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Sample records for plant sacred lotus1woa

  1. Woody plant diversity in sacred forests and fallows in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junsongduang, A.; Balslev, Henrik; Jampeetong, Arunothai;

    2014-01-01

    ; old fallow, 5-6 years old). All woody plant species were identified and counted in three transects (20 x 40 m) . Seedlings were inventoried in 12 circular (5 m diam.) plots. The highest species richness of all woody species and seedlings were found in the sacred forests in both villages. The highest......All woody plant and seedling diversity was compared in a Karen and a Lawa hill-tribe village in northern Thailand in four different habitats: sacred forests and fallow fields of three ages derived from rotational shifting cultivation (young fallows, 1–2 years old; medium-age fallow, 3-4 years old...... values of the Shannon-Wiener index for both trees and seedlings were in the sacred forest of the Karen village. There were significant differences in species richness between the four studied habitats surrounding both villages (pplant and seedlings species compositions in the sacred...

  2. The sacred lotus genome provides insights into the evolution of flowering plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Fan, Guangyi; Liu, Yiman; Sun, Fengming; Shi, Chengcheng; Liu, Xin; Peng, Jing; Chen, Wenbin; Huang, Xinfang; Cheng, Shifeng; Liu, Yuping; Liang, Xinming; Zhu, Honglian; Bian, Chao; Zhong, Lan; Lv, Tian; Dong, Hongxia; Liu, Weiqing; Zhong, Xiao; Chen, Jing; Quan, Zhiwu; Wang, Zhihong; Tan, Benzhong; Lin, Chufa; Mu, Feng; Xu, Xun; Ding, Yi; Guo, An-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Ke, Weidong

    2013-11-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) is an ornamental plant that is also used for food and medicine. This basal eudicot species is especially important from an evolutionary perspective, as it occupies a critical phylogenetic position in flowering plants. Here we report the draft genome of a wild strain of sacred lotus. The assembled genome is 792 Mb, which is approximately 85-90% of genome size estimates. We annotated 392 Mb of repeat sequences and 36,385 protein-coding genes within the genome. Using these sequence data, we constructed a phylogenetic tree and confirmed the basal location of sacred lotus within eudicots. Importantly, we found evidence for a relatively recent whole-genome duplication event; any indication of the ancient paleo-hexaploid event was, however, absent. Genomic analysis revealed evidence of positive selection within 28 embryo-defective genes and one annexin gene that may be related to the long-term viability of sacred lotus seed. We also identified a significant expansion of starch synthase genes, which probably elevated starch levels within the rhizome of sacred lotus. Sequencing this strain of sacred lotus thus provided important insights into the evolution of flowering plant and revealed genetic mechanisms that influence seed dormancy and starch synthesis.

  3. Sacred groves of north Malabar: treasure trove of endemic and rare medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Subrahmanya Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Sacred groves are one of the finest examples of traditional in situ conservation practices and act as treasure house of endemic, endangered and rare plants. Endemic species of any geographical region, throw light on the biogeography of the area, areas of extinction and evolution of the flora. Twelve famous sacred groves of north Malabar region of Kerala were selected for study. Studies were aimed at the documentation of floristic diversity with special reference to endemic as well as RET medicinal plants and to know threats to them. Present inventory accounted for a total of 99 endemic angiosperms, of which 28 qualified for RET categories. Their role in germplasm conservation is evident from the fact that not a single plant is common to the groves studied and restriction of 47 endemic plants to any one of the grove. There are 59 endemic plants, of which 18 belong to RET category are in high demand due to their medicinal properties. Medicinal plant diversity varies from a minimum of 65% to a maximum of 91% while that of endemic plants ranges from 11% in Andallur to 18% in Edayilakkad. Present study revealed the endemic plant diversity of these groves and also their role in the conserving germplasms of wild yam, figs, pepper, mango and a variety of endemic medicinal plants. Like other groves of Kerala, these are also facing the threat of extinction from increasing anthropogenic activities and there is an urgent need of complete protection and public awareness for the existence of these near-climax communities.

  4. Plant wealth of a sacred grove: Mallur Gutta, Telangana state, India

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    Suthari S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sateesh Suthari,1 Ramesh Kandagalta,2 Ajmeera Ragan,2 Vatsavaya S Raju,2 1Department of Plant Sciences, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, 2Plant Systematics Laboratory, Department of Botany, Kakatiya University, Warangal, India Abstract: The Mallur Gutta (Hill of Warangal district in Telangana state, India, reputed as a habitat for medicinal plants, was inventoried from 2009 to 2015 for its plant wealth through the traditional knowledge of the local people. The Hindu temples of Lord Sri Laxminarasimha Swamy and Lord Hanuman, and the ethnic worship of mahua trees indicated it was a sacred grove which was selected as a Medicinal Plants Conservation Area. The exploration of Mallur Gutta resulted in the enumeration and documentation of plant wealth representing 470 species of 318 genera pertaining to 95 families of vascular plants. The importance of the grove as the residence for many rare or medicinal species in the state of Telangana is documented. The plant diversity is analyzed in terms of growth and life forms which indicate the prevailing microclimate, ecological opportunities and the species richness. The ecological services rendered by the Mallur Gutta forest ecosystem are documented to study how the great majority of the species are used by the ethnic and nonethnic people, and also the pilgrims who visit the shrine for its serenity. The study also identified two major threats to the conservation of hill ecosystem and the archeological site: 1 biotic pressure (the ever-increasing pilgrims, grazing by cattle, goat and sheep, the development activities taken up for the pilgrims, nondegradable litter thrown, collection of medicinal plants and widening of the pathway to the Chintamani perennial stream – the trampling and alien plant invasions of the marsh sustaining the stream; and 2 the potential for fire spreading from burning the litter. The study suggests the need to initiate remedial measures toward ecosystem

  5. THE THERAPEUTIC POTENTIAL OF TEN SACRED PLANTS (DASHAPUSHPA OF KERALA STATE OF SOUTHERN INDIA

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    Ajayan S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kerala state is famous for its medicinal plant wealth and the tradition of indigenous system of therapy, specifically the Ayurveda. Dashapushpam constitute a group of ten potential herbs which are culturally and medicinally significant to the people of Kerala state. They are a group of ten herbs with which the ladies decorate their hairs and dance the thiruvathira kali on the day of thiruvathira in the Malayalam month of dhanu (December to January. Dashapushpas are also been eaten in the form of karkkadaka kanji in karkkidaka masam (during mid-July to mid August to get better health in the upcoming monsoon season. Also these plants are used in folklore practice in lithiasis, gonorrhea, vomiting, indigestion, skin diseases, intermittent fever, flatulence, urogenital diseases etc. Most of them are scientifically validated for various bioactivities. Still there are lots of possibilities for potential pharmacological activities from these herbs, yet to be explored. This article would throw light on the therapeutic potential of these ten sacred plants aiding to further propagation of these plants.

  6. Vascular plant diversity in the sacred grove of Modapalli in Viskhapatnam District of Andhra Pradesh, India

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    M. Tarakeswara Naidu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sacred groves are tracts of virgin forest with rich biodiversity, as they have been protected for centuries by the local people for their cultural and religious beliefs and taboos.  Sacred groves are representatives of climax vegetation and exhibit diversity of species such as trees, climbers and other shade loving herbs.  In the present investigation, an attempt was made to study the diversity of a sacred grove of Modapalli, Visakhapatnam District, which comes under the Eastern Ghats of India.  A total of 207 species, 181 genera and 78 families comprising pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms were reported in the sacred grove.  In this study, only one endemic species, i.e., Ophiorrhiza chandrasekharanii and a few threatened species were recorded.  

  7. Bioprospecting of Plant Growth Promoting Bacilli and Related Genera Prevalent in Soils of Pristine Sacred Groves: Biochemical and Molecular Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngwi, Nathaniel A; Nongkhlaw, Macmillan; Kalita, Debajit; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus spp. and related genera native to soils of the pristine sacred groves from Meghalaya, India were characterized using biochemical and 16S rRNA gene analysis which revealed dominance of Bacillus, Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus and Viridibacillus in the groves. Biochemical estimation was carried out for in vitro testing of plant growth promoting traits present in these isolates. PCR screening were performed for plant growth-promoting related genes involved in the biosynthesis of acid phosphatase (AcPho), indolepyruvate decarboxylase (ipdC), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (accd) and siderophore biosynthesis protein (asbA). 76% of the sacred grove isolates gave an amplified fragment for AcPho. Three of the isolates gave an amplified fragment for IpdC gene. Apart from 2 isolates, all the other isolates including the reference strains were positive for the amplification of the accd gene indicating their potential to produce ACC deaminase enzyme. 42% of the isolates gave an amplified fragment for asbA gene indicating the potential ability of these isolates to produce the catechol type siderophore, petrobactin. Overall findings indicated multiple PGP genetic traits present in these isolates which suggested that these isolates are capable of expressing multiple PGP traits. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis of accd and asbA genes from the isolates revealed that asbA genes from Paenibacillus taichungiensis SG3 and Paenibacillus tylopili SG24 indicated the occurrence of intergeneric horizontal transfer between Paenibacillus and Bacillus.

  8. Assessment of traditional ecological knowledge and beliefs in the utilisation of important plant species: The case of Buhanga sacred forest, Rwanda

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    Runyambo Irakiza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional ecological knowledge is an integrated part of the African people and indeed the Rwandese for cultural purpose. Buhanga sacred forest is a relict forest of tremendous ecological importance to Rwandan society located in Musanze District. The aim of this study was to assess the traditional ecological knowledge and belief in the utilisation of some important plant species for the conservation of Buhanga sacred forest. Ecological information about ethnomedicinal and traditional practices were collected following structured questionnaire through interview involving eight traditional healers and three focus group discussions. Data were collected from the natural habitats, home gardens, farmlands and roadsides of Buhanga sacred forest. A total of 45 botanical taxa belonging to 28 families were reported to be used by the local community. Species such as Brillantaisia cicatricosa and Senna septemtrionalis were the popular species cited by traditional healers to treat human and animal diseases and ailments, respectively. The results of the study indicated that because of the cultural norms and values associated with the sacred forest, this has led to non-exploitation. The study presents key sites and plant species in which their use and belief can lead to their conservation. However, not only is it imperative to conserve traditional local knowledge for biocultural conservation motives but there is also need to train traditional healers on how to domesticate indigenous species as conservation measure because some species have become susceptible to extinction.Conservation implications: Highlighting indigenous species investigated in this research will provide a powerful tool for ensuring biodiversity conservation through community participation in a country of high population density in Africa. Some plant species that provided satisfactory Local Health Traditions among communities surrounding Buhanga can contribute as good material for further

  9. Relationship between age, size, fecundity and climatic factors in Panax wangianus an endangered medicinal plant in the sacred grove forest of North-East India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Venugopal; Preeti Ahuja

    2011-01-01

    Panax wangianus (Syn. Panax pseudoginseng) S. C. Sun (Araliaceae) is a critically endangered, medicinal plant of North-East India. The objective of this study was to determine how plant size affects flowering phenology and to evaluate the effect of climatic factors on flowering, fruiting and seed production. Data on vegetative and repro- ductive characters were monitored from 2016 individuals of Panax wan- gianus population in Law Lyngdoh, Smit sacred grove in Nongkrem, Shillong, India. Leaflet area was measured by a planimeter. Size vari- ables of both vegetative and reproductive traits in different age classes were measured. Climatic factors were recorded from 2007 to 2009. Age was recorded by counting the number of bud scale scars on the rhizome. Light intensity and relative humidity were measured using a photometer, LiCor Model LI-189 and thermohygrometer respectively. Different cli- maric variables are correlated with vegetative and reproductive phenological events. Statistical analysis revealed that a strong positive correlation was observed between the age versus vegetative and repro- ductive characters, except 1%-2% plants showed neoteny. Morphologi- cal variations were observed in natural conditions on the basis of the number of prong and carpellate conditions. Phenological status revealed that most of the individuals of the age class 35-50 years and above 50 years contributed the most to flowering, fruiting and seed production. Age class was significant to predict the size of the plant and its reproduc- tive capacity. Climatic factors such as temperature, precipitation and relative humidity show synergistic effect on both the vegetative and reproductive phases in Panax wangianus in the undisturbed Nongkrem sacred grove. The color of flowers of P. Wangianus also varied depend- ing upon the sunlight intensity. Therefore, in the view of conservation and management, the age class of 35-50 years and above 50 years is the most important for population

  10. Emerging sacred values

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    Sonya Sachdeva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sacred values are different from secular values in that they are often associated with violations of the cost-benefit logic of rational choice models. Previous work on sacred values has been largely limited to religious or territorial conflicts deeply embedded in historical contexts. In this work we find that the Iranian nuclear program, a relatively recent development, is treated as sacred by some Iranians, leading to a greater disapproval of deals which involve monetary incentives to end the program. Our results suggest that depending on the prevalence of such values, incentive-focused negotiations may backfire.

  11. Sacred Way (Greek World)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Sacred ways were roads that led to major sanctuaries, typically those located at a distance from the urban center, and were the vehicles for the processions involved in civic festivals at these shrines.

  12. Sacred Sky and Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, F.

    2011-06-01

    The concept of the sacred world beyond the stars found expression in the works of Plato, into Gnosticism and was incorporated into Christianity where medieval images of the cosmos pictured the heavenly domain as beyond the stars. Today cyberspace literature abounds with descriptions of a transmundane space, a great Beyond. This talk looks at current views of cyberspace and asks if they are a re-packaging of the age-old concept of a sacred sky in a secular and technological format?

  13. Sustainability and sacred values

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    John Cairns Jr.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful implementation of the quest for sustainable use of the planet requires that human society both reexamine and expand present views of what is sacred and what is not. The most important aspect will be going beyond a homocentric focus to a biocentric emphasis. A unifying theme would be the desire to leave a habitable planet for human descendants and those of other species. It is unlikely that society can be confident of achieving sustainability until persuasive evidence supporting this belief has existed for several generations. In order for sustainable use of the planet to persist indefinitely, the conditions essential to this state must be morally preserved on sacred grounds. Viewing natural systems as sacred requires not only preventing damage to them but, wherever possible, repairing damage to them caused by humankind.

  14. Darwin's Sacred Cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    of scholarly specialists and been appropriated by money makers. One could not help thinking about this as, in the autumn of 2008, the publisher began hyping Darwin's Sacred Cause as ‘one of the major contributions to the worldwide Darwin anniversary celebrations in 2009' Udgivelsesdato: February...

  15. Sacred Groves, Spirituality and Sustainable Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sacred Groves, Spirituality and Sustainable Development in Northern Ghana. ... and making certain specific trees, water bodies, highlands and other places sacred. ... This paper revealed that in examining the nature of sacred groves, ...

  16. Darwin's Sacred Cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    As we are being flooded by Darwin lollipops, t-shirts, quills and stamps it is becoming increasingly difficult to be heard or seen in the commercialised celebration in 2009. Some are in the business for the science, but a lot are in it for profit. Accordingly, the Darwin industry has left the hands...... of scholarly specialists and been appropriated by money makers. One could not help thinking about this as, in the autumn of 2008, the publisher began hyping Darwin's Sacred Cause as ‘one of the major contributions to the worldwide Darwin anniversary celebrations in 2009' Udgivelsesdato: February...

  17. Fannish tattooing and sacred identity

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    Bethan Jones

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pleasure is an important motivation for fans to adopt texts. Fannish tattoos function to demonstrate affective investments in a text; they are also a performance of fandom and an example of sacred fan identity. Like engaging in cosplay or wearing clothing that features logos, fannish tattoos mark people as fans of a text. Furthermore, the more obscure the logo or fannish reference, the more performative the tattoo. Fannish tattoos help to construct a sacred fan identity. The sacred experience (as theorized by Émile Durkheim and his concept of the totem is imbued with meaning through choices that set it aside from the mundane. Within the context of fannish tattoos, fan affect gains similar significance.

  18. Le sacré sauvage

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    Roger Bastide

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Conférence prononcée le 13 septembre 1973 dans le cadre des Rencontres Internationales de Genève qui avaient pour thème cette année-là « Le besoin religieux ». Cette conférence figure dans les Actes de cette rencontre (Le Besoin religieux, Éditions de la Baconnière, Neuchâtel, 1974, pp. 123-145. Elle a été republiée dans un ouvrage posthume dont elle est l’éponyme, ouvrage édité par Henri Desroche (Paris, éditions Stock, 1975. Nous reproduisons ici le texte intégral original, avec l’aimable autorisation des Rencontres Internationales de Genève auxquelles SociologieS adresse ses remerciements.The wild sacredText of a lecture taken on November the 13th 1973 during the Rencontres Internationales de Genève whom theme was "The religious need". This lecture was first published in: Le Besoin religieux (La Baconnière Editions, Neuchâtel, 1974, pp. 123-145, and published once again in a posthumous book: Le sacré sauvage ("The wild sacred" edited by Henri Desroche (Paris, Stock Editions, 1975. It is reproduced here with the kind authorization of the Rencontres Internationales de Genève. SociologieS gives them sincere thanks.Le Sacré sauvage (Lo sagrado en el mundo primitivoConferencia efectuada el 13 de septiembre de 1973 en el marco de las Rencontres Internationales de Genève (Encuentros Internacionales de Ginebra que tenia como tema general la necesidad de la experiencia religiosa (“Le besoin religieux”, Éditions de la Baconnière, Neuchâtel, 1974, pp. 123-145. Esta conferencia fue publicada de nuevo en un trabajo póstumo que lleva el mismo título, editado por Henri Desroche (Paris, Éditions Stock, 1975. Reproducimos aquí la integralidad del texto original con la amable autorización de las Rencontres Internationales de Genève, a las cuales la revista SociologieS expresa su agradecimiento.

  19. Sacred Space and Sublime Sacramental Piety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2012-01-01

    Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime.......Analyses and Discussions of Mozart's Sacramental Litanies K. 125 and K. 243 in relation to the notions of the Sacred and the Sublime....

  20. Sacred activity by the Method of Excavation

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    Eliana Anjos Furtado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excavation is a clinical and teaching methodology created by the first author of this article. It constitutes a way of helping subjects think, make and speak. This process occurs through the xcavation of making, unblinding and/or unveiling elements in search for the understanding of sacred activity. Through xcavation, subjects understand their thoughts, values and the society in which they live in as they excavate their life stories and their relations with making, including their daily, social and work activities. We applied a thoughtful analysis to approach the role of excavation and the concept of sacred activity. Sacred activity is the core activity of every human being, which is not necessarily the activity we perform in our everyday or work life. Sacred activity is that in which subjects are inserted and experience integrally, genuinely and with no masking. Through sacred activities, subjects surrender, not only to the activity itself, but also to the other, to himself and into himself, by quest. Seeking sacred activity is, therefore, a process of questioning, excavating the routine of subjects, watching and understanding the content of this excavation, replacing and adjusting what is being unveiled, and thus making this activity sacred. In this analysis, we concluded that, by the method of excavation, the sacralization of this action should allow subjects to have tender relationships, and thus be cured.

  1. Sacred Groves of Parinche Valley of Pune District of Maharashtra, India and their Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghchaure, Chandrakant K; Tetali, Pundarikakshudu; Gunale, Venkat R; Antia, Noshir H; Birdi, Tannaz J

    2006-04-01

    Sacred groves are protected areas of forests because of religious beliefs and constitute an important aspect of the cultural life of various communities throughout the world. The source of this culture can be traced back to prehistoric times. The sacred groves of Parinche valley, Pune district of Maharashtra, India were studied to understand their status and importance in relation to common natural resource bases and cultural aspects. Through formal interviews and non-participatory observation undertaken in all seasons between October 2002 and February 2004, 14 sacred groves were documented. Both EMIC and ETIC dimensions were incorporated in the choice of subjects. The results show that they are important for various communities as a common natural resource base. They promote cultural bonding among various communities and maintain harmony in social life. This can be evidenced during annual village festivals and family celebrations, which invariably take place within the premises of sacred groves. They are also important for biodiversity as many groves function like mini sanctuaries and harbour endemic and threatened plant species. The natural vegetation of the groves comprises many medicinal plants that are regularly harvested by local medicine men ( Vaidus ). Water is a precious resource, especially during summer months, and the perennial water sources that are present in the sacred groves are the only remaining water sources for seven villages. There is a compunction, on the other hand, of the sacred groves being influenced by urbanization, resulting in the building of concrete temples by clearing natural vegetation and planting ornamental and other economically useful trees in the cleared areas of the groves. Such actions alter these fragile ecosystems and deplete or destroy the natural resource base for which this ancient culture is believed to have been originally evolved. We conclude here that sacred groves were originally a common natural resource which were

  2. Sacred places in global big cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    the relation between the sacred and the profane, and about the role of the sacred in modern societies. The question is if the development of modern societies has implied the gradual abolishment of religious beliefs, rituals and rites, or has it on the contrary implied the installment of new forms of religious...... beliefs and sacred places, which are cultivated through regular rituals and rites, just as some traditional societies have cultivated for instance totemism. This paper will take its point of departure in Durkheim’s study of The Elementary Forms of Religious Life from 1912. Then it will turn...

  3. Managing the Sacred Lands of Native America

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    Roxanne T. Ornelas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is a review of ten years of sacred lands management and policy in the United States. The author reports from the unique position of having been involved in national and international meetings with communities of indigenous peoples and intergovernmental stakeholders during this time. Discussion includesan historical overview of such topics as environmental justice and the 2001 Native American Sacred Lands Forum, one of the first national meetings in the United States to specifically address the sacred lands of Native Americans. Further discussion draws attention to the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 as a gateway to better sacred lands management and policy for Native Americans in the future.

  4. SACRED LANDSCAPES AS REPOSITORIES OF BIODIVERSITY. A CASE STUDY FROM THE HARIYALI DEVI SACRED LANDSCAPE, UTTARAKHAND

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    Yogesh GOKHALE

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in the Hariyali Devi sacred landscape of Garhwal Himalaya in Uttarakhand State of India. The study area falls under the jurisdiction of the Forest Department, having the status of reserve forest. The land scape is dedicated to the deity “Hariyali Devi” and that plays a major role in conserving the biodiversity of this land scape. Taboos, rituals and socio-cultural practices are associated with conservation practices. The study recorded 98 plant species, representing 88 genera and 46 families with different economic values. The dominant family was Rosaceae, which recorded the highest (10 number of species. Out of 98 plant species the dominant life form contribution was of herbs (52, shrubs (26 and tree species (21. Almost 82 plants species in the landscape are of medicinal importance, 15 species are used for timber and construction purposes, 19 species with different edible plant parts, such as fruits, flowers, seeds and rhizomes. The information about the uses/economic value of different plant species was gathered directly by interviewing knowledgeable elderly local villagers (including women.

  5. Natural pigments and sacred art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  6. Sacred Grove of Punyagiri Hill, Vizianagaram District, AP, India: Ecological And Sociological Study

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    D. Srinivasa Rao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  Sacred groves are important repositories of rare endangered endemic plants and floral diversity that have been conserved by the local people or communities in a sustainable manner. Sri Umakotilingeswara Swami Temple is a famous Siva Kshetra located in Vizianagaram district of the Andhra Pradesh, India. This holy shrine is situated in the Punyagiri hills, 4 kms away from the Srungavarapu Kota and 62 kms away from the Visakhapatnam (a coastal city of Andhra Pradesh. Two study sites were selected, one was in the sacred grove region another was in forest region. Line transects were used for collection of data on species richness and diversity of the flora. Density and basal area were more in the sacred grove region than the nearby forest region. Some important medicinal and valuable plants were reported in this region, plants such as Saraca asoca (Roxb., Diospyros peregryna (L., Sterculia urens (Roxb., Cleistanthus collinus (Roxb., Ficus relisiosa (L., Strublus aspera (L., Chloroxylon swietenia (L., Firmiana colorata (Roxb., Albizia odoratissima (L., Dalbergia paniculata (Roxb., Dalbergia sisso (Roxb., Azadiricta indica A. Juss., Diospyros chloroxylon (L., Holoptelea integrifolia (Roxb., Mangifera indica (L., Eucalyptus globulesv(Labelle, Bombax ceieba (L., Aegle marmelos, Ailanthus excelsa and some important pteridophytes and Bryophytes were reported in the sacred forest of the Punyagiri hills. Extension of the temple buildings and other developmental activities may be threat to the sacred groves. Invasion by the exotic weeds may further degrade the structure and composition of the sacred forests as a whole.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i1.12176 International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2014/15, page: 30-47

  7. Socio- cultural importance of sacred forests conservation in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio- cultural importance of sacred forests conservation in south southern Nigeria. ... on the preservation of sacred sites with reason being the fear of desecration, ... beliefs and cultural systems was observed to enhance nature conservation ...

  8. Sacred Architecture, Historic Religious Traditions and Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, James J.

    This paper analyzes the relationship between society and education within the framework of sacred architectural sites, as well as through the more customary vehicle of sacred texts and practices. In particular, the study of sacred architectural sites is a unique and powerful research tool for studying spiritual and cultural meaning and its…

  9. Rituals and Sacred Space of Pandharpur, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The small town Pandharpur, situated about two hundred kilometres south east of Pune, is one of the most popular sacred places in the state of Maharashtra, India. It is dedicated to the god Vithoba who is considered to be an incarnation of Vishnu in the form of Krishna. Pandharpur and Vithoba plays...

  10. The sacred, the secular, and the profane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsinovoi, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    In security studies, the dichotomy between ‘security’ and ‘regular’ politics has been effectively challenged in recent years, both theoretically and empirically. To address this challenge, the article develops Giorgio Agamben’s concepts of the sacred, the profane and the secular into three ideal ...

  11. Teaching Leadership as Exploring Sacred Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the sacred space of teaching and learning by examining a five-year personal inquiry into the study and practice of teaching leadership. The research described exposes the value of engaging in action inquiry as a heuristic in the ongoing process of teaching and learning about leadership. The writing reflects five years of work…

  12. THE SACRED FEMININE IN 'DA VINCI CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila de Souza Moreira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyse the feminine in the “Da Vinci Code”, a novel written by Dan Brown, whose the mean theme is permeated by issues relating to the feminine, linking it to the art and religion.We use the notion of female seized by psychoanalysis, to take this reading of the book, placing the efforts of the author in his attempt to unravel the mysteries of the sacred feminine.

  13. [Tobacco: sacred and profane as regards smoke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Bosco

    2009-01-01

    Blowing smoke was a sacred habit among the American Indian people in Brazil at the arrival of the first Europeans. That remains a practice of prevention and recovery among the remote people of Amazon and Rio Negro. Addiction to smoking was propagated by Nicot in Europe for the pleasure it procures but it became such real plague of the modern society that every country has to struggle against its given attractive image of a way of life.

  14. THE SACRED FEMININE IN 'DA VINCI CODE

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila de Souza Moreira; Tânia Mara Silva Benfica; Tatiana Salzer Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyse the feminine in the “Da Vinci Code”, a novel written by Dan Brown, whose the mean theme is permeated by issues relating to the feminine, linking it to the art and religion.We use the notion of female seized by psychoanalysis, to take this reading of the book, placing the efforts of the author in his attempt to unravel the mysteries of the sacred feminine.

  15. THE SACRED FEMININE IN 'DA VINCI CODE

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila de Souza Moreira; Tânia Mara Silva Benfica; Tatiana Salzer Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyse the feminine in the “Da Vinci Code”, a novel written by Dan Brown, whose the mean theme is permeated by issues relating to the feminine, linking it to the art and religion.We use the notion of female seized by psychoanalysis, to take this reading of the book, placing the efforts of the author in his attempt to unravel the mysteries of the sacred feminine.

  16. Psychoanalysis: the sacred and the profane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Allan

    2014-06-01

    Colleagues from a variety of perspectives have written about the propensity to enshrine psychoanalytic theory. The meaning of the word "enshrine" is to cherish as sacred an idea or philosophy and protect it from change. In other words, the way we view psychoanalysis, our theories of mind and technique, become holy writ and we have divided the world of theory into the sacred and the profane. This is the kiss of death for theory, which must constantly evolve and change, but comforting for the analyst who believes he is on the side of the right, the sacred. In this paper I will discuss how our propensity to enshrine theory has had a debilitating effect on the development of psychoanalysis and, in particular, as a treatment for the most vulnerable people who seek our help. I also address the idea that movement away from enshrined positions allows us to construct different versions of reality. In this context, the notion of "action at a distance" is presented along with the attendant idea of psychoanalytic entanglement.

  17. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity in sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) using AFLP and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jihong; Pan, Lei; Liu, Honggao; Wang, Shuzhen; Wu, Zhihua; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2012-04-01

    The sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) is an aquatic plant of economic and ornamental importance in China. In this study, we developed twenty novel sacred lotus SSR markers, and used AFLP and SSR markers to investigate the genetic diversity and genetic relationships among 58 accessions of N. nucifera including 15 seed lotus, 12 rhizome lotus, 24 flower lotus and 7 wild lotus. Our results showed that sacred lotus exhibited a low level of genetic diversity, which may attribute to asexual reproduction and long-term artificial selection. A dendrogram based on both AFLP and SSR clustering data showed that: (1) the seed lotus accessions and rhizome lotus accessions were distinctly clustered into different groups, which indicated the significant genetic differentiation between them. This may be attributed to the two modes of reproduction and lack of genetic exchange; (2) the accessions of Thailand wild lotus were separated from other wild lotus accessions. This implied that the Thailand lotus might be genetically differentiated from other wild lotuses. In addition, Mantel test conducted gave highly significant correlation between AFLP-SSR data and each of the AFLP and SSR ones, with the values of r = 0.941 and r = 0.879, respectively, indicating the higher efficiency of the combination of these techniques (AFLP and SSR) in estimation and validation of the genetic diversity among the accession of sacred lotus. This knowledge of the genetic diversity and genetic relatedness of N. nucifera is potentially useful to improve the current strategies in breeding and germplasm conservation to enhance the ornamental and economic value of sacred lotus.

  18. Reflections Around the Conservation of Sacred Thangkas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Cotte

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan thangkas (Buddhist scroll paintings are created as religious ritual objects. The fact that they are mainly considered as artworks in the Western world impacts on the decisions made for their display and conservation. This article explores the current approach to thangkas in Australian public collections and compares it with the views of contemporary Tibetan Buddhism practitioners. It underlines a few misconceptions at the source of conservation decision-making, and discusses practical outcomes of integrating the sacred dimension into professional practice against the backdrop of conservation’s Codes of Ethics. Conserving living religious heritage requires that professional ethical standards are adaptable to the needs of users. Existing frameworks for the conservation of sacred objects of pre-colonised, indigenous cultures provide useful models for the conservation of thangkas. This article argues that engaging with contemporary cultural groups to conserve religious significance is part of the mission of conservators. This is viewed as an expansion of conservation practice into the social realm, in a search for purposeful conservation that establishes the social relevance of our profession.

  19. Birds of sacred groves of northern Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Jyothi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sacred groves are patches of vegetation preserved due to  religious or cultural tradition.  They are protected through spiritual beliefs.  Sacred groves provide an excellent abode to the biodiversity of the region where they are located.   Scientific exploration of fauna from sacred groves of India is few and far between.  The present study was conducted to explore the bird diversity and abundance in 15 selected sacred groves of northern Kerala, eight from Kannur District and seven from Kasargod District each.  A total of 111 bird species were observed belonging to 49 families and 16 orders.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala support many of the ‘forest-birds’ such as the Grey Junglefowl Gallus sonneratii, Asian Fairy-bluebird Irena puella, Tickell’s Blue-flycatcher Cyornis tickelliae, Malabar Trogon Harpactes fasciatus, Heart-spotted Woodpecker Hemicircus canente, Malabar Whistling-Thrush Myophonus horsfieldii, Little Spiderhunter Arachnothera longirostra, etc.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala also support two endemic bird species of the Western Ghats, such as the Malabar Grey Hornbill Ocyceros griseus and Rufous Babbler Turdoides subrufa. Five species of raptors and four owl species were reported from the sacred groves of north Kerala during the present study.  The breeding of the White-bellied Sea-Eagle has been reported at Edayilakadu Kavu, a sacred grove in Kasargod District.  The sacred groves of northern Kerala also supported 17 species of long distant migratory birds.  Thazhe Kavu, recorded the Black-headed Ibis Threskiornis melanocephalus, a Near-Threatened bird according to IUCN. 

  20. Common Sense Approach to the Restoration of Sacred Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphonso Lopez Pinto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Sacred Art is examined as an imitation of historia. Historia interprets historical human events as empirical, material and real while seeking to understand their moral and spiritual significance. It is from historia that sacred art can be understood, where Christ and the saints are portrayed in the integrity of their human natures united to symbols representing Divinity or grace in order to present a visual/contemplative narrative. Mortimer Adler rightly sees that the vision of the beautiful is inherently contemplative, thus sacred iconography provides a language that can form the common sense of men and women.

  1. Profaning the Sacred in Leadership Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliwa, Martyna; Spoelstra, Sverre; Meier Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    The leadership literature is full of stories of heroic self-sacrifice. Sacrificial leadership behaviour, some scholars conclude, is to be recommended. In this article we follow Keith Grint's conceptualization of leadership as necessarily pertaining to the sacred, but-drawing on Giorgio Agamben......'s notion of profanation-we highlight the need for organization scholars to profane the sacralizations embedded in leadership thinking. One example of this, which guides us throughout the article, is the novel A Wild Sheep Chase, by the Japanese author Haruki Murakami. By means of a thematic reading...... from their current collective urge to become leaders. Inspired by Murakami's fictional example, we call organization scholars to engage in profanation of leadership studies and, in doing so, open new vistas for leadership theory and practice....

  2. Phytodiversity and conservation of Nithypooja Kona Sacred Grove of Nallamala Hill Range, Eastern Ghats, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKM Basha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sacred groves are climax forests and are the only representatives of natural or near-natural vegetation. These are dedicated to deities or ancestral spirits worshipped by local tribes along with surrounding plants and trees. These are ecosystems by themselves and perform all the ecological functions. Phytodiversity constitute a large segment of the flora which provides raw materials for use by numerous Pharmaceutical industries. The present study will be useful for researchers in the field of Ethan botany, Ethnomedicine, Taxonomy, and Pharmacology for further studies. Nithyapoojakona Sacred grove is one of the important sacred groves in Kadapa district. The present paper deals with the phyto-diversity of the above grove used by local tribes. This paper deals with the 181 species of probable medicinal potential belonging to 138 genera and 71 families. Significant flora are Cycas beddomei, Pterocarpus santalinus, Drosera burmaptonni, Orabanche cernua, Neptunia oleracea, Hugonia mystax, Caralluma adsendens , Gloriosa superba, Limnophila spp, Centella sasiatica etc. Word famous Red sanders population of the study area is being destroyed unethically and it is to be protected. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i2.12648 International Journal of Environment Vol.4(2 2015: 271-288

  3. Stravinsky, Igor: Le Sacre du Printemps / Pierre-E. Barbier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Barbier, Pierre-E.

    1996-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Stravinsky, Igor: Le Sacre du Printemps. Requiem Canticles. Canticum sacrum. Variations sur un choral de Bach. Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, Neeme Järvi" Chandos CHAN 9 408, distribution Media 7 (SD:160F)

  4. Biodiversity and ecological assessments of Indian sacred groves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasri Ray; M.D.S. Chandran; T.V. Ramachandra

    2014-01-01

    Sacred groves are patches of forests preserved for their spiri-tual and religious significance. The practice gained relevance with the spread of agriculture that caused large-scale deforestation affecting bio-diversity and watersheds. Sacred groves may lose their prominence no-wadays, but are still relevant in Indian rural landscapes inhabited by traditional communities. The recent rise of interest in this tradition en-couraged scientific study that despite its pan-Indian distribution, focused on India’s northeast, Western Ghats and east coast either for their glob-al/regional importance or unique ecosystems. Most studies focused on flora, mainly angiosperms, and the faunal studies concentrated on verte-brates while lower life forms were grossly neglected. Studies on ecosys-tem functioning are few although observations are available. Most stud-ies attributed watershed protection values to sacred groves but hardly highlighted hydrological process or water yield in comparison with other land use types. The grove studies require diversification from a stereo-typed path and must move towards creating credible scientific founda-tions for conservation. Documentation should continue in unexplored areas but more work is needed on basic ecological functions and ecosys-tem dynamics to strengthen planning for scientifically sound sacred grove management.

  5. Trampling the Sacred: Multicultural Education as Pedagogical Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovern, Lavonna Lea

    2012-01-01

    The following paper is a critical examination involving the misuse of sacred cultural tools and practices in the name of multicultural education. Native American practices are identified to illustrate how such inappropriate usages promote pedagogical racism. The misuse continues the hegemonic distribution of social capital. Through the…

  6. The Sacred and the Profane in American History Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The question of why students think there are two kinds of American history taught--one in the K-12 system and one in the university system--can be examined critically using Emile Durkheim's (1973) description of the sacred and the profane. The history taught in K-12 classrooms often focuses on idealized accounts of the past that protect the status…

  7. Sacred Conversation: A Spiritual Response to Unavoidable Suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferch, Shann R.; Ramsey, Marleen I.

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that spiritual questions can be explored in the therapeutic context in order to help the client gain a sense of meaning in their suffering, as well as a measure of peace in their lives. The authors' approach, entitled Sacred Conversation, uses Victor Frankl's work as well as literature on empathy, forgiveness, and spirituality as its…

  8. Glagolitic Script as a Manifestation of Sacred Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Uspenskij

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that the Glagolitic alphabet was constructed as an ideographic illustration of sacred knowledge. The author attempts to demonstrate some basic ideas encoded in the forms of the letters. At the same time the alphabet seems to reveal the acquaintance of the inventor of the Glagolitic alphabet – St Cyril the Philosopher – with Semitic languages.

  9. Sacred Values, Strategic Communication, and Military Operations in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    Tuberculosis and drug addiction are widespread. The country is infested with 5-7 million land mines which have disabled more than 200,000 Afghans...war‖ or ―holy warrior‖) which cede to the enemy the sacred status they crave , and to irhabi (terrorist) or hiraba (terrorism), which address AQ‘s

  10. The sacred geography of Kapila: the Kapilasrama of Sidhpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut A. Jacobsen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available To most scholars of Hinduism, the sage Kapila is a person associated only with ancient India and known mainly as the mythical founder of the Sāmkhya system of religious thought. This is the Kapila whose teaching is known through Yuktidīpikā, the Sāmkhyakārikā by Isvarakrsna and other Sāmkhya texts and the tradition of technical commentaries on them. In India this Kapila belongs to a scholarly tradition preserved mainly by pandits with a knowledge of Sanskrit and, for the last hundred years, also by professors in the Indian university system. In this article, the symbolic significance of one of the most important pilgrimage centres connected with Kapila, Sidhpur in Gujarat, is explored. The close connection between the sacred narratives and the rituals performed at the pilgrimage centre is a significant feature of the sacred places devoted to Kapila. At every place of pilgrimage to Kapila there are narratives about him which account for the sacredness of the place. These narratives belong to the geography of Hindu India as much as to the mythology of the Hindu tradition. The life history of Kapila is engraved in a sacred landscape. The place where Kapila was born, the place where he gave the sacred knowledge of ultimate reality to his mother, the different places where he performed tapas, the place where he killed the sons of King Sagara are all part of India's imagined landscape. The promise of the Kapila pilgrimage sites is that these places have power in themselves to remove moral impurity and grant moksa to the pilgrims. The sacred narratives of Kapila function to make this promise trustworthy.

  11. Tibetan Sacred Sites: Understanding the Traditional Management System and Its Role in Modern Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Lu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sacred sites are based on indigenous culture and traditional practices that value land and lives, and are considered to be of significant contribution in biodiversity conservation. However, there is a lack of understanding about how these traditional systems function (i.e., the distribution and size of sacred sites, their management and current status, especially for those sites within the Tibetan region. From 2004 to 2007, we investigated 213 sacred mountains, a major form of Tibetan sacred site, in western China, and documented their traditional management system. We mapped 154 sacred mountains within a GIS and estimated their average size was 25.9 km2 (range 0.6–208.4 km2, with sacred mountains of greater religious significance covering greater areas. Monasteries had an essential role in protecting sacred mountains; 73.1% assigning specific personnel to manage their sacred mountains, and 63.9% patrolling their mountains. Official nature reserves had a remarkable spatial overlap with sacred mountains, but few reserves had established collaboration with local communities or monasteries on the land resource management. We conclude that Tibetan sacred mountains could have an important role in conservation, not only because they cover a considerable area, but also because of strong local participation in conservation of sacred mountains. We believe that Tibetan sacred sites are a landscape-level conservation attribute. To promote conservation in western China, Tibetan sacred sites need to be recognized and incorporated in the formal conservation network, and local communities should be empowered to participate in protecting and managing their sacred sites.

  12. Monasteries and tourism: interpreting sacred landscape through gastronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Aulet Serrallonga, Sílvia; Mundet i Cerdan, Lluís; Vidal Casellas, Dolors

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses the role of monasteries as a sacred space and how their relationship with tourism depicts a landscape of 'good taste'. Monasteries are examples of both tangible and intangible heritage, and are highly symbolic built spaces that have often become the guardians of tradition. They are strongly embedded within a local cultural landscape, which has determined their historical evolution. Monasteries used to be selfsufficient communities that relied on the resources available i...

