WorldWideScience

Sample records for plant research laboratory

  1. MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports of research funded through the Michigan State University/Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall biosynthesis and proteins, gene expression, stress responses, plant hormone biosynthesis, interactions between the nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria, and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 320 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs. (MHB)

  2. Plant research '79: report of the Michigan State University, Department of Energy, Plant Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Botanical research conducted at MSU during 1979 is described. Areas of study include cell wall biosynthesis, hormonal regulation, responses of plants to environmental stresses, and molecular studies. (ACR)

  3. Experimental researches on power plant condensers performed at ENEA laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizi, F.; Girardi, G.; Palazzi, G. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energetica

    1993-09-01

    Improvement of Italian industrial design capability is the principal aim of the ENEA (Italian Agency for Energy, New Technologies and the Environment) R&D program which is studying the thermo-hydraulic aspects of shell-and-tube condensers. The principal experimental apparatus of this project allows researchers to perform tests for investigating in detail feed-water heater (FWH) thermo-hydraulic performance. A scaled-down test section was used in significant size to reproduce condensing, de-superheating and drain cooling zones. To approach condensation phenomena occurring in the FWH, a visualization test section was also built. A new model for condensation flow, perpendicular to the tubes, was developed using the films shot through the visualization test section. All the experimental data carried out in the program were used to assess an original code, named COND. Concerning the tube-side condenser design, an analysis of the velocity field in the front end head was performed to minimize erosion phenomena.

  4. The good and the bad of poisonous plants: an introduction to the USDA-ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin D; Panter, Kip E; Gardner, Dale R; Stegelmeier, Bryan L

    2012-06-01

    This article provides an overview of the Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory (PPRL), about the unique services and activities of the PPRL and the potential assistance that they can provide to plant poisoning incidences. The PPRL is a federal research laboratory. It is part of the Agricultural Research Service, the in-house research arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The mission of the PPRL is to identify toxic plants and their toxic compounds, determine how the plants poison animals, and develop diagnostic and prognostic procedures for poisoned animals. Furthermore, the PPRL's mission is to identify the conditions under which poisoning occurs and develop management strategies and treatments to reduce losses. Information obtained through research efforts at the PPRL is mostly used by the livestock industry, natural resource managers, veterinarians, chemists, plant and animal scientists, extension personnel, and other state and federal agencies. PPRL currently has 9 scientists and 17 support staff, representing various disciplines consisting of toxicology, reproductive toxicology, veterinary medicine, chemistry, animal science, range science, and plant physiology. This team of scientists provides an interdisciplinary approach to applied and basic research to develop solutions to plant intoxications. While the mission of the PPRL primarily impacts the livestock industry, spinoff benefits such as development of animal models, isolation and characterization of novel compounds, elucidation of biological and molecular mechanisms of action, national and international collaborations, and outreach efforts are significant to biomedical researchers. The staff at the PPRL has extensive knowledge regarding a number of poisonous plants. Although the focus of their knowledge is on plants that affect livestock, oftentimes, these plants are also poisonous to humans, and thus, similar principles could apply for cases of human poisonings. Consequently, the information provided

  5. SeedUSoon: A New Software Program to Improve Seed Stock Management and Plant Line Exchanges between Research Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavay, Céline; Segard, Stéphane; Pochon, Nathalie; Nussaume, Laurent; Javot, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Plant research is supported by an ever-growing collection of mutant or transgenic lines. In the past, a typical basic research laboratory would focus on only a few plant lines that were carefully isolated from collections of lines containing random mutations. The subsequent technological breakthrough in high-throughput sequencing, combined with novel and highly efficient mutagenesis techniques (including site-directed mutagenesis), has led to a recent exponential growth in plant line collections used by individual researchers. Tracking the generation and genetic properties of these genetic resources is thus becoming increasingly challenging for researchers. Another difficulty for researchers is controlling the use of seeds protected by a Material Transfer Agreement, as often only the original recipient of the seeds is aware of the existence of such documents. This situation can thus lead to difficult legal situations. Simultaneously, various institutions and the general public now demand more information about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In response, researchers are seeking new database solutions to address the triple challenge of research competition, legal constraints, and institutional/public demands. To help plant biology laboratories organize, describe, store, trace, and distribute their seeds, we have developed the new program SeedUSoon, with simplicity in mind. This software contains data management functions that allow the separate tracking of distinct mutations, even in successive crossings or mutagenesis. SeedUSoon reflects the biotechnological diversity of mutations and transgenes contained in any specific line, and the history of their inheritance. It can facilitate GMO certification procedures by distinguishing mutations on the basis of the presence/absence of a transgene, and by recording the technology used for their generation. Its interface can be customized to match the context and rules of any laboratory. In addition, Seed

  6. SeedUSoon: A New Software Program to Improve Seed Stock Management and Plant Line Exchanges between Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavay, Céline; Segard, Stéphane; Pochon, Nathalie; Nussaume, Laurent; Javot, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    Plant research is supported by an ever-growing collection of mutant or transgenic lines. In the past, a typical basic research laboratory would focus on only a few plant lines that were carefully isolated from collections of lines containing random mutations. The subsequent technological breakthrough in high-throughput sequencing, combined with novel and highly efficient mutagenesis techniques (including site-directed mutagenesis), has led to a recent exponential growth in plant line collections used by individual researchers. Tracking the generation and genetic properties of these genetic resources is thus becoming increasingly challenging for researchers. Another difficulty for researchers is controlling the use of seeds protected by a Material Transfer Agreement, as often only the original recipient of the seeds is aware of the existence of such documents. This situation can thus lead to difficult legal situations. Simultaneously, various institutions and the general public now demand more information about the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In response, researchers are seeking new database solutions to address the triple challenge of research competition, legal constraints, and institutional/public demands. To help plant biology laboratories organize, describe, store, trace, and distribute their seeds, we have developed the new program SeedUSoon, with simplicity in mind. This software contains data management functions that allow the separate tracking of distinct mutations, even in successive crossings or mutagenesis. SeedUSoon reflects the biotechnological diversity of mutations and transgenes contained in any specific line, and the history of their inheritance. It can facilitate GMO certification procedures by distinguishing mutations on the basis of the presence/absence of a transgene, and by recording the technology used for their generation. Its interface can be customized to match the context and rules of any laboratory. In addition, Seed

  7. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  8. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  9. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  10. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  11. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  12. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  13. Beginning Plant Biotechnology Laboratories Using Fast Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mike

    This set of 16 laboratory activities is designed to illustrate the life cycle of Brassicae plants from seeds in pots to pods in 40 days. At certain points along the production cycle of the central core of labs, there are related lateral labs to provide additional learning opportunities employing this family of plants, referred to as "fast…

  14. Simula Research Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tveito, Aslak

    2010-01-01

    The Simula Research Laboratory, located just outside Oslo in Norway, is rightly famed as a highly successful research facility, despite being, at only eight years old, a very young institution. This fascinating book tells the history of Simula, detailing the culture and values that have been the guiding principles of the laboratory throughout its existence. Dedicated to tackling scientific challenges of genuine social importance, the laboratory undertakes important research with long-term implications in networks, computing and software engineering, including specialist work in biomedical comp

  15. Green Building Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David Jean [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2013-12-29

    This project provided support to the Green Building Research Laboratory at Portland State University (PSU) so it could work with researchers and industry to solve technical problems for the benefit of the green building industry. It also helped to facilitate the development of PSU’s undergraduate and graduate-level training in building science across the curriculum.

  16. Plant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Land's agricultural research team is testing new ways to sustain life in space as a research participant with Kennedy Space Center's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The Land, sponsored by Kraft General Foods, is an entertainment, research, and education facility at EPCOT Center, part of Walt Disney World. The cooperative effort is simultaneously a research and development program, a technology demonstration that provides the public to see high technology at work and an area of potential spinoff: the CELSS work may generate Earth use technology beneficial to the hydroponic (soilless growing) vegetable production industries of the world.

  17. Materials Behavior Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to evaluate mechanical properties of materials including metals, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites under typical...

  18. Metallurgical Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to increase basic knowledge of metallurgical processing for controlling the microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic aerospace alloys and...

  19. Metallurgical Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to increase basic knowledge of metallurgical processing for controlling the microstructure and mechanical properties of metallic aerospace alloys and...

  20. The National Fire Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Fire Research Laboratory (NFRL) is adding a unique facility that will serve as a center of excellence for fireperformance of structures ranging in size...

  1. Laboratory for Large Data Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The Laboratory for Large Data Research (LDR) addresses a critical need to rapidly prototype shared, unified access to large amounts of data across both the...

  2. Geocentrifuge Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The geocentrifuge subjects a sample to a high-gravity field by spinning it rapidly around a central shaft. In this high-gravity field, processes, such as fluid flow,...

  3. Naval Research Laboratory Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Res Ctr Blossom Point Pomonkey KEY WEST Marine Corrosion Facility MOBILE , AL Ex-USS Shadwell BAY ST. LOUIS, MS John C. Stennis Space Center...decision support, and autonomous systems. Mobile Networks / Personal Secure Phone The Navy and Marine Corps Corporate Laboratory NRL Personnel FY 11...laser 1980 1990 2000 2010 1970 SHARP Reconnaissance 2001 QuadGard 2005 IPsec, IPv6 , NKDS ANDE-2 Spacecraft Blood Surrogate Significant and

  4. Plant Research '75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Research is reported on stomatal regulation of the gas exchanges between plant and environment; inhibitory effects in flower formation; plant growth and development through hormones; hormone action; development and nitrogen fixation in algae; primary cell wall glycoprotein ectensin; enzymic mechanisms and control of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis; molecular studies of membrane studies; sensory transduction in plants; regulation of formation of protein complexes and enzymes in higher plant cell and mechanism of sulfur dioxide toxicity in plants. (PCS)

  5. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NOAA-GLERL and its partners conduct innovative research on the dynamic environments and ecosystems of the Great Lakes and coastal regions to provide information for...

  6. Research System Integration Laboratory (SIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The VEA Research SIL (VRS) is essential to the success of the TARDEC 30-Year Strategy. The vast majority of the TARDEC Capability Sets face challenging electronics...

  7. Virtual robotics laboratory for research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Gerard T.

    1995-09-01

    We report on work currently underway to put a robotics laboratory onto the Internet in support of teaching and research in robotics and artificial intelligence in higher education institutions in the UK. The project is called Netrolab. The robotics laboratory comprises a set of robotics resources including a manipulator, a mobile robot with an on-board monocular active vision head and a set of sonar sensing modules, and a set of laboratory cameras to allow the user to see into the laboratory. The paper will report on key aspect of the project aimed at using multimedia tools and object-oriented techniques to network the robotics resources and to allow them to be configured into complex teaching and experimental modules. The paper will outline both the current developments of Netrolab and provide a perspective on the future development of networked virtual laboratories for research.

  8. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  9. Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL) is a facility designed to conduct experimental small-scale propulsion and power generation systems research....

  10. Air Force Research Laboratory Integrated Omics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    the goals of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is the development of new methods to assess warfighter performance by using advanced...Objective (DTO) project. The research project (MD.34 Biotechnology for Near-Real-Time Predictive Toxicology ) aimed to identify biomarkers of toxicity...Technology, established in discovery work in 2001, and has provided technical support to many researchers in the Department of Defense (DoD). The

  11. SESAME/Environmental Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The Environmental Research Laboratories (ERL) have been designated as the basic research group of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ERL performs an integrated program of research and research services directed toward understanding the geophysical environment, protecting the environment, and improving the forecasting ability of NOAA. Twenty-four laboratories located throughout the United States comprise ERL. The Project SESAME (Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment) Planning Office is a project office within ERL. SESAME is conceived as a joint effort involving NOAA, NASA, NSF, and the atmospheric science community to lay the foundation for improved prediction of severe convective storms. The scientific plan for SESAME includes a phased buildup of analysis, modeling, instrumentation development and procurement, and limited-scale observational activities.

  12. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Among the many cancer research laboratories operated by NCI, the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research(FNLCR) is unique in that it is a Federally Funded...

  13. Laboratory directed research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  14. Escape from the laboratory: new horizons for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Maurizio; Henry, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is changing the way biologists work, as large amounts of genetic data can be easily outsourced commercially. Consequently, crucial research efforts in plant genetics can now be found outside the traditional laboratory setting, allowing for novel and more challenging scientific questions to be answered by virtual collaborative networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NAS Human Factors Safety Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts an integrated program of research on the relationship of factors concerning individuals, work groups, and organizations as employees perform...

  16. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  17. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Audrey G; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Ryan, Michael G; Tissue, David T; Baggett, L Scott; Adams, Henry D; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R L; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W; Dickman, L Turin; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Saint Joanis, Brigitte; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R

    2015-11-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also asked whether any differences among laboratories were related to the extraction and quantification methods used to determine starch and sugar concentrations. These questions were addressed by sending sub-samples collected from five woody plant tissues, which varied in NSC content and chemical composition, to 29 laboratories. Each laboratory analyzed the samples with their laboratory-specific protocols, based on recent publications, to determine concentrations of soluble sugars, starch and their sum, total NSC. Laboratory estimates differed substantially for all samples. For example, estimates for Eucalyptus globulus leaves (EGL) varied from 23 to 116 (mean = 56) mg g(-1) for soluble sugars, 6-533 (mean = 94) mg g(-1) for starch and 53-649 (mean = 153) mg g(-1) for total NSC. Mixed model analysis of variance showed that much of the variability among laboratories was unrelated to the categories we used for extraction and quantification methods (method category R(2) = 0.05-0.12 for soluble sugars, 0.10-0.33 for starch and 0.01-0.09 for total NSC). For EGL, the difference between the highest and lowest least squares means for categories in the mixed model analysis was 33 mg g(-1) for total NSC, compared with the range of laboratory estimates of 596 mg g(-1). Laboratories were reasonably consistent in their ranks of estimates among tissues for starch (r = 0.41-0.91), but less so for total NSC (r = 0.45-0.84) and soluble sugars (r = 0.11-0.83). Our results show that NSC estimates for woody plant tissues cannot be compared among laboratories. The relative changes in NSC between treatments measured within a laboratory

  18. Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

  19. Photobiology Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Photobiology Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL. The photobiology group's research is in four main areas: (1) Comprehensive studies of fuel-producing photosynthetic, fermentative, and chemolithotrophic model microorganisms; (2) Characterization and engineering of redox enzymes and proteins for fuel production; (3) Genetic and pathway engineering of model organisms to improve production of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels; and (4) Studies of nanosystems using biological and non-biological materials in hybrid generation. NREL's photobiology research capabilities include: (1) Controlled and automated photobioreactors and fermenters for growing microorganisms under a variety of environmental conditions; (2) High-and medium-throughput screening of H{sub 2}-producing organisms; (3) Homologous and heterologous expression, purification, and biochemical/biophysical characterization of redox enzymes and proteins; (4) Qualitative and quantitative analyses of gases, metabolites, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; (5) Genetic and pathway engineering and development of novel genetic toolboxes; and (6) Design and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-based biofuel cells and energy conversion nanodevices.

  20. NECESSITY FOR UNDERGROUND RESEARCH LABORATORY IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Želimir Vejnović

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plant (NPP Krško has a license to operate until 2023, and under the current agreement between the Republic of Slovenia and the Republic of Croatia, countries are bound to dispose one half of radioactive waste produced during the operation time and after decommissioning of NPP each. Safe long-term management of high level radioactive waste and spent fuel represents one of the most important issues of the modern world. The best way to provide practical demonstration of repository’s safety, which will be one of convincing arguments in the process of licensing future repository, is developed underground research laboratory (URL. Existence of URL open to international co-operation would certainly improve the international recognition and credibility of Croatian programme, as well as allow dissemination of scientific research results to a broader scientific community (the paper is published in Croatian.

  1. Plant Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kossmann, J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Nielsen, K.K.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003 the Plant Research Department (PRD) at Risø National Laboratory was involved in establishing the consortium Plant Biotech Denmark, which is unifying most of the Danish Plant Biotechnology activities. Within the consortium, PRD has the uniqueopportunity to be the only life science department...... located in an environment that is largely dominated by physicists. PRD is challenged to optimally interface Plant Biology with the different fields of expertise that are established at Risø NationalLaboratory. These activities are mainly related to develop novel post-genomic tools to assign function...... to genes, which are widely applicable in the life sciences, such as non-invasive and non-destructive technologies to determine metabolite concentrationswith high spatial and temporal resolution. The Plant Research Department applies these and state-of-the-art technologies to increase knowledge to develop...

  2. Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The SARL is a unique high contraction, open circuit subsonic wind tunnel providing a test velocity up to 436 mph (0.5 Mach number) and a high quality,...

  3. Biometrics Research and Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As the Department of Defense moves forward in its pursuit of integrating biometrics technology into facility access control, the Global War on Terrorism and weapon...

  4. Stanford Aerospace Research Laboratory research overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.

    1993-02-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be, addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modelling and control of extremely flexible space structures. The ARL has designed and built several semi-autonomous free-flying robots that perform numerous tasks in a zero-gravity, drag-free, two-dimensional environment. It is envisioned that future generations of these robots will be part of a human-robot team, in which the robots will operate under the task-level commands of astronauts. To make this possible, the ARL has developed a graphical user interface (GUI) with an intuitive object-level motion-direction capability. Using this interface, the ARL has demonstrated autonomous navigation, intercept and capture of moving and spinning objects, object transport, multiple-robot cooperative manipulation, and simple assemblies from both free-flying and fixed bases. The ARL has also built a number of experimental test beds on which the modelling and control of flexible manipulators has been studied. Early ARL experiments in this arena demonstrated for the first time the capability to control the end-point position of both single-link and multi-link flexible manipulators using end-point sensing. Building on these accomplishments, the ARL has been able to control payloads with unknown dynamics at the end of a flexible manipulator, and to achieve high-performance control of a multi-link flexible manipulator.

  5. Research and Progress on Virtual Cloud Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jian Wei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, cloud computing technology has experienced continuous development and improvement, and has gradually expanded to the education sector. First, this paper will introduce the background knowledge of the current virtual cloud laboratory; by comparing the advantages and disadvantages between traditional laboratory and virtual cloud laboratory, and comparing the application, advantages and disadvantages, and development trend of OpenStack technology and VMWare technology in safety, performance, design, function, use case, and value of virtual cloud laboratory, this paper concludes that application based on OpenStack virtual cloud laboratory in universities and research institutes and other departments is essential.

  6. Virtual Instruction: A Qualitative Research Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtlander, Lee M.; Giles, Martha J.

    2010-01-01

    Online graduate programs in psychology are becoming common; however, a concern has been whether instructors in the programs provide adequate research mentoring. One issue surrounding research mentoring is the absence of research laboratories in the virtual university. Students attending online universities often do research without peer or lab…

  7. NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    and without any measurable voltage. In an applied field G.P. Espinosa , Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 1676 of 9 T, this value was only reduced by a factor of...Division Dr. S. Ossakow 72723 WARFARE SYSTEMS AND SENSORS RESEARCH DIRECTORATE 5000 Associate Director of Research Mr. R.R. Rojas 73294 5100 Supt...Dr. W.R. Ellis Code 5000 Code 6000 P.G. Wilhelm R.R. Rojas Dr. B.B. Rath ORGANIZATIONAL CHART (Continued) EXECUTIVE DIRECTORATE EEUIECOMMANDING OFFICER

  8. Cyber Defense Research and Monitoring Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility acts as a fusion point for bridging ARL's research in tactical and operational Information Assurance (IA) areas and the development and assessment of...

  9. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  10. Plant research '76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Overall objective remains unchanged: to contribute to the knowledge, with strong emphasis on fundamental problems, of how plants function, the roles they play in the environment and energy relations of the world, and how these roles may be optimized for the benefit of mankind. (PCS)

  11. Plant Protection Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Allsopp

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the mycorrhizal status of plants growing in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa was undertaken to assess the range of mycorrhizal types and their dominance in species characteristic of this region. Records were obtained by ex­amining the root systems of plants growing in three Cape lowland vegetation types, viz. West Coast Strandveld, West Coast Renosterveld and Sand Plain Lowland Fynbos for mycorrhizas, as well as by collating literature records of mycorrhizas on plants growing in the region. The mycorrhizal status of 332 species is listed, of which 251 species are new records. Members of all the important families in this region have been examined. Mycorrhizal status appears to be associated mainly with taxonomic position of the species. Extrapolating from these results, we conclude that 62% of the flora of the Cape Floristic Region form vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas, 23% have no mycorrhizas, 8% are ericoid mycorrhizal, 2% form orchid mycorrhizas, whereas the mycorrhizal status of 4% of the flora is unknown. There were no indigenous ectomycor- rhizal species. The proportion of non-mycorrhizal species is high compared to other ecosystems. In particular, the lack of mycorrhizas in several important perennial families in the Cape Floristic Region is unusual. The diversity of nutrient acquir­ing adaptations, including the range of mycorrhizas and cluster roots in some non-mycorrhizal families, may promote co­existence of plants in this species-rich region.

  12. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quentin, Audrey G.; Pinkard, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Michael G.; Tissue, David T.; Baggett, Scott L.; Adams, Henry D.; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M.; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R.L.; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K.; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S.; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W.; Dickman, Turin L.; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S.; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M.; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E.; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G.; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G.; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Joanis, Brigitte Saint; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A.; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R.; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A.; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent lite

  13. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey G. Quentin; Elizabeth A. Pinkard; Michael G. Ryan; David T. Tissue; L. Scott Baggett; Henry D. Adams; Pascale Maillard; Jacqueline Marchand; Simon M. Landhausser; Andre Lacointe; Yves Gibon; William R. L. Anderegg; Shinichi Asao; Owen K. Atkin; Marc Bonhomme; Caroline Claye; Pak S. Chow; Anne Clement-Vidal; Noel W. Davies; L. Turin Dickman; Rita Dumbur; David S. Ellsworth; Kristen Falk; Lucía Galiano; Jose M. Grunzweig; Henrik Hartmann; Gunter Hoch; Sharon Hood; Joanna E. Jones; Takayoshi Koike; Iris Kuhlmann; Francisco Lloret; Melchor Maestro; Shawn D. Mansfield; Jordi Martinez-Vilalta; Mickael Maucourt; Nathan G. McDowell; Annick Moing; Bertrand Muller; Sergio G. Nebauer; Ulo Niinemets; Sara Palacio; Frida Piper; Eran Raveh; Andreas Richter; Gaelle Rolland; Teresa Rosas; Brigitte Saint Joanis; Anna Sala; Renee A. Smith; Frank Sterck; Joseph R. Stinziano; Mari Tobias; Faride Unda; Makoto Watanabe; Danielle A. Way; Lasantha K. Weerasinghe; Birgit Wild; Erin Wiley; David R. Woodruff

    2016-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also...

  14. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quentin, Audrey G.; Pinkard, Elizabeth A.; Ryan, Michael G.; Tissue, David T.; Baggett, Scott L.; Adams, Henry D.; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M.; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R.L.; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K.; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S.; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W.; Dickman, Turin L.; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S.; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M.; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E.; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G.; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G.; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Joanis, Brigitte Saint; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A.; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R.; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A.; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K.; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent lite

  15. Laboratory Learning in a Research Methods Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Knapp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based learning is increasingly considered to be an integral component of undergraduate education. However, students do not always perceive the value of laboratory learning in the college classroom. The current research sought to create an effective laboratory learning environment within a research methods course and to assess students’ perceptions of this approach at the end of one semester. This article reports the findings for two studies; in Study 1, a survey was given to 17 criminal justice, health care management and advocacy, and psychology students. In a subsequent semester, challenges from Study 1 were addressed, and the same survey (i.e., Study 2 was given to 20 criminal justice and psychology majors. Across both samples, students’ responses to the laboratory learning paradigm were generally positive, yet concerns and challenges were identified. Future research should attempt to address these concerns and to assess objective student outcomes, such as grades in the course.

  16. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. CANDU steam generator life management: laboratory data and plant experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, R.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Nickerson, J.H.; Subash, N. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Wright, M.D

    2001-10-01

    As CANDU reactors enter middle age, and the potential value of the plants in a deregulated market is realized, life management and life extension issues become increasingly important. An accurate assessment of critical components, such as the CANDU 6 steam generators (SGs), is crucial for successful life extension, and in this context, material issues are a key factor. For example, service experience with Alloy 900 tubing indicates very low levels of degradation within CANDU SGs; the same is also noted worldwide. With little field data for extrapolation, life management and life extension decisions for the tube bundles rely heavily on laboratory data. Similarly, other components of the SGs, in particular the secondary side internals, have only limited inspection data upon which to base a condition assessment. However, in this case there are also relatively little laboratory data. Decisions on life management and life extension are further complicated--not only is inspection access often restricted, but repair or replacement options for internal components are, by definition, also limited. The application of CANDU SG life management and life extension requires a judicious blend of in-service data, laboratory research and development (R and D) and materials and engineering judgment. For instance, the available laboratory corrosion and fretting wear data for Alloy 800 SG tubing have been compared with plant experience (with all types of tubing), and with crevice chemistry simulations, in order to provide an appropriate inspection guide for a 50-year SG life. A similar approach has been taken with other SG components, where the emphasis has been on known degradation mechanisms worldwide. This paper provides an outline of the CANDU SG life management program, including the results to date, a summary of the supporting R and D program showing the integration with condition assessment and life management activities, and the approach taken to life extension for a typical

  18. NPS Ocean Acoustics Laboratory Marine Mammal Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Ching-Sang; Collins, Curtis; Joseph, John; Margolina, Tetyana; Stimpert, Alison; Miller, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The Marine Mammal Group within the Ocean Acoustics Laboratory at NPS is involved with a range of research studying marine mammal acoustics , both sound production and effects of anthropogenic sound on marine mammals. A sampling of our research is described below.

  19. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  20. US Naval Research Laboratory focus issue: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Rather than concentrate on a single topic, this feature issue presents the wide variety of research in optics that takes place at a single institution, the United States Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and is analogous to an NRL feature issue published in Applied Optics in 1967. NRL is the corporate research laboratory for the Navy and Marine Corps. It conducts a broadly based multidisciplinary program of scientific research and advanced technological development in the physical, engineering, space, and environmental sciences related to maritime, atmospheric, and space domains. NRL's research is directed toward new and improved materials, techniques, equipment, and systems in response to identified and anticipated Navy needs. A number of articles in this issue review progress in broader research areas while other articles present the latest results on specific topics.

  1. Aquatic plant control research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

    1997-05-01

    The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

  2. Monitoring of biogas plants - experiences in laboratory and full scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Habermann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To control and regulate the biogas process there are online process parameters and offline process parameters, which basically don’t differ between pilot biogas plants and industrial biogas plants. Generally, temperature, pH-value, volume flow rate and sometimes redox potential are measured online. An online-measurement of the dissolved volatile fatty acids and an online-detection of dissolved hydrogen both directly in the liquid phase as well as near-infrared spectroscopy are under development. FOS/TAC-analysis is the most common offline-analysis of the biogas process and normally it is carried out by the plant operator directly at the biogas plant. For example dry matter, organic dry matter, nitrogen and fatty acids are other analyses, which are carried out but by a laboratory. Microbiological analyses of biogas plants are very expensive and time-consuming and are therefore in Germany very rare. Microbiological analyses are mainly for research purposes. For example the Fluorescence in situ Hybridiation (FISH is used for characterization of the populations. Electric-optical measurement should be established as a new method to investigate the vitality of the methane producing microorganisms. In a cooperation project, which is promoted by the German ministry for technology, between IASP and Chair of Bioprocess Engineering at TU Berlin, this method is proper investigated using a device from the firm EloSystems. The microorganisms are brought in an electrical field of different frequencies. In this field the microorganisms direct themselves differently according to their physiological state. At the end of this project an early detection of process disturbance will be possible with the help of this method. In this presentation the result of the first tests are presented.

  3. Researchers Discover Plants Biological Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王全良

    1996-01-01

    Scientists who created glow-in-the-dark plants by shooting up seedlingswith firefly DNA have identified the first biological clock gene in plants. Discovery of the timepiece gene, which controls such biological rhythmsas daily leaf movements and proe openings, flower-blooming schedules andphotosynthesis cycles, could lead to a host of applications in ornamental horti-culture, agriculture and even human health. Many researchers believe that

  4. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Research & Development Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stricker, Nicole [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Technological advances that drive economic growth require both public and private investment. The U.S. Department of Energy’s national laboratories play a crucial role by conducting the type of research, testing and evaluation that is beyond the scope of regulators, academia or industry. Examples of such work from the past year can be found in these pages. Idaho National Laboratory’s engineering and applied science expertise helps deploy new technologies for nuclear energy, national security and new energy resources. Unique infrastructure, nuclear material inventory and vast expertise converge at INL, the nation’s nuclear energy laboratory. Productive partnerships with academia, industry and government agencies deliver high-impact outcomes. This edition of INL’s Impacts magazine highlights national and regional leadership efforts, growing capabilities, notable collaborations, and technology innovations. Please take a few minutes to learn more about the critical resources and transformative research at one of the nation’s premier applied science laboratories.

  6. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E. [Parma Univ., Health Physics (Italy); Pedrazzi, G. [Parma Univ., Dept. of Public Health (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ({sup 57}Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 32}P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  7. Laboratory Apprenticeship through a Student Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.; Rigano, Donna L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the viability of cognitive apprenticeship for learning science in relation to findings from an investigation of a research project involving high school students working in a university chemical engineering laboratory under the mentorship of a university-based scientist. Reports that students were empowered to seek empirically viable…

  8. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  10. PlantDB – a versatile database for managing plant research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruissem Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research in plant science laboratories often involves usage of many different species, cultivars, ecotypes, mutants, alleles or transgenic lines. This creates a great challenge to keep track of the identity of experimental plants and stored samples or seeds. Results Here, we describe PlantDB – a Microsoft® Office Access database – with a user-friendly front-end for managing information relevant for experimental plants. PlantDB can hold information about plants of different species, cultivars or genetic composition. Introduction of a concise identifier system allows easy generation of pedigree trees. In addition, all information about any experimental plant – from growth conditions and dates over extracted samples such as RNA to files containing images of the plants – can be linked unequivocally. Conclusion We have been using PlantDB for several years in our laboratory and found that it greatly facilitates access to relevant information.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  12. Interdisciplinary research and training program in the plant sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports from the Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences funded through the MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering topics such as the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall proteins and assembly, gene expression, stress responses, growth regulator biosynthesis, interaction between nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and membrane trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, the molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 132 refs. (MHB)

  13. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The second technology substitutes fatty acid monomers for styrene in unsaturated polyester and vinyl ester repair resins , while maintain- ing...U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2009 Annual Review Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection...of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering

  14. Master plan of Mizunami underground research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    In June 1994, the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan reformulated the Long-Term Programme for Research, Development and Utilisation of Nuclear Energy (LTP). The LTP (item 7, chapter 3) sets out the guidelines which apply to promoting scientific studies of the deep geological environment, with a view to providing a sound basis for research and development programmes for geological disposal projects. The Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has been conducting scientific studies of the deep geological environment as part of its Geoscientific Research Programme. The LTP also emphasised the importance of deep underground research facilities in the following terms: Deep underground research facilities play an important role in research relating to geological disposal. They allow the characteristics and features of the geological environment, which require to be considered in performance assessment of disposal systems, to be investigated in situ and the reliability of the models used for evaluating system performance to be developed and refined. They also provide opportunities for carrying out comprehensive research that will contribute to an improved overall understanding of Japan's deep geological environment. It is recommended that more than one facility should be constructed, considering the range of characteristics and features of Japan's geology and other relevant factors. It is important to plan underground research facilities on the basis of results obtained from research and development work already carried out, particularly the results of scientific studies of the deep geological environment. Such a plan for underground research facilities should be clearly separated from the development of an actual repository. JNC's Mizunami underground research laboratory (MIU) Project will be a deep underground research facility as foreseen by the above provisions of the LTP. (author)

  15. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2005 Research Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.; Gwinner, D.; Miller, M.; Pitchford, P.

