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Sample records for plant polysaccharide degradation

  1. Aspergillus enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.; Visser, J.

    2001-01-01

    Degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides is of major importance in the food and feed, beverage, textile, and paper and pulp industries, as well as in several other industrial production processes. Enzymatic degradation of these polymers has received attention for many years and is becoming a m

  2. Polysaccharide Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bruce A.; Svensson, Birte; Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    An overview of current and potential enzymes used to degrade polysaccharides is presented. Such depolymerases are comprised of glycoside hydrolases, glycosyl transferases, phosphorylases and lyases, and their classification, active sites and action patterns are discussed. Additionally, the mechanisms that these enzymes use to cleave glycosidic linkages is reviewed as are inhibitors of depolymerase activity; reagents which react with amino acid residues, glycoside derivatives, transition state inhibitors and proteinaceous inhibitors. The characterization of various enzymes of microbial, animal or plant origin has led to their widespread use in the production of important oligosaccharides which can be incorporated into food stuffs. Sources of polysaccharides of particular interest in this chapter are those from plants and include inulin, dextran, xylan and pectin, as their hydrolysis products are purported to be functional foods in the context of gastrointestinal health. An alternative use of degraded polysaccharides is in the treatment of disease. The possibility exists to treat bacterial exopolysaccharide with lyases from bacteriophage to produce oligosaccharides exhibiting bioactive sequences. Although this area is currently in its infancy the knowledge is available to investigate further.

  3. Plant-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from basidiomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rytioja, Johanna; Hildén, Kristiina; Yuzon, Jennifer; Hatakka, Annele; de Vries, Ronald P; Mäkelä, Miia R; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: Basidiomycete fungi subsist on various types of plant material in diverse environments, from living and dead trees and forest litter to crops and grasses and to decaying plant matter in soils. Due to the variation in their natural carbon sources, basidiomycetes have highly varied plant-poly

  4. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Martens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target

  5. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, Pedro M; Andersen, Mikael R; Kolenova, Katarina; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Benoit, Isabelle; Gruben, Birgit S; Trejo-Aguilar, Blanca; Visser, Hans; van Solingen, Piet; Pakula, Tiina; Seiboth, Bernard; Battaglia, Evy; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; de Jong, Jan F; Ohm, Robin A; Aguilar, Mariana; Henrissat, Bernard; Nielsen, Jens; Stålbrand, Henrik; de Vries, Ronald P

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs

  6. Indigenous West African plants as novel sources of polysaccharide degrading enzymes: application in the reduction of the viscosity of cereal porridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Hilhorst, M.H.; Traore, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Ethnobotanical and biochemical surveys revealed that some local plants from West Africa are novel sources of polysaccharide degrading enzymes such as amylases and glucanases. The study shows that these enzymes could be used for various biotechnological applications. In a crude extract of Curculigo p

  7. Indigenous West African plants as novel sources of polysaccharide degrading enzymes: application in the reduction of the viscosity of cereal porridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Hilhorst, M.H.; Traore, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Ethnobotanical and biochemical surveys revealed that some local plants from West Africa are novel sources of polysaccharide degrading enzymes such as amylases and glucanases. The study shows that these enzymes could be used for various biotechnological applications. In a crude extract of Curculigo

  8. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Pedro M.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Kolenova, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs an...

  9. Carbohydrate-active enzymes in pythium and their role in plant cell wall and storage polysaccharide degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo M Zerillo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of glycoconjugates, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides and, in the case of plant pathogens, in the degradation of the host cell wall and storage compounds. We performed an in silico analysis of CAZymes predicted from the genomes of seven Pythium species (Py. aphanidermatum, Py. arrhenomanes, Py. irregulare, Py. iwayamai, Py. ultimum var. ultimum, Py. ultimum var. sporangiiferum and Py. vexans using the "CAZymes Analysis Toolkit" and "Database for Automated Carbohydrate-active Enzyme Annotation" and compared them to previously published oomycete genomes. Growth of Pythium spp. was assessed in a minimal medium containing selected carbon sources that are usually present in plants. The in silico analyses, coupled with our in vitro growth assays, suggest that most of the predicted CAZymes are involved in the metabolism of the oomycete cell wall with starch and sucrose serving as the main carbohydrate sources for growth of these plant pathogens. The genomes of Pythium spp. also encode pectinases and cellulases that facilitate degradation of the plant cell wall and are important in hyphal penetration; however, the species examined in this study lack the requisite genes for the complete saccharification of these carbohydrates for use as a carbon source. Genes encoding for xylan, xyloglucan, (galacto(glucomannan and cutin degradation were absent or infrequent in Pythium spp.. Comparative analyses of predicted CAZymes in oomycetes indicated distinct evolutionary histories. Furthermore, CAZyme gene families among Pythium spp. were not uniformly distributed in the genomes, suggesting independent gene loss events, reflective of the polyphyletic relationships among some of the species.