  13. Sacred values and conflict over Iran's nuclear program

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Dehghani; Scott Atran; Rumen Iliev; Sonya Sachdeva; Douglas Medin; Jeremy Ginges

    2010-01-01

    Conflict over Iran's nuclear program, which involves a US-led policy to impose sanctions on Iran, is perceived by each side as a preeminent challenge to its own national security and global peace. Yet, there is little scientific study or understanding of how material incentives and disincentives, such as economic sanctions, psychologically affect the targeted population and potentially influence behaviour. Here we explore the Iranian nuclear program within a paradigm concerned with sacred val...

  14. Sacred values and conflict over Iran's nuclear program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Dehghani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conflict over Iran's nuclear program, which involves a US-led policy to impose sanctions on Iran, is perceived by each side as a preeminent challenge to its own national security and global peace. Yet, there is little scientific study or understanding of how material incentives and disincentives, such as economic sanctions, psychologically affect the targeted population and potentially influence behaviour. Here we explore the Iranian nuclear program within a paradigm concerned with sacred values. We integrate experiments within a survey of 1997 Iranians. We find that a relatively small but politically significant portion of the Iranian population believes that acquiring nuclear energy has become a sacred value, in the sense that proposed economic incentives and disincentives result in a ``backfire effect'' in which offers of material rewards or punishment lead to increased anger and greater disapproval. This pattern was specific to nuclear energy and did not hold for acquiring nuclear weapons. The present study is the first demonstration of the backfire effect for material disincentives as well as incentives, and on an issue whose apparent sacred nature is recent rather than longstanding.

  15. Impacts of land-use change on sacred forests at the landscape scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desalegn Desissa Daye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacred forests often exist as isolated patches of natural forest even after conversion of the surrounding matrix to different forms of land-use. This study set out to: (1 evaluate land-cover changes and patch fragmentation in a landscape containing sacred and non-sacred forest patches over 15 years and (2 compare the effects at an individual patch level between sacred and non-sacred forests. Past changes in area and patch fragmentation of land cover classes and individual forest patches in the Gamo Highlands, Ethiopia, were assessed using maximum-likelihood classification of LANDSAT images. Large changes in land-cover occurred during 1995–2010, with 109.4% increase in area of farm and settlement and 36.6% decrease of forest area, with a decrease in number of forest patches by 16.1%, mean size by 26.8%, edge density by 29.1% and shape index by 13.3%. While all four individually studied non-sacred forests decreased in size over this period only four of the six individual sacred forests patches showed reduction in area. Forest patches with sacred status had greater protection by local communities than non-sacred forests in the Gamo Highlands. However, their small size and increasing edge density indicate high vulnerability, especially if an erosion of traditional cultural values reduces their protection.

  16. Sacred rivers: their spiritual significance in Hindu religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2015-06-01

    The ancient civilizations in India, China, Egypt and Mesopotamia have flourished due to large rivers that provided water for agriculture over millennia. Egypt was able to grow well because of the Nile. Similarly, Mesopotamia had two rivers namely the Tigris and the Euphrates. Likewise, India and China have several great rivers that continue to support the agrarian culture. This article discusses the sacred significance of rivers in the ancient and contemporary Indian culture with examples from popular Hindu scriptures. It also presents the ancient model of an eco-friendly check dam and its modern application with potential to mitigate future water-related problems across the drylands of India and elsewhere.

  17. Dyggve's 'Adrio-Byzantine' capitals and the sacred space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (Eigentümlichkeiten) and its origin (Ursprung). After about 300, Oriental and Syrian styles took a firm hold in early Dalmatian architecture. Simultaneously, a Late Antique “Byzantine” art was present, which gives rise to Dyggve’s concept of several phenomena fused together, and what he calls ‘Adrio......-zone protome capitals in a broader perspective. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the figured motifs and foliage in so far it is possible on the basis of other forms of architectural sculpture and the sacred space as a vision of Paradise....

  18. Finding the Sacred Direction: Medieval Books on the Qibla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, M.

    2009-08-01

    Medieval Islamic scholars wrote a great number of books on the qibla, the Sacred Direction. These books had a huge readership and provided instructions for finding the direction of Mecca by either exact or approximate means. In principle, the qibla was a purely religious subject, but in practice its determination required the use of astronomy as an applied science. As so often, religion and politics had many points of contact and, in this case, it was generally political considerations that prevailed. Finally, the analysis of nautical charts can offer new perspectives. As yet, modern scholarship has not established the link between this area of study and the classical literature on this subject.

  19. Sports players : the heroes of the mediated sacred sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar RUBIO-HERNÁNDEZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadcasted sport is one of the elements of the mediated culture which mobilizes extremely passionate masses. Thus, it can be considered as a mythical expression within current society, since contemporary era is witness to the revival of the sacred which manifests through rituals, myths and the divinization of certain products and celebrities. This article analyzes how media depictions exalt players as objects of worship and devotion. It will specifically focus on the most successful Spanish sportsmen such as the tennis player Rafael Nadal and the players of the national soccer team and how they are promoted as national heroes in advertising.

  20. The genome of the long-living Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera, Gaertn.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacred lotus, a basal eudicot of agricultural, medicinal, cultural, and religious importance, is particularly noted for its 1,300-year seed longevity, and for its outstanding water repellency, the "lotus effect”. The genome sequence of the Sacred lotus variety 'China Antique' lacks the paleo-triplic...

  1. The Sacred or the Profane: The Challenge of Modern Dance in Religious Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The article addresses the utilization of modern dance compositional approaches in the development of sacred dance works. A brief history of sacred dance in the Western Church is traced as a foundation for students' stereotypical approaches to dance and religion. Also examined is the 20th Century modern dance choreographers' practice of…

  2. The Tunebook That Roars: The Sound and Style of Sacred Harp Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, James

    1980-01-01

    The Chattahoochee, Georgia, Sacred Harp Musical Convention has been held annually since 1852. Its tunebook uses a shape-note solmization system introduced to America in the seventeenth century. This article describes the history of shape-note tunebooks; some Sacred Harp songs, modern singing events, and teaching techniques. Resources are listed.…

  3. The man, the machine and the sacred: when the virtual reality reenchants the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier NANNIPIERI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The rationality associated with the technical progress were able to let believe that the world became disillusioned. Now, far from disillusioning the world, certain technical devices reveal the sacred dimension inherent to any human activity. Indeed, paradoxically, we shall show that the human-machine interaction producing virtual environments is an experience of the sacred.

  4. Examining the Role of Religiosity in Moral Cognition, Specifically in the Formation of Sacred Values, and Researching Computational Models for Analyzing Sacred Rhetoric and its Consequential Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-13

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0270 Examining the Role of Religiosity in Moral Cognition, Specifically in the Formation of Sacred Values, and Researching...SUBTITLE (YIP-12) Examining the Role of Religiosity in Moral Cognition, Specifically in the Formation of Sacred Values, and Researching Computational...overall goal of this project was to research and develop computational text analysis techniques for tracking and detecting transformations in moral

  5. The Sacred Groves of the Balts: Lost History and Modern Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vykintas Vaitkevičius

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the sacred groves of the Balts in Lithuania andpresents the linguistic background, the historical documents from the 12th–18th century, the key folklore motifs of the topic, as well as selected examples of groves. The article also discusses possible relationships between pre-Christian religious traditions connected with the sacred groves and the ones which have survived into the 21st century. Despite the fact that the sacred groves of past ages have mostly disappeared on the landscape, this tradition has not significantly changed. Various religious activities which were carried out in sacred groves, at smaller groups of trees, and beneath separate trees enable us to learn, even if insignificantly, about the phenomenon. Interdisciplinary approach to sacred groves should be preferred in modern research.

  6. The price of your soul: neural evidence for the non-utilitarian representation of sacred values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S; Bell, Emily; Capra, C Monica; Prietula, Michael J; Moore, Sara; Anderson, Brittany; Ginges, Jeremy; Atran, Scott

    2012-03-05

    Sacred values, such as those associated with religious or ethnic identity, underlie many important individual and group decisions in life, and individuals typically resist attempts to trade off their sacred values in exchange for material benefits. Deontological theory suggests that sacred values are processed based on rights and wrongs irrespective of outcomes, while utilitarian theory suggests that they are processed based on costs and benefits of potential outcomes, but which mode of processing an individual naturally uses is unknown. The study of decisions over sacred values is difficult because outcomes cannot typically be realized in a laboratory, and hence little is known about the neural representation and processing of sacred values. We used an experimental paradigm that used integrity as a proxy for sacredness and which paid real money to induce individuals to sell their personal values. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we found that values that people refused to sell (sacred values) were associated with increased activity in the left temporoparietal junction and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, regions previously associated with semantic rule retrieval. This suggests that sacred values affect behaviour through the retrieval and processing of deontic rules and not through a utilitarian evaluation of costs and benefits.

  7. VEGETATION IN MESOPOTAMIAN TEMPLE PRECINCTS:GARDENS,“SACRED GROVES” OR POTTED PLANTS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-FrancoiseBesnier

    2004-01-01

    It is usually believed that “sacred groves” found their origins in the Near East.According to Israel's prophets, cultic ceremonies were organized in suchplaces,during the Hellenistic period, famous “sacred groves” were located in the Near East, more precisely in Asia Minor,it is well-known Adonis himself camefrom Levant - and might be identified with the former Dumuzi -, as well as some cultic practices related to him originated from this region. Moreover, Frazer's research, at the end of the XIXth century, tackled the importance of “sacred groves” in archaic religions.

  8. The Sacred Economy: Devotional Objects as Sacred Presence for German Catholics in Aachen and Trier, 1832-1937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skye Doney

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a long-standing tradition within western Germany of religious journey, and more pertinent to this paper, of pilgrims requesting Andenken (remembrances when they could not physically attend pilgrimages. In the following essay, I analyze pilgrim correspondence sent to the Catholic Pilgrimage Committees, groups of clerics who facilitated pilgrimage to Aachen and Trier, Germany. I argue that Catholic pilgrims participated in an ‘economy of the sacred’ through their requests for and use of various pilgrimage objects; including, commemorative cards, medals, and rosaries. Within this economy wealth, worth, and merit were determined by an item’s physical proximity to the relics of these towns. Even as the number of objects available increased in diversity between 1832 and 1937, pilgrims continued to view Andenken as a tangible connection to the sacred - not as trinkets or souvenirs.

  9. [Presence of the sacred in a critical moment: internment in an unit of intensive therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Batista, Miranildes Abreu

    2004-01-01

    It is had as purpose understands the given meaning, for the patient, to the sacred object in a moment of internment in Unit of Intensive Therapy. Stands out forms of expression of the sacred in a critical instant in which the man in state of physical-emotional fragility, looks for answers transcendental front the anguish of the disease and of dying. The sacred is a trick of the religion through which the man tends taking refuge of the installed chaos. The presence of the sacred object, close to the patient, represents an event of immeasurable cultural meaning, being revealed in a supra-natural entail of which exhales hope, safety, help, comfort and, even, company.

  10. Bird Species Diversity and Abundance in the Abiriw Sacred Grove in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L. Kangah-Kesse1 , D. Attuquayefio1*, E. Owusu2, F. Gbogbo1

    human disturbances and wanton over-exploitation. ... health, and death. ... diversity of the bird species inhabiting the Abiriw Sacred Grove as an ... encountered (both visually and vocally) were systematically recorded with counts repeated six.

  11. Images for preaching the Gospel. The presence of the Imprese sacre of bishop Aresi in the spanish sacred oratory of the Modern Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier Azanza López

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the Seventeenth Century, the Theatine Paolo Aresi, Bishop of Tortona, wrote the Imprese sacre, a collection of symbolic images for the use of preachers which can be seen as a response to the concern to use the most effective means of persuasion in discourses such as the homily. In Spain, the Imprese sacre was well known early on, and its application in homilies was widespread, in both time and space. When reaching the IV Centennial of its publication, the aim of this paper is to analyse the use of the concepts from Aresi’s work in Spanish Sacred Oratory, specifically in its explanation of the passages of the Gospel.

  12. Dancing the Numinous: Sacred and Spiritual Techniques of Contemporary American Belly Dancers

    OpenAIRE

    Jeana Jorgensen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I explore how contemporary American practitioners of belly dance (as Middle Eastern dance and its many varieties are often called in the English-speaking world) conceptualize not only the spiritual dimensions of their dance, but also how the very notion of performance affects sacred and spiritual dance practices. Drawing on interviews with this community, I describe the techniques of sacred and spiritual belly dancers, how these dancers theorize performance, and how the conflic...

  13. The supernatural characters and powers of sacred trees in the Holy Land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafni, Amots

    2007-02-25

    This article surveys the beliefs concerning the supernatural characteristics and powers of sacred trees in Israel; it is based on a field study as well as a survey of the literature and includes 118 interviews with Muslims and Druze. Both the Muslims and Druze in this study attribute supernatural dimensions to sacred trees which are directly related to ancient, deep-rooted pagan traditions. The Muslims attribute similar divine powers to sacred trees as they do to the graves of their saints; the graves and the trees are both considered to be the abode of the soul of a saint which is the source of their miraculous powers. Any violation of a sacred tree would be strictly punished while leaving the opportunity for atonement and forgiveness. The Druze, who believe in the transmigration of souls, have similar traditions concerning sacred trees but with a different religious background. In polytheistic religions the sacred grove/forest is a centre of the community's official worship; any violation of the trees is regarded as a threat to the well being of the community. Punishments may thus be collective. In the monotheistic world (including Christianity, Islam and Druze) the pagan worship of trees was converted into the worship/adoration of saints/prophets; it is not a part of the official religion but rather a personal act and the punishments are exerted only on the violating individual.

  14. A Preliminary Assessment of Ethiopian Sacred Grove Status at the Landscape and Ecosystem Scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemaheyu Wassie Eshete

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The northern Ethiopian landscape is dotted with small patches of church forests that are religious centers for the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church (EOTC. These sacred groves are what remain of the once vast tropical Afromontane dry forest. Herein we review the landscape pattern of sacred groves in the Amhara region of Ethiopia, and their local scale nutrient status at two sites, Zahara and Debresena. A total of 1,488 sacred groves were inventoried within the study area, yielding an overall density of one sacred grove for every twenty square kilometers. Sacred groves averaged a little over five hectares and were separated from one another by more than two kilometers. At the local scale we found that soil carbon and nitrogen stocks have decreased significantly between the forest interior and the clearing indicating decreased soil fertility. Together our data indicate that these sacred groves are vulnerable to loss because of their small average size, isolation from seed sources, and decreasing soil status.

  15. Reconstructing sacred landscapes from soils-based records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ian; Gilliland, Krista; Coningham, Robin; Manuel, Mark; Davis, Christopher; Strickland, Keir; Acharya, Kosh; Hyland, Katherine; Bull, Ian; Kinnaird, Timothy; Sanderson, David

    2015-04-01

    From soils- and sediments- based records we reconstruct development of the sacred landscape at Lumbini UNESCO World Heritage Site in the central Nepalese Terai, the birthplace of Buddha, a world religion and now a major place of pilgrimage to its temple site. The Terai is a plain less than 100 m above sea level with incising rivers that originate in the Churia Hills and flow to the Ganges. Alluvial sediments on the Terai plain, originating as laterite soils within the hills, are characterised by a range of textural classes rich in iron oxides and manganese, with sandier sediments near water sources and finer textures near the distal ends of alluvial reaches. Our objectives are to establish a chronological framework for occupation, identify influences of alluvial environments on site occupation and determine the process of secular and sacred site formation within the World Heritage Site. A set of key stratigraphies are the basis for our analyses and are located in a palaeo-channel adjacent the temple site, within the temple site itself, and within the mound of the original Lumbini village. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements of soils and sediments together with supporting single entity radiocarbon measurements provide robust chronological frameworks. Assessment of field properties, thin section micromorphology and organic biomarkers offer new insight into the intimate and complex relationships between natural, cultural and culturally mediated processes in landscape development. Integration of our findings allows a detailed narrative of cultural landscape development at Lumbini. The area was occupied from ca. 1,500 BC first of all by a transient community who used the area for product storage and who were subject to persistent flooding with periodic major flood events. Subsequent occupation deliberately raised a permanent village settlement above the level of flood events flooding and which had associated managed field cultivation. Village life was

  16. Mourning Mandela: sacred drama and digital visuality in Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Uimonen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The world united in unprecedented ways in mourning the global icon Nelson Mandela, an emotionally charged historical event in which digital visuality played an influential role. The memorial service for Nelson Mandela on Tuesday, 10 December 2013, gathered dignitaries and celebrities from around the world at the First National Bank Stadium in Johannesburg, to mourn the passing of Madiba and to celebrate his life work. At the Grand Parade in Cape Town, the event was broadcast on large public screens, followed by live music performances and narrowcast interaction with the audience. Building on recent research on public screens during global media events, this article addresses the mediated mourning rituals at the Grand Parade in terms of a sacred drama. Focusing on social relationality, the article discusses how digital visuality mediated a sense of global communitas, thus momentarily overcoming historical frictions between the global north and the global south, while expanding the fame of Madiba. Paying attention to the public display of visual memory objects and the emotional agency of images, it argues that digital visuality mediated social frictions between the living and the dead, while recasting a historical subject as a historical object. The article further discusses how digital visuality mediated cultural frictions of apartheid and xenophobia, through the positioning of Mandela in the pantheon of Pan-African icons, thus underlining the African origin of this global icon. The analysis is based on ethnographic observations and experiences in Cape Town.

  17. Tchen's Sacred Isolation—Prelude to Malraux's Fraternal Humanism

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    Roch C. Smith

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available While Malraux's life-long quest was to seek new values in man's perennial and shared struggle against an overwhelming fate, his early protagonist, particularly the assassin, turns to destruction and terrorism in a frenzied search for absolutes. This attempt to identify with the very fatality that has the power to destroy him is especially developed in Tchen, who embodies a despairing fascination with totalistic nihilism that Malraux must overcome in his search for a new notion of man. Tchen's initiation to murder in La Condition humaine marks a transgression of a taboo that thrusts him into what Georges Bataille calls the realm of the "sacred." His attempt to reconcile life and death by identifying with his victim irredeemably isolates Tchen from other, uninitiated men. Transformed by murder, he leaves the reality of revolution for the inhuman world of cosmic existence and individual death. Seeking to escape the human condition, he becomes obsessed with killing Chang-Kai-shek in order to kill himself and thereby "possess" his fate. But the illusion of such an escape dies with Tchen. Even his admiring disciples repudiate his nihilistic temptation as Malraux begins to seek in human fraternity the foundations of a new humanism.

  18. The sacred weapon: bow and arrow combat in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents the development of the bow and arrow, and its important role in the history of Iran. The bow always played an important role not only on the battlefield, but also in hunting. It was also considered as a sacred weapon and additionally a royal symbol. Bow and arrow were considered as a superior weapon in comparison with other types of weapons because one could fight with them at a safer distance as one offered by swords, maces and axes. The first part of the article presents a short history of the bow in Iran. Based on historical Persian manuscripts, the next part explains the structure of the composite bow and the materials used for making it. The third part describes some types of bows based on the material, place of production, the usage, and bow type based on the length of the bow and the arrows. The following part talks about different types of arrows based on morphology of arrowheads, the type of plume/feather, the material of the shaft, the material of the arrowhead, the length of arrows, the target of arrows, the place of production of arrowheads and terms for describing its different features of an arrowhead. Then, the article talks about different types of thumb rings, bowstrings, quivers and bow cases and arrow guides for shooting short arrows. The next part discusses different principles of archery as explained in Persian manuscripts. Finally the article describes different archery targets.

  19. The Preservation of The Traditional Performing Arts’ Sacred Place

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    Bhernadetta Pravita Wahyuningtyas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explains the management of “Bharata” reputation, an Icon of classic, legendary, theatrical; traditional performing arts of Indonesia. Puppet has noble values in terms of moral education and philosophy of life; and “Bharata” becomes the "sacred" place for the preservation of the noble values of the puppet. “Bharata” is an institution that manages sustainable reputation and have to defend against the onslaught of competition from other institutions as a tourism destination. “Bharata” is a picture of a long journey and process of proving the majesty of traditional culture that owned by Indonesia. This study used post positivist paradigm. The nature of the study was descriptive and the selected approach was qualitative with in-depth interviews and observation for collecting data. Narrative analysis was used to analyze this study. The aim of this study has reviewed the reputation management of “Bharata” in its struggle of facing the globalization. The reputation management of “Bharata” is the results of coordination and socialization process within the institution; it is achieved through cooperation of each department by communication power. 

  20. Rituals, ceremonies and customs related to sacred trees with a special reference to the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafni, Amots

    2007-07-09

    Tree worship is very common worldwide. This field study surveys the ceremonies and customs related to sacred trees in present-day Israel; it includes the results of interviews with 98 informants in thirty-one Arab, Bedouin, and Druze villages in the Galilee. The main results are: 1. Sacred trees were treated as another kind of sacred entity with all their metaphysical as well as physical manifestations. 2. There is not even one ceremony or custom that is peculiar only to a sacred tree and is not performed in other sacred places (such as a saint's grave or a mosque). 3. Few customs, such as: quarrel settling (= Sulkha), leaving objects to absorb the divine blessing and leaving objects for charity) seem to be characteristic of this region, only. 4. In modern times, sacred trees were never recorded, in Israel, as centres for official religious ceremonies including sacrifices, nor as places for the performing of rites of passage. 5. There is some variation among the different ethnic groups: Kissing trees and worshipping them is more common among the Druze although carrying out burials under the tree, leaving water and rain-making ceremonies under them have not been recorded in this group. Passing judgments under the tree is more typical of the Bedouin in which the sacred trees were commonly used as a public social centre. Most of the customs surveyed here are known from other parts of the world. The differences between Muslims and Druze are related to the latter's belief in the transmigration of souls.

  1. Rituals, ceremonies and customs related to sacred trees with a special reference to the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafni Amots

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tree worship is very common worldwide. This field study surveys the ceremonies and customs related to sacred trees in present-day Israel; it includes the results of interviews with 98 informants in thirty-one Arab, Bedouin, and Druze villages in the Galilee. The main results are: 1. Sacred trees were treated as another kind of sacred entity with all their metaphysical as well as physical manifestations. 2. There is not even one ceremony or custom that is peculiar only to a sacred tree and is not performed in other sacred places (such as a saint's grave or a mosque. 3. Few customs, such as: quarrel settling (= Sulkha, leaving objects to absorb the divine blessing and leaving objects for charity seem to be characteristic of this region, only. 4. In modern times, sacred trees were never recorded, in Israel, as centres for official religious ceremonies including sacrifices, nor as places for the performing of rites of passage. 5. There is some variation among the different ethnic groups: Kissing trees and worshipping them is more common among the Druze although carrying out burials under the tree, leaving water and rain-making ceremonies under them have not been recorded in this group. Passing judgments under the tree is more typical of the Bedouin in which the sacred trees were commonly used as a public social centre. Most of the customs surveyed here are known from other parts of the world. The differences between Muslims and Druze are related to the latter's belief in the transmigration of souls.

  2. 'Marriage is sacred': the religious right's arguments against 'gay marriage' in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jane

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the Australian government legislated to prohibit 'gay marriage'; the religious right had lobbied vigorously for passage of this legislation. Drawing on Durkheim's theory of sacred and profane, this paper examines the argument proffered by right-wing Christians that allowing legalised unions between lesbians and between gay men would seriously undermine the institution of marriage and the family. Claims about the spectre of gays and lesbians marrying reveal a deeper unease about the status of heterosexual marriage and the nuclear family. These concerns, in turn, house a deeper unease about the nature and place of masculinity in contemporary Australian society. This disquiet about masculinity and masculine authority is isomorphic with concerns about challenges to the notion of an objective epistemological order. Marriage and nature are both sacred in Durkheimian terms because they must be radically separated from matters profane. By locating heterosexual marriage within the domain of nature, it is protected from contact with things that threaten its sacred status. However, Durkheim's theory of the sacred is simultaneously an account of the exercise of ideological power. Attempts to cast heterosexual marriage as sacred and, therefore, as inviolate are inextricably linked with attempts to protect an epistemological order linked to masculine authority.

  3. Are Brands Postmodern Relics? Taking a Closer Look at New Sacred Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane DUFOUR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the Church lost its monopoly on the sacred, no longer able to solely determine its form or contents, the social sphere has gradually taken over this value, applying it to new human and social objects. As a result, the modes of expression of the sacred have multiplied, along with the subjective and intimate experiences of modern individualism. Among the vast number of potential manifestations of this value, to which almost everything now seems to aspire, this paper will concentrate on commercial brands as vectors of meaning, with the hypothesis that some of them seek to position themselves, in postmodern society, as new figures of the sacred. This area of study is close to that of the sociologist Adam Arvidsson, when he describes brands as religious objects. If brands are less interested in selling products than in creating an affective experience, Arvidsson assimilates them to modern relics. However, this paper goes beyond metaphors, to examine the rhetorical strategies (discourse, rituals, representations, imagery through which brands construct meaning around sacred objects. Situated between a branch of marketing which concentrates on sacralising commercial products, and a theory popular in the English-speaking world, which has illustrated how the media work to sacralise products and brands, this paper uses a communicational approach to analyse the construction of meaning, by brands looking to make themselves (appear sacred.

  4. A study on traditional knowledge about ecology and environment from Tibetans in Kailash Sacred Landscape(KSL)%A study on traditional knowledge about ecology and environment from Tibetans in Kailash Sacred Landscape(KSL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luorong Zhandui; Fan Yibin

    2011-01-01

    I. Introduction 1. The Meaning and Purpose of the study "A study on traditional knowledge about ecology and environment from Tibetans in Kailash Sacred landscape(KSL)" is part of a research project entitled "Mount Kailash Sacred Landscape Conservation Initiative".

  5. Desmond and Moore’s Darwin’s Sacred Cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Esterson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In their book Darwin’s Sacred Cause (2009 Adrian Desmond and James Moore purport to demonstrate that they have provided an original explanation for the inspiration behind Darwin’s determined pursuit of an explanatory theory for the transformation of species of which he became convinced as a result of his experiences during the Beagle voyage of 1831 to 1836. This, they argue, was the “moral passion” that was evoked by his encountering the horrors of slavery during the periods he was able to disembark to explore areas of South America in the years 1832 to 1835. In short, they provide what they describe as “the untold story of how Darwin’s abhorrence of slavery led to our modern understanding of evolution.” This article explores the means by which the authors seek to persuade readers of the validity of their thesis, and concludes that far from providing compelling evidence, by providing a mass of historically interesting material relating to slavery that is actually tangential to their case, they obscure the fact that they fail to accomplish their aim. There is nothing in their account of events that provides a reason for preferring their explanation for Darwin’s devotion to understanding the processes involved in the transformation of species to the known historical facts of Darwin’s early zeal for natural science, exhibited in his childhood exploits with beetles and his more organized scientific activities when he was a student at Cambridge, enabled to come to fruition by his scientific activities during the voyage of the Beagle.

  6. The nature and workings of sacred intellect from the perspective of Avicenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollah Khademi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sacred intellect in Avicenna, a degree of rationality in which the highest form of communication is done with the intellectual world. Reasonable time to the times of human rationality is achieved without difficulty, pain and time, only be achieved by applying guess. The owners of Avicenna's top intellects in human beings are sacred and highest prophet for them. These people are the first intelligible human teachers perceive first and put it to other people. . Bu-Ali about how to communicate the power of the active intellect and innate or acquired its own works differently to comment the funds are somehow retractable. To prove his philosophical question of the nature and functions of the sacred intellect as much existence of intellect, perception as well as all forms of The Holy Quran verses seeks help.

  7. The changing landscape of sacred groves in Kerala (India): A critical view on the role of religion in nature conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, C.D.; Nugteren, A.; Sunny, S.

    2016-01-01

    Sacred groves are an age-old and world-wide phenomenon, traditionally consisting of forest zones, protected by people based on their spiritual relationship with the deities or ancestral spirits believed to reside there. India alone counts nearly 50,000 sacred groves, with 2000 in Kerala where they a

  8. 43 CFR 10.7 - Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of unclaimed human remains... REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural Patrimony From Federal or Tribal Lands § 10.7 Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects...

  9. 'They Never Dance': The Choreography of Le Sacre du Printemps, 1913

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Järvinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this text, I discuss Vaslav Nijinsky's choreography of Le Sacre du Printemps (henceforth Sacre as it appears in the light of primary source materials from 1913. By focusing on the unique challenges Nijinsky posed to his dancers in terms of movement style and composition, I contest many of the frequently-heard claims made about this work, particularly its danced component, and argue that Nijinsky's choreographic ideas challenged both dancers and critics by questioning the ontological qualities of (art dance in contemporary discourse.

  10. Dancing the Numinous: Sacred and Spiritual Techniques of Contemporary American Belly Dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeana Jorgensen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I explore how contemporary American practitioners of belly dance (as Middle Eastern dance and its many varieties are often called in the English-speaking world conceptualize not only the spiritual dimensions of their dance, but also how the very notion of performance affects sacred and spiritual dance practices. Drawing on interviews with this community, I describe the techniques of sacred and spiritual belly dancers, how these dancers theorize performance, and how the conflicts inherent to patriarchal mind-body dualism are resolved in these practices. My purpose here is twofold: to document an emergent dance tradition and to analyze its meanings in the relevant social context.

  11. Religious and Poetical Consciousness: a Study of Interdependence Between the Question of Sacred and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Lazić, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Th is essay in the examples of seemingly disparate writers, such as Miroslav Krleža, Herman Hesse, and Richard Wright, fi nds the common ground for analysis of the interconetions between the issues of sacred as religious term and sacred as an inner ethical feeling of supposedly secular writers. Th e main focus is upon Wright’s spiritual biography (having been an SDA member in his early days) and his later personal ethical and political views during the struggle for the rights of the blacks in...

  12. Religious and Poetical Consciousness: a Study of Interdependence Between the Question of Sacred and Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Lazić, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Th is essay in the examples of seemingly disparate writers, such as Miroslav Krleža, Herman Hesse, and Richard Wright, fi nds the common ground for analysis of the interconetions between the issues of sacred as religious term and sacred as an inner ethical feeling of supposedly secular writers. Th e main focus is upon Wright’s spiritual biography (having been an SDA member in his early days) and his later personal ethical and political views during the struggle for the rights of the blacks in...

  13. The Ontological Concept of Sacred and Profane in Islam (analytic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulnaser Sultan Mohsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘sacred’ in the study of religions appeared at the beginning of the last century; Western scholars studied primitive religions in the world and combined it with the term of ‘profane’ in an ambivalent or a deterministic relationship. This study is questing the concepts of sacred and profane through Islamic prospective of ontology, in which it confirms that the dualism of sacred and profane is involved in the spirit existence, not in the natural or material as the Western thought alleges. It is through Muslim scholars’ study of spirit and existence, and linguistic study of sacred and profane that has clarified that the existence has sacredness as much as granted by spirit. Much is also the achievement of perfect existence, or retrieval of pure spirit and not retrieval of the origin of creation according to Christian thought. Otherwise, the existence became profane when it has been disintegrated by obstruction of spirit functions, or losing of the spirit totally. Therefore, the concept of sacred in Islam is the perfect existence by spirit; conversely, the profane is isintegration of spirit.

  14. "Approaching the Sacred": Directionality in the Relation between Curriculum and Knowledge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Increasing pressure on all levels of educational provision, whether academic or overtly vocational, to be to "relevant" and "useful" prompts consideration of the relation between curriculum and pedagogy in terms of the internal structure of knowledge forms. Following Durkheim's distinction between "sacred" and…

  15. Tree Diversity and Their Regeneration in the Sacred Groves of Virajpet, Central Western Ghats, India

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    Devi A.G. PRASAD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sacred groves are one of the finest examples of informal way of conserving the forest wealth. Baseline data collection of their diversity, distribution and regeneration capacity becomes necessary for the management and conservation of these undisturbed forest patches. In this context, the present investigation was carried out using random quadrat method in the sacred groves of Virajpet, Karnataka, India. A total of 132 tree species belonging to 113 genera and 45 families were identified within five sacred groves. Higher basal area (51.73-85.65 m2/ha and tree density (453.33-515.9 individuals/ha were observed as compared to other forests of Western Ghats region. The present investigation has revealed a healthy regeneration of tree species. Seedling and sapling composition differed to some extent from the mature tree species composition which could be used in predicting the future possibilities. Protection and conservation of such sacred groves should be of interest, for better regeneration of the rich diversity they harbour.

  16. Longing for the Sacred in Schools: A Conversation with Nel Noddings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Joan Montgomery

    1999-01-01

    Educating for belief or unbelief means educating for religious and spiritual literacy and examining religions from historical and philosophical perspectives. The First Amendment does not forbid teaching about religion as part of our cultural heritage. Spirituality requires no institutional affiliation. Sacred music and art should be restored to…

  17. "Approaching the Sacred": Directionality in the Relation between Curriculum and Knowledge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Increasing pressure on all levels of educational provision, whether academic or overtly vocational, to be to "relevant" and "useful" prompts consideration of the relation between curriculum and pedagogy in terms of the internal structure of knowledge forms. Following Durkheim's distinction between "sacred" and…

  18. A rare agaric (Agaricomycetes: Agaricaceae from a sacred grove of Eastern Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Clarkeinda trachodes, a rare tropical Asian agaric was recorded for the first time in the Eastern Ghats, India, from a sacred grove in the Kolli Hills. It is a large lepiotoid fungi characterized by the presence of volva and annulus, with olive brown spore print and small spores with truncated germ pore.

  19. Sacred Torrents in Modernity: German Jewish Philosophers and the Legacy of Secularization

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    Roemer Nils

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the ongoing interaction between the Jewish sacred past and its modern interpreters. Jewish thinkers from the eighteenth century reclaimed these ideals instead of dismissing them. Sacred traditions and modern secular thought existed in their mutual constitutive interdependence and not in opposition. When the optimism in historical progress and faith in reason unraveled in the fin de siècle, it engendered a new critical response by Jewish historians and philosophers of the twentieth century. These critical voices emerged within the fault lines of nineteenth and early twentieth century Jewish anti-historicist responses. What separated twentieth-century Jewish thinkers such as Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, and Gershom Scholem from their nineteenth-century forerunners was not their embrace of religion but their critical stance toward reason and their crumbling faith in historical progress.

  20. Sacred scarab” in jewelry of Ancient Egypt: the symbol interpretation problem

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    Lada V. Prokopovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The image of the Sacred scarab, like any other fact of culture, should be considered only in the context of certain circumstances, which involve the approach choice: viewing as either a sign or a symbol. In those cases where the scarab image stands as a symbol, while interpreting this one it should be taken into account the cultural context, which, as relevant studies show, can never be reduced to a simple interpretation scheme “Scarab — Dorbeetle — Sun symbol”. In that connection suggested is a hypothesis, according to which the image of the Sacred scarab as a symbol is divided into two, at least, concepts: a “Sunny Beetle”, to mean the beetle species Cetonia aurata (or any other similar, and a “Beetle-Demiurge”, to mean the dorbeetle.

  1. La mer et le sacré en Islam médiéval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Picard

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Les travaux sur la mer et le sacré en Islam médiéval, présentés ici, reflètent assez bien l’état de la recherche actuelle sur un domaine qui a déjà été abordé au travers de thèses et travaux, mais sans que véritablement l’association de la notion de sacré et des espaces maritimes ait fait l’objet d’une réflexion approfondie. Dans le même temps les historiens et les archéologues qui ont eu la mer pour objet d’étude, ont tous fait le constat d’une relation forte, la traversée ou la contemplatio...

  2. Compassionate love as a mechanism linking sacred qualities of marriage to older couples' marital satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabey, Allen K; Rauer, Amy J; Jensen, Jakob F

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has underscored the robust links between sanctification of marriage and marital outcomes, and recent developments in the literature suggest that compassionate love, which is important for intimate relationships, may act as a mediator of that relationship. Accordingly, the current study used actor-partner interdependence models to examine the relationship between a spiritual cognition (i.e., perceived sacred qualities of marriage) and marital satisfaction, and to determine whether that relationship is mediated by compassionate love, in a sample of older married couples (N = 64). Results revealed that wives' greater sacred qualities of marriage were significantly and positively linked to marital satisfaction on the part of both spouses, and that these links were partially mediated by couples' reports of compassionate love. These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond simply establishing the existence of the link between global markers of involvement of religion and marriage to understanding how specific spiritual cognitions may foster better relationship quality, especially among older couples.

  3. Les bois sacrés des Celtes et des Germains

    OpenAIRE

    Brunaux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    La littérature antique mentionne à plusieurs reprises l’existence de “bois sacrés” chez les Celtes comme chez les Germains. De récents travaux archéologiques, dans le domaine celtique, et dans le nord de la Gaule plus précisément, indiquent que ces bois sacrés sont en réalité, comme en Grèce et en Italie, de véritables lieux de culte fixes et structurés où l’arbre ne joue plus qu’un rôle mineur ou symbolique. L’image qui s’en dégage va parfaitement à l’encontre de la vision développée par les...

  4. Jaime Prades and the sacred images. In defense of their worship and use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Velandia Onofre

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies how the Valencian theologian Jaime Prades justifies the worship of sacred images in his treatise Historia de la adoración y el uso de las Santas Imágenes y de la Fuente de la Salud. The analysis of the treatise will allow the research of Spanish religiosity at the pos-tridentine period and, specifically, the importance that art had as means for divine knowledge.

  5. Relevant Norms of Holy Places and Times in Three Sacred Books

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsenian, M; Bahonar, N

    2011-01-01

      Basically speaking, saintliness is considered as a commented and valued issue allotting to religion realm which without the presence of such a meaning, no religion is worthy of its name.   This article aims to consider the normative prepositions related to holy places and times in three sacred books : Quran, Pentateuch, and Gospel with their similarities and differences. A specific software program is used with quantitative and qualitative research method to process and analyz...

  6. Effects of exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations on soil properties in and around sacred natural sites in the northern Ethiopian Highlands

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    Alemayehu Wassie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Species of the genus Eucalyptus (common name eucalyptus are widely planted all across Ethiopia—including on large areas of land previously allocated to food production. In recent decades eucalyptus has also increasingly been planted on lands around and within “church forests,” sacred groves of old-aged Afromontane trees surrounding Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido churches. These revered holy sites have long been recognized for their cultural values and also for their ecosystem services—including their potential to support species conservation and restoration, as church forests are some of the only remaining sanctuaries for many of Ethiopia’s indigenous and endemic plant and animal populations. Ethiopian Orthodox church communities have a long history of planting and nurturing indigenous tree seedlings to sustain church forest groves. However, due to the fast-growing nature of eucalyptuscombined with its widely recognized socio-economic benefits (as fuelwood, charcoal, construction wood, etc., this introduced species has been widely plantedaround church forests—in some cases even replacing native tree species within church forests themselves. In many developing country contexts the introduction of exotic eucalyptus has been shown to have ecological impacts ranging from soil nutrient depletion, to lowering water tables, to allelopathic effects. In this study, we collected soil samples from indigenous forest fragments (church forests, adjacent eucalyptus plantations, and surrounding agricultural land to examine how eucalyptus plantations in Ethiopian Orthodox church communitiesmight impact soil quality relative to alternative land uses. Soil properties, including organic matter, pH, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus were measured in samples across 20 church forest sites in South Gondar, East Gojjam, West Gojjam, Awi, and Bahir Dar Liyu zones in the Amhara Region of the northern Ethiopian Highlands. Findings indicate that although soil in

  7. The Experience Of The Time In The Sacred And Profane In The Light Of Interpretation Of MiceaA Eliade

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    Rodrigo Danubio Queiroz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to analyze and describe the human experience of the time in the sacred and the profane from the thought of the philosopher and historian Mircea Eliade. The research has as its starting point the observation of duality sacred/profane statement that results in two modes of being in the world, namely the religious and non-religious. Thus, we aimed to assess the extent of heterogeneous temporality in the life of man and the religious and man without religion. However, the understanding of this experience can be established only when one realizes the importance of constructions of temples, religious festivals, rituals and myth presented as one of the sacred language that only makes sense because of the inhomogeneity of time.

  8. The butterfly (Insecta: Lepidoptera diversity of four sacred groves of Goa, India

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    Kiran Gaude

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly diversity of four sacred groves in Goa, viz., Nirankarachi Rai, Alvatinichi Rai, Mharinginichi Rai and Azobhachi Rai was selected for study purposes.  A total of 33 species belonging to 31 genera were observed which accounts for about 13% of the species recorded from Goa.  The Family Nymphalidae dominated with a high number of species with maximum diversity in Mharinginichi Rai.  It is concluded that further studies on groves from different habitats will significantly increase this number.  

  9. Decline of sacred fir (Abies religiosa) in a forest park south of Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado R, D; De Bauer, L I; Galindo A, J

    1993-01-01

    Decline of sacred fir (Abies religiosa) trees in the high elevation forest park, Desierto de los Leones, located south of Mexico City, is described. Trees located in the windward zone (exposed to air masses from Mexico City) were the most severely affected, especially trees at the distal ends of ravines. Examination of tree growth rings indicated decreases in ring widths for the past 30 years. Polluted air from Mexico City may be an important causal factor in fir decline. Drought, due to excessive removal of soil water, insects, mites and pathogens, and poor forest management are possible contributing and interactive factors in fir decline.