    2006-06-01

    Science and technology are at the heart of everything we do at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as we pursue innovative, robust, and sustainable ways to produce energy--and as we seek to understand and illuminate the physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering behind alternative energy technologies. This year's Research Review highlights the Lab's work in the areas of alternatives fuels and vehicles, high-performing commercial buildings, and high-efficiency inverted, semi-mismatched solar cells.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  17. Bringing ayahuasca to the clinical research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2005-06-01

    Since the winter of 1999, the authors and their research team have been conducting clinical studies involving the administration of ayahuasca to healthy volunteers. The rationale for conducting this kind of research is twofold. First, the growing interest of many individuals for traditional indigenous practices involving the ingestion of natural psychotropic drugs such as ayahuasca demands the systematic study of their pharmacological profiles in the target species, i.e., human beings. The complex nature of ayahuasca brews combining a large number of pharmacologically active compounds requires that research be carried out to establish the safety and overall pharmacological profile of these products. Second, the authors believe that the study of psychedelics in general calls for renewed attention. Although the molecular and electrophysiological level effects of these drugs are relatively well characterized, current knowledge of the mechanisms by which these compounds modify the higher order cognitive processes in the way they do is still incomplete, to say the least. The present article describes the development of the research effort carried out at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, commenting on several methodological aspects and reviewing the basic clinical findings. It also describes the research currently underway in our laboratory, and briefly comments on two new studies we plan to undertake in order to further our knowledge of the pharmacology of ayahuasca.

  18. National Storage Laboratory: a collaborative research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry; Watson, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The grand challenges of science and industry that are driving computing and communications have created corresponding challenges in information storage and retrieval. An industry-led collaborative project has been organized to investigate technology for storage systems that will be the future repositories of national information assets. Industry participants are IBM Federal Systems Company, Ampex Recording Systems Corporation, General Atomics DISCOS Division, IBM ADSTAR, Maximum Strategy Corporation, Network Systems Corporation, and Zitel Corporation. Industry members of the collaborative project are funding their own participation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through its National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) will participate in the project as the operational site and provider of applications. The expected result is the creation of a National Storage Laboratory to serve as a prototype and demonstration facility. It is expected that this prototype will represent a significant advance in the technology for distributed storage systems capable of handling gigabyte-class files at gigabit-per-second data rates. Specifically, the collaboration expects to make significant advances in hardware, software, and systems technology in four areas of need, (1) network-attached high performance storage; (2) multiple, dynamic, distributed storage hierarchies; (3) layered access to storage system services; and (4) storage system management.

  19. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold; March, Paul; Williams, Nehemiah; ONeill, William

    2011-01-01

    NASA/JSC is implementing an advanced propulsion physics laboratory, informally known as "Eagleworks", to pursue propulsion technologies necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system over the next 50 years, and enabling interstellar spaceflight by the end of the century. This work directly supports the "Breakthrough Propulsion" objectives detailed in the NASA OCT TA02 In-space Propulsion Roadmap, and aligns with the #10 Top Technical Challenge identified in the report. Since the work being pursued by this laboratory is applied scientific research in the areas of the quantum vacuum, gravitation, nature of space-time, and other fundamental physical phenomenon, high fidelity testing facilities are needed. The lab will first implement a low-thrust torsion pendulum (physics and engineering models can be explored and understood in the lab to allow scaling to power levels pertinent for human spaceflight, 400kW SEP human missions to Mars may become a possibility, and at power levels of 2MW, 1-year transit to Neptune may also be possible. Additionally, the lab is implementing a warp field interferometer that will be able to measure spacetime disturbances down to 150nm. Recent work published by White [1] [2] [3] suggests that it may be possible to engineer spacetime creating conditions similar to what drives the expansion of the cosmos. Although the expected magnitude of the effect would be tiny, it may be a "Chicago pile" moment for this area of physics.

  20. 41 CFR 101-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Laboratory and research...-General Policies § 101-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. (a) This section prescribes controls for use by Federal agencies in managing laboratory and research equipment in Federal...

  1. 41 CFR 109-25.109 - Laboratory and research equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laboratory and research... PROCUREMENT 25-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 109-25.109 Laboratory and research equipment. The provisions of 41 CFR 101-25.109 and this section apply to laboratory and research equipment in the possession...

  2. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  3. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment. (ERB)

  4. Using the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laboratory for Safety Focused Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Jeffrey .C; Boring, Ronald L.

    2016-07-01

    Under the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been using the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) to conduct critical safety focused Human Factors research and development (R&D) for the nuclear industry. The LWRS program has the overall objective to develop the scientific basis to extend existing nuclear power plant (NPP) operating life beyond the current 60-year licensing period and to ensure their long-term reliability, productivity, safety, and security. One focus area for LWRS is the NPP main control room (MCR), because many of the instrumentation and control (I&C) system technologies installed in the MCR, while highly reliable and safe, are now difficult to replace and are therefore limiting the operating life of the NPP. This paper describes how INL researchers use the HSSL to conduct Human Factors R&D on modernizing or upgrading these I&C systems in a step-wise manner, and how the HSSL has addressed a significant gap in how to upgrade systems and technologies that are built to last, and therefore require careful integration of analog and new advanced digital technologies.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2001-05-24

    This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

  6. New advances in virtual plant research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual plants are computer simulations of the growth, development and deployment of plants in a three-dimensional space. Over the past 20 years, significant pro-gress has been made in virtual plant modeling corresponding to the rapid advances in information technology. Virtual plant research has broad applications in agronomy, forestry, ecology, and remote sensing areas. In this review, we attempt to introduce the significance, modeling methodology, and main advances in virtual plant research and applications. The challenges associated with virtual plant modeling in agronomy applications, including the interaction mechanism between plant and environment and root system modeling, are also discussed. Insights into applications of virtual plants in agronomy are given in the areas of performing virtual experiments to accurately quantify the utilization of soil water and nutrients, to design crop ideotype on computers, and to improve crop planting.

  7. Frontiers for Laboratory Research of Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao [Princeton University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-16

    Magnetic reconnection occcurs throughout heliophysical and astrophysical plasmas as well as in laboratory fusion plasmas. Two broad categories of reconnection models exist: collisional MHD and collisionless kinetic. Eight major questions with respect to magnetic connection are set down, and past and future devices for studying them in the laboratory are described. Results of some computerized simulations are compared with experiments.

  8. Enhancing Hispanic Minority Undergraduates' Botany Laboratory Experiences: Implementation of an Inquiry-Based Plant Tissue Culture Module Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Navas, Vivian; Diffoot, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Early involvement of students in hands-on research experiences are known to demystify research and promote the pursuit of careers in science. But in large enrollment departments such opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research are rare. To counteract such lack of opportunities, inquiry-based laboratory module in plant tissue…

  9. Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) Propagation Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    ARL-TR-7860 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop...ARL-TR-7860 ● OCT 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory... Design and Calibration of the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Closed Loop Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) Propagation Section 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Plant Research Department annual report 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kossmann, J.; Gissel Nielsen, G.; Jakobsen, Iver

    2002-01-01

    The Plant Research Department integrates modern post-genomic tools to improve our understanding of plants. The aim is to develop crops with improved agronomic traits and to engineer high-value plants, which are able to meet the growth conditions of thefuture environment. The department is divided...

  11. Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  12. An action research to overcome undergraduates’ laboratory anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Acar Şeşen, Burçin; Mutlu (Karadaş), Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine and overcome undergraduates’ laboratory anxiety. For this purpose, Laboratory Anxiety Questionnaire (LAQ) was developed by researchers. LAQ was applied to 92 undergraduates as a pre-test and focus group interviews were performed to determine their laboratory anxiety. An action research was conducted by researchers. After instruction was accomplished in ten weeks, LAQ was applied as post-test. According to results, it was found that undergradua...

  13. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques. DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  14. Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Effects Research and Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables research into advanced laser countermeasure techniques.DESCRIPTION: This laser facility has a capability to produce very high peak power levels of...

  15. Plant and mycorrhizal weathering at the laboratory mesocosm scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Y.; Leake, J.; Banwart, S. A.; Beerling, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The evolutionary development of large vascular land plants in the Paleozoic is hypothesized to have enhanced weathering of Ca and Mg silicate minerals. This plant-centric view overlooks the fact that plants and their associated mycorrhizal fungi co-evolved. Many weathering processes usually ascribed to plants may actually be driven by the combined activities of roots and mycorrhizal fungi. This study focuses on two key evolutionary events in plant and fungal evolution: 1) the transition from gymnosperm-only to mixed angiosperm-gymnosperm forests in the Mesozoic and 2) the similarly timed rise of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EM) in a previously arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) only world. Here we present results from a novel mesocosm-scale laboratory experiment designed to allow investigation of plant- and mycorrhizae-driven carbon fluxes and mineral weathering at different soil depths, and under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (1500 ppm) atmospheric CO2. To test our hypothesis that photosynthetic carbon flux from the plant to the roots and fungal partner drives biological weathering of minerals, we studied five mycorrhizal plant species: the gymnosperms Sequoia sempervirens (AM), Pinus sylvestris (EM) and Ginkgo biloba (AM), and two angiosperms, Magnolia grandiflora (AM) and Betula pendula (EM). This long term (7-9 months) experiment was grown in controlled environment chambers, with replicated systems at two atmospheric CO2 levels. Each mycorrhizal plant had access to isolated horizontal mesh cores containing crushed granite and basalt at three depths, in a compost:sand (50:50 vol:vol) bulk substrate, with appropriate plant-free and mineral-free controls. 14CO2 pulse-labeling provided a snapshot of the magnitude, timing, and allocation of carbon through the atmosphere-plant-fungi-soil system and also measured mycorrhizal fungal activity associated with the target granite and basalt. Total plant and fungal biomass were also assessed in relation to +/- mineral treatments and

  16. Sandia, California Tritium Research Laboratory transition and reutilization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T.B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes a project within Sandia National Laboratory to convert the shut down Tritium Research Laboratory into a facility which could be reused within the laboratory complex. In the process of decommissioning and decontaminating the facility, the laboratory was able to save substantial financial resources by transferring much existing equipment to other DOE facilities, and then expeditiously implementing a decontamination program which has resulted in the building being converted into laboratory space for new lab programs. This project of facility reuse has been a significant financial benefit to the laboratory.

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-15 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2015.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2011-03-01

    The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  19. MICROWAVE SYSTEM FOR RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON LABORATORY ANIMALS

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kruglik, Olga; Khlebopros, Rem

    2014-01-01

    This research is concerned with development of the microwave system for research the radiophysical microwave radiation effects on laboratory animals. The frequency was 1 GHz. The results obtained demonstrate the metabolic changes in mice under the electromagnetic field influence.

  20. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    providing efficient and responsive services to millions of simultaneous users. Seeing as their business model is largely dependent on maintaining its users...Laboratory (NSRL) is composed of a suite of hardware and software that models the operation of mobile networked device radio frequency (RF) links...unique requirements like hybrid networks and extensive modeling of ground and urban effects on communications. NSRL supports investigation of

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

  2. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Laboratory Technology Research: Abstracts of FY 1996 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing/manufacturing research, and sustainable environments.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: FY 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SLAC,

    2016-04-04

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) encourage innovation, creativity, originality and quality to maintain the Laboratory’s research activities and staff at the forefront of science and technology. To further advance its scientific research capabilities, the Laboratory allocates a portion of its funds for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. With DOE guidance, the LDRD program enables SLAC scientists to make rapid and significant contributions that seed new strategies for solving important national science and technology problems. The LDRD program is conducted using existing research facilities.

  5. Naval Research Laboratory Major Facilities 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Mexico seawater throughout the year. The tropical climate is ideally suited for marine exposure testing. There is minimal climatic variation and a...TW magnetically insulated inductive voltage adder ( IVA ). Mercury is a focal point of research for several areas, including IVA power-flow research...nuclear weapons effects simulation, and particle-beam source and transport research for various applications. DESCRIPTION: Mercury is a 6-stage IVA . The

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R

    2002-06-20

    Established by Congress in 1991, the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program provides the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories, like Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL or the Laboratory), with the flexibility to invest up to 6% of their budget in long-term, high-risk, and potentially high payoff research and development (R&D) activities to support the DOE/NNSA's national security missions. By funding innovative R&D, the LDRD Program at LLNL develops and extends the Laboratory's intellectual foundations and maintains its vitality as a premier research institution. As proof of the Program's success, many of the research thrusts that started many years ago under LDRD sponsorship are at the core of today's programs. The LDRD Program, which serves as a proving ground for innovative ideas, is the Laboratory's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. Basic and applied research activities funded by LDRD enhance the Laboratory's core strengths, driving its technical vitality to create new capabilities that enable LLNL to meet DOE/NNSA's national security missions. The Program also plays a key role in building a world-class multidisciplinary workforce by engaging the Laboratory's best researchers, recruiting its future scientists and engineers, and promoting collaborations with all sectors of the larger scientific community.

  7. Chemical exposures in research laboratories in a university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shiro; Okamoto, Satoru; Yamada, Chikahisa; Ukai, Hirohiko; Samoto, Hajime; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2008-04-01

    Research laboratories in a university were investigated for air-borne levels of legally designated organic solvents and specified chemical substances. Repeated surveys in 2004-5 (four times in the two years) of about 720 laboratories (thus 2,874 laboratories in total) revealed that the solvent concentrations were in excess of the Administrative Control Levels only in a few laboratories (the conditions improved shortly after the identification) and none with regard to specified chemicals. Thus, working environments were in Control Class 1 in almost all (99.5%) laboratories examined. Such conditions were achieved primarily by extensive installation and use of local exhaust systems. The survey further revealed that types of chemicals used in research laboratories were extremely various (only poorly covered by the regulation) whereas the amounts of each chemical to be consumed were quite limited. For protection of health of researchers (including post- and under-graduate students) in laboratories, therefore, it appeared more appropriate to make personal exposure assessment rather than evaluation of levels of chemicals in air of research laboratories. Considering unique characteristics of research activity, it is important to educate each researcher to make his/her own efforts to protect his/her health, through supply of knowledge on toxicity of chemicals as well as that on proper use of protective equipments including exhaust chambers.

  8. Nuclear physics detector technology applied to plant biology research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Lee, Seung Joo [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Xi, Wenze [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB; Howell, Calvin [DUKE; Crowell, A.S. [DUKE; Reid, C.D. [DUKE; Smith, Mark [MARYLAND U.

    2013-08-01

    The ability to detect the emissions of radioactive isotopes through radioactive decay (e.g. beta particles, x-rays and gamma-rays) has been used for over 80 years as a tracer method for studying natural phenomena. More recently a positron emitting radioisotope of carbon: {sup 11}C has been utilized as a {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer for plant ecophysiology research. Because of its ease of incorporation into the plant via photosynthesis, the {sup 11}CO{sub 2} radiotracer is a powerful tool for use in plant biology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. Presently there are several groups developing and using new PET instrumentation for plant based studies. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with the Duke University Phytotron and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is involved in PET detector development for plant imaging utilizing technologies developed for nuclear physics research. The latest developments of the use of a LYSO scintillator based PET detector system for {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer studies in plants will be briefly outlined.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kelly O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-30

    A national laboratory must establish and maintain an environment in which creativity and innovation are encouraged and supported in order to fulfill its missions and remain viable in the long term. As such, multiprogram laboratories are given discretion to allocate a percentage of their operating budgets to support research and development projects that align to PNNL’s and DOE’s missions and support the missions of other federal agencies, including DHS, DOD, and others. DOE Order 413.2C sets forth DOE’s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) policy and guidelines for DOE multiprogram laboratories, and it authorizes the national laboratories to allocate up to 6 percent of their operating budgets to fund the program. LDRD is innovative research and development, selected by the Laboratory Director or his/her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory. The projects supported by LDRD funding all have demonstrable ties to DOE/DHS missions and may also be relevant to the missions of other federal agencies that sponsor work at the Laboratory. The program plays a key role in attracting the best and brightest scientific staff, which is needed to serve the highest priority DOE mission objectives. Individual project reports comprise the bulk of this LDRD report. The Laboratory focuses its LDRD research on scientific assets that often address more than one scientific discipline.

  10. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Aerospace Research and Development (AOARD) and from the Office of Naval Research-Global (ONRG), AFRL’s Dr. Kevin Kwiat worked with Professor...machined titanium (Ti) doubler to the surface of a C-130’s main wing plank , with positive results. The Ti doubler repair process uses a heat...thus greatly improved—bond-line. Having just undergone its first-ever operational implementation—in the depot repair of the C-130 wing plank —the

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

  12. Air Force Research Laboratory Technology Milestones 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    develop a unique measurement platform employing tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy ( TDLAS ). The TDLAS platform provides a novel approach to...conduct research in the exploration and development of fundamental hypersonic aerospace technologies. TDLAS experiments are scheduled for three of...team expects that the TDLAS measurement platform will achieve Technology Readiness Level 6 status (i.e., system/subsystem model or prototype

  13. Research Review: Laboratory Student Magazine Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tom

    1994-01-01

    Explores research on student-produced magazines at journalism schools, including the nature of various programs and curricular structures, ethical considerations, and the role of faculty advisors. Addresses collateral sources that provide practical and philosophical foundations for the establishment and conduct of magazine production programs.…

  14. Laboratory directed research and development program, FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1996 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Berkeley Lab LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory`s forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for Berkeley Lab scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Areas eligible for support include: (1) Work in forefront areas of science and technology that enrich Laboratory research and development capability; (2) Advanced study of new hypotheses, new experiments, and innovative approaches to develop new concepts or knowledge; (3) Experiments directed toward proof of principle for initial hypothesis testing or verification; and (4) Conception and preliminary technical analysis to explore possible instrumentation, experimental facilities, or new devices.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report fulfills that requirement.

  16. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the...

  17. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public for...

  18. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  19. Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westrich, Henry Roger

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory research offers clues to Alzheimer's plaques

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago have developed methods to directly observe the structure and growth of microscopic filaments that form the characteristic plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's Disease (1 page).

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts

  3. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  4. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  5. Plant biotechnology: research behind fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeis, Jörg; Meissle, Michael; Brunner, Susanne; Tschamper, Denise; Winzeler, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The government of Switzerland has responded to vandalism of field experiments with genetically modified (GM) crops by establishing a protected field site. This site will enable research groups to conduct experiments without having to install and pay for security measures. This could be a model for other European countries who wish to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of GM crops in an objective and scientific manner and without the interference of vandalism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

  7. The Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory Philosophy: Mentoring Students in a Scientific Neurosurgical Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Betty M; Liu, Ann; Sankey, Eric W; Mangraviti, Antonella; Barone, Michael A; Brem, Henry

    2016-06-01

    After over 50 years of scientific contribution under the leadership of Harvey Cushing and later Walter Dandy, the Johns Hopkins Hunterian Laboratory entered a period of dormancy between the 1960s and early 1980s. In 1984, Henry Brem reinstituted the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory, with a new focus on localized delivery of therapies for brain tumors, leading to several discoveries such as new antiangiogenic agents and Gliadel chemotherapy wafers for the treatment of malignant gliomas. Since that time, it has been the training ground for 310 trainees who have dedicated their time to scientific exploration in the lab, resulting in numerous discoveries in the area of neurosurgical research. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory has been a unique example of successful mentoring in a translational research environment. The laboratory's philosophy emphasizes mentorship, independence, self-directed learning, creativity, and people-centered collaboration, while maintaining productivity with a focus on improving clinical outcomes. This focus has been served by the diverse backgrounds of its trainees, both in regard to educational status as well as culturally. Through this philosophy and strong legacy of scientific contribution, the Hunterian Laboratory has maintained a positive and productive research environment that supports highly motivated students and trainees. In this article, the authors discuss the laboratory's training philosophy, linked to the principles of adult learning (andragogy), as well as the successes and the limitations of including a wide educational range of students in a neurosurgical translational laboratory and the phenomenon of combining clinical expertise with rigorous scientific training.

  8. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, J P; Fox, K J

    2008-03-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary Laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2008 spending was $531.6 million. There are approximately 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. To be a premier scientific Laboratory, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research and renew its research agenda. The competition for LDRD funds stimulates Laboratory scientists to think in new and creative ways, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining research excellence and a means to address National needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. By fostering high-risk, exploratory research, the LDRD program helps

  10. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  11. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  13. Research of the Power Plant Operational Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koismynina Nina M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the algorithm of the power plant operational modes research is offered. According to this algorithm the program for the modes analysis and connection power transformers choice is developed. The program can be used as educational means for studying of the power plant electric part, at the same time basic data are provided. Also the program can be used for the analysis of the working power plants modes. Checks of the entered data completeness and a choice correctness of the operational modes are provided in the program; in all cases of a deviation from the correct decisions to the user the relevant information is given.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  15. Laboratory technology research - abstracts of FY 1997 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of this country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Energy Research (ER) multi-program national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. A distinguishing feature of the ER multi-program national laboratories is their ability to integrate broad areas of science and engineering in support of national research and development goals. The LTR program leverages this strength for the Nation`s benefit by fostering partnerships with US industry. The partners jointly bring technology research to a point where industry or the Department`s technology development programs can pursue final development and commercialization. Projects supported by the LTR program are conducted by the five ER multi-program laboratories. These projects explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials; intelligent processing/manufacturing research; and sustainable environments.

  16. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ASSESSMENT FOR FY 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19,2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13,2006. The goals and' objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Assessment for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman,L.; Fox, K.J.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal Year 2007 spending was $515 million. There are approximately 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which

  18. Development Research for Bamboo Vinegar as Potential Plant Growth Regulator: Laboratory Test and Field Investigation%竹醋液作为植物生长调节剂的开发研究:室内和田间试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王品维; 童森淼

    2008-01-01

    本文采用萝卜子叶扩张法,萝卜、小麦和黄瓜的幼苗生长法,分别对原竹醋液和中和竹醋液进行室内生物活性筛选试验.结果表明:(1)低浓度(黄瓜根茎长>萝卜根茎长>小麦根茎长,其中对于黄瓜、萝卜和小麦,根长敏感性均高于茎长.对原竹醋液和中和竹醋液在苹果、柑橘、草莓等作物上进行应用试验.表明:竹醋液不仅显著地提高农林作物的产量;具有明显改善叶片质量,延长叶片寿命,提高果实硬度从而改善果实的储藏品质,改善果品的内在品质和外观品质等功能;在调节果实成熟期减少锈斑面积、落叶、落果和病害等方面均有显著作用.%The bioactivity of original and neutralized bamboo vinegar are screened by means of radish cotyledon, radish seedling, wheat seedling and cucumber seedling in laboratory. The results showed: (1) The bamboo vinegar of low concentration (500mg/L) effect as plant growth regulator stimulated growth similar to 2, 4-D herbicides; those of high concentration (2000~5000mg/L) inhibit growth as plant growth regular, the effect is similar to hormones herbicides, gibberellic acid (GA3) and 6-Benzylaminop-urine (6-BA). (2) The bioactivity of neutralized bamboo vinegar is higher than that of original bamboo vinegar. (3) The sensitivity of tested plants for screen bioactivity from high to low expressed as follows: radish cotyledon>cucumber seedling>radish seedling>wheat seedling. The sensitivity of root growth was higher than that of stem; The field experiments are carried out to test the stimulating effect of original and neutralized bamboo vinegar on apple, orange and strawberry in China. The results showed that Original bamboo vinegar and neutralized bamboo vinegar could add yield greatly; They could also improve leaf quality, prolong its natural life, increased the fruit hardness to improve its storage quality, make the fruit had better intrinsic quality and appearance; Original bamboo

  19. Laboratory technology research: Abstracts of FY 1998 projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) program supports high-risk, multidisciplinary research partnerships to investigate challenging scientific problems whose solutions have promising commercial potential. These partnerships capitalize on two great strengths of the country: the world-class basic research capability of the DOE Office of Science (SC) national laboratories and the unparalleled entrepreneurial spirit of American industry. Projects supported by the LTR program in FY 1998 explore the applications of basic research advances relevant to DOE`s mission over a full range of scientific disciplines. The program presently emphasizes three critical areas of mission-related research: advanced materials, intelligent processing and manufacturing research, and environmental and biomedical research. Abstracts for 85 projects are contained in this report.

  20. Laboratory evaluation of four medicinal plants as protectants against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-11-02

    Nov 2, 2006 ... Gaping Dutchman's pipe. Allium sativum .... covered the outer layer (testa) of the grains (thereby serving as food ... Table 3. Effect of plant extracts on Sitophilus zeamais adult emergence (7 weeks post-treatment). Plants.

  1. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1995 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1996-03-01

    This document presents an overview of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Programs at Los Alamos. The nine technical disciplines in which research is described include materials, engineering and base technologies, plasma, fluids, and particle beams, chemistry, mathematics and computational science, atmic and molecular physics, geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, nuclear and particle physics, and biosciences. Brief descriptions are provided in the above programs.

  2. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  3. Integrating Interdisciplinary Research-Based Experiences in Biotechnology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa S.; Wales, Melinda E.

    2012-01-01

    The increasingly interdisciplinary nature of today's scientific research is leading to the transformation of undergraduate education. In addressing these needs, the University of Houston's College of Technology has developed a new interdisciplinary research-based biotechnology laboratory curriculum. Using the pesticide degrading bacterium,…

  4. Use of laboratory animals in biomedical and behavioral research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    ... of Laboratory Animals in Biomedical and Behavioral Research Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council Institute of Medicine NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1988 Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the typesetting-specific created from the as publ...

  5. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  6. Genomics-based plant germplasm research (GPGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizeng Jia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant germplasm underpins much of crop genetic improvement. Millions of germplasm accessions have been collected and conserved ex situ and/or in situ, and the major challenge is now how to exploit and utilize this abundant resource. Genomics-based plant germplasm research (GPGR or “Genoplasmics” is a novel cross-disciplinary research field that seeks to apply the principles and techniques of genomics to germplasm research. We describe in this paper the concept, strategy, and approach behind GPGR, and summarize current progress in the areas of the definition and construction of core collections, enhancement of germplasm with core collections, and gene discovery from core collections. GPGR is opening a new era in germplasm research. The contribution, progress and achievements of GPGR in the future are predicted.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagle, C.D. (comp.)

    1982-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operates six research reactors dedicated to research and development work as well as radioisotope production. These reactors are used by ORNL and qualified non-ORNL research and development groups. The purpose of this report is to provide information to research personnel concerning the facilities and the ORNL research and services groups available to assist in the design, fabrication, operation, and post-operation examination of irradiation assemblies. Safety and operability reviews and quality assurance requirements are also described.

  9. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2016-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  10. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W., editor

    2015-05-26

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab.

  11. Air conditioning a vaccine laboratory. [Connaught Medical Research Laboratory, Toronto, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross J.

    1976-05-01

    In 1974, the new Bacterial Vaccine Building of Connaught Medical Research Laboratories, Toronto, Canada, was opened to produce such vaccines as pertussis, typhoid, paratyphoids, and cholera and such toxoids as staphylococcus, diphtheria, and tetanus. It also produces other medicinal products. The layout of the complex and the air conditioning system necessary in all zones are described and schematically shown. (MCW)

  12. The changing role of the National Laboratories in materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Fluss, M.

    1995-06-02

    The role of the National Laboratories is summarized from the era of post World War II to the present time. The U.S. federal government policy for the National Laboratories and its influence on their materials science infrastructure is reviewed with respect to: determining overall research strategies, various initiatives to interact with industry (especially in recent years), building facilities that serve the nation, and developing leading edge research in the materials sciences. Despite reductions in support for research in the U.S. in recent years, and uncertainties regarding the specific policies for R&D in the U.S., there are strong roles for materials research at the National Laboratories. These roles will be centered on the abilities of the National Laboratories to field multidisciplinary teams, the use of unique cutting edge facilities, a focus on areas of strength within each of the labs, increased teaming and partnerships, and the selection of motivated research areas. It is hoped that such teaming opportunities will include new alliances with China, in a manner similar, perhaps, to those recently achieved between the U.S. and other countries.

  13. Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

  14. Smart Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for the NIST Research Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Richard S; McLean, Mark J; Osborn, William A

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory notebooks have been a staple of scientific research for centuries for organizing and documenting ideas and experiments. Modern laboratories are increasingly reliant on electronic data collection and analysis, so it seems inevitable that the digital revolution should come to the ordinary laboratory notebook. The most important aspect of this transition is to make the shift as comfortable and intuitive as possible, so that the creative process that is the hallmark of scientific investigation and engineering achievement is maintained, and ideally enhanced. The smart electronic laboratory notebooks described in this paper represent a paradigm shift from the old pen and paper style notebooks and provide a host of powerful operational and documentation capabilities in an intuitive format that is available anywhere at any time.

  15. 2015 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is conducting a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Fiscal year 2015 represents the first full year of LDRD at Fermilab and includes seven projects approved mid-year in FY14 and six projects approved in FY15. One of the seven original projects has been completed just after the beginning of FY15. The implementation of LDRD at Fermilab is captured in the approved Fermilab 2015 LDRD Annual Program Plan. In FY15, the LDRD program represents 0.64% of Laboratory funding. The scope of the LDRD program at Fermilab will be established over the next couple of years where a portfolio of about 20 on-going projects representing approximately between 1% and 1.5% of the Laboratory funding is anticipated. This Annual Report focuses on the status of the current projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2005-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating

  19. Laboratory directed research and development FY98 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R; Holzrichter, J

    1999-05-01

    In 1984, Congress and the Department of Energy (DOE) established the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program to enable the director of a national laboratory to foster and expedite innovative research and development (R and D) in mission areas. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) continually examines these mission areas through strategic planning and shapes the LDRD Program to meet its long-term vision. The goal of the LDRD Program is to spur development of new scientific and technical capabilities that enable LLNL to respond to the challenges within its evolving mission areas. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies and enables the Laboratory to attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The FY98 LDRD portfolio described in this annual report has been carefully structured to continue the tradition of vigorously supporting DOE and LLNL strategic vision and evolving mission areas. The projects selected for LDRD funding undergo stringent review and selection processes, which emphasize strategic relevance and require technical peer reviews of proposals by external and internal experts. These FY98 projects emphasize the Laboratory's national security needs: stewardship of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, responsibility for the counter- and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction, development of high-performance computing, and support of DOE environmental research and waste management programs.

  20. Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  2. Laboratory directed research and development: FY 1997 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1998-05-01

    This is the FY 1997 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic and molecular physics and plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  3. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. This report is the transcript of his talk.