  10. Methods of saccharification of polysaccharides in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Fake, Gina

    2014-04-29

    Saccharification of polysaccharides of plants is provided, where release of fermentable sugars from cellulose is obtained by adding plant tissue composition. Production of glucose is obtained without the need to add additional .beta.-glucosidase. Adding plant tissue composition to a process using a cellulose degrading composition to degrade cellulose results in an increase in the production of fermentable sugars compared to a process in which plant tissue composition is not added. Using plant tissue composition in a process using a cellulose degrading enzyme composition to degrade cellulose results in decrease in the amount of cellulose degrading enzyme composition or exogenously applied cellulase required to produce fermentable sugars.

  11. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted.

  12. Mapping the polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, M.R.; Giese, M.; De Vries, R.P.; Nielsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background The degradation of plant materials by enzymes is an industry of increasing importance. For sustainable production of second generation biofuels and other products of industrial biotechnology, efficient degradation of non-edible plant polysaccharides such as hemicellulose is required. For

  13. Extractability and digestibility of plant cell wall polysaccharides during hydrothermal and enzymatic degradation of wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads A.T.; Ahl, Louise I.; Pedersen, Henriette L.

    2014-01-01

    , regardless their extractability in water or only alkali. Based on the results, AX and MLG appear to be loosely bound in the cell wall matrix while the other polysaccharides are bound more tightly and shielded from enzymatic attack by AX and MLG until pretreatment. The gradual solubilisation and digestion...... and by comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP). This way, the effects of each degradation step to the intermolecular organisation of specific polysaccharides in the cell walls were elucidated. After pretreatment, the degree of polymerisation (DP) of released xylo-oligosaccharides in both samples was up...... to about 20, but mostly around 3-8, and notably more acetylated in stems. Arabinoxylan (AX) and mixed-linkage glucan (MLG) became water-extractable while xylan, xyloglucan (XG), mannan and glucan remained only alkali-extractable. All polysaccharides became partly digestible after pretreatment however...

  14. Application of carbohydrate arrays coupled with mass spectrometry to detect activity of plant-polysaccharide degradative enzymes from the fungus Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Thomas, Baptiste; Riese, Michel; Davis, Adrienne L.; Gray, Christopher J.; Archer, David B.; Flitsch, Sabine L.

    2017-01-01

    Renewables-based biotechnology depends on enzymes to degrade plant lignocellulose to simple sugars that are converted to fuels or high-value products. Identification and characterization of such lignocellulose degradative enzymes could be fast-tracked by availability of an enzyme activity measurement method that is fast, label-free, uses minimal resources and allows direct identification of generated products. We developed such a method by applying carbohydrate arrays coupled with MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry to identify reaction products of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. We describe the production and characterization of plant polysaccharide-derived oligosaccharides and their attachment to hydrophobic self-assembling monolayers on a gold target. We verify effectiveness of this array for detecting exo- and endo-acting glycoside hydrolase activity using commercial enzymes, and demonstrate how this platform is suitable for detection of enzyme activity in relevant biological samples, the culture filtrate of A. niger grown on wheat straw. In conclusion, this versatile method is broadly applicable in screening and characterisation of activity of CAZymes, such as fungal enzymes for plant lignocellulose degradation with relevance to biotechnological applications as biofuel production, the food and animal feed industry. PMID:28220903

  15. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments...

  16. Enzymatic Modification of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øbro, Jens; Hayashi, Takahisa; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2011-01-01

    fibres, hydrocolloids, paper,textile, animal feeds or biofuels. Classical microbial-based fermentation systems could in the future face serious competition from plant-based expression systems for enzyme production. Plant expressed enzymes can either be targeted to specific cellular compartments......Plant cell walls are intricate structures with remarkable properties, widely used in almost every aspect of our life. Cell walls consist largely of complex polysaccharides and there is often a need for chemical and biochemical processing before industrial use. There is an increasing demand...... for sustainable processes that replace chemical treatments with white biotechnology. Plants can contribute significantly to this sustainable process by producing plant or microbialenzymes in planta that are necessary for plant cell wall modification or total degradation. This will give rise to superior food...

  17. The fungal symbiont of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants expresses the full spectrum of genes to degrade cellulose and other plant cell wall polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grell, Morten N; Linde, Tore; Nygaard, Sanne; Nielsen, Kåre L; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Lange, Lene