  10. Reading The Road with Paul Ricoeur and Julia Kristeva: The Human Body as a Sacred Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Arel Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road confronts readers with a question: what is there to live towards after apocalypse? McCarthy locates his protagonists in the aftermath of the world’s fiery destruction, dramatizing a relationship between a father and a son, who are, as McCarthy puts it, “carrying the fire.” This essay asserts that the body carrying the fire is a sacred, incandescent body that connects to and with the world and the other, unifying the human and the divine. This essay will consid...

  11. Tracce d’inizio e di fine. Citazioni sacre nelle “17 variazioni” di Emilio Villa

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    Bianca Battilocchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify the numerous quotations from sacred texts appearing in Emilio Villa’s 17 variazioni. Indeed, the 1955 collection of poems offers a wide range of references to Biblical sources and archaic cosmogonic myths, ancient symbologies and eschatological conjectures. The poet is both the translator and the interpreter of these texts, which the collection mixes and interlinks in the shape of an enigma. This air of mystery seems to deny any definitive revelation, highlighting instead a plurality of points of view that ultimately result in Apocalypse.

  12. Relevant Norms of Holy Places and Times in Three Sacred Books

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    Mohsenian, M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basically speaking, saintliness is considered as a commented and valued issue allotting to religion realm which without the presence of such a meaning, no religion is worthy of its name.This article aims to consider the normative prepositions related to holy places and times in three sacred books : Quran, Pentateuch, and Gospel with their similarities and differences. A specific software program is used with quantitative and qualitative research method to process and analyze the data by means of a profound content analysis method.As a result of searching in these three sacred books, 10396 normative propositions were found which are categorized in 123 sections. One of these sections includes 295 prepositions with the content of holy places and the other one has 301 prepositions with the content of holy times.Therefore, 5.7 percent of the dos and don'ts of these three books presented in tables of this article is based on the norms of holy places and times. According to these tables, Pentateuch considers do's and don'ts in our relation and holy places as well as us and holy times more than the two other books. In a section of holy places, the share of normative prepositions related to us and sacred objects is more in Pentateuch rather than Quran and Gospel. However Gospel compared to the other books has more relevant norms related to places of worship like churches and synagogues. Additionally, the least normative propositions related to us and holy times could be found in Gospel. The normative prepositions related to religiously prohibited months are just seen in Quran.This article lists 596 normative propositions with their identity numbers by representing the exact address of the source of verses.Eventually, a symmetry model of fivefold contents of places and times norms in three sacred books is computed and designed. Factors to be taken in to accounts in this model are reaching to coefficient correlation of 0.7 between the contents of Eids and

  13. Relevant Norms of Holy Places and Times in Three Sacred Books

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    Naser Bahonar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Basically speaking, saintliness is considered as a commented and valued issue allotting to religion realm which without the presence of such a meaning, no religion is worthy of its name.   This article aims to consider the normative prepositions related to holy places and times in three sacred books : Quran, Pentateuch, and Gospel with their similarities and differences. A specific software program is used with quantitative and qualitative research method to process and analyze the data by means of a profound content analysis method.As a result of searching in these three sacred books, 10396 normative propositions were found which are categorized in 123 sections. One of these sections includes 295 prepositions with the content of holy places and the other one has 301 prepositions with the content of holy times.   Therefore, 5.7 percent of the dos and don'ts of these three books presented in tables of this article is based on the norms of holy places and times. According to these tables, Pentateuch considers do's and don'ts in our relation and holy places as well as us and holy times more than the two other books. In a section of holy places, the share of normative prepositions related to us and sacred objects is more in Pentateuch rather than Quran and Gospel. However Gospel compared to the other books has more relevant norms related to places of worship like churches and synagogues. Additionally, the least normative propositions related to us and holy times could be found in Gospel. The normative prepositions related to religiously prohibited months are just seen in Quran.This article lists 596 normative propositions with their identity numbers by representing the exact address of the source of verses.   Eventually, a symmetry model of fivefold contents of places and times norms in three sacred books is computed and designed. Factors to be taken in to accounts in this model are reaching to coefficient correlation of 0.7 between the contents

  14. Relevant Norms of Holy Places and Times in Three Sacred Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Mohsenian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Basically speaking, saintliness is considered as a commented and valued issue allotting to religion realm which without the presence of such a meaning, no religion is worthy of its name.   This article aims to consider the normative prepositions related to holy places and times in three sacred books : Quran, Pentateuch, and Gospel with their similarities and differences. A specific software program is used with quantitative and qualitative research method to process and analyze the data by means of a profound content analysis method.As a result of searching in these three sacred books, 10396 normative propositions were found which are categorized in 123 sections. One of these sections includes 295 prepositions with the content of holy places and the other one has 301 prepositions with the content of holy times.   Therefore, 5.7 percent of the dos and don'ts of these three books presented in tables of this article is based on the norms of holy places and times. According to these tables, Pentateuch considers do's and don'ts in our relation and holy places as well as us and holy times more than the two other books. In a section of holy places, the share of normative prepositions related to us and sacred objects is more in Pentateuch rather than Quran and Gospel. However Gospel compared to the other books has more relevant norms related to places of worship like churches and synagogues. Additionally, the least normative propositions related to us and holy times could be found in Gospel. The normative prepositions related to religiously prohibited months are just seen in Quran.This article lists 596 normative propositions with their identity numbers by representing the exact address of the source of verses.   Eventually, a symmetry model of fivefold contents of places and times norms in three sacred books is computed and designed. Factors to be taken in to accounts in this model are reaching to coefficient correlation of 0.7 between the

  15. Isolation of a New Chlamydia species from the Feral Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus): Chlamydia ibidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorimore, Fabien; Hsia, Ru-Ching; Huot-Creasy, Heather; Bastian, Suzanne; Deruyter, Lucie; Passet, Anne; Sachse, Konrad; Bavoil, Patrik; Myers, Garry; Laroucau, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Investigations conducted on feral African Sacred Ibises (Threskiornisaethiopicus) in western France led to the isolation of a strain with chlamydial genetic determinants. Ultrastructural analysis, comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, ompA, and of a concatenate of 31 highly conserved genes, as well as determination of the whole genome sequence confirmed the relatedness of the new isolate to members of the Chlamydiaceae, while, at the same time demonstrating a unique position outside the currently recognized species of this family. We propose to name this new chlamydial species Chlamydiaibidis .

  16. Sacred Choices: Adolescent Relationships and Sexual Ethics--The Reform Movement's Response to the Need for Faith-Based Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rabbi Laura Novak

    2011-01-01

    "Sacred Choices: Adolescent Relationships and Sexual Ethics" is a sexual ethics curriculum for middle school and high school students developed by the Union for Reform Judaism. Sacred Choices strives to teach Reform Jewish teens that their bodies are gifts from God and that Judaism provides relevant guidance on how to use and care for that gift…

  17. Sacred spaces in public places: religious and spiritual plurality in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Sharma, Sonya; Pesut, Barb; Sawatzky, Richard; Meyerhoff, Heather; Cochrane, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Several intriguing developments mark the role and expression of religion and spirituality in society in recent years. In what were deemed secular societies, flows of increased sacralization (variously referred to as 'new', 'alternative', 'emergent' and 'progressive' spiritualities) and resurgent globalizing religions (sometimes with fundamentalist expressions) are resulting in unprecedented plurality. These shifts are occurring in conjunction with increasing ethnic diversity associated with global migration, as well as other axes of difference within contemporary society. Democratic secular nations such as Canada are challenged to achieve social cohesion in the face of growing religious, spiritual and ethnic diversity. These challenges are evident in the high-paced, demanding arena of Health care. Here, religious and spiritual plurality enter in, sometimes resulting in conflict between medical services and patients' beliefs, other times provoking uncertainties on the part of healthcare professionals about what to do with their own religiously or spiritually grounded values and beliefs. In this paper, we present selected findings from a 3-year study that examined the negotiation of religious and spiritual pluralism in Health care. Our focus is on the themes of 'sacred' and 'place', exploring how the sacred - that which is attributed as special and set apart as it pertains to the divine, transcendence, God or higher power - takes form in social and material spaces in hospitals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. AHP 21: Sacred Dairies, Dairymen, and Buffaloes of the Nilgiri Mountains in South India

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    Anthony R. Walker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1,500 Toda people inhabit the Nilgiri Mountains in south India. Arguably the most remarkable characteristic of Toda culture is the sacred nature of the husbandry of herds of long-horned mountain water buffaloes. No other community in India has so single-mindedly focused its ritual attention on one particular animal species. Every important task associated with the buffalo herds – milking, milk-processing, giving salt, naming, seasonal migrations, burning pastures, introducing new equipment into the dairies, etc. – has been embellished with ritual. Todas make a clear-cut distinction between temple and domestic buffaloes. Ordinary men (but not women herd the latter, whose milk and milk-products (buttermilk, butter, and clarified butter, but not flesh (since the community espouses vegetarianism may be consumed, bartered, or sold without restriction. Males who are responsible for herding temple buffaloes conduct their daily lives in a manner preserving greater ritual purity than ordinary men. Moreover, they are not just dairymen, but also the community's priests. They must guard the ritual purity of the dairies they serve, and all that is in them, for these are the Todas' temples – sacred places, infused with divinity.

  19. Sacred Dairies, Dairymen, and Buffaloes of the Nilgiri Mountains in South India

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    Anthony Walker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1,500 Toda people inhabit the Nilgiri Mountains in south India. Arguably the most remarkable characteristic of Toda culture is the sacred nature of the husbandry of herds of long-horned mountain water buffaloes. No other community in India has so single-mindedly focused its ritual attention on one particular animal species. Every important task associated with the buffalo herds – milking, milk-processing, giving salt, naming, seasonal migrations, burning pastures, introducing new equipment into the dairies, etc. – has been embellished with ritual. Todas make a clear-cut distinction between temple and domestic buffaloes. Ordinary men (but not women herd the latter, whose milk and milk-products (buttermilk, butter, and clarified butter, but not flesh (since the community espouses vegetarianism may be consumed, bartered, or sold without restriction. Males who are responsible for herding temple buffaloes conduct their daily lives in a manner preserving greater ritual purity than ordinary men. Moreover, they are not just dairymen, but also the community's priests. They must guard the ritual purity of the dairies they serve, and all that is in them, for these are the Todas' temples – sacred places, infused with divinity.

  20. Paysages sacrés et lieux de culte dans la vision du monde traditionnelle des Nénets Sacred landscapes and cult places  in the traditional world conception of the Nenets

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    Galina P. Kharioutchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Le peuple Nénets qui vit dans le district autonome de Yamalo-Nénets de Sibérie du Nord fait face à l���exploitation industrielle de la zone arctique de la toundra où se trouvent des gisements de pétrole et de gaz. A cet égard la protection des paysages sacrés et des lieux de culte comme partie intégrante de la vie de Nénets est une nécessité urgente. L’auteur, elle-même représentante de ce peuple, explique la signification des notions du sacré dans la mentalité de son peuple, cherche à concilier les besoins du progrès avec la préservation du mode de vie traditionnel.The Nenets people living in the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous district of Northern Siberia is confronted with the industrial exploitation of the tundra arctical zone which contains reserves of oil and gaz. In this regard the protection of sacred landscapes and cult places as an integral part of Nenets life is of utmost urgency. The author, herself a representative of this people, explains the meaning of the concepts of what is sacred in the mentality of her people and tries to reconcile the needs of progress with the preservation of the traditional way of life.

  1. Sacred Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three years this author has spent a good deal of time in primary classrooms, working with teachers on problem solving approaches to the teaching and learning of mathematics. He has also worked part-time on an initial teacher training course and an NCETM/Yorkshire Forward funded project entitled "Inspiring Mathematics Champions". Thus…

  2. The Camouflage of the Sacred in the Short Fiction of Hemingway

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    Zaid Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the short fiction of Ernest Hemingway in the light of Mircea Eliade’s notion of the camouflage of the sacred and the larval survival of original spiritual meaning. A subterranean love pulsates beneath the terse dialogue of Hemingway’s characters whose inner life we glimpse only obliquely. In the short play (“Today Is Friday” and four short stories (“The Killers,” “A Clean Well-Lighted Place,” “Old Man at the Bridge,” and “The Light of the World,” discussed here, light imagery, biblical allusions, and the figure of Christ, reveal a hidden imaginary universe. This sacral dimension has been largely overlooked by critics who dwell on the ostensible spiritual absence that characterizes Hemingway’s fiction.

  3. Issue 5 The Medieval Choir Screen in Sacred Space: The Dynamic Interiors of Vezzolano and Breisach

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    Jacqueline E. Jung

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In their later medieval heyday, choir screens were pivotal centerpieces and focalisers of their sacred environments. Embellished with figural imagery; outfitted with platforms, pulpits, and altars; and rendered visually porous by the presence of large doors and windows, screens at once defined liturgical zones and provided a unifying bridge between them. This presentation offers an analysis of two extant screens: the early thirteenth-century structure in the abbey church of St Maria in Vezzolano, and the late fifteenth-century example in the church of St Stephen in Breisach. Though very different in format and decoration, both screens act as mediators – physical, visual, and conceptual – between the functional spaces and pictorial programmes in the apses (eastern ends and exterior thresholds (western ends of their respective churches. This presentation seeks to reveal the dynamic, mutually reinforcing relations among choir screens, the spaces they inhabited, and the liturgical objects that animated those zones.

  4. Le Mexique d’Alejandro Jodorowsky dans La Montagne sacrée

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Estevão

    2014-01-01

    L’article se propose d’analyser la représentation du Mexique dans La Montagne sacrée d’Alejandro Jodorowsky. Aussi, le texte commence par une introduction qui mentionne brièvement la réception de l’œuvre de Jodorowsky par la critique et l’historiographie du cinéma mexicain, ainsi que l’état actuel des recherches sur l’œuvre du cinéaste. Ensuite, l’article retrace la trajectoire artistique de Jodorowsky depuis son arrivée au Mexique comme metteur en scène de théâtre en 1960, jusqu’à ses débuts...

  5. The Development of the Sacred Landscape of Saqqara in the Old Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magli, Giulio

    2015-05-01

    Saqqara is one of the most important Necropolis in Egypt. In the course of the third millennium BC many Pharaohs choose Saqqara for their tombs. As a consequence the landscape constantly grew with the addition of new monuments, from the mastaba tombs of the first dynasty to the last pyramid of the Old Kingdom, that of Pepi II. The monuments were constructed respecting a series of topographical constraints which are not due to the morphology of the area but rather reflect symbolic - dynastic or astronomical - motivations. The analysis of these connections gives a better understanding of the choices made by the kings' architects in order to keep Maat - order - in the development of the site. Further, the way in which the sacred landscape came to be structured at the end of the Old Kingdom allows us to formulate a proposal for the possible location of the unique pyramid of the sixth dynasty which is still to be found: that of Userkare.

  6. The Sacred Circle: a conceptual framework for spiritual care in hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, L

    1996-01-01

    Hospice care has consistently recognized the need to integrate spiritual care into holistic plans of care for dying patients and their families. Designing and implementing spiritual care interventions can be potentially difficult for hospice practitioners who have not had specific training in theology or pastoral care. Matthew Fox, a theologian, has developed a model of spiritual development that utilizes an ecumenical, ethical framework that can be directly applied to the care of hospice patients and families. This model employs a Sacred Circle approach that begins with an emphasis upon the sense of awe and wonder (the Via Positiva), moves into the next cycle by recognizing problems and negative emotions (the Via Negativa), that then flows into the creative solutions to problems (the Via Creativa), which finally transforms the problem into a new level of understanding (the Via Transformativa).

  7. Sacred Psychotherapy in the “Age of Authenticity”: Healing and Cultural Revivalism in Contemporary Finland

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    James M. Wilce

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Like other European countries, contemporary Finland has witnessed an explosion of healing modalities designatable as “New Age” (though not without profound controversy, [1]. This paper focuses on Finnish courses in lament (wept song, tuneful weeping with words that combine healing conceived along psychotherapeutic lines and lessons from the lament tradition of rural Karelia, a region some Finns regard as their cultural heartland. A primary goal of the paper is to explicate a concept of “authenticity” emerging in lament courses, in which disclosing the depths of one’s feelings is supported not only by invoking “psy-“ discourses of self-help, but also by construing the genuine emotional self-disclosure that characterizes neolamentation as a sacred activity and a vital contribution to the welfare of the Finnish people.

  8. The Role of Wali, Ancient Mosques and Sacred Tombs in the Dynamics of Islamisation in Lombok

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    Erni Budiwanti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights specifically the inter-relationship amidst the Wali, ancient mosques and sacred tombs (makam playing vital role in the process of Islamization in the Indonesian archipelago, and in Lombok in particular. The process of converting local religion to Islam involves Wali - a venerated religious figure coming from outside Lombok- and the tangible legacies that he left in the forms of keramat creating new tradition of ziarah. The early stage of conversion was strongly marked by contextualizing Islam into local cultural symbol and cosmology. Embedded in this stage is the development of venerated attributes attached to keWalian, in the forms of: karamah, ngalap berkah, and wasilah. These spiritual attributes are pinpointed to highlight a dis¬tinctive cultural variance of Sasak Muslims in Lombok.

  9. To have and to hold: possessing the sacred in the late renaissance

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    Erin E. Benay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Private devotional art of the early 17th century often found its place in the galleries of noblemen and women whose diverse collections were symbols not only of stylistic taste, but of their owners’ exhaustive curiosity. In these domestic settings, boundaries between sacred and secular were permeable, as the unprecedented physical intimacy portrayed in popular religious subjects such as St Matthew and the Angel, the Stigmatisation of St Francis, or Christ’s Agony in the Garden reveal. Representations of the latter reminded viewers of Christ’s human, corporal suffering and suggested a model of resolve strengthened by prayer. The Agony in the Garden appears on the interior of Jacopo Ligozzi’s virtuosic Portable Altar with Carrying Case (1608, likely a Medici gift presented to the Austrian court in anticipation of the marriage of archduchess Maria Maddalena to soon-to-be grand duke Cosimo II. Adorned with lavish botanical motifs on its exterior, the Altar’s potency as a sacred possession was redoubled by the owner’s tactile revelation of the portrayal of Christ supported by an Angel contained inside the case. Comprised of wood, oil on copper, and pietre dure inlay, it is an object intended to be held, opened, and experienced. This paper suggests that Ligozzi’s selective combination of sumptuous materials and choice of subject matter – botanical illustration and Christological iconography – allowed the object to appeal to the full sensorium, and therefore to function as efficaciously as a devotional aid as it did as a curiosity among other rare collectibles.

  10. Sacred byzantine music and its influence on old East Slavic Orthodox music

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    Włodzimierz Wołosiuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sacred Byzantine music originates from three sources: “the liturgy of heaven”, synagogue music as well as old Greek theory of music and lays at the bottom of the East Slavs liturgical chant. The tonal base of the Byzantine music formed tetrachords. From them the so called Diatonic mode took shape. It was the easiest and the most popular sound arrangement steming from Greek music. The Cristian Church considered it to be in accordance with its Spirit and needs. From the tetrachords mentioned above other tones were created, namely Doric tones, Lydian, Phrygian and Mixolydian and, together withall their derivatives they gave beginning to the Oktoechos tradition. Byzantine music was flourishing in monasteries and in town areas andmany different forms were elaborated on like troparions, kontakions, stichiry, canons, etc. If one speaks about composers then certainly some names cannot be omitted. These are: St. Anatolius (Patriarchof Constantinople, St. Andrew of Crete, St. Romanos the Melodist,St. Sophronius of Jerusalem and, above all, St. John of Damascus who collected and systematized the liturgical chants creating mentioned Oktoechos. The acceptance of the Greek form of Christianity by Rus’ caused a cultivation of the sacred Greek vocal art on its territory which manifested in a form of so called Znamenny chant. This type of chant was at first similar to the Greek model but later on it moved away from it. Musical notation of the Old East Slavic singing was based on neumes which names in Old East Slavic have changed a little and only few survived. Furthermore, liturgical note books together with their genre and music content have been taken over from Byzantium. Especially visible in the Old East Slavic monody, Byzantine patterns were pervading also the later polyphony which proves they were always current. Moreover, this allows to claim that Rus’ became the real successor of the Greek Orthodox traditions in new circumstances of sacral

  11. The Sacromonte and the Geography of the Sacred in Early Modern Granada

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    Harris, A. Katie

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades of the sixteenth century, a series of forged documents and supposed saints' relics were discovered in the Spanish city of Granada. This article examines how the Sacromonte, the site of the most prominent of the finds, became the symbolic landscape of Granadino spiritual identity. The relics and the miraculous events associated with them reconfigured the city's sacred geography, transforming a morisco holy site into a center of Christian holiness and a principal symbol of the religious aspects of early modem Granadino civic identity. This article also considers how this new sacred landscape found graphic expression in contemporary cartographic representations of Granada.

    En las últimas décadas del siglo XVI, se hallaron en la ciudad de Granada una serie de documentos falsificados y unas supuestas reliquias. Este artículo examina cómo el Sacromonte, el sitio de los hallazgos más destacados, fue convertido en el paisaje simbólico de la identidad espiritual granadina. Las reliquias y las circunstancias milagrosas con las cuales estaban relacionadas efectuaron una reconfiguración de la geografía sagrada de la ciudad, transformando un sitio sagrado de los moriscos en un centro de la santidad cristiana y un símbolo principal de los aspectos religiosos de la identidad cívica de la Granada moderna. Este artículo también considera cómo este paisaje sagrado fue expresado gráficamente por medio de representaciones cartográficas de Granada.

  12. Primitive Rituals, Contemporary Aftershocks: Evocations of the Orientalist ‘Other’ in four productions of 'Le Sacre du printemps'

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    Lucy Weir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper situates the original choreography of Sacre as a basis for an ongoing exploration of non-Western themes in modern dance, a persistent fascination with the Orientalist ‘Other,’ before exploring the versions choreographed by Wigman, Bausch and Graham in chronological order of their first performances. In analysing different interpretations of the same score, two themes become apparent: first, that this piece heralded the birth of Modernism in classical dance performance, and second, that the driving anti-classical, anti-traditional rhythms that characterise the piece communicate an enduring interest in primitive aesthetics. Accordingly, this discussion takes Nijinsky’s Sacre as a starting point in re-evaluating the influence of primitivism and Otherness on contemporary dance, and represents an early indication of the significance of the Saidian, non-Western ‘Other’ in shaping the evolution of avant-garde dance.

  13. La nuit sacrée: figurações de espelhamento no filme de Nicolas Klotz

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    Reto Melchior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo consiste em examinar a transposição intersemiótica de algumas figurações de espelhamento no filme de Nicolas Klotz, La nuit sacrée (1993, baseado nos dois romances L 'enfant de sable (1985 et La nuit sacrée (1987, do autor marroquino Tahar Ben Jelloun, e. em salientar às distorções resultantes desta transmutação. Baseado, em primeiro lugar, na teoria semiótica formulada por Ignacio Assis Silva, em Figurativização e metamorfose: o mito de Narciso, tentei analisar a integração dos constituintes narrativos: vida - paixão - morte e metamorfose, nos dois textos literários e na adaptação cinematográfica.

  14. The belives on the asphalt. Sacred sites as means of appropriation of the public space in México City

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    María Ana Portal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how residents of México City appropriate public spaces by transforming local places into sacred sites.  This sacred quality is achieved by installing crucifixes, altars and niches for virgins and saints.  These symbols of folk religion not only adorn public sites, but also offer protection, serve as mnemonic devices and manage spatial liminality -all this in a chaotic city where public spaces are considered to be almost extinct.  These elements -- faces, proper names, common religious symbols- mark “anonymous” urban spaces, generating meaning and memory for inhabitants.  In this fashion, public spaces become a scenario for projecting personal elements of  neighborhood groups.

  15. Sympatric Apes in Sacred Forests: Shared Space and Habitat Use by Humans and Endangered Javan Gibbons (Hylobates moloch.

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    Melissa Ann Reisland

    Full Text Available In this research, we use a combination of ethnographic observation and GIS analysis to explore the use of space by humans and gibbons (Hylobates moloch to determine areas of potential space competition in the sacred forest and nature reserve Cagar Alam Leuweung Sancang in West Java, Indonesia. More specifically, we test whether gibbons respond to the presence of humans in a manner consistent with predator-avoidance and predicted that the gibbon study subjects would avoid areas visited by humans (Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis. Data were collected August 2010-June 2011. We collected GPS locations and behavioral data on both the humans (6,652 hours and the gibbons (1,253 hours in the forest using 10 minute instantaneous sampling. Results indicate that humans preferentially assemble at the most sacred spot in the forest (Cikajayaan waterfall. Two gibbon groups' home ranges encompassed most of the sacred areas. Group B avoided areas of high human use, as high human use areas and high gibbon use areas did not overlap. Group C, though, continued to use areas that were heavily visited by humans. We thus found partial support for the Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis, although the variation in gibbon response to human disturbance indicates behavioral flexibility. We suggest that understanding the effects of shared space on wildlife is necessary for informing conservation policy in human-visited forests.

  16. The Park 51/Ground Zero Controversy and Sacred Sites as Contested Space

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    Jeanne Halgren Kilde

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Park 51 controversy swept like wildfire through the media in late August of 2010, fueled by Islamophobes who oppose all advance of Islam in America. Yet the controversy also resonated with many who were clearly not caught up in the fear of Islam. This article attempts to understand the broader concern that the Park 51 project would somehow violate the Ground Zero site, and, thus, as a sign of "respect" should be moved to a different location, an argument that was invariably articulated in “spatial language” as groups debated the physical and spatial presence of the buildings in question, their relative proximity, and even the shadows they cast. This article focuses on three sets of spatial meanings that undergirded these arguments: the site as sacred ground created through trauma, rebuilding as retaliation for the attack, and the assertion of American civil religion. The article locates these meanings within a broader civic discussion of liberty and concludes that the spatialization of the controversy opened up discursive space for repressive, anti-democratic views to sway even those who believe in religious liberty, thus evidencing a deep ambivalence regarding the legitimate civic membership of Muslim Americans.

  17. New precise dates for the ancient and sacred coral pyramidal tombs of Leluh (Kosrae, Micronesia).

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    Richards, Zoe T; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Wu, Chung-Che; Jiang, Xiuyang; Beardsley, Felicia

    2015-03-01

    Monumental tombs within ancient civilizations worldwide hold precious clues for deciphering the architectural skill, acumen, and industry of prehistoric cultures. Most tombs were constructed from abiotic materials-stone, soil, and/or clay, predominately-and were built to permanently inter royalty or high-status individuals. On the island of Kosrae in the central Pacific, monumental tombs were constructed with scleractinian coral and were confined to the prehistoric island capital of Leluh, where they served as temporary mortuary processing points. Like other prehistoric tombs, the Leluh tombs were dated by association-from the remnants of the temporarily interred. We present new dates for three sacred tombs using high-precision U-Th dates from 24 corals collected directly from the structural materials. The results suggest that the tombs were built about 700 years ago during the 14th century, about three centuries earlier than previously reported. The new dates redefine the peak occupation of Leluh and place its ruling paramountcy at the leading edge of the developing trans-oceanic political hierarchies, as well as the social and economic systems that dominated the civilizations in this part of the world.

  18. Music As a Sacred Cue? Effects of Religious Music on Moral Behavior.

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    Lang, Martin; Mitkidis, Panagiotis; Kundt, Radek; Nichols, Aaron; Krajčíková, Lenka; Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Religion can have an important influence in moral decision-making, and religious reminders may deter people from unethical behavior. Previous research indicated that religious contexts may increase prosocial behavior and reduce cheating. However, the perceptual-behavioral link between religious contexts and decision-making lacks thorough scientific understanding. This study adds to the current literature by testing the effects of purely audial religious symbols (instrumental music) on moral behavior across three different sites: Mauritius, the Czech Republic, and the USA. Participants were exposed to one of three kinds of auditory stimuli (religious, secular, or white noise), and subsequently were given a chance to dishonestly report on solved mathematical equations in order to increase their monetary reward. The results showed cross-cultural differences in the effects of religious music on moral behavior, as well as a significant interaction between condition and religiosity across all sites, suggesting that religious participants were more influenced by the auditory religious stimuli than non-religious participants. We propose that religious music can function as a subtle cue associated with moral standards via cultural socialization and ritual participation. Such associative learning can charge music with specific meanings and create sacred cues that influence normative behavior. Our findings provide preliminary support for this view, which we hope further research will investigate more closely.

  19. WATCH Scrubs: a video observational study of workplace-based learning at Sacred Heart Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Eliot L; Sinha, Yashashwi; Davies, Benjamin; J Quinn, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Workplace-based learning remains the cornerstone of clinical training. Teaching in the clinical environment promotes active engagement as trainees are required to combine their competencies (e.g. skills in history taking, examination and clinical reasoning) to determine an appropriate course of action. High-quality clinical teaching supports and scaffolds trainees' learning in clinical workplaces. This study aimed to explore the quality of clinical teaching at a large teaching hospital. A retrospective video observational study of 9 years of workplace-based learning at Sacred Heart Hospital, a large private teaching hospital, was conducted. Each academic year was observed by one researcher. Clinical teaching encounters were identified and analysed using the Warwick Assessment insTrument for Clinical teacHing (WATCH). Descriptive observation notes were recorded and analysed thematically. A total of 131 teaching encounters provided by 12 tutors were identified. The 15-item instrument demonstrated a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. The hidden curriculum, role modelling and reflection played prominent roles in trainees' personal and professional development. Trainees' learning in clinical workplaces extends beyond the formal teaching they receive to include the development of professional behaviours through role modelling and reflection on clinical encounters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  20. The Effects of Sacred Value Networks Within an Evolutionary, Adversarial Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, Scott G.; Short, Martin B.; Brantingham, P. Jeffrey

    2013-05-01

    The effects of personal relationships and shared ideologies on levels of crime and the formation of criminal coalitions are studied within the context of an adversarial, evolutionary game first introduced in Short et al. (Phys. Rev. E 82:066114, 2010). Here, we interpret these relationships as connections on a graph of N players. These connections are then used in a variety of ways to define each player's "sacred value network"—groups of individuals that are subject to special consideration or treatment by that player. We explore the effects on the dynamics of the system that these networks introduce, through various forms of protection from both victimization and punishment. Under local protection, these networks introduce a new fixed point within the game dynamics, which we find through a continuum approximation of the discrete game. Under more complicated, extended protection, we numerically observe the emergence of criminal coalitions, or "gangs". We also find that a high-crime steady state is much more frequent in the context of extended protection networks, in both the case of Erdős-Rényi and small world random graphs.

  1. Medico-historical study of "aśvattha" (sacred fig tree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, P V V; Subhaktha, P K J P; Narayana, Ala; Rao, M Mruthyumjaya

    2006-01-01

    Aśvattha (Ficus religiosa Linn.) is a tree which has got mythological, religious and medicinal importance in Indian culture since ancient times. As per Vedic Index Aśvattha means horse stand, a place or site or an object where or under which horses stand. Aśvattha is also known as Pipal and Bodhidrma. This tree is the oldest depicted tree in India. In Vedic times it was used to make fire by friction and considered sacred. Atharvavĕda associates it with the third heaven. It discusses medicinal properties of Aśvattha along with Soma and Kuştha. Aśvattha is associated with the triad of Gods-Brahma, vişņu and siva. Reference to Aśvattha is found in Rămăyaņa, Mahăbhărata, Bhagavadgĭta, Buddhistic literature, Arthaśăstra, Purănăs, Upanişads etc. non-medical literature also. According to Ayurvĕda it has several synonyms. Most of them symbolize its sacredness. Aśvattha is useful in various ailments like consumption, vomiting, ulcers in oral cavity, burns, gynaecological problems etc. Thus its medico-historical importance, regional nomenclature, morphological features in brief etc. are being presented in this article with few illustrations.

  2. Maria Giulia Dondero, Le sacré dans l’image photographique.

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    Jean Fisette

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

     

    Maria Giulia Dondero, Le sacré dans l’image photographique. Études sémiotiques, Paris, 2009, Lavoisier, («Formes et sciences», 234p.

    ISBN-13:

     

     

    978-2746224537

  3. Politics, religion and space. About places of mediation and sacred space among the Gurage of Ethiopia

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    PALMISANO, Antonio Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main faiths among the Gurage of Ethiopia – Orthodox Christianity, Islam and autochthonous polytheism – provide a constellation of integrative principles for territorial and descent segmentation. Religious leaders and ritual specialists of the three confessions have always represented the unity of Gurage tribes facing the outside world and still receive tributes of cattle, sheep, goats, honey, ensete, money etc. The ethnic court of justice of the Gurage, the yejoka, has re-dimensioned its office, in order to prevent the rise of central instances within the process of political mediation between juxtaposed lineages and territorial segments. The article focuses on the identification and institutionalisation of sacred places among these tribes, the places where the personae, the lineages and residential groups interact within the self-representation processes of Gurage society. The theological and liturgical pluralism, practised by the three faiths, confirms the Gurage’s capacity to answer to the many and contradictory stimuli of modern society, of market economy, of political, administrative and territorial transformation which takes place in the world. This religious plurality in a single family, in a single person, unveils religion as an answer, or rather as a structure of satisfactory answers.

  4. Symbolic structure in the architecture of the temple – introduction into theology of the sacred art

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    Jerzy Uścinowicz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Symbol has always been an intrinsic part of a person. The human being – homo religiosus – is by nature also a homo symbolicus, who thinks and feels symbolically, who lives symbolically. In the domain of sacrum, in the temple, life is realized through holy symbols.In the past, this was directly reflected in the architecture and in the art of all religions. They have their special compensation in the temple and vice versa; the temple is a concrete manifestation of the function of a symbol. Thanks to them, art could manifest itself, could naturally pass from the level of aesthetics to the level of religion. Nowadays we face a kind of crisis of symbol in the sphere of art, certain reluctance towards symbols. The language of symbols seems to be dying out.Two thousand years of history of Christianity proved that a main criterion of a value of church architecture was not based on architectural precursors. This architecture was sacred because it was a carrier of a „truth of God” and – like a liturgical mysterion and iconography art – it was a theological comment. It was a codified language of the transposes of religions essences and orders, into the form of architectural expression. This was in a East Christianity and this happens there up to this day.One of the proofs to confirmate this thesis is an example of dome. It has been in existence since the beginning of forming the traditional architecture structure of the orthodox temple; it manifested symbolical and archetype essence – as an interior space and as an exterior form. In the history of architecture as well as the history of religion it had precisely defined symbolic meanings. They designated its significance in the temple, they gave rise to its long duration in the history, and eventually they gave it a status of an essential element, an everlasting witness of Divine mystery”. Presentation of this essence and orders constructs indispensable context to a value of the

  5. Integrating Sacred Knowledge for Conservation: Cultures and Landscapes in Southwest China

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    Jianchu Xu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available China is undergoing economic growth and expansion to a free market economy at a scale and pace that are unprecedented in human history. This is placing great pressure on the country's environment and cultural diversity. This paper examines a number of case histories in China, focusing on the culturally varied and ecologically diverse southwest region of the country. We show how developments in recent Chinese history have devalued and in some cases eliminated indigenous knowledge and practices in the quest to strengthen the centralized state. Despite these changes, more than 30 ethnic minorities live in southwest China. For generations these peoples have maintained landscapes through traditional land use and cultural practices. This indigenous knowledge places a high value on protecting forests, landscapes, and water catchments while preserving biodiversity. These values are maintained through religious beliefs, hunting taboos, and the protection of sacred sites. We advocate a conservation policy for China that includes the indigenous knowledge and values needed to maintain the environment and the traditional cultures themselves. There are seminal signs that the government is beginning to support indigenous cultures in China. The Organic Law of 1998 granted villages the legal right to self-government and gave indigenous communities greater responsibility for land and resource use. Traditional and indigenous cultural products have also developed a market and an economic value within a growing tourism industry. In many cases, however, indigenous people remain isolated from major land-use and conservation decisions that are the result of centrally planned policy. Meanwhile, frequent oscillations in forest policy and land tenure insecurity since the 1950s have led to the erosion of many local institutions and the loss of indigenous knowledge. We suggest that the long-term viability of the environment requires an interactive approach that involves

  6. Sacred populations of Cercopithecus sclateri: analysis of apparent population increases from census counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lynne R; Tanimola, Adebowale A; Olubode, Oluseun S

    2014-04-01

    The development of effective conservation and management actions for populations of wild species generally requires monitoring programs that provide reliable estimates of population size over time. Primate researchers have to date given more attention to evaluating techniques for monitoring primates in natural habitats compared to populations that occur in villages or urban areas. We conducted censuses to estimate the abundance and density of two sacred, village-dwelling populations (Lagwa and Akpugoeze) of Sclater's monkey (Cercopithecus sclateri), a threatened species endemic to southeastern Nigeria, and compared these data to previous census results. We recorded population increases in both sites: a 66% increase over 4½ years in Lagwa (from 124 to 206 individuals) at an annual rate of 10.2%, and a 29% increase over 4 years in Akpugoeze (from 193 to 249 individuals) at an annual rate of 5.7%. Mean group size also increased in both sites. Density in Lagwa was 24.2 individuals/km(2) , and density in a core survey area of Akpugoeze was 36-38 individuals/km(2) . Our results may have been affected by monkey ranging and grouping patterns and improved detectability due to our revised census technique, which included secondary observers. With further work on methodology for censusing populations that occur in human-settled environments, techniques can be refined and customized to individual sites for more accurate estimates. Our investigation of Sclater's monkey in Lagwa and Akpugoeze, two sites critical for conservation of the species, indicated that both of these populations have increased, and neither faces immediate risk of extirpation. Such population growth, while encouraging, will likely exacerbate human-monkey conflict and thus should be understood in terms of potential socioeconomic impacts.

  7. A sacred command of reason? Deceit, deception, and dishonesty in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Kant (Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals. Hackett, Indianapolis, 1797) described honesty as 'a sacred command of reason' which should be obeyed at all times and at any cost. This study inquires into the practice of dishonesty, deception, and deceit by universities in the UK in the pursuit of quality indicators such as league table positions, Research Excellence Framework (REF) scores, and student satisfaction survey results. Deception occurs when the metrics which inform these tables and surveys are manipulated to suggest an improvement in quality when, in fact, the raised scores are merely the result of clever strategic planning. Deceit occurs when these manipulated scores are deliberately and knowingly presented as real improvements in research and educational quality. It might be argued that, within the context of the artificial ivory tower world of academe, this is a game played by almost every academic in every higher education institution with no real losers and little wider consequence. However, this study suggests that some of the strategies employed by institutions to improve their scores without directly addressing the issue of quality can, in certain practice-based disciplines such as nursing, result in dire consequences for practitioners and service users. It concludes with a number of suggestions taken from personal experience to resolve the tension between the contractual demands placed on nurse academics by their employers and the moral and practical obligations of their professional body, most notably the use of subversion. The conclusion, contra Kant, is that the most effective strategy against dishonesty and deception is often more dishonesty and deception.

  8. Sacred landscapes, ecclesiastical landscapes: from necropolis to parish in central Iberia

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    Iñaki Martín Viso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The rock dug graves are one of the few archaeological signs of the early medieval rural landscape in the central part of Iberia. This paper studies the evidence of that kind of tombs in a wide region, the central-western Iberian Peninsula, with an special focus in two specific areas, the territories of Ciudad Rodrigo and Sierra de Ávila. The role of the graves as spatial markers in order to enforce the social and economic control over some farming and pasture areas inside the territories of local communities is the most probable hypothesis, according to the results of the research. The tombs have been used by the members of these communities as a reference of the kin-group memory from 7th to 10th century, so they could be explained like a significant fragment of a sacred landscape, although they were placed in areas where there was not any ecclesiastical organization. The implementation of the parish system between 12th and 13th centuries, which was a consequence of the political integration of the Central-Western Iberia into the Christian monarchies (a process described by the traditional Spanish historiography as repoblación broke the previous model of burial practices. The cemeteries were linked to parishes, which were built in new places, and it was imposed by the new ecclesiastical organization. Therefore an ecclesiastical landscape was created, and, as a consequence, a new local identity was shaped. However, the row-organised cemeteries of some central places related to the Leonese repoblación in 10th century were an exception. The Church could use the symbolic capital of these ancient burials to shape the new ecclesiastical landscape. They were the places where some parishes were built during 12th century.