  4. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory - An Isolated Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Norris E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Early in his twenty-five year career as the Director of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Norris Bradbury wrote at length about the atomic bomb and the many implications the bomb might have on the world. His themes were both technical and philosophical. In 1963, after nearly twenty years of leading the nation’s first nuclear weapons laboratory, Bradbury took the opportunity to broaden his writing. In a paper delivered to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s symposium on the “Criteria in the Selection of Sites for the Construction of Reactors and Nuclear Research Centers,” Bradbury took the opportunity to talk about the business of nuclear research and the human component of operating a scientific laboratory. Below is the transcript of his talk.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Vigil; Kyle Wheeler

    1999-04-01

    This is the FY 1998 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principle investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  6. Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development LDRD-FY-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011. This report demonstrates the types of cutting edge research the INL is performing to help ensure the nation's energy security. The research conducted under this program is aligned with our strategic direction, benefits the Department of Energy (DOE) and is in compliance with DOE order 413.2B. This report summarizes the diverse research and development portfolio with emphasis on the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) mission, encompassing both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2009-03-24

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with

  9. Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) Subsurface Containment Berm Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The former Navy Arctic Research Laboratory Airstrip Site in Barrow, Alaska, has a history of fuel spills. Various methods have been used to re- mediate ...or [− + −]) were ab- sent directly under the insulation/plywood and on the shoulder areas im- mediately adjacent to the insulation/plywood. The lack

  10. Flocculation of venereal disease research laboratory reagent by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K D; von Recklinghausen, G; Heintschel von Heinegg, E; Ansorg, R

    1991-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains flocculated with Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) reagent in a glass slide test. Other pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains were nonreactive. The specific VDRL reaction property of Helicobacter pylori indicates an affinity of the cells for lipoidal substances, and can be used as a diagnostic aid for species identification.

  11. Fermilab a laboratory at the frontier of research

    CERN Document Server

    Gillies, James D

    2002-01-01

    Since its foundation in 1967, creeping urbanization has taken away some of Fermilab's remoteness, but the famous buffalo still roam, and farm buildings evocative of frontier America dot the landscape - appropriately for a laboratory at the high-energy frontier of modern research. Topics discussed are the Tevatron, detector upgrades, the neutrino programme, Fermilab and the LHC and the non-accelerator programme.

  12. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report compiles the annual reports of Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects supported by the Berkeley Lab. Projects are arranged under the following topical sections: (1) Accelerator and fusion research division; (2) Chemical sciences division; (3) Computing Sciences; (4) Earth sciences division; (5) Environmental energy technologies division; (6) life sciences division; (7) Materials sciences division; (8) Nuclear science division; (9) Physics division; (10) Structural biology division; and (11) Cross-divisional. A total of 66 projects are summarized.

  13. The Laboratory Rat as an Animal Model for Osteoporosis Research

    OpenAIRE

    Lelovas, Pavlos P; Xanthos, Theodoros T.; Thoma, Sofia E; Lyritis, George P; Dontas, Ismene A

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an important systemic disorder, affecting mainly Caucasian women, with a diverse and multifactorial etiology. A large variety of animal species, including rodents, rabbits, dogs, and primates, have been used as animal models in osteoporosis research. Among these, the laboratory rat is the preferred animal for most researchers. Its skeleton has been studied extensively, and although there are several limitations to its similarity to the human condition, these can be overcome th...

  14. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  15. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the...

  16. The plant ecology of Amchita Island, Alaska: Report on a research contract between the Department of Botany, the University of Tennessee and Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Laboratories for the period 1 August 1967 through 30 June 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Department of Botany of The University of Tennessee is conducting a study of the plant ecology of Amchitka Island, Alaska, as a subcontractor for Battelle...

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in

  18. 2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Sussman

    2010-07-23

    The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

  19. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

    1999-04-02

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

  20. Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2013-03-29

    This project was aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an “open” laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) the development of methods for the analysis of lignin and its deconstruction products. Highlights from these activities include the development of catalysts for the upgrading of lipids to hydrocarbons by means of decarboxylation/decarbonylation (deCOx), a study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of algae (Scenedesmus), and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  1. Annual Report FY2011: Establishment of a Laboratory for Biofuels Research at the University of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Crofcheck, Czarena [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Andrews, Rodney [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2011-12-21

    This project is aimed at the development of the biofuels industry in Kentucky by establishing a laboratory to develop improved processes for biomass utilization. The facility is based at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, and constitutes an open laboratory, i.e., its equipment is available to other Kentucky researchers working in the area. The development of this biofuels facility represents a significant expansion of research infrastructure, and will provide a lasting resource for biobased research endeavors at the University of Kentucky. In order to enhance the laboratory's capabilities and contribute to on-going biofuels research at the University of Kentucky, initial research at the laboratory has focused on the following technical areas: (i) the identification of algae strains suitable for oil production, utilizing flue gas from coal-fired power plants as a source of CO2; (ii) the conversion of algae to biofuels; and (iii) thermochemical methods for the deconstruction of lignin. Highlights from these activities include a detailed study of bio-oil production from the fast pyrolysis of microalgae (Scenedesmus sp.) and the application of pyrolytic gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) to the characterization of high lignin biomass feedstocks.

  2. Laboratory-Directed Research and Development 2016 Summary Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rekha Sukamar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jacobson, Julie Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all INL programs. This report includes summaries of all INL LDRD research activities supported during Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. INL is the lead laboratory for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). The INL mission is to discover, demonstrate, and secure innovative nuclear energy solutions, other clean energy options, and critical infrastructure with a vision to change the world’s energy future and secure our critical infrastructure. Operating since 1949, INL is the nation’s leading research, development, and demonstration center for nuclear energy, including nuclear nonproliferation and physical and cyber-based protection of energy systems and critical infrastructure, as well as integrated energy systems research, development, demonstration, and deployment. INL has been managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (a wholly owned company of Battelle) for DOE since 2005. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, is a partnership between Battelle, BWX Technologies, Inc., AECOM, the Electric Power Research Institute, the National University Consortium (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Ohio State University, North Carolina State University, University of New Mexico, and Oregon State University), and the Idaho university collaborators (i.e., University of Idaho, Idaho State University, and Boise State University). Since its creation, INL’s research and development (R&D) portfolio has broadened with targeted programs supporting national missions to advance nuclear energy

  3. Laboratory directed research and development fy1999 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R A

    2000-04-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was founded in 1952 and has been managed since its inception by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of this long association with UC, the Laboratory has been able to recruit a world-class workforce, establish an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and innovation, and achieve recognition in relevant fields of knowledge as a scientific and technological leader. This environment and reputation are essential for sustained scientific and technical excellence. As a DOE national laboratory with about 7,000 employees, LLNL has an essential and compelling primary mission to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide. The Laboratory receives funding from the DOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, whose focus is stewardship of our nuclear weapons stockpile. Funding is also provided by the Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, many Department of Defense sponsors, other federal agencies, and the private sector. As a multidisciplinary laboratory, LLNL has applied its considerable skills in high-performance computing, advanced engineering, and the management of large research and development projects to become the science and technology leader in those areas of its mission responsibility. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1984. The Program allows the Director of each DOE laboratory to fund advanced, creative, and innovative research and development (R&D) activities that will ensure scientific and technical vitality in the continually evolving mission areas at DOE and the Laboratory. In addition, the LDRD Program provides LLNL with the flexibility to nurture and enrich essential scientific and technical competencies, which attract the most qualified scientists and engineers. The LDRD Program

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of fiscal year 1993. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. The program advances the Laboratory`s core competencies, foundations, scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. Reports are given from the following divisions: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment -- Health and Safety, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics, and Structural Biology. (GHH)

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, T. [ed.; Chartock, M.

    1999-02-05

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Berkeley Lab) Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 1998 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The LBNL LDRD program is a critical tool for directing the Laboratory's forefront scientific research capabilities toward vital, excellent, and emerging scientific challenges. The program provides the resources for LBNL scientists to make rapid and significant contributions to critical national science and technology problems. The LDRD program also advances LBNL's core competencies, foundations, and scientific capability, and permits exploration of exciting new opportunities. All projects are work in forefront areas of science and technology. Areas eligible for support include the following: Advanced study of hypotheses, concepts, or innovative approaches to scientific or technical problems; Experiments and analyses directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of new scientific ideas, technical concepts, or devices; and Conception and preliminary technical analyses of experimental facilities or devices.

  6. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  7. Nuclear power plant Severe Accident Research Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkins, J T; Cunningham, M A

    1983-01-01

    The Severe Accident Research Plan (SARP) will provide technical information necessary to support regulatory decisions in the severe accident area for existing or planned nuclear power plants, and covers research for the time period of January 1982 through January 1986. SARP will develop generic bases to determine how safe the plants are and where and how their level of safety ought to be improved. The analysis to address these issues will be performed using improved probabilistic risk assessment methodology, as benchmarked to more exact data and analysis. There are thirteen program elements in the plan and the work is phased in two parts, with the first phase being completed in early 1984, at which time an assessment will be made whether or not any major changes will be recommended to the Commission for operating plants to handle severe accidents. Additionally at this time, all of the thirteen program elements in Chapter 5 will be reviewed and assessed in terms of how much additional work is necessary and where major impacts in probabilistic risk assessment might be achieved. Confirmatory research will be carried out in phase II to provide additional assurance on the appropriateness of phase I decisions. Most of this work will be concluded by early 1986.

  8. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  9. FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

    2008-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

  10. Guidelines for euthanasia of laboratory animals used in biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Baias,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory animals are used in several fields of science research, especially in biology, medicine and veterinary medicine. The majority of laboratory animals used in research are experimental models that replace the human body in study regarding pharmacological or biological safety products, studies conducted for a betterunderstanding of oncologic processes, toxicology, genetic studies or even new surgical techniques. Experimental protocols include a stage in which animals are euthanized in order to remove organs and tissues,or for no unnecessary pain and suffering of animals (humane endpoints or to mark the end of research. The result of euthanasia techniques is a rapid loss of consciousness followed by cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest and disruption of brain activity. Nowadays, the accepted euthanasia techniques can use chemicals (inhalant agents like: carbon dioxide, nitrogen or argon, overdoses of injectable anesthetics or physical methods (decapitation, cervical spine dislocation, stunning, gunshot, pitching.

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen (Ed.), Todd

    2007-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness.

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  13. FY03 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C

    2004-03-05

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2003, and exemplifies Engineering's 50-year history of researching and developing the engineering technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the LDRD program and the ''Tech Base'' program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge, or that require a significant level of research, or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply those technologies, or adapt them to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice.'' Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2003, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technology

  14. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  15. Tritium monitoring at the Sandia Tritium Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, T.K.

    1978-10-01

    Sandia Laboratories at Livermore, California, is presently beginning operation of a Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL). The laboratory incorporates containment and cleanup facilities such that any unscheduled tritium release is captured rather than vented to the atmosphere. A sophisticated tritium monitoring system is in use at the TRL to protect operating personnel and the environment, as well as ensure the safe and effective operation of the TRL decontamination systems. Each monitoring system has, in addition to a local display, a display in a centralized control room which, when coupled room which, when coupled with the TRL control computer, automatically provides an immediate assessment of the status of the entire facility. The computer controls a complex alarm array status of the entire facility. The computer controls a complex alarm array and integrates and records all operational and unscheduled tritium releases.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In

  17. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd C.

    2005-03-22

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Goals that are codified in DOE's September 2003 Strategic Plan, with a primary focus on Advancing Scientific Understanding. For that goal, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 LDRD projects support every one of the eight strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the goals of Investing in America's Energy Future (six of the fourteen strategies), Resolving the Environmental Legacy (four of the eight strategies), and Meeting National Security Challenges (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20 year Scientific Facilities Plan and the draft Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also

  19. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at the...

  20. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2000-03-08

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY99.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2002-03-15

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. This is the annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program for FY01.

  2. FY04 Engineering Technology Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, R M

    2005-01-27

    This report summarizes the science and technology research and development efforts in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2004, and exemplifies Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's missions. Engineering has been a partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence and has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and the technical resources developed through venues like the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD). This accomplishment is well summarized by Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out through two programs, the ''Tech Base'' program and the LDRD program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating those technologies and competencies that are cutting edge. These require a significant level of research or contain some unknown that needs to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to apply technologies to a Laboratory need. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Therefore, the LDRD report covered here has a strong research emphasis. Areas that are presented all fall into those needed to accomplish our mission. For FY2004, Engineering's LDRD projects were focused on mesoscale target fabrication and characterization, development of engineering computational capability, material studies and modeling, remote sensing and communications, and microtechnology and nanotechnology for national security applications. Engineering's five Centers, in partnership with the Division Leaders and Department Heads, are responsible for guiding the long-term science and technology investments for the Directorate. The Centers represent technologies that have been identified as

  3. DESALINATION AND WATER TREATMENT RESEARCH AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigali, Mark J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Altman, Susan J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Biedermann, Laura [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuzio, Stephanie P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rempe, Susan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Water is the backbone of our economy - safe and adequate supplies of water are vital for agriculture, industry, recreation, and human consumption. While our supply of water today is largely safe and adequate, we as a nation face increasing water supply challenges in the form of extended droughts, demand growth due to population increase, more stringent health-based regulation, and competing demands from a variety of users. To meet these challenges in the coming decades, water treatment technologies, including desalination, will contribute substantially to ensuring a safe, sustainable, affordable, and adequate water supply for the United States. This overview documents Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL, or Sandia) Water Treatment Program which focused on the development and demonstration of advanced water purification technologies as part of the larger Sandia Water Initiative. Projects under the Water Treatment Program include: (1) the development of desalination research roadmaps (2) our efforts to accelerate the commercialization of new desalination and water treatment technologies (known as the 'Jump-Start Program),' (3) long range (high risk, early stage) desalination research (known as the 'Long Range Research Program'), (4) treatment research projects under the Joint Water Reuse & Desalination Task Force, (5) the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership Program, (6) water treatment projects funded under the New Mexico Small Business Administration, (7) water treatment projects for the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), (8) Sandia- developed contaminant-selective treatment technologies, and finally (9) current Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funded desalination projects.

  4. Research in the Mont Terri Rock laboratory: Quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Paul; Thury, Marc

    During the past 10 years, the 12 Mont Terri partner organisations ANDRA, BGR, CRIEPI, ENRESA, FOWG (now SWISSTOPO), GRS, HSK, IRSN, JAEA, NAGRA, OBAYASHI and SCK-CEN have jointly carried out and financed a research programme in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. An important strategic question for the Mont Terri project is what type of new experiments should be carried out in the future. This question has been discussed among partner delegates, authorities, scientists, principal investigators and experiment delegates. All experiments at Mont Terri - past, ongoing and future - can be assigned to the following three categories: (1) process and mechanism understanding in undisturbed argillaceous formations, (2) experiments related to excavation- and repository-induced perturbations and (3) experiments related to repository performance during the operational and post-closure phases. In each of these three areas, there are still open questions and hence potential experiments to be carried out in the future. A selection of key issues and questions which have not, or have only partly been addressed so far and in which the project partners, but also the safety authorities and other research organisations may be interested, are presented in the following. The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory is positioned as a generic rock laboratory, where research and development is key: mainly developing methods for site characterisation of argillaceous formations, process understanding and demonstration of safety. Due to geological constraints, there will never be a site specific rock laboratory at Mont Terri. The added value for the 12 partners in terms of future experiments is threefold: (1) the Mont Terri project provides an international scientific platform of high reputation for research on radioactive waste disposal (= state-of-the-art research in argillaceous materials); (2) errors are explicitly allowed (= rock laboratory as a “playground” where experience is often gained through

  5. A checklist of plant and animal species at Los Alamos National Laboratory and surrounding areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinojosa, H. [comp.

    1998-02-01

    Past and current members of the Biology Team (BT) of the Ecology Group have completed biological assessments (BAs) for all of the land that comprises Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within these assessments are lists of plant and animal species with the potential to exist on LANL lands and the surrounding areas. To compile these lists, BT members examined earlier published and unpublished reports, surveys, and data bases that pertained to the biota of this area or to areas that are similar. The species lists that are contained herein are compilations of the lists from these BAs, other lists that were a part of the initial research for the performance of these BAs, and more recent surveys.

  6. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  8. Space plant biology research in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ričkienė, Aurika

    2012-09-01

    In 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial Earth satellite, initiating its space exploration programs. Throughout the rest of the twentieth century, the development of these space programs received special attention from Soviet Union authorities. Scientists from the former Soviet Republics, including Lithuania, participated in these programs. From 1971 to 1990, Lithuanians designed more than 20 experiments on higher plant species during space flight. Some of these experiments had never before been attempted and, therefore, made scientific history. However, the formation and development of space plant biology research in Lithuania or its origins, context of formation, and placement in a worldwide context have not been explored from a historical standpoint. By investigating these topics, this paper seeks to construct an image of the development of a very specific field of science in a small former Soviet republic.

  9. 2016 Fermilab Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Fermilab is executing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) as outlined by order DOE O 413.2B in order to enhance and realize the mission of the laboratory in a manner that also supports the laboratory’s strategic objectives and the mission of the Department of Energy. LDRD funds enable scientific creativity, allow for exploration of “high risk, high payoff” research, and allow for the demonstration of new ideas, technical concepts, and devices. LDRD also has an objective of maintaining and enhancing the scientific and technical vitality of Fermilab. LDRD is able to fund employee-initiated proposals that address the current strategic objectives and better position Fermilab for future mission needs. The request for such funds is made in consideration of the investment needs, affordability, and directives from DOE and Congress. Review procedures of the proposals will insure that those proposals which most address the strategic goals of the DOE and the Laboratory or which best position Fermilab for the future will be recommended to the Laboratory Director who has responsibility for approval. The execution of each approved project will be the responsibility of the Principal Investigator, PI, who will follow existing Laboratory guidelines to ensure compliance with safety, environmental, and quality assurance practices. A Laboratory Director-appointed LDRD Coordinator will work with Committees, Laboratory Management, other Fermilab Staff, and the PI’s to oversee the implementation of policies and procedures of LDRD and provide the management and execution of this Annual Program Plan. FY16 represents third fiscal year in which LDRD has existed at Fermilab. The number of preliminary proposals (117) submitted in response to the LDRD Call for Proposals indicates very strong interest of the program within the Fermilab community. The first two Calls have resulted in thirteen active LDRD projects – and it is expected that between five and seven new

  10. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  11. Benchmarking International High-Technology Research Laboratories' Marketing in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Suvi-Anna

    2014-01-01

    The thesis studies current marketing conventions of international high-technology research laboratories in Europe and is done for the UNELMA-project. UNELMA is a joint project between Finnish and Swedish universities and institutions funded by the European Union, the Provincial Government of Norbotten, Lapin Liitto and Interreg IV A. The project wishes to create a network of professional services which will benefit companies in the Bothnian Arc between Finland and Sweden. The study itself...

  12. A laboratory for life sciences research in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. A.; Klein, H. P.

    1982-01-01

    Biological studies hardware for Spacelab flights are described. The research animal holding facility has modular construction and is installed on a single ESA rack. A biotelemetry system will provide body temperature and EKG/heart rate data from a radio transmitter surgically implanted in the animals' stomachs. A plant growth unit (PGU) will be used to study micro-g plant lignin growth. The PGU is automated and can carry as many as 96 plants. A general purpose work station (GPWS) biohazard cabinet will be flown on Spacelab 4 to control liquid and chemical vapors released during experimentation. Spacelab 4 will be the premier flight of actual animal studies comprising measurements of hematology, muscle biochemistry, blood circulation, fluids and electrolytes, vestibular adaptation, etc., using rats and squirrel monkeys as subjects.

  13. CNR LARA project, Italy: Airborne laboratory for environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R. M.; Fiumi, L.; Marino, C. M.; Pignatti, S.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest for the environmental problems and the study of the impact on the environment due to antropic activity produced an enhancement of remote sensing applications. The Italian National Research Council (CNR) established a new laboratory for airborne hyperspectral imaging, the LARA Project (Laboratorio Aero per Ricerche Ambientali - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Research), equipping its airborne laboratory, a CASA-212, mainly with the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) instrument. MIVIS's channels, spectral bandwidths, and locations are chosen to meet the needs of scientific research for advanced applications of remote sensing data. MIVIS can make significant contributions to solving problems in many diverse areas such as geologic exploration, land use studies, mineralogy, agricultural crop studies, energy loss analysis, pollution assessment, volcanology, forest fire management and others. The broad spectral range and the many discrete narrow channels of MIVIS provide a fine quantization of spectral information that permits accurate definition of absorption features from a variety of materials, allowing the extraction of chemical and physical information of our environment. The availability of such a hyperspectral imager, that will operate mainly in the Mediterranean area, at the present represents a unique opportunity for those who are involved in environmental studies and land-management to collect systematically large-scale and high spectral-spatial resolution data of this part of the world. Nevertheless, MIVIS deployments will touch other parts of the world, where a major interest from the international scientific community is present.

  14. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  15. 2014 Fermilab Laboratory Directoed Research & Development Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-05-26

    After initiation by the Fermilab Laboratory Director, a team from the senior Laboratory leadership and a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Advisory Committee developed an implementation plan for LDRD at Fermilab for the first time. This implementation was captured in the approved Fermilab 2014 LDRD Program Plan and followed directions and guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 413.2B, a “Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines, …” document, and examples of best practices at other DOE Office of Science Laboratories. At Fermilab, a FY14 midyear Call for Proposals was issued. A LDRD Selection Committee evaluated those proposals that were received and provided a recommendation to the Laboratory Director who approved seven LDRD projects. This Annual Report focuses on the status of those seven projects and provides an overview of the current status of LDRD at Fermilab. The seven FY14 LDRD approved projects had a date of initiation late in FY14 such that this report reflects approximately six months of effort approximately through January 2015. The progress of these seven projects, the subsequent award of six additional new projects beginning in FY15, and preparations for the issuance of the FY16 Call for Proposals indicates that LDRD is now integrated into the overall annual program at Fermilab. All indications are that LDRD is improving the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory and providing new, novel, or cutting edge projects carried out at the forefront of science and technology and aligned with the mission and strategic visions of Fermilab and the Department of Energy.

  16. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  17. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  18. Laboratory-directed research and development: FY 1996 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil, J.; Prono, J. [comps.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the FY 1996 goals and accomplishments of Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects. It gives an overview of the LDRD program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, and provides an index to the projects` principal investigators. Projects are grouped by their LDRD component: Individual Projects, Competency Development, and Program Development. Within each component, they are further divided into nine technical disciplines: (1) materials science, (2) engineering and base technologies, (3) plasmas, fluids, and particle beams, (4) chemistry, (5) mathematics and computational sciences, (6) atomic and molecular physics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) biosciences.

  19. Intertech Corporation Equipment for Laboratory Analysis and Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanov, S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intertech Corporation is an American company supplying instruments in Ukraine for laboratory analysis and scientific research for 15 years. The Company is an exclusive dealer of Thermo Fisher Scientific, TA Instruments and some other companies. Intertech Corporation offers instrumentation for elemental and molecular analysis, surface and nanostructure investigation, thermal analysis, sample preparation and provides certified service and methodological sup port for supplied equipment. There are two service centers in Ukraine — in Kyiv and Donetsk. More than 100 Ukrainian enterprises use instrumentation supplied by Intertech Corporation including metallurgical, machine-building, chemical and food industries, academic and research institutions, medical institutions and ecology inspections.

  20. 1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the 1992 fiscal year. It describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The Divisions that report include: Accelerator and Fusion Research, Chemical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Energy and Environment, Engineering, Environment and Safety and Health, Information and Computing Sciences, Life Sciences, Materials Sciences, Nuclear Science, Physics and Structural Biology.

  2. Toxicological study of plant extracts on termite and laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, I; Gogoi, Inee; Dolui, A K; Handique, Ruma

    2005-04-01

    Toxic activity of leaf extracts of Polygonum hydropiper L. and Pogostemon parviflorus Benth. were tested in the laboratory against tea termite, Odontotermes assamensis Holm. Both the tested extracts caused mortality of the termite. The highest toxic activity (100%) was found in the 2.0% chloroform extracts of P. hydropiper. The chloroform extract of P. hydropiper was explored for possible mammalian toxicological effects. The LD50 was 758.58 mg/kg in male albino mice. Subcutaneous injection of sub-lethal dose of extract into male mice once a week for 6 weeks failed to express any significant influence on WBC, RBC count and blood cholesterol.

  3. The need for econometric research in laboratory animal operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David G; Kearney, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    The scarcity of research funding can affect animal facilities in various ways. These effects can be evaluated by examining the allocation of financial resources in animal facilities, which can be facilitated by the use of mathematical and statistical methods to analyze economic problems, a discipline known as econometrics. The authors applied econometrics to study whether increasing per diem charges had a negative effect on the number of days of animal care purchased by animal users. They surveyed animal numbers and per diem charges at 20 research institutions and found that demand for large animals decreased as per diem charges increased. The authors discuss some of the challenges involved in their study and encourage research institutions to carry out more robust econometric studies of this and other economic questions facing laboratory animal research.

  4. Finding neurosyphilis without the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, S; Luger, A

    1996-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test is only 27% sensitive for diagnosing neurosyphilis. Discriminant analysis, used on 124 patients, shows that other commonly used laboratory tests can, in combination, identify 87% of patients with neurosyphilis with 94% specificity. The insensitivity of the CSF-VDRL (27% in persons with neurosyphilis) and the foreseen greater need to identify and treat neurosyphilis in the era of human immunodeficiency virus caused us to analyze the serum and cerebrospinal fluid results of 73 patients with syphilis and of 51 patients with clinically diagnosed neurosyphilis. Discriminant analysis was applied to different sets of laboratory tests to find the combination of test results best able to predict retrospectively the clinical diagnosis of syphilis or neurosyphilis, without reference to the CSF-VDRL. The predicting function averages 94% specificity and 87% sensitivity. Test result variables considered together are: CSF-FTA-ABS, serum FTA-ABS, CSF-TPHA, serum TPHA, and CSF cells. The authors conclude that clinicians or laboratories can, independently of the CSF-VDRL, compute a score showing whether the results of a set of commonly used tests suggest neurosyphilis in a patient.

  5. FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK & RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-AGRICULTRAL RESEARCH SERVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Article describes Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory to an audience of scientific researchers (i.e. ecologists) interested in the interactions among organisms and their environment. Article outlines the facilities, environment, history, and ongoing types of research. Emphasis is on...

  6. Ultrapure Gases — From the Production Plant to the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simgen, H.; Zuzel, G.

    2007-03-01

    Radioactive noble gas isotopes are a potential source of background in low-level physics experiments, since they are present in the atmosphere and also in widely used gases produced from the atmosphere. We have studied the 39Ar, 85Kr and 222Rn contamination of commercially available nitrogen using low background proportional counters and a rare gas mass spectrometer. It was found that air separation plants are very effective in removing traces of radioactive noble gases and that the available purity can be significantly higher than commercial specifications. On the other hand the gas handling processes which are necessary to deliver gases from the production plant to the customer are a possible source of re-contaminations and determine in most cases the achievable purity. By simulating these processes under realistic conditions we have establish together with the Italian company `SOL group' a well controlled delivery path which can hold the purity. For the short-lived 222Rn the initial contamination is less critical, because it decays away. Instead the emanation rate of the cryogenic tank was found to determine the achievable purity, since it permanently delivers new 222Rn.

  7. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  8. Zoonoses of occupational health importance in contemporary laboratory animal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankenson, F Claire; Johnston, Nancy A; Weigler, Benjamin J; Di Giacomo, Ronald F

    2003-12-01

    In contemporary laboratory animal facilities, workplace exposure to zoonotic pathogens, agents transmitted to humans from vertebrate animals or their tissues, is an occupational hazard. The primary (e.g., macaques, pigs, dogs, rabbits, mice, and rats) and secondary species (e.g., sheep, goats, cats, ferrets, and pigeons) of animals commonly used in biomedical research, as classified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, are established or potential hosts for a large number of zoonotic agents. Diseases included in this review are principally those wherein a risk to biomedical facility personnel has been documented by published reports of human cases in laboratory animal research settings, or under reasonably similar circumstances. Diseases are listed alphabetically, and each section includes information about clinical disease, transmission, occurrence, and prevention in animal reservoir species and humans. Our goal is to provide a resource for veterinarians, health-care professionals, technical staff, and administrators that will assist in the design and on-going evaluation of institutional occupational health and safety programs.

  9. Governing solar geoengineering research as it leaves the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andy

    2014-12-28

    One of the greatest controversies in geoengineering policy concerns the next stages of solar radiation management research, and when and how it leaves the laboratory. Citing numerous risks and concerns, a range of prominent commentators have called for field experiments to be delayed until there is formalized research governance, such as an international agreement. As a piece of pragmatic policy analysis, this paper explores the practicalities and implications of demands for 'governance before research'. It concludes that 'governance before research' is a desirable goal, but that a delay in experimentation-a moratorium-would probably be an ineffective and counterproductive way to achieve it. Firstly, it is very unlikely that a moratorium could be imposed. Secondly, even if it were practicable it seems that a temporary ban on field experiments would have at best a mixed effect addressing the main risks and concerns, while blocking and stigmatizing safe research and delaying the development of good governance practices from learning by doing. The paper suggests a number of steps to ensure 'governance before research' that can be taken in the absence of an international agreement or national legislation, emphasizing the roles of researchers and research funders in developing and implementing good practices.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are

  11. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research 1

    OpenAIRE

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel J.; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant–plant and plant–insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas...

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

    2012-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

    1997-12-31

    This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wein, G.; Rosier, B.

    1998-12-31

    This report provides an overview of the research programs and program components carried out by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Research focused on the following: advanced analytical and spectroscopic techniques for developing novel waste isolation and stabilization technologies as well as cost-effective remediation strategies; ecologically sound management of damaged and remediation of ecological systems; ecotoxicology, remediation, and risk assessment; radioecology, including dose assessments for plants and animals exposed to environmental radiation; and other research support programs.