    2013-12-28

    The fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants are natural biomass conversion systems that turn fresh plant forage into fungal biomass to feed the farming ants. However, the decomposition potential of the symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus for processing polysaccharides has remained controversial. We therefore used quantifiable DeepSAGE technology to obtain mRNA expression patterns of genes coding for secreted enzymes from top, middle, and bottom sections of a laboratory fungus-garden of Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants. A broad spectrum of biomass-conversion-relevant enzyme genes was found to be expressed in situ: cellulases (GH3, GH5, GH6, GH7, AA9 [formerly GH61]), hemicellulases (GH5, GH10, CE1, GH12, GH74), pectinolytic enzymes (CE8, GH28, GH43, PL1, PL3, PL4), glucoamylase (GH15), α-galactosidase (GH27), and various cutinases, esterases, and lipases. In general, expression of these genes reached maximal values in the bottom section of the garden, particularly for an AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase and for a GH5 (endocellulase), a GH7 (reducing end-acting cellobiohydrolase), and a GH10 (xylanase), all containing a carbohydrate binding module that specifically binds cellulose (CBM1). Although we did not directly quantify enzyme abundance, the profile of expressed cellulase genes indicates that both hydrolytic and oxidative degradation is taking place. The fungal symbiont of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants can degrade a large range of plant polymers, but the conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose, and part of the pectin occurs primarily towards the end of the decomposition process, i.e. in the bottom section of the fungus garden. These conversions are likely to provide nutrients for the fungus itself rather than for the ants, whose colony growth and reproductive success are limited by proteins obtained from ingesting fungal gongylidia. These specialized hyphal tips are hardly produced in the bottom section of fungus gardens, consistent with the ants

  18. Advances on Bioactive Polysaccharides from Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-Hua; Jin, Ming-Liang; Morris, Gordon A; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Han-Qing; Yi, Yang; Li, Jing-En; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Jie; Nie, Shao-Ping; Shang, Peng; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2016-07-29

    In recent decades, the polysaccharides from the medicinal plants have attracted a lot of attention due to their significant bioactivities, such as anti-tumor activity, antioxidant activity, anticoagulant activity, antidiabetic activity, radioprotection effect, anti-viral activity, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory activities, which make them suitable for medicinal applications. Previous studies have also shown that medicinal plant polysaccharides are non-toxic and show no side effects. Based on these encouraging observations, most researches have been focusing on the isolation and identification of polysaccharides, as well as their bioactivities. A large number of bioactive polysaccharides with different structural features and biological effects from medicinal plants have been purified and characterized. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent developments in physiochemical, structural features and biological activities of bioactive polysaccharides from a number of important medicinal plants, such as polysaccharides from Astragalus membranaceus, Dendrobium plants, Bupleurum, Cactus fruits, Acanthopanax senticosus, Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels, Aloe barbadensis Miller, and Dimocarpus longan Lour. Moreover, the paper has also been focused on the applications of bioactive polysaccharides for medicinal applications. Recent studies have provided evidence that polysaccharides from medicinal plants can play a vital role in bioactivities. The contents and data will serve as a useful reference material for further investigation, production, and application of these polysaccharides in functional foods and therapeutic agents.

  19. Degradation studies on Escherichia coli capsular polysaccharides by bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmich, W

    1997-08-01

    The serologically and structurally related Eschrichia coli capsular polysaccharides (K antigens) K13, K20, and K23 were found to be depolymerized by the bacteriophages phi K13 and phi K20 to almost similar oligomer profiles as shown by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The phage-polysaccharide interactions were followed by an increase of reducing 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid due to a phage-associated glycanase that catalyzed the hydrolytic cleavage of common beta-ketopyranosidic 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid linkages. The related E. coli K antigens K18, K22, and K100 as well as the Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide were degraded by bacteriophage phi K100 with different efficacy. It is suggested that phi K100 enzymatically cleaves ribitol-5-phosphate bonds as the only structural feature present in all the polysaccharides investigated.

  20. O-acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eGille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation.From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of e.g. lignocellulosic based biofuel production.

  1. Downstream processing of polysaccharide degrading enzymes by affinity chromatography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somers, W.A.C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development of affinity matrices to isolate and purify a number of polysaccharide degrading enzymes and the application of these adsorbents in the large- scale purification of the enzymes from fermentation broths. Affinity adsorbents were developed for endo-polyga

  2. Melissotarsus ants are likely able to digest plant polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Ruth; Dejean, Alain; Bilong, Charles Félix Bilong; Kenne, Martin; Rouland-Lefèvre, Corinne

    2013-10-01

    Melissotarsus ants have an extremely specialized set of behaviours. Both workers and gynes tunnel galleries in their host tree bark. Workers walk with their mesothoracic legs pointing upwards and tend Diaspididae hemiptera for their flesh. The ants use their forelegs to plug the galleries with silk that they secrete themselves. We hypothesised that the ants' energetic needs for nearly constant gallery digging could be satisfied through the absorption of host tree tissues; so, using basic techniques, we examined the digestive capacities of workers from two species. We show that workers are able to degrade oligosaccharides and heterosides as well as, to a lesser degree, polysaccharides. This is one of the rare reports on ants able to digest plant polysaccharides other than starch. Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation-induced degradation of galactomannan polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Murat [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, 06532 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: msen@hacettepe.edu.tr; Yolacan, Burcu; Gueven, Olgun [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Beytepe, 06532 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-12-15

    In this study, guar gum, tara gum and locust bean gum were irradiated in a gamma cell in the solid state. The change in their molecular weights were determined by size exclusion chromatography analysis and the change in their viscosity values with change of temperature and irradiation dose were determined. Chain scission yield, G(s), and degradation rate values were calculated. The calculated G(s) values is 1.09 {+-} 0.16, 1.07 {+-} 0.06, 0.85 {+-} 0.10 for GG, TG and LBG, respectively. The effect of mannose-galactose ratio and initial molecular weight of these gums on the degradation behavior were discussed.