  9. St Maxim the Greek: Some notes on his understanding of the sacred time

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    Neža Zajc

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available St Maxim the Greek: Some notes on his understanding of the sacred time Based on a manuscript by St Maxim the Greek, this article explores his specific under­standing of the relationship between language and biblical tradition. It gives some answers to questions concerning his theology, which are posed by his liturgical experience of the sacred time, which is based not on repeating the excerptions from the patristic authors, but is primarily founded on his accurate reading and in-depth perception of the Holy Bible. Maxim the Greek, who in his personal writings showed a detailed knowledge of both the Old Testament and Sla­vonic biblical texts, was thus not only able to separate the canonical from the non-canonical sacred texts, but also successfully classified the Christian teachings according to ethical value, from the Old Testament prophets to the apostles and the Church Fathers. With his hierarchy he also gave meaning to the ontological-eschatological dimension (three levels – appropriate to the Holy Trinity of their spiritual efforts. His knowledge, which also reflects the precise understanding of dogmatic theological decisions of the first ecumenical church councils, ranks highest the learning that comes directly from the Son of God, which Maxim the Greek experienced through his theological-liturgical prayer practice. Maxim found theologically unambiguous formulations which most profoundly deter­mined the specific nature of his personal theology in the Byzantine hymnography dedicated to the Mother of God. All the mentioned facts lead the author to the further explore his specific Old Church Slavonic language, in which he managed to preserve not only the early Christian mentality but also the theological-liturgical characteristics of the ascetic and later monastic discipline that he learned in the monastery of Vatopedi at the Holy Mount Athos. The article concludes with the proposition that only through detailed study of the personal

  10. A técnica moderna e o retorno do sagrado The modern technique and the return of the Sacred

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    Franz Josef Brüseke

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available A fala do retorno do sagrado aponta, quando pensado de forma fundamental, para uma problemática além do horizonte sociológico. Porque não, então, reler um dos clássicos da literatura sobre o sagrado, o teólogo Rudolf Otto? Porque não tentar decifrar os textos tardios do pensador Heidegger com as suas alusões freqüentes ao sagrado como pista dos deuses desertados? Pois, é curioso que o programa cognitivo das ciências modernas chega, nas suas contribuições mais inovadoras, aos resultados que parecem confrontar- nos (de novo com um mundo estranho, paradoxal e antinómico - características que apresenta Otto como atribuições do numinoso. O que tudo isto tem a ver com a técnica, a sociedade moderna e a sociologia? Disto trata o artigo a Técnica Moderna e o Retorno do Sagrado.The return to the Sacred points to a problem beyound the sociological horizon, if thought in a fundamental way. If so, why not reading one of the classical works concerning this topic, the theologist Rudolf Otto ? Why not trying to decipher the late texts from Heidegger and its frequent allusions to the sacred as a clue to the renegated gods? It is curious that the cognitive programme of modern sciences guide us to some results which seems to confront a strange, paradoxal and antinomical world, with its inovating contribution to this change. These features were presented by Otto. And what does it have to do with technique, modern society and sociology ? This is the topic of the textThe modern Society and the return to the Sacred .

  11. Sacred Practices and Family Processes in a Jewish Context: Shabbat as the Weekly Family Ritual Par Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Loren D; Hatch, Trevan G; Dollahite, David C

    2017-03-19

    The present article provides a deep and more focused look at the utility, meaning, processes, and power involved in a specific, family-level, sacred practice or ritual from Judaism: Shabbat (Sabbath). Content analysis of in-depth interviews with 30 diverse, marriage-based Jewish families living in the United States (N = 77 individuals) yielded three emergent themes: (a) "Shabbat brings us closer together"; (b) How Shabbat brings the family together; and (c) The Power of Blessing the Children. These themes will be discussed respectively, along with related verbatim data from participants' in-depth qualitative interviews. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  12. The Virgin of Luján: sacred source of legitimation of the heroes of the Malvinas War

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    Laura Marina Panizo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The loss of a loved one in war, as in the extraordinary losses in general, produces a break in the usual ways of facing death. In this article we will see how relatives of fallen in the Malvinas War were adapted to these changes in a creative way, reformulating conventional models to understand them, through a framework of interpretation of losses where the Virgin of Luján, sacred source of legitimation of the dead and the bereaved, becomes the instrument through which occurs the communion of all Argentineans, both living and dead, and strengthening the national identity.  

  13. Do sagrado ao lúdico: a festa do asno From the sacred to the playful: the Festum asinorum

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    Francisco Benjamin de Souza Netto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto trata de certas comemorações de caráter profano dentro do espaço sagrado ou litúrgico. Além do carnaval, enfoca-se a Festa do Asno, notadamente a celebrada na cidade de Rouen, que compreendia uma procissão com grande aparato, acompanhada pelo clero e pelo povo.This essay is concerned with certain profane commemorations within the sacred or liturgical space. Besides Carnival, it focuses on the Festum asinorum, particularly the one celebrated in the town of Rouen, which comprised a magnificent procession, congregating the clergy and the people.

  14. Retrieval of Surface Reflectance using SACRS2: a Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of ResourceSat-2 AWiFS data

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    Pandya, M. R.; Pathak, V. N.; Shah, D. B.; Singh, R.. P.

    2014-11-01

    The Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellite series has been providing data since 1988 through various Earth observation missions. Before using IRS data for the quantitative analysis and parameter retrieval, it must be corrected for the atmospheric effects because spectral bands of IRS sensors are contaminated by intervening atmosphere. Standard atmospheric correction model tuned for the IRS sensors was not available for deriving surface reflectance. Looking at this gap area, a study was carried out to develop a physicsbased method, called SACRS2- a Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of Resourcesat-2 (RS2) AWiFS data. SACRS2 is a computationally fast scheme developed for correcting large amount of data acquired by RS2-AWiFS sensor using a detailed radiative transfer model 6SV. The method is based on deriving a set of coefficients which depend on spectral bands of the RS2-AWiFS sensor through thousands of forward signal simulations by 6SV. Once precise coefficients of all the physical processes of atmospheric correction are determined for RS2-AWiFS spectral bands then a complete scheme was developed using these coefficients. Major inputs of the SACRS2 scheme are raw digital numbers recorded by RS2-AWiFS sensor, aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm, columnar water vapour content, ozone content and viewing-geometry. Results showed a good performance of SACRS2 with a maximum relative error in the SACRS2 simulations ranged between approximately 2 to 7 percent with respect to reference 6SV computations. A complete software package containing the SACRS2 model along with user guide and test dataset has been released on the website (www.mosdac.gov.in) for the researchers.

  15. Viable contribution of Tibetan sacred mountains in southwestern China to forest conservation.

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    Shen, Xiaoli; Li, Sheng; Wang, Dajun; Lu, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The Tibetan sacred mountains (TSMs) cover a large area and may represent a landscape-scale conservation opportunity. We compared the conservation value of forests in these mountains with the conservation value of government-established nature reserves and unmanaged open-access areas in Danba County, southwestern China. We used Landsat satellite images to map forest cover and to estimate forest loss in 1974-1989, 1989-1999, and 1999-2013. The TSMs (n = 41) and nature reserves (n = 4) accounted for 21.6% and 29.7% of the county's land area, respectively. Remaining land was open-access areas (i.e., areas without any restrictions on resource use) (56.2%) and farmlands (2.2%). Within the elevation range suitable for forests, forest cover did not differ significantly between nature reserves (58.8%) and open-access areas (58.4%), but was significantly higher in TSMs (65.5%) after controlling for environmental factors such as aspect, slope, and elevation. The TSMs of great cultural importance had higher forest cover, but patrols by monastery staff were not necessarily associated with increased forest cover. The annual deforestation rate in nonsacred areas almost tripled in 1989-1999 (111.4 ha/year) relative to 1974-1989 (40.4 ha/year), whereas the rate in TSMs decreased in the later period (19.7 ha/year vs. 17.2 ha/year). The reduced forest loss in TSMs in 1989-1999 was possibly due to the renaissance of TSM worship and strengthened management by the local Buddhist community since late 1980s. The annual deforestation rate in Danba decreased dramatically to 4.4 ha/year in 1999-2013, which coincided with the implementation of a national ban on logging in 1998. As the only form of protected area across the Tibetan region during much of its history, TSMs have positively contributed to conserving forest at a landscape scale. Conservation of TSM forests largely relied on the strength of local religious institutions. Integrating community-based conservation of TSMs within the

  16. Changes in extreme high-temperature tolerance and activities of antioxidant enzymes of sacred lotus seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, YanFen; Cheng, HongYan; Song, SongQuan

    2008-09-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. 'Tielian') seed is long-lived and extremely tolerant of high temperature. Water content of lotus and maize seeds was 0.103 and 0.129 g H2O [g DW](-1), respectively. Water content, germination percentage and fresh weight of seedlings produced by surviving seeds gradually decreased with increasing treatment time at 100 degrees C. Germination percentage of maize (Zea mays L. 'Huangbaogu') seeds was zero after they were treated at 100 degrees C for 15 min and that of lotus seeds was 13.5% following the treatment at 100 degrees C for 24 h. The time in which 50% of lotus and maize seeds were killed by 100 degrees C was about 14.5 h and 6 min, respectively. With increasing treatment time at 100 degrees C, relative electrolyte leakage of lotus axes increased significantly, and total chlorophyll content of lotus axes markedly decreased. When treatment time at 100 degrees C was less than 12 h, subcellular structure of lotus hypocotyls remained fully intact. When treatment time at 100 degrees C was more than 12 h, plasmolysis gradually occurred, endoplasmic reticulum became unclear, nuclei and nucleoli broke down, most of mitochondria swelled, lipid granules accumulated at the cell periphery, and organelles and plasmolemma collapsed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content of lotus axes and cotyledons decreased during 0 -12 h of the treatment at 100 degrees C and then increased. By contrast, the MDA content of maize embryos and endosperms increased during 5-10 min of the treatment at 100 degrees C and then decreased slightly. For lotus seeds: (1) activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) of axes and cotyledons and of catalase (CAT) of axes increased during the early phase of treatment at 100 degrees C and then decreased; and (2) activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) of axes and cotyledons and of CAT of cotyledons gradually decreased with increasing treatment time at 100 degrees

  17. Changes in extreme high-temperature tolerance and activities of antioxidant enzymes of sacred lotus seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING YanFen; CHENG HongYan; SONG SongQuan

    2008-01-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. 'Tielian') seed is long-lived and extremely tolerant of high temperature. Water content of lotus and maize seeds was 0.103 and 0.129 g H2O [g DW]-1, respectively. Water content, germination percentage and fresh weight of seedlings produced by surviving seeds gradually decreased with increasing treatment time at 100℃. Germination percentage of maize (Zea mays L. 'Huangbaogu') seeds was zero after they were treated at 100℃ for 15 min and that of lotus seeds was 13.5% following the treatment at 100℃ for 24 h. The time in which 50% of lotus and maize seeds were killed by 100℃ was about 14.5 h and 6 min, respectively. With increasing treatment time at 100℃, relative electrolyte leakage of lotus axes increased significantly, and total chlorophyll content of lotus axes markedly decreased. When treatment time at 100℃ was less than 12 h, subcellular structure of lotus hypocotyls remained fully intact. When treatment time at 100℃ was more than 12 h, plasmoly-sis gradually occurred, endoplasmic reticulum became unclear, nuclei and nucleoli broke down, most of mitochondria swelled, lipid granules accumulated at the cell periphery, and organelles and plas-molemma collapsed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content of lotus axes and cotyledons decreased during 0 -12 h of the treatment at 100℃ and then increased. By contrast, the MDA content of maize embryos and endosperms increased during 5-10 min of the treatment at 100℃ and then decreased slightly. For lotus seeds: (1) activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) of axes and cotyledons and of catalase (CAT) of axes increased during the early phase of treatment at 100℃ and then decreased; and (2) activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) of axes and cotyledons and of CAT of cotyledons gradually decreased with increasing treat-ment time at 100℃. For maize seeds: (1) activities of SOD and DHAR of embryos and

  18. Changes in extreme high-temperature tolerance and activities of antioxidant enzymes of sacred lotus seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. ‘Tielian’) seed is long-lived and extremely tolerant of high temperature. Water content of lotus and maize seeds was 0.103 and 0.129 g H2O [g DW] ?1, respectively. Water content, germination percentage and fresh weight of seedlings produced by surviving seeds gradually decreased with increasing treatment time at 100℃. Germination percentage of maize (Zea mays L. ‘Huangbaogu’) seeds was zero after they were treated at 100℃ for 15 min and that of lotus seeds was 13.5% following the treatment at 100℃ for 24 h. The time in which 50% of lotus and maize seeds were killed by 100℃ was about 14.5 h and 6 min, respectively. With increasing treatment time at 100℃, relative electrolyte leakage of lotus axes increased significantly, and total chlorophyll content of lotus axes markedly decreased. When treatment time at 100℃ was less than 12 h, subcellular structure of lotus hypocotyls remained fully intact. When treatment time at 100℃ was more than 12 h, plasmoly-sis gradually occurred, endoplasmic reticulum became unclear, nuclei and nucleoli broke down, most of mitochondria swelled, lipid granules accumulated at the cell periphery, and organelles and plas-molemma collapsed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content of lotus axes and cotyledons decreased during 0-12 h of the treatment at 100℃ and then increased. By contrast, the MDA content of maize embryos and endosperms increased during 5-10 min of the treatment at 100℃ and then decreased slightly. For lotus seeds: (1) activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) of axes and cotyledons and of catalase (CAT) of axes increased during the early phase of treatment at 100℃ and then decreased; and (2) activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) of axes and cotyledons and of CAT of cotyledons gradually decreased with increasing treat-ment time at 100℃. For maize seeds: (1) activities of SOD and DHAR of embryos and

  19. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: seismic risk assessment by acoustic emission and structural numerical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Invernizzi, Stefano; Accornero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named "The Sacred Mountain of Varallo." Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the "Sacred Mountain of Varallo" and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth's crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects.

  20. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: Seismic Risk Assessment by Acoustic Emission and Structural Numerical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Carpinteri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named “The Sacred Mountain of Varallo.” Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the “Sacred Mountain of Varallo” and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth’s crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects.

  1. Role of Temples and Other Holy Places in Plant Conservation of Odisha, India

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    Rajballav MOHANTY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An ethnobotanical survey of plants associated with temple rituals and nurtured in the temple yards or gardens in the Jajpur district of Odisha was been carried out during 2009-11. A total of 84 plant species of both trees, shrubs, herbs or climbers have been collected and identified from different temple premises and adjoining areas. Twelve (12 species are found to be exclusively planted and carefully nurtured for their particular utility. Moreover, some plants are considered sacred and planted as well as worshipped on specific occasions. Those plants are available rarely in wild but protected and saved from extinction being associated with religious places in this district.

  2. Dai Nationality's Sacred Site and Its Biodiversity Protection%傣族圣境及其生物多样性意蕴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎莉; 史永义

    2012-01-01

    傣族作为一个具有悠久历史的民族,拥有丰富的信仰文化。依赖这些信仰文化,傣族建立了依托"竜林"的自然圣境与佛教的人文圣境。以这些圣境为核心,傣族培植了敬畏自然、与自然和谐相处的生态自然观,成为了生物多样性保存完好的基地。%With a long history,Dai Nationality holds a rich belief culture.Relying on the belief culture,Dai Nationality builds sacred natural site of"Long Forest"and sacred site of"Fo Jiao".Rounding the sacred site,Dai Nationality cultivates ecological ideas of which Dai people awe nature and get along with nature;and the Sacred Site becomes the base where biodiversity has been protected very well.

  3. Sacred Architecture as a Narrative for Defining Religion, Culture and Social and Educational Change: A Proposal for a Series of Workshops for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, James J.

    Sacred architecture provides a compelling narrative for explaining the ways religious belief and practice contribute to the construction of self identity and of lived cultural values in all societies. This paper proposes a collaborative and ethnographic research workshop series focused on the intersections among culture, religious meaning and…

  4. Note sur les plantes du Coran en comorien

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Saïd Assoumani

    2012-01-01

    Dans le commentaire et traduction du Coran, que pratiquent traditionnellement les maîtres comoriens, toutes les réalités mentionnées par le texte sacré doivent être rendues dans la langue parlée. Cela oblige à trouver une manière d’exprimer en comorien toutes les plantes du Coran, y compris celles qui sont rares ou inconnues aux Comores. On recourt alors à des emprunts à l’arabe, à des assimilations avec des plantes connues, ou à des périphrases. Il arrive que le nom d’une plante coranique, e...

  5. L’approche de « l’Autre sacré » par les observateurs étrangers : explorateurs, scientifiques et ethnologues à Madagascar (XVIIe siècle - début XXe siècle

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    Delphine Burguet

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Le processus de catégorisation du monde selon un système de vision chrétien a permis de référencer les pratiques observées à Madagascar, celles relevant du domaine du sacré, sous un mode de désignation qui permettait de distinguer le chrétien de l’Autre. Le culte des esprits pratiqué par les populations locales avait été considéré, selon ce processus, comme une manifestation du mal. L’étude de l’évolution de ce système de représentation appartenant à l’observateur montre qu’il a gagné en extension et en péjoration. La disjonction de plus en plus affirmée entre les plantes médicinales et les pratiques dites « superstitieuses » de la part des auteurs occidentaux a produit la généralisation de certaines désignations comme celle de sorcier. Approcher, observer et étudier le domaine du sacré devenaient un travail difficile sur la Grande île selon ce jeu d’altérité cinglant étayé au fil du temps.

  6. Camille Tarot, le symbolique et le sacré. Théories de la religion, (2e recension)

    OpenAIRE

    Flipo, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Camille Tarot balise les concepts de religion, de sacré, de symbolique et de société, voire celui de culture, mais ne propose pas à proprement parler de modèle d'analyse du religieux. L'ordre proposé est scolastique, basé sur la lectio (lecture des thèses), la disputatio (discussion des thèses entre elles) et la determinatio (solution). Un tel ordre est un peu déroutant car il n'est plus guère usité mais il explique d'une part la " longueur inhabituelle " de l'ouvrage,...

  7. Responsibility, God and society: The cry of the Other in the sacred texts as a challenge towards responsible global citizenship

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    Johann-Albrecht Meylahn

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to respond to the question: What role can the sacred texts play in the construction of a Christian identity that is responsible to the Other in a pluralistic global world? The sacred texts of the Judaic-Christian tradition offer not only an understanding of the wholly otherness of God, but also form the basis of our understanding and perception of humanity (anthropology, the world and ourselves (personhood/identity. This understanding is constructed in the context of responding to the call of the wholly Other and the others. Identities are traditionally constructed through the identification and exclusion of differences (otherness, thus leading to an ethic of exclusion and responsibility only to oneself/ourselves. Yet these identity-forming texts harbour a persistent otherness, which challenges these traditional identities by interrupting them with a call to responsibility toward the other. The otherness harboured in these texts takes various forms, namely: The otherness of the ancient world to our world, the otherness of the transcendental Other, and the otherness of the text itself, as there is always a différance that has not yet been heard. These various forms of otherness, of our identity-forming texts, deconstruct our identity constructions, thus calling us to a continuous responsibility towards the other. This call could form the basis of a Christian identity and ethic of global cosmopolitan citizenship that is always responding to the eschatological interruption by the other, who is not yet present or who has not been offered presence.

  8. Inter Comparison of Atmospheric Correction Models - SACRS2, FLAASH and 6SV Using Resourcesat-2 AWiFS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, V. N.; Pandya, M. R.; Shah, D. B.; Trivedi, H. J.; Patel, K. D.; Sridhar, V. N.; Singh, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    Remote sensing measurements from space born sensors are strongly attenuated by the scattering and absorption processes through atmospheric molecules, aerosols and gases (ozone, water vapour, oxygen etc). The process of removing the atmospheric interference from the satellite-level signal is called atmospheric correction. Atmospheric correction can be performed through various methods such as, empirical method, semi-physical method, detailed radiative transfer models. Various methods exist for atmospheric correction of available global sensors such as NOAA-AVHRR, MODIS-Terra/Aqua, MERIS, Landsat-TM/ETM etc. However, there was no method available for atmospheric correction of the IRS data sets. A new physics-based model called Scheme for Atmospheric Correction of ResourceSat-2 AWiFS data (SACRS2) has been developed at Space Applications Centre (SAC) specifically tuned for the RS2-AWiFS sensor. This model has been developed from theoretical signal simulations using the 6SV (The Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum vector version) code. A detail analysis was carried out to perform inter comparison of the results of SACRS2 model with standard atmospheric correction models such as FLAASH (Fast Line-of-sight Atmospheric Analysis of Spectral Hypercube) and 6SV on RS2-AWiFS data. In turn, the performance of all three models was compared to in-situ measurements carried out over an experimental site located in the Kutch desert for seven RS2-AWiFS overpasses. The results showed a fairly good match of reflectance derived by all three correction models with the in-situ measurements.

  9. Statutory Interpretation through the Prism of the Bill of Rights: S v Litako 2014 SACR 431 (SCA

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    Salona Lutchman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available On 16 April 2014, the Supreme Court of Appeal handed down judgment in the matter of S v Litako 2014 2 SACR 431 (SCA ("Litako". The judgment reconsiders the landmark decision of the same court, S v Ndhlovu 2002 2 SACR 325 (SCA ("Ndhlovu" in which the court held that an informal admission made by one accused could be admitted against a co-accused even if the accused in court denies making the statement and the statement itself is therefore considered to be hearsay. The court in Ndhlovu applied section 3 of the Law of Evidence Amendment Act 45 of 1988 and found that the hearsay extra curial admission could be admitted in the interests of justice. In Litako the court found that section 3 did not overrule an existing common law rule, which is that the extra curial statement of an accused (whether an informal admission or a confession cannot be tendered against a co-accused. This is because section 3 does not expressly overrule this common law rule. Rather, the provision itself requests that its application be subject to the common law. The judgment is important for various reasons. Firstly, it is generally in keeping with the existing rule on the cautionary treatment of accomplice evidence. Secondly, the judgment highlights the current confusion in the relationship between statute and common law with regards to informal admissions and confessions. Thirdly, the court employs methods of statutory interpretation to re-examine the principle from Ndhlovu and finds that the court in that case did not apply its mind correctly in disregarding the common law rule. The court undertook a teleological approach to interpretation by infusing the meaning of the words with the spirit, purport and objects of the Bill of Rights and found that the statute had not overruled the common law rule.

  10. Les trois Trésors sacrés et la symbolique impérialeau Japon The three Sacred Treasures and the symbolic structure of the Japanese monarchy. Past and present

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    Éric Seizelet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Le Miroir, le Joyau et l’Épée constituent les trois « Trésors sacrés » de la monarchie japonaise, transmis de génération de souverains en génération de souverains depuis des temps immémoriaux au cours des cérémonies de succession. Le présent article retrace l’histoire complexe et les vicissitudes de ces trois emblèmes de leur apparition dans les mythes fondateurs de la nation jusqu’à nos jours. Il en souligne également la dimension idéologique comme symboles récurrents de la dignité, mais aussi de la légitimité monarchique, ainsi que des vertus attachées au gouvernement du prince. De ces objets, exploités avant la Seconde Guerre mondiale à des fins nationalistes pour exalter la spécificité du Japon en tant que nation élue par les dieux, nul ne connaît vraiment l’apparence réelle. Objets singuliers, car cachés à la vue des mortels, ils sont la marque d’une présence immanente, d’une autorité transcendante qui s’affranchit de toute ostentation.The Mirror, the Jewel and the Sword are identified as the Three Sacred Treasures of the Japanese monarchy, passed, from time immemorial, to successive generations of sovereigns during the enthronement ceremony. This paper retraces the story and vicissitudes of these emblems, since their appearance in the myths of the foundation of the nation until now. It underlines the ideological dimension of these objects, not only as symbols of the dignity of the emperor’s position and expressions of the peculiar legitimacy of the imperial lineage, but also as paragons of moral virtues traditionally attached to the throne. It emphasizes the role, before World War II, played by the imperial regalia in the construction of pre-war nationalism praising Japan as a heavenly chosen nation. It finally stresses the unique characteristic of these objects, which have never been publicly displayed, as receptacles of an invisible, but transcendent authority, that does not need to be

  11. Poetic imagination: a qualitative study on emotion, images, and verses from sacred texts in the praxis of theological reflection in pastoral care and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas St James; Meakes, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    What is the role of emotions, imagination, and images in the praxis of theological reflection in pastoral care and counseling, and what images and/or verses from sacred texts best describe the process of theological reflection? These two questions guided this ethnographic study. Seventy-five practitioners of pastoral care and counseling were interviewed and field notes were also made. Findings include the importance of emotion and imagination with a variety of images and verses from sacred texts. Poetic imagination best describes the process. Discussion involves the implications of the findings with suggestions for teaching, ministry, and areas for future research. Lovers and madmen have such seething brains, Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends The lunatic, the lover, and the poet Are of imagination all compact.... William Shakespeare (1596, [1997]) A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act V, Sc I, 5-9.

  12. Les lieux du sacré dans les Miracula sancti Germani d’Heiric d’Auxerre et les Gesta pontificum Autissiodorensium

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    Dominique Iogna-Prat

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Comment cerner la notion de sacré dans les textes carolingiens que sont les Gestes des évêques d’Auxerre et les Miracles de saint Germain écrits par l’un des maîtres de l’école carolingienne d’Auxerre, Heiric ? Une étude lexicale précise des mots latins employés par les auteurs permet d’approcher au plus près les concepts renvoyant aux lieux du sacré. Ce sujet de maîtrise. suggéré par D. Iogna-Prat et réalisé sous la direction de M. Bourin (université de Paris I-Panthéon Sorbonne, avec l’aid...

  13. THE FORMATION OF READERS IN THE ERA OF ITS “SACREDNESS”: IT WOULD BE THE SACRED THE CAUSE OF FASCINATION WITH CONTEMPORARY BESTSELLERS?

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    Jaime dos Reis Sant'Anna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available What explain the great appreciation by mass literature, as the bestseller Harry Potter or The Twilight Saga? We can use the mass literature to form readers in the school, or we must use only canonical literature? Finally, the more important discussion in this article: the sacred would be an enhancer element to explain the appreciation by these works and how would must the teachers debate this theme with their students?

  14. The Spirituality of the Leader and its influence on Visitor Experience Management at Sacred Sites in the Island of Ireland: Insights and Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Enongene, Vreny; Griffin, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing interest in understanding the sacred site visitor experience management, scholars have predominantly explored the phenomenon from the visitor’s perspective. There is very little exploration from the managerial perspectives, given that decisions regarding the nature of the experience, the product and service delivery strategies aimed at providing a diversity of visitors with rewarding, satisfying and memorable experiences, solely depends on these individuals, whose personal att...

  15. Die Versprachlichung des Sakralen: The Transformation of the Authority of the Sacred into Secular Political Deliberation in Habermas’ Theory of Communicative Action

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    Øjvind Larsen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available bermas claims in connection with his development of the theory of communicative action that the sacred is transformed in a positive way and can take the form of free deliberation in society, the so called Versprachlichung des Sakralen. The thesis is that the authority which could be found in religion and which is of fundamental significance for the integration of pre-modern societies is taken over by modern societies in forms of deliberation. Habermas develops his thesis in a discussion of Durkheim’s religious-sociological considerations. Habermas presents his thesis about the linguistic transformation of the sacred as a harmonious theory of secularization. However, if we follow Weber in his religious-sociological considerations of modernity, we reach a tragic theory of secularization which poses the real problem that modernity’s connection to the sacred has been dissolved. Cornelius Castoriadis’ theory of the imaginary institution and Claude Lefort’s theory of the empty place of the political as a new insecure moral ground for modern society are presented together as an alternative theory of secularization which can serve as a new framework for Habermas’ theory of communicative ethics and deliberative politics in modern society.

  16. L’art sacré entre les deux guerres : aspects de la Première Reconstruction en Picardie

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    Jean-Charles Cappronnier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available La Picardie, qui a été l’une des régions les plus meurtries par la Première Guerre mondiale, a connu une période de Reconstruction particulièrement intéressante dans le domaine de l’art sacré. Issus des travaux des Monuments historiques et de l’Inventaire général du patrimoine culturel, quatre aspects de cette question sont abordés : la modernité des matériaux et des techniques ; le rôle nouveau des architectes et décorateurs ; le décor de quelques églises du canton de Braine (Aisne ; les travaux de l’artiste Gérard Ansart.The region of Picardy in the north of France was one of the most seriously scarred by the First World War. It also witnessed a particularly interesting programme of reconstruction after the war, especially rich in the field of sacred art. This article, based on work carried out by the Historic Monuments administration and the regional Inventory service, examines four aspects of this sacred art: the modernity of the materials and techniques used; the new role of architects and church decorators; the decorations of some churches in the canton of Braine in the Aisne department; and the work of the artist Gérard Ansart.

  17. Sri Dalada Maligawa - 3D-Scanning and Documentation of the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic at Kandy, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahrig, M.; Luib, A.

    2017-08-01

    Sri Dalada Maligawa - the Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic - is one of the most important pilgrim sites in Buddhist culture. It is the main part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Sacred City of Kandy. Since the end of the 17th century the temple has been keeping the sacred tooth of the Buddha. Until now an accurate documentation of the temple with all its rich decorations is missing. The Temple is built in an area vulnerable to environmental factors like earthquakes or monsoon rains and was the target of terrorist attacks. To help preserving this important cultural heritage a research project was carried out. Main part of the project was a 3D-documentation of the entire temple by using Terrestrial-Laser-Scanning (TLS) and the creating of CAD-Plans. In addition to the documentation of the architecture several details were taken in high resolution by Structured-Light-Scanning (SLS). All data will be part of the digital archive of the temple and were used as a base for a general site monitoring, especially to observe cracks. Next to the mere documentation a transfer of knowledge was another aim of the project. In future most of the analysis of the scan data can be done by local specialists.

  18. “Native Skywatchers - Earth Sky Mirroring, Kapemni Pairs - Ojibwe and D(L)akota Sacred Star Sites “

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annette S.; Gawboy, Carl; Rock, Jim; Wilson, William; Tibbetts, Jeff; O'Rourke, Charleen

    2015-08-01

    Late in February, deep in the heart of the northern hemisphere winter, Ojibwe people know to look to the east a few hours after sunset and offer tobacco to Mizhi Bizhiw -Curly Tail, the Great Spirit Cat in the night sky. There are many beautiful and layered teachings about Mizhi Bizhiw - Curly Tail relating to the coming of spring, respect for the water, sugar bush camp, but most important; knowing the stars meant survival.Painted high on the granite rock cliffs above the glacial waters in red ochre is the Mizhi Bizhiw - Curly Tail constellation. Along with the Ojibwe lion are two neighboring seasonal constellations: Mooz (Pegasus) and Biboonkionini -Wintermaker (Orion+). On Lake Hegman in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area located near Ely, Minnesota, a sacred reflection, an earth-sky mirroring is illustrated. It is here that tangible and intangible star knowledge meet.In D(L)akota star knowledge one of the most important teachings is kapemni. Wrapped up in this one word are layers of meaning that can be thought of as ‘As it is above; it is below.’ Imagine two tipis stacked vertically. The top triangle is inverted so that the pair meets at the apex. It is understood that the top realm represents the sky above, the stars or the spirit world. The bottom tipi represents the Earth, the material or the physical world.On Summer Solstice each year the Sun can be found in the Mato Tipila - Bear’s Lodge D(L)akota constellation (Gemini). The day when this astronomical alignment happens is known as the ‘Wacipi - Sundance Ceremony in the Stars’. At this time traditionally D(L)akota people would meet at Mato Tipila Paha - Grey Horn Butte (Devil’s Tower) in northeast Wyoming and participate in the earthly Wacipi - Sun Dance ceremony. This is a beautiful example of a kapemni pair or an earth-sky mirroring.Presented here are just two examples of sacred star sites found in our region: Minnesota, North & South Dakota, US. These are examples of cultural heritage that is

  19. The Martin Buber-Carl Jung disputations: protecting the sacred in the battle for the boundaries of analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, B D

    2001-07-01

    The Martin Buber-C.G. Jung disputations rather than the Freud-Jung split or Samuels's post-Jungian categories is considered the more significant paradigm for understanding the conflicts erupting within the Jungian community surrounding clinical practice and candidate training. Looking through the lens of the Freud-Jung split keeps the conflicts focused on the theoretical and technical differences concerning such concepts as object-relations, transference-countertransference, neutrality, clinical boundaries. The Buber-Jung disputations move the discussion into a different and more foundational arena, namely the vertical and horizontal psychological considerations of the experience of the Sacred and how that dimension is supported or thwarted in clinical practice and candidate training by the respective allegiances of the 'warriors' in the 'Holy Wars'. Experiencing the texture of the Buber-Jung disputations as well as grappling with their content suggests that a more dialogical approach to actual clinical material may be a more fruitful way to understand the work of analysis and the business of candidate training.

  20. Lizard Wears Shades. A Spectacled Sphenomorphus (Squamata: Scincidae), from the Sacred Forests of Mawphlang, Meghalaya, North-east India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta-Roy, Aniruddha; Das, Indraneil; Bauer, Aaron M; Tron, Ronald K Lyngdoh; Karanth, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    A new species of lygosomatine scincid lizard is described from the sacred forests of Mawphlang, in Meghalaya, northeastern India. Sphenomorphus apalpebratus sp. nov. possesses a spectacle or brille, an unusual feature within the Scincidae, and a first for the paraphyletic genus Sphenomorphus. The new species is compared with other members of the genus to which it is here assigned, as well as to members of the lygosomatine genera Lipinia and Scincella from mainland India, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, and southeast Asia, to which it also bears resemblance. The new taxon is diagnosable in exhibiting the following combination of characters: small body size (SVL to 42.0 mm); moveable eyelids absent; auricular opening scaleless, situated in a shallow depression; dorsal scales show a line of demarcation along posterior edge of ventral pes; midbody scale rows 27-28; longitudinal scale rows between parietals and base of tail 62-64; lamellae under toe IV 8-9; supraoculars five; supralabials 5-6; infralabials 4-5; subcaudals 92; and dorsum golden brown, except at dorsal margin of lateral line, which is lighter, with four faintly spotted lines, two along each side of vertebral row of scales, that extend to tail base. The new species differs from its congeners in the lack of moveable eyelids, a character shared with several distantly related scincid genera.

  1. Eimeria galateai sp. n. from the Paradise Kingfisher, and Eimeria duncani sp. n. from the Sacred Kingfisher in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, T

    1977-05-01

    Eimeria galateai sp. n. from the paradise kingfisher (Tanysiptera galatea Gray) and Eimeria duncani sp. n. from the sacred kingfisher (Halcyon sancta Vigors & Horsfield) have been described from Papua New Guinea. Four of 11 paradise kingfishers were infected with E. galateai oocysts, measuring 13 (11-16) X 9 (8-11) micron. The oocysts were ovoid with nipple-like protrusion at one pole. Micropyle and polar granule were absent, while oocyst residuum (5 X 4 micron) was present. Sporocysts, measuring 5 (4-6) X 2 micron, were elongate-ovoid, and had a distinct convex Stieda body; the sporocyst residuum was absent. Two of 9 sacred kingfishers were infected with ovoid-truncated, 22 (19-25) X 16 (12-18) micron oocysts of E. duncani. Polar granule (5 X 2) was present in the oocysts, but there was no micropyle or oocyst residuum. Sporocysts were ovoid, measuring 9 (8-10) X 5 (4-6) micron, with a prominent Stieda body, and granular sporocyst residuum. Eimeria galateai and E. duncani are the first species of this genus to be described from birds of the order Coraciiformes.

  2. 《诗经》祭祀诗的特点探析%An Analysis of Characteristics of Sacred Poems in "The Book of Songs"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何君丽

    2011-01-01

    《诗经》中有不少反映祭祀诗的内容,写的是人神相接、上通天帝,通过赞颂神灵来祈福禳灾。本文从祭祀诗的内容、目的和刻画形象的方法等方面探讨祭祀诗,分析其所反映对象的丰富性和多样性、创作目的的政治性和功利性、描绘神灵形象的抽象性和模糊性等方面的特点。%Many sacred poems in "The Book of Songs" reflects the thinking of god-human communication, and people want to get rid of catastrophe and seek fortune by praising the god. This paper inquires into sacred poems from the perspective of their contents, intention and methods of figuring, and then analyzes their characteristics.

  3. Contestation of ‘the holy places in the Zimbabwean Religious Landscape’: A study of the Johane Masowe Chishanu yeNyenyedzi Church’s sacred places

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Musoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Places that are regarded as holy are highly esteemed in most religious institutions. Such places are revered because they denote the converging points of human beings and the divine. The fundamental questions addressed in this study are: what makes a place holy? Do Christians share sacred places with other religious groups? The study theorises that the Johane Masowe Chishanu yeNyenyedzi Church has forcefully appropriated most of the African indigenous scared places such as hills, shades and dams for all-night prayers and water baptisms. The researcher has selected two indigenous religious shrines; Chivavarira hill and Gonawapotera pool of Chirumhanzu located in the Midlands Province of Zimbabwe. The two shrines are regarded by the indigenes as renowned and sacred. This study analyses and thereto seeks to decode deeper on what makes the Johane Masowe Chishanu yeNyenyedzi Church to enthusiastically appropriate most of the African indigenous shrines and, to some extent, turn them to be their shrines. It is this insight which makes the two shrines to be contested places, especially as perceived from both the indigenes and Christian perspectives. Therefore, this study is a contemporary issue that constitutes the focus of the present concerns. Accordingly, in order to archive the intended goal, this research study relies heavily on participant observation and interviews for data collection, since there is hardly documentation readily available about the Masowe yeNyenyedzi Church in Zimbabwe.

  4. Shrines in Central Italy conserve plant diversity and large trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frascaroli, Fabrizio; Bhagwat, Shonil; Guarino, Riccardo; Chiarucci, Alessandro; Schmid, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Sacred natural sites (SNS) are instances of biocultural landscapes protected for spiritual motives. These sites frequently host important biological values in areas of Asia and Africa, where traditional resource management is still upheld by local communities. In contrast, the biodiversity value of SNS has hardly been quantitatively tested in Western contexts, where customs and traditions have relatively lost importance due to modernization and secularization. To assess whether SNS in Western contexts retain value for biodiversity, we studied plant species composition at 30 SNS in Central Italy and compared them with a paired set of similar but not sacred reference sites. We demonstrate that SNS are important for conserving stands of large trees and habitat heterogeneity across different land-cover types. Further, SNS harbor higher plant species richness and a more valuable plant species pool, and significantly contribute to diversity at the landscape scale. We suggest that these patterns are related not only to pre-existent features, but also to traditional management. Conservation of SNS should take into account these specificities, and their cultural as well as biological values, by supporting the continuation of traditional management practices.

  5. Learning to (Re)member the Things We've Learned to Forget: Endarkened Feminisms, Spirituality, and the Sacred Nature of Research and Teaching. Black Studies and Critical Thinking. Volume 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Cynthia B.

    2012-01-01

    Feminist research has both held and contested experience as a category of epistemological importance, often as a secular notion. However, spirituality and sacred knowing are also fundamental to a Black/endarkened feminist epistemology in teaching and research, given the historical and cultural experiences of African ascendant women worldwide. How…

  6. Is nothing sacred?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    N-sodium-N-chloro-rho-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) effectively controls bacterial gill disease (BGD) in cultured fishes, BGD, a common disease of hatchery-reared salmonids, causes more fish losses than any other disease among these species, This study describes a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is capable of direct, simultaneous analysis of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, rho-toluenesulfonamide (rho-TSA), in water. The procedure involves reversed-phase (C-18) LC analysis with ion suppression, using 0.01 M phosphate buffer at pH 3. The mobile phase is phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (60 + 40) at 1 mL/min. Both chemicals can be detected with a UV spectrophotometer at 229 nm; the method is linear up to 40 mg, chloramine-T or rho-TSA/L. Mean recoveries were 96.4 +/- 6.1% for water samples fortified with 0.03 mg chloramine-T/L and 95.3 +/- 4.6% for water samples fortified with 0.005 mg rho-TSA/L. Limits of detection without sample enrichment for chloramine-T and rho-TSA are 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L, respectively.

  7. Le sacre du printemps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Pumain

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Cybergeo aura six ans en avril : dans la réalité du virtuel, dans l'univers récent et fluctuant de la publication en ligne, cela fait de nous, tout à la fois, des pionniers et des vétérans. De façon plus surprenante, il se trouve que nous sommes aussi uniques : parmi toutes les revues électroniques de sciences sociales, aucune ne combine comme Cybergeo ancienneté, publication exclusivement électronique, liberté d'accès au texte intégral, édition et gestion par des chercheurs, et comité de lec...

  8. Sacred History for a Central Asian TownSaints, Shrines, and Legends of Origin inHistories of Sayrām, 18th-19th Centuries

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    Devin DeWeese

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cet article étudie les mythes historiques concernant Sayrām, une petite ville du sud de l'actuel Kazakhstan, cas exemplaire de concepts indigènes d'identité communautaire en Asie centrale pré-soviétique. Ces traditions sont conservées dans un ensemble de travaux en turc, sous le titre générique de « Histoire de Sayrām », qui combine une « histoire sacrée » de la ville avec une « géographie sacrée » sous la forme d'un catalogue de mausolées locaux ; ces deux composantes situent ainsi Sayrām à la fois dans le temps et dans l'espace, à l'intérieur d'un univers sacré défini en tant qu'islamique. Elles offrent une vision de la participation de cette ville à un cadre historique déterminé par l'hommage sanctificateur du Prophète Muhammad à Sayrām, et une affirmation de la présence continue et de la protection, à travers leurs mausolées, d'une multitude de saints musulmans (comprenant aussi bien des personnages purement locaux que d'autres bien connus dans le folklore islamique. Ces ouvrages, compilés vraisemblablement au XVIIIe siècle et répandus très largement dans la seconde moitié du XIXe siècle, reflètent souvent d'anciennes traditions narratives évocatrices du rôle de Sayrām au début de l'islamisation de l'Asie centrale. Mais elles montrent également l'importance capitale de la définition par la religion des identités locales et régionales, au sein de la population sédentaire d'Asie centrale, avant les changements induits par la conquête russe, l'établissement du pouvoir soviétique et la formulation des nouvelles identités « nationales » qui perdurent aujourd'hui.