  15. Aespoe hard rock laboratory. Current research projects 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    In 1986 SKB decided to construct the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in order to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic and undisturbed underground rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The focus of current and future work is on development and testing of site characterization methods, verification of models describing the function of the natural and engineered barriers and development, testing, and demonstration of repository technology. The program has been organised so that all important steps in the development of a repository are covered, in other words the Aespoe HRL constitutes a `dress rehearsal` for the Swedish deep geological repository for spent fuel and other long-lived waste. Geoscientific investigations on Aespoe and nearby islands began in 1986. Aespoe was selected as the site for the laboratory in 1988. Construction of the facility, which reaches a depth of 460 m below the surface, began in 1990 and was completed in 1995. A major milestone had been reached in 1996 with the completion of the pre-investigation and construction phases of the Aespoe HRL. The comprehensive research conducted has permitted valuable development and verification of site characterization methods applied from the ground surface, boreholes, and underground excavations. The results of this research are summarised in the book `Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory - 10 years of Research` published by SKB in 1996. The Operating Phase of the Aespoe HRL began in 1995 and is expected to continue for 15-20 years, that is until the first stage of the development of the Swedish deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel is expected to be completed. A number of research projects were initiated at the start of the Operating Phase. Most of these projects have made substantial progress since then and important results have been obtained. The purpose of this brochure is to provide a brief presentation of the

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    editor, Todd C Hansen

    2009-02-23

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under

  17. Musca domestica laboratory susceptibility to three ethnobotanical culinary plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zayyat, Elham A; Soliman, Mohammed I; Elleboudy, Noha A; Ofaa, Shaimaa E

    2015-10-01

    Throughout history, synanthropic Musca domestica had remained a worldwide problem whenever poor sanitation and bad hygienic conditions exists. Houseflies growing resistance to chemical insecticides are a rising environmental problem that necessitates search for alternatives. Mentha cervina, Ocimum basilicum, and Coriandrum sativum were tested for bioactivity on M. domestica adults and larvae. They are culinary Mediterranean plants. In adulticidal bioassay, using both CDC bottles and fumigation techniques, basil was the most effective extract with LC50 1.074 and 34.996 g/L, respectively. Concerning larvicidal bioassay by fumigation technique, coriander had the highest toxicity index with LC50 29.521 g/L. In both dipping and feeding technique, basil had the highest toxicity with LC50 32.643 and 0.749 g/L, respectively. Basil showed the highest toxicity results in four out of the five models tested followed by coriander then mint; this result highlights the potentiality of basil as a green insecticide in management of flies and opens new insight in the industrialization of basil-based fly control products.

  18. D and D of a plutonium research laboratory and related auxiliary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Arocas, P.; Martinez Ortega, A.; Sama Colao, J.; Garcia Diaz, A.; Torre Rodriguez, J.; Diaz Diaz, J.L. [Safety Department, Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 22 E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Argiles, E. [Lainsa Poligono Industrial Europolis C/.Belgrado no. 6, 28232 Las Rozas, E-28232 Madrid (Spain); Garrido, C. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y construccion, Avda. Manoteras 20, E-28036 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    CIEMAT, former Junta de Energia Nuclear (JEN) started nuclear research at the 60. decade, focussed on the development of pacific uses of Nuclear Energy. At that time, CIEMAT research and pilot plants developed involved the whole nuclear fuel cycle steps. It means from the uranium recovery to the spent fuel reprocessing. With this scope a plutonium research laboratory was constructed and operated from 1961 to the 90's focussed on chemistry of plutonium studies, separation processes and radiochemical analyses, in order to assist the working pilot plants at the Centre. Thereafter, as the result of the changes on the research objectives of CIEMAT, the plutonium laboratory suffered several modifications and finally it was safety stopped due to the obsolescence of its equipments and auxiliary systems. Present paper shows the D and D activities performed and techniques developed to avoid alpha emitter contamination. In every dismantling phase there were established the measures of operational radiological protection adapted to the radiological risk. Dosimetric controls realized during dismantlement showed that incorporation of radionuclides was not detected. Radiological final control was performed applying the derived levels of declassification to request the installation decommissioning. (authors)

  19. Establishment of a clean chemistry laboratory at JAERI. Clean laboratory for environmental analysis and research (CLEAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-02-01

    The JAERI has established a facility with a cleanroom: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). This report is an overview of the design, construction and performance evaluation of the CLEAR in the initial stage of the laboratory operation in June 2001. The CLEAR is a facility to be used for analyses of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples for the safeguards, for the CTBT verification and for researches on environmental sciences. One of the special features of the CLEAR is that it meets double requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials. As another feature of the CLEAR, much attention was paid to the construction materials of the cleanroom for trace analysis of metal elements using considerable amounts of corrosive acids. The air conditioning and purification system, specially designed experimental equipment to provide clean work surfaces, utilities and safety systems are also demonstrated. The potential contamination from the completed cleanroom atmosphere during the analytical procedure was evaluated. It can be concluded that the CLEAR has provided a suitable condition for reliable analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials and other heavy elements in environmental samples. (author)

  20. Establishment of a clean chemistry laboratory at JAERI. Clean laboratory for environmental analysis and research (CLEAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzawa, Yukiko; Magara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-02-01

    The JAERI has established a facility with a cleanroom: the Clean Laboratory for Environmental Analysis and Research (CLEAR). This report is an overview of the design, construction and performance evaluation of the CLEAR in the initial stage of the laboratory operation in June 2001. The CLEAR is a facility to be used for analyses of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials in environmental samples for the safeguards, for the CTBT verification and for researches on environmental sciences. One of the special features of the CLEAR is that it meets double requirements of a cleanroom and for handling of nuclear materials. As another feature of the CLEAR, much attention was paid to the construction materials of the cleanroom for trace analysis of metal elements using considerable amounts of corrosive acids. The air conditioning and purification system, specially designed experimental equipment to provide clean work surfaces, utilities and safety systems are also demonstrated. The potential contamination from the completed cleanroom atmosphere during the analytical procedure was evaluated. It can be concluded that the CLEAR has provided a suitable condition for reliable analysis of ultra trace amounts of nuclear materials and other heavy elements in environmental samples. (author)

  1. PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

  2. Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Experimenters' Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagle, C.D. (comp.)

    1982-10-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has three multipurpose research reactors which accommodate testing loops, target irradiations, and beam-type experiments. Since the experiments must share common or similar facilities and utilities, be designed and fabricated by the same groups, and meet the same safety criteria, certain standards for these have been developed. These standards deal only with those properties from which safety and economy of time and money can be maximized and do not relate to the intent of the experiment or quality of the data obtained. The necessity for, and the limitations of, the standards are discussed; and a compilation of general standards is included.

  4. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

  5. 1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

  6. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2004-11-15

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are

  7. A design guide for energy-efficient research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wishner, N.; Chen, A.; Cook, L. [eds.; Bell, G.C.; Mills, E.; Sartor, D.; Avery, D.; Siminovitch, M.; Piette, M.A.

    1996-09-24

    This document--A Design Guide for Energy-Efficient Research Laboratories--provides a detailed and holistic framework to assist designers and energy managers in identifying and applying advanced energy-efficiency features in laboratory-type environments. The Guide fills an important void in the general literature and compliments existing in-depth technical manuals. Considerable information is available pertaining to overall laboratory design issues, but no single document focuses comprehensively on energy issues in these highly specialized environments. Furthermore, practitioners may utilize many antiquated rules of thumb, which often inadvertently cause energy inefficiency. The Guide helps its user to: introduce energy decision-making into the earliest phases of the design process, access the literature of pertinent issues, and become aware of debates and issues on related topics. The Guide does focus on individual technologies, as well as control systems, and important operational factors such as building commissioning. However, most importantly, the Guide is intended to foster a systems perspective (e.g. right sizing) and to present current leading-edge, energy-efficient design practices and principles.

  8. Biomedical applications of poisonous plant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lynn F; Panter, Kip E; Gaffield, William; Molyneux, Russell J

    2004-06-01

    Research designed to isolate and identify the bioactive compounds responsible for the toxicity of plants to livestock that graze them has been extremely successful. The knowledge gained has been used to design management techniques to prevent economic losses, predict potential outbreaks of poisoning, and treat affected animals. The availability of these compounds in pure form has now provided scientists with tools to develop animal models for human diseases, study modes of action at the molecular level, and apply such knowledge to the development of potential drug candidates for the treatment of a number of genetic and infectious conditions. These advances are illustrated by specific examples of biomedical applications of the toxins of Veratrum californicum (western false hellebore), Lupinus species (lupines), and Astragalus and Oxytropis species (locoweeds).

  9. Neutron Imaging at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Application to Biological Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Cekanova, Maria [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Bailey, William Barton [ORNL; Keener, Wylie S [ORNL; Davis, Larry E [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD) has recently installed a neutron imaging beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold guide hall. The CG-1D beamline supports a broad range of user research spanning from engineering to material research, energy storage, additive manufacturing, vehicle technologies, archaeology, biology, and plant physiology. The beamline performance (spatial resolution, field of view, etc.) and its utilization for biological research are presented. The NScD is also considering a proposal to build the VENUS imaging beamline (beam port 10) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Unlike CG-1D which provides cold neutrons, VENUS will offer a broad range of neutron wavelengths, from epithermal to cold, and enhanced contrast mechanisms. This new capability will also enable the imaging of thicker biological samples than is currently available at CG-1D. A brief overview of the VENUS capability for biological research is discussed.

  10. A Virtual Laboratory for Aviation and Airspace Prognostics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Gorospe, George; Teubert, Christ; Quach, Cuong C.; Hogge, Edward; Darafsheh, Kaveh

    2017-01-01

    Integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), autonomy, spacecraft, and other aviation technologies, in the airspace is becoming more and more complicated, and will continue to do so in the future. Inclusion of new technology and complexity into the airspace increases the importance and difficulty of safety assurance. Additionally, testing new technologies on complex aviation systems and systems of systems can be challenging, expensive, and at times unsafe when implementing real life scenarios. The application of prognostics to aviation and airspace management may produce new tools and insight into these problems. Prognostic methodology provides an estimate of the health and risks of a component, vehicle, or airspace and knowledge of how that will change over time. That measure is especially useful in safety determination, mission planning, and maintenance scheduling. In our research, we develop a live, distributed, hardware- in-the-loop Prognostics Virtual Laboratory testbed for aviation and airspace prognostics. The developed testbed will be used to validate prediction algorithms for the real-time safety monitoring of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the prediction of unsafe events. In our earlier work1 we discussed the initial Prognostics Virtual Laboratory testbed development work and related results for milestones 1 & 2. This paper describes the design, development, and testing of the integrated tested which are part of milestone 3, along with our next steps for validation of this work. Through a framework consisting of software/hardware modules and associated interface clients, the distributed testbed enables safe, accurate, and inexpensive experimentation and research into airspace and vehicle prognosis that would not have been possible otherwise. The testbed modules can be used cohesively to construct complex and relevant airspace scenarios for research. Four modules are key to this research: the virtual aircraft module which uses the X

  11. UTRaLab – Urban Traffic Research Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Kozempel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Traffic Research Laboratory (UTRaLab is a research and test track for traffic detection methods and sensors. It is located at the Ernst-Ruska-Ufer, in the southeast of the city of Berlin (Germany. The UTRaLab covers 1 km of a highly-frequented urban road and is connected to a motorway. It is equipped with two gantries with distance of 850 m in between and has several outstations for data collection. The gantries contain many different traffic sensors like inductive loops, cameras, lasers or wireless sensors for traffic data acquisition. Additionally a weather station records environmental data. The UTRaLab’s main purposes are the data collection of traffic data on the one hand and testing newly developed sensors on the other hand.

  12. Multi-modal virtual environment research at Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    One mission of the Paul M. Fitts Human Engineering Division of Armstrong Laboratory is to improve the user interface for complex systems through user-centered exploratory development and research activities. In support of this goal, many current projects attempt to advance and exploit user-interface concepts made possible by virtual reality (VR) technologies. Virtual environments may be used as a general purpose interface medium, an alternative display/control method, a data visualization and analysis tool, or a graphically based performance assessment tool. An overview is given of research projects within the division on prototype interface hardware/software development, integrated interface concept development, interface design and evaluation tool development, and user and mission performance evaluation tool development.

  13. Environmental and effluent monitoring at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Camilleri, A.; Loosz, T.; Farrar, Y.

    1995-12-01

    Results are presented of environmental and effluent monitoring conducted in the vicinity of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) during 1994. All low level liquid and gaseous effluent discharges complied with existing discharge authorisations and relevant environmental regulations. Potential effective doses to the general public from controlled airborne discharges during this period, were estimated to be less than 0.015 mSv/year for receptor locations on the 1.6 km buffer zone boundary around HIFAR. This value represents 1.5 % of the 1 mSv/year dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council, and 5 % of the site dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/year adopted by ANSTO. 27 refs., 22 tabs., 6 figs.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none, none

    2012-04-27

    Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). Going forward in FY 2012, the LDRD program also supports the Goals codified in the new DOE Strategic Plan of May, 2011. The LDRD program also supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Brief summares of projects and accomplishments for the period for each division are included.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

    1999-07-14

    The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

  16. Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Lyons

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also

  17. Ecological research at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    Research is organized around two major programs: thermal and aquatic stress and mineral cycling. These programs are strengthened by a previously established foundation of basic ecological knowledge. Research in basic ecology continues to be a major component of all SREL environmental programs. Emphasis in all programs has been placed upon field-oriented research relating to regional and local problems having broad ecological significance. For example, extensive research has been conducted in the Par Pond reservoir system and the Savannah River swamp, both of which have received thermal effluent, heavy metals, and low levels of radioisotopes. Furthermore, the availability of low levels of plutonium and uranium in both terrestrial and aquatic environments on the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has provided an unusual opportunity for field research in this area. The studies seek to document the effects, to determine the extent of local environmental problems, and to establish predictable relationships which have general applicability. In order to accomplish this objective it has been imperative that studies be carried out in the natural, environmentally unaffected areas on the SRP as a vital part of the overall program. Progress is reported in forty-nine studies.

  18. HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E

    2009-03-02

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies

  19. Laboratory directed research and development program FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Todd

    2004-03-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. In FY03, Berkeley Lab was authorized by DOE to establish a funding ceiling for the LDRD program of $15.0 M, which equates to about 3.2% of Berkeley Lab's FY03 projected operating and capital equipment budgets. This funding level was provided to develop new scientific ideas and opportunities and allow the Berkeley Lab Director an opportunity to initiate new directions. Budget constraints limited available resources, however, so only $10.1 M was expended for operating and $0.6 M for capital equipment (2.4% of actual Berkeley Lab FY03 costs). In FY03, scientists submitted 168 proposals, requesting over $24.2 M in operating funding. Eighty-two projects were funded, with awards ranging from $45 K to $500 K. These projects are summarized in Table 1.

  20. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  1. Plant biology research and training for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    The committee was assembled in response to a request from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the US Department of Energy (DoE). The leadership of these agencies asked the National Academy of Sciences through the National Research Council (NRC) to assess the status of plant-science research in the United States in light of the opportunities arising from advances inother areas of biology. NRC was asked to suggest ways of accelerating the application of these new biologic concepts and tools to research in plant science with the aim of enhancing the acquisition of new knowledge about plants. The charge to the committee was to examine the following: Organizations, departments, and institutions conducting plant biology research; human resources involved in plant biology research; graduate training programs in plant biology; federal, state, and private sources of support for plant-biology research; the role of industry in conducting and supporting plant-biology research; the international status of US plant-biology research; and the relationship of plant biology to leading-edge research in biology.

  2. Publication bias in laboratory animal research: a survey on magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, G. ter; Korevaar, D.A.; Leenaars, M.; Sterk, P.J.; Noorden, C.J. van; Bouter, L.M.; Lutter, R.; Oude Elferink, R.P.; Hooft, L.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Publication bias jeopardizes evidence-based medicine, mainly through biased literature syntheses. Publication bias may also affect laboratory animal research, but evidence is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion of laboratory animal researchers on the magnitude, drivers, consequences a

  3. Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-03-01

    Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

  4. Reproducibility testing of RAPD, AFLP and SSR markers in plants by a network of European laboratories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, C.J.; Edwards, K.J.; Castiglione, S.; Winfield, M.O.; Sala, F.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.; Bredemeijer, G.M.M.; Vosman, B.; Matthes, M.; Daly, A.; Brettschneider, R.; Bettini, P.; Buiatti, M.; Maestri, E.; Malcevschi, A.; Marmiroli, N.; Aert, R.; Volckaert, G.; Ru, J.; eda,; Linacero, R.; Vazquez, A.; Karp, A.

    1997-01-01

    A number of PCR-based techniques can be used to detect polymorphisms in plants. For their wide-scale usage in germplasm characterisation and breeding it is important that these marker technologies can be exchanged between laboratories, which in turn requires that they can be standardised to yield re

  5. Idaho National Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-01

    The FY 2009 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development. Established by Congress in 1991, LDRD proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, publications, national and international awards, and new hires from the universities and industry, which helps refresh the scientific and engineering workforce. The benefits of INL's LDRD research are many as shown in the tables below. Last year, 91 faculty members from various universities contributed to LDRD research, along with 7 post docs and 64 students. Of the total invention disclosures submitted in FY 2009, 7 are attributable to LDRD research. Sixty three refereed journal articles were accepted or published, and 93 invited presentations were attributable to LDRD research conducted in FY 2009. The LDRD Program is administered in accordance with requirements set in DOE Order 413.2B, accompanying contractor requirements, and other DOE and federal requirements invoked through the INL contract. The LDRD Program is implemented in accordance with the annual INL LDRD Program Plan, which is approved by the DOE, Nuclear Energy Program Secretarial Office. This plan outlines the method the laboratory uses to develop its research portfolio, including peer and management reviews, and the use of other INL management systems to ensure quality, financial, safety, security and environmental requirements and risks are

  6. Sandia National Laboratories shock thermodynamics applied research (STAR) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamics Applied Research (STAR) Facility has recently consolidated three different guns and a variety of instrumentation capabilities into a single location. The guns available at the facility consist of a single-stage light gas gun, a single-stage propellant gun and a two-stage light gas gun, which cover a velocity range from 15 m/s to 8 km/s. Instrumentation available at the facility includes optical and microwave interferometry, time-resolved holography, fast x-radiography, framing and streak photography, fast multi-wavelength pyrometry, piezoelectric and piezoresistive gauges and computer data reduction. This report discusses the guns and instrumentation available at the facility and selected recent applications.

  7. 2011 Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism, & Function Gordon Research Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Benning

    2011-02-04

    This is the second Gordon Research Conference on 'Plant Lipids: Structure, Metabolism & Function'. It covers current topics in lipid structure, metabolism and function in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms including seed plants, algae, mosses and ferns. Work in photosynthetic bacteria is considered as well as it serves the understanding of specific aspects of lipid metabolism in plants. Breakthroughs are discussed in research on plant lipids as diverse as glycerolipids, sphingolipids, lipids of the cell surface, isoprenoids, fatty acids and their derivatives. The program covers nine concepts at the forefront of research under which afore mentioned plant lipid classes are discussed. The goal is to integrate areas such as lipid signaling, basic lipid metabolism, membrane function, lipid analysis, and lipid engineering to achieve a high level of stimulating interaction among diverse researchers with interests in plant lipids. One Emphasis is on the dynamics and regulation of lipid metabolism during plant cell development and in response to environmental factors.

  8. Steam oxidation of TP 347H FG. Laboratory exposures versus service conditions at the power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Anette N. [DONG Energy A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark); Montgomery, Melanie [DONG Energy A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Vattenfall Heat Nordic, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2010-07-01

    TP347H FG is often used as final superheater tubing at Danish Power Plants. The oxidation behaviour of TP347H FG in steam was investigated both in laboratory conditions and field conditions. Short time exposures (336 hours) were performed in the laboratory at 500, 600 and 700 C in gasses with 8 or 46% H{sub 2}O and varying oxygen partial pressures. The shortest exposure time at the power plant was 7720 h, the temperature varied between 500 and 650 C. Surprisingly, thicker oxide layers formed within the laboratory facility at 600 and 700 C than during the long time exposures at the power plant. This could not be explained by spallation. Double-layered oxides developed during oxidation. The outer layer consist of Fe-oxides and the inner oxide contained Fe and the remaining alloy elements. Investigations with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the morphology of the inner oxide was different for the two types of exposures. However, investigation using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the inner oxide in both cases consisted of particles of Fe-Mn-Cr spinel embedded in a metallic Fe-Ni matrix in the bulk of the (former) alloy grains and Cr-rich oxide layer along the (former) alloy grain boundaries. The main difference between the layers formed at the two locations is that the Cr-rich oxide layer is thicker for the samples exposed at the power plant than that for the samples exposed at the laboratory conditions. Furthermore, the depth of Cr depletion in the alloy adjacent the oxide layer is greater for the samples exposed at the power plant compared to those exposed in the laboratory. The microstructure investigation suggests that the slower oxidation rate of TP347H FG at the power plant as compared to the laboratory is due to a larger reservoir of Cr for the samples exposed at the power plant probably combined with a higher mobility of Cr within the alloy. (orig.)

  9. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  10. Brain Cancer in Workers Employed at a Laboratory Research Facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Collins

    Full Text Available An earlier study of research facility workers found more brain cancer deaths than expected, but no workplace exposures were implicated.Adding four additional years of vital-status follow-up, we reassessed the risk of death from brain cancer in the same workforce, including 5,284 workers employed between 1963, when the facility opened, and 2007. We compared the work histories of the brain cancer decedents in relationship to when they died and their ages at death.As in most other studies of laboratory and research workers, we found low rates of total mortality, total cancers, accidents, suicides, and chronic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. We found no new brain cancer deaths in the four years of additional follow-up. Our best estimate of the brain cancer standardized mortality ratio (SMR was 1.32 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.66-2.37, but the SMR might have been as high as 1.69. Deaths from benign brain tumors and other non-malignant diseases of the nervous system were at or below expected levels.With the addition of four more years of follow-up and in the absence of any new brain cancers, the updated estimate of the risk of brain cancer death is smaller than in the original study. There was no consistent pattern among the work histories of decedents that indicated a common causative exposure.

  11. The Mammalian Microbiome and Its Importance in Laboratory Animal Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, André; Fox, James G

    2015-01-01

    In this issue are assembled 10 fascinating, well-researched papers that describe the emerging field centered on the microbiome of vertebrate animals and how these complex microbial populations play a fundamental role in shaping homeostasis of the host. The content of the papers will deal with bacteria and, because of relative paucity of information on these organisms, will not include discussions on viruses, fungus, protozoa, and parasites that colonize various animals. Dissecting the number and interactions of the 500-1000 bacterial species that can inhabit the intestines of animals is made possible by advanced DNA sequencing methods, which do not depend on whether the organism can be cultured or not. Laboratory animals, particularly rodents, have proven to be an indispensable component in not only understanding how the microbiome aids in digestion and protects the host against pathogens, but also in understanding the relationship of various species of bacteria to development of the immune system. Importantly, this research elucidates purported mechanisms for how the microbiome can profoundly affect initiation and progression of diseases such as type 1 diabetes, metabolic syndromes, obesity, autoimmune arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The strengths and limitations of the use of germfree mice colonized with single species of bacteria, a restricted flora, or most recently the use of human-derived microbiota are also discussed.

  12. Monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, G.S.; Chernis, P.J.; Bushman, A.T.; Spinney, M.H.; Backer, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a customer oriented monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The system is used to monitor instruments and manage, process, and distribute data. It consists of signal conditioners and remote loggers, central schedule and control systems, computer aided design and drafting work centres, and the communications linking them. The monitoring and communications elements are designed to meet the harsh demands of underground conditions while providing accurate monitoring of sensitive instruments to rigorous quality assured specifications. These instruments are used for testing of the concept for the deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Many of the tests are done in situ and at full-scale. The monitoring and information management system services engineering, research, and support staff working to design, develop, and demonstrate and present the concept. Experience gained during development of the monitoring and information management system at the URL, can be directly applied at the final disposal site. (author)

  13. Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ARL-TN-0736 ● FEB 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army...Laboratory Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory by Jennifer L Gottfried...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable -Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  14. The hot cell laboratories for material investigations of the Institute for Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-10-01

    Special facilities for handling and testing of irradiated specimens are necessary, to perform the investigation of activated material. The Institute for Safety Research has two hot cell laboratories: - the preparation laboratory and - the materials testing laboratory. This report is intended to give an overview of the available facilities and developed techniques in the laboratories. (orig.)

  15. Current and Planned Cochlear Implant Research at New York University Laboratory for Translational Auditory Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, Mario A.; Fitzgerald, Matthew B.; Neuman, Arlene; Sagi, Elad; Tan, Chin-Tuan; Ketten, Darlene; Martin, Brett

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratory of Translational Auditory Research (LTAR/NYUSM) is part of the Department of Otolaryngology at the New York University School of Medicine and has close ties to the New York University Cochlear Implant Center. LTAR investigators have expertise in multiple related disciplines including speech and hearing science, audiology, engineering, and physiology. The lines of research in the laboratory deal mostly with speech perception by hearing impaired listeners, and particularly those who use cochlear implants (CIs) or hearing aids (HAs). Although the laboratory's research interests are diverse, there are common threads that permeate and tie all of its work. In particular, a strong interest in translational research underlies even the most basic studies carried out in the laboratory. Another important element is the development of engineering and computational tools, which range from mathematical models of speech perception to software and hardware that bypass clinical speech processors and stimulate cochlear implants directly, to novel ways of analyzing clinical outcomes data. If the appropriate tool to conduct an important experiment does not exist, we may work to develop it, either in house or in collaboration with academic or industrial partners. Another notable characteristic of the laboratory is its interdisciplinary nature where, for example, an audiologistandan engineer might work closely to develop an approach that would not have been feasible if each had worked singly on the project. Similarly, investigators with expertise in hearing aids and cochlear implants might join forces to study how human listeners integrate information provided by a CI and a HA. The following pages provide a flavor of the diversity and the commonalities of our research interests. PMID:22668763

  16. Does the name really matter? The importance of botanical nomenclature and plant taxonomy in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Bradley C; Balick, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    Medical research on plant-derived compounds requires a breadth of expertise from field to laboratory and clinical skills. Too often basic botanical skills are evidently lacking, especially with respect to plant taxonomy and botanical nomenclature. Binomial and familial names, synonyms and author citations are often misconstrued. The correct botanical name, linked to a vouchered specimen, is the sine qua non of phytomedical research. Without the unique identifier of a proper binomial, research cannot accurately be linked to the existing literature. Perhaps more significant, is the ambiguity of species determinations that ensues of from poor taxonomic practices. This uncertainty, not surprisingly, obstructs reproducibility of results-the cornerstone of science. Based on our combined six decades of experience with medicinal plants, we discuss the problems of inaccurate taxonomy and botanical nomenclature in biomedical research. This problems appear all too frequently in manuscripts and grant applications that we review and they extend to the published literature. We also review the literature on the importance of taxonomy in other disciplines that relate to medicinal plant research. In most cases, questions regarding orthography, synonymy, author citations, and current family designations of most plant binomials can be resolved using widely-available online databases and other electronic resources. Some complex problems require consultation with a professional plant taxonomist, which also is important for accurate identification of voucher specimens. Researchers should provide the currently accepted binomial and complete author citation, provide relevant synonyms, and employ the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III family name. Taxonomy is a vital adjunct not only to plant-medicine research but to virtually every field of science. Medicinal plant researchers can increase the precision and utility of their investigations by following sound practices with respect to botanical

  17. Broadening Undergraduate Research Skills With A New Astrophysics Laboratory Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Barth, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    To broaden the research skills of undergraduate students at the University of California, Irvine, we created a new required laboratory class called Observational Astrophysics, designed to be taken by junior and senior physics majors specializing in astrophysics. Students spend the first two weeks learning the basics of observational astronomy (coordinate systems, telescopes, CCDs, etc.) and completing homework assignments. Students spend the next eight weeks performing three lab experiments that involve: 1) CCD imaging of Jupiter with an 8-inch Meade telescope, doing astrometry of the their four brightest moons, and fitting the moons' distance versus time to derive the moons' orbital period, semimajor axis and inclination and Jupiter's mass, 2) CCD imaging of star cluster with a 24-inch telescope, doing profile-fitting photometry with DAOPHOT and doing main-sequence fitting of their observed color-magnitude diagram with stellar evolutionary models to derive the cluster's distance, reddening, and age, and 3) reducing longslit spectra of an x-ray binary previously taken with the Keck 10-meter telescope, deriving the radial velocity curve from cross-correlating the spectra with stellar templates, and deriving a lower limit on the mass of the black hole. In this paper, we discuss the course, report on the student reactions, and summarize some of the important things we learned in creating the class. Students enjoy the class. Although they find it difficult, they highly value the experience because they realize they are learning crucial research skills that will greatly help them when go on to do summer research, attend graduate school or work to industry. We are open to sharing our lab manual and data with others who wish to augment their university's curriculum.

  18. Land Reclamation Laboratory: Jim Bridger mine site description of research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, B. B.

    1977-02-01

    Four subprojects have been developed for the Jim Bridger Mine near Rock Springs, Wyoming. This research addresses the problems associated with vegetative response to stressed environments, water availability in reclaimed spoils, refaunation dynamics, and snowpack management for reclamation. A fifth project, soil microbiota recovery dynamics, will also be done at the mine site. Research on vegetative adaptations to stressed ecosystems concentrates on productivity, population dynamics and energy allocation strategies as indicators of plant response to stress. Water availability studies address erosion and spoil moisture characteristics of the native ecosystem and selected reclamation treatments. Design snowfence systems studies will develop methodologies to maximize the amount of the precipitation which is available to vegetation. Animal species composition and density on revegetated areas are also being examined. Wildlife studies are also investigating the impacts of small mammals on revegetation. The microbiological component of topsoil is being investigated in stored and native topsoil. These experiments are designed to provide insight into the reclamation of communities, not just revegetation of mine spoils.

  19. 2007 Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Conference and Graduate Research Seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erich Grotewold

    2008-09-15

    Plant Metabolic Engineering is an emerging field that integrates a diverse range of disciplines including plant genetics, genomics, biochemistry, chemistry and cell biology. The Gordon-Kenan Graduate Research Seminar (GRS) in Plant Metabolic Engineering was initiated to provide a unique opportunity for future researcher leaders to present their work in this field. It also creates an environment allowing for peer-review and critical assessment of work without the intimidation usually associated with the presence of senior investigators. The GRS immediately precedes the Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Research Conference and will be for and by graduate students and post-docs, with the assistance of the organizers listed.

  20. Research advances on transgenic plant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Su, Tao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; An, Zhi-Gang

    2006-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of genetics molecular biology and plant biotechnology, the vaccination (e.g. genetic engineering subunit vaccine, living vector vaccine, nucleic acid vaccine) programs are taking on a prosperous evolvement. In particular, the technology of the use of transgenic plants to produce human or animal therapeutic vaccines receives increasing attention. Expressing vaccine candidates in vegetables and fruits open up a new avenue for producing oral/edible vaccines. Transgenic plant vaccine disquisitions exhibit a tempting latent exploiting foreground. There are a lot of advantages for transgenic plant vaccines, such as low cost, easiness of storage, and convenient immune-inoculation. Some productions converged in edible tissues, so they can be consumed directly without isolation and purification. Up to now, many transgenic plant vaccine productions have been investigated and developed. In this review, recent advances on plant-derived recombinant protein expression systems, infectious targets, and delivery systems are presented. Some issues of high concern such as biosafety and public health are also discussed. Special attention is given to the prospects and limitations on transgenic plant vaccines.

