriculture. The metabolites produced by the fungal endophyte Fusarium oxysporum 162 when cultivated on rice media were isolat

  1. Potato glycoalkaloids and metabolites: roles in the plant and in the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2006-11-15

    Potatoes, members of the Solanaceae plant family, serve as major, inexpensive low-fat food sources providing energy (starch), high-quality protein, fiber, and vitamins. Potatoes also produce biologically active secondary metabolites, which may have both adverse and beneficial effects in the diet. These include glycoalkaloids, calystegine alkaloids, protease inhibitors, lectins, phenolic compounds, and chlorophyll. Because glycoalkaloids are reported to be involved in host-plant resistance and to have a variety of adverse as well as beneficial effects in cells, animals, and humans, a need exists to develop a clearer understanding of their roles both in the plant and in the diet. To contribute to this effort, this integrated review presents data on the (a) history of glycoalkaloids; (b) glycoalkaloid content in different parts of the potato plant, in processed potato products, and in wild, transgenic, and organic potatoes; (c) biosynthesis, inheritance, plant molecular biology, and glycoalkaloid-plant phytopathogen relationships; (d) dietary significance with special focus on the chemistry, analysis, and nutritional quality of low-glycoalkaloid potato protein; (e) pharmacology and toxicology of the potato glycoalkaloids comprising alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine and their hydrolysis products (metabolites); (f) anticarcinogenic and other beneficial effects; and (g) possible dietary consequences of concurrent consumption of glycoalkaloids and other biologically active compounds present in fresh and processed potatoes. An enhanced understanding of the multiple and overlapping aspects of glycoalkaloids in the plant and in the diet will benefit producers and consumers of potatoes.

  2. Seasonal variability of Chelidonium majus L. secondary metabolites content and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Z Dragana; Stankovic, S Milan; Topuzovic, D Marina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the total phenolic content, concentration of flavonoids and antioxidant activity in extracts of the plant Chelidonium majus L. during different phenological stages (stage of rosette, the initial flowering stage, the stage of fully formed flowers and stage of fruits formation). Five different extracts of the whole plant, for each phase, were obtained by extraction with water, methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. The concentration of total phenolic content was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu´s reagent and obtained values were the highest in the rosette stage (60.96 mg GA/g). The concentration of flavonoids was the highest in the initial stage of flowering (291.58 mg RU/g). The antioxidant activity was determined in vitro using DPPH reagent. The highest antioxidant activity was expressed in the rosette stage (50.72 mg/ml). Based on the obtained results it can be concluded that the concentrations of secondary metabolites in Ch. majus depend on the phenological stage of the plant.

  3. Sources of Secondary Metabolite Variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae: The Importance of Having Good Neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Banaigs

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from a population of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors and internal (reproductive stages factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures.

  4. Sources of secondary metabolite variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae): the importance of having good neighbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caralt, Sonia; Bry, Delphine; Bontemps, Nataly; Turon, Xavier; Uriz, Maria-Jesus; Banaigs, Bernard

    2013-02-18

    Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives) with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from a population of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors) and internal (reproductive stages) factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures.

  5. Lipoxygenases and their metabolites in formation of plant stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Babenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the analysis of new information concerning molecular enzymology of lipoxygenases – proteins involved in lipid peroxidation and found in animals and plants. Modern concept of structural features, catalytic characteristics and functions of lipoxygenase family enzymes as well as products of their catalytic activity in plants have been discussed and summarized. Issues of enzyme localization in plant cells and tissues, evolution and distribution of lipoxygenases, involvement in production of signaling substances involved in formation of adaptation response to abiotic and biotic stress factors and in regulation of lipoxygenase signal system activity are highlighted. Participants of the elements signaling of LOX-pathway reception and transduction into genome are considered. Special attention is given to jasmonates, metabolites of the allene oxide synthase branch of the lipoxygenase cascade, because these metabolites have high biological activity, are ubiquitously present in all plant organisms, and are involved in regulation of vitally important processes. Data concerning lipoxygenase phylogeny, possible occurrence of a common predecessor for modern isoforms of the enzyme in pro- and eukaryote have been examined. Some results of our studies that open up possibilities of using the lipoxygenase catalytic activity characteristics as biological markers in plant stress tolerance researches are given.

  6. Secondary metabolite profiling of Curcuma species grown at different locations using GC/TOF and UPLC/Q-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jueun; Jung, Youngae; Shin, Jeoung-Hwa; Kim, Ho Kyoung; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Ryu, Do Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2014-07-04

    Curcuma, a genus of rhizomatous herbaceous species, has been used as a spice, traditional medicine, and natural dye. In this study, the metabolite profile of Curcuma extracts was determined using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS) and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS) to characterize differences between Curcuma aromatica and Curcuma longa grown on the Jeju-do or Jin-do islands, South Korea. Previous studies have performed primary metabolite profiling of Curcuma species grown in different regions using NMR-based metabolomics. This study focused on profiling of secondary metabolites from the hexane extract of Curcuma species. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) plots showed significant differences between the C. aromatica and C. longa metabolite profiles, whereas geographical location had little effect. A t-test was performed to identify statistically significant metabolites, such as terpenoids. Additionally, targeted profiling using UPLC/Q-TOF MS showed that the concentration of curcuminoids differed depending on the plant origin. Based on these results, a combination of GC- and LC-MS allowed us to analyze curcuminoids and terpenoids, the typical bioactive compounds of Curcuma, which can be used to discriminate Curcuma samples according to species or geographical origin.

  7. Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Curcuma Species Grown at Different Locations Using GC/TOF and UPLC/Q-TOF MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jueun Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma, a genus of rhizomatous herbaceous species, has been used as a spice, traditional medicine, and natural dye. In this study, the metabolite profile of Curcuma extracts was determined using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF MS and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS to characterize differences between Curcuma aromatica and Curcuma longa grown on the Jeju-do or Jin-do islands, South Korea. Previous studies have performed primary metabolite profiling of Curcuma species grown in different regions using NMR-based metabolomics. This study focused on profiling of secondary metabolites from the hexane extract of Curcuma species. Principal component analysis (PCA and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA plots showed significant differences between the C. aromatica and C. longa metabolite profiles, whereas geographical location had little effect. A t-test was performed to identify statistically significant metabolites, such as terpenoids. Additionally, targeted profiling using UPLC/Q-TOF MS showed that the concentration of curcuminoids differed depending on the plant origin. Based on these results, a combination of GC- and LC-MS allowed us to analyze curcuminoids and terpenoids, the typical bioactive compounds of Curcuma, which can be used to discriminate Curcuma samples according to species or geographical origin.

  8. Different Narrow-Band Light Ranges Alter Plant Secondary Metabolism and Plant Defense Response to Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Ole; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Wu, Sasa; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Light of different wavelengths affects various physiological processes in plants. Short-wavelength radiation (like UV) can activate defense pathways in plants and enhance the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (such as flavonoids and glucosinolates) responsible for resistance against certain herbivorous insects. The intensity of light-induced, metabolite-based resistance is plant- and insect species-specific and depends on herbivore feeding guild and specialization. In this study, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) plants were grown for 4 weeks in a climate chamber under conventional fluorescent tubes and were additionally treated with UV-B (310 nm), UV-A (365 or 385 nm), or violet (420 nm) light generated with UV-B tubes or light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The objective was to determine the influence of narrow bandwidths of light (from UV-B to violet) on plant secondary metabolism and on the performance of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae (a specialist) and the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (a generalist). Among flavonol glycosides, specific quercetin and kaempferol glycosides increased markedly under UV-B, while among glucosinolates only 4-methoxy-3-indolylmethyl showed a 2-fold increase in plants exposed to UV-B and UV-A. The concentration of 3-indolylmethyl glucosinolate in broccoli plants increased with UV-B treatment. Brevicoryne brassicae adult weights and fecundity were lower on UV-B treated plants compared to UV-A or violet light-treated plants. Adult weights and fecundity of M. persicae were increased under UV-B and UV-A treatments. When specific light wavelengths are used to induce metabolic changes in plants, the specificity of the induced effects on herbivores should be considered.

  9. Intra-Population Variation of Secondary Metabolites in Cistus ladanifer L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Valares Masa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, secondary metabolites in the leaf exudate of Cistus ladanifer, specifically aglycone flavonoids and diterpenes, were demonstrated to play an ecophysiological role. They protect against ultraviolet radiation, have antiherbivore activity, and are allelopathic agents. Their synthesis in the plant was also found to vary quantitatively and qualitatively in response to various environmental factors. In view of these findings, the present work was designed to clarify whether within a single population there are differences among individuals subject to the same environmental conditions. To this end, we analyzed the leaves of 100 individuals of C. ladanifer. The results showed the existence of intrapopulational variation, since, although all the individuals had the same composition of secondary chemistry, the amounts were different. The individuals of a given population of C. ladanifer differ from each other even when growing under similar conditions. According to the ammount of flavonoids and diterpenes observed in each individual, it was possible to distinguish four different groups of individuals. Most individuals, evenly distributed within the population, had low concentrations of the studied compounds, whilst other individuals synthesized greater amounts and were randomly distributed among the former. Given the functions of flavonoids and diterpenes in this species, the quantified intra-population variation may involve greater plasticity for the species in the face of environmental changes.

  10. Intra-Population Variation of Secondary Metabolites in Cistus ladanifer L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valares Masa, Cristina; Alías Gallego, Juan Carlos; Chaves Lobón, Natividad; Sosa Díaz, Teresa

    2016-07-21

    In previous studies, secondary metabolites in the leaf exudate of Cistus ladanifer, specifically aglycone flavonoids and diterpenes, were demonstrated to play an ecophysiological role. They protect against ultraviolet radiation, have antiherbivore activity, and are allelopathic agents. Their synthesis in the plant was also found to vary quantitatively and qualitatively in response to various environmental factors. In view of these findings, the present work was designed to clarify whether within a single population there are differences among individuals subject to the same environmental conditions. To this end, we analyzed the leaves of 100 individuals of C. ladanifer. The results showed the existence of intrapopulational variation, since, although all the individuals had the same composition of secondary chemistry, the amounts were different. The individuals of a given population of C. ladanifer differ from each other even when growing under similar conditions. According to the ammount of flavonoids and diterpenes observed in each individual, it was possible to distinguish four different groups of individuals. Most individuals, evenly distributed within the population, had low concentrations of the studied compounds, whilst other individuals synthesized greater amounts and were randomly distributed among the former. Given the functions of flavonoids and diterpenes in this species, the quantified intra-population variation may involve greater plasticity for the species in the face of environmental changes.

  11. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation on yam (Dioscorea spp.) tuber weights and secondary metabolite content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fun-Chi; Lee, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widely distributed in nature. They live in the roots of higher plants, in a symbiotic relationship. In this study, five commercial species of yams (Dioscorea spp.) were inoculated with six species of AMF, Glomus clarum, G. etunicatum, G. fasciculatum, Gigaspora sp., G. mosseae, and Acaulospora sp., in field cultivation conditions to investigate the influence of AMF inoculation on tuber weights and secondary metabolite content in yam tubers. The results showed that mycorrhizae formation rates ranged from 63.33% to 90%. G. etunicatum inoculation treatment increased the tube weights of the five species of yam tubers by 39%, 35%, 20%, 56%, and 40% for Tainung 1, Tainung 2, Ercih, Zihyuxieshu, and Tainung 5, respectively. The content of secondary metabolites, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanin, was significantly increased by the AMF treatment in tuber flesh and peel of all the tested yam species. Specifically, the maximums exchange of secondary metabolite contents increased to 40%, 42%, and 106% for polyphenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanin, respectively, in the tuber fresh. This study revealed that different species of yam had varying degrees of affinity with various AMF species; selecting effective AMF species is necessary to facilitate yam growth and improve the quality and quantity of yam tubers.

  12. The role of metabolic engineering in the production of secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1998-01-01

    In the production of secondary metabolites yield and productivity are the most important design parameters. The focus is therefore to direct the carbon fluxes towards the product of interest, and this can be obtained through metabolic engineering whereby directed genetic changes are introduced in...... to construct strains that produce novel metabolites, either through the recruitment of heterologous enzyme activities or through introduction of specific mutations in catalytic activities....

  13. Drought-related secondary metabolites of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) leaves and their metabolomic quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecka, Anna; Sawikowska, Aneta; Kuczyńska, Anetta; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Mikołajczak, Krzysztof; Krystkowiak, Karolina; Gudyś, Kornelia; Guzy-Wróbelska, Justyna; Krajewski, Paweł; Kachlicki, Piotr

    2017-03-01

    Determining the role of plant secondary metabolites in stress conditions is problematic due to the diversity of their structures and the complexity of their interdependence with different biological pathways. Correlation of metabolomic data with the genetic background provides essential information about the features of metabolites. LC-MS analysis of leaf metabolites from 100 barley recombinant inbred lines (RILs) revealed that 98 traits among 135 detected phenolic and terpenoid compounds significantly changed their level as a result of drought stress. Metabolites with similar patterns of change were grouped in modules, revealing differences among RILs and parental varieties at early and late stages of drought. The most significant changes in stress were observed for ferulic and sinapic acid derivatives as well as acylated glycosides of flavones. The tendency to accumulate methylated compounds was a major phenomenon in this set of samples. In addition, the polyamine derivatives hordatines as well as terpenoid blumenol C derivatives were observed to be drought related. The correlation of drought-related compounds with molecular marker polymorphisms resulted in the definition of metabolomic quantitative trait loci in the genomic regions of single-nucleotide polymorphism 3101-111 and simple sequence repeat Bmag0692 with multiple linkages to metabolites. The associations pointed to genes related to the defence response and response to cold, heat and oxidative stress, but not to genes related to biosynthesis of the compounds. We postulate that the significant metabolites have a role as antioxidants, regulators of gene expression and modulators of protein function in barley during drought. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Evaluation of culture media for the production of secondary metabolites in a natural products screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermolen, Karen M; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2013-12-17

    Variation in the growing environment can have significant impacts on the quantity and diversity of fungal secondary metabolites. In the industrial setting, optimization of growing conditions can lead to significantly increased production of a compound of interest. Such optimization becomes challenging in a drug-discovery screening situation, as the ideal conditions for one organism may induce poor metabolic diversity for a different organism. Here, the impact of different media types, including six liquid media and five solid media, on the secondary metabolite production of three fungal strains was examined in the context of the drug-discovery screening process. The relative production of marker compounds was used to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of each medium for the purpose of producing secondary metabolites.

  15. Characterisation of secondary metabolites in saffron from central Italy (Cascia, Umbria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossignani, Lina; Urbani, Eleonora; Simonetti, Maria Stella; Maurizi, Angela; Chiesi, Claudia; Blasi, Francesca

    2014-01-15

    Saffron's quality depends on the concentration of secondary metabolites, such as crocins, picrocrocin and safranal. The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of drying conditions on the secondary metabolite contents of saffron produced in the area of Cascia, in central Italy. Different aliquots of the same saffron sample were subjected to various dehydration conditions and analysed by UV-Vis spectrophotometry to determine crocins, picrocrocin and safranal.. Safranal was also analysed by high resolution gas chromatography, while the crocins and picrocrocin were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and mass spectrometric detectors. The results of chromatographic analyses showed that the samples dried in the milder conditions had the lowest content of secondary metabolites. Moreover the sample dried at 60°C for 55min presented the highest contents of trans-crocin-4 and picrocrocin, while safranal was most represented in saffron dried at 55°C for 95min.

  16. Altitudinal variation of secondary metabolite profiles in flowering heads of Arnica montana cv. ARBO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaler, Renate; Schlorhaufer, P Daniel; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Merfort, Irmgard; Bortenschlager, Sigmar; Stuppner, Hermann; Zidorn, Christian

    2006-02-01

    The altitudinal variation on the contents of secondary metabolites in flowering heads of Arnica montana was assessed. Plants of A. montana cultivar ARBO were grown in nine experimental plots at altitudes between 590 and 2230m at Mount Patscherkofel near Innsbruck/Austria. The total contents of sesquiterpene lactones and flavonoids were not positively correlated with the altitude of the growing site. However, the proportion of flavonoids with vicinal free hydroxy groups in ring B to flavonoids lacking this feature significantly increased with elevation. Additionally, the level of caffeic acid derivatives also positively correlated with the altitude of the growing site. In particular amounts of 1-methoxyoxaloyl-3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid significantly increased in higher sites and samples from the summit region contained 85% more of this compound than samples from valley sites. These results are discussed with regards to chemosystematic studies comparing samples collected in different altitudes as well as in the light of a UV-B protective and radical scavenging function of phenolics and their significance for plant life in environments with elevated UV-B radiation.

  17. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica

    secondary metabolites in cell factories. In this research project, we developed a yeast platform strain for the production of p-coumaric acid an intermediate compound for the synthesis of aromatic secondary metabolites. Subsequently, we performed a systems biology analysis of the strain and finally we...... developed an array of yeast strains expressing flavonoid metabolic pathways containing up to ten heterologous genes. The platform strain was capable of producing 1.93 ± 0.26 g L-1 of p-coumaric acid in fed-batch fermentation, which is the highest titer that has been reported for a yeast cell factory so far...

  18. Secondary Metabolites Analysis of Methanol Extract of Surian (Toona sureni (Bl. Merr Leaf as Antioxidant Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhernita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary Metabolites Analysis of Methanol Extract of Surian (Toona sureni (Bl. Merr Leaf as AntioxidantPotential. The study of performed secondary metabolites from the methanol extract of Surian (Toona sureni (Bl. Merrleaves have been done by thin-layer chromatography (TLC method. The result showed that methanol extract of Surianleaves consist of alkaloid, flavonoid, polyphenol and terpenoid. All of them positively have the ability to scavenge 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH. It has IC50 (4.80 are smaller than the ascorbat acid standard (IC50 = 9.23.

  19. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jae Shin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed.

  20. Production of bioactive secondary metabolites by marine Vibrionaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Vibrionaceae family are widespread in the marine environment. Today, 128 species of vibrios are known. Several of them are infamous for their pathogenicity or symbiotic relationships. Despite their ability to interact with eukaryotes, the vibrios are greatly underexplored......). Though covering a limited chemical space, vibrios produce compounds with attractive biological activities, including antibacterial, anticancer, and antivirulence activities. This review highlights some of the most interesting structures from this group of bacteria. Many compounds found in vibrios have...... also been isolated from other distantly related bacteria. This cosmopolitan occurrence of metabolites indicates a high incidence of horizontal gene transfer, which raises interesting questions concerning the ecological function of some of these molecules. This account underlines the pending potential...

  1. Compilation of secondary metabolites from Bidens pilosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fabiana Lima; Fischer, Dominique Corinne Hermine; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Silva, Marcelo Sobral; de Athayde-Filho, Petronio Filgueiras; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria

    2011-01-26

    Bidens pilosa L. is a cosmopolitan annual herb, known for its traditional use in treating various diseases and thus much studied for the biological activity of its extracts, fractions and isolated compounds. Polyacetylenes and flavonoids, typical metabolite classes in the Bidens genus, predominate in the phytochemistry of B. pilosa. These classes of compounds have great taxonomic significance. In the Asteraceae family, the acetylene moiety is widely distributed in the Heliantheae tribe and some representatives, such as 1-phenylhepta-1,3,5-triyne, are noted for their biological activity and strong long-wave UV radiation absorbance. The flavonoids, specifically aurones and chalcones, have been reported as good sub-tribal level markers. Natural products from several other classes have also been isolated from different parts of B. pilosa. This review summarizes the available information on the 198 natural products isolated to date from B. pilosa.

  2. Compilation of Secondary Metabolites from Bidens pilosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronio Filgueiras de Athayde-Filho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bidens pilosa L. is a cosmopolitan annual herb, known for its traditional use in treating various diseases and thus much studied for the biological activity of its extracts, fractions and isolated compounds. Polyacetylenes and flavonoids, typical metabolite classes in the Bidens genus, predominate in the phytochemistry of B. pilosa. These classes of compounds have great taxonomic significance. In the Asteraceae family, the acetylene moiety is widely distributed in the Heliantheae tribe and some representatives, such as 1-phenylhepta-1,3,5-triyne, are noted for their biological activity and strong long-wave UV radiation absorbance. The flavonoids, specifically aurones and chalcones, have been reported as good sub-tribal level markers. Natural products from several other classes have also been isolated from different parts of B. pilosa. This review summarizes the available information on the 198 natural products isolated to date from B. pilosa.

  3. Investigations of fungal secondary metabolites with potential anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balde, ElHadj Saidou; Andolfi, Anna; Bruyère, Céline; Cimmino, Alessio; Lamoral-Theys, Delphine; Vurro, Maurizio; Damme, Marc Van; Altomare, Claudio; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Evidente, Antonio

    2010-05-28

    Fourteen metabolites, isolated from phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi, were evaluated for their in vitro antigrowth activity for six distinct cancer cell lines, using the MTT colorimetric assay. Bislongiquinolide (1) and dihydrotrichodimerol (5), which belong to the bisorbicillinoid structural class, displayed significant growth inhibitory activity against the six cancer cell lines studied, while the remaining compounds displayed weak or no activity. The data show that 1 and 5 have similar growth inhibitory activities with respect to those cancer cell lines that display certain levels of resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli or those that are sensitive to apoptosis. Quantitative videomicroscopy analysis revealed that 1 and 5 exert their antiproliferative effect through cytostatic and not cytotoxic activity. The preliminary results from the current study have stimulated further structure-activity investigations with respect to the growth inhibitory activity of compounds belonging to the bisorbicillinoid group.

  4. Pulmonary cytotoxicity of secondary metabolites of Stachybotrys chartarum (Ehrenb.) Hughes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieckova, Elena; Hurbankova, Marta; Cerna, Silvia; Pivovarova, Zuzana; Kovacikova, Zuzana

    2006-01-01

    Damp dwellings represent suitable conditions for extended indoor moulds. A cellulolytic micromycete Stachybotrys chartarum (Ehrenb.) Hughes is considered to be a tertiary colonizer of surfaces in affected buildings. Known adverse health effects of S. chartarum result from its toxins--trichothecenes or atranones, as well as spirolactams. Mechanism of their potential pathological effects on the respiratory tract has not yet been sufficiently clarified. The cytotoxic effects of complex chloroform-extractable endo- (in biomass) and exometabolites (in cultivation medium) of an indoor S. chartarum isolate of an atranone chemotype, grown on a liquid medium with yeast extract and sucrose at 25 degrees C for 14 d, on lung tissue were evaluated in the 3-day experiment. For the purpose, 4 mg of toxicants were intratracheally instilled in 200 g Wistar male rats. A trichothecene mycotoxin diacetoxyscirpenol was used as the positive control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) parameters--viability and phagocytic activity of alveolar macrophages (AM), activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acid phosphatase and cathepsin D in cell-free BAL fluid (BALF), as well as in BAL cells, were measured. Acute exposure to the metabolites caused statistically significant changes, indicating lung tissue injury in the experimental animals. Decreased AM viability and increased activity of lysosomal enzyme cathepsin D in BAL cells after fungal exometabolite exposure were the most impressive. As toxic principles were found predominantly in the growth medium, toxins were more likely responsible for lung cell damage than e.g. fungal cell wall components. S. chartarum toxic metabolites can contribute to the ill health of occupants of mouldy building after inhalation of contaminated aerosol.