  9. Did Secret, Sacred Science: ``Kokopelli/Pamola,'' Motivate the Tarratines' Assassination of the Penobscots' Bashaba ca 1615, and Does ``Orono'' Yield Direct Physics Insights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Italani; de Souza, Beatriz; Pawa Matagamon, Sagamo

    2007-04-01

    ``Tarratine'' may share cognate phonetics with Tatoosh, (Makah, Pacific NE), Tuitan, Totonac, (coastal ``neighbors'' of the Aztec), Teedyuscung/Tatiuskundt, (Penn.), Teotihuacan, Tomtomhegan, (``ME'' ca 1781-2), Titikaka/Titicaca, and Tantaquidgeon, (Conn.); the military action that led to the assassination of the Penobscots' Bashaba has explanatory roots tying it to the last raid involving `Indian' military action of the Revolutionary War. ``Turf'' rights influenced conflict imperatives. Preserved linguistic roots have it best: Ñari Huallac, coupled with Arizona, Allagash, Allahpatah, and Orono/Orinoco, indicate traditionalists' information, by recognizing Kokopelli/Pamola/Pele/electromagnetics/EMF, says how nature behaves. Penobscots and modern Peruvian descendants of the Incas have it right: the concealed ``Serpent God'' of their EMF alter ego(s), says their science, (applied physics) is sacred because it ``predicts'' nature, even tinnitus, via ``Rawandagon''! To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.8

  10. Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED): Protocol for a Prospective Study of Stroke Risk and Hydroxyurea Treatment in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeste, Neelum D; Sánchez, Luisanna M; Urcuyo, Gabriela S; Bergés, Melissa E; Luden, Judy P; Stuber, Susan E; Latham, Teresa S; Mena, Rafael; Nieves, Rosa M; Ware, Russell E

    2017-06-02

    In the Dominican Republic, where the burden of sickle cell anemia (SCA) is high, many children lack access to routine screening and preventative care. Children with SCA are at risk for stroke, an event that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States, screening via transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies children with SCA at highest stroke risk, allowing early intervention with blood transfusions. The need for indefinite transfusions for primary stroke prevention limits their practicality in limited-resource countries. Hydroxyurea has been shown to lower TCD velocities and to prevent conversion from conditional (170 to 199 cm/sec) to abnormal (greater than or equal to 200 cm/sec) velocities. In resource-limited settings, implementation of a TCD screening program, coupled with hydroxyurea therapy, could reduce the burden of SCA and stroke. The aims of the Stroke Avoidance for Children in REpública Dominicana (SACRED) trial are (1) to screen children with SCA for stroke risk using TCD and to determine the prevalence of elevated velocities in a cross-sectional sample; (2) to identify clinical and laboratory correlates of elevated velocities; and (3) to obtain longitudinal data on the natural history of TCD velocities and to measure therapeutic effects of hydroxyurea. This prospective trial, designed and conducted by Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and Hospital Infantil Robert Reid Cabral (HIRRC) with Centro de Obstetricia y Ginecología, includes a baseline cross-sectional epidemiological survey of the distribution of TCD velocities across a large cohort of children with SCA in the Dominican Republic. Children with conditional velocities are eligible to begin protocol-directed hydroxyurea if laboratory criteria are met. The treatment schedule begins with a fixed-dose of approximately 20 mg/kg/day for 6 months, after which it escalates to maximum tolerated dose (MTD). All participants undergo longitudinal annual TCD

  11. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES AND FUTURE PERCEPTIONS OF SACRED PILGRIMAGE SPOT OF CENTRAL GUJARAT, INDIA – A CASE STUDY OF GOMTI WATER TANK

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    Sheju Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hindu pilgrimage sites in India always experience tremendous influxes of pilgrims and they are eventually subjected to considerable environmental impact. This article demonstrates how this sacred wetland has been established, and how since then it has been a religious – urban place which receives thousands of pilgrims daily. The present review is the case study of one of the anthropogenicfreshwater wetland ecosystem of viz. Gomti Pond of Dakor Town, Kheda District of Central Gujarat, India. The pond is one of the esteemed and religious Hindu pilgrimage places, associated with exodus of Lord Krishna and his devotee Bodana. Geographically, the place is a regional province, fringed by mainly three districts viz. Anand, Kheda (Charotar and Ahmedabad, reflected by identical culture, heritage, traditions, rites, and rituals. The present article has been prepared referring to various printed and on-line published literatures, visiting the place several times, and gathering information from the locals by semi-structured questionnaires. Besides, the screening of the entire area was done and a complete scenario was observed. This article delineates how the most sacred town ‘Dakor’ got recognized as a renowned pilgrimage spot, attracting the people from all over the State and the Country for its splendid historical significance, vivid geographical features, natural habitats, prevalent biotic community, variegated human population, and its holistic scenario. Keeping in mind the future challenges and projected perceptions about Gomti Pond, Dakor, many questions are still to be unanswered about how it is losing its natural habitats and biotic components. The information provided in the form of an article undoubtedly offers an insight for better understanding the environmental aspects to be addressed effectively for its better protection, conservation and management

  12. Revisiting plant conservation on wooded shrines by a transversal approach: "Core" vs. "satellite" species and anthropological knowledge in Bwaba land, Burkina Faso

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    Anne Fournier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on plant conservation in sacred groves provide mixed results, with some showing their effectiveness while others do not. We argue that beyond the variety of field cases, studies usually suffer from overrating rare species and insufficient consideration of societal data. The sacred sites of Bondoukuy department in Bwaba cultural area (Burkina Faso were geo-referenced and measured; the most abundant ligneous species were listed and their abundance recorded. Their conservation status and dynamics were assessed based on the core vs. satellite species model of Hanski. Data interpretations relied on the phytogeographical affinities of abundant species and on anthropological knowledge of the Bwaba society. The vast majority of shrines were less than 1 ha, located in or near villages in specific landscape features, and covered with trees. The most abundant species of shrines belonged mostly to local phytochories, but were subject to rather high anthropisation. The results support the concept that wooded shrines preserve local biodiversity, but indicate threats from an invasive alien species. The location and condition of shrines appeared to be constitutive features: the Bwaba system of thought involves a series of sacred sites (with and without trees located in remarkable features of the landscape, and their way of life has resulted in the proximity of these sites to the villages. The beliefs that promote plant cover conservation do so only to a certain extent and regardless of the species content, which raises the concern that alien species may upset the established communities. These beliefs have led the Bwaba to choose the most humid environments in which to set up their wooded shrines, which is interesting from a conservation perspective. The study advocates for a better consideration of social data to identify the key elements of the dynamics of the vegetation of sacred groves.

  13. 岭南近代教堂神圣空间的解读--以广州圣心大教堂和东山堂为例%The Sacred Space of Modern Churches in Lingnan:A Case Study of Shishi Sacred Heart Cathedral & Christian Dongshan Hall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱志越

    2016-01-01

    This essay begins with the case study of modern Lingnan Churches, such as Guangzhou Shishi Sacred Heart Cathedral and Christian Dongshan Hall. It summarizes the method of constructing sacred space, which resulted in different mental experience, and different religious spiritual representations. Architectures of churches also changed in the process of localization from single ecclesiastical purpose to multi-secular functionality. Especially with the development of Protestant Churches, missionary schools, hospitals and various welfare organizations were established to benefit people in the area. The understanding of the concept of the sacred space in churches wil help the discuss the conceptual and the extensive meaning of them as wel as the more profound on this basis. Then comes an analysis of the extensive of this from its angel of secular buildings.%从岭南近代教堂的案例(如广州圣心大教堂,东山堂等教会建筑)出发,先对其神圣空间的营造方法进行归类总结,展现不同的神圣空间对信众带来的不同的心理感受,以及宗教精神的表达方式与表现程度。另外,由于岭南教堂建筑在传入的过程中也有变化,从单一的神圣空间转变为多样化的世俗性功能空间,特别是新教教会的发展,让教会学校,医院和众多福利机构进入岭南人民的生活之中。在此基础上,对这些教堂神圣空间概念的进行更加深入的解读,并探讨其在内心层面和教区世俗建筑的广延意义。

  14. Stealing the sacred: Why “global heritage” discourse is perceived as a frontal attack on local heritage-making in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J.T.M. Evers

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses Malagasy notions of land as heritage through the concept of fomba gasy, known as ‘Malagasy customs’, within the context of foreign land acquisitions for mineral extraction. Fomba gasy is a concept intimately tied to land – as it provides a social, economic, existential, cultural, and ontological web, which ties past, present and future generations. Global or ‘western’ conceptualizations of heritage generally adopt a more static definition of land as their point of departure, wherein biodiversity or clearly demarcated ‘heritage sites’ become objects of frontier conservation. This vision directly conflicts with Malagasy conceptions and ontologies of fomba gasy – a concept inherently anchored in dynamic, material and intangible uses of land. The model of heritage as universal patrimony does not sit easily with beliefs held by local (land-based groups within Madagascar. On the contrary, it challenges a core tenet of Malagasy power and belief: their sovereign right to define fomba gasy and heritage through land, and to harness the powers of the sacred. The contested nature of heritage claims in Madagascar is discussed using a case study concerning a mining/biodiversity protection project where international and local stakeholders are vying for the same land. RésuméCet article analyse la notion des terres malgaches en tant que patrimoine à travers le concept de fomba gasy ('coutumes malgaches', dans le cadre de l'acquisition de terres par des compagnies étrangères pour les extractions de minéraux. Fomba gasy est un concept étroitement lié à la terre car il fournit une toile environnementale, sociale, économique, existentielle, culturelle et ontologique, qui relie les générations passées, présentes et futures. Les conceptualisations globales ou occidentales du patrimoine tendent généralement à adopter une définition plus statique de la terre comme point de départ. Cette vision se heurte n

  15. Mixtec plant nomenclature and classification

    OpenAIRE

    de Avila, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Ñuu Savi (`Sacred Rain's collectivity'), the Mixtec people of southern Mexico, had createdsome of the most complex polities in the continent at the time of European contact. Fivehundred years later, they remain cohesive, culturally distinct communities, as increasingnumbers of individuals and families migrate to northern Mexico and the US for work in theagricultural and service sectors. In 2005, the Mexican Federal Government reported there weremore than 446,000 speakers of Tu'un Savi (`Sacre...

  16. Duncan Tanner Essay Prize Winner 2014. Against the 'Sacred Cow': NHS Opposition and the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine, 1948-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaton, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This essay recovers organized opposition to the National Health Service (NHS) by considering the Fellowship for Freedom in Medicine (FFM), a conservative organization of doctors who challenged the 'Sacred Cow' of nationalized healthcare in the 1950s and 1960s. While there has been little interest in anti-NHS politics because of shortcomings in the institution's historiography, this study suggests ways a new history of the service can be written. Central to that project is taking the broader ideological and emotive quality of the NHS seriously, and appreciating the way, for all sides of the political spectrum, as well as the general public, the service has always been a contested symbol of post-war British identity. This essay argues that two NHS 'crises'--panics over costs, and disillusionment within general practice--were not merely disagreements over budgets and pay-packets but politically charged moments infused with conservative anxieties over Britain's post-war trajectory. The FFM imagined the NHS as an economically dangerous bureaucratic machine that crushed medical independence and risked pushing the country towards dictatorship. Allies within the Conservative Party, private health insurance industry, and free-market 'think-tanks' worked with the FFM to challenge defences of both the service's operation and meaning. To appreciate why the NHS remains 'the closest thing the English have to a religion', one must consider the apostates as well as the faithful.

  17. Daily Activity Patterns and Perch Height Utilization in Pre-Breeding Season by Forest Calotes, Calotes rouxii (Sauria: Agamidae in the Sacred Grove of the Northern Western Ghats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Bajru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although, the Forest Calotes Calotes rouxii is the most common and endemic species of lizard inhabiting the Western Ghats, information on its ecology is remain scarce. In order to better understanding of life history of C. rouxii, we investigated its pre breeding activity patterns and microhabitat utilization in a small sacred grove (~0.65 ha of the northern Western Ghats. Calotes rouxii showed a unimodal activity pattern, peak activity period was observed at late morning (11.00-12.30 h and afternoon (13.00-15.45 h. The activity patterns of lizards involved basking and resting at early morning period. Once they attained optimum body temperature at peak period activities such as moving, social displays and foraging were performed. In late afternoon all activities were decreased and they retreat to their refuge sites. Sex specific microhabitat segregation was detected; males occupied higher perches than females. The males encounter during study period were positively correlated with temperature while negatively correlated with humidity, however females encountered were not correlated with humidity and temperature.

  18. Alkaloid constituents from flower buds and leaves of sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera, Nymphaeaceae) with melanogenesis inhibitory activity in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Tanabe, Genzo; Oda, Yoshimi; Yokota, Nami; Fujimoto, Katsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Sakuma, Rika; Ohta, Tomoe; Ogawa, Keiko; Nishida, Shino; Miki, Hisako; Matsuda, Hisashi; Muraoka, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Methanolic extracts from the flower buds and leaves of sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera, Nymphaeaceae) were found to show inhibitory effects on melanogenesis in theophylline-stimulated murine B16 melanoma 4A5 cells. From the methanolic extracts, a new alkaloid, N-methylasimilobine N-oxide, was isolated together with eleven benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. The absolute stereostructure of the new alkaloid was determined from chemical and physicochemical evidence. Among the constituents isolated, nuciferine, N-methylasimilobine, (-)-lirinidine, and 2-hydroxy-1-methoxy-6a,7-dehydroaporphine showed potent inhibition of melanogenesis. Comparison of the inhibitory activities of synthetic related alkaloids facilitated characterization of the structure-activity relationships of aporphine- and benzylisoquinoline-type alkaloids. In addition, 3-30 μM nuciferine and N-methylasimilobine inhibited the expression of tyrosinase mRNA, 3-30 μM N-methylasimilobine inhibited the expression of TRP-1 mRNA, and 10-30 μM nuciferine inhibited the expression of TRP-2 mRNA.

  19. Is Continuing Contumely Relative to Mc Leod's Vision and ``Secret Sacred Science, (SSS),'': Contagiously Counterproductive in Science, or an Unhealthy Artifact of ``Turf Wars''?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leod, Roger

    2007-04-01

    Mc Leod confirmed, with physics, his models for vision, and for electromagnetic artifacts, by traditional methods, associated with phenomena like tornados, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The latter confirmations are evidently apparent across current ethnology, cultures, linguistics, religion, rituals, exotic astronomy, somewhat concealed evidence of native record-keeping/writing, and iconography. Use of cultural anthropology while observing a modern Peruvian sacred-site-sweeping at Cuzco, coupled with their assertion that Ñari Huallac means ``serpent God,'' plus electromagnet information, reveals that their religious world-view include(s)(d) applied science that is still otherwise unacknowledged. Alexander Thom's precise megalithic site-measurements also imply that ``The Ancients' Serpent'' made/makes precise tracks that convey valuable information. The linguistics of words like Seminole, and unusual visual effects, reveal some traditionalists have done better than most scientists, for vision, and observational physics, and earth science. Tornado and hurricane tracks are predictable, as are some earthquakes. Tornado ``detuning'' or shutdown is electromagnetically possible. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.7

  20. 藏族地区祭祀物的转变及文化意义%The Cultural Significance of the Changing Sacred Items in Tibetan Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜亮

    2012-01-01

    藏族作为一个宗教信仰浓厚的民族,在其宗教发展历史上拥有种类庞杂的祭祀仪式,早期的活人祭祀、牺牲祭祀、后来的模拟祭祀以及演化出的静态祭祀物,每一类祭祀物都隐含着藏民族特有的文化内涵,代表着他们对于自身有限性的认知以及对外在无限性探索的神性诉求。%There is a variety of rituals in the religious history of Tibetans who have a strong faith in the religion. From the early human sacrifice, sacrificial rituals, to the later simulative sacrifice and the static sacred items evolved, each takes a unique cultural connotation of Tibetan people, and repre sents their divine aspirations of the limited self-cognition and the limitless external quest.

  1. Development of novel EST-SSRs from sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn) and their utilization for the genetic diversity analysis of N. nucifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Xia, Qiuju; Quan, Zhiwu; Liu, Honggao; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide a valuable resource for the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite markers. This study identified SSRs within ESTs from Nelumbo nucifera (lotus or sacred lotus), developed markers from them, and assessed the potential of those markers for diversity analysis. Within 2207 ESTs from N. nucifera downloaded from GenBank, 1483 unigenes (303 contigs and 1180 singletons) were identified. After eliminating for redundancy, 125 SSR-containing ESTs were derived, and 71 unique SSRs were detected with an average density of one SSR per 13.04 kb. Dinucleotide repeats were the dominant motif in N. nucifera, whereas the sequences AG/TC/GA/CT, AAG/TTC/GAT/AGA, and AAAGCC were the most frequent of di-, tri-, and hexanucleotide motifs, respectively. The AG/TC (40.85%) and AAG (5.63%) motifs were predominant for the di- and trinucleotide repeats, respectively. Sixty-two SSR-containing ESTs were suitable for primer design. From these sequences, 23 EST-SSR markers were developed and were applied to 39 cultivated varieties of N. nucifera, 10 accessions of wild N. nucifera, and 1 accession of Nelumbo lutea (American lotus). Genetic diversity and genetic relationships were examined by constructing unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average dendrograms and principal coordinates analysis plots based on SSR polymorphisms. Results indicated genetic differentiation between cultivated and wild lotus and between seed lotus cultivars and rhizome lotus cultivars. These EST-SSR markers will be useful for further studies of the evolution and diversity of Nelumbo.

  2. Imagining Exodus for Israel-Palestine: Reading the Secular and the Sacred, Diaspora and Homeland, in Edward Said and David Grossman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hartnell

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes as its starting point Edward Said's distinction between 'religious' and 'secular' modes of cultural affiliation. As these simultaneously diverging and converging modes also trammel the particular grounds of thinking that have been Said's natural target of criticism - Zionism - his work speaks particularly powerfully to the debate surrounding the religious genealogy of Jewish identity. This paper argues that Said's interventions on Zionism highlight as problematic the position whereby the 'Ingathering of the Exiles' is promoted as coexisting with a 'diasporic consciousness' nurtured by Judaism during exile; messianic hopes of religious Jews cannot be reconciled with physical return to the Promised Land; identity circumscribed by ethnicity and place cannot stand in as exemplary for the exiled, unsettled and ultimately homeless identity trumpeted by discourses of the 'post', as many contemporary theorists would have it. And yet through an exploration of the writings of David Grossman, whose construction of Jewish identity is envisaged through the regulating, competing and collaborating tropes of Zionism and Diaspora, I argue that this position is crucial for the elaboration of Israeli identity. I also argue that in fact there is room within Said's thinking both for the anti-essentialist elaboration of 'homeless' identities as well as 'the permission to narrate' an identity politics, and that his own distinction between the 'secular' and the 'religious' begins to disassemble. I explore this blurring of the sacred and the secular through the prism of Exodus - as both concept and narrative. This paper suggests that it is precisely Said's achievement to embody these tensions between religion and its other, divine providence and human agency, historical materialism and postmodernism, alienation and its perennially tempting opposite: home.

  3. Le Sacré Collège en villégiature : le palais d’un cardinal au temps de la papauté avignonnaise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Sournia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Lieu de villégiature cardinalice au temps de la papauté avignonnaise, Villeneuve-lès-Avignon conserve quelques vestiges des palais de plusieurs membres du Sacré Collège. Le palais de Thurroye est l'un d'eux, successivement habité par Bertrand de Deaux, Guy de Boulogne et Pierre de Thury, aujourd'hui très morcelé et profondément bouleversé. Le présent article propose une restitution de cette résidence à la lumière de descriptions anciennes d'autres palais semblables de la banlieue avignonnaise, à la lumière notamment de la relation toscane d'une fête donnée dans l'un des palais en 1353 en présence de Clément VI. L'analyse fait apparaître le schéma type de ces demeures avec leur cour et leur portique, leur distribution à double grand-salle etc.During the Avignon papacy, Villeneuve-lès-Avignon was a place of summer retreat for the cardinals. Today, the town still has some vestiges of the palaces of several members of the Holy College. The Thurroye palace is one of these, successively occupied by Bertrand de Deaux, Guy de Boulogne and Pierre de Thury. It is now considerably altered. The present article proposes a restitution of the residence, based on old descriptions of similar palaces in the region of Avignon and, in particular, on the Tuscan account of a fete given at one of these palaces in 1353, in the presence of Pope Clément VI. The analysis depicts a typical layout for these residences with a courtyard and a gateway and their interior distribution with two large chambers.

  4. Sacred Music in Castille in the late Middle Ages: Documentation on Choirmasters, Singers, Organs and Organists of the Santa María la Mayor Cathedral in Cuenca (1195-1496

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis de la Fuente Charfolé

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the guidelines that outline the musical activity in the Cathedral of Santa Maria la Mayor in Cuenca, Spain and its implication on the overall development of the Hispanic sacred and polyphonic music of the Late Middle Ages. After a thorough consultation process an archival package has been obtained. Not only are these data unknown under a musicological point of view, but also are these relevant to an intense and important activity that has mainly been observed from Juan Cabeza de Vaca´s Episcopate.

  5. Epiphytic and endophytic bacteria that promote growth of ethnomedicinal plants in the subtropical forests of Meghalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongkhlaw, Fenella Mary War; Joshi, S R

    2014-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the endophytic and epiphytic bacteria associated with selected ethnomedicinal plants from the pristine subtropical forests of Meghalaya and analyse them for plant growth promotion and antagonistic ability. This study is an attempt to explore plant associated bacteria which are beneficial to host plants, and thus aid in the conservation of ethnomedicinal plants of the studied subtropical forests, which are dwindling due to exploitation. The plant growth promotion parameters like indole acetic acid (IAA) production, mineral phosphate solubilisation, acid phosphatase activity, presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (ACC) gene, nitrogen fixation, cellulose digestion, chitin and pectin degrada- tion were screened among the isolates. The study revealed significant differences in bacterial population not only between the epiphytic and endophytic microhabitats, but also amongst the host plants. Out of the 70 isolated plant associated bacteria, Bacillus sp., Serratia sp., Pseudomonas sp., Pantoea sp., and Lysinibacillus sp. showed potent plant growth promotion properties. Bacillus siamensis C53 and B. subtilis cenB showed significant antagonistic activity against the tested pathogens. This study indicated the isolates inhabiting the plants prevalent in the subtropical sacred forests could be explored for use as plant growth promoters while practising the cultiva- tion and conservation of ethnomedicinal plants.

  6. Sacred communities: contestations and connections

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Abby; Rogaly, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses a project whose purpose was to review existing qualitative and quantitative data from two separate studies to provide new insights about everyday religion and belonging. Researchers engaged in knowledge exchange and dialogue with new and former research participants, with other researchers involved in similar research, and with wider academic networks beyond the core disciplines represented here, principally anthropology and geography. Key concluding themes related to t...

  7. 西双版纳民族自然圣境与区域性生物多样性保护%Sacred Natural Site and Regional Biodiversity Conservation in Xishuangbanna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兰新; 杨正斌; 赵建伟; 刀桐杰; 郭贤明

    2014-01-01

    西双版纳是一个多民族聚居的地区,各民族均有自己传统的保护生物多样性的方式,而龙山、坟山、寺庙林等自然圣境是其主要代表形式。随着人口增长及经济发展的影响下,民族传统文化意识逐渐淡化,自然圣境的数量与面积发生了一定的变化,淡化了自然圣境在生物多样性保护中的地位,但是这些圣境在西双版纳的生物多样性保护中仍然起到了积极的作用,尤其是在物种保护、物种基因交流等方面的作用更是明显。%Xishuangbanna is a multinational region and different ethnic groups have self-owned traditional ways of protecting biodiversity, represented by Dragon Moun-tain and Hil Cemetery, and Temple Forest. As population increases and economy develops, people’s consciousness of traditional culture is fading and both of the number and area of sacred natural sites underwent changes, undermining the role of sacred natural sites playing in biodiversity protection, especial y for species pro-tection and gene exchange.

  8. Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  9. Aquatic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between...... terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water....

  10. Manufacturing Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Sunshine, air and soil are indispensable for green plants. This might be axi-omatic but not in a plant factory. By creating a plant factory, scientists are trying to grow plants where natural elements are deficient or absent, such as deserts,islands, water surfaces, South and North poles and space, as well as in human habi-tats such as skyscrapers in modern cities.

  11. Manufacturing Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    China starts to produce vegetables and fruits in a factory sunshine,air and soil are indispensable for green plants. This might be axiomatic but not in a plant factory. By creating a plant factory,scientists are trying to grow plants where natural elements are deficient or absent,such as deserts, islands,water surfaces,South and North poles and space,as well as in human habitats such as skyscrapers in modern cities.

  12. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  13. Sur les ruines sacrées de l’image. L’occupation des sols de Jean Echenoz. Nel museo di Reims de Daniele del Giudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Thimonnier

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Dans L’occupation des sols de Jean Echenoz et Nel museo di Reims de Daniele Del Giudice, deux courts récits publiés en 1988, l’image est élevée au rang d’objet sacré, alors même que le récit met en scène sa disparition dramatique, comme si le pouvoir de l’image rendait nécessaire sa destruction, pour que les personnages prennent vie et que le récit puisse s’écrire. La mise à distance de l’image, dont le texte préserve pourtant la force irréductible, permet l’apprentissage d’un au-delà de l’image, rééquilibrant visible et invisible, et réinscrivant l’image dans une temporalité.In L’occupation des sols by Jean Echenoz and Nel Museo de Reims by Daniele del Giudice, two short texts published in 1998, image is promoted to the rank of a sacred object, while the story depicts its dramatic disappearance, as if the power of image made its destruction all but more necessary for the characters to become alive and the tale to be written. The foregrounding of images whose inner force the text seeks to preserve permits a new knowledge of a space beyond the image, in which the visible and the invisible come into balance and the image can be inscribed in time.En L’occupation des sols de Jean Echenoz y Nel museo di Reims de Daniele Del Giudice, dos relatos cortos publicados en 1988, la imagen se vuelve un objeto sagrado en el preciso instante en que se relata su desaparición dramática, como si el poder de la imagen dependiera de su necesaria destrucción, para que los personajes tomen vida y el relato pueda escribirse. La distancia que impone la imagen permite el aprendizaje de un “más allá de la imagen”, al inscribirla el texto en una temporalidad, permitiendo un reequilibrio entre lo visible y lo invisible sin que se reduzca por lo tanto la fuerza de la imagen.

  14. Autoluminescent plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krichevsky

    Full Text Available Prospects of obtaining plants glowing in the dark have captivated the imagination of scientists and layman alike. While light emission has been developed into a useful marker of gene expression, bioluminescence in plants remained dependent on externally supplied substrate. Evolutionary conservation of the prokaryotic gene expression machinery enabled expression of the six genes of the lux operon in chloroplasts yielding plants that are capable of autonomous light emission. This work demonstrates that complex metabolic pathways of prokaryotes can be reconstructed and function in plant chloroplasts and that transplastomic plants can emit light that is visible by naked eye.

  15. Plant volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-05-11

    Plant volatiles are the metabolites that plants release into the air. The quantities released are not trivial. Almost one-fifth of the atmospheric CO2 fixed by land plants is released back into the air each day as volatiles. Plants are champion synthetic chemists; they take advantage of their anabolic prowess to produce volatiles, which they use to protect themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses and to provide information - and potentially disinformation - to mutualists and competitors alike. As transferors of information, volatiles have provided plants with solutions to the challenges associated with being rooted in the ground and immobile.

  16. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  17. Imagen y discurso de la representación religiosa del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús / Image and discourse of the representation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Díaz Patiño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta la historia de la devoción e imagen del Sagrado Corazón de Jesús, desde los primeros indicios de su construcción como imagen devocional hasta la consagración de toda la humanidad a dicha devoción en el año de 1899. El propósito de este recorrido histórico es entender la evolución de los sentidos religiosos otorgados a una imagen devocional a lo largo del tiempo desde la óptica institucional; entender las sutilezas de esas transformaciones a lo largo de espacios de larga duración, así como las innovaciones que en el campo espiritual encuentra la institución eclesiástica para reestructurar los usos y funciones de las imágenes devocionales./ The article presents the history of the cult and image of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, from the first signs of its construction as a devotional image until the consecration of all humanity to the devotion in 1899. The purpose of this historical survey is to understand the evolution of religious meanings given to a devotional image over time from the institutional perspective, to understand the subtleties of these changes over long-term spaces, as well as the innovations that in the spiritual realm the ecclesiastic institution finds to restructure the uses and functions of devotional images.

  18. Al-qarāfa, la Città dei Morti del Cairo. Il circuito delle sette tombe sacre - Al-Qarāfa: the pilgrimage to the holy seven tombs in Cairene Muslim cemetery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tozzi Di Marco

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of al-Qarāfa, the Muslim inhabitated cemetery in Cairo is the devotion to seven ancient sacred tombs and its relative pilgrimage. The Cairene graveyard was renowned for the local and interregional pilgrimages because of its high concentration of awliyā’s graves (literally friends of God, as holders of baraka, the divine grace. In particular, in the XIII century the famous circuit of the Seven tombs was formalized by the shaykh al- Fārsī who, according to the scholar El Kadi, also called it “pilgrimage of the seven sleepers”. Hence the multitude of Muslim pilgrims who spent the night on the holy spot without taking into account the social code about the separation between sexes. Nowadays some mausoleums of the circuit have disappeared and local people have no memories of them, whereas the most renowned holy men’ tombs are still venerated by a large crowd of devotees, even if the nightly practice of incubation is missing. The author, in considering the scholars’ studies on this issue, explores the current veneration and the contemporary pilgrims’ pattern of habits, comparing it with the Medieval ones.

  19. “The same love, the same faith, the same tears”: ecclesial initiatives about the cult of Our Lady of El Quinche to defend the Republic of the Sacred Heart, Ecuador (1883-1889

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Esteban Vizuete Marcillo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the conflict between church and state in the 19th century, the clergy and laymen tried to defend the establishment where the church had hegemony over the state and society. Between 1883 and 1889, Ecuador experienced some ecclesial initiatives to defend which stood for the idea of a Republic of the Sacred Heart. This article studies the case of Our Lady of El Quiche, a colonial massive cult, which was part of a process of re-appropriation and reinterpretation of its history. It also suffered a process of spreading and strengthening of its cult, linking with the image of the Republic, political conflicts and the power of the church. Between politics and religion, the discourses and practices of the clergy and the faithful show the intention of the church to shore up its own idea of a catholic Republic and an organized society. In this article, the use of manuscripts and printed sources give information to contrast multiple voices and multiple religious acts which performed a new local Mariology about El Quinche and a reaction to a context in which the religious hegemony and the participation of the clergy in politics were questioned; meanwhile the relations inside the church were recomposing.

  20. Kerkhoff v Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development 2011 2 SACR 109 (GNP: Intermediary Appointment Reports and a Child's Right to Privacy Versus the Right of an Accused to Access to Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mildred Bekink

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available General consensus exists that the adversarial nature of the South African criminal procedure with its often aggressive cross-examination of a witness, sometimes by an accused himself, will in most cases expose a child to undue mental stress or suffering when having to testify in court. In confirmation of this fact and with a notion to shield child witnesses from the stress or suffering when having to testify in the presence of an accused the function of an intermediary was introduced with the insertion of section 170A into the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977. In terms of section 170A(1 a court may if it appears to such court that it would expose any witness under the biological or mental age of eighteen years to undue mental stress or suffering if he or she testified at such hearing, appoint a competent person as an intermediary in order for the witness to give evidence through that intermediary. Section 170A(1 contemplates that a child complainant will be assessed prior to testifying in court in order to determine whether the services of an intermediary should be used. If the assessment reveals that the services of an intermediary are needed, then the state must arrange for an intermediary to be available at the commencement of the trail. The aforementioned procedure of section 170A(1 was followed in Kerkhoff v Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development 2011 2 SACR 109 (GP and is the subject of this discussion.

  1. Electronic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T.; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  2. Plant Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis W. C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are a huge and diverse group of organisms, ranging from microscopic marine phytoplankton to enormous terrestrial trees epitomized by the giant sequoia: 300 feet tall, living 3000 years, and weighing as much as 3000 tons. For this plant issue of "CBE-Life Sciences Education," the author focuses on a botanical topic that most…

  3. Plant Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dennis W. C.

    2014-01-01

    Plants are a huge and diverse group of organisms, ranging from microscopic marine phytoplankton to enormous terrestrial trees epitomized by the giant sequoia: 300 feet tall, living 3000 years, and weighing as much as 3000 tons. For this plant issue of "CBE-Life Sciences Education," the author focuses on a botanical topic that most…

  4. Plant minichromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchler, James A; Graham, Nathaniel D; Swyers, Nathan C; Cody, Jon P; McCaw, Morgan E

    2016-02-01

    Plant minichromosomes have the potential for stacking multiple traits on a separate entity from the remainder of the genome. Transgenes carried on an independent chromosome would facilitate conferring many new properties to plants and using minichromosomes as genetic tools. The favored method for producing plant minichromosomes is telomere-mediated chromosomal truncation because the epigenetic nature of centromere function prevents using centromere sequences to confer the ability to organize a kinetochore when reintroduced into plant cells. Because haploid induction procedures are not always complete in eliminating one parental genome, chromosomes from the inducer lines are often present in plants that are otherwise haploid. This fact suggests that minichromosomes could be combined with doubled haploid breeding to transfer stacked traits more easily to multiple lines and to use minichromosomes for massive scale genome editing.

  5. Mer partagée, part maudite. La fabrique rituelle d’un horizon maritime : mer et sacré chez les pêcheurs Imrâgen (Mauritanie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Artaud

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available La mer a longtemps été perçue pour la société maure comme un monde en marge, étranger et étrange. Seule exception notable : la relation liant les communautés imrâgen à l’espace maritime. Dans la perception imrâgen de la mer se présentent d’emblée comme enchevêtrés les mondes naturels et surnaturels. Les modalités de leur articulation procèdent toutefois de logiques que seuls distinguent et maîtrisent certains initiés, dépositaires du « secret de la mer ». Quelques familles, issues des groupes maraboutiques Bârikalla et Buhubbayni, ont ainsi réussi à asseoir leur légitimité sur la côte par l’exercice de pouvoirs supposés influencer le cours des phénomènes naturels (vents, intensité des courants, cycle de la lune ou le comportement d’espèces marines (dauphins et tortues, dont ils ont fait leurs principaux émissaires. Quelles sont la nature, l’efficacité et les limites de ce pouvoir sur la mer? Comment inscrit-il le marabout au cœur de l’écologie imrâgen, le sacré au principe de l’équilibre naturel ? C’est à ces questionnements que nous nous proposons d’apporter quelques éléments d’analyse.

  6. Plant Macrofossils

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past vegetation and environmental change derived from plant remains large enough to be seen without a microscope (macrofossils), such as leaves, needles,...

  7. Seed planting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes prairie seed plantings on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  8. T Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Arguably the second most historic building at Hanford is the T Plant.This facility is historic in that it's the oldest remaining nuclear facility in the country that...

  9. TRANSGENIC PLANTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MANAGEMENT OF INSECT PEST RESISTANCE WHILE USING ... Stratégies to delay the development of résistance while using Bt engineered plants are many and would need to be ..... training, pesticide use patterns change, and the.

  10. Presença do sagrado em um momento crítico: internação em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva La presencia del sagrado en un momento yo critico: La internación en una Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Presence of the sacred in a critical moment: internment in an Unit of Intensive Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranildes de Abreu Batista

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Tem-se como propósito compreender o significado dado, pelo paciente, ao objeto sagrado em um momento de internação em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva. Destaca-se formas de expressão do sagrado em um instante crítico no qual o homem em estado de fragilidade físico-emocional, busca respostas transcendentais frente a angústia da doença e do morrer. O sagrado é uma artimanha da religião por meio da qual o homem tende a se refugiar do caos instalado. A presença do objeto sagrado, junto ao paciente, representa um acontecimento de imensurável significado cultural, revelando-se em um vínculo supra-natural do qual exala esperança, segurança, amparo, conforto e, até mesmo, companhia.Se tiene como el propósito entiende el significado dado, para el paciente, al sagrado objeto en un momento de internación en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva. Las posiciones fuera las formas de expresión del sagrado en un momento crítico en que el hombre en el estado de fragilidad físico-emocional, miradas para las respuestas el frente transcendental la angustia de la enfermedad y de teñir. El sagrado es un truco de la religión a través de que el hombre cuida refugio de la toma de los caoses instalados. La presencia del sagrado objeto, cerca del paciente, representa un evento de significado cultural inmensurable, revelándose en un entai supra-natural de que exhala la esperanza, seguridad, la ayuda, el consuelo y, incluso, compañía.It is had as purpose understands the given meaning, for the patient, to the sacred object in a moment of internment in Unit of Intensive Therapy. Stands out forms of expression of the sacred in a critical instant in which the man in state of physical-emotional fragility, looks for answers transcendental front the anguish of the disease and of dying. The sacred is a trick of the religion through which the man tends taking refuge of the installed chaos. The presence of the sacred object, close to the patient, represents an event

  11. O sagrado no romance hispano-americano do século XX (The sacred in the Hispanic-American novel of the 20th century - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n29p279

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Trevisan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho estuda as formas de representação do sagrado no romance hispano-americano do século XX e propõe uma reflexão sobre algumas formas de utilização das mitologias e tradições religiosas pela literatura. A presença das narrativas sagradas no texto literário do século XX surge marcada por uma renovada experiência estética, pois não se trata apenas de utilizar ou reutilizar uma temática exótica, mas, sim, perceber um potencial tradutor de verdades universais, imanentes aos textos religiosos ou mitologias ancestrais. O artigo propõe uma reflexão sobre as particularidades da produção literária europeia e hispano-americana, que utilizam os temas sagrados, a fim de perceber as consonâncias e dissonâncias estéticas e históricas. O fenômeno estético denominado “mitologismo”, estudado por E.M. Mielietinski, pode ser entendido como um modus operandi da estruturação do romance que conjuga literatura e relatos sagrados e, neste estudo, fundamenta a discussão sobre a heterogeneidade cultural dos povos hispânicos expressa em suas representações literárias. Palavras-chave: Romance . Mitologias. Religião. Hispano-América. Abstract This article studies the forms of representation of the sacred in the Hispanic-American novel of the 20th century and proposes a reflection on some ways of using the mythological and religious traditions by literature. The presence of sacred narratives in the literary texts of the 20th century is marked by a renewed aesthetic experience, once it does not only refer to using or re-using an exotic theme, but perceiving a potential translator of universal truths, immanent to religious texts or mythological ancestors. The present proposal offers a reflection on the peculiarities of European and Hispanic-American productions which make use of sacred themes, meaning to understand the aesthetic and historical consonances and dissonances. The aesthetic phenomenon named “mythologism”, studied

  12. Toxic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reproductive performance is the single most important economic animal trait to the livestock industry and is reported to be 5 and 10 times more significant than carcass quality and growth traits respectively. Poisonous plants impact livestock reproductive function in a major way and have been shown...

  13. Corrales de piedra, campos abiertos y pampas de camaruco: Memorias de relacionalidad en la meseta central de Chubut Stone yards, open fields and sacred places: Memories of relatedness in the Chubut´s central plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ramos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La "cuestión indígena" como política de estado en Argentina ha estado acompañada por la elaboración académica de mapas étnicos. Las definiciones hegemónicas de estas entidades han presupuesto generalmente algún elemento "esencial" como, por ejemplo, fenotipos, uso de una lengua, o la aglutinación en torno a linajes consanguíneos. A partir de las reformulaciones de las teorías del parentesco desde el modelo heurístico de las sociedades de casas y las teorías sobre la relacionalidad proponemos una aproximación a la memoria social como marco alternativo de interpretación histórica. Esta contempla las prácticas sociales del parentesco y la objetivación de la continuidad de los grupos de pertenencia en las políticas y lugares de la memoria -corrales de piedra, actividades productivas y pampas de camaruco- en la región de la "meseta" de Chubut. Dichas relaciones con el espacio físico cuestionan tanto las definiciones académicas tradicionales de parentesco y de cacicazgo como las clasificaciones étnicas-nacionales.The "Indigenous issue" as a state policy in Argentina has been accompanied by an academic production of ethnic maps. Hegemonic definitions of these entities used to presume some "essential" elements like the phenotype, the use of language or consanguineous lineage membership. Based on the reformulation of kinship theory, which came from the heuristic model of houses and relatedness theory, we propose an approach to social memory as an alternative framework for historical interpretation. This includes kinship social practices as well as the materialization of group membership's continuity in policies and places of memory -such as stone yards, productive activities, open fields and sacred places- in the Chubut central plateau. Finally, we argue that regarding a physical space, these relations question not only the ethnic-national classifications but also the traditional academic definitions of kinship and chieftaincy.

  14. Audubon Plant Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are an illustrated student reader, "The Story of Plants and Flowers," an adult leaders' guide, and a large wall chart picturing 37 wildflowers and describing 23 major plant families. The student reader presents these main topics: The Plant Kingdom, The Wonderful World of Plants, Plants Without Flowers, Flowering Plants, Plants Make Food…

  15. Plant adaptogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H; Nörr, H; Winterhoff, H

    1994-06-01

    The term adaptogen has not yet been accepted in medicine. This is probably due to the difficulties in discriminating adaptogenic drugs from immunostimulators, anabolic drugs, nootropic drugs, and tonics. There can be not doubt, however, that, at least in animal experiments, there are plant drugs capable of modulating distinct phases of the adaptation syndrome as defined by Seyle. These drugs either reduce stress reactions in the alarm phase or retard / prevent the exhaustion phase and thus provide a certain degree of protection against long-term stress. The small number of drugs the antistress activity of which has been proven or reported includes, among others, the plant drugs Ginseng, Eleutherococcus, Withania, Ocimum, Rhodiola, and Codonopsis. This review summarizes the major findings of pharmacological tests and human studies carried out with these drugs. Currently used assay systems allowing detection of antistress activities are also reported. At present the most likely candidates responsible for the putative antistress activity of plant drugs are special steroids, phenylprogane compounds and lignanes, respectively. Apart from influencing activities of the pituitary-adrenal axis and inducing stress proteins, many adaptogens also possess immunomodulatory and / or anabolic activities. Copyright © 1994 Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  16. Veiled Word(s) – Sacred Silence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    or secret prayer, and divine silence, which are at the very centre of the Byzantine altar. The main focus is to investigate the liminal nature of the Mystery, manifested through concealing-revealing devices, which are thresholds in the liturgical participation of the Byzantine subject. Fear and secrecy...