  4. Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharide Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal S. Sandhu; Gursharn S. Randhawa; Kanwarpal S. Dhugga

    2009-01-01

    The wall of an expanding plant cell consists primarily of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemi-cellulosic and pectic polysaccharides along with small amounts of structural and enzymatic proteins. Matrix polysacchar-ides are synthesized in the Golgi and exported to the cell wall by exocytosis, where they intercalate among cellulose microfibrUs, which are made at the plasma membrane and directly deposited into the cell wall. Involvement of Golgi glucan synthesis in auxin-induced cell expansion has long been recognized; however, only recently have the genes corresponding to glucan synthases been identified. Biochemical purification was unsuccessful because of the labile nature and very low abundance of these enzymes. Mutational genetics also proved fruitless. Expression of candidate genes identified through gene expression profiling or comparative genomics in heterologous systems followed by functional characterization has been relatively successful. Several genes from the cellulose synthase-like (Cs/) family have been found to be involved in the synthesis of various hemicellulosic glycans. The usefulness of this approach, however, is limited to those enzymes that probably do not form complexes consisting of unrelated proteins. Nonconventional approaches will continue to incre-mentally unravel the mechanisms of Golgi polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  5. [Gravity resistance, another graviresponse in plants--function of anti-gravitational polysaccharides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Soga, Kouichi

    2003-08-01

    The involvement of anti-gravitational polysaccharides in gravity resistance, one of two major gravity responses in plants, was discussed. In dicotyledons, xyloglucans are the only cell wall polysaccharides, whose level, molecular size, and metabolic turnover were modified under both hypergravity and microgravity conditions, suggesting that xyloglucans act as anti-gravitational polysaccharides. In monocotyledonous Poaceae, (1-->3),(1-->4)-beta glucans, instead of xyloglucans, were shown to play a role as anti-gravitational polysaccharides. These polysaccharides are also involved in plant responses to other environmental factors, such as light and temperature, and to some phytohormones, such as auxin and ethylene. Thus, the type of anti-gravitational polysaccharides is different between dicotyledons and Poaceae, but such polysaccharides are universally involved in plant responses to environmental and hormonal signals. In gravity resistance, the gravity signal may be received by the plasma membrane mechanoreceptors, transformed and transduced within each cell, and then may modify the processes of synthesis and secretion of the anti-gravitational polysaccharides and the cell wall enzymes responsible for their degradation, as well as the apoplastic pH, leading to the cell wall reinforcement. A series of events inducing gravity resistance are quite independent of those leading to gravitropism.

  6. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolai Obel; Veronika Erben; Tatjana Schwarz; Stefan Kühne; Andrea Fodor; Markus Pauly

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the study of a wide range of plant organs, revealing a high degree of heterogeneity in the substitution pattern of wall polymers such as the cross-linking glycan xyloglucan and the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan. The high sensitivity of MALDI-TOF allows the use of small amounts of samples, thus making it possible to investigate the wall structure of single cell types when material is collected by such methods as laser micro-dissection. As an example, the analysis of the xyloglucan structure in the leaf cell types outer epidermis layer, entire epidermis cell layer, palisade mesophyll cells, and vascular bundles were investigated. OLIMP is amenable to in situ wall analysis, where wall polymers are analyzed on unprepared plant tissue itself without first iso-lating cell walls. In addition, OLIMP enables analysis of wall polymers in Golgi-enriched fractions, the location of nascent matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis, enabling separation of the processes of wall biosynthesis versus post-deposition apo-plastic metabolism. These new tools will make possible a semi-quantitative analysis of the cell wall at an unprecedented level.

  7. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer's view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian E. H. Frandsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future.

  8. Liposome-Based Delivery Systems in Plant Polysaccharides

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    Meiwan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant polysaccharides consist of many monosaccharide by α- or β-glycosidic bond which can be extracted by the water, alcohol, lipophile liquid from a variety of plants including Cordyceps sinensis, astragalus, and mushrooms. Recently, many evidences illustrate that natural plant polysaccharides possess various biological activities including strengthening immunity, lowering blood sugar, regulating lipid metabolism, antioxidation, antiaging, and antitumour. Plant polysaccharides have been widely used in the medical field due to their special features and low toxicity. As an important drug delivery system, liposomes can not only encapsulate small-molecule compound but also big-molecule drug; therefore, they present great promise for the application of plant polysaccharides with unique physical and chemical properties and make remarkable successes. This paper summarized the current progress in plant polysaccharides liposomes, gave an overview on their experiment design method, preparation, and formulation, characterization and quality control, as well as in vivo and in vitro studies. Moreover, the potential application of plant polysaccharides liposomes was prospected as well.