  5. Secondary metabolites of Eichhornia crassipes (Waterhyacinth): a review (1949 to 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha, Pottail; Sripathi, Shubashini K; Jayanthi, Ponnusamy

    2012-09-01

    Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms (Waterhyacinth), an aquatic perennial herb present throughout the world, has a myriad of metabolites. Phenalenone compounds and sterols have been isolated from this plant. Extracts, as well as pure compounds isolated from this plant, have been demonstrated to possess pharmacological activities. An account of the phytochemistry, pharmacological activities and several applications ofwaterhyacinth are included in this review.

  6. Pathway elucidation and metabolic engineering of specialized plant metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Bo

    , these projects have increased revenues on fermentative production of several biochemicals. The use of systems biology is, however, not limited to microorganisms. Recent advances in biotechnology methods have provided a wealth of data within functional genomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, proteomics...... and fluxomics for a considerable number of organisms. Unfortunately, transferring the wealth of data to valuable information for metabolic engineering purposes is a non-obvious task. This PhD thesis describes a palate of tools used in generation of cell factories for production of specialized plant metabolites......, namely the plant defense compounds camalexin and glucosinolates. The thesis shows methodologies for elucidation of biosynthesis pathways and describes how to transfer obtained knowledge of metabolic pathways to other organisms through establishment of a synthetic biology platform. Through pathway...

  7. Isolation and characterization of new secondary metabolites from Asphodelus microcarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Mohammed M; Elokely, Khaled M; El-Hela, Atef A; Mohammad, Abd Elsalam I; Jacob, Melissa; Cutler, Stephen J; Doerksen, Robert J; Ross, Samir A

    2014-07-01

    Phytochemical study of the ethanolic extract of Asphodelus microcarpus Salzm. et Viv. (Asphodelaceae) resulted in the isolation of two new compounds, methyl-1,4,5-trihydroxy-7-methyl-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2-carboxylate (1), and (1R) 3,10-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1H-1,4-epoxybenzo[h]isochromene (2) as well as three known compounds; 3,4-dihydroxy-methyl benzoate (3), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (4), and 6-methoxychrysophanol (5). Compound 1 showed a potent activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus with IC50 values of 1.5 and 1.2 µg/mL, respectively. Compound 3 showed antileishmanial activity with an IC50 value of 33.2 µg/mL. Compound 2 is the first isochromene possessing a highly strained 1,4-epoxy moiety. The structure elucidation of isolated metabolites was carried out using spectroscopic data, the absolute configuration of 2 based on optical rotation and electronic circular dichroism experiments and calculations.

  8. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters h...... collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species....

  9. Metabolite profiling of the carnivorous pitcher plants Darlingtonia and Sarracenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki

    2017-01-01

    Sarraceniaceae is a New World carnivorous plant family comprising three genera: Darlingtonia, Heliamphora, and Sarracenia. The plants occur in nutrient-poor environments and have developed insectivorous capability in order to supplement their nutrient uptake. Sarracenia flava contains the alkaloid coniine, otherwise only found in Conium maculatum, in which its biosynthesis has been studied, and several Aloe species. Its ecological role and biosynthetic origin in S. flava is speculative. The aim of the current research was to investigate the occurrence of coniine in Sarracenia and Darlingtonia and to identify common constituents of both genera, unique compounds for individual variants and floral scent chemicals. In this comprehensive metabolic profiling study, we looked for compound patterns that are associated with the taxonomy of Sarracenia species. In total, 57 different Sarracenia and D. californica accessions were used for metabolite content screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting high-dimensional data were studied using a data mining approach. The two genera are characterized by a large number of metabolites and huge chemical diversity between different species. By applying feature selection for clustering and by integrating new biochemical data with existing phylogenetic data, we were able to demonstrate that the chemical composition of the species can be explained by their known classification. Although transcriptome analysis did not reveal a candidate gene for coniine biosynthesis, the use of a sensitive selected ion monitoring method enabled the detection of coniine in eight Sarracenia species, showing that it is more widespread in this genus than previously believed. PMID:28222171

  10. LC-MS based analysis of secondary metabolites from Chaetomium and Stachybotrys growth in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosen, Ina

    on fungal species characterized as so-called tertiary colonizers, namely Stachybotrys spp. and Chaetomium spp. Both Stachybotrys spp. and Chaetomium spp. require high water activity for optimal growth (aw ~ 0.98), which, for the indoor environment, often translates into serious water ingress rather than...... a high level of condensation. Thus, presence of these species and/or their metabolites in indoor environment is a good indicator of water damage, whether old or new. Furthermore, secondary metabolites produced by Stachybotrys spp. and Chaetomium spp. are known mycotoxins, thereby increasing likelyhood...... of causing negative health impact. With this in mind, a prime goal of this PhD study was to develop and optimize methods for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of secondary metabolites and bioactive compounds produced by Stachybotrys spp. and Chaetomium spp. The main analytical technique used...

  11. Effect of competition on the production and activity of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Losada, L.; Ajayi, O.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2009-01-01

    and in the presence of other fungal species. However, it is not known whether secreted secondary metabolites provide a competitive advantage over other fungal species, or whether competition has any effect on the production of those metabolites. Here, we have performed co-cultivation competition assays among...... different species of Aspergillus to determine relative species fitness in culture, and to analyze the presence of possible antifungal activity of secondary metabolites in extracts. The results show that, for the most part, at 30C only one species is able to survive direct competition with a second species...... activity, but in general, the extracts had greater antifungal activity when species were grown in the presence of a competitor. Using gas chromatography it was determined that the composition of extracts changed due to competition and a shift in temperature. These findings indicate that co...

  12. Chemical Diversity and Biological Properties of Secondary Metabolites from Sea Hares of Aplysia Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato B. Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is an important source of structurally-diverse and biologically-active secondary metabolites. During the last two decades, thousands of compounds were discovered in marine organisms, several of them having inspired the development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Marine mollusks constitute a successful phyla in the discovery of new marine natural products (MNPs. Over a 50-year period from 1963, 116 genera of mollusks contributed innumerous compounds, Aplysia being the most studied genus by MNP chemists. This genus includes 36 valid species and should be distinguished from all mollusks as it yielded numerous new natural products. Aplysia sea hares are herbivorous mollusks, which have been proven to be a rich source of secondary metabolites, mostly of dietary origin. The majority of secondary metabolites isolated from sea hares of the genus Aplysia are halogenated terpenes; however, these animals are also a source of compounds from other chemical classes, such as macrolides, sterols and alkaloids, often exhibiting cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and/or antifeedant activities. This review focuses on the diverse structural classes of secondary metabolites found in Aplysia spp., including several compounds with pronounced biological properties.

  13. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzsch, M.; Sulyok, M.; Täubel, M.; Vishwanath, V.; Krop, E.J.M.; Borràs-Santos, A.; Hyvärinen, A.; Nevalainen, A.; Krska, R.; Larsson, L.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of the

  14. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H.; Kottmann, Renzo;

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms are the main source of bioactive compounds that are in use as antimicrobial and anticancer drugs, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides. In the last decade, the increasing availability of microbial genomes has established genome mining as a very im...

  15. Formation flavonoid secondary metabolites in callus culture of Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium as alternative provision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwianingsih, Widi; Febri, Santika; Kusdianti

    2016-02-01

    Increasing need of medicine ingredients require the discovery of other methods that can be used as an alternative. One method that can be used as an alternative is tissue culture. Quercetin is a flavonoid secondary metabolites that have been known to be useful as antiviral, anti-asthma and anti-cancer potential. The purpose of this study was to produce flavonoids, especially quercetin in callus culture Chrysanthemum cinerariefolium. Pieces of leaves of plantlets C. cinerariefolium used as explants for formation of callus tissue. To grow the callus, Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium used with addition of various concentrations of growth regulators 2.4-D, and kinetin. For multiplication, callus subcultured on similar medium. Callus that had formed, especially brown callus, further analyzed using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrum (GCMS). Before analyzed callus was extracted in 95% ethanol. The result showed that callus potentially generate secondary metabolite are brown and friable. Based on these parameters, the best callus produced from leaf explants grown on MS medium with the addition of 4 mg / L 2,4-D and 0 mg / L kinetin. The callus contain secondary metabolites such as some of the flavonoid quercetin precursors such as acetic acid and tetrahydroxychalcone, and some other secondary metabolites.

  16. Lipocarbazoles, secondary metabolites from Tsukamurella pseudospumae Acta 1857 with antioxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathrin; Nachtigall, Jonny; Hänchen, Anne; Nicholson, Graeme; Goodfellow, Michael; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2009-10-01

    A family of new secondary metabolites with a carbazole moiety and an alkyl side chain was isolated from Tsukamurella pseudospumae strain Acta 1857. They were named lipocarbazoles in accordance with their chemical structures, which were determined by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Lipocarbazoles are free radical scavengers showing antioxidative activity.

  17. Fractionation of the secondary metabolites of orange (Citrus sinensis L.) leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is interest in the detection of changes in secondary metabolites in orange leaves in response to citrus greening disease. Conventional HPLC analysis readily provides detection of major phenolic compounds, but further, more detailed chromatographic analyses show many more compounds, to an exten...

  18. Discovery of secondary metabolites from Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains using genome mining and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequencing, data mining and mass spectrometry were used to identify secondary metabolites produced by several Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains. These biocontrol strains have shown promise in managing Fusarium head blight in wheat. Draft genomes were produced and screened in silico using genom...

  19. Systematics of Penicillium simplicissimum based on rDNA sequences, morphology and secondary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuthill, D.E.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    supported by differences in micromorphological characters, particularly of the conidia and phialides, and the production of distinct profiles of secondary metabolites by each species. Group-I introns, located in the SSU rDNA, were identified in six of the 21 isolates; their presence was used to test...

  20. Secondary metabolites from Glycine soja and their growth inhibitory effect against Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Ying; Luo, Shi-Hong; Yi, Ting-Shuang; Li, Chun-Huan; Luo, Qian; Hua, Juan; Liu, Yan; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2011-06-08

    The wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) has been reported to be relatively resistant to insect and pathogenic pests. However, the responsible secondary metabolites in the aerial part of this important plant are largely unknown. From the aerial part of G. soja, 13 compounds were isolated and identified, including seven isoflavonoids (1-7), a cyclitol (8), two sterol derivatives (9 and 10), and three triterpenoids (11-13). Compound 7 is a new isoflavonoid, and compounds 9 and 10 are reported as natural products for the first time. The growth inhibitory activity of 1, 3, 4, and 8 against the larvae of Spodoptera litura was investigated. The most abundant isoflavonoid in the aerial part of G. soja, daidzein (1), which could not be metabolized by S. litura, was found to inhibit the insect larvae growth significantly in 3 days after feeding diets containing the compound. Compounds 3, 4, and 8, which could be partially or completely metabolized, were inactive. Our results suggested that the isoflavonoid daidzein (1) might function as a constitutive defense component in G. soja against insect pests.

  1. Intraspecific variation in plant size, secondary plant compounds, herbivory and parasitoid assemblages during secondary succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostenko, O.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    During secondary succession on abandoned agricultural fields the diversity and abundance of insect communities often increases, whereas the performance and nutritional quality of early successional plants often declines. As the diversity and abundance of insects on a single plant are determined by c

  2. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from Zygophyllum coccineum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-22

    of the publishers only Planta Medica Journal of Medicinal Plant and Natural Product Research www.thieme.de/fz/plantamedica l www.thieme-connect.com...insecticidal activity of compounds 1, 3, 5, 6, and 9. Amin E et al. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive… Planta Med Letters Th is is a co py of th e...Amin E et al. Triterpenoidal Saponins: Bioactive… Planta Med Letters Th is is a co py of th e au th or ʼs pe rs on al re pr in t Th is is a co py of th

  3. In vitro culture and secondary metabolite isolation in bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabovljevic, Aneta; Sabovljevic, Marko; Jockovic, Nebojsa

    2009-01-01

    Bryophytes, the second largest group of land plants, are extremely rich in terpenoids, phenols, glycosides, and fatty acids. Although bryophytes could be used in medicine, their chemistry is not very well known and the problem remains to obtain enough quantity of same species for analysis. In vitro cultivation of bryophytes is the most appropriate way for large biomass production and isolate of numerous useful compounds showing some interesting biologic activities. This technique is also useful in developmental, cellular, molecular, biochemical, and eco-physiologic studies.

  4. Sequence-based analysis of secondary-metabolite biosynthesis in marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontang, Erin A; Gaudêncio, Susana P; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-04-01

    A diverse collection of 60 marine-sediment-derived Actinobacteria representing 52 operational taxonomic units was screened by PCR for genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis. Three primer sets were employed to specifically target adenylation domains associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and ketosynthase (KS) domains associated with type I modular, iterative, hybrid, and enediyne polyketide synthases (PKSs). In total, two-thirds of the strains yielded a sequence-verified PCR product for at least one of these biosynthetic types. Genes associated with enediyne biosynthesis were detected in only two genera, while 88% of the ketosynthase sequences shared greatest homology with modular PKSs. Positive strains included representatives of families not traditionally associated with secondary-metabolite production, including the Corynebacteriaceae, Gordoniaceae, Intrasporangiaceae, and Micrococcaceae. In four of five cases where phylogenetic analyses of KS sequences revealed close evolutionary relationships to genes associated with experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways, secondary-metabolite production was accurately predicted. Sequence clustering patterns were used to provide an estimate of PKS pathway diversity and to assess the biosynthetic richness of individual strains. The detection of highly similar KS sequences in distantly related strains provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, while control experiments designed to amplify KS sequences from Salinispora arenicola strain CNS-205, for which a genome sequence is available, led to the detection of 70% of the targeted PKS pathways. The results provide a bioinformatic assessment of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic potential that can be applied in the absence of fully assembled pathways or genome sequences. The rapid identification of strains that possess the greatest potential to produce new secondary metabolites along with those that produce known compounds can be used

  5. Sequence-Based Analysis of Secondary-Metabolite Biosynthesis in Marine Actinobacteria ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontang, Erin A.; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    A diverse collection of 60 marine-sediment-derived Actinobacteria representing 52 operational taxonomic units was screened by PCR for genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis. Three primer sets were employed to specifically target adenylation domains associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and ketosynthase (KS) domains associated with type I modular, iterative, hybrid, and enediyne polyketide synthases (PKSs). In total, two-thirds of the strains yielded a sequence-verified PCR product for at least one of these biosynthetic types. Genes associated with enediyne biosynthesis were detected in only two genera, while 88% of the ketosynthase sequences shared greatest homology with modular PKSs. Positive strains included representatives of families not traditionally associated with secondary-metabolite production, including the Corynebacteriaceae, Gordoniaceae, Intrasporangiaceae, and Micrococcaceae. In four of five cases where phylogenetic analyses of KS sequences revealed close evolutionary relationships to genes associated with experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways, secondary-metabolite production was accurately predicted. Sequence clustering patterns were used to provide an estimate of PKS pathway diversity and to assess the biosynthetic richness of individual strains. The detection of highly similar KS sequences in distantly related strains provided evidence of horizontal gene transfer, while control experiments designed to amplify KS sequences from Salinispora arenicola strain CNS-205, for which a genome sequence is available, led to the detection of 70% of the targeted PKS pathways. The results provide a bioinformatic assessment of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic potential that can be applied in the absence of fully assembled pathways or genome sequences. The rapid identification of strains that possess the greatest potential to produce new secondary metabolites along with those that produce known compounds can be used

  6. Secondary metabolites from the stem of Ravenia spectabilis Lindl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mozammel Haque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ravenia spectabilis is a medium tall shrub found widespread in South America. It also found in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh etc. Few alkaloid and steroid compounds were reported from the plant previously. Materials and Methods: Methanol extract from the stems of Ravenia spectabilis were partitioned into n-hexane, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and aqueous soluble fractions, respectively. The crude methanol extract, carbon tetrachloride fraction and chloroform fraction were fractionated by column chromatography of Silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 for isolation and purification of compounds. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined by extensive NMR spectral analysis, including 2D NMR, mass spectroscopy etc. Results: Ten compounds, γ-fagarine (1, ravenoline (2, N-methyl atanine (3,2,3,3,5-tetramethyl-2,3,4,5- tetrahydrofurano [3,2-c] quinolin-4-one (4, arborinine (5, 3-geranyl indole (6, atanine (7, steroids sitosta-4-en- 3-one (8, stigmasterol (9 and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (10 were isolated from the stems of Ravenia spectabilis. Conclusion: Compounds N-methyl atanine (3, 2,3,3,5-tetramethyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrofurano [3,2-c] quinolin-4-one (4 , 3-geranyl indole (6, sitosta-4-en-3-one (8 and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (10 were isolated from this plant for the first time. 3-geranyl indole (6 was also isolated second time from natural sources.

  7. Fungal secondary metabolites as modulators of interactions with insects and other arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Marko; Churchill, Alice C L

    2011-01-01

    Fungi share a diverse co-evolutionary history with animals, especially arthropods. In this review, we focus on the role of secondary metabolism in driving antagonistic arthropod-fungus interactions, i.e., where fungi serve as a food source to fungal grazers, compete with saprophagous insects, and attack insects as hosts for growth and reproduction. Although a wealth of studies on animal-fungus interactions point to a crucial role of secondary metabolites in deterring animal feeding and resisting immune defense strategies, causal evidence often remains to be provided. Moreover, it still remains an unresolved puzzle as to what extent the tight regulatory control of secondary metabolite formation in some model fungi represents an evolved chemical defense system favored by selective pressure through animal antagonists. Given these gaps in knowledge, we highlight some co-evolutionary aspects of secondary metabolism, such as induced response, volatile signaling, and experimental evolution, which may help in deciphering the ecological importance and evolutionary history of secondary metabolite production in fungi.

  8. Global analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters reveals vast potential of secondary metabolite production in Penicillium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Christian; Grijseels, Sietske; Prigent, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a wide range of bioactive compounds with important pharmaceutical applications, such as antibiotic penicillins and cholesterol-lowering statins. However, less attention has been paid to fungal secondary metabolites compared to those from bacteria. In this study, we...... sequenced the genomes of 9 Penicillium species and, together with 15 published genomes, we investigated the secondary metabolism of Penicillium and identified an immense, unexploited potential for producing secondary metabolites by this genus. A total of 1,317 putative biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) were...... identified, and polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase based BGCs were grouped into gene cluster families and mapped to known pathways. The grouping of BGCs allowed us to study the evolutionary trajectory of pathways based on 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA) synthases. Finally, we cross...

  9. Computer Aided Drug Design Studies in the Discovery of Secondary Metabolites Targeted Against Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus Tullius

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are plant products that occur usually in differentiated cells, generally not being necessary for the cells themselves, but likely useful for the plant as a whole. Neurodegeneration can be found in many different levels in the neurons, it always begins at the molecular level and progresses toward the systemic levels. Usually, alterations are observed such as decreasing cholinergic impulse, toxicity related to reactive oxygen species (ROS, inflammatory "amyloid plaque" related processes, catecholamine disequilibrium, etc. Computer aided drug design (CADD has become relevant in the drug discovery process; technological advances in the areas of molecular structure characterization, computational science, and molecular biology have contributed to the planning of new drugs against neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses scientific CADD studies of the secondary metabolites. Flavonoids, alkaloids, and xanthone compounds have been studied by various researchers (as inhibitory ligands in molecular docking; mainly with three enzymes: acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8, and monoamine oxidase (MAO; EC 1.4.3.4. In addition, we have applied ligand-based-virtual screening (using Random Forest, associated with structure-based- virtual screening (docking of a small dataset of 469 alkaloids of the Apocynaceae family from an in-house data bank to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against human AChE. This computer-aided drug design study selected certain alkaloids that might be useful in further studies for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

  10. Anti-rheumatoid Activity of Secondary Metabolites Produced by Endophytic Chaetomium globosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abdel-Azeem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-rheumatoid activity of secondary metabolites produced by endophytic mycobiota in Egypt. A total of 27 endophytic fungi were isolated from 10 dominant medicinal plant host species in Wadi Tala, Saint Katherine Protectorate, arid Sinai, Egypt. Of those taxa, seven isolates of Chaetomium globosum (CG1 – CG7, being the most frequent taxon, were recovered from seven different host plants and screened for production of active anti-inflammatory metabolites. Isolates were cultivated on half – strength potato dextrose broth for 21 days at 28ºC on a rotatory shaker at 180 rpm, and extracted in ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. The probable inhibitory effects of both extracts against an adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA rat model were examined and compared with the effects of methotrexate as a standard disease-modifying anti-rheumatoid drug. Disease activity and mobility scoring of AIA, histopathology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to evaluate probable inhibitory roles. A significant reduction (P < 0.05 in the severity of arthritis was observed in both the methanolic extract of CG6 (MCG6 and methotrexate (MTX treatment groups six days after treatment commenced. The average arthritis score of the MCG6 treatment group was (10.7 ± 0.82 compared to (13.8 ± 0.98 in the positive control group. The mobility score of the MCG6 treatment group (1.50 ± 0.55 was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (3.33 ± 0.82. In contrast, the ethyl acetate extract of CG6 (EACG6 treatment group showed no improvements in arthritis and mobility scores in AIA model rats. Histopathology and TEM findings confirmed the observation. Isolate CG6 was subjected to sequencing for confirmation of phenotypic identification. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS 1 – 5.8s – ITS2 rDNA sequences obtained were compared with those deposited in the GenBank Database and

  11. A High-Resolution LC-MS-Based Secondary Metabolite Fingerprint Database of Marine Bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Liang

    2014-10-09

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Marine bacteria are the most widely distributed organisms in the ocean environment and produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites. However, traditional screening for bioactive natural compounds is greatly hindered by the lack of a systematic way of cataloguing the chemical profiles of bacterial strains found in nature. Here we present a chemical fingerprint database of marine bacteria based on their secondary metabolite profiles, acquired by high-resolution LC-MS. Till now, 1,430 bacterial strains spanning 168 known species collected from different marine environments were cultured and profiled. Using this database, we demonstrated that secondary metabolite profile similarity is approximately, but not always, correlated with taxonomical similarity. We also validated the ability of this database to find species-specific metabolites, as well as to discover known bioactive compounds from previously unknown sources. An online interface to this database, as well as the accompanying software, is provided freely for the community to use.