  17. Hydrographic and Impairment Statistics Database: SACR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Hydrographic and Impairment Statistics (HIS) is a National Park Service (NPS) Water Resources Division (WRD) project established to track certain goals created in...

  18. Veiled Word(s) – Sacred Silence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    or secret prayer, and divine silence, which are at the very centre of the Byzantine altar. The main focus is to investigate the liminal nature of the Mystery, manifested through concealing-revealing devices, which are thresholds in the liturgical participation of the Byzantine subject. Fear and secrecy...

  19. Sacred Heart Hospital, Pontoon Road, Castlebar, Mayo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sorensen, Kristine

    2012-01-25

    Abstract Background Health literacy concerns the knowledge and competences of persons to meet the complex demands of health in modern society. Although its importance is increasingly recognised, there is no consensus about the definition of health literacy or about its conceptual dimensions, which limits the possibilities for measurement and comparison. The aim of the study is to review definitions and models on health literacy to develop an integrated definition and conceptual model capturing the most comprehensive evidence-based dimensions of health literacy. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify definitions and conceptual frameworks of health literacy. A content analysis of the definitions and conceptual frameworks was carried out to identify the central dimensions of health literacy and develop an integrated model. Results The review resulted in 17 definitions of health literacy and 12 conceptual models. Based on the content analysis, an integrative conceptual model was developed containing 12 dimensions referring to the knowledge, motivation and competencies of accessing, understanding, appraising and applying health-related information within the healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion setting, respectively. Conclusions Based upon this review, a model is proposed integrating medical and public health views of health literacy. The model can serve as a basis for developing health literacy enhancing interventions and provide a conceptual basis for the development and validation of measurement tools, capturing the different dimensions of health literacy within the healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion settings.

  20. Inca Royal Estates in the Sacred Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim Malville, J.

    The royal estates lying between Cusco and Machu Picchu illustrate the remarkable variety by which the sun was honored and worshipped in the Inca Empire. The terraced basins of Moray combine the sun at both solstices and, perhaps, the zenith sun, with flowing water and offerings to Pachamama. The complex astronomy at Urubamba involves the palace of Quespiwanka, horizon pillars, solstices, and mountain worship. Ollantaytambo contains horizontal shadow-casting gnomons with a major water shrine.

  1. Sacred Heart Hospital, Golf Link Road, Roscommon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Driscoll, N

    2017-05-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is associated with a significant increase in mortality compared to the general population, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) the leading cause of death. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence and treatment of modifiable CV risk factors and history of CVD in those with RA and those without arthritis in Ireland. Data from the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA), a population-representative cohort study of people in Ireland aged 50 or over, was used. Participants with RA (n=457) were twice as likely to be obese (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.99 to 2.06) compared to those without arthritis (n=4,063). Participants with RA were also more likely to be physically inactive (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.69 to 1.76) and taking antihypertensive medication than those without arthritis. Exercise can have a beneficial impact on CVD and specific interventions to increase physical activity in those with RA may be warranted

  2. The civilized sacred in contemporary China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travagnin, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Recent policies set by the Government renewed the urgency of being civilized (wenming): behavior in public parks needs to be wenming, and also rituals in Buddhist and Daoist temples have to be wenming. The next step has been to encourage citizens to avoid burning incense or visiting temples, and to

  3. Stress tolerant plants

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to transgenic plants and methods for modulating abscisic acid (ABA) perception and signal transduction in plants. The plants find use in increasing yield in plants, particularly under abiotic stress.

  4. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  5. Stress tolerant plants

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, Vicente; Iniesto Sánchez, Elisa; Irigoyen Miguel, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to transgenic plants and methods for modulating abscisic acid (ABA) perception and signal transduction in plants. The plants find use in increasing yield in plants, particularly under abiotic stress.

  6. 非洲裔移民在穗宗教场所地方感特征及其形成机制--基于广州石室圣心大教堂的实证研究%Profile and Determinants of African Immigrants’ Sense of Place in Religious Space:A Case Study of Guangzhou Sacred Heart Cathedral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄嘉玲; 何深静

    2014-01-01

    Under globalization, the geographyof religion has recently attracted much scholarly attention, and become a significant component of cultural geography. Yet, theoretical exploration and systematic empirical work on the role of sacred spaces in facilitating internal and international migrants’ assimilation and adaptation to local society are still lacking, especially in the Chinese context. With the rising global mobility, international immigrants are ubiquitous in a few large Chinese cities. In Guangzhou, an enlarging community of African immigrants is emerging. Their residential areas and daily activities, including religious activities, have shown a clear pattern of spatial concentration. Combined with semi-structured questionnaires and interviews, this study attempts to focus on this under-researched topic by exploring the underlying mechanism and the determinants of African immigrants’ sense of place in religious space in Guangzhou, using theSacred Heart Cathedral as a study area. Emperical evidence shows that African immigrants’ place attachment and place identity tended to develop before place dependence was formed. Although strong place attachment in religion space coexists with strong space substitutability, Sacred Heart Cathedral is irreplaceable to some extent because of its uniquelocation. And since the religious doctrine advocates psychological dependence rather than substance dependence, place dependence tends to be concealed unconsciously, which reveals the different nature of sense of place towards sacred space and secular space. Multivariate linear regression model reveals that social activities and the length of human-place interaction, instead of the length of residence in Guangzhou, are significant determinants for the development of African’s sense of place, because human-place interaction can foster senses of distinctiveness, continuity, self-esteem and self-efficacy. Social conditions also contribute in a significant way because social

  7. Between Thought, Religion, and Contemporaneity: the hyperboles of being and the equivocal communication of the sacred - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p879en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Aguiar de Souza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Between Thought, Religion, and Contemporaneity: the hyperboles of being and the equivocal communication of the sacred (Entre o Pensamento, a Religião e a Contemporaneidade: as hipérboles do ser e a comunicação equívoca do sagrado.AbstractThe contemporary philosophical thought regards itself as postmetaphysical, post-religious, postmodern, and post-philosophical. It advocates for metaphysics without metaphysics, ethics without ethics, and religion without religion. This paper aims at exploring the possibilities of thinking through the place and role of God, religion, and mystique in the philosophical discourse of contemporaneity, having William Desmond’s thought as a reference. According to Desmond’s thought, there’s an intimate, idiotic, porosity in the call to truth. Thought is communication openness for its own originating source.  This means that thought is situated at the knowledge threshold, and it may open up to a reverence attitude in the face of the mystery of being. Through metaphysical metaphors, intermediate names going beyond the univocal determination of metaphysical constructs from the past, Desmond aims at thinking through something which is present amidst finitude, indicating a foremost transcendence going beyond our experience: an upper transcendence essentially asymmetrical to our own transcendence. Such metaphors or hyperboles safeguard the enigma involved in the issue of God and the religious being. This enigma or mystery isn’t something negative, but openness for a fuller and overdetermined agapic origin. Keywords: Metaxology. Religion. Postmodern. Agape. Mystique. Resumo O pensamento filosófico contemporâneo se compreende como pós-metafisico, pós-religioso, pós-moderno e pós-filosófico. Ele advoga uma metafisica sem metafisica, uma ética sem ética e uma religião sem religião. O objetivo deste artigo é explorar as possibilidades de refletir sobre o lugar e o papel de Deus, da religião e da m

  8. Present Situation Investigation of Pollination for Asian Sacred Lotus in Jiangxi Province, Hunan Province and Hubei Province%赣湘鄂三省荷花授粉现状调查报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭凤; 颜志立; 邵有全

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize present situation of Asian sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn) in Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei Provinces, beekeepers who collected lotus pollen and lotus growers were interviewed with following aspects on July 5-11, 2012: ways of beekeeping and managing bees, income of beekeepers and lotus growers, necessity of bee pollination for lotus, meanwhile numbers and species of wild pollinators for lotus among three provinces were investigated. Results indicated that, there were fewer numbers and species of wild pollinators for lotus in three provinces, main wild pollinators were Hymenoptera insects as follows: Xylocopa sinensis Smith, Xylocopa valga Gestaecker, Xylocopa appendiculata Smith, Halictus aerarius Smith, Halictus subopacus Smith and so on, so high yield of lotus seed should be depended on bee pollination, bee pollination was more conducive to beekeepers and lotus growers to obtain higher yields. The best time of bee collecting lotus pollen was 5:00-8:00; temperature and wind-force were the main factors which affect the bee collection lotus. The price fluctuation of lotus pollen was influenced by natural disaster, marketing channel and supply-demand relationship. Beekeepers’age structure presented aging trend.%  为掌握赣湘鄂三省荷花(Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn)授粉现状,2012年7月5—11日在江西、湖南、湖北三省对采收荷花粉蜂农以及当地荷花种植户进行了采访调查,针对蜂农放蜂和蜂群管理方式,蜂农和荷花种植户收益,蜜蜂为荷花授粉的必要性开展调查,同时在三省进行了荷花野生传粉昆虫数量和种类的资源调查。调查表明:三省荷花野生传粉昆虫种类和数量均较匮乏,经鉴定,荷花野生传粉昆虫主要为膜翅目昆虫,包括中华木蜂(Xylocopa sinensis Smith)、紫木蜂(Xylocopa valga Gestaecker)、黄胸木蜂(Xylocopa appendiculata Smith)、铜色隧蜂(Halictus aerarius Smith)、尖肩隧蜂(Halictus subopacus

  9. Plant host finding by parasitic plants: A new perspective on plant to plant communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark C. Mescher; Justin B. Runyon; Consuelo M. De Moraes

    2006-01-01

    Plants release airborne chemicals that can convey ecologically relevant information to other organisms. These plant volatiles are known to mediate a large array of, often complex, interactions between plants and insects. It has been suggested that plant volatiles may have similar importance in mediating interactions among plant species, but there are few well-...

  10. Poinsettia plant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas flower poisoning; Lobster plant poisoning; Painted leaf poisoning ... Leaves, stem, sap of the poinsettia plant ... Poinsettia plant exposure can affect many parts of the body. EYES (IF DIRECT CONTACT OCCURS) Burning Redness STOMACH AND ...

  11. Teaching Plant Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Marvin N., Ed.; Hardy, Garry R., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using Amaryllis hippeastrum to teach young children about plant reproduction. Provides tips for growing these plants, discusses the fast growing rate of the plant, and explains the anatomy. (YDS)

  12. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  13. Plant Growth Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  14. Ethylene insensitive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Joseph R.; Nehring, Ramlah; McGrath, Robert B.

    2007-05-22

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  15. Plant Biology Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    This book contains science projects about seed plants that deal with plant physiology, plant ecology, and plant agriculture. Each of the projects includes a step-by-step experiment followed by suggestions for further investigations. Chapters include: (1) "Bean Seed Imbibition"; (2) "Germination Percentages of Different Types of Seeds"; (3)…

  16. The body and the sacred: the rebirth of the sacred in the speech of the body

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Tavares Martins

    2003-01-01

    Resumo: No mundo contemporâneo, o corpo tem sido tratado sob diferentes perspectivas, que vão desde a redução da totalidade corporal, até a percepção de que o conceito de corpo é complexo e sistêmico. O discurso da corporeidade parece ostentar a preocupação por ver o corpo de forma a superar uma visão reducionista de corpo. Assim, podemos identificar no discurso da corporeidade, um componente que faz entender o corpo para além dos limites impostos pelo mecanicismo, pelas instituições, pela le...

  17. JSTOR Plant Science

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    JSTOR Plant Science is an online environment that brings together content, tools, and people interested in plant science. It provides access to foundational content vital to plant science – plant type specimens, taxonomic structures, scientific literature, and related materials, making them widely accessible to the plant science community as well as to researchers in other fields and to the public. It also provides an easy to use interface with powerful functionality that su...

  18. Plant Research '75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Research is reported on stomatal regulation of the gas exchanges between plant and environment; inhibitory effects in flower formation; plant growth and development through hormones; hormone action; development and nitrogen fixation in algae; primary cell wall glycoprotein ectensin; enzymic mechanisms and control of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis; molecular studies of membrane studies; sensory transduction in plants; regulation of formation of protein complexes and enzymes in higher plant cell and mechanism of sulfur dioxide toxicity in plants. (PCS)

  19. PLANT BIOPRINTING: NOVEL PERSPECTIVE FOR PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhityo WICAKSONO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioprinting is a technical innovation that has revolutionized tissue engineering. Using conventional printer cartridges filled with cells as well as a suitable scaffold, major advances have been made in the biomedical field, and it is now possible to print skin, bones, blood vessels, and even organs. Unlike animal systems, the application of bioprinting in simple plant tissue cells is still in a nascent phase and has yet to be studied. One major advantage of plants is that all living parts are reprogrammable in the form of totipotent cells. Plant bioprinting may improve scientists’understanding of plant shape and morphogenesis, and could serve for the mass production of desired tissues or plants, or even the production of plant-based biomaterial for industrial uses. This perspectives paper explores these possibilities using knowledge on what is known about bioprinting in other biosystems.

  20. Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal Stewart

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or ‘phytosensors’, by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different

  1. "Plantas con madre": plants that teach and guide in the shamanic initiation process in the East-Central Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, X; Clavo, Z M; Jovel, E M; Pardo-de-Santayana, M

    2011-04-12

    We present and discuss a particular group of plants used by a diversity of healers in the initiation process and apprenticeship of traditional medicine, as practiced by Amazonian societies in East-Central Peru. Often, these plants are locally called plantas con madre (plants with a mother), and are thought to guide initiates in the process of seeking sacred knowledge, learning about plant usage, and understanding traditional medicine practices. We illustrate the diversity of plants used in the apprenticeship and practice of traditional medicine, and nurture the discussion to better understand the terminology used by Indigenous healers to describe plant uses and their practices. The study was conducted between 2003 and 2008 with the participation of 29 curanderos (healers; 23 men, 6 women), 3 apprentices and 4 herbalists. The participants belonged to four ethnic groups: 17 Mestizos, 15 Shipibo-Konibo, 1 Ashaninka, and 1 Matsiguenga; a Spanish apprentice and an Italian herbalist were also included in the study. The field data were collected using semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and the witnessing of numerous healing sessions. Oral informed consent was obtained from each participant. We identified 55 plant species belonging to 26 botanical families, which are used in initiation processes and apprenticeships of traditional medicine. This group of plants is administered under strict conditions during training and healing sessions called dietas (shamanic diets), with the supervision of one or more maestros curanderos (master healers). We observed that during the shamanic diets, maestros curanderos administered plants depending on the teachings or tools he/she was passing on, and were based on a particular sequence during the initiation process: (I) purification and cleansing species; (II) sensitivity and intuition; (III) strengthening; and (IV) protection and defence. Traditional healers continue to be a primary source of health care for the majority

  2. O êxtase de Teresas: o sacro e o profano na Literatura e nas Artes (The ecstasy of Teresas: the sacred and the profane in the Literature and in the Arts - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n31p843

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Vieira da Silva do Amparo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No altar da Igreja de Santa Maria della Vittoria (Roma, encontramos a bela escultura de Bernini, denominada “O êxtase de Santa Teresa”. Símbolo da entrega ao gozo espiritual, a escultura do artista italiano representa Santa Teresa de Ávila recebendo do anjo a seta do amor divino, reprodução perfeita do êxtase místico e religioso. Esse trabalho tem como objetivo analisar a ocorrência de Teresas na literatura brasileira, como heroínas divididas entre o sacro e o profano. Propomos o estudo do romance Tereza Batista: cansada de guerra, de Jorge Amado, a partir da intertextualidade com a tradição literária baiana, de Gregório de Matos e Castro Alves, e em contraponto ao pensamento religioso da obra lírica de Santa Teresa de Ávila, em diálogo com a escultura extática da santa, criada por Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Palavras-chaves: Santa Teresa de Ávila. Jorge Amado. Castro Alves. Gregório de Matos. Sagrado. Profano.   Abstract At the altar of the Church of Santa Maria della Vittoria (Rome, is located the Bernini’s sculpture, called "The Ecstasy of St. Teresa." Symbol of surrender to spiritual joy, the sculpture by the Italian artist represents St. Teresa of Avila affected by the arrow of the Angel, perfect reproduction of the religious and mystical ecstasy. This article aims to analyze the occurrence of Teresas in Brazilian literature, as heroines divided between the sacred and the profane. We propose to study of the novel Tereza Batista: cansada de guerra, by Jorge Amado, from the intertextuality with the literary tradition of Bahia, of Gregorio de Mattos and Castro Alves, and in opposition to the religious thought of the lyrical work of St. Teresa de Ávila, in dialogue with the ecstatic sculpture of St. Tereza, by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Keywords: St. Teresa of Ávila. Jorge Amado. Castro Alves. Gregório de Mattos. Sacred. Profane. 

  3. Beginning Plant Biotechnology Laboratories Using Fast Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mike

    This set of 16 laboratory activities is designed to illustrate the life cycle of Brassicae plants from seeds in pots to pods in 40 days. At certain points along the production cycle of the central core of labs, there are related lateral labs to provide additional learning opportunities employing this family of plants, referred to as "fast…

  4. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  5. Classification of cultivated plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Agricultural practice demands principles for classification, starting from the basal entity in cultivated plants: the cultivar. In establishing biosystematic relationships between wild, weedy and cultivated plants, the species concept needs re-examination. Combining of botanic classification, based

  6. Plant tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  7. Plant growth and cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Dorina

    2013-01-01

    There is a variety of methods used for growing plants indoor for laboratory research. In most cases plant research requires germination and growth of plants. Often, people have adapted plant cultivation protocols to the conditions and materials at hand in their own laboratory and growth facilities. Here I will provide a guide for growing some of the most frequently used plant species for research, i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, barley (Hordeum vulgare) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the methods presented can be used for other plant species as well, especially if they are related to the above-mentioned species. The presented methods include growing plants in soil, hydroponics, and in vitro on plates. This guide is intended as a starting point for those who are just beginning to work on any of the above-mentioned plant species. Methods presented are to be taken as suggestive and modification can be made according to the conditions existing in the host laboratory.

  8. Plant tissue culture techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rolf Dieter Illg

    1991-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue culture in a simple fashion refers to techniques which utilize either single plant cells, groups of unorganized cells (callus) or organized tissues or organs put in culture, under controlled sterile conditions.

  9. On Plant Names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Ronald W.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the scientific and common names of numerous plants and the satisfaction children derive from mastering them. Includes drawings which illustrate the connections between plant structures and their names. (MA)

  10. Soil carbon and plant diversity distribution at the farm level in the savannah region of Northern Togo (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-T. Sebastià

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In western Africa, soil organic matter is a source of fertility for food provision and a tool for climate mitigation. In the Savannah region, strong soil degradation linked to an increase in population threatens organic matter conservation and agricultural yield. Soil degradation is also expected to impact biodiversity and, with it, increase the vulnerability of ecosystem goods and services, including the storage of soil organic carbon. Studies of land use, plant species composition and soil fertility were conducted for a conservation project at a demonstration farm in Northern Togo (West Africa, host to various management regimes. Results showed a low organic matter content of the surface soil horizons, often around 0.5%. The highest values were found in a sacred forest within the farm (2.2%. Among crops, rice had the highest soil organic matter, around 1%. In a survey of grasslands, pastures showed the highest organic matter content, with vegetation composition differing from grazed fallows and abandoned grasslands. Plant species richness showed a positive relationship with soil organic matter (R2adj=41.2%, but only by the end of the wet season, when species richness was also highest. Sampling date had a strong effect on vegetation composition. Results showed a strong influence of human activity on soil formation and distribution, and also on plant diversity. The soil characteristics found under the permanent forest suggest a high potential of the soils of the region for improvement of both agricultural yields and as a potential carbon sink relevant to global change policies.

  11. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react to their co......Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  12. Fundaments of plant cybernetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, F

    2001-01-01

    A systemic approach is proposed for analyzing plants' physiological organization and cybernesis. To this end, the plant is inspected as a system, starting from the integration of crown and root systems, and its impact on a number of basic epigenetic events. The approach proves to be axiomatic and facilitates the definition of the principles behind the plant's autonomous control of growth and reproduction.

  13. Plants of the Bayshore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This field guide gives pictures and descriptions of plants that can be found along the San Francisco Bayshore, especially along the Hayward shoreline. The plants are divided into three categories, those of the mud-flat zone, the drier zone, and the levee zone. Eighteen plants are represented in all. The guide is designed to be used alone, with an…

  14. Plant Diseases & Chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Sherm

    2008-01-01

    This course discusses the use of chemicals for plant disease control. Specifically, pesticides that can be used both in commercial or home/yard sitautions. This course also teaches how to determine plant diseases that may have caused a plant to die.

  15. Designing with plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, R.

    2012-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Rainforests are the lungs of the earth and plants can be the lungs of a buildings. Every plant uses CO2, water and light to produce sugars and oxygen; furthermore plants provide shade, take pollutants from th

  16. Plant Systems Biology (editorial)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2003, Plant Physiology published an Arabidopsis special issue devoted to plant systems biology. The intention of Natasha Raikhel and Gloria Coruzzi, the two editors of this first-of-its-kind issue, was ‘‘to help nucleate this new effort within the plant community’’ as they considered that ‘‘...

  17. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  18. Handbook of Plant Virology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, J.A.; Dijkstra, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Handbook of Plant Virology is a comprehensive guide to the terms and expressions commonly used in the study of plant virology, complete with descriptions of plant virus families down to the generic level. Rather than simply listing terms in alphabetical order, this unique book links each term to

  19. Diagnosing plant problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryl A. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosing Christmas tree problems can be a challenge, requiring a basic knowledge of plant culture and physiology, the effect of environmental influences on plant health, and the ability to identify the possible causes of plant problems. Developing a solution or remedy to the problem depends on a proper diagnosis, a process that requires recognition of a problem and...

  20. Iron stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  1. Iron stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Erin L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2002-01-01

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches.

  2. Recognizing plant defense priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Medina, A.; Flors, V.; Heil, M.; Mauch-Mani, B.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Pozo, M.J.; Ton, J.; Van Dam, N.M.; Conrath, U.

    2016-01-01

    Defense priming conditions diverse plant species for the superinduction of defense, often resulting in enhanced pest and disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Here, we propose a guideline that might assist the plant research community in a consistent assessment of defense priming in plant

  3. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive......, and widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant...

  4. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  5. Pharming and transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, David; Sourrouille, Christophe; Gomord, Véronique; Faye, Loïc

    2007-01-01

    Plant represented the essence of pharmacopoeia until the beginning of the 19th century when plant-derived pharmaceuticals were partly supplanted by drugs produced by the industrial methods of chemical synthesis. In the last decades, genetic engineering has offered an alternative to chemical synthesis, using bacteria, yeasts and animal cells as factories for the production of therapeutic proteins. More recently, molecular farming has rapidly pushed towards plants among the major players in recombinant protein production systems. Indeed, therapeutic protein production is safe and extremely cost-effective in plants. Unlike microbial fermentation, plants are capable of carrying out post-translational modifications and, unlike production systems based on mammalian cell cultures, plants are devoid of human infective viruses and prions. Furthermore, a large panel of strategies and new plant expression systems are currently developed to improve the plant-made pharmaceutical's yields and quality. Recent advances in the control of post-translational maturations in transgenic plants will allow them, in the near future, to perform human-like maturations on recombinant proteins and, hence, make plant expression systems suitable alternatives to animal cell factories.

  6. Safe genetically engineered plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  7. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed.

  8. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  9. Conditional sterility in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; McKinney, Elizabeth; Kim, Tehryung

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  10. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants.

  11. Risk-taking plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Nir; Gebremedhin, Alem; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-01-01

    Water scarcity is a critical limitation for agricultural systems. Two different water management strategies have evolved in plants: an isohydric strategy and an anisohydric strategy. Isohydric plants maintain a constant midday leaf water potential (Ψleaf) when water is abundant, as well as under drought conditions, by reducing stomatal conductance as necessary to limit transpiration. Anisohydric plants have more variable Ψleaf and keep their stomata open and photosynthetic rates high for longer periods, even in the presence of decreasing leaf water potential. This risk-taking behavior of anisohydric plants might be beneficial when water is abundant, as well as under moderately stressful conditions. However, under conditions of intense drought, this behavior might endanger the plant. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these two water-usage strategies and their effects on the plant’s ability to tolerate abiotic and biotic stress. The involvement of plant tonoplast AQPs in this process will also be discussed. PMID:22751307

  12. Annual Plant Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , three dimensional structures and functions of each protein in a biological system. In plant science, the number of proteome studies is rapidly expanding after the completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence, and proteome analyses of other important or emerging model systems and crop plants...... are in progress or are being initiated. Proteome analysis in plants is subject to the same obstacles and limitations as in other organisms, but the nature of plant tissues, with their rigid cell walls and complex variety of secondary metabolites, means that extra challenges are involved that may not be faced when...... analysing other organisms. This volume aims to highlight the ways in which proteome analysis has been used to probe the complexities of plant biochemistry and physiology. It is aimed at researchers in plant biochemistry, genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics who wish to gain an up-to-date insight...

  13. Recombinant Cytokines from Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Patrycja Redkiewicz; Anna Góra-Sochacka; Tomas Vaněk; Agnieszka Sirko

    2011-01-01

    Plant-based platforms have been successfully applied for the last two decades for the efficient production of pharmaceutical proteins. The number of commercialized products biomanufactured in plants is, however, rather discouraging. Cytokines are small glycosylated polypeptides used in the treatment of cancer, immune disorders and various other related diseases. Because the clinical use of cytokines is limited by high production costs they are good candidates for plant-made pharmaceuticals. S...

  14. MBS Native Plant Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer contains results of the Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS). It includes polygons representing the highest quality native plant communities...

  15. The Kuroshio power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Falin

    2013-01-01

    By outlining a new design or the Kuroshio power plant, new approaches to turbine design, anchorage system planning, deep sea marine engineering and power plant operations and maintenance are explored and suggested. The impact on the local environment, particularly in the face of natural disasters, is also considered to provide a well rounded introduction to plan and build a 30MW pilot power plant. Following a literature review, the six chapters of this book propose a conceptual design by focusing on the plant's core technologies and establish the separate analysis logics for turbine design and

  16. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  17. Plant Transporter Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) play a critical role for numerous biological processes, by controlling the movements of ions and molecules in and out of cells. In plants, transporters thus function as gatekeepers between the plant and its surrounding environment and between organs......, tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Since plants are highly compartmentalized organisms with complex transportation infrastructures, they consequently have many transporters. However, the vast majority of predicted transporters have not yet been experimentally verified to have transport...... activity. This project contains a review of the implemented methods, which have led to plant transporter identification, and present our progress on creating a high-throughput functional genomics transporter identification platform....

  18. Plant intelligence and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This article applies the phenomenological model of attention to plant monitoring of environmental stimuli and signal perception. Three complementary definitions of attention as selectivity, modulation and perdurance are explained with reference to plant signaling and behaviors, including foraging, ramet placement and abiotic stress communication. Elements of animal and human attentive attitudes are compared with plant attention at the levels of cognitive focus, context and margin. It is argued that the concept of attention holds the potential of becoming a cornerstone of plant intelligence studies.

  19. Plant Transporter Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bo

    Membrane transport proteins (transporters) play a critical role for numerous biological processes, by controlling the movements of ions and molecules in and out of cells. In plants, transporters thus function as gatekeepers between the plant and its surrounding environment and between organs......, tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. Since plants are highly compartmentalized organisms with complex transportation infrastructures, they consequently have many transporters. However, the vast majority of predicted transporters have not yet been experimentally verified to have transport...... activity. This project contains a review of the implemented methods, which have led to plant transporter identification, and present our progress on creating a high-throughput functional genomics transporter identification platform....

  20. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  1. Phyllotactic Patterns on Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Patrick D.; Newell, Alan C.

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate how phyllotaxis (the arrangement of leaves on plants) and the deformation configurations seen on plant surfaces may be understood as the energy-minimizing buckling pattern of a compressed shell (the plant's tunica) on an elastic foundation. The key new idea is that the strain energy is minimized by configurations consisting of special triads of almost periodic deformations. We reproduce a wide spectrum of plant patterns, all with the divergence angles observed in nature, and show how the occurrences of Fibonacci-like sequences and the golden angle are natural consequences.

  2. Oil from plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, M.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of the exhaustion of our supplies of ancient photosynthesis (oil and gas) it is necessary to develop renewable fuels for the future. The most immediate source of renewable fuel is, of course, the annually growing green plants, some of which produce hydrocarbon(s) directly. New plant sources can be selected for this purpose, plants which have high potential for production of chemicals and liquid fuels. Suggestions are made for modification of both the product character and the productivity of the plants. Ultimately, a totally synthetic device will be developed for the conversion of solar quanta into useful chemical form completely independent of the need for arable land.

  3. Plant biotic interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    occurring after infestation by olive fly larvae. The last research article by Niu et al.(2016) describes a growth-promoting rhizobacterium that primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing a host R gene-targeting micro RNA pairs and activating host immune responses. This finding further supports the important roles of plant endogenous small RNAs in plant-pathogen interactions. Hailing Jin, Professor Special Issue Editor UC President’s Chair Director of Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics Graduate Program, Center for Plant Cell Biology, Institute for Integrative Genome Biology, University of California, Riverside, USA doi:10.1111/jipb.12476 ©2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences REFERENCES Alagna F, Kal enbach M, Pompa A, De Marchis F, Rao R, Baldwin IT, Bonaventure G, Baldoni L (2016) Olive fruits infested with olive fly larvae respond with an ethylene burst and the emission of specific volatiles. J Integr Plant Biol 58:413–425 Castiblanco LF, Sundin GW (2016) New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria. J Integr Plant Biol 58:362–372 da GraSca JV, Douhan GW, Halbert SE, Keremane ML, Lee RF, Vidalakis G, Zhao H (2016) Huanglongbing: An overview of a complex pathosystem ravaging the world’s citrus. J Integr Plant Biol 58:373–387 Giovino A, Martinel i F, Saia S (2016) Rhynchophorus ferrugineus attack affects a group of compounds rather than rearranging Phoenix canariensis metabolic pathways. J Integr Plant Biol 58:388–396 Huang J, Yang M, Zhang X (2016) The function of smal RNAs in plant biotic stress response. J Integr Plant Biol 58:312–327 Kaloshian I, Wal ing LL (2016) Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators. J Integr Plant Biol 58:350–361 Mermigka G, Verret F, Kalantidis K (2016) RNA silencing movement in plants. J Integr Plant Biol 58:328–342 Niu D, Xia J, Jiang C, Qi B, Ling X, Lin S, Zhang W, Guo J, Jin H, Zhao H (2016) Bacil us cereus AR156

  4. The Virtue of Temples and Sacred Agreement ---Anthropological Research on the Order of the Village Temple ’s Space in Ma Ping, Guangxi%庙宇之德与神圣的约定--桂中马坪村落庙宇秩序空间的人类学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婉婉

    2014-01-01

    关注庙宇这一神圣空间,对人类学关于多民族聚居村落信仰互动的研究具有特殊的意义。在汉壮族杂居的广西来宾市马坪乡,庙宇是当地极具代表性的关键文化符号,围绕庙宇的实践隐含了一整套空间认知、伦理秩序和行为规范。从以物看人的人类学视角对马坪村落的人与庙宇之间所形成的秩序空间进行分析,文章揭示了作为“物”的庙宇如何被赋予道德属性,及其如何实现村落的立体整合。%There is a special significance in paying attention to the temple as a sacred space on the study of multi-ethnic village faith interaction in anthropological. In Ma Ping, a township which Han and Zhuang nationalities lived mixed inhabitancy in Lai Bin city, Guangxi, the temple is a representative key of cultural symbol. The practice encompassed the temple implied by a set of spatial cognitions, ethical order and code of conduct. From the angle of anthropological, the viewpoint of this article analyzed the orderly space formed by people and the temple of the village, revealed how temples were endowed with moral attribute as a‘thing’, and how it realized the village three-dimensional consolidation.

  5. MRI of intact plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  6. MRI of intact plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  7. Modulating lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  8. Plant vascular development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybel, De Bert; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Helariutta, Yrjö; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-01-01

    Vascular tissues in plants are crucial to provide physical support and to transport water, sugars and hormones and other small signalling molecules throughout the plant. Recent genetic and molecular studies have identified interconnections among some of the major signalling networks that regulate

  9. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  10. NMR, Water and Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.

    1982-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of a non-destructive pulsed proton NMR method mainly to measure water transport in the xylem vessels of plant stems and in some model systems. The results are equally well applicable to liquid flow in other biological objects than plants, e.g. flow of blood and

  11. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...

  12. Slavery in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabiri, S.; Rodenburg, J.; Ast, van A.; Bastiaans, L.

    2017-01-01

    The rain-fed lowland rice weed Rhamphicarpa fistulosa (Rice Vampireweed) is a facultative root parasitic plant. Growth and reproduction of R. fistulosa benefit considerably from parasitism, but how this affects the host plant is not well established. We determined accumulation and partitioning of

  13. Carotenoid metabolism in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are mostly C40 terpenoids, a class of hydrocarbons that participate in various biological processes in plants, such as photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, photoprotection, and development. Carotenoids also serve as precursors for two plant hormones and a diverse set of apocarotenoids. Th...

  14. Overview of plant pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  15. Plant pathogen resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  16. [Neotropical plant morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Blanca; Mendoza, Aniceto

    2002-01-01

    An analysis on plant morphology and the sources that are important to the morphologic interpretations is done. An additional analysis is presented on all published papers in this subject by the Revista de Biología Tropical since its foundation, as well as its contribution to the plant morphology development in the neotropics.

  17. The Plant Cell Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne-Mie C.Emons; Kurt V.Fagerstedt

    2010-01-01

    @@ Multicellular organization and tissue construction has evolved along essentially different lines in plants and animals. Since plants do not run away, but are anchored in the soil, their tissues are more or less firm and stiff. This strength stems from the cell walls, which encase the fragile cytoplasm, and protect it.

  18. Plant development models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuine, I.; Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, I.; Kramer, K.; Hänninen, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we provide a brief overview of plant phenology modeling, focusing on mechanistic phenological models. After a brief history of plant phenology modeling, we present the different models which have been described in the literature so far and highlight the main differences between them,

  19. Plant growth promoting rhizobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Weston, David

    2015-08-11

    The present invention is directed to the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain GM30 deposited under ATCC Accession No. PTA-13340, compositions containing the GM30 strain, and methods of using the GM30 strain to enhance plant growth and/or enhance plant resistance to pathogens.

  20. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  1. Methylome evolution in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidalis, Amaryllis; Živković, Daniel; Wardenaar, René; Roquis, David; Tellier, Aurélien; Johannes, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Despite major progress in dissecting the molecular pathways that control DNA methylation patterns in plants, little is known about the mechanisms that shape plant methylomes over evolutionary time. Drawing on recent intra- and interspecific epigenomic studies, we show that methylome evolution over

  2. Plants without arbuscular mycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    P is second to N as the most limiting element for plant growth. Plants have evolved a number of effective strategies to acquire P and grow in a P-limited environment. Physiological, biochemical, and molecular studies of P-deficiency adaptations that occur in non-mycorrhizal species have provided str...

  3. Plant pathogen resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  4. Plant names and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter updates one of the same title from Edition 12 of Stearn’s Introductory Biology published in 2011. It reviews binomial nomenclature, discusses three codes of plant nomenclature (the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants...

  5. Better Plants Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is a voluntary partnership initiative to drive significant energy efficiency improvement across energy intensive companies and organizations. 157 leading manufacturers and public water and wastewater treatment utilities are partnering with DOE through Better Plants to improve energy efficiency, slash carbon emissions, and cut energy costs.

  6. Power plant chemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    17 contributions covering topies of fossil fuel combustion, flue gas cleaning, power plant materials, corrosion, water/steam cycle chemistry, monitoring and control were presented at the annual meeting devoted to Power Plant Chemical Technology 1996 at Kolding (Denmark) 4-6 September 1996. (EG)

  7. Plant growth promoting rhizobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Weston, David

    2015-08-11

    The present invention is directed to the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain GM30 deposited under ATCC Accession No. PTA-13340, compositions containing the GM30 strain, and methods of using the GM30 strain to enhance plant growth and/or enhance plant resistance to pathogens.

  8. Plant plastid engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Shabir H; Haider, Nadia; Kumar, Hitesh; Singh, N B

    2010-11-01

    Genetic material in plants is distributed into nucleus, plastids and mitochondria. Plastid has a central role of carrying out photosynthesis in plant cells. Plastid transformation is becoming more popular and an alternative to nuclear gene transformation because of various advantages like high protein levels, the feasibility of expressing multiple proteins from polycistronic mRNAs, and gene containment through the lack of pollen transmission. Recently, much progress in plastid engineering has been made. In addition to model plant tobacco, many transplastomic crop plants have been generated which possess higher resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses and molecular pharming. In this mini review, we will discuss the features of the plastid DNA and advantages of plastid transformation. We will also present some examples of transplastomic plants developed so far through plastid engineering, and the various applications of plastid transformation.

  9. Automatic micropropagation of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Clemens; Schwanke, Joerg; Jensch, Peter F.

    1996-12-01

    Micropropagation is a sophisticated technique for the rapid multiplication of plants. It has a great commercial potential due to the speed of propagation, the high plant quality, and the ability to produce disease-free plants. However, micropropagation is usually done by hand which makes the process cost-intensive and tedious for the workers especially because it requires a sterile work-place. Therefore, we have developed a prototype automation system for the micropropagation of a grass species (miscanthus sinensis gigantheus). The objective of this paper is to describe the robotic system in an overview and to discuss the vision system more closely including the implemented morphological operations recognizing the cutting and gripping points of miscanthus plants. Fuzzy controllers are used to adapt the parameters of image operations on-line to each individual plant. Finally, we discuss our experiences with the developed prototype an give a preview of a possible real production line system.

  10. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants.

  11. Cellulose metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahisa; Yoshida, Kouki; Park, Yong Woo; Konishi, Teruko; Baba, Kei'ichi

    2005-01-01

    Many bacterial genomes contain a cellulose synthase operon together with a cellulase gene, indicating that cellulase is required for cellulose biosynthesis. In higher plants, there is evidence that cell growth is enhanced by the overexpression of cellulase and prevented by its suppression. Cellulase overexpression could modify cell walls not only by trimming off the paracrystalline sites of cellulose microfibrils, but also by releasing xyloglucan tethers between the microfibrils. Mutants for membrane-anchored cellulase (Korrigan) also show a typical phenotype of prevention of cellulose biosynthesis in tissues. All plant cellulases belong to family 9, which endohydrolyzes cellulose, but are not strong enough to cause the bulk degradation of cellulose microfibrils in a plant body. It is hypothesized that cellulase participates primarily in repairing or arranging cellulose microfibrils during cellulose biosynthesis in plants. A scheme for the roles of plant cellulose and cellulases is proposed.

  12. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature......, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. Hence, scaling up of aerobic CH4 emission needs to take...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  13. Alvin plant story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, H.J.; Jobe, H.J.; Rimel, S.F.; Hart, W.C.

    1968-11-11

    The Alvin plant, one of the world's largest high- ethane-recovery natural-gas-liquids-extraction plants, was designed to produce over 900,000 gal/day of natural gas liquids (NGL) and extract 50% of the contained ethane while processing 1,034 MMcfd of natural gas. The plant is a major component in a joint venture owned by Phillips Petroleum Co. and HNG Petrochemicals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Houston Natural Gas Corp. The joint venture also includes a products pipeline, an ethane storage cavern, and an ethylene manufacturing unit. Phillips engineering department designed the plant at the home offices in Bartlesville, Okla., and supervised its construction. Process-design features, mechanical-design features, and construction features are discussed. All products of the Alvin plant are used or marketed by Phillips for the benefit of the joint venture.