  9. A simple technique for removing plant polysaccharide contaminants from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, N; Adams, R P

    1991-02-01

    A survey of the inhibitory effects of various plant polysaccharides on DNA restrictions (HindIII and EcoRI) revealed that neutral polysaccharides (arabino-galactan, dextran, gum guar, gum locust bean, beta-glucan, inulin, laminaran, mannan and starch) were not very inhibitory. In contrast, acidic polysaccharides (carrageenan, dextran sulfate, gum ghatti, gum karaya, pectin and xylan) were very inhibitory, even at low concentrations. The Elutip-d (RPC-5 type resin) was evaluated for removal of the inhibitory polysaccharides. Used alone or in combination with a phenol/chloroform wash, it proved effective in removing the polysaccharide so that HindIII digestion was possible, except in the cases of carrageenan and dextran sulfate. In addition, the genomic DNA extracts from live oak (Quercus virginiana) and magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) were sufficiently purified so that the DNAs could be restricted with both EcoRI and HindIII.

  10. Research of polysaccharide complexes from asteraceae family plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Михайлівна Марчишин

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. Depth study of polysaccharides in some little-known plant species of Asteraceae family is pressing question, considering that polysaccharides are important biologically active compounds widely used in pharmaceutical and medical practice as remedies and preventive medications. The aim of research was to determinate both quantitative content and monomeric composition of polysaccharide complexes from Asteraceae family plant species – Tagetes genus, Arnica genus, and Bellis genus.Materials and methods. Determination of polysaccharides was carried out by the precipitation reaction, using 96 % ethyl alcohol P and Fehling's solution after acid hydrolysis; quantitative content of this group of compounds was determined by gravimetric analysis. On purpose to identify the monomeric composition hydrolysis under sulfuric acid conditions was conducted. Qualitative monomeric composition of polysaccharides after hydrolysis was carried out by paper chromatography method in n-Butanol – Pyridine – Distilled water P (6:4:3 system along with saccharides reference samples.Results. Polysaccharide complexes from Tagetes erecta, Tagetes patula, Tagetes tenuifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica foliosa, wild and cultivated Bellis perennis herbs were studied. Water-soluble polysaccharides and pectin fractions were isolated from studied objects; their quantitative content and monomeric composition were determined.Conclusion. The highest amount of water-soluble polysaccharides was found in cultivated Bellis perennis herb (10,13 %, the highest amount of pectin compounds – in Tagetes tenuifolia herb (13,62 %; the lowest amount of water-soluble polysaccharides and pectin compounds was found in Arnica montana herb (4,61 % and Tagetes patula herb (3,62 %, respectively. It was found that polysaccharide complexes from all studied species include glucose and arabinose

  11. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pectin, a versatile polysaccharide present in plant cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voragen, A.G.J.; Coenen, G.J.; Verhoef, R.P.; Schols, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pectin or pectic substances are collective names for a group of closely associated polysaccharides present in plant cell walls where they contribute to complex physiological processes like cell growth and cell differentiation and so determine the integrity and rigidity of plant tissue. They also pla

  13. SORPTION PROPERTIES OF PLANT POLYSACCHARIDE COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Glagoleva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents information on the laws of the sorption of water to grow-negative polysaccharide complexes of the pumpkin and briar, deter-mined the rate constant of swelling as a function of temperature and pH, the maximum degree of swelling and limit the time to achieve it.

  14. Characterisation and enzymic degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in lignocellulosic by-products. A study on sunflower meal and palm-kernel meal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düsterhöft, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) constitute a potentially valuable part of plant by- products deriving from the food and agricultural industries. Their use for various applications (fuel, feed, food) requires the degradation and modification of the complex plant materials. This can be achieved by en

  15. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly c...

  16. Characterization and antioxidant activities of degraded polysaccharides from Poria cocos sclerotium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin; Nie, Jing; Li, Danping; Zhu, Wenjun; Zhang, Shaopeng; Ma, Fang; Sun, Qiao; Song, Jia; Zheng, Yonglian; Chen, Ping

    2014-05-25

    Poria cocos F.A.Wolf is a Chinese traditional medicine used to treat chronic gastritis, edema, nephrosis, gastric atony, and acute gastroenteric catarrh. Polysaccharides are the main active component of P. cocos. We obtained polysaccharides PCP-1, PCP-2, and PCP-3 from the degradation of P. cocos polysaccharides (PCP) with different concentrations of H2O2 solution. Molecular weights were determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography. HPLC analysis of monosaccharide composition confirmed that PCP-1, PCP-2, and PCP-3 are heteropolysaccharides composed of glucose and arabinose. IR spectra indicated obvious characteristic peaks of polysaccharides. The antioxidant activities of these polysaccharides were evaluated by established in vitro systems, including scavenging activity of hydroxyl radicals, ABTS radicals, and ferrous ions. The degradation polysaccharides exhibited obvious and concentration-dependent antioxidant properties. In addition, DNA binding analysis showed that PCP-1 had a stronger capacity than other polysaccharides to interact with DNA. However, each polysaccharide had a certain capacity for DNA damage protection.