  12. The 4-hydroxyestrone: Electron emission, formation of secondary metabolites and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getoff, Nikola; Gerschpacher, Marion; Hartmann, Johannes; Huber, Johannes C; Schittl, Heike; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2010-01-21

    4-Hydroxyestrone (4-OHE(1)), a typical cancer-inducing metabolite, originating from 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2), was chosen as a model for the studies. The aim was to get a deeper insight in the mechanisms of its ability to initiate cancer. It was found, that 4-OHE(1) can eject electrons (e(aq)(-)), when excited in the singlet state by monochromatic UV-light (lambda=254 nm) in polar media (water:ethanol=40:60 vol.%). The quantum yield Q(e(aq)(-)), determined for various 4-OHE(1) concentrations, is found to be as high as that previously observed for 17beta-E2. It decreases with increasing substrate concentration, but it is enhanced at higher temperature. The ability of 4-OHE(1) to eject as well as to consume and to transfer electrons to other biological systems, classifies it as an electron mediator, similar to 17beta-E2. The 4-OHE(1) transients resulting of the electron emission process are leading to the formation of secondary metabolites. Surprisingly, it was established that the secondary metabolites possess likewise the ability to eject as well as to consume electrons. Hence, they behave similar like 17beta-E2. However, the structure of the secondary formed metabolites, which determinates their biological properties and carcinogenity, depends on the nature of the available reaction partners involved in their formation. A probable reaction mechanism explaining the subject matter is discussed.

  13. Making new molecules--evolution of structures for novel metabolites in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2013-02-01

    Secondary metabolites are essential plant fitness within the natural environment by providing defense against attacking and competing organisms including bacteria, fungi, insects, animals and other plants. These compounds' defensive function is frequently intertwined with specific accumulation in novel developmental structures. While, the biochemical community is making great strides in identifying the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that allow these chemicals to be synthesized there is vastly less progress on understanding the developmental mechanisms that is equally key to their defensive function. In this review, I briefly delve into several novel developmental structures and provide evolutionary hypothesis for how they may have evolved and how they could be unique systems for studying key developmental processes that have heretofore been recalcitrant to study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antioxidant effects of secondary metabolites from Geranium psilostemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhretoğlu, Didem; Sabuncuoğlu, Suna Atasayar; Sakar, M Koray; Ozgüneş, Hilal; Sterner, Olov

    2010-06-01

    An investigation was made of the effects on endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities and H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation inhibition in human red blood cells of the crude MeOH extract and its EtOAc, n-BuOH, and H2O sub-extracts obtained from aerial parts of Geranium psilostemon Ledeb., as well as compounds isolated from the most active EtOAc extract. Gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), pusilagin (3), 1,3,6-tri-O-galloyl-beta-glucopyranoside (4), 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-glucopyranoside (5), kaempferol (6), quercetin (7), kaempferol 7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (8), and quercetin 7-O-alpha-rhamnopyranoside (9) were isolated from the aerial parts of the title plant, and their structures identified from spectroscopic (UV, 1D- and 2D- NMR) and spectrometric (TOF-MS) data. All extracts and isolated compounds inhibited H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation and also enhanced the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT).

  15. The seasonal changes of plant secondary metabolites and their influence on the food selection of plateau pika%植物次生代谢物含量的季节性变化及其对高原鼠兔食物选择的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴鑫; 顾新州; 石佳; 袁飞; 殷宝法; 王爱勤; 魏万红; 杨生妹

    2012-01-01

    The research was carried out from June to September 2008 in the Haibei Alpine Meadow Ecosystem Research Station, Chinese Academy of Science, Qinghai Province. Plateau pikas (Ochotona curzoniae) were fed 20 different plants and the amounts of consumed food were measured using a cafeteria preference test. Seasonal changes of 4 plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) , flavonoids, condensed tannins, simple phenols and total phenols in the 20 plants were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The results for the 20 plants showed that the groups of favored plants and edible plants for plateau pikas comprised 7 species each, the remaining 6 species were anorectic plants. There were some differences between plant species for the 4 PSMs some of which showed seasonal changes - they tended to be the lowest in the beginning of growing season and gradually increased in the following months. The contents of condensed tannins in the favored group was significantly lower than in the edible group, and the content of flavonoids in the favored group was significantly lower than in the anorectic group. There was a significant negative correlation between the amount of food intake and the contents of flavonoids in all 20 plants. Within the favored plant group, the plant intake amount was negatively correlated with simple phenols and total phenols content. The results partly verified the hypothesis that plant secondary metabolites serve a defense strategy that could significantly influence the plants' selection as food by Ochotona curzoniae. Flavonoids were the factor which significantly restrained the plant food selection of plateau pikas and condensed tannins could deter the plant food selection of plateau pikas in some extent, and results demonstrated that plateau pikas might have a food selection strategy to forage on the plants with high contents of simple phenols or total phenols in relative small quantities, but avoid foraging them in large doses.%2008年6~9月在中国科

  16. Oxidative stress and apoptosis in HIV infection: a role for plant-derived metabolites with synergistic antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, H C; Aruoma, O I

    1994-05-01

    The cascade of events resulting from 'oxidative stress' is markedly similar to that which can initiate apoptosis, a possible mechanism of immune-cell loss in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. Since primary and secondary metabolites found in plants can act as synergistic antioxidants, and can prevent oxidation-induced cell death, Howard Greenspan and Okezie Aruoma ask whether or not these compounds can be useful in inhibiting viral activation and the death of immune cells in HIV/AIDS.

  17. Rapid analysis of fungal cultures and dried figs for secondary metabolites by LC/TOF-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyuva, Hamide Z. [Ankara Test and Analysis Laboratory, Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Ankara 06330 (Turkey)], E-mail: hamide.senyuva@tubitak.gov.tr; Gilbert, John [Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom); Oztuerkoglu, Sebnem [Ankara Test and Analysis Laboratory, Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey, Ankara 06330 (Turkey)

    2008-06-09

    A liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) method has been developed for profiling fungal metabolites. The performance of the procedure in terms of mass accuracy, selectivity (specificity) and repeatability was established by spiking aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes and other metabolites into blank growth media. After extracting, and carrying out LC/TOF-MS analysis, the standards were correctly identified by searching a specially constructed database of 465 secondary metabolites. To demonstrate the viability of this approach 11 toxigenic and four non-toxigenic fungi from reference collections were grown on various media, for 7-14 days. The method was also applied to two toxigenic fungi, A. flavus (200-138) and A. parasiticus (2999-465) grown on gamma radiation sterilised dried figs, for 7-14 days. The fungal hyphae plus a portion of growth media or portions of dried figs were solvent extracted and analysed by LC/TOF-MS using a rapid resolution microbore LC column. Data processing based on cluster analysis, showed that electrospray ionization (ESI)-TOF-MS could be used to unequivocally identify metabolites in crude extracts. Using the elemental metabolite database, it was demonstrated that from culture collection isolates, anticipated metabolites. The speed and simplicity of the method has meant that levels of these metabolites could be monitored daily in sterilised figs. Over a 14-day period, levels of aflatoxins and kojic acid maximised at 5-6 days, whilst levels of 5-methoxysterigmatocystin remained relatively constant. In addition to the known metabolites expected to be produced by these fungi, roquefortine A, fumagillin, fumigaclavine B, malformins (peptides), aspergillic acid, nigragillin, terrein, terrestric acid and penicillic acid were also identified.

  18. In silico analysis of methyltransferase domains involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhale Rajesh S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary metabolites biosynthesized by polyketide synthase (PKS and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS family of enzymes constitute several classes of therapeutically important natural products like erythromycin, rapamycin, cyclosporine etc. In view of their relevance for natural product based drug discovery, identification of novel secondary metabolite natural products by genome mining has been an area of active research. A number of different tailoring enzymes catalyze a variety of chemical modifications to the polyketide or nonribosomal peptide backbone of these secondary metabolites to enhance their structural diversity. Therefore, development of powerful bioinformatics methods for identification of these tailoring enzymes and assignment of their substrate specificity is crucial for deciphering novel secondary metabolites by genome mining. Results In this work, we have carried out a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of methyltransferase (MT domains present in multi functional type I PKS and NRPS proteins encoded by PKS/NRPS gene clusters having known secondary metabolite products. Based on the results of this analysis, we have developed a novel knowledge based computational approach for detecting MT domains present in PKS and NRPS megasynthases, delineating their correct boundaries and classifying them as N-MT, C-MT and O-MT using profile HMMs. Analysis of proteins in nr database of NCBI using these class specific profiles has revealed several interesting examples, namely, C-MT domains in NRPS modules, N-MT domains with significant homology to C-MT proteins, and presence of NRPS/PKS MTs in association with other catalytic domains. Our analysis of the chemical structures of the secondary metabolites and their site of methylation suggested that a possible evolutionary basis for the presence of a novel class of N-MT domains with significant homology to C-MT proteins could be the close resemblance of the chemical

  19. Cell cytotoxicity and mycotoxin and secondary metabolite production by common penicillia on cheese agar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gareis, M.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2002-01-01

    Known or potential new fungal starter culture species such as Penicillium camemberti, P. roqueforti, P. nalgiovense, P. caseifulvum, and P. solitum have been cultivated on a cheese agar medium together with the common cheese contaminants P. commune, P. crustosum, P. discolor, P. atramentosum, and P....... nordicum. Secondary metabolites were extracted and analyzed by HPLC-DAD and tested for cytotoxicity by using the MTT-cell culture assay. Metabolites such as cyclopiazonic acid, roquefortine C, and penitrem A, previously reported from cheese, were detected together with sclerotigenin, solistatin, meleagrin......, oxaline, compactins, diaportins, chaetoglobosins, rugulovasines, verrucolones, anacines, verrucines, cyclopeptines, viridicatins, and viridic acid, all metabolites not previously reported from cheese. The two P. nalgiovense extracts were the most toxic in the MTT-cell culture test. These extracts...

  20. Comparison of primary and secondary metabolites for suitability to discriminate the origins of Schisandra chinensis by GC/MS and LC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Yoon, Min Hye; Kang, Yun Pyo; Yu, Jin; Park, Jeong Hill; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won

    2013-12-15

    Discrimination of the origins of plants as traditional medicinal herbs or functional foods is important to accurately comprehend their therapeutic effects or to appropriately utilize their qualities because different environmental backgrounds can induce diverse metabolic changes. In the present study, the origins of the herbal medicine Schisandra chinensis were differentiated using two instrumental approaches, GC/MS and LC/MS. The acquired data were processed using various programs to detect metabolites and statistically examined to measure the suitability of the methods. The R(2)X value of the PCA analysis was used to examine the identified metabolites as potential discriminative markers. The identification of markers by primary metabolites using GC/MS analysis was advantageous because of its reproducibility and the use of a constructed database. However, LC/MS analysis using secondary metabolites provided a greater number of distinguishable variables and higher qualitative R(2)X values for the markers, which suggested that determination of the origins of the plants was more favourable using secondary metabolites.

  1. [Advances in influence of UV-B radiation on medicinal plant secondary metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Fang, Minfeng; Yue, Ming; Chai, Yongfu; Wang, Hui; Li, Yifei

    2012-08-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion results in an increased level of solar UV-B radiation (UV-B, 280-320 nm) reaching the earth surface. By the effect of UV-B radiation, various medicinal active ingredients changed because of the change of gene expression, enzyme activity and secondary metabolism, clinical effect is also changed. The research status of UV-B radiation and the accumulation of plant secondary metabolites in the past 10 years were summarized in this paper to supply reference for cultivation and exploitation of the medicinal plants.

  2. Spatial variability in secondary metabolites of the indo-pacific sponge Stylissa massa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Sven; Gochfeld, Deborah J; Ankisetty, Sridevi; Avula, Bharathi; Schupp, Peter J; Slattery, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Chemical diversity represents a measure of selective pressures acting on genotypic variability. In order to understand patterns of chemical ecology and biodiversity in the environment, it is necessary to enhance our knowledge of chemical diversity within and among species. Many sponges produce variable levels of secondary metabolites in response to diverse biotic and abiotic environmental factors. This study evaluated intra-specific variability in secondary metabolites in the common Indo-Pacific sponge Stylissa massa over various geographic scales, from local to ocean basin. Several major metabolites were quantified in extracts from sponges collected in American Samoa, Pohnpei, Saipan, and at several sites and depths in Guam. Concentrations of several of these metabolites varied geographically across the Pacific basin, with American Samoa and Pohnpei exhibiting the greatest differences, and Guam and Saipan more similar to each other. There were also significant differences in concentrations among different sites and depths within Guam. The crude extract of S. massa exhibited feeding deterrence against the omnivorous pufferfish Canthigaster solandri at natural concentrations, however, none of the isolated compounds was deterrent at the maximum natural concentrations observed, nor were mixtures of these compounds, thus emphasizing the need for bioassay-guided isolation to characterize specific chemical defenses. Antibacterial activity against a panel of ecologically relevant pathogens was minimal. Depth transplants, predator exclusion, and UV protection experiments were performed, but although temporal variability in compound concentrations was observed, there was no evidence that secondary metabolite concentration in S. massa was induced by any of these factors. Although the reasons behind the variability observed in the chemical constituents of S. massa are still in question, all sponges are not created equal from a chemical standpoint, and these studies provide

  3. Green synthesis of Ag nanoparticles using plant metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Antonio; Mattiello, Alessandro; Musetti, Rita; Petrussa, Elisa; Braidot, Enrico; Marchiol, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Nano-biotechnology is one of the most promising areas in modern nanoscience and technology. In this emerging area of research, nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role since the large-scale production and huge numbers of utilization. Gold and silver nanoparticles are among the most extensively studied nanomaterials, since they show high stability and low chemical reactivity in comparison to other metals. They are commonly synthesized using toxic chemical reducing agents able to reduce metal ions into uncharged NPs and/or high energy supplied procedures. The most commonly used method for the synthesis of NPs requires toxic chemicals like N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) or trisodium citrate, but recently a green technique, based on natural reducing agents, has been suggested to substitute the nature-unfriendly chemical methods. Many scientific works put in evidence the efficacy of plant extracts to reduce metal salts into the respective NPs, but this process lacks a clear control of NPs shapes and dimensions, since many different metabolites present into the extracts could participate to the process. This paper aims to clarify the reducing action of single pure natural compounds usually present in plant tissues and to obtain a stable and reproducible protocol for NPs synthesis.

  4. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  5. Tissue-specific distribution of secondary metabolites in rapeseed (Brassica napus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Fang

    Full Text Available Four different parts, hypocotyl and radicle (HR, inner cotyledon (IC, outer cotyledon (OC, seed coat and endosperm (SE, were sampled from mature rapeseed (Brassica napus L. by laser microdissection. Subsequently, major secondary metabolites, glucosinolates and sinapine, as well as three minor ones, a cyclic spermidine conjugate and two flavonoids, representing different compound categories, were qualified and quantified in dissected samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and mass spectrometry. No qualitative and quantitative difference of glucosinolates and sinapine was detected in embryo tissues (HR, IC and OC. On the other hand, the three minor compounds were observed to be distributed unevenly in different rapeseed tissues. The hypothetic biological functions of the distribution patterns of different secondary metabolites in rapeseed are discussed.

  6. The expanding roles of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides and secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2015-05-01

    The cyclic dinucleotide c-di-GMP has emerged in the last decade as a prevalent intracellular messenger that orchestrates the transition between the motile and sessile lifestyles of many bacterial species. The motile-to-sessile transition is often associated with the formation of extracellular matrix-encased biofilm, an organized community of bacterial cells that often contributes to antibiotic resistance and host-pathogen interaction. It is increasingly clear that c-di-GMP controls motility, biofilm formation and bacterial pathogenicity partially through regulating the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and small-molecule secondary metabolites. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of EPS biosynthesis by c-di-GMP in a diversity of bacterial species and highlights the emerging role of c-di-GMP in the biosynthesis of small-molecule secondary metabolites.

  7. Co-cultivation of Sorangium cellulosum strains affects cellular growth and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite epothilones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-fei; Li, Shu-guang; Li, Zhi-feng; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Ting; Pan, Hong-wei; Liu, Hong; Wu, Zhi-hong; Li, Yue-zhong

    2013-08-01

    Sorangium cellulosum, a cellulolytic myxobacterium, is capable of producing a variety of bioactive secondary metabolites. Epothilones are anti-eukaryotic secondary metabolites produced by some S. cellulosum strains. In this study, we analyzed interactions between 12 strains of S. cellulosum consisting of epothilone-producers and non-epothilone producers isolated from two distinct soil habitats. Co-cultivation on filter papers showed that different Sorangium strains inhibited one another's growth, whereas epothilone production by the producing strains changed markedly for most (73%) pairwise mixtures. Using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrated that the expression of epothilone biosynthetic genes in the epothilone producers typically changed significantly when these bacteria were mixed with non-producing strains. The results indicated that intraspecies interactions between different S. cellulosum strains not only inhibited the growth of partners, but also could change epothilone production.

  8. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative prospective of kosinostatin – a secondary metabolite isolated from Streptomyces sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayagam Rambabu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a communal health hazard worldwide. The present investigation attempts to evaluate antimicrobial and anticancer potential of kosinostatin on mammary carcinoma cell line (MCF-7. The anticancer and antiproliferative activities of kosinostatin were analyzed on MCF cell line by MTT assay and cytotoxicity assays like lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and glutathione (GSH. The secondary metabolite kosinostatin exhibited its apoptotic nature by expressing p53 protein. Collectively, the results acquired from this study promise that kosinostatin shows the potent anticancer activity.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mårten Strand; Marcus Carlsson; Hanna Uvell; Koushikul Islam; Karin Edlund; Inger Cullman; Björn Altermark; Ya-Fang Mei; Mikael Elofsson; Nils-Peder Willassen; Göran Wadell; Fredrik Almqvist

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campa...

  10. Biological activities (antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic) of secondary metabolites of Ircinia spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Nazemi, Melika

    2013-01-01

    Sponges are the most primitive of the multicellular, These organisms don’t have any mechanical defense system, so their early appearance in evolution has given them a lot of time for the development of advanced secondary metabolites as chemical defense system. Sponges have the potential to provide drugs from chemical components against diseases. In this investigation the sponge samples, which it is Ircina spp., were collected at depth of 15- 24 meter, from locations on the coastline of Island...

  11. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from the Red Sea soft coral Heteroxenia fuscescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The Red Sea soft coral Heteroxenia fuscescens has been investigated concerning its secondary metabolites. Analysis of H. fuscescens has led to the isolation of 6-hydroxy -α- muurolene (1, gorgosten-5(E-3 β-ol (2, 1-nonadecyloxy-2,3-propanediol (3 and (2S,3R,4E,8E-N-hexadecanoyl-2-amino 4,8-octadecadiene-1,3-diol (4 and sarcoaldosterol A (5. The isolated compounds were reported from several marine organisms and are identified for the first time from the soft coral H. fuscescens collected from the Red Sea. The activity of the alcoholic extract as anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, analgesic, anti oxidant is reported. The activity of the isolated compounds against several pathogenic microbes has been also reported. Industrial Relevance: A huge number of secondary metabolites are produced by soft bodied marine organisms to get over predation and infection. Compounds produced by soft bodied marine organisms are different from those produced by terrestrial organisms, and therefore may yield novel lead for antimicrobial drugs. With the diversity in the secondary metabolites and the new activities and mechanism of action marine animals considered an excellent source for new pharmaceuticals. This work is concerned with the isolation of secondary metabolites isolated form the Heteroxenia fuscescens from the red sea and the evaluation of some biological activities. The alcoholic extract of Heteroxenia fuscescens was found to possess antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activity. 6-hydroxy -α- muurolene was active against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with MIC of 19 µg/ml. The alcoholic extract of the organism under study is none toxic so we believe its sterol content could be a good source for safer anti-inflammatory drugs and also the 6-hydroxy -α- muurolene (compound 1 will be a good candidate for more derivatisation studies to optimize its activity and selectivity as antimicrobial.

  12. Dereplicating and Spatial Mapping of Secondary Metabolites from Fungal Cultures in Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Sica, Vincent P.; Raja, Huzefa A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry techniques have recently become prevalent in natural product research due to their ability to examine secondary metabolites in situ. These techniques retain invaluable spatial and temporal details that are lost through traditional extraction processes. However, most ambient ionization techniques do not collect mutually supportive data, such as chromatographic retention times and/or UV/vis spectra, and this can limit the ability to identify certain metaboli...

  13. Proteomic profile of the Bradysia odoriphaga in response to the microbial secondary metabolite benzothiazole

    OpenAIRE

    Yunhe Zhao; Kaidi Cui; Chunmei Xu; Qiuhong Wang; Yao Wang; Zhengqun Zhang; Feng Liu; Wei Mu

    2016-01-01

    Benzothiazole, a microbial secondary metabolite, has been demonstrated to possess fumigant activity against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ditylenchus destructor and Bradysia odoriphaga. However, to facilitate the development of novel microbial pesticides, the mode of action of benzothiazole needs to be elucidated. Here, we employed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis to investigate the effects of benzothiazole on the proteomic expression of B. odoriphaga. In response to benzothiazole, 92...

  14. TLC and HPTLC Fingerprints of Various Secondary Metabolites in the Stem of the Traditional Medicinal Climber, Solena amplexicaulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthika, K; Paulsamy, S

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to develop a TLC and a HPTLC fingerprint profiles for various secondary metabolites of methanol extracts of the stem of the traditional medicinal climber, Solena amplexicaulis. These studies were carried out as per the methods of Harborne and Wagner et al. The profiles of various individual secondary metabolites were made and developed for authentication. The methanol extract of the stem showed the presence of 6 alkaloids, 6 flavonoids, 2 glycosides, 9 saponins and 3 terpenoids. Owing to the presence of rich variety of secondary metabolites, the stem extract of S. amplexicaulis is expected to exhibit therapeutic properties.

  15. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Greco

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60% were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%. These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds.

  16. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, a starter for the production of Gorgonzola cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Vallone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product, such as Gorgonzola cheese.

  17. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Mariana; Kemppainen, Minna; Pose, Graciela; Pardo, Alejandro

    2015-09-02

    Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60%) were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%). These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds.