  14. Shaping plant architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eTeichmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants exhibit phenotypical plasticity. Their general body plan is genetically determined, but plant architecture and branching patterns are variable and can be adjusted to the prevailing environmental conditions. The modular design of the plant facilitates such morphological adaptations. The prerequisite for the formation of a branch is the initiation of an axillary meristem. Here, we review the current knowledge about this process. After its establishment, the meristem can develop into a bud which can either become dormant or grow out and form a branch. Many endogenous factors, such as photoassimilate availability, and exogenous factors like nutrient availability or shading, have to be integrated in the decision whether a branch is formed. The underlying regulatory network is complex and involves phytohormones and transcription factors. The hormone auxin is derived from the shoot apex and inhibits bud outgrowth indirectly in a process termed apical dominance. Strigolactones appear to modulate apical dominance by modification of auxin fluxes. Furthermore, the transcription factor BRANCHED1 plays a central role. The exact interplay of all these factors still remains obscure and there are alternative models. We discuss recent findings in the field along with the major models.Plant architecture is economically significant because it affects important traits of crop and ornamental plants, as well as trees cultivated in forestry or on short rotation coppices. As a consequence, plant architecture has been modified during plant domestication. Research revealed that only few key genes have been the target of selection during plant domestication and in breeding programs. Here, we discuss such findings on the basis of various examples. Architectural ideotypes that provide advantages for crop plant management and yield are described. We also outline the potential of breeding and biotechnological approaches to further modify and improve plant architecture

  15. Encapsulation plant at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, Anders

    2007-08-15

    SKB has already carried out a preliminary study of an encapsulation plant detached from Clab (Central interim storage for spent fuels). This stand-alone encapsulation plant was named FRINK and its assumed siting was the above-ground portion of the final repository, irrespective of the repository's location. The report previously presented was produced in cooperation with BNFL Engineering Ltd in Manchester and the fuel reception technical solution was examined by Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH (GNS) in Hannover and by Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN) in Paris. This report is an update of the earlier preliminary study report and is based on the assumption that the encapsulation plant and also the final repository will be sited in the Forsmark area. SKB's main alternative for siting the encapsulation plant is next to Clab. Planning of this facility is ongoing and technical solutions from the planning work have been incorporated in this report. An encapsulation plant placed in proximity to any final repository in Forsmark forms part of the alternative presentation in the application for permission to construct and operate an installation at Clab. The main technical difference between the planned encapsulation plant at Clab and an encapsulation plant at a final repository at Forsmark is how the fuel is managed and prepared before actual encapsulation. Fuel reception at the encapsulation plant in Forsmark would be dry, i.e. there would be no water-filled pools at the facility. Clab is used for verificatory fuel measurements, sorting and drying of the fuel before transport to Forsmark. This means that Clab will require a measure of rebuilding and supplementary equipment. In purely technical terms, the prospects for building an encapsulation plant sited at Forsmark are good. A description of the advantages and drawbacks of siting the encapsulation plant at Clab as opposed to any final repository at Forsmark is presented in a separate

  16. Plant Sex Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, John R

    2017-03-06

    Sex determination is as important for the fitness of plants as it is for animals, but its mechanisms appear to vary much more among plants than among animals, and the expression of gender in plants differs in important respects from that in most animals. In this Minireview, I provide an overview of the broad variety of ways in which plants determine sex. I suggest that several important peculiarities of plant sex determination can be understood by recognising that: plants show an alternation of generations between sporophytic and gametophytic phases (either of which may take control of sex determination); plants are modular in structure and lack a germ line (allowing for a quantitative expression of gender that is not common in animals); and separate sexes in plants have ultimately evolved from hermaphroditic ancestors. Most theorising about sex determination in plants has focused on dioecious species, but we have much to learn from monecious or hermaphroditic species, where sex is determined at the level of modules, tissues or cells. Because of the fundamental modularity of plant development and potentially important evolutionary links between monoecy and dioecy, it may be useful to relax the distinction often made between 'developmental sex determination' (which underpins the development of male versus female flowers in monoecious species) and 'genetic sex determination' (which underpins the separation of males and females in dioecious species, often mediated by a genetic polymorphism and sex chromosomes). I also argue for relaxing the distinction between sex determination involving a genetic polymorphism and that involving responses to environmental or hormonal cues, because non-genetic cues might easily be converted into genetic switches.

  17. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  18. Plant nuclear envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Annkatrin; Patel, Shalaka; Meier, Iris

    2004-01-01

    Compared to research in the animal field, the plant NE has been clearly under-investigated. The available data so far indicate similarities as well as striking differences that raise interesting questions about the function and evolution of the NE in different kingdoms. Despite a seemingly similar structure and organization of the NE, many of the proteins that are integral components of the animal NE appear to lack homologues in plant cells. The sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has not led to the identification of homologues of animal NE components, but has indicated that the plant NE must have a distinct protein composition different from that found in metazoan cells. Besides providing a selective barrier between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm, the plant NE functions as a scaffold for chromatin but the scaffolding components are not identical to those found in animal cells. The NE comprises an MTOC in higher plant cells, a striking difference to the organization of microtubule nucleation in other eukaryotic cells. Nuclear pores are present in the plant NE, but identifiable orthologues of most animal and yeast nucleoporins are presently lacking. The transport pathway through the nuclear pores via the action of karyopherins and the Ran cycle is conserved in plant cells. Interestingly, RanGAP is sequestered to the NE in plant cells and animal cells, yet the targeting domains and mechanisms of attachment are different between the two kingdoms. At present, only a few proteins localized at the plant NE have been identified molecularly. Future research will have to expand the list of known protein components involved in building a functional plant NE.

  19. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an extensive review of the empirical evidence found for Sweden concerning plant survival. The result reveals that foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants have the lowest exit rates, followed by purely domestic-oriented plants, and that domestic MNE plants have...... the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...... exporters, but not other types of plants, improves post acquisition....

  20. The Development of Plant Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, John G.

    1985-01-01

    Examines major lines of thought leading to what is meant by plant biotechnology, namely, the application of existing techniques of plant organ, tissue, and cell culture, plant molecular biology, and genetic engineering to the improvement of plants and of plant productivity for the benefit of man. (JN)

  1. Plant-soil feedbacks: role of plant functional group and plant traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, R.; Schröder-Georgi, T.; Weigelt, A.; van der Putten, W.H.; De Deyn, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we grew 4

  2. TOR signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexin, Daniel; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe; Veit, Bruce

    2015-08-15

    Although the eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signalling pathway has emerged as a key player for integrating nutrient-, energy- and stress-related cues with growth and metabolic outputs, relatively little is known of how this ancient regulatory mechanism has been adapted in higher plants. Drawing comparisons with the substantial knowledge base around TOR kinase signalling in fungal and animal systems, functional aspects of this pathway in plants are reviewed. Both conserved and divergent elements are discussed in relation to unique aspects associated with an autotrophic mode of nutrition and adaptive strategies for multicellular development exhibited by plants.

  3. Radiation hormesis in plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Song, Hi Sup; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Byung Hun; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    2000-04-01

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of low dose {gamma}-ray radiation on the seed germination and the following physiological responses in vegetable crops. Special attention was focused on whether the resistance of vegetables against the unfavorable conditions of environment such as subsequent high doses of radiation or Phytophthora blight of pepper could be enhanced as an aspect of radiation hormesis. Analysis and characterization of antioxidant enzyme from plant culture cells and radiation tolerant of transformed plants from antioxidant (POD) were accomplished in the plant irradiated with different dose of {gamma}-ray. (author)

  4. FRIB Cryogenic Plant Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kelly D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ganni, Venkatarao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Knudsen, Peter N. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Casagranda, Fabio [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    After practical changes were approved to the initial conceptual design of the cryogenic system for MSU FRIB and an agreement was made with JLab in 2012 to lead the design effort of the cryogenic plant, many activities are in place leading toward a cool-down of the linacs prior to 2018. This is mostly due to using similar equipment used at CHLII for the 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and an aggressive schedule maintained by the MSU Conventional Facilities department. Reported here is an updated status of the cryogenic plant, including the equipment procurement status, plant layout, facility equipment and project schedule.

  5. Radiation hormesis in plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Song, Hi Sup; Lee, Young Keun; Cun, Ki Jung; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1999-04-01

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of low dose {gamma}-ray radiation on the seed germination and the following physiological responses in vegetable crops. Special attention was focused on whether the resistance of vegetables against the unfavorable conditions of environment such as acid rain or soil types could be enhanced as an aspect of radiation hormesis. Analysis and characterization of antioxidant enzyme from plant culture cells and radiation tolerant of transformed plants from antioxidant enzyme (POD) were accomplished in the plant irradiated with difference dosage of {gamma}-ray.

  6. Optofluidics of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Demetri; Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Optofluidics is a tool for synthesizing optical systems, making use of the interaction of light with fluids. In this paper we explore optofluidic mechanisms that have evolved in plants where sunlight and fluidic control combine to define most of the functionality of the plan. We hope that the presentation of how plants function, from an optofluidics point of view, will open a window for the optics community to the vast literature of plant physiology and provide inspiration for new ideas for the design of bio-mimetic optofluidic devices.

  7. Plant Genome Duplication Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Junah; Robertson, Jon S; Paterson, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    Genome duplication, widespread in flowering plants, is a driving force in evolution. Genome alignments between/within genomes facilitate identification of homologous regions and individual genes to investigate evolutionary consequences of genome duplication. PGDD (the Plant Genome Duplication Database), a public web service database, provides intra- or interplant genome alignment information. At present, PGDD contains information for 47 plants whose genome sequences have been released. Here, we describe methods for identification and estimation of dates of genome duplication and speciation by functions of PGDD.The database is freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/.

  8. Wetland plants: biology and ecology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cronk, Julie K; Fennessy, M. Siobhan

    2001-01-01

    Providing a detailed account of the biology and ecology of wetland plants as well as applications of wetland plant science, this book presents a synthesis of studies and reviews from biology, plant...

  9. Belowground microbes mitigate plant-plant competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Márcia Bacelar; Dias, Teresa; Carolino, Maria Manuela; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; Cruz, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Dimorphandra wilsonii, a Cerrado endemic Fabaceae tree, is threatened by land-use changes. The few remaining individuals occur in areas dominated by alien grasses like Urochloa decumbens. We tested the impact of nitrogen (N) availability and symbionts' presence on mitigating the effects of competition from U. decumbens. Dimorphandra wilsonii seedlings were 50-week pot-cultivated under limiting (3mM) or non-limiting (10mM) N, with or without U. decumbens, and inoculated or not with a N-fixer (Bradyrhizobium sp.) and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF - Glomus etunicatum), both forming symbioses in the field. Since D. wilsonii seedlings grew more and 'lost' fewer nutrients under the symbionts' presence, symbionts mitigated plant-plant competition. Under limiting N, inoculated D. wilsonii seedlings grew more (despite no nodulation), but N fixation was only suggested when inoculated D. wilsonii seedlings competed with U. decumbens. D. wilsonii(13)C, and substrate's carbon and respiration suggest that only the microbes performing key functions received plant carbon. Under non-limiting N, inoculated D. wilsonii seedlings became enriched in (13)C, substrate accumulated carbon and microbial respiration increased, suggesting a more generalist microbial community. Data suggest inoculating D. wilsonii seeds/seedlings with AMF and N-fixers as a conservation measure. However, long-term field-studies need to confirm these conclusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstituting a rainforest patch in southern Benin for the protection of threatened plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Neuenschwander

    2017-08-01

    of 73 IUCN-listed species that could possibly survive in Drabo. Some of these species occur in only one or two other locations in Benin. The biodiversity richness of the rehabilitated forests of Drabo now rivals that of natural rainforest remnants of the region. As the surrounding landscape becomes ever more impoverished because of the high human population and its ever increasing impact, the maintenance of such managed islands of biodiversity is critical. By establishing rare local species from other locations we can compensate for direct human destruction and long-term stochastic loss of species in this highly fragmented landscape where natural seed dispersal is difficult. Benin, sacred forest, threatened plants, IUCN Red List, forest regeneration, Guineo-Congolese semi-deciduous forest

  11. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  12. Plant Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greb, Thomas; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-01-01

    .... While the promise of organ regeneration and the end of cancer have captured our imagination, it has gone almost unnoticed that plant stem cells represent the ultimate origin of much of the food we...

  13. Advanced stellarator power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The stellarator is a class of helical/toroidal magnetic fusion devices. Recent international progress in stellarator power plant conceptual design is reviewed and comparisons in the areas of physics, engineering, and economics are made with recent tokamak design studies.

  14. Advanced stellarator power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.

    1994-07-01

    The stellarator is a class of helical/toroidal magnetic fusion devices. Recent international progress in stellarator power plant conceptual design is reviewed and comparisons in the areas of physics, engineering, and economics are made with recent tokamak design studies.

  15. Poison plants (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by poor circulation, even stress. An example of contact dermatitis is the reaction of a sensitive person's skin to poison ivy, oak or sumac. Contact with these plants, which contain a chemical called ...

  16. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  17. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  18. Lipid signaling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, T.

    2010-01-01

    This book highlights the current status of plant lipid signaling. Written by leading researchers in the field, the chapters include detailed information on the measurement, regulation and function of phospholipases, lipid kinases, lipid phosphatases, inositolpolyphosphates, polyphosphoinositides, ph

  19. Registration of Plant Varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethiopia, forest soils that are either red or chocolate in color classified as Dystric. Nitisol with loam ... Ethiopia has significant benefit from export of ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Directorate and are being maintained, multiplied, and ...

  20. Plant protein glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an essential co- and post-translational modification of secretory and membrane proteins in all eukaryotes. The initial steps of N-glycosylation and N-glycan processing are highly conserved between plants, mammals and yeast. In contrast, late N-glycan maturation steps in the Golgi differ significantly in plants giving rise to complex N-glycans with β1,2-linked xylose, core α1,3-linked fucose and Lewis A-type structures. While the essential role of N-glycan modifications on distinct mammalian glycoproteins is already well documented, we have only begun to decipher the biological function of this ubiquitous protein modification in different plant species. In this review, I focus on the biosynthesis and function of different protein N-linked glycans in plants. Special emphasis is given on glycan-mediated quality control processes in the ER and on the biological role of characteristic complex N-glycan structures. PMID:26911286

  1. Nonferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes nonferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  2. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants.

  3. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  4. Memristors in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Tucket, Clayton; Reedus, Jada; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S; Chua, Leon

    2014-01-01

    We investigated electrical circuitry of the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica and Aloe vera. The goal was to discover if these plants might have a new electrical component--a resistor with memory. This element was postulated recently and the researchers were looking for its presence in different systems. The analysis was based on cyclic current-voltage characteristic where the resistor with memory should manifest itself. We found that the electrostimulation of plants by bipolar sinusoidal or triangle periodic waves induces electrical responses in the Venus flytrap, Mimosa pudica and Aloe vera with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in plant tissue. Our results demonstrate that a voltage gated K(+) channel in the excitable tissue of plants has properties of a memristor. This study can be a starting point for understanding mechanisms of memory, learning, circadian rhythms, and biological clocks.

  5. Ferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes ferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  6. Plant Mobile Small RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Melnyk, Charles; Molnar, Attila; Slotkin, R Keith

    2013-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing is a fundamental regulator of gene expression, heterochromatin formation, suppression of transposable elements, and defense against viruses. The sequence specificity of these processes relies on small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules. Although the spreading of RNA silencing across the plant has been recognized for nearly two decades, only recently have sRNAs been formally demonstrated as the mobile silencing signals. Here, we discuss the various types of mobile sRNA mol...

  7. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  8. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  9. Plant Transgenerational Epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Quadrana, Leandro; Colot, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Transgenerational epigenetics is defined in opposition to developmental epi-genetics and implies an absence of resetting of epigenetic states between generations. Unlike mammals, plants appear to be particularly prone to this type of inheritance. In this review, we summarize our knowledge about trans-generational epigenetics in plants, which entails heritable changes in DNA methylation. We emphasize the role of transposable elements and other repeat sequences in the cr...

  10. Imprinting in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUTIERREZ-MARCOS Jose

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting leads to the differential expression of parental alleles after fertilization. Imprinting appears to have evolved independently in mammals and flowering plants to regulate the development of nutrient-transfer placental tissues. In addition, the regulation of imprinting in both mammals and flowering plants involves changes in DNA methylation and histone methylation, thus suggesting that the epigenetic signals that regulate imprinting have been co-opted in these distantly related species.

  11. Powder detergents production plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for powder detergent production plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories, in 1998. - 2000. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with a capacity of 25,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Delta In", Zrenjanin, in 2000.This technology was an innovation, because new approach in mixing a powder materials was used, as well as introducing ...

  12. The names of plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gledhill, D

    2008-01-01

    ... of Plant Names, this book is in two parts. The first part has been written as an account of the way in which the naming of plants has changed with time and why the changes were necessary. It has not been the writer's intention to dwell upon the more fascinating aspects of common names but rather to progress from these to the situation which exists to...

  13. Tetraspanin genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2012-07-01

    Tetraspanins represent a four-transmembrane protein superfamily with a conserved structure and amino acid residues that are present in mammals, insects, fungi and plants. Tetraspanins interact with each other or with other membrane proteins to form tetraspanin-enriched microdomains that play important roles in development, pathogenesis and immune responses via facilitating cell-cell adhesion and fusion, ligand binding and intracellular trafficking. Here, we emphasize evolutionary aspects within the plant kingdom based on genomic sequence information. A phylogenetic tree based on 155 tetraspanin genes of 11 plant species revealed ancient and fast evolving clades. Tetraspanins were only present in multicellular plants, were often duplicated in the plant genomes and predicted by the electronic Fluorescent Pictograph for gene expression analysis to be either functionally redundant or divergent. Tetraspanins contain a large extracellular loop with conserved cysteines that provide the binding sites for the interactions. The Arabidopsis thaliana TETRASPANIN1/TORNADO2/EKEKO has a function in leaf and root patterning and TETRASPANIN3 was identified in the plasmodesmatal proteome, suggesting a role in cell-cell communication during plant development.

  14. Silica in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, A G; Hodson, M J

    1986-01-01

    Opaline silica deposits are formed by many vascular (higher) plants. The capacity of these plants for silica absorption varies considerably according to genotype and environment. Plant communities exchange silica between soil and vegetation, especially in warmer climates. Silica deposition in epidermal cell walls offers mechanical and protective advantages. Biogenic silica particles from plants are also implicated in the causation of cancer. Recent techniques are reviewed which may aid in the identification of plant pathways for soluble silica movement to deposition sites and in the determination of ionic environments. Botanical investigations have focused on silicification of cell walls in relation to plant development, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Silica deposition in macrohair walls of the lemma of canary grass (Phalaris) begins at inflorescence emergence and closely follows wall thickening. The structure of the deposited silica may be determined by specific organic polymers present at successive stages of wall development. Lowering of transpiration by enclosure of Phalaris inflorescences in plastic bags reduced silica deposition in macrohairs. Preliminary freeze-substitution studies have located silicon, as well as potassium and chloride, in the cell vacuole and wall deposition sites during initial silicification.

  15. Landscaping plant epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Peter C; Spillane, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of epigenetic mechanisms is necessary for assessing the potential impacts of epigenetics on plant growth, development and reproduction, and ultimately for the response of these factors to evolutionary pressures and crop breeding programs. This volume highlights the latest in laboratory and bioinformatic techniques used for the investigation of epigenetic phenomena in plants. Such techniques now allow genome-wide analyses of epigenetic regulation and help to advance our understanding of how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms affect cellular and genome function. To set the scene, we begin with a short background of how the field of epigenetics has evolved, with a particular focus on plant epigenetics. We consider what has historically been understood by the term "epigenetics" before turning to the advances in biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics which have led to current-day definitions of the term. Following this, we pay attention to key discoveries in the field of epigenetics that have emerged from the study of unusual and enigmatic phenomena in plants. Many of these phenomena have involved cases of non-Mendelian inheritance and have often been dismissed as mere curiosities prior to the elucidation of their molecular mechanisms. In the penultimate section, consideration is given to how advances in molecular techniques are opening the doors to a more comprehensive understanding of epigenetic phenomena in plants. We conclude by assessing some opportunities, challenges, and techniques for epigenetic research in both model and non-model plants, in particular for advancing understanding of the regulation of genome function by epigenetic mechanisms.

  16. Molecular plant volatile communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jarmo K; Blande, James D

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have multiple functions as internal plant hormones (e.g., ethylene, methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate), in communication with conspecific and heterospecific plants and in communication with organisms of second (herbivores and pollinators) and third (enemies of herbivores) trophic levels. Species specific VOCs normally repel polyphagous herbivores and those specialised on other plant species, but may attract specialist herbivores and their natural enemies, which use VOCs as host location cues. Attraction of predators and parasitoids by VOCs is considered an evolved indirect defence, whereby plants are able to indirectly reduce biotic stress caused by damaging herbivores. In this chapter we review these interactions where VOCs are known to play a crucial role. We then discuss the importance of volatile communication in self and nonself detection. VOCs are suggested to appear in soil ecosystems where distinction of own roots from neighbours roots is essential to optimise root growth, but limited evidence of above-ground plant self-recognition is available.

  17. Power plant siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, J.V.; Conner, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Just to keep up with expected demand, the US will need over 500 new power generation units by 1985. Where these power plants will be located is the subject of heated debate among utility officials, government leaders, conservationists, concerned citizens and a multitude of special interest groups. This book offers a balanced review of all of the salient factors that must be taken into consideration in selecting power plant locations. To deal with this enormously complex subject, the authors (1) offer a general overview of the history and reasoning behind present legislation on the state and national levels; (2) describe the many different agencies that have jurisdiction in power plant location, from local water authorities and city councils to state conservation boards and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and (3) include a state-by-state breakdown of siting laws, regulations and present licensing procedures. Architects, engineers, contractors, and others involved in plant construction and site evaluation will learn of the trade-offs that must be made in balancing the engineering, economic, and environmental impacts of plant location. The book covers such areas as availability of water supplies for generation or cooling; geology, typography, and demography of the proposed site; and even the selection of the fuel best suited for the area. Finally, the authors examine the numerous environmental aspects of power plant siting.

  18. Plant toxicity, adaptive herbivory, and plant community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilan Feng; Rongsong Liu; Donald L. DeAngelis; John P. Bryant; Knut Kielland; F. Stuart Chapin; Robert K. Swihart

    2009-01-01

    We model effects of interspecific plant competition, herbivory, and a plant's toxic defenses against herbivores on vegetation dynamics. The model predicts that, when a generalist herbivore feeds in the absence of plant toxins, adaptive foraging generally increases the probability of coexistence of plant species populations, because the herbivore switches more of...

  19. Chapter 15. Plant pathology and managing wildland plant disease systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Nelson

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining specific, reliable knowledge on plant diseases is essential in wildland shrub resource management. However, plant disease is one of the most neglected areas of wildland resources experimental research. This section is a discussion of plant pathology and how to use it in managing plant disease systems.

  20. Plant-mediated insect interactions on a perennial plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants interact with many organisms around them, and one of the most important groups that a plant has to deal with, are the herbivores. Insects represent the most diverse group of herbivores and have many different ways of using the plant as a food source. Plants can, however, defend themselves aga

  1. Promoting Interest in Plant Biology with Biographies of Plant Hunters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daisey, Peggy

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of biographical stories to promote student interest in plant biology. Discusses plant hunters of various time periods, including ancient, middle ages, renaissance, colonial Americas, and 18th and 19th centuries; women plant hunters of the 1800s and early 1900s; and modern plant hunters. Discusses classroom strategies for the…

  2. Plant-mediated insect interactions on a perennial plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants interact with many organisms around them, and one of the most important groups that a plant has to deal with, are the herbivores. Insects represent the most diverse group of herbivores and have many different ways of using the plant as a food source. Plants can, however, defend themselves

  3. Electroanalysis of Plant Thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to unique physico-chemical properties of –SH moiety thiols comprise widegroup of biologically important compounds. A review devoted to biological functions ofglutathione and phytochelatins with literature survey of methods used to analysis of thesecompounds and their interactions with cadmium(II ions and Murashige-Skoog medium ispresented. For these purposes electrochemical techniques are used. Moreover, we revealedthe effect of three different cadmium concentrations (0, 10 and 100 μM on cadmiumuptake and thiols content in maize plants during 192 hours long experiments usingdifferential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry to detect cadmium(II ions and highperformance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to determineglutathione. Cadmium concentration determined in tissues of the plants cultivated innutrient solution containing 10 μM Cd was very low up to 96 hours long exposition andthen the concentration of Cd markedly increased. On the contrary, the addition of 100 μMCd caused an immediate sharp increase in all maize plant parts to 96 hours Cd expositionbut subsequently the Cd concentration increased more slowly. A high performance liquidchromatography with electrochemical detection was used for glutathione determination intreated maize plants after 96 and 192 hours of treatment. The highest total content of glutathione per one plant was 6 μg (96 h, 10 μM Cd in comparison with non-treated plant (control where glutathione content was 1.5 μg. It can be concluded that electrochemical techniques have proved to be useful to analyse plant thiols.

  4. Plants in alpine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Alpine and subalpine plant species are of special interest in ecology and ecophysiology because they represent life at the climate limit and changes in their relative abundances can be a bellwether for climate-change impacts. Perennial life forms dominate alpine plant communities, and their form and function reflect various avoidance, tolerance, or resistance strategies to interactions of cold temperature, radiation, wind, and desiccation stresses that prevail in the short growing seasons common (but not ubiquitous) in alpine areas. Plant microclimate is typically uncoupled from the harsh climate of the alpine, often leading to substantially warmer plant temperatures than air temperatures recorded by weather stations. Low atmospheric pressure is the most pervasive, fundamental, and unifying factor for alpine environments, but the resulting decrease in partial pressure of CO2 does not significantly limit carbon gain by alpine plants. Factors such as tree islands and topographic features create strong heterogeneous mosaics of microclimate and snow cover that are reflected in plant community composition. Factors affecting tree establishment and growth and formation of treeline are key to understanding alpine ecology. Carbohydrate and other carbon storage, rapid development in a short growing season, and physiological function at low temperature are prevailing attributes of alpine plants. A major contemporary research theme asks whether chilling at alpine-treeline affects the ability of trees to assimilate the growth resources and particularly carbon needed for growth or whether the growth itself is limited by the alpine environment. Alpine areas tend to be among the best conserved, globally, yet they are increasingly showing response to a range of anthropogenic impacts, such as atmospheric deposition.

  5. African names for American plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, van T.R.

    2015-01-01

    African slaves brought plant knowledge to the New World, sometimes applying it to related plants they found there and sometimes bringing Old World plants with them. By tracing the linguistic parallels between names for plants in African languages and in communities descended from African slaves, pie

  6. Plant ID. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on plant identification. Presented first are a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about the scientific classification of plants. The following topics are among those discussed: main types of plants; categories of vascular plants; gymnosperms and…

  7. Aquatic Plants and their Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Natural Resources, Lansing.

    Aquatic plants can be divided into two types: algae and macrophytes. The goal of aquatic plant management is to maintain a proper balance of plants within a lake and still retain the lake's recreational and economic importance. Aquatic plant management programs have two phases: long-term management (nutrient control), and short-term management…

  8. Antidiabetic Plants of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafeddin Goushegir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To identify the antidiabetic plants of Iran, a systematic review of the published literature on the efficacy of Iranian medicinal plant for glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was conducted. We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, Science Direct, Scopus, Proquest, Ebsco, Googlescholar, SID, Cochrane Library Database, from 1966 up to June 2010. The search terms were complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, diabetes mellitus, plant (herb, Iran, patient, glycemic control, clinical trial, RCT, natural or herbal medicine, hypoglycemic plants, and individual herb names from popular sources, or combination of these key words. Available Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT published in English or Persian language examined effects of an herb (limited to Iran on glycemic indexes in type 2 diabetic patients were included. Among all of the articles identified in the initial database search, 23 trials were RCT, examining herbs as potential therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The key outcome for antidiabetic effect was changes in blood glucose or HbA1 c, as well as improves in insulin sensitivity or resistance. Available data suggest that several antidiabetic plants of Iran need further study. Among the RCT studies, the best evidence in glycemic control was found in Citrullus colocynthus, Ipomoea betatas, Silybum marianum and Trigonella foenum graecum.

  9. Plants, diet, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cathie; Zhang, Yang; Tonelli, Chiara; Petroni, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Chronic disease is a major social challenge of the twenty-first century. In this review, we examine the evidence for discordance between modern diets and those on which humankind evolved as the cause of the increasing incidence of chronic diseases, and the evidence supporting consumption of plant foods as a way to reduce the risk of chronic disease. We also examine the evidence for avoiding certain components of plant-based foods that are enriched in Western diets, and review the mechanisms by which different phytonutrients are thought to reduce the risk of chronic disease. This body of evidence strongly suggests that consuming more fruits and vegetables could contribute both to medical nutrition therapies, as part of a package of treatments for conditions like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and obesity, and to the prevention of these diseases. Plant science should be directed toward improving the quality of plant-based foods by building on our improved understanding of the complex relationships between plants, our diet, and our health.

  10. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  11. Engineered plant virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Leny C; Banerjee, Joydeep; Pinar, Hasan; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Virus diseases are among the key limiting factors that cause significant yield loss and continuously threaten crop production. Resistant cultivars coupled with pesticide application are commonly used to circumvent these threats. One of the limitations of the reliance on resistant cultivars is the inevitable breakdown of resistance due to the multitude of variable virus populations. Similarly, chemical applications to control virus transmitting insect vectors are costly to the farmers, cause adverse health and environmental consequences, and often result in the emergence of resistant vector strains. Thus, exploiting strategies that provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance over diverse environments are of paramount importance. The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Genetic engineering offers various options for introducing transgenic virus resistance into crop plants to provide a wide range of resistance to viral pathogens. This review examines the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants.

  12. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya [Oregon Inst. of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  13. Micropropagation of some ornamental plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koleva Gudeva, Liljana; Spasenoski, Mirko

    2002-01-01

    Till now many horticulture plants have been successfully regenerated on in vitro conditions. Among them there are ornamental plants such as: Rosa-miniature pot roses; myrillocatus geometrizans-cacti, succulent plant; Echinopsis spachiana-cacti, succulent plant and Dianthus cariophyllus-carnation. Regeneration or micropropagation has been used for production of copies(clones) of the original unique plants(Hussery, 1986). Depending on the species, apical or axillar buds was used for micropro...

  14. Arsenite transport in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Waqar; Isayenkov, Stanislav V; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2009-07-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid which is toxic to living organisms. Natural occurrence of arsenic and human activities have led to widespread contamination in many areas of the world, exposing a large section of the human population to potential arsenic poisoning. Arsenic intake can occur through consumption of contaminated crops and it is therefore important to understand the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and tolerance that plants display in response to arsenic. Plants are mainly exposed to the inorganic forms of arsenic, arsenate and arsenite. Recently, significant progress has been made in the identification and characterisation of proteins responsible for movement of arsenite into and within plants. Aquaporins of the NIP (nodulin26-like intrinsic protein) subfamily were shown to transport arsenite in planta and in heterologous systems. In this review, we will evaluate the implications of these new findings and assess how this may help in developing safer and more tolerant crops.

  15. Willow plant name 'Preble'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2014-06-10

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.(Salix sachalinensis.times.Salix miyabeana) named `Preble`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 29% more woody biomass than the average of three current production cultivars (Salix.times.dasyclados `SV1` (unpatented), Salix sachalinensis `SX61` (unpatented), and Salix miyabeana `SX64` (unpatented)) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (three growing seasons after coppice) in two different trials in Constableville, N.Y. and Middlebury, Vt. `Preble` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Preble` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  16. PV power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Within the international seminar of the Ostbayerisches Technologie-Transfer-Institut e.V. (OTTI) at 11th June, 2012 in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Technical due diligence (Dietmar Obst); (2) Certification / rating system for large PV plants (Robert Pfatischer); (3) O and M requirements (Lars Rulf); (4) IR photography for large scale systems (Bernhard Weinreich); (5) New market models for PV systems - direct marketing and sales of PV electricity (Martin Schneider); (6) Needs and benefits for plant certification for grid connection and operation (Christoph Luetke-Lengerich); (7) Lare volume module testing / Screening in the field and workshop (Semir Merzoug); (8) Dismantling costs of large scale PV plants (Siegfried Schimpf).

  17. Domestication and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haibao; Sezen, Uzay; Paterson, Andrew H

    2010-04-01

    The techniques of plant improvement have been evolving with the advancement of technology, progressing from crop domestication by Neolithic humans to scientific plant breeding, and now including DNA-based genotyping and genetic engineering. Archeological findings have shown that early human ancestors often unintentionally selected for and finally fixed a few major domestication traits over time. Recent advancement of molecular and genomic tools has enabled scientists to pinpoint changes to specific chromosomal regions and genetic loci that are responsible for dramatic morphological and other transitions that distinguish crops from their wild progenitors. Extensive studies in a multitude of additional crop species, facilitated by rapid progress in sequencing and resequencing(s) of crop genomes, will further our understanding of the genomic impact from both the unusual population history of cultivated plants and millennia of human selection.

  18. Annotation on Mangrove Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伯荪; 张炜银; 梁士楚; 昝启杰

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the technical terms and definition of mangrove and mangal, as well as mangrove plant. The word mangrove has been used to refer either to the constituent plant of tropical and subtropical intertidal community or to the community itself, but this usage makes more confusion. Being leaved mangrove in the more limited sense for the constituent plant species, mangal was proposed by MacNae (1968) as aterm for mangrove community, which has been universally applied to most previous studies and should be adopted now. Mangrove should be therefore defined as a tropical and subtropical tree restricted to intertidal zones, which possesses some morphological specializion and physiological mechanism adapted to its habitat, and mangal as a tropical and subtropical forest community restricted to marine intertidal zones and periodically inundeated by the tides. A new term ″consortive plant″ is proposed here for herb, liana, epiphyte or parasite, which is restricted in the strict mangrove habitat.

  19. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  20. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  1. Tungsten Toxicity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S.; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten (W) is a rare heavy metal, widely used in a range of industrial, military and household applications due to its unique physical properties. These activities inevitably have accounted for local W accumulation at high concentrations, raising concerns about its effects for living organisms. In plants, W has primarily been used as an inhibitor of the molybdoenzymes, since it antagonizes molybdenum (Mo) for the Mo-cofactor (MoCo) of these enzymes. However, recent advances indicate that, beyond Mo-enzyme inhibition, W has toxic attributes similar with those of other heavy metals. These include hindering of seedling growth, reduction of root and shoot biomass, ultrastructural malformations of cell components, aberration of cell cycle, disruption of the cytoskeleton and deregulation of gene expression related with programmed cell death (PCD). In this article, the recent available information on W toxicity in plants and plant cells is reviewed, and the knowledge gaps and the most pertinent research directions are outlined. PMID:27137642

  2. Plant adenylate cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomovatskaya, Lidiya A; Romanenko, Anatoliy S; Filinova, Nadejda V

    2008-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase (AC) (ATP diphosphate-lyase cyclizing; EC 4.6.1.1) is a key component of the adenylate cyclase signaling system and catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) from ATP. This review summarizes data from the literature and the authors' laboratory on the investigation of plant transmembrane (tmAC) and soluble (sAC) adenylate cyclases, in comparison with some key characteristics of adenylate cyclases of animal cells. Plant sAC has been demonstrated to exhibit similarities with animal sAC with respect to certain characteristics. External factors, such as far-red and red light, temperature, exogenous phytohormones, as well as specific triggering compounds of fungal and bacterial origin exert a significant influence on the activity of plant tmAC and sAC.

  3. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  4. Integrated Gasification SOFC Plant with a Steam Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Pierobon, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    enter into a burner to burn the rest of the fuel. The offgases after the burner are now used to generate steam in a Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG). The generated steam is expanded in a ST to produce additional power. Thus a triple hybrid plant based on a gasification plant, a SOFC plant......A hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Steam Turbine (ST) plant is integrated with a gasification plant. Wood chips are fed to the gasification plant to produce biogas and then this gas is fed into the anode side of a SOFC cycle to produce electricity and heat. The gases from the SOFC stacks...... and a steam plant is presented and studied. The plant is called as IGSS (Integrated Gasification SOFC Steam plant). Different systems layouts are presented and investigated. Electrical efficiencies up to 56% are achieved which is considerably higher than the conventional integrated gasification combined...

  5. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako eMitsumasu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root-parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones (SLs, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant-parasite interactions.

  6. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Seto, Yoshiya; Yoshida, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant-parasite interactions.

  7. Quantitative plant ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com) The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement...... and statistical modelling of plant species abundance and the relevant ecological processes that control species abundance. The focus on statistical modelling and likelihood function based methods also means that more algorithm based methods, e.g. ordination techniques and boosted regression tress...

  8. Conceptualizing Pharmaceutical Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bent Dalgaard; Jensen, Klaes Ladeby; Gjøl, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    In the conceptual design phase of pharmaceutical plants as much as 80%-90% of the total cost of a project is committed. It is therefore essential that the chosen concept is viable. In this design process configuration and 3D models can help validate the decisions made. Designing 3D models...... is a complex task and requires skilled users. We demonstrate that a simple 2D/3D configuration tool can support conceptualizing of pharmaceutical plants. Present paper reports on preliminary results from a full scale implementation project at a Danish engineering company....

  9. Plant Mobile Small RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Melnyk, Charles; Molnar, Attila; Slotkin, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing is a fundamental regulator of gene expression, heterochromatin formation, suppression of transposable elements, and defense against viruses. The sequence specificity of these processes relies on small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules. Although the spreading of RNA silencing across the plant has been recognized for nearly two decades, only recently have sRNAs been formally demonstrated as the mobile silencing signals. Here, we discuss the various types of mobile sRNA molecules, their short- and long-range movement, and their function in recipient cells. PMID:23818501

  10. Total Logistic Plant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Dorcak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Total Logistics Plant Solutions, plant logistics system - TLPS, based on the philosophy of advanced control processes enables complex coordination of business processes and flows and the management and scheduling of production in the appropriate production plans and planning periods. Main attributes of TLPS is to create a comprehensive, multi-level, enterprise logistics information system, with a certain degree of intelligence, which accepts the latest science and research results in the field of production technology and logistics. Logistic model of company understands as a system of mutually transforming flows of materials, energy, information, finance, which is realized by chain activities and operations

  11. Multiplex tokamak power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    The concept of multiplexing for a fusion power core as an option for producing power is explored. Superconducting, as well as normal magnet, coils in either first or second stability regimes are considered. The results show that multiplex plants with superconducting magnets operating in the second stability regime could be competitive with the single-unit plants in some unit sizes. The key issues that impact the expected benefits of multiplexing must be investigated further. These are factory fabrication, economy of scale, the extent of equipment sharing, inherent safety, maintainability, and utility load management.

  12. La fiesta, grito sagrado de la tierra y del pueblo: el sentido de la fiesta a partir de un pueblo de Madrid (The feast, Sacred scream of land and people: The meaning of feast in a village of Madrid - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n20p83

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salustiano Alvaréz Gómez

    2011-05-01

    fiesta concreta y particular se puede pasar a lo universal. De hecho, la fiesta supone un momento muy especial en la historia de los grupos humanos, permitiendo dimensionar su vida desde un pasado vivencial y un futuro de esperanza. La fiesta permite quebrar la monotonía de lo cotidiano reorganizando la vida del grupo, haciendo posible la alegría y el dinamismo de la existencia humana. Se trata de una necesidad humana, tan humana como el trabajo, en donde lo sagrado y lo profano entran como formas integradoras de convivencia. Convivencia que necesita de la risa, de la alegría, de la irreverencia y de la felicidad, además del trabajo, del compromiso y del orden establecido. Palabras clave: Antropología de la fiesta; sagrado y profano; sociedad; religión Abstract Taking into account the experience of the patron festivities of a small town of Madrid, the present article aims to reflect on the general meaning of such party. To do so, the article looks for its human significance, their collective need and the interpretations of human groups trying to achieve their main goals.  It is known that festivals assume a very special moment in the history of human groups, allowing them to resize their lives from an existential past and a future of hope. The festival allows us to break the monotony of our daily lives and help us in the reorganization of our group life. It also makes the joy and the dynamism of human existence ever possible. The sacred and the profane insert in this dimension of human existence as integrative forms of human coexistence. key words: Holy anthropology; sacred and profane; society; religión.

  13. The plant exocyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    exocyst is an octameric vesicle tethering complex that functions upstream of SNARE mediated exocytotic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane. All proteins in the complex have been conserved during evolution, and genes that encode the exocyst subunits are present in the genomes of all plants invest

  14. Radiosensitivity in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nauman, A F

    1979-01-01

    The report presents a compilation of available data on the sensitivity of plants to ionizing radiation, and provides basic information on methods of determining such sensitivities, or of estimating radiosensitivities by calcuation of the nuclear factors upon which they depend. The scope of the data presented here is necessarily limited to the most generally useful radiobiological end points and to the most commonly-used types of radiation. Many of the factors which influence radiosensitivity, particularly nuclear factors, will be discussed. Emphasis will be upon whole-plant studies done at Brookhaven National Laboratory by A.H. Sparrow and his associates, since these studies are the source of most of the available radiosensitivity data and of all the sensitivity predictions listed here. Data presented here include summaries of experimentally-determined radiosensitivities at various end points for both herbaceous and woody higher plants, and for a few species of ferns and lower plants. The algae and fungi have not been considered here due to space limitations.

  15. Plants flex their skeletons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Randy; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2003-01-01

    Recent work on the fragile fiber mutants of Arabidopsis has identified microtubule-associated proteins that affect the orientation of cellulose microfibrils in cell walls, a major determinant of plant elongation growth. These same proteins are implicated in responses to gibberellin, provoking fresh...