  17. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  18. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  19. Affinity purification of polysaccharide degrading enzymes with crosslinked substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozie, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find economically favourable, affinity based, purification methods for several polysaccharide splitting bulk enzymes. The framework in which this study is done is described in Chapter 1.

    Chapter 2 describes the adsorption of endo-polygalacturonase (endoPG

  20. Affinity purification of polysaccharide degrading enzymes with crosslinked substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozie, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find economically favourable, affinity based, purification methods for several polysaccharide splitting bulk enzymes. The framework in which this study is done is described in Chapter 1.

    Chapter 2 describes the adsorption of endo-polygalacturonase

  1. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer’s view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future. PMID:27840684

  2. Carbohydrase Systems of Saccharophagus degradans Degrading Marine Complex Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Suvorov

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 is a γ-subgroup proteobacterium capable of using many of the complex polysaccharides found in the marine environment for growth. To utilize these complex polysaccharides, this bacterium produces a plethora of carbohydrases dedicated to the processing of a carbohydrate class. Aiding in the identification of the contributing genes and enzymes is the known genome sequence for this bacterium. This review catalogs the genes and enzymes of the S. degradans genome that are likely to function in the systems for the utilization of agar, alginate, α- and β-glucans, chitin, mannans, pectins, and xylans and discusses the cell biology and genetics of each system as it functions to transfer carbon back to the bacterium.

  3. Mapping the polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Giese, Malene; de Vries, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    of 188 genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes from Aspergillus niger, thus forming an analysis framework, which can be queried. Combination of this information network with gene expression analysis on mono-and polysaccharide substrates has allowed elucidation of concerted gene expression from...... of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applying this network-based approach, we provide the first genome-scale characterization of all genes coding for carbohydrate-active enzymes identified in A. niger....

  4. Effect of ultrasonic treatment on the degradation and inhibition cancer cell lines of polysaccharides from Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaojie; Zhou, Cunshan; Yang, Hua; Huang, Xingyi; Ma, Haile; Qin, Xiaopei; Hu, Jiali

    2015-03-01

    The exposure of polysaccharides solutions to high-energy ultrasound produces a permanent reduction in viscosity and change in activity. However, the exact mechanism which occurs in the process is still not clear. In this work, degradation of polysaccharides from Porphyra yezoensis (PP) was indirectly and directly judged by intrinsic viscosity and high performance gel permeation chromatography. The degradation process was established with dynamics and affirmed by theoretical derivation. Inhibition of cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, 95D) was also investigated by assays of tetrazolium colorimetric. The intrinsic viscosity of the degraded PP decreased exponentially with increase in ultrasonic time, and theoretical derivation was established and confirmed well. The distribution and new fraction of degraded polysaccharides was found. Ultrasound degraded preferentially large PP molecules and cleavage took place roughly at the centre of the molecules. During ultrasound degradation the molecular weight distribution was narrowed. The inhibition activities of SGC7901 with ultrasound degraded polysaccharides were increased.

  5. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  6. Molecular weight controllable degradation of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides and its antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Shenghua; Zhao, Qingsheng; Zhao, Bing; Ouyang, Jie; Mo, Jianling; Chen, Jinjin; Cao, Lili; Zhang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    In this study, molecular weight controllable degradation of algal Laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LPS) was investigated by ultrasound combined with hydrogen peroxide. Three main factors, i.e., ultrasonic power (A), ultrasonic time (B), and H2O2 concentration (C) were chosen for optimizing parameters by employing three-factors, three-levels BBD. The influence of degradation on structure change and antioxidant activities was also investigated. A second-order polynomial equation including molecular weight (Y) of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides and each variable parameter, i.e., ultrasonic power (A), ultrasonic time (B), and H2O2 concentration (C), was established: Y=20718.67-4273.13 A-4000.38 B-1438.75 C+2333.25 AB+1511.00 AC+873.00 BC+2838.29 A 2 + 2490.79 B 2+873.04 C 2. The equation regression coefficient value ( R 2 = 0.969) indicated that this equation was valid. The value of the adjusted determination coefficient (adjusted R 2 = 0.914) also confirmed that the model was highly significant. The results of selected experimental degradation conditions matched with the predicted value. FT-IR spectra revealed that the structures of LPS before and after degradation were not significantly changed. Antioxidant activities of LPS revealed that low Mws possessed stronger inhibitory than the original polysaccharides. The scavenging effects on superoxide radicals was the highest when IC50 of crude LPS was 4.92 mg mL-1 and IC50 of Mw 18.576 KDa was 1.02 mg mL-1, which was fourfold higher than initial polysaccharide.