  18. Comparison of the secondary metabolites in Penicillium chrysogenum between pilot and industrial penicillin G fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Qiao, Bin; Lu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2011-02-01

    The disparity of secondary metabolites in Penicillium chrysogenum between two scales of penicillin G fermentation (50 L as pilot process and 150,000 L as industrial one) was investigated by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography tandemed with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In industrial process, the pools of intracellular L-α-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (LLD-ACV) and isopenicillin N (IPN) were remarkably less than that in the pilot one, which indicated that the productivity of penicillin G might be higher in the large scale of fermentation. This conclusion was supported by the higher intracellular penicillin G concentration as well as its higher yield per unit biomass in industrial cultivation. The different changing tendencies of IPN, 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 6-oxopiperide-2-carboxylic acid between two processes also suggested the same conclusion. The higher content of intracellular LLD-ACV in pilot process lead to a similarly higher concentration of bis-δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine, which had an inhibitory effect on ACV synthetase and also subdued the activity of IPN synthetase. The interconversion of secondary metabolites and the influence they put on enzymes would intensify the discrepancy between two fermentations more largely. These findings provided new insight into the changes and regulation of secondary metabolites in P. chrysogenum under different fermentation sizes.

  19. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Mariana; Kemppainen, Minna; Pose, Graciela; Pardo, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60%) were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%). These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds. PMID:26364643

  20. Secondary Metabolites from Penicillium roqueforti, A Starter for the Production of Gorgonzola Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Alberto; Soncini, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The presence of mold in food, although necessary for production, can involve the presence of secondary metabolites, which are sometimes toxic. Penicillium roqueforti is a common saprophytic fungus but it is also the essential fungus used in the production of Roquefort cheese and other varieties of blue cheese containing internal mold. The study was conducted on industrial batches of Penicillium roqueforti starters used in the production of the Gorgonzola cheese, with the aim to verify the production of secondary metabolites. Nine Penicillium roqueforti strains were tested. The presence of roquefortine C, PR toxin and mycophenolic acid was tested first in vitro, then on bread-like substrate and lastly in vivo in nine cheese samples produced with the same starters and ready to market. In vitro, only Penicillium out of nine produced roquefortine C, four starters showed mycophenolic acid production, while no significant amounts of PR toxin were detected. In the samples grown on bread-like substrate, Penicillium did not produce secondary metabolites, likewise with each cheese samples tested. To protect consumers’ health and safety, the presence of mycotoxins needs to be verified in food which is widely consumed, above all for products protected by the protected denomination of origin (DOP) label (i.e. a certificate guaranteeing the geographic origin of the product), such as Gorgonzola cheese.

  1. Systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species for the production of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyu-Sang; Kim, Hyun Uk; Charusanti, Pep; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Lee, Sang Yup

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces species continue to attract attention as a source of novel medicinal compounds. Despite a long history of studies on these microorganisms, they still have many biochemical mysteries to be elucidated. Investigations of novel secondary metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters have been more systematized with high-throughput techniques through inspections of correlations among components of the primary and secondary metabolisms at the genome scale. Moreover, up-to-date information on the genome of Streptomyces species with emphasis on their secondary metabolism has been collected in the form of databases and knowledgebases, providing predictive information and enabling one to explore experimentally unrecognized biological spaces of secondary metabolism. Herein, we review recent trends in the systems biology and biotechnology of Streptomyces species.

  2. Identification of Secondary Metabolites Compounds and Antibacterial Activities on The Extract of Soursop Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Riana Ningsih

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of bacterial infectious diseases using semi-synthetic antibiotics can lead to resistance, so as to overcome it necessary to search for natural ingredients from plant extracts that has potential as an antibacterial, one of which is the leaf extract of soursop (Annona muricata L.. This study aims to determine the antibacterial activity of soursop leaf against E. coli and identify groups most active chemical compounds from the extracts. Soursop leaves extracted by maceration using n-hexane, chloroform and methanol. The extracts were tested for antibacterial activity using the diffusion method. Extract with the highest activity determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations grow (MIC and tested the content of secondary metabolites with phytochemical test, subsequently identified using IR spectrophotometer. Soursop leaves with extraction solvent n-hexane, chloroform and methanol to produce n-hexane extract (E1, the chloroform extract (E2, and the methanol extract (E3 with a yield respectively 0.82%; 5.21%; 8.2% and produce antibacterial activity with consecutive inhibition zone of 3.52 mm; 8.34 mm; 3.00 mm. MIC of soursop leaf chloroform extract of the E. coli bacteria that is at a concentration of 1 ppm with inhibition zone of 3.23 mm. Based on the test results phytochemical soursop leaf chloroform extract showed the presence of compounds alkaloids, steroids, saponins and tannins. IR spectrophotometer identification results showed that the chloroform extract of the leaves of the soursop has functional groups OH, aliphatic C-H, C = O, C = C aromatic, CH3, C-O ether and C-H outside the field.

  3. Peptaibol, secondary-metabolite, and hydrophobin pattern of commercial biocontrol agents formulated with species of the Trichoderma harzianum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Fog Nielsen, Kristian; Dieckmann, Ralf; Branco-Rocha, Fabiano; Chaverri, Priscila; Samuels, Gary J; Thrane, Ulf; von Döhren, Hans; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Brückner, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The production of bioactive polypeptides (peptaibiotics) in vivo is a sophisticated adaptation strategy of both mycoparasitic and saprotrophic Trichoderma species for colonizing and defending their natural habitats. This feature is of major practical importance, as the detection of peptaibiotics in plant-protective Trichoderma species, which are successfully used against economically relevant bacterial and fungal plant pathogens, certainly contributes to a better understanding of these complex antagonistic interactions. We analyzed five commercial biocontrol agents (BCAs), namely Canna(®) , Trichosan(®) , Vitalin(®) , Promot(®) WP, and TrichoMax(®) , formulated with recently described species of the Trichoderma harzianum complex, viz. T. afroharzianum, T. simmonsii, and T. guizhouense. By using the well-established, HPLC/MS-based peptaibiomics approach, it could unequivocally be demonstrated that all of these formulations contained new and recurrent peptaibols, i.e., peptaibiotics carrying an acetylated N-terminus, the C-terminus of which is reduced to a 1,2-amino alcohol. Their chain lengths, including the amino alcohol, were 11, 14, and 18 residues, respectively. Peptaibols were also to be the dominating secondary metabolites in plate cultures of the four strains obtained from four of the Trichoderma- based BCAs, contributing 95% of the UHPLC-UV/VIS peak areas and 99% of the total ion count MS peak area from solid media. Furthermore, species-specific hydrophobins, as well as non-peptaibiotic secondary metabolites, were detected, the latter being known for their antifungal, siderophore, or plant-growth-promoting activities. Notably, none of the isolates produced low-molecular weight mycotoxins. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  4. Changes of Enzymes Activity and Production of Secondary Metabolites of Artemisia aucheri in Different Altitudes and Its Relation to Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zare-maivan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia plants are the most abundant plants species in Iran which contain strong antioxidant properties and as such, have medicinal and economic value. Despite wide distribution of Artemisisa species, ecophysiology of its adaptation to changes in altitude and soil property had not been investigated. In this study, the relationships between ecophysiological and adaptation capabilities of A. aucheri to altitude changes through measuring changes in the activity of its antioxidant enzymes and secondary metabolites in situ was investigated based on a completely randomized experiment. The enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, and the amount of total phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins, malondialdehyde and chlorophylls A and B were measured in A. aucheri plants growing in three different altitudes at and above the 36° latitude on the southern slopes of Eastern Alborz Mountain ranges in triplicate 10*10 m quadrates. Statistical analysis of data showed that soil type was loamy significantly becoming more sandy- loam with lowering in altitude and the soil contained greater amounts of oxides of silicone, aluminum, magnesium, sodium, potassium and phosphorus in upper altitude except calcium which was present in greater quantity in lower altitude. With increasing altitude, activity of superoxide dismutase and quantities of chlorophylls and total phenols in leaves increased. Some biochemical factors in A. aucheri showed significant positive correlation(P ≤ 0.05 between them. Adaptation of A. aucheri to changes in altitude occurred through changing its antioxidant enzymes activity and production of secondary metabolites in response to factors related to the altitude including soil type and texture, moisture level, temperature and most importantly radiation

  5. Determination of triterpenic acids and screening for valuable secondary metabolites in Salvia sp. suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmritz, Sibylle; Haas, Christiane; Pavlov, Atanas I; Geib, Doris; Ulber, Roland; Bley, Thomas; Steingroewer, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Plant in vitro cultures are a prospective alternative for biochemicals production, for example the triterpenes oleanolic and ursolic acid present in plants and cell cultures of Salvia sp. Our objective was to develop a suitable analysis protocol for evaluation of triterpenic acid yield in plant raw material and in vitro cultures supporting selection processes. Moreover, valuable bioactive compounds had to be revealed. Thus, different strategies enhancing the separation for a sensitive and effective HPLC-UV method were investigated and the developed method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, limits of detection and quantification. A baseline separation of these isomers enabled detection limits of below 0.4 microg/mL and quantification limits of about 1.2 microg/mL. Over the tested concentration range a good linearity was observed (R2 > 0.9999). The variations in the method were below 6% for intra- and inter-day assays of concentration. Recoveries were between 85-98% for both compounds using ethanol as extraction solvent. Additionally, metabolite profiling of cell suspension culture extracts by GC-MS has shown the production variability of different plant metabolites and especially the presence of plant phenols and sterols. These studies provide a method suitable for screening plant and cell culture productivity of triterpenic acids and highlighted interesting co-products of plant cell cultures.

  6. Activity-Independent Discovery of Secondary Metabolites Using Chemical Elicitation and Cheminformatic Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Elardo, Sheila M; Sørensen, Dan; Ho, Louis; Ziko, Mikaela; Bueler, Stephanie A; Lu, Stella; Tao, Joe; Moser, Arvin; Lee, Richard; Agard, David; Fairn, Greg; Rubinstein, John L; Shoichet, Brian K; Nodwell, Justin R

    2015-11-20

    Most existing antibiotics were discovered through screens of environmental microbes, particularly the streptomycetes, for the capacity to prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria. This "activity-guided screening" method has been largely abandoned because it repeatedly rediscovers those compounds that are highly expressed during laboratory culture. Most of these metabolites have already been biochemically characterized. However, the sequencing of streptomycete genomes has revealed a large number of "cryptic" secondary metabolic genes that are either poorly expressed in the laboratory or that have biological activities that cannot be discovered through standard activity-guided screens. Methods that reveal these uncharacterized compounds, particularly methods that are not biased in favor of the highly expressed metabolites, would provide direct access to a large number of potentially useful biologically active small molecules. To address this need, we have devised a discovery method in which a chemical elicitor called Cl-ARC is used to elevate the expression of cryptic biosynthetic genes. We show that the resulting change in product yield permits the direct discovery of secondary metabolites without requiring knowledge of their biological activity. We used this approach to identify three rare secondary metabolites and find that two of them target eukaryotic cells and not bacterial cells. In parallel, we report the first paired use of cheminformatic inference and chemical genetic epistasis in yeast to identify the target. In this way, we demonstrate that oxohygrolidin, one of the eukaryote-active compounds we identified through activity-independent screening, targets the V1 ATPase in yeast and human cells and secondarily HSP90.

  7. [Progress in predicting animal feed intake of plant secondary compounds by spectral analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Su; Hong, Fu-Zeng; Wang, Kun

    2007-09-01

    Study on feed intake of phytophagic animals is a key issue in promoting animal productivity and conservation of wild life. However, how to accurately predict the feed intake of grazing animal and wild life is a long remaining problem. Under the mechanism of co-evolution, plant produces secondary compounds such as phenolics, terpenoids and nitrogen-containing compounds to avoid or reduce animal herbivorous damage as a defensive strategy, while animal attained detoxification capacity of biotransforming and mineralizing the compounds by microbial activities and reactions such as hydrolysis and reduction. The attributes of feedstuff and the amount of a particular feed consumed by the animal affect directly the urinary excretion of secondary metabolites. Plant secondary compounds and their metabolites can be efficiently extracted, separated and structure-identified by spectroscopic analytic method. Then the feed intake of the animal can be accurately measured or predicted by the inference model of concentration-ratio that is based on the regression of correlating the secondary metabolites to the precursors in plant. Aromatic compounds, an universal occurrence in vascular plants, play an important role in predicting feed intake of ruminants. Progresses have been made all-around about the new method. Intensive studies have found that different species and developing stage of plant have varying kinds and levels of secondary compounds, and the age, gender and type of animal have different capacity of metabolizing the compounds. Increasing concentrations of the compounds in the diet led to a dose-dependent decrease in food intake best described as an exponential decay. Animals that had not previously been exposed to the compounds ate significantly more when first offered food containing the compound than on subsequent days. Advanced spectroscopic analytic method has been developed and widely applied in extraction (e. g. microwave assisted extraction and ultrasonic extraction

  8. Potentially harmful secondary metabolites produced by indoor Chaetomium species on artificially and naturally contaminated building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosen, Ina; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Clausen, Geo;

    2017-01-01

    The presence of the fungal genus Chaetomium and its secondary metabolites in indoor environments is suspected to have a negative impact on human health and wellbeing. About 200 metabolites have been currently described from Chaetomium spp., but only the bioactive compound group, chaetoglobosins, ...

  9. Secondary metabolite production in Hypericum perforatum L. cell suspensions upon elicitation with fungal mycelia from Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadzovska-Simic Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the production of phenylpropanoids (phenolic compounds, flavanols, flavonols and anthocyanins and naphtodianthrones (hypericins in elicited Hypericum perforatum L. cell suspensions. To determine whether secondary metabolite production could be enhanced, Hypericum cell suspensions were exposed to mycelia extract from the fungus Aspergillus flavus. Elicited Hypericum cell suspension cultures displayed reduced growth and viability and a modification of secondary metabolites production. Anthocyanins were only stimulated in fungal-elicited cell suspensions. Secondary metabolite production in elicited Hypericum cells revealed an antagonism between the flavonoid/naphtodianthrone and anthocyanin pathways. The data suggest a modification of the channeling of the phenylpropanoid compounds. Together, these results represent useful data for monitoring the channeling in different secondary metabolite pathways during the scaled-up production of naphtodianthrones for medicinal uses.

  10. Simulated moose (Alces alces L.) browsing increases accumulation of secondary metabolites in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Bergström, Roger; Wallgren, Märtha; Suominen, Otso; Danell, Kjell

    2012-10-01

    We have addressed the impact of moose (Alces alces L.) on accumulation of secondary metabolites, lignin, and nitrogen in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation. The study was conducted within a long-term research project on direct and indirect impacts of moose on the ecosystem. In the experiment, browsing, defecation, and urination corresponding to four different moose densities were simulated for eight years before bilberry tissue was collected and analyzed. Some quantitatively dominant flavonoids were affected by the simulated moose browsing and by habitat productivity and light. The content of flavonoids increased with increasing moose density and light, and decreased with increasing habitat productivity. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in bilberry from nutrient-poor sites may have resulted from the increased photosynthesis relative to growth, which facilitated secondary metabolism. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in plants subjected to simulated moose- herbivory might have been caused in part by loss of biomass. In addition, in areas with high biomass loss, i.e., high moose density, a more open canopy was created and more solar radiation could have induced secondary metabolism.

  11. Capacity for absorption of water-soluble secondary metabolites greater in birds than in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Karasov

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites (SMs are pervasive in animal foods and potentially influence feeding behavior, interspecies interactions, and the distribution and abundance of animals. Some of the major classes of naturally occurring SMs in plants include many water-soluble compounds in the molecular size range that could cross the intestinal epithelium via the paracellular space by diffusion or solvent drag. There are differences among species in paracellular permeability. Using Middle Eastern rodent and avian consumers of fruits containing SMs, we tested the hypothesis that avian species would have significantly higher paracellular permeability than rodent species. Permeability in intact animals was assessed using standard pharmacological methodology to measure absorption of two radiolabeled, inert, neutral water-soluble probes that do not interact with intestinal nutrient transporters, L-arabinose (M(r = 150.1 Da and lactulose (M(r = 342.3 Da. We also measured absorption of labeled 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3OMD-glucose; M(r = 194.2 Da, which is a nonmetabolized analogue of D-glucose that is passively absorbed through the paracellular space but also transported across the enterocyte membranes. Most glucose was absorbed by all species, but arabinose fractional absorption (f was nearly three times higher in birds (1.03±0.17, n = 15 in two species compared to rodents (0.37±0.06, n = 10 in two species (P<0.001. Surprisingly, the apparent rates of absorption in birds of arabinose exceeded those of 3OMD-glucose. Our findings are in agreement with previous work showing that the paracellular pathway is more prominent in birds relative to nonflying mammals, and suggests that birds may be challenged by greater absorption of water-soluble, dietary SMs. The increased expression of the paracellular pathway in birds hints at a tradeoff: the free energy birds gain by absorbing water-soluble nutrients passively may be offset by the metabolic

  12. Comparative SNP diversity among four Eucalyptus species for genes from secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foley William J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little information about the DNA sequence variation within and between closely related plant species. The combination of re-sequencing technologies, large-scale DNA pools and availability of reference gene sequences allowed the extensive characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes of four biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of ecologically relevant secondary metabolites in Eucalyptus. With this approach the occurrence and patterns of SNP variation for a set of genes can be compared across different species from the same genus. Results In a single GS-FLX run, we sequenced over 103 Mbp and assembled them to approximately 50 kbp of reference sequences. An average sequencing depth of 315 reads per nucleotide site was achieved for all four eucalypt species, Eucalyptus globulus, E. nitens, E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba. We sequenced 23 genes from 1,764 individuals and discovered 8,631 SNPs across the species, with about 1.5 times as many SNPs per kbp in the introns compared to exons. The exons of the two closely related species (E. globulus and E. nitens had similar numbers of SNPs at synonymous and non-synonymous sites. These species also had similar levels of SNP diversity, whereas E. camaldulensis and E. loxophleba had much higher SNP diversity. Neither the pathway nor the position in the pathway influenced gene diversity. The four species share between 20 and 43% of the SNPs in these genes. Conclusion By using conservative statistical detection methods, we were confident about the validity of each SNP. With numerous individuals sampled over the geographical range of each species, we discovered one SNP in every 33 bp for E. nitens and one in every 31 bp in E. globulus. In contrast, the more distantly related species contained more SNPs: one in every 16 bp for E. camaldulensis and one in 17 bp for E. loxophleba, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest frequency of SNPs

  13. Occurrence of Pre- and Post-Harvest Mycotoxins and Other Secondary Metabolites in Danish Maize Silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Ida M. L. Drejer; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Rasmussen, Peter Have

    2014-01-01

    Maize silage is a widely used feed product for cattle worldwide, which may be contaminated with mycotoxins, pre- and post-harvest. This concerns both farmers and consumers. To assess the exposure of Danish cattle to mycotoxins from maize silage, 99 samples of whole-crop maize (ensiled and un-ensiled) were analyzed for their contents of 27 mycotoxins and other secondary fungal metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method specifically targets the majority of common pre- and post-harvest fungi associated with maize silage in Denmark. Sixty-one samples contained one or more of the 27 analytes in detectable concentrations. The most common mycotoxins were zearalenone, enniatin B nivalenol and andrastin A, found in 34%, 28%, 16% and 15% of the samples, respectively. None of the samples contained mycotoxins above the EU recommended maximum concentrations for Fusarium toxins in cereal-based roughage. Thus, the present study does not indicate that Danish maize silage in general is a cause of acute single mycotoxin intoxications in cattle. However, 31 of the samples contained multiple analytes; two samples as much as seven different fungal metabolites. Feed rations with maize silage may therefore contain complex mixtures of fungal secondary metabolites with unknown biological activity. This emphasizes the need for a thorough examination of the effects of chronic exposure and possible synergistic effects. PMID:25089350

  14. Occurrence of pre- and post-harvest mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites in Danish maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Ida M L Drejer; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Rasmussen, Peter Have

    2014-07-31

    Maize silage is a widely used feed product for cattle worldwide, which may be contaminated with mycotoxins, pre- and post-harvest. This concerns both farmers and consumers. To assess the exposure of Danish cattle to mycotoxins from maize silage, 99 samples of whole-crop maize (ensiled and un-ensiled) were analyzed for their contents of 27 mycotoxins and other secondary fungal metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method specifically targets the majority of common pre- and post-harvest fungi associated with maize silage in Denmark. Sixty-one samples contained one or more of the 27 analytes in detectable concentrations. The most common mycotoxins were zearalenone, enniatin B nivalenol and andrastin A, found in 34%, 28%, 16% and 15% of the samples, respectively. None of the samples contained mycotoxins above the EU recommended maximum concentrations for Fusarium toxins in cereal-based roughage. Thus, the present study does not indicate that Danish maize silage in general is a cause of acute single mycotoxin intoxications in cattle. However, 31 of the samples contained multiple analytes; two samples as much as seven different fungal metabolites. Feed rations with maize silage may therefore contain complex mixtures of fungal secondary metabolites with unknown biological activity. This emphasizes the need for a thorough examination of the effects of chronic exposure and possible synergistic effects.

  15. Characterization and Optimization of Biosynthesis of Bioactive Secondary Metabolites Produced by Streptomyces sp. 8812.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnisz, Aleksandra; Guśpiel, Adam; Postek, Magdalena; Ziemska, Joanna; Laskowska, Anna; Rabczenko, Daniel; Solecka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional requirements and environmental conditions for a submerged culture of Streptomyces sp. 8812 were determined. Batch and fed-batch Streptomyces sp. 8812 fermentations were conducted to obtain high activity of secondary metabolites. In the study several factors were examined for their influence on the biosynthesis of the active metabolites-7-hydroxy-6-oxo-2,3,4,6-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxy acid (C10H9NO4) and N-acetyl-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (C11H13NO5): changes in medium composition, pH of production medium, various growth phases of seed culture, amino acid supplementation and addition of anion exchange resin to the submerged culture. Biological activities of secondary metabolites were examined with the use of DD-carboxypeptidase 64-575 and horseradish peroxidase. Streptomyces sp. 8812 mycelium was evaluated under fluorescent microscopy and respiratory activity of the strain was analyzed. Moreover, the enzymatic profiles of the strain with the use of Api ZYM test were analyzed and genetic analysis made. Phylogenetic analysis of Streptomyces sp. 8812 revealed that its closest relative is Streptomyces capoamus JCM 4734 (98%), whereas sequence analysis for 16S rRNA gene using NCBI BLAST algorithm showed 100% homology between these two strains. Biosynthetic processes, mycelium growth and enzyme inhibitory activities of these two strains were also compared.