  1. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  2. The Plant Protoplast: A Useful Tool for Plant Research and Student Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, George J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A plant protoplast is basically a plant cell that lacks a cell wall. This article outlines some of the ways in which protoplasts may be used to advance understanding of plant cell biology in research and student instruction. Topics include high efficiency experimental virus infection, organelle isolation, and osmotic effects. (Author/MA)

  3. Joint Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory CSI experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neat, Gregory W.; O'Brien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.; Garnica, Angel; Belvin, W. K.; Sulla, Jeff; Won, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a joint Control Structure Interaction (CSI) experiment in which Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) damping devices were incorporated into the Langley Research Center (LaRC) Phase 0 Testbed. The goals of the effort were twofold: (1) test the effectiveness of the JPL structural damping methods in a new structure and (2) assess the feasibility of combining JPL local control methods with the LaRC multiple input multiple output global control methods. Six dampers (2 piezoelectric active members, 4 viscous dampers), placed in three different regions of the structure, produced up to 26 dB attenuation in target modes. The combined control strategy in which the JPL damping methods contributed local control action and the LaRC control scheme provided global control action, produced and overall control scheme with increased stability margins and improved performance. This paper presents an overview of the technologies contributed from the two centers, the strategies used to combine them, and results demonstrating the success of the damping and cooperative control efforts.

  4. Configuration of the Virtual Laboratory for Fusion Researches in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Nakanishi, H.; Ishiguro, S.; Takami, S.; Tsuda, K.; Okamura, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Toki (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    SNET is a virtual laboratory system for nuclear fusion research in Japan, it has been developed since 2001 with SINET3, which is a national academic network backbone operated by National Institute of Computer sciences. Twenty one sites including major Japanese universities, JAEA and NIFS are mutually connected on SNET with the speed of 1 Gbps in 2008 fiscal year. The SNET is a closed network system based on L2 and L3 VPN and is connected to the web through the firewall at NIFS for security maintenance. Collaboration categories in SNET are as follows: the LHD remote participation; the remote use of supercomputer system; the all Japan ST (Spherical Tokamak) research program. For example, the collaborators of the first category in a remote station can control their diagnostic devices at LHD and analyze the LHD data as if they were at the LHD control room. The detail of the network policy is different from each other because each category has its own particular purpose. In October 2008, the Kyushu University and NIFS were connected by L2 VPN. The site was already connected by L3 VPN, but the data transfer rate was rather low. L2 VPN supports the bulk data transfer which is produced by QUEST, the spherical tokamak device at Kyushu University. The wide-area broadcast test began to distribute to remote stations the video which is presented at the front panel of the LHD control room. ITER activity started in 2007 and 'The ITER Remote Experimentation Centre' will be constructed at the Rokkasho village in Japan under ITER-BA agreement. SNET would be useful for distributing the data of ITER to Japanese universities and institutions. (authors)

  5. Solvent use in private research laboratories in Japan: comparison with the use in public research laboratories and on production floors in industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Takaaki; Zaitsu, Ai; Kojima, Satoshi; Ukai, Hirohiko; Nagasawa, Yasuhiro; Takada, Shiro; Kawakami, Takuya; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Solvents used in production facility-affiliated private laboratories have been seldomly reported. This study was initiated to specify solvent use characteristics in private laboratories in comparison with the use in public research laboratories and on production floors. Elucidation of the applicability of conclusions from a public laboratory survey to private institutions is not only of scientific interest but also of practical importance. A survey on use of 47 legally stipulated organic solvents was conducted. The results were compiled for April 2011 to March 2013. Through sorting, data were available for 479 unit workplaces in private laboratories. Similar sorting for April 2012 to March 2013 was conducted for public research laboratories (e.g., national universities) and production floors (in private enterprises) to obtain 621 and 937 cases, respectively. Sampling of workroom air followed by capillary gas-chromatographic analyses for solvents was conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements. More than one solvent was usually detected in the air of private laboratories. With regard to solvent types, acetone, methyl alcohol, chloroform and hexane were prevalently used in private laboratories, and this was similar to the case of public laboratories. Prevalent use of ethyl acetate was unique to private laboratories. Toluene use was less common both in private and public laboratories. The prevalence of administrative control class 1 (i.e., an adequately controlled environment) was higher in laboratories (both private and public) than production floors. Solvent use patterns are similar in private and public laboratories, except that the use of mixtures of solvents is substantially more popular in private laboratories than in public laboratories.

  6. Laboratory Investigation of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion in straw-fired power plants has been studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C metal temperature for upto 300 hours.In addition the corrosion behaviour of the same materials was examined in ash taken from a straw......-fired boiler. The corrosive potential of the individual components were thus evaluated...

  7. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant-plant and plant-insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies.

  8. Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

  9. Plant Research Department annual report 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    these and state-of-the-art technologies to increase knowledge to develop crops with improved agronomic traits and to engineer high-value compound containingplants, which are, in addition, able to meet the growth conditions of the future environment with elevated temperatures and increasing carbondioxide and ozone...... to the optimal use of crops. One programme is devoted to improve the market value of plant products. Plants with enhanced nutritional value or that contain novel renewable resources are designed to add value to the European Agro-Industries.A fifth programme ultimately is studying the effects of the future...

  10. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  11. Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    2009-06-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

  12. NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY: PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

    Science.gov (United States)

    This small, two-fold flyer contains general information introducing EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory and its research program. The key overarching areas of research described are: Protection of drinking water; control of air pollution; pollution prevention and e...

  13. Summer Research Program (1992). Graduate Student Research Programs Reports. Armstrong Laboratory. Volume 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-28

    Gottlob 15 The Effects of Two Doses of Exogenous Melatonin on Temperature and Rod J. Hughes Subjective Fatigue 16 Assisting Air Force Instructional... Gottlob Department of Psychology Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287 Final Report for Summer Research Program Armstrong Laboratory Sponsored by: Air...TASK Lawrence R. Gottlob Department of Psychology Arizona State University In a previous study, it was found that observers could allocate attention to

  14. Laboratory assessment of indigenous plant extracts for anti-juvenile hormone activity in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R C; Dixit, O P; Sukumaran, P

    1992-07-01

    Of 15 plants tested, five plant extracts showed anti-juvenile hormone-like activity against laboratory colonised late fourth instar larvae and adult female mosquitoes. Petroleum ether extract of Eichhornia crassipes and acetone extracts of Ageratum conyzoides, Cleome icosandra, Tagetes erectes and Tridax procumbens showed growth inhibitory (P less than 0.001) and juvenile hormone mimicing activity to the treated larvae of C. quinquefasciatus.. Larval pupal intermediates, demalanised pupae, defective egg rafts and adult with deformed flight muscles were few noticeable changes. Biting behaviour was observed to be affected only in Ageratum, Cleome and Tridax extracts (P less than 0.001). Loss of fecundity was observed in the treated mosquitoes but no sterilant effects could be seen. Adults, obtained from larvae exposed to the plant extracts produced significantly shorter egg-rafts (P less than 0.005) than in control.

  15. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2016 Annual Summary of Completed Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-30

    ORNL FY 2016 Annual Summary of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Completed Projects. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at ORNL operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (October 22, 2015), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. The LDRD program funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. ORNL reports its status to DOE in March of each year.

  16. Researches on Sequence of Plant Cystatin: Phytocystatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QINQingfeng; HEWei; LIANGJun; ZHANGXingyao

    2005-01-01

    Plant cystatins or phytocystatins are cysteine proteinase inhibitors exist widely in different plant species. Because they can kill insects by inhibiting the digestive function of the cysteine proteinase in gut, they are believed to play an important role in plant's defense against pests. Phytocystatins contain the conserved QXVXG motif and show some features on their sequence different to animal cystatins.After sequencing the protein directly and the cDNA clone, a large number of plant cystatins have been characterized. A multialignment with BLAST software and a detail analysis of 38 phytocystatins show that phytocystatins possess a specific conserved amino acid sequence [LRVI]-[AGT]-[RQKE]-[FY]-[AS]-[VI]-X-[EGHDQV]-[HYFQ]-N different to the conserved sequence demonstrated by Margis in 1998. This conserved sequence can be enough to detect with exclusivity phytocystatin sequences on protein data banks. A classification of these phytocystatins is performed and they can be divided into 3 groups according to their features on amino acid sequence, and the group-I can be still divided into 3 subgroups based on the feature of their amino acid and genomic sequence. By the CLUSTALX software,the most conserved nucleotide sequences of phytocystatins were found, which could be used to design the degenerate premiers to search new phytocystatins with PCR reaction.

  17. Low-gravity Orbiting Research Laboratory Environment Potential Impact on Space Biology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Kenol

    2006-01-01

    One of the major objectives of any orbital space research platform is to provide a quiescent low gravity, preferably a zero gravity environment, to perform fundamental as well as applied research. However, small disturbances exist onboard any low earth orbital research platform. The impact of these disturbances must be taken into account by space research scientists during their research planning, design and data analysis in order to avoid confounding factors in their science results. The reduced gravity environment of an orbiting research platform in low earth orbit is a complex phenomenon. Many factors, among others, such as experiment operations, equipment operation, life support systems and crew activity (if it is a crewed platform), aerodynamic drag, gravity gradient, rotational effects as well as the vehicle structural resonance frequencies (structural modes) contribute to form the overall reduced gravity environment in which space research is performed. The contribution of these small disturbances or accelerations is precisely why the environment is NOT a zero gravity environment, but a reduced acceleration environment. This paper does not discuss other factors such as radiation, electromagnetic interference, thermal and pressure gradient changes, acoustic and CO2 build-up to name a few that affect the space research environment as well, but it focuses solely on the magnitude of the acceleration level found on orbiting research laboratory used by research scientists to conduct space research. For ease of analysis this paper divides the frequency spectrum relevant to most of the space research disciplines into three regimes: a) quasi-steady, b) vibratory and c) transient. The International Space Station is used as an example to illustrate the point. The paper discusses the impact of these three regimes on space biology research and results from space flown experiments are used to illustrate the potential negative impact of these disturbances (accelerations

  18. A Place for Materials Science: Laboratory Buildings and Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungsub; Shields, Brit

    2015-01-01

    The Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM), University of Pennsylvania, was built in 1965 as part of the Advanced Research Projects Agency's (ARPA) Interdisciplinary Laboratories (IDL) program intended to foster interdisciplinary research and training in materials science. The process that led to the construction of the…

  19. NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY - PROVIDING SOLUTIONS FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) conducts research into ways to prevent and reduce pollution risks that threaten human health and the environment. The laboratory inve...

  20. Large-Scale Laboratory Facility For Sediment Transport Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Effective design and maintenance of inlet navigation and shore protection projects require accurate estimates of the quantity of sand that moves along the beach. The...

  1. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  2. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  3. Detective work at the Risley Laboratory. [Corrosion research by AEA Technology, UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, F.

    1989-11-01

    The Northern Research Laboratory at Risley is part of AEA Technology and until recently, the major responsibility of its Materials Science Group was to advise the nuclear power industry on corrosion and material compatibility problems. Part of the Group also provides a materials science and analysis service to the whole of the 100-acre site. The Group's work is essentially concerned with the performance of reactor or plant materials during long-term exposure to hostile chemical environments, often under static and/or dynamic loading, sometimes in an applied heat flux. The major coolants used in UK reactors vary from carbon dioxide (AGR) and high temperature pressurised water (PWR) through to high purity liquid sodium (PFR). Extensive facilities are available for investigating corrosion behaviour in all these environments, including water and sodium loops, tensile testing machines and autoclaves. (author).

  4. [Research progress on plant diversity conservation in sand dune areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-min; Ma, Jun-ling

    2008-01-01

    The landscape in sand dune areas is characterized by the alternate distribution of sand dune and interdune lowland, and the unique floras in these areas are some endemic or rare plant species. In recent years, the decrease in plant species richness and the disappearance of some endemic or rare plant species in these areas have been received special attention, which were listed in the Program of International Biodiversity Conservation, and studied in many countries and districts. In this paper, the research progress in these fields was summarized from the aspects of significance of plant diversity conservation, formation mechanisms of plant diversity, ways of plant diversity conservation, roles of plant diversity research in the development of ecological theories, and important issues in operating plant diversity conservation project. To conserve plant diversity in sand dune areas, attentions should be paid to the differences in conservation goals (to maintain high species richness or to conserve endemic or rare species) among different regions, and the balances between the stabilization of active sand and the conservation of endemic or rare species, and the maintenance of high species richness and the conservation of endemic or rare species. It needed also to consider the sand dune and the interdune lowland as a unified landscape unit to explore the impacts of disturbances and habitat fragment on plant diversity.

  5. A plant resource and experiment management system based on the Golm Plant Database as a basic tool for omics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selbig Joachim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For omics experiments, detailed characterisation of experimental material with respect to its genetic features, its cultivation history and its treatment history is a requirement for analyses by bioinformatics tools and for publication needs. Furthermore, meta-analysis of several experiments in systems biology based approaches make it necessary to store this information in a standardised manner, preferentially in relational databases. In the Golm Plant Database System, we devised a data management system based on a classical Laboratory Information Management System combined with web-based user interfaces for data entry and retrieval to collect this information in an academic environment. Results The database system contains modules representing the genetic features of the germplasm, the experimental conditions and the sampling details. In the germplasm module, genetically identical lines of biological material are generated by defined workflows, starting with the import workflow, followed by further workflows like genetic modification (transformation, vegetative or sexual reproduction. The latter workflows link lines and thus create pedigrees. For experiments, plant objects are generated from plant lines and united in so-called cultures, to which the cultivation conditions are linked. Materials and methods for each cultivation step are stored in a separate ACCESS database of the plant cultivation unit. For all cultures and thus every plant object, each cultivation site and the culture's arrival time at a site are logged by a barcode-scanner based system. Thus, for each plant object, all site-related parameters, e.g. automatically logged climate data, are available. These life history data and genetic information for the plant objects are linked to analytical results by the sampling module, which links sample components to plant object identifiers. This workflow uses controlled vocabulary for organs and treatments. Unique

  6. Exchange of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, C.; Meixner, F. X.; Thielmann, A.; Kuhn, U.; Dindorf, T.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), often denoted as nitrogen oxides (NOx), and ozone (O3) are considered as most important compounds in atmospheric chemistry. In remote areas NOx concentration is related to biological activities of soils and vegetation. The emitted NOx will not entirely be subject of long range transport through the atmosphere. Aside oxidation of NO2 by the OH radical (forming HNO3), a considerable part of it is removed from the atmosphere through the uptake of NO2 by plants. The exchange depends on stomatal activity and on NO2 concentrations in ambient air. It is known that NO2 uptake by plants represents a large NO2 sink, but the magnitude and the NO2 compensation point concentration are still under discussion. Our dynamic chamber system allows exchange measurements of NO2 under field conditions (uncontrolled) as well as studies under controlled laboratory conditions including fumigation experiments. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter (photolytic converter) with subsequent chemiluminescence analysis of the generated NO. Furthermore, as the exchange of NO2 is a complex interaction of transport, chemistry and plant physiology, in our field experiments we determined fluxes of NO, NO2, O3, CO2 and H2O. For a better knowledge of compensation point values for the bi-directional NO2 exchange we investigated a primary representative of conifers, Picea abies, under field and laboratory conditions, and re-analyzed older field data of the deciduous tree Quercus robur.

  7. Progress in Research of Bacteria Fertilizer Strengthening Resistance of Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria fertilizer is used most widely among all kinds of microbial fertilizers. We summarize the research headway of bacteria fertilizer. It mainly focuses on bacteria fertilizer improving the stress resistance of plant. Then we can offer basis to research and exploit bacteria fertilizer. These bacteria include azotobacter, photosynthetic bacteria, Bacillus mucilaginosus siliceous, phosphorus bacteria, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR), effective microorganism(EM).

  8. Open- and closed-formula laboratory animal diets and their importance to research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Dennis E; Lewis, Sherry M; Teter, Beverly B; Thigpen, Julius E

    2009-11-01

    Almost 40 y ago the scientific community was taking actions to control environmental factors that contribute to variation in the responses of laboratory animals to scientific manipulation. Laboratory animal diet was recognized as an important variable. During the 1970s, the American Institute of Nutrition, National Academy of Science, Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, and Laboratory Animals Centre Diets Advisory Committee supported the use of 'standard reference diets' in biomedical research as a means to improve the ability to replicate research. As a result the AIN76 purified diet was formulated. During this same time, the laboratory animal nutritionist at the NIH was formulating open-formula, natural-ingredient diets to meet the need for standardized laboratory animal diets. Since the development of open-formula diets, fixed-formula and constant-nutrient-concentration closed-formula laboratory animal natural ingredient diets have been introduced to help reduce the potential variation diet can cause in research.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2001-04-01

    The projects described in this report represent the Laboratory's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides, a) a director's statement, b) an overview of the laboratory's LDRD program, including PNNL's management process and a self-assessment of the program, c) a five-year project funding table, and d) project summaries for each LDRD project.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen

  12. Laboratory and pilot plant scale study on the electrochemical oxidation of landfill leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglada, Angela; Urtiaga, Ana M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Quimica Inorganica, E.T.S.I.I. y T., Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Ortiz, Inmaculada, E-mail: ortizi@unican.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Quimica Inorganica, E.T.S.I.I. y T., Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Kinetic data regarding COD oxidation were measured in a laboratory scale cell and used to scale-up an electro-oxidation process for landfill leachate treatment by means of boron-doped diamond anodes. A pilot-scale reactor with a total BDD anode area of 1.05 m{sup 2} was designed. Different electrode gaps in the laboratory and pilot plant cells resulted in dissimilar reactor hydrodynamics. Consequently, generalised dimensionless correlations concerning mass transfer were developed in order to define the mass transfer conditions in both electrochemical systems. These correlations were then used in the design equations to validate the scale-up procedure. A series of experiments with biologically pre-treated landfill leachate were done to accomplish this goal. The evolution of ammonia and COD concentration could be well predicted.

  13. An efficient field and laboratory workflow for plant phylotranscriptomic projects1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Moore, Michael J.; Brockington, Samuel F.; Timoneda, Alfonso; Feng, Tao; Marx, Hannah E.; Walker, Joseph F.; Smith, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: We describe a field and laboratory workflow developed for plant phylotranscriptomic projects that involves cryogenic tissue collection in the field, RNA extraction and quality control, and library preparation. We also make recommendations for sample curation. Methods and Results: A total of 216 frozen tissue samples of Caryophyllales and other angiosperm taxa were collected from the field or botanical gardens. RNA was extracted, stranded mRNA libraries were prepared, and libraries were sequenced on Illumina HiSeq platforms. These included difficult mucilaginous tissues such as those of Cactaceae and Droseraceae. Conclusions: Our workflow is not only cost effective (ca. $270 per sample, as of August 2016, from tissue to reads) and time efficient (less than 50 h for 10–12 samples including all laboratory work and sample curation), but also has proven robust for extraction of difficult samples such as tissues containing high levels of secondary compounds. PMID:28337391

  14. Investment in plant research and development bears fruit in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Kang; Xu, Zhihong

    2014-04-01

    Recent rapid progress in plant science and biotechnology in China demonstrates that China's stronger support for funding in plant research and development (R&D) has borne fruit. Chinese groups have contributed major advances in a range of fields, such as rice biology, plant hormone and developmental biology, genomics and evolution, plant genetics and epigenetics, as well as plant biotechnology. Strigolactone studies including those identifying its receptor and dissecting its complex structure and signaling are representative of the recent researches from China at the forefront of the field. These advances are attributable in large part to interdisciplinary studies among scientists from plant science, chemistry, bioinformatics, structural biology, and agronomy. The platforms provided by national facilities facilitate this collaboration. As well, efficient restructuring of the top-down organization of state programs and free exploration of scientists' interests have accelerated achievements by Chinese researchers. Here, we provide a general outline of China's progress in plant R&D to highlight fields in which Chinese research has made significant contributions.

  15. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program. Allelopathic Aquatic Plants for Aquatic Plant Management: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Allelopathy "Bioassay . Growth inhibition. Aquatic macrophytes. Biocontrol Lena minor 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...Bibliography of Aquatic Plant Allelopathy ........ Al 2 ALLELOPATHIC AQUATIC PLANTS FOR AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT; A FEASIBILITY STUDY Introduction Background 1...nutrients, water, and other biotic effects could have overriding effects that appear as competition or allelopathy . These biotic factors must be

  16. Measurement Instruments and Software Used in Biotribology Research Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyurin Andrei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Precision measurements of friction processes have a key role in a variety of industrial processes. The emergence of fine electronic circuit techniques greatly expands capabilities of control. There are some difficulties for their full implementation today, especially when it regards the accuracy and frequency of measurements. The motion-measuring method in real-time system is considered in this article, paying special attention to increased accuracy. This method is based on rapid analog digital converter (ADC, transmission program and digital signal processor (DSP algorithms. Description of laboratory devices is included: Tribal-T and universal friction machine (MTU-01 designed for “Pin on disc” tests. Great emphasis is placed on the usability of accelerometers. The present study examined the collected data via laboratory system for data acquisition and control, and processing it in the laboratory of Biotribology. Laboratory supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA algorithms is described below. Task of regulation is not considered. This paper describes only methods of automatic control theory to analyze the frictional quality.

  17. Research Laboratory of Electronics Progress Report Number 133

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    The substantial labora- ZnSe tory renovation was completed in February; the CBE system hardware was delivered in March and Sponsors installed...laboratories of E.N.E.A. ( Energia ceedings of the International Sherwood Theory Nucleare e Energie Alternative), as well as in- Meeting, Williamsburg, Virginia

  18. Adsorption of Phosphate on Goethite: An Undergraduate Research Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribe, Lorena; Barja, Beatriz C.

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the adsorption of phosphate on goethite is presented, which also includes discussion on surface properties, interfaces, acid-base equilibrium, molecular structure and solid state chemistry. It was seen that many students were able to produce qualitatively correct results for a complex system of real interest and they…

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K J

    2011-03-22

    A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has at its core a primary national security mission - to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing, and to prevent and counter the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction: nuclear, chemical, and biological. The Laboratory uses the scientific and engineering expertise and facilities developed for its primary mission to pursue advanced technologies to meet other important national security needs - homeland defense, military operations, and missile defense, for example - that evolve in response to emerging threats. For broader national needs, LLNL executes programs in energy security, climate change and long-term energy needs, environmental assessment and management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and for breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. With this multidisciplinary expertise, the Laboratory serves as a science and technology resource to the U.S. government and as a partner with industry and academia. This annual report discusses the following topics: (1) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation; (2) Biological Sciences; (3) Chemistry; (4) Earth and Space Sciences; (5) Energy Supply and Use; (6) Engineering and Manufacturing Processes; (7) Materials Science and Technology; Mathematics and Computing Science; (8) Nuclear Science and Engineering; and (9) Physics.

  20. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  1. Computerization upgrade project for the Rocky Flats Plant Critical Mass Laboratory Reactor Control Console

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, H.C.; Miles, R.E.; Sachs, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This report discusses present and planned future work on computerization of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) Nuclear Reactor Control Console. No computerized control functions are planned or anticipated at this time. The scope of this computerization effort is limited to Data Acquisition and Analysis. In this work an IBM-PC will be connected to four (4) Nuclear Safety channels, and two (2) nonnuclear safety channels. Programming is being done in interpretive advanced BASIC. At the present time only two channels, Linear Picoammeters 1 and 2, are having their signals processed by the IBM-PC.

  2. Towards a more holistic research approach to plant conservation: the case of rare plants on oceanic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luís; Dias, Elisabete Furtado; Sardos, Julie; Azevedo, Eduardo Brito; Schaefer, Hanno; Moura, Mónica

    2015-06-11

    Research dedicated to rare endemic plants is usually focused on one given aspect. However, holistic studies, addressing several key issues, might be more useful, supporting management programmes while unravelling basic knowledge about ecological and population-level processes. A more comprehensive approach to research is proposed, encompassing: phylogenetics/systematics, pollination biology and seed dispersal, propagation, population genetics, species distribution models (SDMs), threats and monitoring. We present a holistic study dedicated to Veronica dabneyi Hochst. ex Seub., an endangered chamaephyte endemic to the Azores. Veronica dabneyi was mainly found associated with other endemic taxa; however, invasive plants were also present and together with introduced cattle, goats and rabbits are a major threat. Most populations grow at somewhat rocky and steep locations that appeared to work as refuges. Seed set in the wild was generally high and recruitment of young plants from seed seemed to be frequent. In the laboratory, it was possible to germinate and fully develop V. dabneyi seedlings, which were planted at their site of origin. No dormancy was detected and time for 50 % germination was affected by incubation temperature. Eight new microsatellite markers were applied to 72 individuals from 7 sites. A considerable degree of admixture was found between samples from the two islands Flores and Corvo, with 98 % of the genetic variability allocated within populations. Levels of heterozygosity were high and no evidence of inbreeding was found. Species distribution models based on climatic and topographic variables allowed the estimation of the potential distribution of V. dabneyi on Flores and Corvo using ecological niche factor analysis and Maxent. The inclusion of land-use variables only slightly increased the information explained by the models. Projection of the expected habitat in Faial largely coincided with the only historic record of V. dabneyi on that island

  3. An Improved Dielectric Constant Cell for Use in Student and Research Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, H. Bradford.; Walmsley, Judith A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the latest stage in the design of an economical dielectric constant cell, tested in both instructional and research applications, that is suitable for student laboratories and for precision research measurements. (BT)

  4. Special-Status Plant Species Surveys and Vegetation Mapping at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R E

    2006-10-03

    This report presents the results of Jones & Stokes special-status plant surveys and vegetation mapping for the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Special-status plant surveys were conducted at Site 300 in April to May 1997 and in March to April 2002. Eight special-status plants were identified at Site 300: large-flowered fiddleneck, big tarplant, diamond-petaled poppy, round-leaved filaree, gypsum-loving larkspur, California androsace, stinkbells, and hogwallow starfish. Maps identifying the locations of these species, a discussion of the occurrence of these species at Site 300, and a checklist of the flora of Site 300 are presented. A reconnaissance survey of the LLNL Livermore Site was conducted in June 2002. This survey concluded that no special-status plants occur at the Livermore Site. Vegetation mapping was conducted in 2001 at Site 300 to update a previous vegetation study done in 1986. The purpose of the vegetation mapping was to update and to delineate more precisely the boundaries between vegetation types and to map vegetation types that previously were not mapped. The vegetation map is presented with a discussion of the vegetation classification used.

  5. Design of Biomass Gasification and Combined Heat and Power Plant Based on Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydary, Juma; Jelemenský, Ľudovít

    Three types of wooden biomass were characterized by calorimetric measurements, proximate and elemental analysis, thermogravimetry, kinetics of thermal decomposition and gas composition. Using the Aspen steady state simulation, a plant with the processing capacity of 18 ton/h of biomass was modelled based on the experimental data obtained under laboratory conditions. The gasification process has been modelled in two steps. The first step of the model describes the thermal decomposition of the biomass based on a kinetic model and in the second step, the equilibrium composition of syngas is calculated by the Gibbs free energy of the expected components. The computer model of the plant besides the reactor model includes also a simulation of other plant facilities such as: feed drying employing the energy from the process, ash and tar separation, gas-steam cycle, and hot water production heat exchangers. The effect of the steam to air ratio on the conversion, syngas composition, and reactor temperature was analyzed. Employment of oxygen and air for partial combustion was compared. The designed computer model using all Aspen simulation facilities can be applied to study different aspects of biomass gasification in a Combined Heat and Power plant.

  6. Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Review of Army Research Laboratory Programs for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions" examines the ways in which historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions have used the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) funds to enhance the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics…

  7. Redefining Authentic Research Experiences in Introductory Biology Laboratories and Barriers to Their Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spell, Rachelle M.; Guinan, Judith A.; Miller, Kristen R.; Beck, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating authentic research experiences in introductory biology laboratory classes would greatly expand the number of students exposed to the excitement of discovery and the rigor of the scientific process. However, the essential components of an authentic research experience and the barriers to their implementation in laboratory classes are…

  8. Frontiers: Research highlights 1946-1996 [50th Anniversary Edition. Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This special edition of 'Frontiers' commemorates Argonne National Laboratory's 50th anniversary of service to science and society. America's first national laboratory, Argonne has been in the forefront of U.S. scientific and technological research from its beginning. Past accomplishments, current research, and future plans are highlighted.

  9. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  10. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  11. The high temperature materials laboratory: A research and user facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    HTML is a modern facility for high-temperature ceramic research; it is also a major user facility, providing industry and university communities access to special research equipment for studying microstructure and microchemistry of materials. User research equipment is divided among six User Centers: Materials Analysis, X-ray Diffraction, Physical Properties, Mechanical Properties, Ceramic Specimen Preparation, and Residual Stress. This brochure provides brief descriptions of each of the major research instruments in the User Centers: scanning Auger microprobe, field emission SEMs, electron microprobe, multitechnique surface analyzer, analytical electron microscope, HRTEM, optical microscopy & image analysis, goniometer, scanning calorimetry, simultaneous thermal analysis, thermal properties (expansion, diffusivity, conductivity), high-temperature tensile test facilities, flexure, electromechanical test facilities (flexure, compression creep, environmental), microhardness microprobe, ceramic machining. Hands-on operation by qualified users is encouraged; staff is available. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research may be performed. Proprietary research is one on a full-cost recovery basis.

  12. Use of Laboratory Animals in Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Education, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia).

    The use of animals in scientific research has been a controversial issue for over a hundred years. Research with animals has saved human lives, lessened human suffering, and advanced scientific understanding, yet that same research can cause pain and distress for the animals involved and may result in their death. It is hardly surprising that…

  13. Research priorities for harnessing plant microbiomes in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Soman, Chinmay; Wagner, Maggie R; Friesen, Maren L; Kremer, James; Bennett, Alison; Morsy, Mustafa; Eisen, Jonathan A; Leach, Jan E; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2017-03-01

    Feeding a growing world population amidst climate change requires optimizing the reliability, resource use, and environmental impacts of food production. One way to assist in achieving these goals is to integrate beneficial plant microbiomes-i.e., those enhancing plant growth, nutrient use efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance, and disease resistance-into agricultural production. This integration will require a large-scale effort among academic researchers, industry researchers, and farmers to understand and manage plant-microbiome interactions in the context of modern agricultural systems. Here, we identify priorities for research in this area: (1) develop model host-microbiome systems for crop plants and non-crop plants with associated microbial culture collections and reference genomes, (2) define core microbiomes and metagenomes in these model systems, (3) elucidate the rules of synthetic, functionally programmable microbiome assembly, (4) determine functional mechanisms of plant-microbiome interactions, and (5) characterize and refine plant genotype-by-environment-by-microbiome-by-management interactions. Meeting these goals should accelerate our ability to design and implement effective agricultural microbiome manipulations and management strategies, which, in turn, will pay dividends for both the consumers and producers of the world food supply.