  16. Chromatin dynamics in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in yeast, animals and plants have provided major breakthroughs in unraveling the molecular mechanism of higher-order gene regulation. In conjunction with the DNA code, proteins that are involved in chromatin remodeling, histone modification and epigenetic imprinting form a large

  17. Plants on the Move

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Mary

    2009-01-01

    When it comes to directly interacting with and doing experiments with organisms, plants have some distinct advantages over animals. Their diversity and accessibility allows students to use them in experiments, thus practicing important science inquiry skills. This article describes an investigation that was designed to help students appreciate the…

  18. Plants, People, and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, Arthur W.

    1970-01-01

    Advocates that some established botanists should become involved in social and political problems to which botanical expertise is relevant. Discusses food production in relation to world population growth, indicating problems on which botanical knowledge and research should be brought to bear. Discusses herbicides and plant growth regulators as…

  19. Plant research '76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Overall objective remains unchanged: to contribute to the knowledge, with strong emphasis on fundamental problems, of how plants function, the roles they play in the environment and energy relations of the world, and how these roles may be optimized for the benefit of mankind. (PCS)

  20. Plant biochemistry course, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides a brief description of a summer lecture course on metabolic pathways and regulation of flow through these pathways in plants. Descriptions of the 1992 course held at La Jolla,Ca; 1993 course held in Madison, Wis, and plans for the 1994 course projected for East Lansing, MI.

  1. Chromatin dynamics in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransz, P.F.; Jong, de J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies in yeast, animals and plants have provided major breakthroughs in unraveling the molecular mechanism of higher-order gene regulation. In conjunction with the DNA code, proteins that are involved in chromatin remodeling, histone modification and epigenetic imprinting form a large netwo

  2. Next Generation Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goud, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Van 11-14 november 2012 vond in de Reehorst de conferentie ‘Next Generation Plant Breeding’ plaats. Tijdens deze bijeenkomst kwamen de grote uitdagingen van de toekomstige plantenveredeling aan de orde: de opkomst van nieuwe sequencing-technieken, de bijbehorende enorme hoeveelheid gegevens die gepr

  3. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  4. Next Generation Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goud, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Van 11-14 november 2012 vond in de Reehorst de conferentie ‘Next Generation Plant Breeding’ plaats. Tijdens deze bijeenkomst kwamen de grote uitdagingen van de toekomstige plantenveredeling aan de orde: de opkomst van nieuwe sequencing-technieken, de bijbehorende enorme hoeveelheid gegevens die

  5. [Amebicidal plants extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derda, Monika; Hadaś, Edward; Thiem, Barbara; Sułek, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The free-living amoebae from genus Acanthamoeba are the causative agents of granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system; amebic keratitis (AK), a chronic eye infection; amebic pneumitis (AP), a chronic lung infection, and skin infection. Chemotherapy of Acanthamoeba infection is problematic. The majority of infections have been fatal. Only a few cases are reported to have been treated successfully with very highly toxic drugs. The therapy might be succeed, if the diagnosis and therapy is made at very early stage of infection. In our experiments we used the following plant extracts: Solidago virgaurea, Solidago graminifolia, Rubus chamaemorus, Pueraria lobata, and natural plants products as ellagic acid and puerarin. Those therapeutic agents and plants extracts have been tested in vitro for amebicidal or amebostatic activity against pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. Our results showed that methanol extracts obtained from plants are active against axenic pathogenic Acanthamoeba sp. trophozoites in vitro at concentration below 0.1 mg/ml. Further studies are needed to investigate whether these extracts are also effective in vivo in animal model of infection with Acanthamoeba sp.

  6. Plants and Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D.

    1977-01-01

    This is the first of two articles showing how plants that have been used in folk medicine for many centuries are guiding scientists in the design and preparation of new and potent drugs. Opium and its chemical derivatives are examined at length in this article. (Author/MA)

  7. Salinity and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsford, Simon; Meredith, Steve; Munday, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Presents science activities that mirror real life issues relating to plants and sustainability. Describes how to turn seed growing activities into an environmental simulation. Discusses the advantages of cross-curriculum learning opportunities. Includes student references and notes for teachers. (KHR)

  8. Peru, People and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dennis

    Designed for horticulture, horticulture therapy, and botany students at Edmonds Community College (Washington), this 6-hour module explores the pre-Columbian use of plant materials in Peru and its relationships to cultural practices in modern Peru. The first sections provide basic information about the module, such as its objectives, the concepts…

  9. Quantitative plant ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com) The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement......, will not be covered in this e-book....

  10. Plant Protection Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Allsopp

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the mycorrhizal status of plants growing in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa was undertaken to assess the range of mycorrhizal types and their dominance in species characteristic of this region. Records were obtained by ex­amining the root systems of plants growing in three Cape lowland vegetation types, viz. West Coast Strandveld, West Coast Renosterveld and Sand Plain Lowland Fynbos for mycorrhizas, as well as by collating literature records of mycorrhizas on plants growing in the region. The mycorrhizal status of 332 species is listed, of which 251 species are new records. Members of all the important families in this region have been examined. Mycorrhizal status appears to be associated mainly with taxonomic position of the species. Extrapolating from these results, we conclude that 62% of the flora of the Cape Floristic Region form vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas, 23% have no mycorrhizas, 8% are ericoid mycorrhizal, 2% form orchid mycorrhizas, whereas the mycorrhizal status of 4% of the flora is unknown. There were no indigenous ectomycor- rhizal species. The proportion of non-mycorrhizal species is high compared to other ecosystems. In particular, the lack of mycorrhizas in several important perennial families in the Cape Floristic Region is unusual. The diversity of nutrient acquir­ing adaptations, including the range of mycorrhizas and cluster roots in some non-mycorrhizal families, may promote co­existence of plants in this species-rich region.

  11. Plant Tissue Culture Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert Alan

    Plant tissue culture has developed into a valid botanical discipline and is considered a key area of biotechnology, but it has not been a key component of the science curriculum because of the expensive and technical nature of research in this area. This manual presents a number of activities that are relatively easy to prepare and perform. The…

  12. Plant Biotech Lab Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides laboratory experiments to enhance any food science/botany curriculum. Chapter 1, "Introduction," presents a survey of the techniques used in plant biotechnology laboratory procedures. Chapter 2, "Micronutrition," discusses media and nutritional requirements for tissue culture studies. Chapter 3, "Sterile Seeds," focuses on the…

  13. Plants under continuous light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velez Ramirez, A.I.; Ieperen, van W.; Vreugdenhill, D.; Millenaar, F.F.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous light is an essential tool for understanding the plant circadian clock. Additionally, continuous light might increase greenhouse food production. However, using continuous light in research and practice has its challenges. For instance, most of the circadian clock-oriented experiments wer

  14. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in si

  15. Next Generation Plant Breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goud, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Van 11-14 november 2012 vond in de Reehorst de conferentie ‘Next Generation Plant Breeding’ plaats. Tijdens deze bijeenkomst kwamen de grote uitdagingen van de toekomstige plantenveredeling aan de orde: de opkomst van nieuwe sequencing-technieken, de bijbehorende enorme hoeveelheid gegevens die gepr

  16. Tetrapyrrole Signaling in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles make critical contributions to a number of important processes in diverse organisms. In plants, tetrapyrroles are essential for light signaling, the detoxification of reactive oxygen species, the assimilation of nitrate and sulfate, respiration, photosynthesis, and programed cell death. The misregulation of tetrapyrrole metabolism can produce toxic reactive oxygen species. Thus, it is not surprising that tetrapyrrole metabolism is strictly regulated and that tetrapyrrole metabolism affects signaling mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In plants and algae, tetrapyrroles are synthesized in plastids and were some of the first plastid signals demonstrated to regulate nuclear gene expression. In plants, the mechanism of tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling remains poorly understood. Additionally, some of experiments that tested ideas for possible signaling mechanisms appeared to produce conflicting data. In some instances, these conflicts are potentially explained by different experimental conditions. Although the biological function of tetrapyrrole signaling is poorly understood, there is compelling evidence that this signaling is significant. Specifically, this signaling appears to affect the accumulation of starch and may promote abiotic stress tolerance. Tetrapyrrole-dependent plastid-to-nucleus signaling interacts with a distinct plastid-to-nucleus signaling mechanism that depends on GENOMES UNCUOPLED1 (GUN1). GUN1 contributes to a variety of processes, such as chloroplast biogenesis, the circadian rhythm, abiotic stress tolerance, and development. Thus, the contribution of tetrapyrrole signaling to plant function is potentially broader than we currently appreciate. In this review, I discuss these aspects of tetrapyrrole signaling.

  17. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

    2013-08-21

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  18. Plant breeding and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of plant breeding is to develop improved crops. Improvements can be made in crop productivity, crop processing and marketing, and/or consumer quality. The process of developing an improved cultivar begins with intercrossing lines with high performance for the traits of interest, th...

  19. Pinellas Plant facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-11-01

    The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

  20. Engineered minichromosomes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchler, James A

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minichromosomes have been produced in several plant species via telomere-mediated chromosomal truncation. This approach bypasses the complications of the epigenetic nature of centromere function in plants, which has to date precluded the production of minichromosomes by the re-introduction of centromere sequences to a plant cell. Genes to be added to a cleaved chromosome are joined together with telomere repeats on one side. When these constructs are introduced into plant cells, the genes are ligated to the broken chromosomes but the telomere repeats will catalyze the formation of a telomere on the other end cutting the chromosome at that point. Telomere-mediated chromosomal truncation is sufficiently efficient that very small chromosomes can be generated consisting of basically the endogenous centromere and the added transgenes. The added transgenes provide a platform onto which it should be possible to assemble a synthetic chromosome to specification. Combining engineered minichromosomes with doubled haploid breeding should greatly expedite the transfer of transgenes to new lines and to test the interaction of transgenes in new background genotypes. Potential basic and applied applications of synthetic chromosomes are discussed.

  1. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  2. The plant exocyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    exocyst is an octameric vesicle tethering complex that functions upstream of SNARE mediated exocytotic vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane. All proteins in the complex have been conserved during evolution, and genes that encode the exocyst subunits are present in the genomes of all plants invest

  3. Plants and Oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey-Serres, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this oratie I will first consider the fundamental nature of oxygen and its role within the plant cell and then will summarize studies on the cellular low-oxygen response that are interwoven with international efforts to provide farmers with rice that endures prolonged periods of complete

  4. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  5. Plant Biotech Lab Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides laboratory experiments to enhance any food science/botany curriculum. Chapter 1, "Introduction," presents a survey of the techniques used in plant biotechnology laboratory procedures. Chapter 2, "Micronutrition," discusses media and nutritional requirements for tissue culture studies. Chapter 3, "Sterile Seeds," focuses on the…

  6. Quantitative plant ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This e-book is written in the Wolfram' CDF format (download free CDF player from Wolfram.com) The objective of this e-book is to introduce the population ecological concepts for measuring and predicting the ecological success of plant species. This will be done by focusing on the measurement......, will not be covered in this e-book....

  7. Phenolics and Plant Allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-An Jiang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  8. Phenolics and plant allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ruan, Xiao; Pan, Cun-De; Jiang, De-An

    2010-12-07

    Phenolic compounds arise from the shikimic and acetic acid (polyketide) metabolic pathways in plants. They are but one category of the many secondary metabolites implicated in plant allelopathy. Phenolic allelochemicals have been observed in both natural and managed ecosystems, where they cause a number of ecological and economic problems, such as declines in crop yield due to soil sickness, regeneration failure of natural forests, and replanting problems in orchards. Phenolic allelochemical structures and modes of action are diverse and may offer potential lead compounds for the development of future herbicides or pesticides. This article reviews allelopathic effects, analysis methods, and allelopathic mechanisms underlying the activity of plant phenolic compounds. Additionally, the currently debated topic in plant allelopathy of whether catechin and 8-hydroxyquinoline play an important role in Centaurea maculata and Centaurea diffusa invasion success is discussed. Overall, the main purpose of this review is to highlight the allelopacthic potential of phenolic compounds to provide us with methods to solve various ecology problems, especially in regard to the sustainable development of agriculture, forestry, nature resources and environment conservation.

  9. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...

  10. Apoplastic interactions between plants and plant root intruders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumasu, Kanako; Seto, Yoshiya; Yoshida, Satoko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic or parasitic organisms attack plant roots to obtain nutrients, and the apoplast including the plant cell wall is where the plant cell meets such organisms. Root parasitic angiosperms and nematodes are two distinct types of plant root parasites but share some common features in their strategies for breaking into plant roots. Striga and Orobanche are obligate root parasitic angiosperms that cause devastating agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants form an invasion organ called a haustorium, where plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are highly expressed. Plant-parasitic nematodes are another type of agriculturally important plant root parasite. These nematodes breach the plant cell walls by protruding a sclerotized stylet from which PCWDEs are secreted. Responding to such parasitic invasion, host plants activate their own defense responses against parasites. Endoparasitic nematodes secrete apoplastic effectors to modulate host immune responses and to facilitate the formation of a feeding site. Apoplastic communication between hosts and parasitic plants also contributes to their interaction. Parasitic plant germination stimulants, strigolactones, are recently identified apoplastic signals that are transmitted over long distances from biosynthetic sites to functioning sites. Here, we discuss recent advances in understanding the importance of apoplastic signals and cell walls for plant–parasite interactions. PMID:26322059

  11. Evolution of plant senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Mike

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is integral to the flowering plant life-cycle. Senescence-like processes occur also in non-angiosperm land plants, algae and photosynthetic prokaryotes. Increasing numbers of genes have been assigned functions in the regulation and execution of angiosperm senescence. At the same time there has been a large expansion in the number and taxonomic spread of plant sequences in the genome databases. The present paper uses these resources to make a study of the evolutionary origins of angiosperm senescence based on a survey of the distribution, across plant and microbial taxa, and expression of senescence-related genes. Results Phylogeny analyses were carried out on protein sequences corresponding to genes with demonstrated functions in angiosperm senescence. They include proteins involved in chlorophyll catabolism and its control, homeoprotein transcription factors, metabolite transporters, enzymes and regulators of carotenoid metabolism and of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Evolutionary timelines for the origins and functions of particular genes were inferred from the taxonomic distribution of sequences homologous to those of angiosperm senescence-related proteins. Turnover of the light energy transduction apparatus is the most ancient element in the senescence syndrome. By contrast, the association of phenylpropanoid metabolism with senescence, and integration of senescence with development and adaptation mediated by transcription factors, are relatively recent innovations of land plants. An extended range of senescence-related genes of Arabidopsis was profiled for coexpression patterns and developmental relationships and revealed a clear carotenoid metabolism grouping, coordinated expression of genes for anthocyanin and flavonoid enzymes and regulators and a cluster pattern of genes for chlorophyll catabolism consistent with functional and evolutionary features of the pathway. Conclusion The expression and phylogenetic

  12. Plant genetics: gene transfer from parasitic to host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Jeffrey P; Stefanović, Sasa; Young, Gregory J; Palmer, Jeffrey D

    2004-11-11

    Plant mitochondrial genes are transmitted horizontally across mating barriers with surprising frequency, but the mechanism of transfer is unclear. Here we describe two new cases of horizontal gene transfer, from parasitic flowering plants to their host flowering plants, and present phylogenetic and biogeographic evidence that this occurred as a result of direct physical contact between the two. Our findings complement the discovery that genes can be transferred in the opposite direction, from host to parasite plant.

  13. Curvilinear effects of invasive plants on plant diversity: plant community invaded by Sphagneticola trilobata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Qi

    Full Text Available The effects of invasive plants on the species diversity of plant communities are controversial, showing either a positive or negative linear relationship. Based on community data collected from forty 5 m×5 m plots invaded by Sphagneticola trilobata in eight cities across Hainan Island, China, we found S. trilobata decreased plant community diversity once its cover was beyond 10%. We demonstrated that the effects of invasive/native plants on the plant diversity of communities invaded by S. trilobata were curvilinear. These effects, which showed peaks under different degrees of vegetation cover, appeared not only for S. trilobata and all invasive plants, but also for all native plants. Invasive plants primarily had negative effects on plant diversity when they became abundant at a much lower cover level (less than 35%, compared with the native plants (over 60%. Thus, it is necessary to distinguish a range for assessing the effects of plants, especially invasive plants. Our results also confirmed that the invasion intensity of invasive alien plants increased with the intensity of local economic development. We highlight and further discuss the critical importance of curvilinear effects of biological invasion to provide ideas regarding the conservation of local biodiversity and the management of invasive plants.

  14. Curvilinear effects of invasive plants on plant diversity: plant community invaded by Sphagneticola trilobata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shan-Shan; Dai, Zhi-Cong; Zhai, De-Li; Chen, Si-Chong; Si, Chun-Can; Huang, Ping; Wang, Rui-Ping; Zhong, Qiong-Xin; Du, Dao-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of invasive plants on the species diversity of plant communities are controversial, showing either a positive or negative linear relationship. Based on community data collected from forty 5 m×5 m plots invaded by Sphagneticola trilobata in eight cities across Hainan Island, China, we found S. trilobata decreased plant community diversity once its cover was beyond 10%. We demonstrated that the effects of invasive/native plants on the plant diversity of communities invaded by S. trilobata were curvilinear. These effects, which showed peaks under different degrees of vegetation cover, appeared not only for S. trilobata and all invasive plants, but also for all native plants. Invasive plants primarily had negative effects on plant diversity when they became abundant at a much lower cover level (less than 35%), compared with the native plants (over 60%). Thus, it is necessary to distinguish a range for assessing the effects of plants, especially invasive plants. Our results also confirmed that the invasion intensity of invasive alien plants increased with the intensity of local economic development. We highlight and further discuss the critical importance of curvilinear effects of biological invasion to provide ideas regarding the conservation of local biodiversity and the management of invasive plants.

  15. The Sacred Circle: Using Mandalas in Counselor Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Shelley A.; Muro, Joel; Lee, Yueh-Ting; DeOrnellas, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    In the supervisory relationship, the use of expressive arts activities has proven to be beneficial to students. Using art materials, students often discover new ways of understanding complex cases and grow personally. Through the art activities, unconscious material is made conscious and then that material is open to processing with the…

  16. Sacred Space: A Beginning Framework for Off-Planet Church

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T. K.

    As governments and corporations continue to engage space security, commerce, exploration and colonization, the Christian Church will not be far behind. Historically the Church has always been part of the first waves of explorers and colonizers, with its ideological interests being easily supported by generous resources and strong infrastructures. The exploring Church has not always been a friendly guest, however, and at times has initiated or condoned great harm. This paper offers a beginning framework as one way of insuring an appropriate presence in space for the Church. This framework is built with three common religious planks, namely, theology, ecclesiology and church worker vocation. Each of these is recast in terms of the off-planet scenario. This paper concludes that an appropriate off-planet Church will be founded on an "exomissiological" theology, will embrace an ecclesiology that emphasizes religious health, and will adequately select, train and monitor its off-planet church workers.

  17. Sacre Coeur Nursing Home, Station Road, Tipperary Town, Tipperary

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zannad, Faiez

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and discuss current methods of risk stratification for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention, emerging biomarkers, and imaging techniques, and their relative merits and limitations. This report is based on discussions that took place among experts in the area during a special CardioVascular Clinical Trialists workshop organized by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Drug Therapy in September 2009. Classical risk factors such as blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels remain the cornerstone of risk estimation in primary prevention but their use as a guide to management is limited by several factors: (i) thresholds for drug treatment vary with the available evidence for cost-effectiveness and benefit-to-risk ratios; (ii) assessment may be imprecise; (iii) residual risk may remain, even with effective control of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Novel measures include C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) , genetic markers, and markers of subclinical organ damage, for which there are varying levels of evidence. High-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to assess carotid atherosclerotic lesions have potential but require further validation, standardization, and proof of clinical usefulness in the general population. In conclusion, classical risk scoring systems are available and inexpensive but have a number of limitations. Novel risk markers and imaging techniques may have a place in drug development and clinical trial design. However, their additional value above and beyond classical risk factors has yet to be determined for risk-guided therapy in CVD prevention.

  18. Sacred Hearts Nursing Home, Roslea Road, Clones, Monaghan.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quirke, M

    2014-11-01

    To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.

  19. Sacred Ground: Pluralism, Prejudice and the Promise of America ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa | Volume 4(2) 2016, 67–69 | 2307-6267 | DOI: 10.18820/jsaa.v4i2.11 ... interfaith dialogue among college students is the use of community service as a primary ... Working together on projects that benefit the.

  20. Sacred Spaces in Secular (post)-Lutheran Contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Lisbet

    2013-01-01

    Using a spatial method of analysis (cf Kim Knott) this book chapter presents the Danish church asylum case summer 2009 and analyses it theoretically with help of John Witte's presentation of Lutheran theology, concerning especially the concepts of church, law and state.......Using a spatial method of analysis (cf Kim Knott) this book chapter presents the Danish church asylum case summer 2009 and analyses it theoretically with help of John Witte's presentation of Lutheran theology, concerning especially the concepts of church, law and state....

  1. Sacred, Secular, and Ecological Discourses: the Sethusamudram Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feagans, Carl T.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The nature of discourse in public culture has changed significantly if not noticeably in just the past few decades. The Sethusamudram Shipping Canal Project (SSCP intended to create a commercial shipping lane between India and Sri Lanka demonstrates the nature of this change in discourse, which seems focused around the convergence of traditional news media and public commentary through the medium of the Internet which increases the reach of news as well as the speed with which that news arrives to its audience. Just two decades earlier, at a time when the Internet was very young, many of the same political parties and government agencies involved with the SSCP were also involved in the Babri Mosque controversy which culminated in the deaths of perhaps 2000 people as well as the destruction of an historical site, the mosque itself. While many factors are likely to have contributed, the SSCP controversy, in which thousands of concerned Hindus mobilized in protests, resulted in little if no injury or damage to property. This was, perhaps, due in part to the nature of the public discourse.La naturaleza del discurso en la cultura pública ha experimentado cambios notables en el transcurso de unas décadas. El análisis del proyecto Sethusamudram Shipping Canal Project (SSCP para la creación de una línea de navegación comercial entre la India y Sri Lanka muestra el efecto de este cambio en el que Internet ha sido decisivo debido a la mayor afluencia de noticias y a su rápida difusión respecto de los medios tradicionales de comunicación y de creación de opinión pública. Solo dos décadas atrás, cuando Internet iniciaba su andadura, muchos de los partidos políticos y agencias gubernamentales involucrados en el SSCP se vieron implicados en el polémico asunto de la Mezquita de Babri que culminó con la muerte de casi 2.000 personas así como con la destrucción del propio monumento. Aunque indudablemente hay que tener en cuenta otros factores, la controversia en torno al SSCP que ha seguido movilizando a miles de activistas hindúes, no ha producido daños personales ni materiales. Comportamientos tan distintos podrían explicarse, en parte, por los cambios habidos en las formas del discurso público.

  2. FROM THE SACRED TO THE PROFANE: THE OBLATION RITUALIZED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Ramas Cañete

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The study approaches the historical construction of the narratives surrounding the statue titled Oblation, deemed as the symbol of the University of the Philippines (UP, from the theoretical perspective of Eric Hobsbawn’s notion of “invented traditions,” as well as Judith Butler’s theory of performativity. The study looks at the genesis of this narrative as informed by the anti-colonial struggle of the late-19th and early 20th century, but amplified and “sacralised” through the symbolic power of the UP Presidency, particularly under Jorge C. Bocobo (1935-1939 under whose auspices the Oblation was erected on November 30, 1935. The study also foregrounds the key term “Sacrificial Body” as a determinant of the Oblation’s narrational focus of itself as subject, and its function as idealized model or template to be “followed” by the UP community. The ambivalence of this narrative, however, is central to the production of contradicting discourses throughout its history, from the “sacred” Pre-War image akin to a secular Crucifixion upon which rituals supervised by a “priesthood” composed of the University’s officials were enacted; to the Post- War secular (and thus “profane” image of the Oblation as that “representing academic freedom” from the viewpoint of its progressive student body and faculty. The common assertion of a sacrificial representation of anti-colonial struggle, however, is intuited by the study as exemplifying the epistemic problematics of postcolonial nationalism.

  3. 76 FR 47538 - Sacred Sites; Executive Order 13007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... Secretary Vilsack's request, USDA's Office of Tribal Relations and the Forest Service formed a team to talk... native descendants. The team conducting this review also surveyed Forest Service line officers...

  4. THE RIVER: INDIGENOUS LITERATURE’S SACRED PLACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson "Krenak" Dorneles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The river invites us to see in a thousand ways: blurring and lens of the eye, it’s perspectivist pedagogy. In its perennial but fickle waters leads us to nomadic revealed secrets about human nature. Perspectivism and instability are two adoptable aspects to understand Amerindian literature such as sailed in this essay. Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Indigenous authors of Brazil. Milton Hatoum. Guimarães Rosa. Amerindian souls which sometimes are diving and sometimes are floating in these rebel waters.

  5. Sacred Hearts Nursing Home, Roslea Road, Clones, Monaghan.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Mark

    2011-09-29

    Abstract Background Diet, in addition to tobacco, alcohol and physical exercise, is a major factor contributing to chronic diseases in Europe. There is a pressing need for multidisciplinary research to promote healthier food choices and better diets. Food and Health Research in Europe (FAHRE) is a collaborative project commissioned by the European Union. Among its tasks is the description of national research systems for food and health and, in work reported here, the identification of strengths and gaps in the European research base. Methods A typology of nine research themes was developed, spanning food, society, health and research structures. Experts were selected through the FAHRE partners, with balance for individual characteristics, and reported using a standardised template. Results Countries usually commission research on food, and on health, separately: few countries have combined research strategies or programmes. Food and health are also strongly independent fields within the European Commission\\'s research programmes. Research programmes have supported food and bio-technology, food safety, epidemiological research, and nutritional surveillance; but there has been less research into personal behaviour and very little on environmental influences on food choices - in the retail and marketing industries, policy, and regulation. The research is mainly sited within universities and research institutes: there is relatively little published research contribution from industry. Discussion National food policies, based on epidemiological evidence and endorsed by the World Health Organisation, recommend major changes in food intake to meet the challenge of chronic diseases. Biomedical and biotechnology research, in areas such as \\'nutrio-genomics\\

  6. Sacred Hearts Nursing Home, Roslea Road, Clones, Monaghan.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  7. The Dervishes Dance — The Sacred Ritual of Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jale Erzen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Sufi Way, the experience of the world and its perception is aesthetic in an ecstatic fashion. The awareness of the overpowering beauty of the world fills the heart with love and opens the mind to cosmic relations. The integration of reason, form-making, and imagining, along with yielding the body and mind to the powers of the earth, is a total aesthetic in Sufism. In the Islamic world, humans' movement, the way they understand the process of time and space, depends on nature and parallels the cosmic order and the basic underlying forms that are found in nature. They are not only circular, which means they revolve and repeat, but rather spiral. They grow and expand in a way that radiates from the center out. Many forms of city order, architectural arrangement and movement pattern, including the basic orders of music and the representation of space in miniatures, comply with such an understanding of space and time. The Dervish Dance is in complete harmony with this understanding and with the cosmic movement.

  8. Le Battaglie Sacre : L'iconografia delle battaglie veterotestamentarie

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    L’argomento che Calabrese presenta è la terza tappa di un lavoro più complesso sull’iconografia analitica. Il termine, ideato da Daniel Arasse, porta in sé una visione distante dall’iconografia tradizionale, infatti crea un connubio molto più stretto con l'antropologia e con la semiotica per analizzare ed approfondita in maniera completa le figure e i loro significati. Distanziandosi dalla visione tradizionale, secondo la quale gli elementi dell’espressione sono la base per arrivare a compren...

  9. Islamic bioethics: between sacred law, lived experiences, and state authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I

    2013-04-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the field of "Islamic" bioethics within public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several critical questions that a comprehensive and cohesive Islamic bioethical theory must address: (i) What are the relationships between Islamic law (Sharī'ah), moral theology (uṣūl al-Fiqh), and Islamic bioethics? (ii) What is the relationship between an Islamic bioethics and the lived experiences of Muslims? and (iii) What is the relationship between Islamic bioethics and the state? This manuscript, and the papers in this special collection, provides insight into how Islamic bioethicists and Muslim communities are addressing some of these questions, and aims to spur further dialogue around these overaching questions as Islamic bioethics coalesces into a true field of scholarly and practical inquiry.

  10. Educational Implications of Michael Fishbane's "Sacred Attunement: A Jewish Theology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This article posits Michael Fishbane's Judaic scholarship as a prime resource for Jewish education. The link between the two fields can be made through a translation of the theological underpinnings of Fishbane's insights into Judaism to educational purposes and practices. Initial work with Jewish educators on establishing this link encouraged…

  11. Fringe Benefits: Should We Milk This Sacred Cow?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert W. Turner

    1989-01-01

    Addresses the effect on revenue of taxing fringe benefits. Asks whether taxing fringe benefits would lead to a dramatic decrease in the share of compensation paid in the form of fringes and whether the level of total compensation is affected by the tax free status of fringe benefits.

  12. Sacred Heart Hospital, Old Dublin Road, Carlow, Carlow.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  13. SACRED TEXTS AND MYSTIC MEANING: AN INqUIRY INTO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and defining “truth” about the nature of human existence in its ultimate and conclusive ... as a meaningful enterprise in its ultimate sense, to impose foreclosure upon that text .... On the subjective side this requires knowing the inner and outer.

  14. Sacred and Profane American History: Does It Exist in Textbooks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tony Waters, a sociologist at California State University, Chico, has raised an interesting issue about the intellectual conflict some of his students experienced when they arrived on campus and enrolled in American history classes. He reported students were perplexed to find there were two kinds of American history--the version they learned in…

  15. Figures du sacré à l'Institut Pasteur

    OpenAIRE

    Perrey, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Malgré plus d’un siècle d’histoire tourmenté, l’Institut Pasteur a préservé son statut ambigu de fondation privée reconnue d’utilité publique et sa triple fonction de centre de recherche, d’enseignement et de vaccination. Cet article étudie la manière dont les pasteuriens ont su défendre et faire fructifier à leur profit l’image de Louis Pasteur, transformer l’Institut en un véritable lieu de mémoire et assurer le maintien des composantes majeures du projet fondateur. Les transformations inte...

  16. Trajetórias do sagrado Pathways of the sacred

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lísias Nogueira Negrão

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é analisar a dinâmica atual do campo religioso paulistano, vista não por intermédio da pluralidade de suas organizações religiosas, nem dos posicionamentos de lideranças eclesiais ou grupais. Nele focamos os agentes religiosos individuais e suas atitudes diante do pluralismo religioso crescente, que culminou na formação de um campo altamente diversificado. Para isso selecionamos indivíduos que são mutantes religiosos, isto é, que mudaram de orientação religiosa ao menos uma vez em suas vidas, ou então que são dúplices ou multíplices religiosos, participantes de dois ou mais universos simbólico-religiosos simultaneamente. Por meio do levantamento de suas trajetórias religiosas analisaram-se suas crenças e práticas rituais, independentemente da pertença ou não a grupos organizados. Com a única exceção dos protestantes, tanto históricos quanto pentecostais - estes um tanto diferenciados pela incorporação da magia -, ainda ancorados na concepção de um Deus transcendente e numa forte eclesialidade, podem ser detectadas tendências em direção a uma religiosidade que Troeltsch chamou de mística, o que implicaria, segundo Campbell, em sua orientalização. Os adeptos de qualquer outra religião ou então os dúplices/multíplices aproximam-se de concepções religiosas místicas e práticas mágicas vividas na privacidade, admitem a freqüência a grupos religiosos diversos e repudiam o autoritarismo clerical. As velhas tramas das duplicidades religiosas tradicionais (catolicismo/espiritismo; catolicismo religiões afro-brasileiras ampliam-se com novas formas (católica/protestante; católica/outras religiões e com a emergência da multiplicidade, reproduzindo à brasileira as mesmas transformações vividas há muito em todo o Ocidente.The aim of this article is to analyze the current dynamic of the São Paulo religious field, seen not through the plurality of its religious organizations, nor through the positions adopted by ecclesiastical or group leaders. Instead, I focus on the individual religious agents and their attitudes in response to a growing religious pluralism and diversification. The work therefore looks at individuals who are 'religious mutants:' people who have changed their religious affiliation at least once during their lives, or who are religious duplicates or multiplicates, participants of two or more symbolic-religious universes simultaneously. By studying people's religious trajectories, we can analyze their beliefs and religious practices irrespective of their affiliation to specific organized groups. With the single exception of the Protestants, still anchored in the conception of a transcendent God and a strong ecclesiality (though the Pentecostals diverge slightly through their incorporation of magic, we can perceive a trend towards a kind of religiosity that Troeltsch called mystic - and which Campbell identifies as its orientalization. The followers of other religions, or the duplicates/multiplicates, tend towards mystical religious ideas and magical practices lived out in private, accept frequenting a variety of religious groups and repudiate clerical authoritarianism. The old conflicts of traditional religious duplicities (Catholicism/Spiritism; Catholicism/Afro-Brazilian Religions have been amplified with new forms (Catholic/Protestant; Catholic/Other Religions and with the emergence of multiplicity, reproducing in Brazilian style the same transformations experienced throughout the West for a long time.

  17. Dyggve's 'Adrio-Byzantine' capitals and the sacred space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Ejnar Dyggve in his 1933 Eigentümlichkeiten und Ursprung der frühmittelaterlichen Architektur in Dalmatien gives a sketchy, yet comprehensive picture of his archaeological research in Salona. According to Dyggve, early medieval architecture in Dalmatia was characterized by oddities (Eigentümlichk......Ejnar Dyggve in his 1933 Eigentümlichkeiten und Ursprung der frühmittelaterlichen Architektur in Dalmatien gives a sketchy, yet comprehensive picture of his archaeological research in Salona. According to Dyggve, early medieval architecture in Dalmatia was characterized by oddities...... (Eigentümlichkeiten) and its origin (Ursprung). After about 300, Oriental and Syrian styles took a firm hold in early Dalmatian architecture. Simultaneously, a Late Antique “Byzantine” art was present, which gives rise to Dyggve’s concept of several phenomena fused together, and what he calls ‘Adrio...

  18. Visiting Ground Zero: sacred echoes in secular rites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past several years since September 11, 2001, large numbers of people from across the continent and around the world have visited the site of the devastated World Trade Center in New York. Scholars in religious studies and the social sciences have noticed that there were and continue to be (though less so over time religious aspects to the observances and performances of visitors to ‘Ground Zero’, as the site of the former World Trade Center almost immediately came to be called. A central argument of this article is that the ongoing stream of visitors to Ground Zero, strictly speaking, does not qualify this phenomenon as a pilgrimage in the traditional religious sense; it is more akin to the growing phenomenon of religious tourism, although it is not exactly that either. Nonetheless the event of 9/11 generated many ritualized activities; the article will also address the pro­cess scholars call ‘ritualization’ and related terms in ritual studies. Although ritualized performances at Ground Zero do not amount to a pilgrimage in the narrow sense that historians of religion mean when they analyse traditional pilgrimages, such as the Hajj to Mecca, or following the Via Dolorosa in Jerusalem, visiting Ground Zero has taken on both secular and religious elements.

  19. The Sacred Circle: Using Mandalas in Counselor Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Shelley A.; Muro, Joel; Lee, Yueh-Ting; DeOrnellas, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    In the supervisory relationship, the use of expressive arts activities has proven to be beneficial to students. Using art materials, students often discover new ways of understanding complex cases and grow personally. Through the art activities, unconscious material is made conscious and then that material is open to processing with the…

  20. Re-enchanted bodies: experiences of the sacred and healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence of the Cartesian dualism body and soul have for a long time been conceived of as separate entities of a different nature. These notions of body and soul are changing. This is especially evident in New Age inspired concepts of body and soul, illness and healing as it is also...... reflected in my study of spiritual healing and patients with medically unexplained symptoms on which this paper is based. The paper will address the following questions: How do patients and healers conceptualize body and soul? What does it mean in relation to a healing process? Two concepts that aim...... to encompass body and soul are Csordas’ concept: ‘imaginal performance’ (1994) and McGuire’s concept: ‘embodied spiritual practices’ (2008). Drawing on these two concepts and with a point of departure in on the one hand patients' and healers' notions of body and self, illness and healing and on the other hand...

  1. Geographical Assessment of Sacred Groves in Bolpur Sub-division ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    single old tree depending on the history of the vegetation and local culture. Local ... the pollution impact from our society with the access of this indigenous .... the essentials of harmony with nature, social unity, ... site with huge tourism potential.

  2. The articulation of the sacred attitude to nature

    OpenAIRE

    Paterykina, Valentyna

    2013-01-01

    A man lives in natural environment and considers it the primordial of his being on the Earth. But depending on the nature causes terrible feeling. It is the state that is caused by sacral things.Sacral things have ambiguous meaning in philosophical literature; it is different from "religious", "dark", "spiritual". Such terms can be synonyms and they have to be differentiated. Indistinct content of term "sacral" enables to use it for any natural landscapes, manmade constructions.Man's existenc...

  3. The Sacred Object: Anne Carson and Simone Weil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Coles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo examina la relación entre la lectura crítica y el objeto crítico en laobra de la poeta y ensayista canadiense Anne Carson, principalmente los textosque surgen de su largo acercamiento a los escritos de la filósofa y mística cristiana Simone Weil. Mi lectura de Carson se centra en los deseos conflictuales de la relación crítica que se encuentran confesados y no confesados en su obra, y en las formas de intimidad que sus respuestas logran con la obra de Weil. Agudizadas por su encuentro con el pensamiento y la fe de Weil, las preguntasde Carson para la crítica ―sobre sus propios objetos y la resistencia de ellos ala interpretación, sobre la distinción entre crítica y literatura, y sobre la vanidadde la estética de la crítica misma― encuentran su articulación en varios génerosde la escritura: estudiando la complicidad de cada uno de estos con Weil, yla capacidad de cada uno a radicalizar sus cuestiones, llego a unas conclusionspropias para la crítica literaria.

  4. Effect of plant growth regulators on callus induction and plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... Effect of plant growth regulators on callus induction and plant ... MS media supplemented with different levels of BA and TDZ were employed for shoot ... acre many times that of any grain crop (Burton, 1969) and are used in a ... plant regeneration from explants require the presence of .... light green. 2.50 ± ...

  5. Plant responses to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Non-pathogenic soilborne microorganisms can promote plant growth, as well as suppress diseases. Plant growth promotion is taken to result from improved nutrient acquisition or hormonal stimulation. Disease suppression can occur through microbial antagonism or induction of resistance in the plant. Se

  6. Plant responses to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Non-pathogenic soilborne microorganisms can promote plant growth, as well as suppress diseases. Plant growth promotion is taken to result from improved nutrient acquisition or hormonal stimulation. Disease suppression can occur through microbial antagonism or induction of resistance in the plant.

  7. Woody plants and woody plant management: ecology, safety, environmental impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    2001-01-01

    Wise and effective woody plant management is an increasing necessity for many land uses and conservation practices, especially on forests and rangelands where native or exotic plants are affecting productivity, access, or critical habitat. Tools and approaches for managing woody plants have been under concerted development for the past 50 years, integrating mechanical...

  8. Evaluating plant and plant oil repellency against the sweetpotato whitefly

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci is a major insect pest of vegetables world-wide. We evaluated the effect of commercial plant oils – garlic oil, hot pepper wax, and mustard oil against B. tabaci. Cucumber plants served as the control. Additional treatments included no plants or oil (clear ai...

  9. 7 CFR 1032.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1032.7 Section 1032.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1032.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (i) of...

  10. 7 CFR 1033.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1033.7 Section 1033.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1033.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, or a plant specified in paragraph (j) of...

  11. 7 CFR 1124.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1124.7 Section 1124.7 Agriculture... Regulating Handling Definitions § 1124.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or a system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified...

  12. 7 CFR 1001.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1001.7 Section 1001.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1001.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant described in paragraph (h)...

  13. 7 CFR 1030.7 - Pool plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pool plant. 1030.7 Section 1030.7 Agriculture... Handling Definitions § 1030.7 Pool plant. Pool plant means a plant, unit of plants, or system of plants as specified in paragraphs (a) through (f) of this section, but excluding a plant specified in paragraph (h)...

  14. [Alfalfa Planting as weed control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter to farming cooperators regarding the stipulations surrounding alfalfa plantings in lieu of small grain plantings to provide weed control,...

  15. Networking in the Plant Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Marcel G A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/240923901; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Almost all higher organisms, including plants, insects, and mammals, are colonized by complex microbial communities and harbor a microbiome. Emerging studies with plants reveal that these microbiomes are structured and form complex, interconnected microbial networks. Within these networks, different

  16. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  17. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  18. Networking in the Plant Microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Almost all higher organisms, including plants, insects, and mammals, are colonized by complex microbial communities and harbor a microbiome. Emerging studies with plants reveal that these microbiomes are structured and form complex, interconnected microbial networks. Within these networks, different

  19. The hidden world within plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardoim, Pablo R.; Overbeek, Van Leonard S.; Berg, Gabriele; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Compant, Stéphane; Campisano, Andrea; Döring, Matthias; Sessitsch, Angela

    2015-01-01

    All plants are inhabited internally by diverse microbial communities comprising bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and protistic taxa. These microorganisms showing endophytic lifestyles play crucial roles in plant development, growth, fitness, and diversification. The increasing awareness of and inform

  20. The Rhizobium-plant symbiosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Rhijn, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1995-01-01

    .... In these nodules, the rhizobia convert atmospheric N2 into ammonia for the plant. To establish this symbiosis, signals are produced early in the interaction between plant and rhizobia and they elicit discrete responses by the two symbiotic partners...