  16. Prediction and characterization of small non-coding RNAs related to secondary metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bing Liu

    Full Text Available Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389 belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5 that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3 was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M, except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h. The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to

  17. Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, James C.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are an understudied domain of life often found in “extreme” environments in terms of temperature, salinity, and a range of other factors. Archaeal proteins, such as a wide range of enzymes, have adapted to function under these extreme conditions, providing biotechnology with interesting activities to exploit. In addition to producing structural and enzymatic proteins, archaea also produce a range of small peptide molecules (such as archaeocins) and other novel secondary metabolites such as those putatively involved in cell communication (acyl homoserine lactones), which can be exploited for biotechnological purposes. Due to the wide array of metabolites produced there is a great deal of biotechnological potential from antimicrobials such as diketopiperazines and archaeocins, as well as roles in the cosmetics and food industry. In this review we will discuss the diversity of small molecules, both peptide and nonpeptide, produced by archaea and their potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26504428

  18. Molluscan biological and chemical diversity: secondary metabolites and medicinal resources produced by marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2010-11-01

    The phylum Mollusca represents an enormous diversity of species with eight distinct classes. This review provides a taxonomic breakdown of the published research on marine molluscan natural products and the medicinal products currently derived from molluscs, in order to identify priority targets and strategies for future research. Some marine gastropods and bivalves have been of great interest to natural products chemists, yielding a diversity of chemical classes and several drug leads currently in clinical trials. Molluscs also feature prominently in a broad range of traditional natural medicines, although the active ingredients in the taxa involved are typically unknown. Overall secondary metabolites have only been investigated from a tiny proportion (gastropods, the opisthobranchs (a subgroup of Heterobranchia), which are primarily comprised of soft-bodied marine molluscs. Conversely, most molluscan medicines are derived from shelled gastropods and bivalves. The complete disregard for several minor classes of molluscs is unjustified based on their evolutionary history and unique life styles, which may have led to novel pathways for secondary metabolism. The Polyplacophora, in particular, have been identified as worthy of future investigation given their use in traditional South African medicines and their abundance in littoral ecosystems. As bioactive compounds are not always constitutively expressed in molluscs, future research should be targeted towards biosynthetic organs and inducible defence reactions for specific medicinal applications. Given the lack of an acquired immune system, the use of bioactive secondary metabolites is likely to be ubiquitous throughout the Mollusca and broadening the search field may uncover interesting novel chemistry.

  19. Patulin and secondary metabolite production by marine-derived Penicillium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteelandt, Marieke; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Blanchet, Elodie; Fossi Tankoua, Olivia; Robiou Du Pont, Thibaut; Joubert, Yolaine; Monteau, Fabrice; Le Bizec, Bruno; Frisvad, Jens C; Pouchus, Yves François; Grovel, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Genus Penicillium represents an important fungal group regarding to its mycotoxin production. Secondary metabolomes of eight marine-derived strains belonging to subgenera Furcatum and Penicillium were investigated using dereplication by liquid chromatography (LC)-Diode Array Detector (DAD)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. Each strain was grown on six different culture media to enhance the number of observable metabolites. Thirty-two secondary metabolites were detected in crude extracts with twenty first observations for studied species. Patulin, a major mycotoxin, was classically detected in extracts of Penicillium expansum, and was also isolated from Penicillium antarcticum cultures, whose secondary metabolome is still to be done. These detections constituted the first descriptions of patulin in marine strains of Penicillium, highlighting the risk for shellfish and their consumers due to the presence of these fungi in shellfish farming areas. Patulin induced acute neurotoxicity on Diptera larvae, indicating the interest of this bioassay as an additional tool for detection of this major mycotoxin in crude extracts.

  20. Role of growth media and chemical enhancers in secondary metabolites production from Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) and their pharmaceutical potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid Ali; Bacha, Nafess; Ahmad, Bashir; Cox, R J; Bakht, Jehan

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the effect of different growth media and chemical enhancer on silent genes in Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) for secondary metabolites production and its in vitro biological activities. Results revealed that Aspergillus carbonarius (NRL-369) grown in Czapeak yeast extract broth medium produced more metabolites compared with other media. Chemical epigenetic modifiers (suberoyl-anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) at concentration of 15mM were effective for the expression of silent genes resulting in increased secondary metabolites production. Secondary metabolites extracted in ethyl acetate and fractionized in n-Hexane showed variable degree of growth inhibitions of the tested microorganisms. Similarly, these samples were also active against brine shrimps and Lemna.

  1. Production of a toxic metabolite in 2,4-D-resistant GM crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurquin, Paul F

    2016-06-01

    This Note questions the safety of crop plants engineered with transgenes coding for the degradation of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) into its cytotoxic metabolite 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP).

  2. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems.

  3. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jane C.; Kessell, Allan; Weston, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems. PMID:24451131

  4. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H.; Kottmann, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms are the main source of bioactive compounds that are in use as antimicrobial and anticancer drugs, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides. In the last decade, the increasing availability of microbial genomes has established genome mining as a very...... important method for the identification of their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). One of the most popular tools for this task is antiSMASH. However, so far, antiSMASH is limited to de novo computing results for user-submitted genomes and only partially connects these with BGCs from other organisms...

  5. Anthracenedione Derivatives as Anticancer Agents Isolated from Secondary Metabolites of the Mangrove Endophytic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-ye Zhang; Li-yang Tao; Yong-ju Liang; Li-ming Chen; Yan-jun Mi; Li-sheng Zheng; Fang Wang; Zhi-gang She; Yong-cheng Lin; Kenneth Kin Wah To; Li-wu Fu

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report anticancer activity of 14 anthracenedione derivatives separated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403) and Guignardia sp. (No. 4382). Some of them inhibited potently the growth of KB and KBv200 cells, among which compound 6 displayed strong cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 3.17 and 3.21 μM to KB and KBv200 cells, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism involved in the apoptosis induced by co...

  6. Anthracenedione derivatives as anticancer agents isolated from secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-ye; Tao, Li-yang; Liang, Yong-ju; Chen, Li-ming; Mi, Yan-jun; Zheng, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; She, Zhi-gang; Lin, Yong-cheng; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Fu, Li-wu

    2010-04-23

    In this article, we report anticancer activity of 14 anthracenedione derivatives separated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403) and Guignardia sp. (No. 4382). Some of them inhibited potently the growth of KB and KBv200 cells, among which compound 6 displayed strong cytotoxicity with IC(50) values of 3.17 and 3.21 microM to KB and KBv200 cells, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism involved in the apoptosis induced by compound 6 is probably related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, the structure-activity relationships of these compounds are discussed.

  7. Anthracenedione Derivatives as Anticancer Agents Isolated from Secondary Metabolites of the Mangrove Endophytic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ye Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report anticancer activity of 14 anthracenedione derivatives separated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403 and Guignardia sp. (No. 4382. Some of them inhibited potently the growth of KB and KBv200 cells, among which compound 6 displayed strong cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 3.17 and 3.21 μM to KB and KBv200 cells, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism involved in the apoptosis induced by compound 6 is probably related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, the structure-activity relationships of these compounds are discussed.

  8. Isolation and characterisation of three new anthraquinone secondary metabolites from Symplocos racemosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Umar; Naz, Sadia; Khan, Ajmal; Khan, Sara; Khan, Afsar; Ali, Mumtaz; Khan, Saleha Suleman

    2016-01-01

    Three new anthraquinone secondary metabolites were isolated from Symplocos racemosa, a small tree of family symplocaceae. The structures of compounds (1-3) were elucidated to be 1,4-dihydroxy-6-(ethoxymethyl)-8-propylanthracene-9,10-dione (1), 1,4-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)-8-butylanthracene-9,10-dione (2) and 1,4-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)-8-propyl anthracene-9,10-dione (3) using their spectral data, i.e. through IR, UV, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques including heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence, heteronuclear multiple bond correlation and correlation spectroscopy.

  9. Isolation and characterizacion of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with phytotherapeutic interest

    OpenAIRE

    Trapero Mozos, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with phytotherapeutic interest. Las plantas medicinales han sido utilizadas como primer recurso sanitario desde la antigüedad. En los últimos años el interés de la industria farmacéutica por los productos naturales o metabolitos secundarios provenientes de plantas medicinales, se ha incrementado considerablemente, entre las que se incluyen el azafrán. Se conoce como especia azafrán a los estigma...

  10. Allocation of carbon to growth and secondary metabolites in birch seedlings under UV-B radiation and CO{sub 2} exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavola, A.; Julkunen-Tiitto, R. [Univ. of Joensuu, Dept. of Biology, Joensuu (Finland); Rosa, T.M. de la [Univ. of Joensuu, Faculty of Forestry, Joensuu (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    In plants, the allocation of carbon to secondary metabolites has been shown to be determined by both the availability of resources (e.g., CO{sub 2} concentration) and by specific stress factors (e.g., ultraviolet [UV]-radiation). It has been suggested that, in combination, CO{sub 2} and UV-B radiation may differentially affect plant growth and morphogenic parameters, and elevated CO{sub 2} may ameliorate the effects of UV-B radiation, In the present work, the effects of increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and UV-B radiation on growth and the accumulation of different types of secondary metabolites were studied in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth). Seedlings were exposed to 350 and 700 {mu} mol mol{sup -1} of CO{sub 2} in a greenhouse. At both CO{sub 2} levels, additional UV-B was either present (8.16 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1} of biologically effective UV-B irradiance) or absent. The time course of accumulation of individual secondary compounds and the shifts in allocation of carbon between biomass and the secondary metabolites (phenolic acids, flavonoids, condensed tannins) were studied during a 1-month-long exposure. Additionally, the activities of enzymes (L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase [PAL], EC 4.3.1.5; peroxidase, EC 1.11.1.7; polyphenol oxidase, EC 1.10.3.1) were determined for leaves. UV-B radiation significantly increased biomass, PAL activity, and the accumulation of phenolic acids and flavonoids in seedlings. Elevated CO{sub 2} concentration increased the activities of all the enzymes studied and the accumulation of condensed tannins in leaves, especially with UV-B radiation. Because the observed UV-B induction of flavonoids was smaller under a high CO{sub 2} concentration, it was suggested that the excess of carbon in the atmosphere may moderate the effect of UV-B by increasing the metabolic activity of leaves (high enzyme activities) and by changing the allocation of internal carbon between different primary and secondary metabolites in the

  11. Bioactive secondary metabolites produced by an endophytic fungus Gaeumannomyces sp. JS0464 from a maritime halophyte Phragmites communis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changyeol; Kim, Soonok; Li, Wei; Bang, Sunghee; Lee, Hanna; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Noh, Eun-Young; Park, Jung-Eun; Bang, Woo Young; Shim, Sang Hee

    2017-03-29

    Endophytes, important plant-associated mycobionts, have attracted a great deal of attention because of their bioactive secondary metabolites. Even though halophytes have been reported to overcome salt stress via associations with their endophytes, few studies have investigated the metabolites produced by the endophytes from halophytes. In this study, a dark septate endophytic fungal strain (JS0464), identified as Gaeumannomyces sp. by ITS sequencing, was isolated from the rhizome of a halophyte, Phragmites communis, in Suncheon bay, South Korea. This strain was cultured on a large scale and extracted with ethyl acetate. Chemical investigations of extracts of JS0464 led to the isolation of two glycosylated dialkylresorcinol derivatives (1-2), an anthraquinone derivative (3) and eight known compounds (4-11), which were identified by spectroscopic analyses incorporating one-dimensional/2D NMR and MS. Nine compounds showed significant nitric oxide reduction activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglia BV-2 cells, seven of which did not impair cell viability. The results suggest that endophytes from the halophytes could be potential resources for bioactive natural products.The Journal of Antibiotics advance online publication, 29 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ja.2017.39.

  12. Effects of rare-earth elements La3+and Ce3+ on the growth of Rabdosia rubescens regeneration plant and the accumulation of main secondary metabolites%稀土元素镧和铈对冬凌草再生植株生长及次生代谢产物的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董诚明; 曹利华; 苏秀红; 张艳贞; 乔毅琳; 姚锋

    2015-01-01

    oridonin,ponicidin,rosmarinic acid in R .rubescens were studied.The synthetic score of blank control group was 61.51 points,under the condition of 1 μmol·L-1 CeCl3 ·7H2 O,the score reached up to the highest value of 87.20 points.But under the condition of 5 μmol·L-1 LaCl3 ·6H2 O,the score 74.44 points.The results of this experiment showed that CeCl3 ·7H2 O had more positive promoting effects on the growth of regeneration plant of R .rubescens and the accumulation of main secondary metabolites than LaCl3 ·6H2 O.The optimal concentration of Ce3+ or La3+ could promote the growth of regeneration plant of R .rubescens and secondary metabolites oridonin,ponicidin and rosmarinic synthesis.However,La3+ concentration in high level inhibited the growth of R .rubescens plant regeneration.The experiment would lay a foundation for further study on the promotion effect on the growth of regeneration plant of R .rubescens .The study of R .rubescens could provide theoretical basis for the rational utilization of rare earth elements.

  13. Comparative metabolite profiling of the insecticide thiamethoxam in plant and cell suspension culture of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Rajib; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan; Kulshrestha, Gita

    2009-07-22

    The metabolism of thiamethoxam [(EZ)-3-(2-chloro-1,3-thiazol-5-yl-methyl)-5-methyl-1,3,5-oxadiazinan-4-ylidene (nitro) amine] was investigated in whole plant, callus, and heterotrophic cell suspension culture of aseptically and field grown tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants. The structure of the metabolites was elucidated by chromatographic (HPLC) and spectroscopic (IR, NMR, and MS) methods. Thiamethoxam metabolism proceeded by the formation of a urea derivative, a nitroso product, and nitro guanidine. Both urea and nitro guanidine metabolites further degraded in plants, and a mechanism has been proposed. In the plant, organ-specific differences in thiamethoxam metabolism were observed. Only one metabolite was formed in whole plant against four in callus and eight metabolites in cell suspension culture under aseptic conditions. Out of six metabolites of thiamethoxam in tomato fruits in field conditions, five were similar to those formed in the cell suspension culture. In the cell suspension culture, thiamethoxam degraded to maximum metabolites within 72 h, whereas in plants, such extensive conversion could only be observed after 10 days.

  14. Influence of natural substrates and co-occurring marine bacteria on the production of secondary metabolites by Photobacterium halotolerans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Giobergia, Sonia; Møller, Kirsten A.

    Genome sequences reveal that our current standard laboratory conditions only support a fraction of the potential secondary metabolism in bacteria. Thus, we must rethink cultivation, detection, and isolation strategies for bacterial secondary metabolites in order to explore the huge, so far...

  15. Fungal secondary metabolites from Monascus spp. reduce rumen methane production in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgavi, D P; Martin, C; Boudra, H

    2013-02-01

    Decreasing methanogenesis without affecting fermentation and digestion of feeds in the rumen can reduce the environmental impact of ruminant production and have a beneficial effect on feed conversion efficiency. In this work, metabolites produced by Monascus spp. molds were assayed for their antimethanogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. The capacity of 7 strains of Monascus to produce secondary metabolites was assessed in solid media. Monitored metabolites included the statins monacolin K, pravastatin, and mevastatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin. Ethanolic extracts from 5 different solid media from 2 selected strains were tested in vitro. Fermentation was not negatively affected by any treatment, but one extract decreased methane production (P 0.05). Rice on which the selected Monascus sp. was grown also decreased methane production when used as substrate for in vitro incubations (P Monascus-fermented rice on methane production was then assayed in vivo. Six wethers were adapted to a diet containing rice grain and hay (1:1 ratio). Rice was then replaced by fermented rice and given to animals for nearly 2 wk. Animals were monitored for a further 2 wk after the treatment. Daily methane emissions decreased (P Monascus appear to have an inhibitory effect on methanogens and decreased methanogenesis in vitro and in short-term in vivo without any apparent negative effect on rumen fermentation. This strategy deserves to be further explored and could be an abatement option under certain feeding situations.

  16. Gene probes for the detection of 6-deoxyhexose metabolism in secondary metabolite-producing streptomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, M; Piepersberg, W

    1992-01-01

    DNA probes were designed from the streptomycin production genes strDELM of Streptomyces griseus involved in the biosynthesis of the 6-deoxyhexose (6DOH) dihydrostreptose which could detect the genomic fragments coding for 6DOH formation in other actinomycetes strains. In about 70% of the 43 strains tested at least one signal could be detected with strD-, strE- or strLM-specific probes. Evidence is presented that the hybridizing genes are mostly clustered and probably engaged in the formation of secondary metabolites. Because of the wide-spread use of 6DOH constituents in natural products these probes should allow to detect a vast array of different secondary metabolic gene clusters in actinomycetes.

  17. Senior Secondary School Children's Understanding of Plant Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosothwane, Modise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess children's understanding of plant nutrition. The research was done on a sample of secondary school pupils in the age range of 16 to 19 years in two senior secondary schools in Botswana. The sample contained 137 senior secondary pupils all in their final year of study. These children were above average…

  18. Ecological implication of variation in the secondary metabolites in Parmelioid lichens with respect to altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vertika; Patel, D K; Bajpai, Rajesh; Semwal, Manoj; Upreti, D K

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are known to synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites having multifunctional activity in response to external environmental condition. Two common lichen extrolites, atranorin and salazinic acid, are known to afford antioxidant as well as photoprotectant nature depending on the abiotic/biotic stress. The present investigation aims to study the influence of altitudinal gradient on the quantitative profile of atranorin and salazinic acid in three lichen species, Bulbothrix setschwanensis (Zahlbr.) Hale, Everniastrum cirrhatum (Fr.) Hale and Parmotrema reticulatum (Taylor) Choisy, Parmeliaceae using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique. Samples were collected from high-altitude area, usually considered as non-polluted sites of Garhwal Himalaya. Characterization and quantification of the lichen substances in samples were carried out comparing with the standards of atranorin and salazinic acid. Results indicated significant variation in the chemical content with the rising altitude. All the three lichen species showed higher quantities of chemical substances with the altitudinal rise, while among the three lichen species, E. cirrhatum showed the highest quantity of total lichen compounds. The higher abundance and frequency of E. cirrhatum with increasing altitude as compared to B. setschwanensis and P. reticulatum may be attributed due to the presence of higher quantity of photoprotecting/antioxidant chemicals especially salazinic acid. Thus, the present study shows the prominent role of secondary metabolite in wider ecological distribution of Parmelioid lichens at higher altitudes.

  19. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C; Jensen, Paul R; Soria-Mercado, Irma E

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1-38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26-56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98-100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites.

  20. Low-volume toolbox for the discovery of immunosuppressive fungal secondary metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Berthier

    Full Text Available The secondary metabolome provides pathogenic fungi with a plethoric and versatile panel of molecules that can be deployed during host ingress. While powerful genetic and analytical chemistry methods have been developed to identify fungal secondary metabolites (SMs, discovering the biological activity of SMs remains an elusive yet critical task. Here, we describe a process for identifying the immunosuppressive properties of Aspergillus SMs developed by coupling a cost-effective microfluidic neutrophil chemotaxis assay with an in vivo zebrafish assay. The microfluidic platform allows the identification of metabolites inhibiting neutrophil recruitment with as little as several nano-grams of compound in microliters of fluid. The zebrafish assay demonstrates a simple and accessible approach for performing in vivo studies without requiring any manipulation of the fish. Using this methodology we identify the immunosuppressive properties of a fungal SM, endocrocin. We find that endocrocin is localized in Aspergillus fumigatus spores and its biosynthesis is temperature-dependent. Finally, using the Drosophila toll deficient model, we find that deletion of encA, encoding the polyketide synthase required for endocrocin production, yields a less pathogenic strain of A. fumigatus when spores are harvested from endocrocin permissive but not when harvested from endocrocin restrictive conditions. The tools developed here will open new "function-omic" avenues downstream of the metabolomics, identification, and purification phases.

  1. Methods for isolation, purification and structural elucidation of bioactive secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebada, Sherif S; Edrada, Ru Angelie; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In the past few decades, marine natural products bioprospecting has yielded a considerable number of drug candidates. Two marine natural products have recently been admitted as new drugs: Prialt (also known as ziconotide) as a potent analgesic for severe chronic pain and Yondelis (known also as trabectedin or E-743) as antitumor agent for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma. In this protocol, methods for bioactivity-guided isolation, purification and identification of secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates such as sponges, tunicates, soft corals and crinoids are discussed. To achieve this goal, solvent extraction of usually freeze-dried sample of marine organisms is performed. Next, the extract obtained is fractionated by liquid-liquid partitioning followed by various chromatographic separation techniques including thin layer chromatography, vacuum liquid chromatography, column chromatography (CC) and preparative high-performance reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Isolation of bioactive secondary metabolites is usually monitored by bioactivity assays, e.g., antioxidant (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl) and cytotoxicity (microculture tetrazolium) activities that ultimately yield the active principles. Special care should be taken when performing isolation procedures adapted to the physical and chemical characteristics of the compounds isolated, particularly their lipo- or hydrophilic characters. Examples of isolation of compounds of different polarities from extracts of various marine invertebrates will be presented in this protocol. Structure elucidation is achieved using recent spectroscopic techniques, especially 2D NMR and mass spectrometry analysis.

  2. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential

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    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1–38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26–56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98–100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites. PMID:23229438

  3. Uncovering the repertoire of fungal secondary metabolites: From Fleming's laboratory to the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruta, Tomasz

    2017-06-20

    Fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites (SMs), low-molecular weight compounds associated with many potentially useful biologic activities. The examples of biotechnologically relevant fungal metabolites include penicillin, a β-lactam antibiotic, and lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug. The discovery of pharmaceutical lead compounds within the microbial metabolic pools relies on the selection and biochemical characterization of promising strains. Not all SMs are produced under standard cultivation conditions, hence the uncovering of chemical potential of investigated strains often requires the use of induction strategies to awake the associated biosynthetic genes. Triggering the secondary metabolic pathways can be achieved through the variation of cultivation conditions and growth media composition. The alternative strategy is to use genetic engineering to activate the respective genomic segments, e.g. by the manipulation of regulators or chromatin-modifying enzymes. Recently, whole-genome sequencing of several fungi isolated from the Chernobyl accident area was reported by Singh et al. (Genome Announc 2017; 5:e01602-16). These strains were selected for exposure to microgravity at the International Space Station. Biochemical characterization of fungi cultivated under extreme conditions is likely to provide valuable insights into the adaptation mechanism associated with metabolism and, possibly, a catalog of novel molecules of potential pharmaceutical importance.