  14. Research priorities for harnessing plant microbiomes in sustainable agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Chinmay; Wagner, Maggie R.; Friesen, Maren L.; Kremer, James; Bennett, Alison; Morsy, Mustafa; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Leach, Jan E.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding a growing world population amidst climate change requires optimizing the reliability, resource use, and environmental impacts of food production. One way to assist in achieving these goals is to integrate beneficial plant microbiomes—i.e., those enhancing plant growth, nutrient use efficiency, abiotic stress tolerance, and disease resistance—into agricultural production. This integration will require a large-scale effort among academic researchers, industry researchers, and farmers to understand and manage plant-microbiome interactions in the context of modern agricultural systems. Here, we identify priorities for research in this area: (1) develop model host–microbiome systems for crop plants and non-crop plants with associated microbial culture collections and reference genomes, (2) define core microbiomes and metagenomes in these model systems, (3) elucidate the rules of synthetic, functionally programmable microbiome assembly, (4) determine functional mechanisms of plant-microbiome interactions, and (5) characterize and refine plant genotype-by-environment-by-microbiome-by-management interactions. Meeting these goals should accelerate our ability to design and implement effective agricultural microbiome manipulations and management strategies, which, in turn, will pay dividends for both the consumers and producers of the world food supply. PMID:28350798

  15. DAMAGE RESEARCH WITH P. PENETRANS IN ASPARAGUS PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, J; Molendijk, L P G

    2014-01-01

    During cultivation of asparagus plants growth can be inhibited and yield can be reduced by plant-parasitic nematodes. Plant raising companies assume that the root lesion nematode (Pratylenchus penetrans) can cause severe yield loss in asparagus plants. However quantitative information about yield reduction in relation to the degree of infestation of this nematode species in the field is lacking. Research was done in The Netherlands by Applied Plant Research (part of Wageningen University and Research Centre) to determine the maximum degree of yield loss of asparagus plants at high infestation levels of P. penetrans and to establish the height of the tolerance limit for this nematode species. Also was investigated whether a field application of a granular nematicide could prevent or reduce yield loss caused by P. penetrans. Research was done in the field at sandy soils at the PPO location near Vredepeel in The Netherlands over a period of two years. In the first year the most suitable field was selected and on this field different infestation levels of P. penetrans were created. In the second year asparagus was cultivated and plant yield (number and quality of deliverable plants and financial yield) was calculated. At high infestation levels of Pratylenchus penetrans maximum yield loss was 12% (which can mean a financial loss of 7.000 C per ha). Yield started to decrease at very low infestation levels of P. penetrans and no statistical reliable tolerance limit could be calculated. Field application of 40 kg per ha of Vydate 10 G just before sowing of asparagus, could almost completely prevent yield loss caused by P. penetrans. After harvest infestation levels of P. penetrans were much lower than could be expected if asparagus was a non-host for this nematode species. In this paper therefore it is suggested that asparagus plants are (actively) controlling P. penetrans.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Pamela J.

    2010-03-31

    This report documents progress made on all LDRD-funded projects during fiscal year 2009. As a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) national laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has an enduring mission to bring molecular and environmental sciences and engineering strengths to bear on DOE missions and national needs. Their vision is to be recognized worldwide and valued nationally for leadership in accelerating the discovery and deployment of solutions to challenges in energy, national security, and the environment. To achieve this mission and vision, they provide distinctive, world-leading science and technology in: (1) the design and scalable synthesis of materials and chemicals; (2) climate change science and emissions management; (3) efficient and secure electricity management from generation to end use; and (4) signature discovery and exploitation for threat detection and reduction. PNNL leadership also extends to operating EMSL: the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility dedicated to providing itnegrated experimental and computational resources for discovery and technological innovation in the environmental molecular sciences.

  17. Materials research at selected Japanese laboratories. Based on a 1992 visit: Overview, summary of highlights, notes on laboratories and topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    I visited Japan from June 29 to August 1, 1992. The purpose of this visit was to assess the status of materials science research at selected governmental, university and industrial laboratories and to established acquaintances with Japanese researchers. The areas of research covered by these visits included ceramics, oxide superconductors, intermetallics alloys, superhard materials and diamond films, high-temperature materials and properties, mechanical properties, fracture, creep, fatigue, defects, materials for nuclear reactor applications and irradiation effects, high pressure synthesis, self-propagating high temperature synthesis, microanalysis, magnetic properties and magnetic facilities, and surface science.

  18. A New Model for Transitioning Students from the Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory to the Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Jessica J.; Wixson, Emily N.; Geske, Grant D.; Dodge, Matthew W.; Tseng, T. Andrew; Clauss, Allen D.; Blackwell, Helen E.

    2006-01-01

    The transformation of 346 chemistry courses into a training experience that could provide undergraduate students with a skill set essential for a research-based chemistry career is presented. The course has an innovative structure that connects undergraduate students with graduate research labs at the semester midpoint and also includes new,…

  19. Two decades of Mexican ethnobotany and research in plant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya, X

    1994-01-01

    A renewed interest in the systematic study of indigenous medicines and associated medicinal plants arose in the 1970s. In Mexico the government established a national pharmaceutical industry to make use of the valuable colonial heritage of traditional practices combined with European medical concepts and resources. In 1975 the Mexican Institute for the Study of Medical Plants was created to integrate botanical, chemical and pharmacological studies on the Mexican flora. It compiled a database on ethnobotanical information relating to Mexican medicinal plants from the medical literature of the 16th to 19th centuries. A second database contained information on medicinal plants in current use. A medicinal herbarium was established. Taxonomical studies led to classification of the 11,000 voucher specimens in the herbarium and cross-referencing of the information with other databanks. A core group of 1000 plants used in traditional medicine throughout Mexico for almost 400 years was identified. Most of these are used to treat common diseases or basic health problems, usually given orally as decoctions or infusions. 95% of the plants used traditionally are from wild species. Information was collected from almost 3000 small Indian communities over four years on three aspects of traditional medicine--the healer, the disease categories recognized and the therapeutic resources in use. Plants with reported medicinal activity were selected for laboratory screening according to the frequency and commonality of their use, geographical distribution and seasonal availability. Screening involves a collaboration between chemists and pharmacologists: plant extracts are sequentially assayed and fractionated until the pure compound is isolated. Several active compounds are usually obtained from the same extract, frequently from the aqueous fractions. Ethnomedical information influences which plants are selected for screening and the type of assay used.

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2006 Research Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    This 2006 issue of the NREL Research Review again reveals just how vital and diverse our research portfolio has become. Our feature story looks at how our move to embrace the tenants of "translational research" is strengthening our ability to meet the nation's energy goals. By closing the gap between basic science and applied research and development (R&D)--and focusing a bright light on the valuable end uses of our work--translational research promises to shorten the time it takes to push new technology off the lab bench and into the marketplace. This issue also examines our research into fuels of the future and our computer modeling of wind power deployment, both of which point out the real-world benefits of our work.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory research highlights for FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1978-01-01

    Brief, nontechnical reviews are presented of work in the following areas: solar energy projects, fusion research, silicon cell research, superconducting magnetometers, psi particles, positron--electron project (PEP), pulsar measurements, nuclear dynamics, element 106, computer control of accelerators, the Bevalac biomedical facility, blood--lipid analysis, and bungarotoxin and the brain. Financial data and personnel lists are given, along with citations to well over a thousand research papers. (RWR)

  2. Perspectives from Former Executives of the DOD Corporate Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    private and public sectors. He served with Monsanto Company for 18 years in various research and development positions, starting at the research bench and...then holding various positions in management of research and development. Following his stay at Monsanto , Lyons joined the Department of Commerce’s...experience. At Monsanto , he observed that those individuals who took a fundamental approach to solving industrial problems and were able to publish the

  3. Laboratory demonstration of a multi-sensor unattended cylinder verification station for uranium enrichment plant safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, David I [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rowland, Kelly L [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sheriden [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-10

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of the diversion of a significant quantity of nuclear materials, and safeguarding uranium enrichment plants is especially important in preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA’s proposed Unattended Cylinder Verification Station (UCVS) for UF6 cylinder verification would combine the operator’s accountancy scale with a nondestructive assay system such as the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) and cylinder identification and surveillance systems. In this project, we built a laboratory-scale UCVS and demonstrated its capabilities using mock UF6 cylinders. We developed a signal processing algorithm to automate the data collection and processing from four continuous, unattended sensors. The laboratory demonstration of the system showed that the software could successfully identify cylinders, snip sensor data at the appropriate points in time, determine the relevant characteristics of the cylinder contents, check for consistency among sensors, and output the cylinder data to a file. This paper describes the equipment, algorithm and software development, laboratory demonstration, and recommendations for a full-scale UCVS.

  4. Behavioural science at work for Canada: National Research Council laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Jennifer A

    2007-03-01

    The National Research Council is Canada's principal research and development agency. Its 20 institutes are structured to address interdisciplinary problems for industrial sectors, and to provide the necessary scientific infrastructure, such as the national science library. Behavioural scientists are active in five institutes: Biological Sciences, Biodiagnostics, Aerospace, Information Technology, and Construction. Research topics include basic cellular neuroscience, brain function, human factors in the cockpit, human-computer interaction, emergency evacuation, and indoor environment effects on occupants. Working in collaboration with NRC colleagues and with researchers from universities and industry, NRC behavioural scientists develop knowledge, designs, and applications that put technology to work for people, designed with people in mind.

  5. Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated...... from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms...

  6. MOOCs as a Massive Research Laboratory: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Paul; Martinez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) offer many opportunities for research into several topics related to pedagogical methods and student incentives. In the context of over 20 years of online learning research, we discuss lessons to be learned from observational comparisons and experiments on randomly chosen groups of students. We target two MOOCs…

  7. Evolving the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Technical Communication Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    seat serving as a part of a big machine . In research, most S&E’s tend to follow work of individuals and small groups rather than research of an...so maybe there is some sort of roundup of ARL interviews that could be collated and posted somewhere? I don’t have a strong suggestion yet. Just

  8. Life history of Paracoccus marginatus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) on four host plant species under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Kaushalya G; Mannion, Catharine M; Osborne, Lance S; Epsky, Nancy D

    2008-06-01

    Life history of the mealybug, Paracoccus marginatus Williams and Granara de Willink, on three ornamental plants [Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L., Acalypha wilkesiana (Muell.-Arg.), and Plumeria rubra L.] and one weed species (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) was studied under laboratory conditions. Mealybugs were able to develop, survive, and reproduce on all four hosts; however, there were differences in the life history parameters. Adult females that developed on acalypha and parthenium emerged approximately 1 d earlier than those that developed on hibiscus and plumeria. Adult males had a longer developmental time on plumeria than on the other hosts. Survival of first- and second-instar nymphs and cumulative adult survival were lowest on plumeria. Longevity was not affected by hosts for males and females and averaged 2.3 +/- 0.1 and 21.2 +/- 0.1 d, respectively. On plumeria, 58.9 +/- 1.7% of the adults were females, which was a higher female percentage than on the other hosts. No egg production occurred in virgin females. Prereproductive and reproductive periods of the females were not affected by hosts and averaged 6.3 +/- 0.1 and 11.2 +/- 0.1 d, respectively. Mean fecundity of 186.3 +/- 1.8 eggs on plumeria was lower than on the other three plant species. Life history parameters of P. marginatus on hibiscus, acalypha, plumeria, and parthenium show its ability to develop, survive, and reproduce on a wide variety of plant species.

  9. Operation and performance of the ICARUS-T600 cryogenic plant at Gran Sasso underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, M; Baibussinov, B; Boffelli, F; Bubak, A; Calligarich, E; Canci, N; Centro, S; Cesana, A; Cieślik, K; Cline, D B; Cocco, A G; Dabrowska, A; Dermenev, A; Disdier, J M; Falcone, A; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Ferrari, A; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Guglielmi, A; Haranczyk, M; Holeczek, J; Ivashkin, A; Kirsanov, M; Kisiel, J; Kochanek, I; Lagoda, J; Mania, S; Menegolli, A; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Otwinowski, S; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Plonski, P; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rossella, M; Rubbia, C; Sala, P R; Scaramelli, A; Segreto, E; Sergiampietri, F; Stefan, D; Sulej, R; Szarska, M; Terrani, M; Torti, M; Varanini, F; Ventura, S; Vignoli, C; Wang, H G; Yang, X; Zalewska, A; Zani, A; Zaremba, K

    2015-01-01

    ICARUS T600 liquid argon time projection chamber is the first large mass electronic detector of a new generation able to combine the imaging capabilities of the old bubble chambers with the excellent calorimetric energy measurement. After the three months demonstration run on surface in Pavia during 2001, the T600 cryogenic plant was significantly revised, in terms of reliability and safety, in view of its long-term operation in an underground environment. The T600 detector was activated in Hall B of the INFN Gran Sasso Laboratory during Spring 2010, where it was operated without interruption for about three years, taking data exposed to the CERN to Gran Sasso long baseline neutrino beam and cosmic rays. In this paper the T600 cryogenic plant is described in detail together with the commissioning procedures that lead to the successful operation of the detector shortly after the end of the filling with liquid Argon. Overall plant performance and stability during the long-term underground operation are discusse...

  10. Potato-related research at USDA-ARS laboratories in Washington and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato-related research currently being conducted at three USDA-ARS laboratories in Idaho and Washington is reviewed. Objectives of research programs at the Temperate Tree Fruit & Vegetable Research Unit (Wapato, WA), the Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center (Prosser, WA), and the Sm...

  11. A typology of evidence based practice research heuristics for clinical laboratory science curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibach, Elizabeth K; Russell, Barbara L

    2010-01-01

    A typology of EBP research heuristics was defined relative to clinical laboratory science levels of practice. Research skills requisite for CLS baccalaureate level are associated mainly with quality control of analytic processes. Research skills at master's level are associated with pre- and post-analytic investigations, as well. Doctoral level CLS practice portends to utilize research skills facilitating quality investigations at the systems level.

  12. MIPS PlantsDB: a database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaumer, Thomas; Martis, Mihaela M; Roessner, Stephan K; Pfeifer, Matthias; Bader, Kai C; Sharma, Sapna; Gundlach, Heidrun; Spannagl, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of plant genome (sequence) data enables powerful comparative analyses and integrative approaches and also requires structured and comprehensive information resources. Databases are needed for both model and crop plant organisms and both intuitive search/browse views and comparative genomics tools should communicate the data to researchers and help them interpret it. MIPS PlantsDB (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/genomes.jsp) was initially described in NAR in 2007 [Spannagl,M., Noubibou,O., Haase,D., Yang,L., Gundlach,H., Hindemitt, T., Klee,K., Haberer,G., Schoof,H. and Mayer,K.F. (2007) MIPSPlantsDB-plant database resource for integrative and comparative plant genome research. Nucleic Acids Res., 35, D834-D840] and was set up from the start to provide data and information resources for individual plant species as well as a framework for integrative and comparative plant genome research. PlantsDB comprises database instances for tomato, Medicago, Arabidopsis, Brachypodium, Sorghum, maize, rice, barley and wheat. Building up on that, state-of-the-art comparative genomics tools such as CrowsNest are integrated to visualize and investigate syntenic relationships between monocot genomes. Results from novel genome analysis strategies targeting the complex and repetitive genomes of triticeae species (wheat and barley) are provided and cross-linked with model species. The MIPS Repeat Element Database (mips-REdat) and Catalog (mips-REcat) as well as tight connections to other databases, e.g. via web services, are further important components of PlantsDB.

  13. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  14. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois is an interdisciplinary laboratory operated in the College of Engineering. Its focus is the science of materials and it supports research in the areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. This report addresses topics such as: an MRL overview; budget; general programmatic and institutional issues; new programs; research summaries for metallurgy, ceramics, solid state physics, and materials chemistry.

  15. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    research associates. The PI and the research team have published over 10 journal articles and over 50 conference proceedings and over 50 symposiums...reflections. Optical interference filters with center wavelength at 5322 or 632.82 nm are used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma self- luminescence ...wavelength at 532 ± 2 nm was used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma jet self- luminescence . The shadow of the laser induced plasma falls onto

  16. Mapping the Use of Engineered NM in Quebec's Industries and Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostiguy, Claude; Emond, Claude; Dossa, Inès; Malki, Yasmina; Boily, Chantale; Roughley, David; Plavski, Anton; Endo, Charles-Anica

    2013-04-01

    Engineered NanoMaterials (NM) offer an opportunity to develop a wide variety of new products with unique properties but many studies have shown potential OHS risks specific to NM. Addressing these risks requires knowledge about release of NM into the workplaces. This research aimed to map the state of nanotechnology OHS practices in Quebec through a questionnaire following a first contact by telephone when possible and by compiling the type and volumes of NM used as well as gathering information related to the working conditions and OHS aspects. This survey was conducted among 1310 Quebec industries and 653 researchers working in different specialties potentially involved in the development/production/distribution/integration of NM and use of NM containing products. Overall, 90 questionnaires, including 51 from the industries, were completed. These showed that NM are mainly used into the powder form, in many different sectors and deserve a wide range of markets. The prevention measures implemented vary widely from a workplace to another but about one third of the participants report that they have implemented NP adapted prevention measures but they remain worried on some specific operations. More than 50% of the participants request more information about the safe laboratory/plant design, toxicity, regulation, good work practices and prevention measures, efficiency of personal protective equipment and environmental impacts.

  17. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  18. Nuclear Power Plant Operator Reliability Research Based on Fuzzy Math

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes use of the concept and theory of fuzzy number in fuzzy mathematics, to research for the response time of operator in accident of Chinese nuclear power plant. Through the quantitative analysis for the performance shape factors (PSFs which influence the response time of operators, the formula of the operator response time is obtained based on the possibilistic fuzzy linear regression model which is used for the first time in this kind of research. The research result shows that the correct research method can be achieved through the analysis of the information from a small sample. This method breaks through the traditional research method and can be used not only for the reference to the safe operation of nuclear power plant, but also in other areas.

  19. Research on Aeration Systems Efficiency in Small Wastewater Treatment Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ala Sokolova

    2011-01-01

    Large amount of small wastewater treatment plants does not work properly. One of the reasons could be wrong design of the aeration system. Therefore, the aim of this research is to analyse the performance of two aeration systems used in Lithuanian small wastewater treatment plants. Both aeration systems are designed for the following parameters: 4 PE and 0,8 m3/d wastewater flow. These data correspond to the oxygen requirement of 40,9 g O2/h. Summarizing the results of the research, it was fo...

  20. Using Laboratory Experimental Auctions in Marketing Research: A Case Study of New Packaging for Fresh Beef

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Hoffman; Menkhaus, Dale J.; Dipankar Chakravarti; Field, Ray A.; Whipple, Glen D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of laboratory experimental auctions in a pretest market research program for new products. We review the experimental auctions literature, discuss the range of auction mechanisms available and present the advantages and disadvantages of using a particular mechanism for a laboratory pretest market. We then present a step-by-step example of how a theoretically incentive compatible auction mechanism (fifth-price, sealed-bid) was used in a laboratory pretest market ...

  1. Atlas: A Facility for High Energy Density Physics Research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY W. M. Parsons, W. A. Reass, J. ~-Griego, D. W. Bowman...C. Thompson, R. F. Gribble, J. S. Shlachter, C. A. Ekdahl, P. D. Goldstone, and S.M. Younger Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM. 87545...Atlas A Facility For High Energy Density Physics Research At Los Alamos National Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  2. Design and fabrication of adjustable red-green-blue LED light arrays for plant research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenitz J Dustin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although specific light attributes, such as color and fluence rate, influence plant growth and development, researchers generally cannot control the fine spectral conditions of artificial plant-growth environments. Plant growth chambers are typically outfitted with fluorescent and/or incandescent fixtures that provide a general spectrum that is accommodating to the human eye and not necessarily supportive to plant development. Many studies over the last several decades, primarily in Arabidopsis thaliana, have clearly shown that variation in light quantity, quality and photoperiod can be manipulated to affect growth and control developmental transitions. Light emitting diodes (LEDs has been used for decades to test plant responses to narrow-bandwidth light. LEDs are particularly well suited for plant growth chambers, as they have an extraordinary life (about 100,000 hours, require little maintenance, and use negligible energy. These factors render LED-based light strategies particularly appropriate for space-biology as well as terrestrial applications. However, there is a need for a versatile and inexpensive LED array platform where individual wavebands can be specifically tuned to produce a series of light combinations consisting of various quantities and qualities of individual wavelengths. Two plans are presented in this report. Results In this technical report we describe the practical construction of tunable red-green-blue LED arrays to support research in plant growth and development. Two light fixture designs and corresponding circuitry are presented. The first is well suited for a laboratory environment for use in a finite area with small plants, such as Arabidopsis. The second is expandable and appropriate for growth chambers. The application of these arrays to early plant developmental studies has been validated with assays of hypocotyl growth inhibition/promotion and phototropic curvature in Arabidopsis seedlings

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  4. How Work Positions Affect the Research Activity and Information Behaviour of Laboratory Scientists in the Research Lifecycle: Applying Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nahyun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of research and information activities of laboratory scientists in different work positions throughout a research lifecycle. Activity theory was applied as the conceptual and analytical framework. Method: Taking a qualitative research approach, in-depth interviews and field…

  5. Bridging the Gap between Instructional and Research Laboratories: Teaching Data Analysis Software Skills through the Manipulation of Original Research Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sarah J. R.; Zhu, Jieling; Karch, Jessica M.; Sorrento, Cristina M.; Ulichny, Joseph C.; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2016-01-01

    The gap between graduate research and introductory undergraduate teaching laboratories is often wide, but the development of teaching activities rooted within the research environment offers an opportunity for undergraduate students to have first-hand experience with research currently being conducted and for graduate students to develop…

  6. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2010. The associated FY 2010 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2011/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  7. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2009 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2009. The associated FY 2009 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2010/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  8. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2013. The associated FY 2013 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2014/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  9. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2008. The associated FY 2008 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  10. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2011. The associated FY 2011 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  11. ORNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-03-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports its status to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries of all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2012. The associated FY 2012 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2012/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program’s management process.

  12. Catalog of Research Abstracts, 1993: Partnership opportunities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The 1993 edition of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Catalog of Research Abstracts is a comprehensive listing of ongoing research projects in LBL`s ten research divisions. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a major multi-program national laboratory managed by the University of California for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL has more than 3000 employees, including over 1000 scientists and engineers. With an annual budget of approximately $250 million, LBL conducts a wide range of research activities, many that address the long-term needs of American industry and have the potential for a positive impact on US competitiveness. LBL actively seeks to share its expertise with the private sector to increase US competitiveness in world markets. LBL has transferable expertise in conservation and renewable energy, environmental remediation, materials sciences, computing sciences, and biotechnology, which includes fundamental genetic research and nuclear medicine. This catalog gives an excellent overview of LBL`s expertise, and is a good resource for those seeking partnerships with national laboratories. Such partnerships allow private enterprise access to the exceptional scientific and engineering capabilities of the federal laboratory systems. Such arrangements also leverage the research and development resources of the private partner. Most importantly, they are a means of accessing the cutting-edge technologies and innovations being discovered every day in our federal laboratories.

  13. The Control Efficiency of Plant Alcohol Extracts on the Laboratory Populations of Myzus persicae (Sulzer)and Lipaphis erysimi (Kaltenbach)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiong; LIANG Guang-wen; ZENG Ling; SHEN Shu-ping

    2002-01-01

    The effects of semiochemicals extracted from 63 species of plants, on peach aphid (Myzus persicae) and mustard aphid (Lipaphis erysimi), were studied in laboratory. The deterrent rate, reproduction deterrent index and the interferential index of population control (ⅡPC) was used to evaluate the efficiency of semiochemicals on population control of the two target aphids. The results showed that the extracts of 34 species of common plants have noticeable effect on both aphid populations, especially, Xanthium sibiricum Petr.Et Widd. and Syngonium podophyllum Schott. These plant extracts could be used to construct the plant protectant to protect crops.

  14. Air Force Research Laboratory Success Stories. A Review of 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    resulting in more durable aircraft/spacecraft. Dr. Scott White and his Ul team received initial and some follow-on funding from a Ul Critical Research...Kennedy, Howard Hughes, Orson Wells, Elvis Presley, and Christopher Reeve. The Junior Chamber International also nominated Maj Lawrence as one of Ten

  15. Amphibians as animal models for laboratory research in physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggren, Warren W; Warburton, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The concept of animal models is well honored, and amphibians have played a prominent part in the success of using key species to discover new information about all animals. As animal models, amphibians offer several advantages that include a well-understood basic physiology, a taxonomic diversity well suited to comparative studies, tolerance to temperature and oxygen variation, and a greater similarity to humans than many other currently popular animal models. Amphibians now account for approximately 1/4 to 1/3 of lower vertebrate and invertebrate research, and this proportion is especially true in physiological research, as evident from the high profile of amphibians as animal models in Nobel Prize research. Currently, amphibians play prominent roles in research in the physiology of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, reproductive, and sensory systems. Amphibians are also used extensively in physiological studies aimed at generating new insights in evolutionary biology, especially in the investigation of the evolution of air breathing and terrestriality. Environmental physiology also utilizes amphibians, ranging from studies of cryoprotectants for tissue preservation to physiological reactions to hypergravity and space exploration. Amphibians are also playing a key role in studies of environmental endocrine disruptors that are having disproportionately large effects on amphibian populations and where specific species can serve as sentinel species for environmental pollution. Finally, amphibian genera such as Xenopus, a genus relatively well understood metabolically and physiologically, will continue to contribute increasingly in this new era of systems biology and "X-omics."

  16. Air Force Research Laboratory’s 2006 Technology Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    the model to different aerodynamic orientations, propeller speeds, nacelle angles, and blade angles. The researchers also performed forced...based cloud profiling radar and light detection and ranging ( lidar ), radiosondes, satellite imagery, and a surface observer collected data throughout...more than 26 different 3-hour cirrus episodes occurring between February and December. Radar and lidar data specified the top and base altitudes of

  17. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  18. Adverse reproduction outcomes among employees working in biomedical research laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennborg, H.; Bonde, Jens Peter; Stenbeck, M.

    2002-01-01

    a previous questionnaire investigation at the research group level according to a specific definition. The ponderal index and ratio between observed and expected birthweights were calculated. Logistic regression models were used for the analyses of dichotomous outcomes (preterm, postterm and birthweight...

  19. Writing Material in Chemical Physics Research: The Laboratory Notebook as Locus of Technical and Textual Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article, drawing on ethnographic study in a chemical physics research facility, explores how notebooks are used and produced in the conduct of laboratory science. Data include written field notes of laboratory activity; visual documentation of "in situ" writing processes; analysis of inscriptions, texts, and material artifacts produced in the…

  20. Writing Material in Chemical Physics Research: The Laboratory Notebook as Locus of Technical and Textual Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Chad

    2010-01-01

    This article, drawing on ethnographic study in a chemical physics research facility, explores how notebooks are used and produced in the conduct of laboratory science. Data include written field notes of laboratory activity; visual documentation of "in situ" writing processes; analysis of inscriptions, texts, and material artifacts produced in the…

  1. Mapping Maize Genes: A Series of Research-Based Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Kralich, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Open-ended, inquiry-based multiweek laboratory exercises are the key elements to increasing students' understanding and retention of the major biological concepts. Including original research into undergraduate teaching laboratories has also been shown to motivate students and improve their learning. Here, we present a series of original…

  2. Developing Digital Courseware for a Virtual Nano-Biotechnology Laboratory: A Design-Based Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Hsiu-Ping; Chen, Tzy-Ling; Lin, Weijane; Sheen, Horn-Jiunn

    2014-01-01

    This paper first reviews applications of multimedia in engineering education, especially in laboratory learning. It then illustrates a model and accreditation criteria adopted for developing a specific set of nanotechnology laboratory courseware and reports the design-based research approach used in designing and developing the e-learning…

  3. U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    milestones per ANSI/ ISO /IEC 17025 (General Requirements for Competence testing and Calibration Labs and ISO 9001 Laboratory Accreditation Program...58  Training ...instructors before, during, and after training . U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory — Fiscal Year 2010 11 Validation of a Weapons Simulator

  4. Introducing Students to Psychological Research: General Psychology as a Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, Thomas J.; Clary, E. Gil; Olson, Andrea M.; Dauner, Rachel C.; Ring, Erin E.

    2009-01-01

    For 6 years, we have offered an integrated weekly laboratory focusing on research methods as part of our general psychology course. Through self-report measures and controlled comparisons, we found that laboratory projects significantly increase students' knowledge and comfort level with scientific approaches and concepts, sustain interest in…

  5. [Research-oriented experimental course of plant cell and gene engineering for undergraduates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, Lin; Rong, Zheng; Morigen, Morigen

    2015-04-01

    Research-oriented comprehensive experimental course for undergraduates is an important part for their training of innovation. We established an optional course of plant cell and gene engineering for undergraduates using our research platform. The course is designed to study the cellular and molecular basis and experimental techniques for plant tissue culture, isolation and culture of protoplast, genetic transformation, and screening and identification of transgenic plants. To develop undergraduates' ability in experimental design and operation, and inspire their interest in scientific research and innovation consciousness, we integrated experimental teaching and practice in plant genetic engineering on the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Students in the course practiced an experimental teaching model featured by two-week teaching of principles, independent experimental design and bench work, and ready-to-access laboratory. In this paper, we describe the contents, methods, evaluation system and a few issues to be solved in this course, as well as the general application and significance of the research-oriented experimental course in reforming undergraduates' teaching and training innovative talents.

  6. Buildings Research using Infrared Imaging Radiometers with Laboratory Thermal Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Brent; Arasteh, Dariush

    1999-01-12

    Infrared thermal imagers are used at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study heat transfer through components of building thermal envelopes. Two thermal chambers maintain steady-state heat flow through test specimens under environmental conditions for winter heating design. Infrared thermography is used to map surface temperatures on the specimens' warm side. Features of the quantitative thermography process include use of external reference emitters, complex background corrections, and spatial location markers. Typical uncertainties in the data are {+-} 0.5 C and 3 mm. Temperature controlled and directly measured external reference emitters are used to correct data from each thermal image. Complex background corrections use arrays of values for background thermal radiation in calculating temperatures of self-viewing surfaces. Temperature results are used to validate computer programs that predict heat flow including Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) conduction simulations and conjugate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Results are also used to study natural convection surface heat transfer. Example data show the distribution of temperatures down the center line of an insulated window.

  7. Plant database resources at The Institute for Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Quackenbush, John; Buell, C Robin; Town, Chris D

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the genome sequences of the model plants Arabidopsis and rice, and the continuing sequencing efforts of other economically important crop plants, an unprecedented amount of genome sequence data is now available for large-scale genomics studies and analyses, such as the identification and discovery of novel genes, comparative genomics, and functional genomics. Efficient utilization of these large data sets is critically dependent on the ease of access and organization of the data. The plant databases at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) have been set up to maintain various data types including genomic sequence, annotation and analyses, expressed transcript assemblies and analyses, and gene expression profiles from microarray studies. We present here an overview of the TIGR database resources for plant genomics and describe methods to access the data.

  8. Research progress of Tunisian medicinal plants used for acute diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wissem Aidi Wannes; Brahim Marzouk

    2016-01-01

    The use of the medicinal plants in treating diabetes is frequent in Africa, especially in Tunisia, and it is ritually transmitted from generation to generation within cultures. Many of Tunisian medicinal plants have been experimentally validated. A comprehensive re-view was conducted to pile up information from scientific journal articles, including indigenous knowledge researches, about Tunisian medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes. The aim of this review article is to provide the reader with information concerning the importance of Tunisian medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes and to draw attention of the health professionals and scientists working in the field of phar-macology and therapeutics to develop new drug formulations to cure different kinds of diabetes.