  7. A Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Flammeovirga sp.MY04 and Its Extracellular Agarase System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Wenjun; GU Jingyan; YAN Qiujie; LI Jungang; WU Zhihong; GU Qianqun; LI Yuezhong

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Flammeovirga can digest complex polysaccharides(CPs),but no details have been reported regarding the CP depolymerases of these bacteria.MY04,an agarolytic marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediments,has been identified as a new member of the genus Flammeovirga.The MY04 strain is able to utilize multiple CPs as a sole carbon source and grows well on agarose,mannan,or xylan.This strain produces high concentrations of extracellular proteins (490mgL-1± 18.2 mgL-1liquid culture)that exhibit efficient and extensive degradation activities on various polysaccharides,especially agarose.These proteins have an activity of 310 U mg-1± 9.6 Umg-1 proteins.The extracellular agarase system(EAS)in the crude extracellular enzymes contains at least four agarose depolymerases,which are with molecular masses of approximately 30-70 kDa.The EAS is stable at a wide range of pH values(6.0-11.0),temperatures(0-50℃),and sodium chloride(NaCl)concentrations(0-0.9mol L-1).Two major degradation products generated from agarose by the EAS are identified to be neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose,suggesting that β-agarases are the major constituents of the MY04 EAS.These results suggest that the Flammeovirga strain MY04 and its polysaccharide-degradation system hold great promise in industrial applications.

  8. Degradation of polysaccharide hydrogels seeded with bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Shiva H; Grover, Liam M; Paxton, Jennifer Z; Smith, Alan M

    2011-10-01

    In order to produce hydrogel cell culture substrates that are fit for the purpose, it is important that the mechanical properties are well understood not only at the point of cell seeding but throughout the culture period. In this study the change in the mechanical properties of three biopolymer hydrogels alginate, low methoxy pectin and gellan gum have been assessed in cell culture conditions. Samples of the gels were prepared encapsulating rat bone marrow stromal cells which were then cultured in osteogenic media. Acellular samples were also prepared and incubated in standard cell culture media. The rheological properties of the gels were measured over a culture period of 28 days and it was found that the gels degraded at very different rates. The degradation occurred most rapidly in the order alginate > Low methoxy pectin > gellan gum. The ability of each hydrogel to support differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to osteoblasts was also verified by evidence of mineral deposits in all three of the materials. These results highlight that the mechanical properties of biopolymer hydrogels can vary greatly during in vitro culture, and provide the potential of selecting hydrogel cell culture substrates with mechanical properties that are tissue specific.

  9. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and their secretion in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2014-01-01

    Approximately a tenth of all described fungal species can cause diseases in plants. A common feature of this process is the necessity to pass through the plant cell wall, an important barrier against pathogen attack. To this end, fungi possess a diverse array of secreted enzymes to depolymerize the main structural polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. Recent advances in genomic and systems-level studies have begun to unravel this diversity and have pinpointed cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) families that are specifically present or enhanced in plant-pathogenic fungi. In this review, we discuss differences between the CWDE arsenal of plant-pathogenic and non-plant-pathogenic fungi, highlight the importance of individual enzyme families for pathogenesis, illustrate the secretory pathway that transports CWDEs out of the fungal cell, and report the transcriptional regulation of expression of CWDE genes in both saprophytic and phytopathogenic fungi.

  10. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  11. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  12. Analysis of Lignin-Polysaccharide Complexes Formed during Grass Lignin Degradation by Cultures of Pleurotus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A; Bocchini, P; Galletti, G C; Martinez, A T

    1996-06-01

    A brown material, precipitable with ethanol, was formed during wheat straw and lignin degradation by liquid cultures of different species of Pleurotus. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that most of the precipitable material was formed from exopolysaccharide secreted by the fungus but it also contained an aromatic fraction. The results of acid hydrolysis, methylation analysis, and Smith degradation indicated that the major exopolysaccharide produced by these fungi is a (1(symbl)3)-(beta)-glucan branched at C-6 every two or three residues along the main chain. The presence of lignin or straw in the culture medium had little effect on the composition and structure of the extracellular polysaccharide. Cross-polarization and magic-angle-spinning (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided an estimation of the aromatic content of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes, assigning 20% of the total (sup13)C signal in the material recovered from cultures of Pleurotus eryngii in lignin medium to aromatic carbon. Analytical pyrolysis indicated that the aromatic fractions of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes were derived from lignin, since products characteristic of pyrolytic breakdown of H (p-hydroxyphenylpropane), G (guaiacylpropane), and S (syringylpropane) lignin units were identified. These complexes cannot be fractionated by treatment with polyvinylpyrrolidone or extraction with lignin solvents, suggesting that the two polymers were chemically linked. Moreover, differences in composition with respect to the original lignin indicated that this macromolecule was modified by the fungi during the process of formation of the lignin-polysaccharide complexes.

  13. Synbiotic matrices derived from plant oligosaccharides and polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    A porous synbiotic matrix was prepared by lyophilization of alginate and pectin or fructan oligosaccharides and polysaccharides cross-linked with calcium. These synbiotic matrices were excellent physical structures to support the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus (1426) and Lactobacillus reuteri (...