  4. Toluhydroquinone, the secondary metabolite of marine algae symbiotic microorganism, inhibits angiogenesis in HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Il; Choi, Woo-Suk; Son, Byeng-Wha; Seo, Yong-Bae; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Gun-Do

    2015-03-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels from the existing ones, occurs during embryo development and wound healing. However, most malignant tumors require angiogenesis for their growth and metastasis as well. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis has been focused as a new strategy of cancer therapies. To treat cancer, there are marine microorganism-derived secondary metabolites developed as chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we used toluhydroquinone (2-methyl-1,4-hydroquinone), one of the secondary metabolites isolated from marine algae symbiotic fungus, Aspergillus sp. We examined the effects of toluhydroquinone on angiogenesis using HUVECs. We identified that toluhydroquinone inhibited the activity of β-catenin and down-regulated Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling which are crucial components during angiogenesis. In addition, the expression and activity of MMPs are reduced by the treatment of toluhydroquinone. In conclusion, we confirmed that toluhydroquinone has inhibitory effects on angiogenic behaviors of human endothelial cells, HUVECs. Our findings suggest that toluhydroquinone can be proposed as a potent anti-angiogenesis drug candidate to treat cancers.

  5. Damage of Streptococcus mutans biofilms by carolacton, a secondary metabolite from the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum

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    Irschik Herbert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen in human dental caries. One of its important virulence properties is the ability to form biofilms (dental plaque on tooth surfaces. Eradication of such biofilms is extremely difficult. We therefore screened a library of secondary metabolites from myxobacteria for their ability to damage biofilms of S. mutans. Results Here we show that carolacton, a secondary metabolite isolated from Sorangium cellulosum, has high antibacterial activity against biofilms of S. mutans. Planktonic growth of bacteria was only slightly impaired and no acute cytotoxicity against mouse fibroblasts could be observed. Carolacton caused death of S. mutans biofilm cells, elongation of cell chains, and changes in cell morphology. At a concentration of 10 nM carolacton, biofilm damage was already at 35% under anaerobic conditions. A knock-out mutant for comD, encoding a histidine kinase specific for the competence stimulating peptide (CSP, was slightly less sensitive to carolacton than the wildtype. Expression of the competence related alternate sigma factor ComX was strongly reduced by carolacton, as determined by a pcomX luciferase reporter strain. Conclusions Carolacton possibly interferes with the density dependent signalling systems in S. mutans and may represent a novel approach for the prevention of dental caries.

  6. Treatment of metabolic syndrome with ankaflavin, a secondary metabolite isolated from the edible fungus Monascus spp.

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    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2014-06-01

    Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products possess a number of functional secondary metabolites, including anti-inflammatory pigments (such as monascin and ankaflavin [AK]), monacolins, and dimerumic acid. These secondary metabolites have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-tumor activities. We found that AK positively regulates several transcription factors associated with the prevention of metabolic syndrome and other diseases, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma, PPAR-alpha, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). AK reduced hyperglycemia and enhanced pancreatic function via PPAR-gamma activation and increased lipid metabolism due to PPAR-alpha activation. The compound also exerted antioxidant effects via activation of Nrf2. These results suggest that AK belongs to the class of selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor modulators (SPPARMs), which are associated with a good safety profile when used in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome. Together with our studies to determine how AK production can be increased during Monascus fermentation, these data demonstrate the great potential of AK as a nutraceutical or therapeutic agent.

  7. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges Containing Dibrominated Indolic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Stefanucci

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum. produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products.

  8. Accessing biological actions of Ganoderma secondary metabolites by in silico profiling.

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    Grienke, Ulrike; Kaserer, Teresa; Pfluger, Florian; Mair, Christina E; Langer, Thierry; Schuster, Daniela; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-06-01

    The species complex around the medicinal fungus Ganoderma lucidum Karst. (Ganodermataceae) is widely known in traditional medicines, as well as in modern applications such as functional food or nutraceuticals. A considerable number of publications reflects its abundance and variety in biological actions either provoked by primary metabolites, such as polysaccharides, or secondary metabolites, such as lanostane-type triterpenes. However, due to this remarkable amount of information, a rationalization of the individual Ganoderma constituents to biological actions on a molecular level is quite challenging. To overcome this issue, a database was generated containing meta-information, i.e., chemical structures and biological actions of hitherto identified Ganoderma constituents (279). This was followed by a computational approach subjecting this 3D multi-conformational molecular dataset to in silico parallel screening against an in-house collection of validated structure- and ligand-based 3D pharmacophore models. The predictive power of the evaluated in silico tools and hints from traditional application fields served as criteria for the model selection. Thus, the focus was laid on representative druggable targets in the field of viral infections (5) and diseases related to the metabolic syndrome (22). The results obtained from this in silico approach were compared to bioactivity data available from the literature. 89 and 197 Ganoderma compounds were predicted as ligands of at least one of the selected pharmacological targets in the antiviral and the metabolic syndrome screening, respectively. Among them only a minority of individual compounds (around 10%) has ever been investigated on these targets or for the associated biological activity. Accordingly, this study discloses putative ligand target interactions for a plethora of Ganoderma constituents in the empirically manifested field of viral diseases and metabolic syndrome which serve as a basis for future

  9. Accessing biological actions of Ganoderma secondary metabolites by in silico profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienke, Ulrike; Kaserer, Teresa; Pfluger, Florian; Mair, Christina E.; Langer, Thierry; Schuster, Daniela; Rollinger, Judith M.

    2016-01-01

    The species complex around the medicinal fungus Ganoderma lucidum Karst. (Ganodermataceae) is widely known in traditional medicines as well as in modern applications such as functional food or nutraceuticals. A considerable number of publications reflects its abundance and variety in biological actions either provoked by primary metabolites such as polysaccharides or secondary metabolites such as lanostane-type triterpenes. However, due to this remarkable amount of information, a rationalization of the individual Ganoderma constituents to biological actions on a molecular level is quite challenging. To overcome this issue, a database was generated containing meta-information, i.e. chemical structures and biological actions of hitherto identified Ganoderma constituents (279). This was followed by a computational approach subjecting this 3D multi-conformational molecular dataset to in silico parallel screening against an in-house collection of validated structure- and ligand-based 3D pharmacophore models. The predictive power of the evaluated in silico tools and hints from traditional application fields served as criteria for the model selection. Thus, we focused on representative druggable targets in the field of viral infections (5) and diseases related to the metabolic syndrome (22). The results obtained from this in silico approach were compared to bioactivity data available from the literature to distinguish between true and false positives or negatives. 89 and 197 Ganoderma compounds were predicted as ligands of at least one of the selected pharmacological targets in the antiviral and the metabolic syndrome screening, respectively. Among them only a minority of individual compounds (around 10%) has ever been investigated on these targets or for the associated biological activity. Accordingly, this study discloses putative ligand target interactions for a plethora of Ganoderma constituents in the empirically manifested field of viral diseases and metabolic

  10. Secondary metabolites inhibiting ABC transporters and reversing resistance of cancer cells and fungi to cytotoxic and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal, bacterial and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: 1. Activation of ABC transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, 2. Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidise lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulphate or amino acids, and 3. Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarises the evidence that secondary metabolites of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids ( monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins, steroids (including cardiac glycosides and tetraterpenes but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse MDR, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these secondary metabolites are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion.

  11. Secondary metabolites from cetrarioid lichens: Chemotaxonomy, biological activities and pharmaceutical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maonian; Heidmarsson, Starri; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia; Buonfiglio, Rosa; Kogej, Thierry; Omarsdottir, Sesselja

    2016-05-15

    Lichens, as a symbiotic association of photobionts and mycobionts, display an unmatched environmental adaptability and a great chemical diversity. As an important morphological group, cetrarioid lichens are one of the most studied lichen taxa for their phylogeny, secondary chemistry, bioactivities and uses in folk medicines, especially the lichen Cetraria islandica. However, insufficient structure elucidation and discrepancy in bioactivity results could be found in a few studies. This review aimed to present a more detailed and updated overview of the knowledge of secondary metabolites from cetrarioid lichens in a critical manner, highlighting their potentials for pharmaceuticals as well as other applications. Here we also highlight the uses of molecular phylogenetics, metabolomics and ChemGPS-NP model for future bioprospecting, taxonomy and drug screening to accelerate applications of those lichen substances. The paper starts with a short introduction in to the studies of lichen secondary metabolites, the biological classification of cetrarioid lichens and the aim. In light of ethnic uses of cetrarioid lichens for therapeutic purposes, molecular phylogeny is proposed as a tool for future bioprospecting of cetrarioid lichens, followed by a brief discussion of the taxonomic value of lichen substances. Then a delicate description of the bioactivities, patents, updated chemical structures and lichen sources is presented, where lichen substances are grouped by their chemical structures and discussed about their bioactivity in comparison with reference compounds. To accelerate the discovery of bioactivities and potential drug targets of lichen substances, the application of the ChemGPS NP model is highlighted. Finally the safety concerns of lichen substances (i.e. toxicity and immunogenicity) and future-prospects in the field are exhibited. While the ethnic uses of cetrarioid lichens and the pharmaceutical potential of their secondary metabolites have been recognized

  12. 昆虫对植物次生物质的代谢适应机制及其对昆虫抗药性的意义%Metabolic adaptation mechanisms of insects to plant secondary metabolites and their implications for insecticide resistance of insects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈澄宇; 康志娇; 史雪岩; 高希武

    2015-01-01

    植物次生物质(plant secondary metabolites)对昆虫的取食行为、生长发育及繁殖可以产生不利影响,甚至对昆虫可以产生毒杀作用.为了应对植物次生物质的不利影响,昆虫通过对植物次生物质忌避取食、解毒代谢等多种机制,而对寄主植物产生适应性.其中,昆虫的解毒代谢酶包括昆虫细胞色素P450酶系(P450s)及谷胱甘肽硫转移酶(GSTs)等,在昆虫对植物次生物质的解毒代谢及对寄主植物的适应性中发挥了重要作用.昆虫的解毒酶系统不仅可以代谢植物次生物质,还可能代谢化学杀虫剂,因而昆虫对寄主植物的适应性与其对杀虫剂的耐药性甚至抗药性密切相关.昆虫细胞色素P450s和GSTs等代谢解毒酶活性及相关基因的表达可以被植物次生物质影响,这不仅使昆虫对寄主植物的防御产生了适应性,还影响了昆虫对杀虫剂的解毒代谢,因而改变昆虫的耐药性或抗药性.掌握昆虫对植物次生物质的代谢适应机制及其在昆虫抗药性中的作用,对于明确昆虫的抗药性机制具有重要的参考意义.本文综述了植物次生物质对昆虫的影响、昆虫对寄主植物次生物质的代谢机制、昆虫对植物次生物质的代谢适应性对昆虫耐药性及抗药性的影响等方面的研究进展.

  13. Could oxidative stress initiate programmed cell death in HIV infection? A role for plant derived metabolites having synergistic antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, H C; Aruoma, O I; Arouma, O

    1994-06-01

    Evidence supports the premise that a pro-oxidant condition exists in HIV-seropositive patients, a result of an overabundance in production of reactive oxygen forms combined with a multilevel deficiency in nutritional and metabolic sources of antioxidants. Apoptosis (a programmed cell death) is recognized as a possible pathway of immune cell loss in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. The cascade of events that results from 'oxidative stress' (OS) is markedly similar to that which can initiate apoptosis and includes oxidation of cellular membranes, alteration of metabolic pathways, disruption of electron transport systems, depletion of cellular ATP production, loss of Ca2+ homeostasis, endonuclease activation and DNA/chromatin fragmentation. Downstream events secondary to these effects may also play a role in activation of latent virus and subsequent viral replication. Primary and secondary metabolites found in plants act as synergistic antioxidants, and can protect plants from oxidation-induced cell death. Experiments have shown that some of these same metabolites can inhibit cell killing by HIV. Can these compounds be useful in inhibiting viral activation and the death of immune cells in HIV/AIDS through their synergistic antioxidant properties? A brief review of the evidence for OS in HIV is presented and the potential basis for OS playing a role in the initiation of cell death and viral replication is explored. The functional antioxidant activities of plant metabolites are illustrated and the use of these synergistic antioxidants from plants are proposed as a mechanism by which viral replication and cell killing in HIV infection can be inhibited.

  14. Comparison of expression of secondary metabolite biosynthesis cluster genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Kenneth C; Mack, Brian M

    2014-06-23

    Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help to refine the identification of probable functional gene clusters within these species. Our results suggest that A. flavus, a prevalent contaminant of maize, cottonseed, peanuts and tree nuts, is capable of producing metabolites which, besides aflatoxin, could be an underappreciated contributor to its toxicity.

  15. Comparison of Expression of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthesis Cluster Genes in Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, and A. oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. Ehrlich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fifty six secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters are predicted to be in the Aspergillus flavus genome. In spite of this, the biosyntheses of only seven metabolites, including the aflatoxins, kojic acid, cyclopiazonic acid and aflatrem, have been assigned to a particular gene cluster. We used RNA-seq to compare expression of secondary metabolite genes in gene clusters for the closely related fungi A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. flavus S and L sclerotial morphotypes. The data help to refine the identification of probable functional gene clusters within these species. Our results suggest that A. flavus, a prevalent contaminant of maize, cottonseed, peanuts and tree nuts, is capable of producing metabolites which, besides aflatoxin, could be an underappreciated contributor to its toxicity.

  16. Alteração dos metabólitos secundários em plantas de Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae submetidas à secagem e ao congelamento Secondary metabolite content in Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae plants submitted to drying and freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Boeno Diniz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos, o interesse por Hypericum perforatum tem aumentado devido à sua ação antiviral, antidepressiva e moduladora de apoptose em células neoplásicas. O preparo do material vegetal, após ser colhido, envolve freqüentemente a dessecação ou o congelamento e posterior armazenamento, processos que podem alterar o perfil dos metabólitos secundários. Neste sentido, este trabalho avaliou o efeito da secagem, do congelamento e da estocagem sob baixas temperaturas na quantidade de flavonóides e de hipericina nas partes vegetativas de plantas de hipérico. Ramos de hipérico foram submetidos à secagem a 25, 30, 50 e 70 °C, congelados em nitrogênio líquido ou congelados e armazenados a -20 °C por 10, 20 e 30 dias. A quantificação dos flavonóides e de hipericina foi realizada por cromatografia líquida de alta eficiência (CLAE. Os teores de flavonóides e de hipericina foram afetados pela temperatura de secagem. Secagem a 25 °C causou redução nos teores de grande parte dos metabólitos analisados, enquanto a 50 °C, os teores de rutina livre e glicosilada, de quercetina e quercitrina glicosiladas e de hipericina foram preservados. Apigenina livre e canferol não sofreram reduções significativas nas suas concentrações, independente das temperaturas de secagem. O tratamento de congelamento e imediata análise das amostras não alterou o perfil dos flavonóides, mas causou redução do nível de hipericina nas plantas de hipérico.In recent years, interest in Hypericum perforatum has increased due to its antiviral, antidepressive and apoptosis-inducing properties. Plant material preparation after harvesting often includes dehydration or freezing and further storage, and these procedures can lead to variations in the secondary metabolite profile. In this study the effects of drying, freezing and storage at -20 ºC on flavonoid and hypericin content in H. perforatum were evaluated. Leaves and stems of H. perforatum were

  17. Overexpression of AtEDT1 promotes root elongation and affects medicinal secondary metabolite biosynthesis in roots of transgenic Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Geng; Zhong, Zhaohui; Ji, Linyi; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianping; Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Kejun

    2016-12-03

    Medicinal secondary metabolites (salvianolic acids and tanshinones) are valuable natural bioactive compounds in Salvia miltiorrhiza and have widespread applications. Improvement of medicinal secondary metabolite accumulation through biotechnology is necessary and urgent to satisfy their increasing demand. Herein, it was demonstrated that the overexpression of the transcription factor Arabidopsis thaliana-enhanced drought tolerance 1 (AtEDT1) could affect medicinal secondary metabolite accumulation. In this study, we observed that the transgenic lines significantly conferred drought tolerance phenotype. Meanwhile, we found that the overexpression of AtEDT1 promoted root elongation in S. miltiorrhiza. Interestingly, we also found that the overexpression of AtEDT1 determined the accumulation of salvianolic acids, such as rosmarinic acid, lithospermic acid, salvianolic acid B, and total salvianolic acids due to the induction of the expression levels of salvianolic acid biosynthetic genes. Conversely, S. miltiorrhiza plants overexpressing the AtEDT1 transgene showed a decrease in tanshinone synthesis. Our results demonstrated that the overexpression of AtEDT1 significantly increased the accumulation of salvianolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza. Further studies are required to better elucidate the functional role of AtEDT1 in the regulation of phytochemical compound synthesis.

  18. Recent progress in polar metabolite quantification in plants using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiqian; Rochfort, Simone

    2014-09-01

    Metabolite analysis or metabolomics is an important component of systems biology in the post-genomic era. Although separate liquid chromatography (LC) methods for quantification of the major classes of polar metabolites of plants have been available for decades, a single method that enables simultaneous determination of hundreds of polar metabolites is possible only with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) techniques. The rapid expansion of new LC stationary phases in the market and the ready access of mass spectrometry in many laboratories provides an excellent opportunity for developing LC–MS based methods for multi-target quantification of polar metabolites. Although various LC–MS methods have been developed over the last 10 years with the aim to quantify one or more classes of polar compounds in different matrices, currently there is no consensus LC–MS method that is widely used in plant metabolomics studies. The most promising methods applicable to plant metabolite analysis will be reviewed in this paper and the major problems encountered highlighted. The aim of this review is to provide plant scientists, with limited to moderate experience in analytical chemistry, with up-to-date and simplified information regarding the current status of polar metabolite analysis using LC–MS techniques.

  19. Recent progress in polar metabolite quantification in plants using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqian Liu; Simone Rochfort

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite analysis or metabolomics is an impor-tant component of systems biology in the post-genomic era. Although separate liquid chromatography (LC) methods for quantification of the major classes of polar metabolites of plants have been available for decades, a single method that enables simultaneous determination of hundreds of polar metabolites is possible only with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. The rapid expansion of new LC stationary phases in the market and the ready access of mass spectrometry in many laboratories provides an excellent opportunity for developing LC-MS based methods for multi-target quantification of polar metabolites. Although various LC-MS methods have been developed over the last 10 years with the aim to quantify one or more classes of polar compounds in different matrices, currently there is no consensus LC-MS method that is widely used in plant metabolomics studies. The most promising methods applicable to plant metabolite analysis wil be reviewed in this paper and the major problems encountered highlighted. The aim of this review is to provide plant scientists, with limited to moderate experience in analytical chemistry, with up-to-date and simplified information regarding the current status of polar metabolite analysis using LC-MS techniques.

  20. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites.

  1. Salt Stress Effects on Secondary Metabolites of Cotton in Relation to Gene Expression Responsible for Aphid Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Many secondary metabolites have insecticidal efficacy against pests and may be affected by abiotic stress. However, little is known of how plants may respond to such stress as pertains the growth and development of pests. The objective of this study was to determine if and how salt stress on cotton plants affects the population dynamics of aphids. The NaCl treatment (50 mM, 100 mM, 150 mM and 200 mM increased contents of gossypol in cotton by 26.8-51.4%, flavonoids by 22.5-37.6% and tannic by 15.1-24.3% at 7-28 d after salt stress. Compared with non-stressed plants, the population of aphids on 150 and 200 mM NaCl stressed plants was reduced by 46.4 and 65.4% at 7d and by 97.3 and 100% at 14 days after infestation. Reductions in aphid population were possibly attributed to the elevated secondary metabolism under salt stress. A total of 796 clones for aphids transcriptome, 412 clones in the positive- library (TEST and 384 clones in the reverse-library (Ck, were obtained from subtracted cDNA libraries and sequenced. Gene ontology (GO functional classification and KEGG pathway analysis showed more genes related to fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis, and fewer genes related to carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism and cell motility pathways in TEST than in Ck library, which might be the reason of aphids population reduction. A comparative analysis with qRT-PCR indicated high expression of transcripts CYP6A14, CYP6A13, CYP303A1, NADH dehydrogenase and fatty acid synthase in the TEST group. However, CYP307A1 and two ecdysone-induced protein genes were down regulated. The results indicate that genes of aphids related to growth and development can express at a higher level in reaction to the enhanced secondary metabolism in cotton under salinity stress. The expression of CYP307A1 was positively correlated with the population dynamics of aphids since it was involved in ecdysone synthesis.

  2. Protozoan growth rates on secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas spp. correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette L.; Winding, Anne; Altenburger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Different features can protect bacteria against protozoan grazing, for example large size, rapid movement, and production of secondary metabolites. Most papers dealing with these matters focus on bacteria. Here, we describe protozoan features that affect their ability to grow on secondary...... with membrane-bound metabolites. Interestingly, protozoan response seemed to correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy, and amoeboid taxa tolerated a broader range of Pseudomonas strains than did the non-amoeboid taxa. This stresses the importance of studying both protozoan and bacterial characteristics...

  3. Engineering of a genome-reduced host: practical application of synthetic biology in the overproduction of desired secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Zhuo, Ying; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhang, Lixin

    2010-07-01

    Synthetic biology aims to design and build new biological systems with desirable properties, providing the foundation for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The most prominent representation of synthetic biology has been used in microbial engineering by recombinant DNA technology. However, there are advantages of using a deleted host, and therefore an increasing number of biotechnology studies follow similar strategies to dissect cellular networks and construct genome-reduced microbes. This review will give an overview of the strategies used for constructing and engineering reduced-genome factories by synthetic biology to improve production of secondary metabolites.

  4. Penicillium strains isolated from Slovak grape berries taxonomy assessment by secondary metabolite profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Antonello; Mikušová, Petra; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Labuda, Roman; Srobárová, Antónia

    2014-11-01

    The secondary metabolite profiles of microfungi of the genus Penicillium isolated from samples of grape berries collected in two different phases during two vegetative seasons in Slovakia is described to assess the taxonomy. Three Slovak vine regions have been selected for this study, based on their climatic differences and national economic importance. Cultures of microfungi isolated from berries were incubated on different selective media for macro and micromorphology identification. The species Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium palitans and Penicillium polonicum were identified according to growth and morphology. The related strains were found to produce a broad spectrum of fungal metabolites, including roquefortine C, chaetoglobosin A, penitrem A, cyclopeptin, cyclopenin, viridicatin, methylviridicatin, verrucofortine, secalonic acid D, cyclopiazonic acid, fumigaclavine and mycophenolic acid. Chemotaxonomy was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). Dried grape berries were also analyzed allowing to assess the presence of patulin, roquefortine C and penicillic acid; this last one has been identified in dried berries but not in vitro.