  9. Research progress of Tunisian medicinal plants used for acute diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissem Aidi Wannes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of the medicinal plants in treating diabetes is frequent in Africa, especially in Tunisia, and it is ritually transmitted from generation to generation within cultures. Many of Tunisian medicinal plants have been experimentally validated. A comprehensive review was conducted to pile up information from scientific journal articles, including indigenous knowledge researches, about Tunisian medicinal plants used for the treatment of diabetes. The aim of this review article is to provide the reader with information concerning the importance of Tunisian medicinal plants in the treatment of diabetes and to draw attention of the health professionals and scientists working in the field of pharmacology and therapeutics to develop new drug formulations to cure different kinds of diabetes.

  10. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Martin Bastian; Iversen, Stig Lykke; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Johansen, Eric

    2005-08-01

    Research innovations are constantly occurring in universities, research institutions and industrial research laboratories. These are reported in the scientific literature and presented to the scientific community in various congresses and symposia as well as through direct contacts and collaborations. Conversion of these research results to industrially useful innovations is, however, considerably more complex than generally appreciated. The long and winding road from the research laboratory to industrial applications will be illustrated with two recent examples from Chr. Hansen A/S: the implementation in industrial scale of a new production technology based on respiration by Lactococcus lactis and the introduction to the market of L. lactis strains constructed using recombinant DNA technology.

  11. A Hybrid Integrated Laboratory and Inquiry-Based Research Experience: Replacing Traditional Laboratory Instruction with a Sustainable Student-Led Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartings, Matthew R.; Fox, Douglas M.; Miller, Abigail E.; Muratore, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Chemistry at American University has replaced its junior- and senior-level laboratory curriculum with two, two-semester long, student-led research projects as part of the department's American Chemical Society-accredited program. In the first semester of each sequence, a faculty instructor leads the students through a set of…

  12. Field and laboratory methods in human milk research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Aiello, Marco O; Fujita, Masako; Hinde, Katie; Milligan, Lauren; Quinn, E A

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is a complex and variable fluid of increasing interest to human biologists who study nutrition and health. The collection and analysis of human milk poses many practical and ethical challenges to field workers, who must balance both appropriate methodology with the needs of participating mothers and infants and logistical challenges to collection and analysis. In this review, we address various collection methods, volume measurements, and ethical considerations and make recommendations for field researchers. We also review frequently used methods for the analysis of fat, protein, sugars/lactose, and specific biomarkers in human milk. Finally, we address new technologies in human milk research, the MIRIS Human Milk Analyzer and dried milk spots, which will improve the ability of human biologists and anthropologists to study human milk in field settings.

  13. Rapid method to screen resistance of potato plants against Myzus persicae (Homoptera: Aphididae) in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Vincent; Saguez, Julien; Vincent, Charles; Giordanengo, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    With the objective to develop a potato, Solanum tuberosum L., resistance program against aphids, we propose a rapid screening method with Myzus persicae (Sulzer) in the laboratory. We aimed to optimize the duration of the whole procedure and to decrease the frequency of measurements. In a first experiment, intrinsic rate of natural increase (r(m)) values were compared between adult aphids reared throughout their entire life and adults reared only during a period equivalent to their prereproductive period. No significant differences were observed. In a second experiment, four groups of aphids were distinguished according to the sampling frequency, i.e., those whose biological parameters were evaluated every single, second, third, and fourth day. Except for the fourth-day experiment, the r(m) values estimated on aphids reared on the three potato lines were not significantly different whatever sampling frequency of single, second, or third day used to check aphids. Thus, screening efforts in laboratory can be largely optimized by evaluating adult aphids only during a period equivalent to their prereproductive period and assessing M. persicae populations every third day. Our method is reliable and adapted to screen a large number of potato plants against M. persicae because it allows an average 70% reduction in the time required for the whole experimental process.

  14. Teaching about citric acid cycle using plant mitochondrial preparations: Some assays for use in laboratory courses*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Joaquim A F; Gomes-Santos, Carina S S; Sousa, Ana Paula M; Madeira, Vítor M C

    2005-03-01

    Potato tubers and turnip roots were used to prepare purified mitochondria for laboratory practical work in the teaching of the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle). Plant mitochondria are particularly advantageous over the animal fractions to demonstrate the TCA cycle enzymatic steps, by using simple techniques to measure O(2) consumption and transmembrane potential (ΔΨ). The several TCA cycle intermediates induce specific enzyme activities, which can be identified by respiratory parameters. Such a strategy is also used to evidence properties of the TCA cycle enzymes: ADP stimulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase; activation by citrate of downstream oxidation steps, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase; and regulation of the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase by citrate action on the citrate/isocitrate carrier. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that, in the absence of exogenous Mg(2+) , isocitrate-dependent respiration favors the alternative oxidase pathway, as judged by changes of the ADP/O elicited by the inhibitor n-propyl galate. These are some examples of assays related with TCA cycle intermediates we can use in laboratory courses. Copyright © 2005 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Drastic reformation of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Laboratory(Researches)

    OpenAIRE

    青柳,稔; Minoru, Aoyagi

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering opened in 1978, as the Department of Electrical Engineering. In 1987, the Department of Electrical Engineering was renamed the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering has conducted basic educations and studies on electric and electronic engineering. In this paper, I will introduce an overview of recent researches and educations of the Department of Ele ctrical and Elect...

  16. Laboratory Research: A Question of When, Not If.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    satisiaction. Journal of Applied Psychoiov. 64, i57-iE.5. - &unkel, F. j., & McGrath. J. E. t?7L). Research on human oehavior: A svstematic aulae to...Arlington Annex Washington, D.C. 20350 LIST 4 NAVMAT & NPRDC Program Administrator for Manpower, Naval Material Command Personnel, and Training... Material Coummand Management Training Center Naval Personnel R&D Center (4) NAVMAT 09M32 Technical Director Jefferson Plaza, Bldg #2, Rm 150 Director

  17. U.S. Army Research Laboratory Annual Review 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    and the 20th Support Command (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High-Yield Explosives (CBRNE)). This training consisted of...enable the conversion of waste biomass to electricity and lead to future applications for the Soldier, such as renewable bio-energy production and... bioremediation of wastewater. The researchers created a functional atomic circuit with stationary barrier. This “atom circuit” is composed of ultra

  18. Robotics Laboratory to Enhance the STEM Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Research Platforms Clearpath Robotics 2 $66,118 Open IMU system integrated with Husky SICK LMS Outdoor LIDAR Outdoor PTZ Camera NovAtel...PLA) 3D printer by Hyrel Hyrel, LLC 3 $14,710 Engineering & Design Software Project Total $4,897 25 seat MATLAB and Simulink Software...models of the UGV systems using the Simulink software purchased during the re-budgeting process. MATLAB will likely be used to develop and test many

  19. FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PJ Hughes

    2000-06-13

    A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

  20. Models for Estimating Research and Development Manpower in Navy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Mathematics Policy Research, Inc. under subcontract to Mathtech, Inc. of Falls Church, Virginia, under contract N00123-83- D-0520. The contracting officer’s...primary objective of forecasting staffing requirements for the SPAWAR R&D Centers. Besides changing policy variables and projecting the effects on...known values. For NOSC, NSWC, DTNSRDC, NUSC, and NCSC, the models were used to backcast FY83. For NADC, the model was used to backcast FY84. For

  1. U.S. Army Research Laboratory 2010 Annual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    that increases velocity and reduces muzzle flash . The M855A1 EPR was fielded in June 2010. Pictures of the M855A1 projectile and its internal...NLOS) covert communications for unattended ground sensors, and rocket propelled grenade/sniper UV flash detection. ARL’s research addresses...powder processing have been transferred to sintering technology to make electromagnetic domes . • The increase in the size and quality of hot-pressed

  2. Baseline Skills Assessment of the US Army Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    efforts underway to look at competencies in different areas of the workforce. These efforts initially began with a focus on human resource ... management ) 9 Small arms research 6 Synthetic environment for training 2 Fig. C-2 Instances chosen for Human Sciences Campaign Competencies for...32 Human machine interaction 39 … 11 50 Reliability 10 … … 10 Mechanism state awareness (Health) 10 … … 10 ^Usage management 2 … … 2 +Warfighter

  3. Exposing the Film Apparatus: The Film Archive as a Research Laboratory [Rezension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellmann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Review of the edited volume Exposing the Film Apparatus: The Film Archive as a Research Laboratory by Giovanna Fossati and Annie van den Oever (eds.): Amsterdam: Amsterdam UP 2016 (Framing Film), ISBN 9789462983168, EUR 39,90

  4. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  5. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  6. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

  7. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

  8. Development and Assessment of Green, Research-Based Instructional Materials for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, Kristen L.

    2010-01-01

    This research entails integrating two novel approaches for enriching student learning in chemistry into the context of the general chemistry laboratory. The first is a pedagogical approach based on research in cognitive science and the second is the green chemistry philosophy. Research has shown that inquiry-based approaches are effective in…

  9. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1997-09-01

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R&D) in the nation`s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R&D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of Ethiopian local plant Phytolacca dodecandra extract for its toxicity effectiveness against aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxicity effectiveness of berries crude extract of Endod [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Phytolacca dodecandra] against aquatic macroinvertebrates Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant, berries of Phytolacca dodecandra are being commonly used for washing clothes and to control fresh water snails. Macroinvertebrates are useful biological indicators of change in the aquatic ecosystems. The present study clearly revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for berries crude extract of Phytolacca dodecandra against Baetidae were 181.94 and 525.78 mg/l and lethal doses (LC50 and LC90) required for Hydropsychidae were 1060.69 and 4120.4 mg/l respectively. The present investigation demonstrated that Baetidae was more susceptible than Hydropsychidae, even at shorter exposure period of 2 h. From our preliminary investigation the toxicity effectiveness of crude extracts of Phytolacca dodecandra has been clearly shown. In addition, it requires further explorations which address both the toxicity activity and the active principles that are responsible for its toxicity effectiveness. Ultimately, the release/introduction of Phytolacca dodecandra plant berries extracts into the river/streams leads to disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, at this moment preserving the aquatic ecosystem is extremely essential and inevitable.

  11. Field-based phenomics for plant genetics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhaps the greatest challenge for crop research in the 21st century is how to predict crop performance as a function of genetic architecture and climate change. Advances in “next generation” DNA sequencing have greatly reduced genotyping costs. Methods for characterization of plant traits (phenotyp...

  12. Energy-rich Plant Research in China: Overview and Prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guojiang; LIU Jie; LOU Zhiping; KANG Le

    2006-01-01

    @@ The energy crisis is an enormous challenge to the human race.Consequently, the technology development and utilization of biomass energy have become a new "hot spot"in the international arena.This article gives an overview on the current status of the research on energy plants and puts forward several suggestions on how to reasonably develop them in China.

  13. Laboratory experiments in innovation research: a methodological overview and a review of the current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemann, Julia; Bizer, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    Innovation research has developed a broad set of methodological approaches in recent decades. In this paper, we propose laboratory experiments as a fruitful methodological addition to the existing methods in innovation research. Therefore, we provide an overview of the existing methods, discuss the advantages and limitations of laboratory experiments, and review experimental studies dealing with different fields of innovation policy, namely intellectual property rights, financial instruments,...

  14. NASA Space Biology Plant Research for 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Tomko, D. L.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. National Research Council (NRC) recently published "Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era" (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record id=13048), and NASA completed a Space Biology Science Plan to develop a strategy for implementing its recommendations ( http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/library/esmd documents.html). The most important recommendations of the NRC report on plant biology in space were that NASA should: (1) investigate the roles of microbial-plant systems in long-term bioregenerative life support systems, and (2) establish a robust spaceflight program of research analyzing plant growth and physiological responses to the multiple stimuli encountered in spaceflight environments. These efforts should take advantage of recently emerged analytical technologies (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and apply modern cellular and molecular approaches in the development of a vigorous flight-based and ground-based research program. This talk will describe NASA's strategy and plans for implementing these NRC Plant Space Biology recommendations. New research capabilities for Plant Biology, optimized by providing state-of-the-art automated technology and analytical techniques to maximize scientific return, will be described. Flight experiments will use the most appropriate platform to achieve science results (e.g., ISS, free flyers, sub-orbital flights) and NASA will work closely with its international partners and other U.S. agencies to achieve its objectives. One of NASA's highest priorities in Space Biology is the development research capabilities for use on the International Space Station and other flight platforms for studying multiple generations of large plants. NASA will issue recurring NASA Research Announcements (NRAs) that include a rapid turn-around model to more fully engage the biology community in designing experiments to respond to the NRC recommendations. In doing so, NASA

  15. Scientometric Study of Doctoral Theses of the Physical Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, N.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of bibliographies compiled from theses submitted in the period 2001-2005. The bibliographies have been studied to find out how research carried out at PRL is being used by the doctoral students. Resources are categorized by type of resource — book, journal article, proceedings, doctoral thesis, etc., to understand the usage of content procured by the library. The period of the study, 2001-2005, has been chosen because technology is changing so fast and so are the formats of scholarly communications. For the sake of convenience, only the "e-journals period" is considered for the sample.

  16. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  17. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. [ed.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  18. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants while it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

  19. A confirmatory research approach to the measurement of EMI/RFI in commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is conducting confirmatory research on the measurement of electromagnetic/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) in nuclear power plants. While it makes a good beginning, the currently available research data are not sufficient to characterize the EMI/RFI environment of the typical nuclear plant. Data collected over several weeks at each of several observation points are required to meet this need. To collect the required data, several approaches are examined, the most promising of which is the relatively new technology of application specific spectral receivers. While several spectral receiver designs have been described in the literature, none is well suited for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. This paper describes the development of two receivers specifically designed for nuclear power plant EMI/RFI surveys. One receiver surveys electric fields between 5 MHz and 8 GHz, while the other surveys magnetic fields between 305 Hz and 5 MHz. The results of field tests at TVA`s Bull Run Fossil Plant are reported.

  20. USDA-ARS Plant Science Research Unit, St. Paul Alfalfa/Forage Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Plant Science Research Unit (PSRU) located at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul receives approximately $1.5 million to fund the research of six scientists who direct their research efforts toward developing new uses and improved traits for alfalfa. Our overarching goal is to develop alfalf...

  1. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L., E-mail: l.davies@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Howard, C. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hobbs, S.J. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jones, D.T. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Power, S.A. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rose, N. [Department of Geography, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ryder, C.; Seed, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stevens, G. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, P.C.L. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: > Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. > Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. > New insights into urban pollution. > A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  2. The GATO gene annotation tool for research laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fujita

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome projects have generated a rapidly increasing number of DNA sequences. Therefore, development of computational methods to rapidly analyze these sequences is essential for progress in genomic research. Here we present an automatic annotation system for preliminary analysis of DNA sequences. The gene annotation tool (GATO is a Bioinformatics pipeline designed to facilitate routine functional annotation and easy access to annotated genes. It was designed in view of the frequent need of genomic researchers to access data pertaining to a common set of genes. In the GATO system, annotation is generated by querying some of the Web-accessible resources and the information is stored in a local database, which keeps a record of all previous annotation results. GATO may be accessed from everywhere through the internet or may be run locally if a large number of sequences are going to be annotated. It is implemented in PHP and Perl and may be run on any suitable Web server. Usually, installation and application of annotation systems require experience and are time consuming, but GATO is simple and practical, allowing anyone with basic skills in informatics to access it without any special training. GATO can be downloaded at [http://mariwork.iq.usp.br/gato/]. Minimum computer free space required is 2 MB.

  3. Basic versus applied research: Julius Sachs (1832-1897) and the experimental physiology of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The German biologist Julius Sachs was the first to introduce controlled, accurate, quantitative experimentation into the botanical sciences, and is regarded as the founder of modern plant physiology. His seminal monograph Experimental-Physiologie der Pflanzen (Experimental Physiology of Plants) was published 150 y ago (1865), when Sachs was employed as a lecturer at the Agricultural Academy in Poppelsdorf/Bonn (now part of the University). This book marks the beginning of a new era of basic and applied plant science. In this contribution, I summarize the achievements of Sachs and outline his lasting legacy. In addition, I show that Sachs was one of the first biologists who integrated bacteria, which he considered to be descendants of fungi, into the botanical sciences and discussed their interaction with land plants (degradation of wood etc.). This "plant-microbe-view" of green organisms was extended and elaborated by the laboratory botanist Wilhelm Pfeffer (1845-1920), so that the term "Sachs-Pfeffer-Principle of Experimental Plant Research" appears to be appropriate to characterize this novel way of performing scientific studies on green, photoautotrophic organisms (embryophytes, algae, cyanobacteria).

  4. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  5. SURVEY OF REMOTELY CONTROLLED LABORATORIES FOR RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz CHMIELEWSKI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the modeling and simulation of the crank-piston model of internal combustion engine. The object of the research was the engine of the vehicle from the B segment. The individual elements of the gasoline engine were digitizing using the process of reverse engineering. After converting the geometry, assembling was imported to MSC Adams software. The crank-piston system was specified by boundary conditions of piston forces applied on the pistons crowns. This force was obtain from the cylinder pressure recorded during the tests, that were carried out on a chassis dynamometer. The simulation studies allowed t determine the load distribution in a dynamic state for the selected kinematic pairs.

  6. Laboratory bioassay for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on plant growth and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, K.S.; Liberta, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on juvenile corn growth and the ability of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi, indigenous to coal spoil, to form mycorrhizae. The bioassay demonstrated that application rates can be identified that have the potential to promote increased plant dry weight without suppressing the formation of VA mycorrhizae in a plant's root system.

  7. Gravity research on plants: use of single cell experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eChebli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions and implementation of permanent bases on Moon and Mars will greatly depend on the availability of ambient air and sustainable food supply. Therefore, understanding the effects of altered gravity conditions on plant metabolism and growth is vital for space missions and extra-terrestrial human existence. In this mini-review we summarize how plant cells are thought to perceive changes in magnitude and orientation of the gravity vector. The particular advantages of several single celled model systems for gravity research are explored and an overview over recent advancements and potential use of these systems is provided.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  9. Revealing all: misleading self-disclosure rates in laboratory-based online research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Diana E; Graff, Martin G; Davies, Joanne

    2013-09-01

    Laboratory-based experiments in online self-disclosure research may be inadvertently compromising the accuracy of research findings by influencing some of the factors known to affect self-disclosure behavior. Disclosure-orientated interviews conducted with 42 participants in the laboratory and in nonlaboratory settings revealed significantly greater breadth of self-disclosure in laboratory interviews, with message length and intimacy of content also strongly related. These findings suggest that a contrived online setting with a researcher presence may stimulate motivation for greater self-disclosure than would occur naturally in an online environment of an individual's choice. The implications of these findings are that researchers should consider the importance of experimental context and motivation in self-disclosure research.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of Indian medicinal plants as repellents against malaria, dengue, and filariasis vector mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2015-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases have an economic impact, including loss in commercial and labor outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates; however, no part of the world is free from vector-borne diseases. Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, West Nile virus, and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticides, in the present study, the repellent activity of crude hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform, and methanol extracts of leaf of Erythrina indica and root of Asparagus racemosus were assayed for their repellency against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The crude extract was applied on a membrane used for membrane feeding of unfed mosquitoes in a 1-ft cage. About 50 unfed 3-4-day-old laboratory-reared pathogen-free strains of A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus were introduced in a 1-ft cage fitted with a membrane with blood for feeding with temperature maintained at 37 °C through circulating water bath maintained at 40-45 °C. Three concentrations (1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mg/cm(2)) of the crude extracts were evaluated. Repellents in E. indica afforded longer protection time against A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus than those in A. racemosus at 5.0 mg/cm(2) concentration, and the mean complete protection time ranged from 120 to 210 min with the different extracts tested. In this observation, these two plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites; also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. These results suggest that the leaf extract of E. indica and root extract of A. racemosus have the potential to

  11. Practicing biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the impact of self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkes, Elizabeth

    As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their impact on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes practices that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of practice develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models

  12. The Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory: A Student Team Approach to the Fourth-Year Research Thesis Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Boyd, Cleo; Barzda, Virginijus; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Stefanovic, Sasa; Stewart, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The advanced interdisciplinary research laboratory (AIRLab) represents a novel, effective, and motivational course designed from the interdisciplinary research interests of chemistry, physics, biology, and education development faculty members as an alternative to the independent thesis project experience. Student teams are assembled to work…

  13. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail F Davies

    Full Text Available Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs', work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving

  14. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F.; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G. W.; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C.; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J.; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J.; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M.; Johnson, Elizabeth R.; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C.; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I.; Lilley, Elliot J.; Longridge, Emma R.; McLeod, Carmen M.; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C.; Ormandy, Elisabeth H.; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Smith, Jane A.; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the ‘3Rs’), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, ‘cultures of care’, harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  15. Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Gail F; Greenhough, Beth J; Hobson-West, Pru; Kirk, Robert G W; Applebee, Ken; Bellingan, Laura C; Berdoy, Manuel; Buller, Henry; Cassaday, Helen J; Davies, Keith; Diefenbacher, Daniela; Druglitrø, Tone; Escobar, Maria Paula; Friese, Carrie; Herrmann, Kathrin; Hinterberger, Amy; Jarrett, Wendy J; Jayne, Kimberley; Johnson, Adam M; Johnson, Elizabeth R; Konold, Timm; Leach, Matthew C; Leonelli, Sabina; Lewis, David I; Lilley, Elliot J; Longridge, Emma R; McLeod, Carmen M; Miele, Mara; Nelson, Nicole C; Ormandy, Elisabeth H; Pallett, Helen; Poort, Lonneke; Pound, Pandora; Ramsden, Edmund; Roe, Emma; Scalway, Helen; Schrader, Astrid; Scotton, Chris J; Scudamore, Cheryl L; Smith, Jane A; Whitfield, Lucy; Wolfensohn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs'), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across these disciplinary perspectives is currently limited, and they design research programmes, generate results, engage users, and seek to influence policy in different ways. To facilitate dialogue and future research at this interface, we convened an interdisciplinary group of 45 life scientists, social scientists, humanities scholars, non-governmental organisations and policy-makers to generate a collaborative research agenda. This drew on methods employed by other agenda-setting exercises in science policy, using a collaborative and deliberative approach for the identification of research priorities. Participants were recruited from across the community, invited to submit research questions and vote on their priorities. They then met at an interactive workshop in the UK, discussed all 136 questions submitted, and collectively defined the 30 most important issues for the group. The output is a collaborative future agenda for research in the humanities and social sciences on laboratory animal science and welfare. The questions indicate a demand for new research in the humanities and social sciences to inform emerging discussions and priorities on the governance and practice of laboratory animal research, including on issues around: international harmonisation, openness and public engagement, 'cultures of care', harm-benefit analysis and the future of the 3Rs. The process outlined below underlines the value of interdisciplinary exchange for improving communication across

  16. The evolution of drug design at Merck Research Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Frank K; Sherer, Edward C; Johnson, Scott A; Holloway, M Katharine; Sherborne, Bradley S

    2017-03-01

    On October 5, 1981, Fortune magazine published a cover article entitled the "Next Industrial Revolution: Designing Drugs by Computer at Merck". With a 40+ year investment, we have been in the drug design business longer than most. During its history, the Merck drug design group has had several names, but it has always been in the "design" business, with the ultimate goal to provide an actionable hypothesis that could be tested experimentally. Often the result was a small molecule but it could just as easily be a peptide, biologic, predictive model, reaction, process, etc. To this end, the concept of design is now front and center in all aspects of discovery, safety assessment and early clinical development. At present, the Merck design group includes computational chemistry, protein structure determination, and cheminformatics. By bringing these groups together under one umbrella, we were able to align activities and capabilities across multiple research sites and departments. This alignment from 2010 to 2016 resulted in an 80% expansion in the size of the department, reflecting the increase in impact due to a significant emphasis across the organization to "design first" along the entire drug discovery path from lead identification (LID) to first in human (FIH) dosing. One of the major advantages of this alignment has been the ability to access all of the data and create an adaptive approach to the overall LID to FIH pathway for any modality, significantly increasing the quality of candidates and their probability of success. In this perspective, we will discuss how we crafted a new strategy, defined the appropriate phenotype for group members, developed the right skillsets, and identified metrics for success in order to drive continuous improvement. We will not focus on the tactical implementation, only giving specific examples as appropriate.

  17. The evolution of drug design at Merck Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Frank K.; Sherer, Edward C.; Johnson, Scott A.; Holloway, M. Katharine; Sherborne, Bradley S.

    2016-11-01

    On October 5, 1981, Fortune magazine published a cover article entitled the "Next Industrial Revolution: Designing Drugs by Computer at Merck". With a 40+ year investment, we have been in the drug design business longer than most. During its history, the Merck drug design group has had several names, but it has always been in the "design" business, with the ultimate goal to provide an actionable hypothesis that could be tested experimentally. Often the result was a small molecule but it could just as easily be a peptide, biologic, predictive model, reaction, process, etc. To this end, the concept of design is now front and center in all aspects of discovery, safety assessment and early clinical development. At present, the Merck design group includes computational chemistry, protein structure determination, and cheminformatics. By bringing these groups together under one umbrella, we were able to align activities and capabilities across multiple research sites and departments. This alignment from 2010 to 2016 resulted in an 80% expansion in the size of the department, reflecting the increase in impact due to a significant emphasis across the organization to "design first" along the entire drug discovery path from lead identification (LID) to first in human (FIH) dosing. One of the major advantages of this alignment has been the ability to access all of the data and create an adaptive approach to the overall LID to FIH pathway for any modality, significantly increasing the quality of candidates and their probability of success. In this perspective, we will discuss how we crafted a new strategy, defined the appropriate phenotype for group members, developed the right skillsets, and identified metrics for success in order to drive continuous improvement. We will not focus on the tactical implementation, only giving specific examples as appropriate.

  18. The evolution of drug design at Merck Research Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Frank K.; Sherer, Edward C.; Johnson, Scott A.; Holloway, M. Katharine; Sherborne, Bradley S.

    2017-03-01

    On October 5, 1981, Fortune magazine published a cover article entitled the "Next Industrial Revolution: Designing Drugs by Computer at Merck". With a 40+ year investment, we have been in the drug design business longer than most. During its history, the Merck drug design group has had several names, but it has always been in the "design" business, with the ultimate goal to provide an actionable hypothesis that could be tested experimentally. Often the result was a small molecule but it could just as easily be a peptide, biologic, predictive model, reaction, process, etc. To this end, the concept of design is now front and center in all aspects of discovery, safety assessment and early clinical development. At present, the Merck design group includes computational chemistry, protein structure determination, and cheminformatics. By bringing these groups together under one umbrella, we were able to align activities and capabilities across multiple research sites and departments. This alignment from 2010 to 2016 resulted in an 80% expansion in the size of the department, reflecting the increase in impact due to a significant emphasis across the organization to "design first" along the entire drug discovery path from lead identification (LID) to first in human (FIH) dosing. One of the major advantages of this alignment has been the ability to access all of the data and create an adaptive approach to the overall LID to FIH pathway for any modality, significantly increasing the quality of candidates and their probability of success. In this perspective, we will discuss how we crafted a new strategy, defined the appropriate phenotype for group members, developed the right skillsets, and identified metrics for success in order to drive continuous improvement. We will not focus on the tactical implementation, only giving specific examples as appropriate.

  19. Review of current research on hydrocarbon production by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, H. M.; Inman, B.

    1979-01-01

    This review assesses the status of research and development in the area of plants that produce hydrocarbons as a possible replacement for traditional fossil fuels. The information is meant to be used as a basis for determining the scope of a possible R and D program by DOE/FFB. Except in the case of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), research on hydrocarbon species generally has not advanced beyond preliminary screening, extraction, and growth studies. Virtually no field studies have been initiated; hydrocarbon component extraction, separation, identification, and characterization have been only timidly approached; the biochemistry of hydrocarbon formation remains virtually untouched; and potential market analysis has been based on insufficient data. Research interest is increasing in this area, however. Industrial interest understandably centers about guayule prospects and is supplemented by NSF and DOE research funds. Additional support for other research topics has been supplied by DOE and USDA and by certain university systems. Due to the infant state of technology in this area of energy research, it is not possible to predict or satisfactorily assess at this time the potential contribution that plant hydrocarbons might make toward decreasing the nation's dependence upon petroleum. However, the general impression received from experts interviewed during this review was that the major thrust of research should be directed toward the manufacture of petrochemical substitutes rather than fuel production.

  20. Review of current research on hydrocarbon production by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, H. M.; Inman, B.

    1979-01-01

    This review assesses the status of research and development in the area of plants that produce hydrocarbons as a possible replacement for traditional fossil fuels. The information is meant to be used as a basis for determining the scope of a possible R and D program by DOE/FFB. Except in the case of guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray), research on hydrocarbon species generally has not advanced beyond preliminary screening, extraction, and growth studies. Virtually no field studies have been initiated; hydrocarbon component extraction, separation, identification, and characterization have been only timidly approached; the biochemistry of hydrocarbon formation remains virtually untouched; and potential market analysis has been based on insufficient data. Research interest is increasing in this area, however. Industrial interest understandably centers about guayule prospects and is supplemented by NSF and DOE research funds. Additional support for other research topics has been supplied by DOE and USDA and by certain university systems. Due to the infant state of technology in this area of energy research, it is not possible to predict or satisfactorily assess at this time the potential contribution that plant hydrocarbons might make toward decreasing the nation's dependence upon petroleum. However, the general impression received from experts interviewed during this review was that the major thrust of research should be directed toward the manufacture of petrochemical substitutes rather than fuel production.

  1. Advances in Research on Genetically Engineered Plants for Metal Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ri-Qing Zhang; Chun-Fang Tang; Shi-Zhi Wen; Yun-Guo Liu; Ke-Lin Li

    2006-01-01

    The engineering application of natural hyperaccumulators in removing or inactivating metal pollutants from soil and surface water in field trials mostly presents the insurmountable shortcoming of low efficiency owing to their little biomass and slow growth. Based on further understanding of the molecular mechanism of metal uptake, translocation, and also the separation, identification, and cloning of some related functional genes, this article highlights and summarizes in detail the advances in research on transgenic techniques, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and particle bombardment, in breeding of plants for metal resistance and accumulation, and points out that deepening the development of transgenic plants is one of the efficient approaches to improving phytoremediation efficiency of metal-contaminated environments. From the viewpoint of sustainable development, governments should strengthen support to the development of genetic engineering for metal resistance and accumulation in plants.

  2. Shaping the library of the future: Digital library developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Research Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, R. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This paper offers an overview of current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL), to develop digital library services. Current projects of LANL`s Library without Walls initiative are described. Although the architecture of digital libraries generally is experimental and subject to debate, one principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the use of Mosaic as a client for the Research Library`s resources. Several projects under development have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet. Specific efforts via Mosaic include support for preprint databases, providing access to citation databases, and access to a digital image database of unclassified Los Alamos technical reports.

  3. Shaping the library of the future: Digital library developments at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Research Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, R. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    This paper offers an overview of current efforts at the Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL), to develop digital library services. Current projects of LANL`s Library without Walls initiative are described. Although the architecture of digital libraries generally is experimental and subject to debate, one principle of LANL`s approach to delivering library information is the use of Mosaic as a client for the Research Library`s resources. Several projects under development have significant ramifications for delivering library services over the Internet. Specific efforts via Mosaic include support for preprint databases, providing access to citation databases, and access to a digital image database of unclassified Los Alamos technical reports.