  5. Evaluation of in vitro antiprotozoal activity of Ajuga laxmannii and its secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Irem; Kirmizibekmez, Hasan; Kaiser, Marcel; Akaydin, Galip; Yesilada, Erdem; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-09-01

    Context Some Ajuga L. (Lamiaceae) species are traditionally used for the treatment of malaria, as well as fever, which is a common symptom of many parasitic diseases. Objective In the continuation of our studies on the identification of antiprotozoal secondary metabolites of Turkish Lamiaceae species, we have investigated the aerial parts of Ajuga laxmannii. Materials and methods The aerial parts of A. laxmannii were extracted with MeOH. The H2O subextract was subjected to polyamide, C18-MPLC and SiO2 CCs to yield eight metabolites. The structures of the isolates were elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and MS analyses. The extract, subextracts as well as the isolates were tested for their in vitro antiprotozoal activities against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense, T. cruzi and Leishmania donovani at concentrations of 90-0.123 μg/mL. Results Two iridoid glycosides harpagide (1) and 8-O-acetylharpagide (2), three o-coumaric acid derivatives cis-melilotoside (3), trans-melilotoside (4) and dihydromelilotoside (5), two phenylethanoid glycosides verbascoside (6) and galactosylmartynoside (7) and a flavone-C-glycoside, isoorientin (8) were isolated. Many compounds showed moderate to good antiparasitic activity, with isoorientin (8) displaying the most significant antimalarial potential (an IC50 value of 9.7 μg/mL). Discussion and conclusion This is the first report on the antiprotozoal evaluation of A. laxmannii extracts and isolates. Furthermore, isoorientin and dihydromelilotoside are being reported for the first time from the genus Ajuga.

  6. A RAPID IN VITRO PROPAGATION AND ESTIMATION OF SECONDARY METABOLITES FOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO PROPAGATED CROTALARIA SPECIES, A FABACEAE MEMBER

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    Srinivas Nakka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The secondary metabolites extracted from both in vivo and in vitro propagated Crotalaria species were comparatively estimated. The in vitro propagated Crotalaria species were obtained from the explants of three medicinally important Crotalaria species (C.prostrata, C. retusa and C. medicagenea on Murashige and Skoog (MS medium fortified with variant concentrations of growth regulators (6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP, α – Naphtahlene acetic acid (NAA, 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D and Kinetin. An optimal response of 12.6 shoots per explant (6.2 cm length was obtained from Crotalaria retusa on Murashige and Skoog medium fortified with 13.31 µM 6-Benzylaminopurine and 2.15 µM α – Naphthalene acetic acid. The shoots raised were rooted optimally on Murashige and Skoog medium containing Indolebutyric acid (7.38 µM with 4.4 roots per shoot. Rooted plantlets thus developed were transferred to greenhouse after hardening with a mix of soil and compost (1:1. Nearly 90% of in vitro raised plants of Crotalaria species were acclimatized. The growth and morphology of in vitro regenerated plants resemble wild species. Therefore in vitro propagated plants of all three species were subjected to comparative estimation of secondary metabolites with both callus cultures and wild species of Crotalaria. Obtained optimal alkaloid content with 29.0% per gram of leaf dry weight was for in vitro propagated Crotalaria retusa amongst the three. Hence from the present investigation it was proved that the quantity of secondary metabolites of an in vitro propagated Crotalaria species is higher than field grown for pharmaceutical preparations.

  7. Various extraction and analytical techniques for isolation and identification of secondary metabolites from Nigella sativa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shim, J-H

    2011-10-01

    Nigella sativa L. (black cumin), commonly known as black seed, is a member of the Ranunculaceae family. This seed is used as a natural remedy in many Middle Eastern and Far Eastern countries. Extracts prepared from N. sativa have, for centuries, been used for medical purposes. Thus far, the organic compounds in N. sativa, including alkaloids, steroids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, fatty acids, etc. have been fairly well characterized. Herein, we summarize some new extraction techniques, including microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and supercritical extraction techniques (SFE), in addition to the classical method of hydrodistillation (HD), which have been employed for isolation and various analytical techniques used for the identification of secondary metabolites in black seed. We believe that some compounds contained in N. sativa remain to be identified, and that high-throughput screening could help to identify new compounds. A study addressing environmentally-friendly techniques that have minimal or no environmental effects is currently underway in our laboratory.

  8. A Morphologically Structured Model for Mycelial Growth and Secondary Metabolite Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘刚; 徐志南; 岑沛霖

    2000-01-01

    A morphologically structured model is proposed to describe the batch fermentation of lovastatin according to the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms. Three kinds of hyphae are considered in the model:actively growing hyphae, non-growing hyphae and deactivated hyphae. Furthermore, actively growing hyphae consist of three morphological compartments: apical compartment which gives rise to hyphal tip extension; subapical compartment which is related to hyphal branching; and hyphal compartment which is only responsible for secondary metabolite formation. The kinetics of mycelial growth mechanism is summarized and applied in modeling lovastatin fermentation. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with substrate inhibition is proposed for product formation. As expected, the model simulations fit well with experimental data obtained either from a laboratory scale 10 L fermenter or from a vilot-vlant scale fermenter.

  9. Assessing the effects of adsorptive polymeric resin additions on fungal secondary metabolite chemical diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Menéndez, Víctor; Asensio, Francisco; Moreno, Catalina; de Pedro, Nuria; Monteiro, Maria Candida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Vicente, Francisca; Bills, Gerald F.; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Tormo, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorptive polymeric resins have been occasionally described to enhance the production of specific secondary metabolites (SMs) of interest. Methods that induce the expression of new chemical entities in fungal fermentations may lead to the discovery of new bioactive molecules and should be addressed as possible tools for the creation of new microbial chemical libraries for drug lead discovery. Herein, we apply both biological activity and chemical evaluations to assess the use of adsorptive resins as tools for the differential expression of SMs in fungal strain sets. Data automation approaches were applied to ultra high performance liquid chromatography analysis of extracts to evaluate the general influence in generating new chemical entities or in changing the production of specific SMs by fungi grown in the presence of resins and different base media. PMID:25379340

  10. Review of secondary metabolites and mycotoxins from the Aspergillus niger group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Mogensen, Jesper Mølgaard; Johansen, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Filamentous fungi in the Aspergillus section Nigri (the black aspergilli) represent some of the most widespread food and feed contaminants known but they are also some of the most important workhorses used by the biotechnological industry. The Nigri section consists of six commonly found species...... (excluding A. aculeatus and its close relatives) from which currently 145 different secondary metabolites have been isolated and/or detected. From a human and animal safety point of view, the mycotoxins ochratoxin A (from A. carbonarius and less frequently A. niger) and fumonisin B2 (from A. niger...... since it is consistently produced by A. tubingensis (177 of 177 strains tested) and A. acidus (47 of 47 strains tested) but never by A. niger (140 strains tested). Naptho-γ-pyrones are the compounds produced in the highest quantities and are produced by all six common species in the group (A. niger 134...

  11. Effect of pamamycin-607 on secondary metabolite production by Streptomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Katsura, Hirotaka; Kato, Risako; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Natsume, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the aerial mycelium-inducing compound, pamamycin-607, on antibiotic production by several Streptomyces spp. was examined. Exposure to 6.6 µM pamamycin-607 stimulated by 2.7 fold the puromycin production by Streptomyces alboniger NBRC 12738, in which pamamycin-607 had first been isolated, and restored aerial mycelium formation. Pamamycin-607 also stimulated the respective production of streptomycin by S. griseus NBRC 12875 and that of cinerubins A and B by S. tauricus JCM 4837 by approximately 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 fold. The antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. 91-a was identified as virginiamycin M(1), and its synthesis was enhanced 2.6 fold by pamamycin-607. These results demonstrate that pamamycin-607 not only restored or stimulated aerial mycelium formation, but also stimulated secondary metabolite production.

  12. Secondary Metabolites from Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae and the Vasorelaxant Activity of Cryptolepinone

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    Maria de Fátima Vanderlei de Souza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The phytochemical study of Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae led to the isolation through chromatographic techniques of eleven secondary metabolites: sitosterol (1a and stigmasterol (1b, sitosterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2a and stigmasterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2b, phaeophytin A (3, 173-ethoxypheophorbide A (4, 132-hydroxy phaeophytin B (5, 173-ethoxypheophorbide B (6, 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone (7, cryptolepinone (8 and a salt of cryptolepine (9. Their structures were identified by 1H- and 13C-NMR using one- and two-dimensional techniques. In addition, the vasorelaxant activity of cryptolepinone in rat mesenteric artery rings is reported herein for the first time.

  13. Secondary metabolites from Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) and the vasorelaxant activity of cryptolepinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Otemberg Souza; Gomes, Roosevelt Albuquerque; Tomaz, Anna Cláudia de Andrade; Fernandes, Marianne Guedes; das Graças Mendes, Leônidas; de Fátima Agra, Maria; Braga, Valdir Andrade; de Fátima Vanderlei de Souza, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The phytochemical study of Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) led to the isolation through chromatographic techniques of eleven secondary metabolites: sitosterol (1a) and stigmasterol (1b), sitosterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2a) and stigmasterol-3-O-b-D-glucopyranoside (2b), phaeophytin A (3), 17³-ethoxypheophorbide A (4), 13²-hydroxy phaeophytin B (5), 17³-ethoxypheophorbide B (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone (7), cryptolepinone (8) and a salt of cryptolepine (9). Their structures were identified by ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR using one- and two-dimensional techniques. In addition, the vasorelaxant activity of cryptolepinone in rat mesenteric artery rings is reported herein for the first time.

  14. Distribution of the tryptophan pathway-derived defensive secondary metabolites gramine and benzoxazinones in Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Yu; Nishizaka, Miho; Ube, Naoki; Yabuta, Yukinori; Tebayashi, Shin-Ichi; Ueno, Kotomi; Taketa, Shin; Ishihara, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    The Poaceae is a large taxonomic group consisting of approximately 12,000 species and is classified into 12 subfamilies. Gramine and benzoxazinones (Bxs), which are biosynthesized from the tryptophan pathway, are well-known defensive secondary metabolites in the Poaceae. We analyzed the presence or absence of garamine and Bxs in 64 species in the Poaceae by LC-MS/MS. We found that Hordeum brachyantherum and Hakonechloa macra accumulated gramine, but the presence of gramine was limited to small groups of species. We also detected Bxs in four species in the Pooideae and six species in the Panicoideae. In particular, four species in the Paniceae tribe in Panicoideae accumulaed Bxs, indicating that this tribe is a center of the Bx distribution. Bxs were absent in the subfamilies other than Pooideae and Panicoideae. These findings provide an overview of biased distribution of gramine and Bxs in Poaceae species.

  15. Fungal volatile compounds induce production of the secondary metabolite Sodorifen in Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ruth; Jager, Victor de; Zühlke, Daniela; Wolff, Christian; Bernhardt, Jörg; Cankar, Katarina; Beekwilder, Jules; Ijcken, Wilfred van; Sleutels, Frank; Boer, Wietse de; Riedel, Katharina; Garbeva, Paolina

    2017-04-13

    The ability of bacteria and fungi to communicate with each other is a remarkable aspect of the microbial world. It is recognized that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) act as communication signals, however the molecular responses by bacteria to fungal VOCs remain unknown. Here we perform transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C exposed to VOCs emitted by the fungal pathogen Fusarium culmorum. We find that the bacterium responds to fungal VOCs with changes in gene and protein expression related to motility, signal transduction, energy metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, and secondary metabolite production. Metabolomic analysis of the bacterium exposed to the fungal VOCs, gene cluster comparison, and heterologous co-expression of a terpene synthase and a methyltransferase revealed the production of the unusual terpene sodorifen in response to fungal VOCs. These results strongly suggest that VOCs are not only a metabolic waste but important compounds in the long-distance communication between fungi and bacteria.

  16. Anticancer activity and mechanism investigation of beauvericin isolated from secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yi-wen; Lin, Yong-cheng; She, Zhi-gang; Lin, Min-ting; Chen, Pin-xian; Zhang, Jian-ye

    2015-01-01

    One known cyclic peptide, beauvericin, was isolated from the secondary metabolites of mangrove endophytic fungi Fusarium sp. (No. DZ27) in South China Sea. Its structure was determined by spectral analyses and comparisons with reference data from literatures. Beauvericin inhibited growth of KB and KBv200 cells potently with IC50 values of 5.76 ± 0.55 and 5.34 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, beauvericin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway, including decrease of relative oxygen species generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, activation of Caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Additionally, regulation of Bcl-2 or Bax was not involved in the apoptosis induced by beauvericin in KB and KBv200 cells.

  17. Physiological performance, secondary metabolite and expression profiling of genes associated with drought tolerance in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Singh, Ruchi; Mishra, Anand; Dhawan, Sunita S; Shirke, Pramod A; Gupta, Madan M; Sharma, Ashok

    2015-11-01

    Physiological, biochemical, and gene expression responses under drought stress were studied in Withania somnifera. Photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, relative water content, chlorophyll content, and quantum yield of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) decreased in response to drought stress. Comparative expression of genes involved in osmoregulation, detoxification, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription factor was analyzed through quantitative RT-PCR. The genes encoding 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), serine threonine-protein kinase (STK), serine threonine protein phosphatase (PSP), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AD), leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase/anthocyanin synthase (LD/AS), HSP, MYB, and WRKY have shown upregulation in response to drought stress condition in leaf tissues. Enhanced detoxification and osmoregulation along with increased withanolides production were also observed under drought stress. The results of this study will be helpful in developing stress-tolerant and high secondary metabolite yielding genotypes.

  18. A proteomic approach to investigating gene cluster expression and secondary metabolite functionality in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Owens

    Full Text Available A combined proteomics and metabolomics approach was utilised to advance the identification and characterisation of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus fumigatus. Here, implementation of a shotgun proteomic strategy led to the identification of non-redundant mycelial proteins (n = 414 from A. fumigatus including proteins typically under-represented in 2-D proteome maps: proteins with multiple transmembrane regions, hydrophobic proteins and proteins with extremes of molecular mass and pI. Indirect identification of secondary metabolite cluster expression was also achieved, with proteins (n = 18 from LaeA-regulated clusters detected, including GliT encoded within the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster. Biochemical analysis then revealed that gliotoxin significantly attenuates H2O2-induced oxidative stress in A. fumigatus (p>0.0001, confirming observations from proteomics data. A complementary 2-D/LC-MS/MS approach further elucidated significantly increased abundance (p<0.05 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase and the gliotoxin oxidoreductase GliT, along with significantly attenuated abundance (p<0.05 of a heat shock protein, an oxidative stress protein and an autolysis-associated chitinase, when gliotoxin and H2O2 were present, compared to H2O2 alone. Moreover, gliotoxin exposure significantly reduced the abundance of selected proteins (p<0.05 involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. Significantly elevated abundance (p<0.05 of a key enzyme, xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase Xpt1, utilised in purine salvage, was observed in the presence of H2O2 and gliotoxin. This work provides new insights into the A. fumigatus proteome and experimental strategies, plus mechanistic data pertaining to gliotoxin functionality in the organism.

  19. Physiological interaction of Daphnia and Microcystis with regard to cyanobacterial secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Thomas; von Elert, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater ecosystems are a matter of high concern with respect to human health and ecosystem services. Investigations on the role of cyanobacterial secondary metabolites have largely been confined to microcystins, although cyanobacteria produce a huge variety of toxic or inhibitory secondary metabolites. Mass occurrences of toxic cyanobacteria strongly impact freshwater zooplankton communities; especially the unselective filter feeder Daphnia. Daphnids have been shown to successfully suppress bloom formation. However, the opposite situation, i.e. the suppression of Daphnia populations by cyanobacteria can be observed as well. To understand these contradictory findings the elucidation of the underlying physiological mechanisms that help daphnids to cope with cyanotoxins is crucial. We fed Daphnia magna with the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806 for 24h and used high-resolution LCMS analytics to analyze the Microcystis cells, the Daphnia tissue and the surrounding medium in order to investigate the fate of seven investigated cyanobacterial compounds (cyanopeptolins A-C, microcyclamide 7806A and aerucyclamides B-D). For none of these bioactive compounds evidence for biotransformation or biodegradation by Daphnia were found. Instead feeding and subsequent release experiments point at the importance of transport mechanisms in Daphnia with regard to the cyanopeptolins A and C and microcyclamide 7806A. In addition we found hints for new inducible defense mechanism in Microcystis against predation by Daphnia. These putative defense mechanisms include the elevated production of toxic compounds other than microcystins, as could be demonstrated here for aerucyclamide B and D, cyanopoeptolin B and microcyclamide 7806A. Moreover, our data demonstrate the elevated active export of at least one cyanobacterial compound (microcyclamide 7806A) into the surrounding medium as a response to grazer presence, which might constitute an entirely new

  20. Effects of secondary metabolite extract from Phomopsis occulta on β-amyloid aggregation.

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    Haiqiang Wu

    Full Text Available Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation is an attractive therapeutic and preventive strategy for the discovery of disease-modifying agents in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Phomopsis occulta is a new, salt-tolerant fungus isolated from mangrove Pongamia pinnata (L. Pierre. We report here the inhibitory effects of secondary metabolites from Ph. occulta on the aggregation of Aβ42. It was found that mycelia extracts (MEs from Ph. occulta cultured with 0, 2, and 3 M NaCl exhibited inhibitory activity in an E. coli model of Aβ aggregation. A water-soluble fraction, ME0-W-F1, composed of mainly small peptides, was able to reduce aggregation of an Aβ42-EGFP fusion protein and an early onset familial mutation Aβ42E22G-mCherry fusion protein in transfected HEK293 cells. ME0-W-F1 also antagonized the cytotoxicity of Aβ42 in the neural cell line SH-SY5Y in dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SDS-PAGE and FT-IR analysis confirmed an inhibitory effect of ME0-W-F1 on the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. ME0-W-F1 blocked the conformational transition of Aβ42 from α-helix/random coil to β-sheet, and thereby inhibited formation of Aβ42 tetramers and high molecular weight oligomers. ME0-W-F1 and other water-soluble secondary metabolites from Ph. occulta therefore represent new candidate natural products against aggregation of Aβ42, and illustrate the potential of salt tolerant fungi from mangrove as resources for the treatment of AD and other diseases.

  1. Transcript and metabolite profiling in cell cultures of 18 plant species that produce benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Scott C; Hagel, Jillian M; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-05-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a large and diverse group of ~2500 specialized metabolites found predominantly in plants of the order Ranunculales. Research focused on BIA metabolism in a restricted number of plant species has identified many enzymes and cognate genes involved in the biosynthesis of compounds such as morphine, sanguinarine and berberine. However, the formation of most BIAs remains uncharacterized at the molecular biochemical level. Herein a compendium of sequence- and metabolite-profiling resources from 18 species of BIA-accumulating cell cultures was established, representing four related plant families. Our integrated approach consisted of the construction of EST libraries each containing approximately 3500 unigenes per species for a total of 58,787 unigenes. The EST libraries were manually triaged using known BIA-biosynthetic genes as queries to identify putative homologs with similar or potentially different functions. Sequence resources were analyzed in the context of the targeted metabolite profiles obtained for each cell culture using electrospray-ionization and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry. Fragmentation analysis was used for the identification or structural characterization coupled with the relative quantification of 72 BIAs, which establishes a key resource for future work on alkaloid biosynthesis. The metabolite profile obtained for each species provides a rational basis for the prediction of enzyme function in BIA metabolism. The metabolic frameworks assembled through the integration of transcript and metabolite profiles allow a comparison of BIA metabolism across several plant species and families. Taken together, these data represent an important tool for the discovery of BIA biosynthetic genes.

  2. Influence of natural substrates and co-occurring marine bacteria on the production of secondary metabolites by Photobacterium halotolerans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Giobergia, Sonia; Møller, Kirsten A.

    Genome sequences reveal that our current standard laboratory conditions only support a fraction of the potential secondary metabolism in bacteria. Thus, we must rethink cultivation, detection, and isolation strategies for bacterial secondary metabolites in order to explore the huge, so far unchar...... uncharacterized chemical potential of these organisms. We are currently investigating the use of natural substrates and co-cultures with commensal bacteria to elicit or alter production of antibacterial compounds in marine bacteria....

  3. Isolation and characterization of anti-adenoviral secondary metabolites from marine actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Mårten; Carlsson, Marcus; Uvell, Hanna; Islam, Koushikul; Edlund, Karin; Cullman, Inger; Altermark, Björn; Mei, Ya-Fang; Elofsson, Mikael; Willassen, Nils-Peder; Wadell, Göran; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-28

    Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Anti-Adenoviral Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mårten Strand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus infections in immunocompromised patients are associated with high mortality rates. Currently, there are no effective anti-adenoviral therapies available. It is well known that actinobacteria can produce secondary metabolites that are attractive in drug discovery due to their structural diversity and their evolved interaction with biomolecules. Here, we have established an extract library derived from actinobacteria isolated from Vestfjorden, Norway, and performed a screening campaign to discover anti-adenoviral compounds. One extract with anti-adenoviral activity was found to contain a diastereomeric 1:1 mixture of the butenolide secondary alcohols 1a and 1b. By further cultivation and analysis, we could isolate 1a and 1b in different diastereomeric ratio. In addition, three more anti-adenoviral butenolides 2, 3 and 4 with differences in their side-chains were isolated. In this study, the anti-adenoviral activity of these compounds was characterized and substantial differences in the cytotoxic potential between the butenolide analogs were observed. The most potent butenolide analog 3 displayed an EC50 value of 91 μM and no prominent cytotoxicity at 2 mM. Furthermore, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for these compounds based on their relative time of appearance and structure.

  5. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed. PMID:28056079

  6. Changes of main secondary metabolites in leaves of Ginkgo biloba in response to ozone fumigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xingyuan; HUANG Wei; CHEN Wei; DONG Tian; LIU Changbing; CHEN Zhenju; XU Sheng; RUAN Yanan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of elevated O3 on the accumulation of main secondary metabolites in leaves of Ginkgo biloba L., four-year-old trees were exposed in open-top chambers with ambient air and the air with twice ambient O3 concentration in Shenyang in 2006.Elevated O3 increased the concentrations of terpenes, but decreased the concentrations of phenolics in G.biloba leaves.The results showed that secondary compounds from G.biloba leaves responded to the elevated O3 exposure in a different way when compared to previous studies which showed elevated O3 increased the concentrations of phenolics but had no effect on the terpenes in leaves of other deciduous trees.Furthermore, reduced synthesis of phenolics may decrease the resistance of G.biloba to O3 and other environmental factors.On the other hand, the induced synthesis of terpenes may enhance the antioxidant abilities in G.biloba leaves at the end of O3 fumigation.