  4. Plants: a unique model for research on high diluted substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vladimirovna Novasadyuk

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High efficiency and low cost of homeopathic drugs, lack of side effects and accumulation of toxins in animal farming products made homeopathy one of the priority developments in veterinary medicine. However, opponents of homeopathy have intensified their activity in the recent years. The attacks of the opponents of homeopathy, with their unfounded claims that it is totally explained by the placebo effect, can largely be explained by complexity of understanding the mechanism of action of these remedies which does not fit into the established concepts the effect of drugs on the body. That is why further study of homeopathic phenomenon is especially important in these days. In order to disproof the opinion that homeopathic phenomenon is explained by placebo effect, we have been studying the effect homeopathic remedies on vegetable growth and ripening. This choice was based on the hope that the opponents of homeopathy would not be able to accuse plants of self-suggestion under the effect of potentiated remedies. There are many publications about application of homeopathic remedies on plants. For example, in this direction such researchers as Stephan Baumgartner, Carneiro SMTPG, Rossi F, Carvalho LM, Bonato CM, Betti L, Lazzarato L V. Majewsky, and other researchers worked. Methods: Our first experiments that we performed during two years demonstrated a significant improvement of growth and ripening variables when homeopathic remedies were added to fertilizing mixtures, as compared with conventional plant care. Tomatoes of Typhoon F1 and Titan breeds were sued to study the effect of homeopathic remedies on plant growth and ripening. The studies were performed in greenhouse conditions in summer 2009 and 2010, on fertile soils of an experimental farm in the Krasnoselskiy district of the Leningrad region. Every study group of a certain tomato breed contained 20 plants. When the young plants were planted in the soil they were watered with

  5. Publication bias in laboratory animal research: a survey on magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben ter Riet

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Publication bias jeopardizes evidence-based medicine, mainly through biased literature syntheses. Publication bias may also affect laboratory animal research, but evidence is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion of laboratory animal researchers on the magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions for publication bias. And to explore the impact of size of the animals used, seniority of the respondent, working in a for-profit organization and type of research (fundamental, pre-clinical, or both on those opinions. DESIGN: Internet-based survey. SETTING: All animal laboratories in The Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Laboratory animal researchers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: Median (interquartile ranges strengths of beliefs on 5 and 10-point scales (1: totally unimportant to 5 or 10: extremely important. RESULTS: Overall, 454 researchers participated. They considered publication bias a problem in animal research (7 (5 to 8 and thought that about 50% (32-70 of animal experiments are published. Employees (n = 21 of for-profit organizations estimated that 10% (5 to 50 are published. Lack of statistical significance (4 (4 to 5, technical problems (4 (3 to 4, supervisors (4 (3 to 5 and peer reviewers (4 (3 to 5 were considered important reasons for non-publication (all on 5-point scales. Respondents thought that mandatory publication of study protocols and results, or the reasons why no results were obtained, may increase scientific progress but expected increased bureaucracy. These opinions did not depend on size of the animal used, seniority of the respondent or type of research. CONCLUSIONS: Non-publication of "negative" results appears to be prevalent in laboratory animal research. If statistical significance is indeed a main driver of publication, the collective literature on animal experimentation will be biased. This will impede the performance of valid literature syntheses. Effective, yet efficient systems should be explored to

  6. The Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory: the first 100 years of neurosurgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, P; Long, D M; Brem, H

    2000-01-01

    research on calcium metabolism by William MacCallum and Carl Voegtlin and seminal preclinical work by Alfred Blalock and Vivian Thomas that led to the famous "blue baby" operation in 1944. With the introduction of the operating microscope in the 1950s, much of the focus in neurosurgical science shifted from the laboratory to the operating room. The old Hunterian building was demolished in 1956. The Hunterian laboratory for surgical and pathological research was rebuilt on its original site in 1987, and the Hunterian Neurosurgical Laboratory was reestablished in 1991, with a focus on novel treatments for brain tumors. The strong tradition of performing basic research with clinical relevance has continued.

  7. Senior Research Connects Students with a Living Laboratory As Part of an Integrated Crop and Livestock System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturklu, Songul; Landblom, Douglas; Brevik, Eric C.

    2015-04-01

    Soil, water, soil microbes, and solar energy are the main sources that sustain life on this planet. Without them working in concert, neither plants nor animals would survive. Considering the efficiency of animal production targets, soil must be protected and improved. Therefore, through our sustainable integrated crop and livestock research, we are studying animal and soil interactions from the soil to the plate. Integrating beef cattle systems into a diverse cropping system is providing a living laboratory for education beyond the traditional classroom setting. To establish the living learning laboratory at the Dickinson Research Extension Center, a five-crop rotation was established that included adapted cool and warm season grasses and broadleaf crops. The crop rotation is: sunflower > hard red spring wheat > fall seeded winter triticale-hairy vetch (hay)/spring seeded 7-species cover crop > Corn (85-95 day varieties) > field pea-barley intercrop. Sunflower and spring wheat are harvested for cash crop income in the rotation. Livestock integration occurs when yearling steers that had previously grazed perennial pastures until mid-August graze field pea-barley and subsequently unharvested corn. Average grazing days for field pea-barley and unharvested corn is 30 and 70 days, respectively. At the end of the grazing period, the yearling steers average 499-544 kg and are moved to a feedlot and fed an additional 75 days until slaughter. Maximizing grazing days and extending the grazing season through integration with the cropping system reduces custom feeding costs and enhances animal profit. Beef cows do not require high quality feed after their calves have been weaned. Therefore, gestating beef cows are an ideal animal to graze cover crops and crop aftermath (residue) after yearling steer grazing and farming operations have been completed. Extending the grazing season for beef cows by grazing cover crops and residues reduces winter feed cost, which is one of the

  8. Radar research at The Pennsylvania State University Radar and Communications Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-05-01

    The Radar and Communications Laboratory (RCL) at The Pennsylvania State University is at the forefront of radar technology and is engaged in cutting edge research in all aspects of radar, including modeling and simulation studies of novel radar paradigms, design and development of new types of radar architectures, and extensive field measurements in realistic scenarios. This paper summarizes the research at The Pennsylvania State University's Radar and Communications Laboratory and relevant collaborative research with several groups over the past 15 years in the field of radar and related technologies, including communications, radio frequency identification (RFID), and spectrum sensing.

  9. Recommendations for the design of laboratory studies on non-target arthropods for risk assessment of genetically engineered plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeis, Jörg; Hellmich, Richard L; Candolfi, Marco P; Carstens, Keri; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Herman, Rod A; Huesing, Joseph E; McLean, Morven A; Raybould, Alan; Shelton, Anthony M; Waggoner, Annabel

    2011-02-01

    This paper provides recommendations on experimental design for early-tier laboratory studies used in risk assessments to evaluate potential adverse impacts of arthropod-resistant genetically engineered (GE) plants on non-target arthropods (NTAs). While we rely heavily on the currently used proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in this discussion, the concepts apply to other arthropod-active proteins. A risk may exist if the newly acquired trait of the GE plant has adverse effects on NTAs when they are exposed to the arthropod-active protein. Typically, the risk assessment follows a tiered approach that starts with laboratory studies under worst-case exposure conditions; such studies have a high ability to detect adverse effects on non-target species. Clear guidance on how such data are produced in laboratory studies assists the product developers and risk assessors. The studies should be reproducible and test clearly defined risk hypotheses. These properties contribute to the robustness of, and confidence in, environmental risk assessments for GE plants. Data from NTA studies, collected during the analysis phase of an environmental risk assessment, are critical to the outcome of the assessment and ultimately the decision taken by regulatory authorities on the release of a GE plant. Confidence in the results of early-tier laboratory studies is a precondition for the acceptance of data across regulatory jurisdictions and should encourage agencies to share useful information and thus avoid redundant testing.

  10. 2015 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2014, through October 31, 2015.

  11. Using Independent Research Projects to Foster Learning in the Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedotti, Michael J.; Fielitz, Christopher; Leonard, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching methodology involving an independent research project component for use in undergraduate Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy laboratory courses. The proposed project introduces cooperative, active learning in a research context to comparative vertebrate anatomy. This project involves pairs or groups of three students…

  12. Grundfagligt Speciale: An advanced laboratory-research course for nonphysicists taught by physicists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A; Lebech, Jens; Mygind, Jesper;

    1979-01-01

    The pedagogical and research advantages of an advanced laboratory-research course for nonphysicists taught by physicists are discussed. The practical considerations which determine the structure and content of such a course are emphasized with particular attention given to those features which...

  13. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions…

  14. A Graduate Laboratory Course on Biodiesel Production Emphasizing Professional, Teamwork, and Research Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, West

    2011-01-01

    In this article we report on the use of a graduate "Special Topics" course to provide vital research and practical laboratory experience, within the context of developing a chemical process to manufacture biodiesel from algal sources. This course contained several key components that we believe are necessary skills in graduate research: 1) a…

  15. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  16. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  17. The Central Importance of Laboratories for Reducing Waste in Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroth, Nikolas

    2016-12-01

    The global biomedical research enterprise is driving substantial advances in medicine and healthcare. Yet it appears that the enterprise is rather wasteful, falling short of its true innovative potential. Suggested reasons are manifold and involve various stakeholders, such that there is no single remedy. In the present paper, I will argue that laboratories are the basic working units of the biomedical research enterprise and an important site of action for corrective intervention. Keeping laboratories relatively small will enable better training and mentoring of individual scientists, which in turn will yield better performance of the scientific workforce. The key premise of this argument is that people are at the heart of the successes and failures of biomedical research, yet the human dimension of science has been unduly neglected in practice. Renewed focus on the importance of laboratories and their constituent scientists is one promising approach to reducing waste and increasing efficiency within the biomedical research enterprise.

  18. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world.

  19. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world. PMID:24501431

  20. Transportable Hydrogen Research Plant Based on Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikel Fernandez; Carlos Madina; Asier Gil de Muro [LABEIN, Parque Tecnologico, edificio 700, 48160 Derio, Bizkaia (Spain); Jose Angel Alzolab; Iker Marino; Javier Garcia-Tejedor [ROBOTIKER, Parque Tecnologico, edificio 202, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia, (Spain); Juan Carlos Mugica; Inaki Azkkrate; Jose Angel Alzola [INASMET, Mikeletegi Pasalekua, Parque Tecnologico, E-20009 San Sebastian, Guipuzcoa (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Efficiency and cost are nowadays the most important barriers for the penetration of systems based on hydrogen and renewable energies. According to this background, TECNALIA Corporation has started in 2004 the HIDROTEC project: 'Hydrogen Technologies for Renewable Energy Applications'. The ultimate aim of this project is the implementation of a multipurpose demonstration and research plant in order to explore diverse options for sustainable energetic solutions based on hydrogen. The plant is conceived as an independent system that can be easily transported and assembled. Research and demonstration activities can thus be carried out at very different locations, including commercial renewable facilities. Modularity and scalability have also been taken into account for an optimised exploitation. (authors)

  1. Research of beekeeping products using as radioprotectors for plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. О. Oginova

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted on a winter wheat, which was cultivated in a 30-km area in the year ofChernobylaccident, allowed to ascertain that complex use of sodium humate and beekeeping products is ineffective for diminishing the negative irradiation influence on the early growth processes of plants. Only the simultaneous use of humic preparations and anodic extraction of propolis has permanent positive effect.

  2. The history of the oldest self-sustaining laboratory animal: 150 years of axolotl research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiß, Christian; Olsson, Lennart; Hoßfeld, Uwe

    2015-07-01

    Today the Mexican axolotl is critically endangered in its natural habitat in lakes around Mexico City, but thrives in research laboratories around the world, where it is used for research on development, regeneration, and evolution. Here, we concentrate on the early history of the axolotl as a laboratory animal to celebrate that the first living axolotls arrived in Paris in 1864, 150 years ago. Maybe surprisingly, at first the axolotl was distributed across Europe without being tied to specific research questions, and amateurs engaged in acclimatization and aquarium movements played an important role for the rapid proliferation of the axolotl across the continent. But the aquarium also became an important part of the newly established laboratory, where more and more biological and medical research now took place. Early scientific interest focused on the anatomical peculiarities of the axolotl, its rare metamorphosis, and whether it was a larva or an adult. Later, axolotl data was used to argue both for (by August Weismann and others) and against (by e.g., Albert von Kölliker) Darwinism, and the axolotl even had a brief history as a laboratory animal used in a failed attempt to prove Lysenkoism in Jena, Germany. Nowadays, technical developments such as transgenic lines, and the very strong interest in stem cell and regeneration research has again catapulted the axolotl into becoming an important laboratory animal.

  3. Model Predictive Control of the Reverse Osmosis Plant at AICA Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel González Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Process control is an essential part of the desalination industry that requires to be controlled at theoptimum operating conditions to guarantee an increase in the life time of the plant and reduction of theunit product cost. Desalination is a highly complex process, so the majority of dynamic models are ofthe form of Multi-Inputs-Multi-Outputs (MIMO systems. Controlling a MIMO system is a complexoperation because of the interconnections between the inputs and the influence of each one of them onthe system outputs. In this paper, we present the MIMO dynamic model that was developed for a twostageReverse Osmosis (RO desalination system at AICA Laboratories. The purpose of this researchwas to apply a new control strategy to the system based on a Model Predictive Control (MPC algorithm.The control system proposed was simulated through computer by using Simulink/Matlab software.The simulation results show the efficiency of the proposed controller based on MPC strategy and canbe useful to increase knowledge in control processes in reverse osmosis desalination systems.

  4. Feasible modifications for the low-level waste treatment plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chilton, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Aqueous, low-level, radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contain small amounts of /sup 60/Co, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides. These wastes are processed by passage through beds of a strong-acid cation exchange resin, and the treated water is then discharged to the environment. Studies show that pretreatment of the waste with a weak-acid cation exchange resin would result in a significant decrease in regeneration reagents and a saving of manpower. This can be accomplished in the present plant by piping changes on the existing columns. The effluent from the cation treatment process contains all of the radionuclides that are present in anionic form. Routinely, this consists only of approximately one-half of the /sup 60/Co. Under certain conditions, other anions (such as /sup 131/I) could be present. Studies show that these can be removed by use of an anion exchange resin bed at the end of the process. This would require the construction of an additional column, if the head-end treatment described above is also installed. 2 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Progress and challenges in the molecular identification of plant-parasitic nematodes at the USDA ARS Nematology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    One mission of the USDA Agricultural Research Service Nematology Laboratory in Beltsville, MD is to provide nematode identifications that are urgently required by ARS scientists, federal and state researchers, and regulatory agencies for research, regulatory actions, and control purposes. In additio...

  6. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Page No: 16- 1 Tullahoma High School Tullahoma, TN 37388-0000 Bowlby , Andrea Laboratory: PL/GP Mudge Way Vol-Page No: 13- 1 Bedford High School Bedford...Ingram Rd. San Antonio, TX 78238 Dr. John Taboada Mentor Final Report for: AFOSR Summer Research Program Armstrong Laboratory Sponsored by: Air Force...Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS) as well as with other methods for studies involving aerosols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (4-8). Dr. John

  7. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laboratory...... system supervision, advanced secondary and tertiary management are realized in a microgrid central controller. The software and hardware schemes are described. Several example case studies are introduced and performed in order to achieve power quality regulation, energy management and flywheel energy...

  8. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in offspring of fathers working in biomedical research laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Linda L; Bodin, Lennart; Wennborg, Helena

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laboratory work may constitute a possible health hazard for workers as well as for their offspring, and involves a wide range of exposures, such as organic solvents, carcinogenic agents, ionizing radiation, and/or microbiological agents. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in the offspring...... of male employees in biomedical research laboratories are examined. METHODS: Offspring to males employed 1970-1989 at four Swedish universities were identified via the Medical Birth Register (MBR), along with other pregnancy parameters. Offspring of fathers with laboratory work (n = 2,281) is considered...

  9. Requirement analysis for an electronic laboratory notebook for sustainable data management in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Julia; Weil, Philipp; Bittihn, Philip; Hornung, Daniel; Mathieu, Nadine; Demiroglu, Sara Y

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable data management in biomedical research requires documentation of metadata for all experiments and results. Scientists usually document research data and metadata in laboratory paper notebooks. An electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) can keep metadata linked to research data resulting in a better understanding of the research results, meaning a scientific benefit [1]. Besides other challenges [2], the biggest hurdles for introducing an ELN seem to be usability, file formats, and data entry mechanisms [3] and that many ELNs are assigned to specific research fields such as biology, chemistry, or physics [4]. We aimed to identify requirements for the introduction of ELN software in a biomedical collaborative research center [5] consisting of different scientific fields and to find software fulfilling most of these requirements.

  10. Cognitive Research and Elementary Science Instruction: From the Laboratory, to the Classroom, and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, David; Li, Junlei

    2005-06-01

    Can cognitive research generate usable knowledge for elementary science instruction? Can issues raised by classroom practice drive the agenda of laboratory cognitive research? Answering yes to both questions, we advocate building a reciprocal interface between basic and applied research. We discuss five studies of the teaching, learning, and transfer of the "Control of Variables Strategy" in elementary school science. Beginning with investigations motivated by basic theoretical questions, we situate subsequent inquiries within authentic educational debates—contrasting hands-on manipulation of physical and virtual materials, evaluating direct instruction and discovery learning, replicating training methods in classroom, and narrowing science achievement gaps. We urge research programs to integrate basic research in "pure" laboratories with field work in "messy" classrooms. Finally, we suggest that those engaged in discussions about implications and applications of educational research focus on clearly defined instructional methods and procedures, rather than vague labels and outmoded "-isms."

  11. 1997 Gordon Research Conference on Plant Cell Walls. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehelin, A.

    1999-08-25

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Plant Cell Walls was held at Tilton School, Tilton, New Hampshire, July 18-22, 1997. The conference was well attended with 106 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. In addition to these formal interactions, free time was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  12. Guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Bolin, Susan

    2012-12-01

    This unit provides a general overview on topics related to the practical care and use of laboratory animals in biomedical research. These topics are briefly described and provide Web sites and/or research articles that can be accessed for more detailed information. While the primary focus is on the care and use of rats and mice bred for biomedical research, many of the Web sites listed provide information on other species used for this purpose.

  13. Laboratory for development of open source geospatial technologies – role in education and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Kilibarda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available International Cartographic CBOs (International Cartographic Association- ICA in partnership with the Open Source Geospatial Foundation-OSGeo has started the initiative ICA-OSGeo Labs to promote and use open source technologies in education and research. For many years, the use and development of open source software and technologies have been present in the field of research and education at the Faculty of Civil Engineering at the Department of Geodesy and Geoinformatics, University of Belgrade. Additionally, at the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Civil Engineering a laboratory called "Laboratory for development of open source geospatial technologies - OSGL" has recently been established. This paper presents the current experience of the lab members in using open source software in geoinformatics, research and education as well as the perspectives and future activities of the newly formed laboratory.

  14. Optical laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkala, Kaisa; Suokanerva, Hanne; Matti Karhu, Juha; Aarva, Antti; Poikonen, Antti; Karppinen, Tomi; Ahponen, Markku; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Kontu, Anna; Kyrö, Esko

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the laboratory facilities at the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC, http://fmiarc.fmi.fi). They comprise an optical laboratory, a facility for biological studies, and an office. A dark room has been built, in which an optical table and a fixed lamp test system are set up, and the electronics allow high-precision adjustment of the current. The Brewer spectroradiometer, NILU-UV multifilter radiometer, and Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer of the FMI-ARC are regularly calibrated or checked for stability in the laboratory. The facilities are ideal for responding to the needs of international multidisciplinary research, giving the possibility to calibrate and characterize the research instruments as well as handle and store samples.

  15. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  16. Earth Science Research in DUSEL; a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhurst, C.; Onstott, T. C.; Tiedje, J. M.; McPherson, B.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Wang, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    micro/molecular evolution. Ideas articulated both at and subsequent to the workshop will be evolved in site-specific programs at Henderson Mine, CO; Homestake Mine, SD; Icicle Creek, WA; Kimballton Mine, VA; Mt. San Jacinto, CA; Soudan Mine, MN; Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, NM; and several other potential sites in abandoned mines and new tunnels below high mountains. The feasibility of multiple DUSELs is being investigated. The sites also offer opportunities to study tectonic and crustal evolution from deep crust in ancient rocks, in sedimentary formations, to igneous processes. Although any one site is inevitably limited with respect to the research scope, advances in understanding and in testing techniques from DUSEL can facilitate shorter-term studies at environmental and industrial sites, where access for long-term research is not possible. International integration with the Underground Research Laboratories (URLs) is intended. Scientists conducting ongoing studies in energy/resource production, environmental protection, earthquake prediction, and industrial manufacture in low-background underground settings are all welcome to participate/contribute to both generic and site-specific proposals for DUSELs.

  17. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the validity of diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) through urine culture between samples processed in routine health service laboratories and those processed in a research laboratory. Population and methods We conducted a prospective diagnostic cohort study in 4808 acutely ill children aged <5 years attending UK primary health care. UTI, defined as pure/predominant growth ≥105 CFU/mL of a uropathogen (the reference standard), was diagnosed at routine health service laboratories and a central research laboratory by culture of urine samples. We calculated areas under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) for UTI predicted by pre-specified symptoms, signs and dipstick test results (the “index test”), separately according to whether samples were obtained by clean catch or nappy (diaper) pads. Results 251 (5.2%) and 88 (1.8%) children were classified as UTI positive by health service and research laboratories respectively. Agreement between laboratories was moderate (kappa = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.43), and better for clean catch (0.54; 0.45, 0.63) than nappy pad samples (0.20; 0.12, 0.28). In clean catch samples, the AUC was lower for health service laboratories (AUC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.80) than the research laboratory (0.86; 0.79, 0.92). Values of AUC were lower in nappy pad samples (0.65 [0.61, 0.70] and 0.79 [0.70, 0.88] for health service and research laboratory positivity, respectively) than clean catch samples. Conclusions The agreement of microbiological diagnosis of UTI comparing routine health service laboratories with a research laboratory was moderate for clean catch samples and poor for nappy pad samples and reliability is lower for nappy pad than for clean catch samples. Positive results from the research laboratory appear more likely to reflect real UTIs than those from routine health service laboratories, many of which (particularly from nappy pad samples) could be due to contamination. Health service

  18. [Research advance in seed germination of desert woody plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Wu, Jian-guo; Liu, Yan-hong

    2007-02-01

    This paper reviewed the research methods of desert woody plants seed germination, and the effects of internal and external ecological factors on it. Most researchers use incubator and artificial climate chamber to dispose the seeds, while field investigation was few involved. Seed dormancy is the important physiological factor affecting germination, while seed size, mass and color are closely correlated with its maturity and vigor. The poor permeability of seed capsule is a barrier that restrains the germination, which can be weakened or eliminated by shaving, cutting, treating with low temperature, and dipping in chemical reagent, etc. Seed water content has a close correlation with its storage life and water-absorbing capability. Suitable temperature is the prerequisite of seed germination, while changing temperature can accelerate the germination. Soil moisture content is a limiting factor, while illumination is not so essential to the seed germination of most desert woody plants. Sand-burying plays an important role in the seed germination through regulating illumination, temperature, and soil moisture content. Salinity stress restrains the seed germination of desert woody plants observably. In further studies, the effects of multi-factors and the eco-physiological and molecular biological mechanisms of germination should be more concerned.

  19. New ion beam materials laboratory for materials modification and irradiation effects research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: Zhangy1@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Crespillo, M.L.; Xue, H.; Jin, K.; Chen, C.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Fontana, C.L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Graham, J.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Weber, W.J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion–solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  20. New Ion Beam Materials Laboratory for Materials Modification and Irradiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Crespillo, Miguel L [University of Tennessee (UT); Xue, Haizhou [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jin, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, Chien-Hung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fontana, Cristiano L [ORNL; Graham, Dr. Joseph T. [The University of Tennessee; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    A new multifunctional ion beam materials laboratory (IBML) has been established at the University of Tennessee, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The IBML is currently equipped with two ion sources, a 3 MV tandem accelerator, three beamlines and three endstations. The IBML is primarily dedicated to fundamental research on ion-solid interaction, ion beam analysis, ion beam modification, and other basic and applied research on irradiation effects in a wide range of materials. An overview of the IBML facility is provided, and experimental results are reported to demonstrate the specific capabilities.

  1. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the DOE Office of Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.F.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes progress on OHER human health, biological, and general life sciences research programs conducted at PNL in FY 1990. The research develops the knowledge and scientific principles necessary to identify understand, and anticipate the long-term health consequences of energy-related radiation and chemicals. Our continuing emphasis is to decrease the uncertainty of health risk estimates from existing and developing energy-related technologies through an increased of understanding of how radiation and chemicals cause biological damage. The sequence of this report of PNL research reflects the OHER programmatic structure. The first section, on human health research, concerns epidemiological and statistical studies for assessing health risks. The next section contains reports of biological research in laboratory animals and in vitro cell systems, including research with radionuclides and chemicals. The general life sciences research section reports research conducted for the OHER human genome research program.

  3. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID

  4. THE PELLETS APPLICATION IN LABORATORY RESEARCHING OF INHIBITIVE MUD/SHALE INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borivoje Pašić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wellbore instability appears to be a serious problem during drilling process through shale. Shales instability cause basically comes out of its mineralogical composition (especially clay minerals content and physico-chemical properties. Many research activities about shale instability causes and shale properties (affecting shale behavior during interaction with water phase of different drilling muds definition have been carried out by now. In these laboratory tests were used original shales samples given by coring process or collecting shale cuttings from shale shakers, and different shale samples from outcrop. From this reason is very difficult compare laboratory tests results given by different authors. Possible solution is use artificial shale samples (pellets with exact mineralogical composition, enabling extensive laboratory tests and tests results comparison. In this paper presented laboratory tests of pellets swelling in inhibitive muds (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. NNSA Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program 2008 Symposium--Focus on Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotta, P R; Sketchley, J A

    2008-08-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 to fund leading-edge research and development central to the national laboratories core missions. LDRD anticipates and engages in projects on the forefront of science and engineering at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, and has a long history of addressing pressing national security needs at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories. LDRD has been a scientific success story, where projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published and cited in peer-reviewed journals, mainstream media coverage, and patents granted. The LDRD Program is also a powerful means to attract and retain top researchers from around the world, to foster collaborations with other prominent scientific and technological institutions, and to leverage some of the world's most technologically advanced assets. This enables the LDRD Program to invest in high-risk and potentially high-payoff research that creates innovative technical solutions for some of our nation's most difficult challenges. Worldwide energy demand is growing at an alarming rate, as developing nations continue to expand their industrial and economic base on the back of limited global resources. The resulting international conflicts and environmental consequences pose serious challenges not only to this nation, but to the international community as well. The NNSA and its national security laboratories have been increasingly called upon to devote their scientific and technological capabilities to help address issues that are not limited solely to the historic nuclear weapons core mission, but are more expansive and encompass a spectrum of national security missions, including energy security. This year's symposium highlights some of the exciting areas of research in alternative fuels and technology, nuclear power, carbon

  6. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  7. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  8. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

  9. Some results of medical researches at Ulba Metallurgical Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemieva, G.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Savchuk, V.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The results of 45-years medical researches at beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant are summarized in this report. Statistic data on different kinds of occupational diseases, related to beryllium production and the dynamics of changing occupational diseases with the development of beryllium production, are given there. Data on average duration of life of occupational disease patients are presented in the report. It includes the description of problems, related to berylliosis diagnosis. Issues, connected to beryllium production effect on health of man, located nearby beryllium production are also discussed there as well. (author)

  10. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  11. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Student Learning in Industrially Situated Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Kelly, Christine; Gummer, Edith

    2011-01-01

    The instructional design and the corresponding research on student learning of two virtual laboratories that provide an engineering task situated in an industrial context are described. In this problem-based learning environment, data are generated dynamically based on each student team's distinct choices of reactor parameters and measurements.…

  12. Using Green Chemistry Principles as a Framework to Incorporate Research into the Organic Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy E.; Gurney, Rich; Soltzberg, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the accepted pedagogical value of integrating research into the laboratory curriculum, this approach has not been widely adopted. The activation barrier to this change is high, especially in organic chemistry, where a large number of students are required to take this course, special glassware or setups may be needed, and dangerous…

  13. Infusing Bioinformatics and Research-Like Experience into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2014-01-01

    A nine-week laboratory project designed for a sophomore level molecular biology course is described. Small groups of students (3-4 per group) choose a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) or an oncogene for this project. Each group researches the role of their TSG/oncogene from primary literature articles and uses bioinformatics engines to find the gene…

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  15. Transitioning from Expository Laboratory Experiments to Course-Based Undergraduate Research in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ted M.; Ricciardo, Rebecca; Weaver, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    General chemistry courses predominantly use expository experiments that shape student expectations of what a laboratory activity entails. Shifting within a semester to course-based undergraduate research activities that include greater decision-making, collaborative work, and "messy" real-world data necessitates a change in student…

  16. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Student Learning in Industrially Situated Virtual Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Kelly, Christine; Gummer, Edith

    2011-01-01

    The instructional design and the corresponding research on student learning of two virtual laboratories that provide an engineering task situated in an industrial context are described. In this problem-based learning environment, data are generated dynamically based on each student team's distinct choices of reactor parameters and measurements.…

  17. Simplifying Complexity: Miriam Blake--Los Alamos National Laboratory Research Library, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The holy grail for many research librarians is one-stop searching: seamless access to all the library's resources on a topic, regardless of the source. Miriam Blake, Library Without Walls Project Leader at Los Alamos National laboratory (LANL), is making this vision a reality. Blake is part of a growing cadre of experts: a techie who is becoming a…

  18. The Research Laboratory of Electronics Progress Report Number 133, January 1-December 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-31

    form of a working Beam Epitaxy (MOMBE) of research facility in 1990. The substantial labora- ZnSe tory renovation was completed in February; the CBE...colleagues at Bernstein Waves in Toroidal Plasmas." Pro- the Italian laboratories of E.N.E.A. ( Energia ceedings of the International Sherwood Theory

  19. Can Scientific Research From the Laboratory be of Any Use to Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Denis; Cole, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Behavior in a psychology laboratory?constrained by the need to efficiently replicate tasks, record individual responses, and avoid contamination from external factors?is different in systematic ways from behavior within an everyday environment where similar tasks are undertaken and problems solved. This article describes a program of research that…

  20. Discovering Inexpensive, Effective Catalysts for Solar Energy Conversion: An Authentic Research Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Sarah E.; Hooker, Paul D.; Nickel, Anne-Marie; Leichtfuss, Amanda R.; Adams, Carissa S.; de la Cerda, Dionisia; She, Yuqi; Gerken, James B.; Pokhrel, Ravi; Ambrose, Nicholas J.; Khaliqi, David; Stahl, Shannon S.; Schuttlefield Christus, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical water oxidation is a major focus of solar energy conversion efforts. A new laboratory experiment has been developed that utilizes real-time, hands-on research to discover catalysts for solar energy conversion. The HARPOON, or Heterogeneous Anodes Rapidly Perused for Oxygen Overpotential Neutralization, experiment allows an array of…