  7. Genes Linked to Production of Secondary Metabolites in Talaromyces atroroseus Revealed Using CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Maria Lund; Isbrandt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Thrane, Ulf; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    The full potential of fungal secondary metabolism has until recently been impeded by the lack of universal genetic tools for most species. However, the emergence of several CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing systems adapted for several genera of filamentous fungi have now opened the doors for future efforts in discovery of novel natural products and elucidation and engineering of their biosynthetic pathways in fungi where no genetic tools are in place. So far, most studies have focused on demonstrating the performance of CRISPR-Cas9 in various fungal model species, and recently we presented a versatile CRISPR-Cas9 system that can be successfully applied in several diverse Aspergillus species. Here we take it one step further and show that our system can be used also in a phylogenetically distinct and largely unexplored species from the genus of Talaromyces. Specifically, we exploit CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing to identify a new gene in T. atroroseus responsible for production of polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid products, hence, linking fungal secondary metabolites to their genetic origin in a species where no genetic engineering has previously been performed.

  8. Activation and silencing of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces lividans after transformation with cosmids containing the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braña, Alfredo F; Rodríguez, Miriam; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jurgen; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2014-05-01

    Activation and silencing of antibiotic production was achieved in Streptomyces albus J1074 and Streptomyces lividans TK21 after introduction of genes within the thienamycin cluster from S. cattleya. Dramatic phenotypic and metabolic changes, involving activation of multiple silent secondary metabolites and silencing of others normally produced, were found in recombinant strains harbouring the thienamycin cluster in comparison to the parental strains. In S. albus, ultra-performance liquid chromatography purification and NMR structural elucidation revealed the identity of four structurally related activated compounds: the antibiotics paulomycins A, B and the paulomenols A and B. Four volatile compounds whose biosynthesis was switched off were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses and databases comparison as pyrazines; including tetramethylpyrazine, a compound with important clinical applications to our knowledge never reported to be produced by Streptomyces. In addition, this work revealed the potential of S. albus to produce many others secondary metabolites normally obtained from plants, including compounds of medical relevance as dihydro-β-agarofuran and of interest in perfume industry as β-patchoulene, suggesting that it might be an alternative model for their industrial production. In S. lividans, actinorhodins production was strongly activated in the recombinant strains whereas undecylprodigiosins were significantly reduced. Activation of cryptic metabolites in Streptomyces species might represent an alternative approach for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  9. CONTENT OF SECONDARY METABOLITES WITH INSECTICIDAL AND REPELLENT ACTIVITY IN THE ALCOHOLIC EXTRACT AND ESSENTIAL OIL OF CHAEROPHYLLUM AROMATICUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. VORONOVA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The most of plant secondary metaboliteshave a safety function to protect plants from pathogens and herbivorous. The important role in the protection of plants from insect pests plays terpenoids and their derivatives.We studied the Chaerophyllumaromaticumessential oil composition in order toreveal the substances which have an insecticidal and repellent activity. This knowledge can make us closer to understand the biochemical basis of host choice in phytophagous, such as close related species of aphids that feed and not feed on Ch.aromaticum.An alcoholic extract and essential oil of Ch.aromaticum were prepared and analyzed with gas chromatography. The alcoholic extract of Ch.aromaticumcontained 39 individual substances.Aninsecticidal and repellent activityis known for14 of them. The average content of sabinenduring the growing season was 15.8 per cent(3.06 and 23.68 per cent at the beginning and at the end of season respectfully.Pinene (13.87%, limonene (1%,γ-terpinene (9.32%, germacrene (6.27%, catechol (3.12%, hydroquinone (3.21% were also presented in the high concentration. Thymol (0.52%, hydrocoumarin (0.71%, β-caryophyllene (0.87%, trans-β-farnesene (4.91%, carotol (3.82% were rarely detected during the growing season. 3-hexen-1-ol which is the phytophagous predator attractant,was only found at the end of the spring in a concentration near 1.5 percent.The total concentrationof metabolites with insecticidal and repellent activity in the Ch. aromaticumessential oil was 6.49 per cent in May, 24.35 per cent in June, and 37.37 per cent in July.The component composition of theessential oil varied during the period of observation. Except of sabinen, catechol and hydroquinone were only presented at the beginning of May.In June the number of toxic componentsincreases to 10 substances, but in July decreases to 8 ones.

  10. Chemical transformations of characteristic hop secondary metabolites in relation to beer properties and the brewing process: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenackers, Bart; De Cooman, Luc; De Vos, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    The annual production of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) exceeds 100,000 mt and is almost exclusively consumed by the brewing industry. The value of hops is attributed to their characteristic secondary metabolites; these metabolites are precursors which are transformed during the brewing process into important bittering, aromatising and preservative components with rather low efficiency. By selectively transforming these components off-line, both their utilisation efficiency and functionality can be significantly improved. Therefore, the chemical transformations of these secondary metabolites will be considered with special attention to recent advances in the field. The considered components are the hop alpha-acids, hop beta-acids and xanthohumol, which are components unique to hops, and alpha-humulene and beta-caryophyllene, sesquiterpenes which are highly characteristic of hops.

  11. Differences among five amaranth varieties (Amaranthus spp.) regarding secondary metabolites and foliar herbivory by chewing insects in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niveyro, Selene L.; Mortensen, Anne G.; Fomsgaard, Inge S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we determined the abundance of secondary metabolites present in leaves of five varieties of Amaranthus, described the community of chewing insects observed in the foliage and also quantified damage by folivore insects in the field. Three flavonoid glucosides (rutin, nicotiflorin an...

  12. Probing of Metabolites in Finely Powdered Plant Material by Direct Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Ali, Arslan; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Atta-ur-Rahman

    2014-04-01

    Natural products continue to serve as an important source of novel drugs since the beginning of human history. High-throughput techniques, such as MALDI-MS, can be techniques of choice for the rapid screening of natural products in plant materials. We present here a fast and reproducible matrix-free approach for the direct detection of UV active metabolites in plant materials without any prior sample preparation. The plant material is mechanically ground to a fine powder and then sieved through different mesh sizes. The collected plant material is dispersed using 1 μL solvent on a target plate is directly exposed to Nd:YAG 335 nm laser. The strategy was optimized for the analysis of plant metabolites after study of the different factors affecting the reproducibility and effectiveness of the analysis, including particle sizes effects, types of solvents used to disperse the sample, and the part of the plant analyzed. Moreover, several plant species, known for different classes of metabolites, were screened to establish the generality of the approach. The developed approach was validated by the characterization of withaferin A and nicotine in the leaves of Withania somnifera and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively, through comparison of its MS/MS data with the standard compound. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used for the tissue imaging purposes. This approach can be used to directly probe small molecules in plant materials as well as in herbal and pharmaceutical formulations for fingerprinting development.

  13. Deciphering the cryptic genome: genome-wide analyses of the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi reveal complex regulation of secondary metabolism and novel metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Wiemann

    Full Text Available The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes "bakanae" disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs, but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19 and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31 are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary

  14. Deciphering the Cryptic Genome: Genome-wide Analyses of the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi Reveal Complex Regulation of Secondary Metabolism and Novel Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studt, Lena; Niehaus, Eva-Maria; Espino, Jose J.; Huß, Kathleen; Michielse, Caroline B.; Albermann, Sabine; Wagner, Dominik; Bergner, Sonja V.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Fischer, Andreas; Reuter, Gunter; Kleigrewe, Karin; Bald, Till; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Ophir, Ron; Freeman, Stanley; Hippler, Michael; Smith, Kristina M.; Brown, Daren W.; Proctor, Robert H.; Münsterkötter, Martin; Freitag, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Güldener, Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes “bakanae” disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs), but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19) and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31) are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary success of F

  15. Enzymes and Metabolites in Carbohydrate Metabolism of Desiccation Tolerant Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Resurrection plants can tolerate extreme water loss. Substantial sugar accumulation is a phenomenon in resurrection plants during dehydration. Sugars have been identified as one important factor contributing to desiccation tolerance. Phylogenetic diversity of resurrection plants reflects the diversity of sugar metabolism in response to dehydration. Sugars, which accumulate during dehydration, have been shown to protect macromolecules and membranes and to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This review focuses on the performance of enzymes participating in sugar metabolism during dehydration stress. The relation between sugar metabolism and other biochemical activities is discussed and open questions as well as potential experimental approaches are proposed.

  16. Enhancement of Leaf Gas Exchange and Primary Metabolites under Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Up-Regulates the Production of Secondary Metabolites in Labisia pumila Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A split plot 3 by 3 experiment was designed to investigate and distinguish the relationships among production of primary metabolites (soluble sugar and starch, secondary metabolites (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF and leaf gas exchange of three varieties of the Malaysian medicinal herb Labisia pumila Blume, namely the varieties alata, pumila and lanceolata, under three levels of CO2 enrichment (400, 800 and 1,200 µmol mol−1 for 15 weeks. The treatment effects were solely contributed by CO2 enrichment levels; no varietal differences were observed. As CO2 levels increased from 400 to 1,200 µmol mol−1, the production of carbohydrates also increased steadily, especially for starch more than soluble sugar (sucrose. TF and TP content, simultaneously, reached their peaks under 1,200 µmol exposure, followed by 800 and 400 µmol mol−1. Net photosynthesis (A and quantum efficiency of photosystem II (fv/fm were also enhanced as CO2 increased from 400 to 1,200 µmol mol−1. Leaf gas exchange characteristics displayed a significant positive relationship with the production of secondary metabolites and carbohydrate contents. The increase in production of TP and TFs were manifested by high C/N ratio and low protein content in L. pumila seedlings, and accompanied by reduction in cholorophyll content that exhibited very significant negative relationships with total soluble sugar, starch and total non structural carbohydrate.

  17. Alteration of secondary metabolites' profiles in potato leaves in response to weakly and highly aggressive isolates of Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Maria A; Adam, Lorne R; Daayf, Fouad

    2012-08-01

    Phytophthora infestans is the cause of late blight, a devastating disease in potato and tomato. Many of the mechanisms underlying P. infestans pathogenesis and defense responses in potato are still unclear. We investigated the effects of P. infestans on the changes in the accumulation of secondary metabolites in potato cultivars using whole plants. Four preformed flavonoids and one terpenoid compound produced in potato tissues were differentially affected by the P. infestans inoculation. In Russet Burbank, the accumulation of catechin and rutin was suppressed by both P. infestans isolates US-11 and US-8, while the flavanone P3 was associated with susceptibility to this pathogen. On the other hand, catechin, flavonol-glycoside P2, and an unidentified terpenoid (T1), may be involved in the defense of cultivar Defender to both tested P. infestans isolates, providing new evidence that different preformed flavonoids and terpenoids in potato may play important roles in its defense or susceptibility to P. infestans. These results add to the pool of data showing the involvement of other phenolics and terpenes in potato resistance to microbial pathogens.

  18. Detection and quantification of three distinct Neotyphodium lolii endophytes in Lolium perenne by real time PCR of secondary metabolite genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfei; Bradshaw, Rosie E; Johnson, Richard D; Hume, David E; Simpson, Wayne R; Schmid, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) is a widely used pasture grass, which is frequently infected by Neotyphodium lolii endophytes that enhance grass performance but can produce alkaloids inducing toxicosis in livestock. Several selected endophyte strains with reduced livestock toxicity, but that confer insect resistance, are now in common use. Little is known regarding the survival and persistence of these endophytes when in competition with common toxic endophytes. This is mainly because there are currently no assays available to easily and reliably quantify different endophytes in pastures or in batches of seeds infected with multiple strains. We developed real time PCR assays, based on secondary metabolite genes known to differ between N. lolii endophyte strains, to quantify two selected endophytes, AR1 and AR37, and a common toxic ecotype used in New Zealand. A duplex PCR allowed assessment of endophyte:grass DNA ratios with high sensitivity, specificity and precision. Endophyte specific primers/probes could detect contamination of AR37 seeds with other endophytes down to a level of 3-25%. We demonstrated that it is possible to quantify different endophyte strains simultaneously using multiplex PCR. This method has potential applications in management of endophytes in pastures and in fundamental research into this important plant-microbe symbiosis.

  19. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on synthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in three varieties of Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Hafiz; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Rahmat, Asmah; Rahman, Zaharah Abdul

    2011-01-01

    A split plot 3 by 4 experiment was designed to examine the impact of 15-week variable levels of nitrogen fertilization (0, 90, 180 and 270 kg N/ha) on the characteristics of total flavonoids (TF), total phenolics (TP), total non structurable carbohydrate (TNC), net assimilation rate, leaf chlorophyll content, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N), phenyl alanine lyase activity (PAL) and protein content, and their relationships, in three varieties of Labisia pumila Blume (alata, pumila and lanceolata). The treatment effects were solely contributed by nitrogen application; there was neither varietal nor interaction effect observed. As nitrogen levels increased from 0 to 270 kg N/ha, the production of TNC was found to decrease steadily. Production of TF and TP reached their peaks under 0 followed by 90, 180 and 270 kg N/ha treatment. However, net assimilation rate was enhanced as nitrogen fertilization increased from 0 to 270 kg N/ha. The increase in production of TP and TF under low nitrogen levels (0 and 90 kg N/ha) was found to be correlated with enhanced PAL activity. The enhancement in PAL activity was followed by reduction in production of soluble protein under low nitrogen fertilization indicating more availability of amino acid phenyl alanine (phe) under low nitrogen content that stimulate the production of carbon based secondary metabolites (CBSM). The latter was manifested by high C/N ratio in L. pumila plants.

  20. Cultivar and Year Rather than Agricultural Practices Affect Primary and Secondary Metabolites in Apple Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Bureau, Sylvie; Renard, Catherine M G C; Plenet, Daniel; Gautier, Hélène; Touloumet, Line; Girard, Thierry; Simon, Sylvaine

    2015-01-01

    Many biotic and abiotic parameters affect the metabolites involved in the organoleptic and health value of fruits. It is therefore important to understand how the growers' decisions for cultivar and orchard management can affect the fruit composition. Practices, cultivars and/or year all might participate to determine fruit composition. To hierarchize these factors, fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids contents, titratable acidity, individual sugars and organics acids, and phenolics were measured in three apple cultivars ('Ariane', 'Melrose' and 'Smoothee') managed under organic, low-input and conventional management. Apples were harvested at commercial maturity in the orchards of the cropping system experiment BioREco at INRA Gotheron (Drôme, 26) over the course of three years (2011, 2012 and 2013). The main factors affecting primary and secondary metabolites, in both apple skin and flesh, were by far the cultivar and the yearly conditions, while the management system had a very limited effect. When considering the three cultivars and the year 2011 to investigate the effect of the management system per se, only few compounds differed significantly between the three systems and in particular the total phenolic content did not differ significantly between systems. Finally, when considering orchards grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions and of the same age, instead of the usual organic vs. conventional comparison, the effect of the management system on the apple fruit quality (Fruit weight, dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, individual sugars, organic acids, and phenolics) was very limited to non-significant. The main factors of variation were the cultivar and the year of cropping rather than the cropping system. More generally, as each management system (e.g. conventional, organic…) encompasses a great variability of practices, this highlights the importance of accurately documenting orchard practices and design beside the generic

  1. Effects of Cu on the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Hara, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Kiminori

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the relationship between Cu and Cu-hyperaccumulator lichens is important for their application in monitoring and assessing heavy metal pollution. We investigated the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen Stereocaulon japonicum at several Cu-polluted and control sites in Japan, and found the lichen to be widely distributed. Its concentrations of Cu, chlorophylls, and secondary metabolites, chlorophyll-related indices, and absorption spectra were measured, and we observed negative effects of Cu on these concentrations and indices. For highly Cu-polluted samples (>100ppm dry weight), however, we found significant linear correlations between Cu and chlorophyll concentrations. This can be considered as the response of the photobiont in S. japonicum to Cu stress. In highly Cu-polluted samples the chlorophyll-related indices and concentration of total secondary metabolites were almost constant regardless of Cu concentration. This suggests that the increase in chlorophyll concentration with the increase in Cu concentration enhances photosynthetic productivity per unit biomass, which will allow the production of extra structure and energy for maintaining the chlorophyll-related indices under Cu stress. The relationship between the increase in chlorophyll concentration of S. japonicum and the decrease in secondary metabolite concentration of the lichen can be explained by considering the balance of carbohydrates in the lichen. We found that a spectral index A372-A394 can be a useful index of the concentrations of Cu and total secondary metabolites in S. japonicum. These findings show the adjustment of the content of chlorophylls and secondary metabolites in S. japonicum to Cu stress, and provide a better understanding of the relationship between Cu and the Cu-hyperaccumulator lichen.

  2. Antibacterial Secondary Metabolites from the Cave Sponge Xestospongia sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi Ankisetty

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of the cave sponge Xestospongia sp. resulted in the isolation of three new polyacetylenic long chain compounds along with two known metabolites. The structures of the new metabolites were established by NMR and MS analyses. The antibacterial activity of the new metabolites was also evaluated.

  3. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Rapid Secondary-Metabolite Profiling of Marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. M2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Jung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocean is a rich resource of flora, fauna, and food. A wild-type bacterial strain showing confluent growth on marine agar with antibacterial activity was isolated from marine water, identified using 16S rDNA sequence analysis as Pseudoalteromonas sp., and designated as strain M2. This strain was found to produce various secondary metabolites including quinolone alkaloids. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis, we identified nine secondary metabolites of 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinoline (pseudane-III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, and XI. Additionally, this strain produced two novel, closely related compounds, 2-isopentylqunoline-4-one and 2-(2,3-dimetylbutylqunoline-4-(1H-one, which have not been previously reported from marine bacteria. From the metabolites produced by Pseudoalteromonas sp. M2, 2-(2,3-dimethylbutylquinolin-4-one, pseudane-VI, and pseudane-VII inhibited melanin synthesis in Melan-A cells by 23.0%, 28.2%, and 42.7%, respectively, wherein pseudane-VII showed the highest inhibition at 8 µg/mL. The results of this study suggest that liquid chromatography (LC-MS/MS-based metabolite screening effectively improves the efficiency of novel metabolite discovery. Additionally, these compounds are promising candidates for further bioactivity development.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Based Molecular 3D-Cartography of Plant Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floros, Dimitrios J; Petras, Daniel; Kapono, Clifford A; Melnik, Alexey V; Ling, Tie-Jun; Knight, Rob; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2017-01-01

    Plants play an essential part in global carbon fixing through photosynthesis and are the primary food and energy source for humans. Understanding them thoroughly is therefore of highest interest for humanity. Advances in DNA and RNA sequencing and in protein and metabolite analysis allow the systematic description of plant composition at the molecular level. With imaging mass spectrometry, we can now add a spatial level, typically in the micrometer-to-centimeter range, to their compositions, essential for a detailed molecular understanding. Here we present an LC-MS based approach for 3D plant imaging, which is scalable and allows the analysis of entire plants. We applied this approach in a case study to pepper and tomato plants. Together with MS/MS spectra library matching and spectral networking, this non-targeted workflow provides the highest sensitivity and selectivity for the molecular annotations and imaging of plants, laying the foundation for studies of plant metabolism and plant-environment interactions.

  5. Chemotaxonomic Metabolite Profiling of 62 Indigenous Plant Species and Its Correlation with Bioactivities

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    Sarah Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxonomic metabolite profiling of 62 indigenous Korean plant species was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC-linear trap quadrupole-ion trap (LTQ-IT mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS combined with multivariate statistical analysis. In partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA, the 62 species clustered depending on their phylogenetic family, in particular, Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae were distinguished from Rosaceae, Fabaceae, and Asteraceae. Quinic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, quercetin derivatives, kaempferol, and kaempferol derivatives were identified as family-specific metabolites, and were found in relatively high concentrations in Aceraceae, Betulaceae, and Fagaceae. Fagaceae and Asteraceae were selected based on results of PLS-DA and bioactivities to determine the correlation between metabolic differences among plant families and bioactivities. Quinic acid, quercetin, kaempferol, quercetin derivatives, and kaempferol derivatives were found in higher concentrations in Fagaceae than in Asteraceae, and were positively correlated with antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibition activities. These results suggest that metabolite profiling was a useful tool for finding the different metabolic states of each plant family and understanding the correlation between metabolites and bioactivities in accordance with plant family.

  6. Metabólitos secundários da família bromeliaceae Secondary metabolites from bromeliaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Maria Manetti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes aspects of the Bromeliaceae family dealing the traditional applications, biological activities and distribution of secondary metabolites in distinct subfamilies. Some species are used with medicinal purposed in the treatment of respiratory, diabetes or inflammation diseases, and gastrointestinal disorders. Special emphasis on cycloartane triterpenoids and flavonoids, typical metabolites of this family, are presented. Bromeliaceae is unique amongst the monocotyledons in the frequency and variety of flavonoids with hydroxylation or methoxylation at the 6-position. Other compound classes as steroids, hidroxycinnamic acids, phenylpropane diglycerides, lignans, are presented.

  7. Functional Genomics of Novel Secondary Metabolites from Diverse Cyanobacteria Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Gugger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become a powerful tool for the detection of metabolites in complex biological systems and for the identification of novel metabolites. We previously identified a number of unexpected metabolites in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, such as histidine betaine, its derivatives and several unusual oligosaccharides. To test for the presence of these compounds and to assess the diversity of small polar metabolites in other cyanobacteria, we profiled cell extracts of nine strains representing much of the morphological and evolutionary diversification of this phylum. Spectral features in raw metabolite profiles obtained by normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS were manually curated so that chemical formulae of metabolites could be assigned. For putative identification, retention times and MS/MS spectra were cross-referenced with those of standards or available sprectral library records. Overall, we detected 264 distinct metabolites. These included indeed different betaines, oligosaccharides as well as additional unidentified metabolites with chemical formulae not present in databases of metabolism. Some of these metabolites were detected only in a single strain, but some were present in more than one. Genomic interrogation of the strains revealed that generally, presence of a given metabolite corresponded well with the presence of its biosynthetic genes, if known. Our results show the potential of combining metabolite profiling and genomics for the identification of novel biosynthetic genes.

  8. Functional Genomics of Novel Secondary Metabolites from Diverse Cyanobacteria Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Richard; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Jose, Nick; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Gugger, Muriel; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become a powerful tool for the detection of metabolites in complex biological systems and for the identificati