  14. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZymes across the entire fungal kingdom has not been reported. Results In this study, we systemically identified glycoside hydrolases (GHs), polysaccharide lyases (PLs), carbohydrate esterases (CEs), and glycosyltransferases (GTs) as well as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) in the predicted proteomes of 103 representative fungi from Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. Comparative analysis of these CAZymes that play major roles in plant polysaccharide degradation revealed that fungi exhibit tremendous diversity in the number and variety of CAZymes. Among them, some families of GHs and CEs are the most prevalent CAZymes that are distributed in all of the fungi analyzed. Importantly, cellulases of some GH families are present in fungi that are not known to have cellulose-degrading ability. In addition, our results also showed that in general, plant pathogenic fungi have the highest number of CAZymes. Biotrophic fungi tend to have fewer CAZymes than necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi. Pathogens of dicots often contain more pectinases than fungi infecting monocots. Interestingly, besides yeasts, many saprophytic fungi that are highly active in degrading plant biomass contain fewer CAZymes than plant pathogenic fungi. Furthermore, analysis of the gene expression profile of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum revealed that most of the CAZyme genes related to cell wall degradation were up-regulated during plant infection. Phylogenetic analysis also

  15. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  16. Degradation of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Transgenic Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mnich, Ewelina

    Lignin is one of the main building blocks of the plant cell wall. It tethers the cell wall by cross-linking with polysaccharides conferring mechanical strength to plants, aiding water transport and providing a mechanical barrier against pathogens. It is generated by the polymerization of the mono......Lignin is one of the main building blocks of the plant cell wall. It tethers the cell wall by cross-linking with polysaccharides conferring mechanical strength to plants, aiding water transport and providing a mechanical barrier against pathogens. It is generated by the polymerization...

  17. Fucans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweeds, inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. II. Degradation and molecular weight effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart, D; Prigent-Richard, S; Boisson-Vidal, C; Chaubet, F; Durand, P; Jozefonvicz, J; Letourneur, D

    1997-12-01

    Fucan, a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, inhibits smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation with a higher antiproliferative activity than heparin (Logeart et al., Eur. J. Cell Biol. 74, 1997, this issue). In order to investigate the structure-activity relationship of fucan on SMC growth, we have prepared by size exclusion chromatography fucan fractions of various molecular masses ranging from 5.5 to 556 kDa. Our experiments showed that the antiproliferative activity is dependent on the molecular weight of the polysaccharide. The molecular weight threshold indicated that about 30 saccharidic units on fucan were necessary to give the antiproliferative activity on SMCs. A kinetics study of DNA synthesis using tritiated thymidine uptake was also performed with different molecular weight fucan fractions. Although all tested fractions acted as soon as the cells enter the first cell cycle, the duration and potency of action varied. Moreover, displacement experiments of iodinated fucan revealed that the low molecular fucan fraction interacted weakly with the binding sites. Finally, gel permeation chromatography of internalized radiolabeled heparin and fucans was performed with SMCs. A rapid degradation of internalized heparin was observed, whereas only low molecular weight fucan fractions were partially degraded by SMCs. Together, these results indicate the significance of molecular weight on the antiproliferative activity of fucans on SMCs, and might help to understand their mechanism of action. In addition, the degradation experiments with internalized heparin and fucans ruled out a direct link between polysaccharide degradation and the antiproliferative effect on SMCs.

  18. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moenne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense responses in plants enhancing protection against pathogens. In addition, oligosaccharides obtained by depolymerization of seaweed polysaccharides also induce protection against viral, fungal and bacterial infections in plants. In particular, most seaweed polysaccharides and derived oligosaccharides trigger an initial oxidative burst at local level and the activation of salicylic (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and/or ethylene signaling pathways at systemic level. The activation of these signaling pathways leads to an increased expression of genes encoding: (i Pathogenesis-Related (PR proteins with antifungal and antibacterial activities; (ii defense enzymes such as pheylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX which determine accumulation of phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs and oxylipins with antiviral, antifugal and antibacterial activities and iii enzymes involved in synthesis of terpenes, terpenoids and/or alkaloids having antimicrobial activities. Thus, seaweed polysaccharides and their derived oligosaccharides induced the accumulation of proteins and compounds with antimicrobial activities that determine, at least in part, the enhanced protection against pathogens in plants.

  19. Ultrasonic effects on the degradation kinetics, preliminary characterization and antioxidant activities of polysaccharides from Phellinus linteus mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing-Kun; Wang, Yao-Yao; Ma, Hai-Le; Wang, Zhen-Bin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide PL-N isolated from the alkaline extract of Phellinus linteus mycelia was degraded by ultrasound. Results showed that ultrasound treatment at different ultrasonic intensities decreased the intrinsic viscosity and molecular weight of PL-N, as well as narrowed the molecular weight distribution. A larger reduction in intrinsic viscosity and molecular weight was caused by a higher ultrasonic intensity. The degradation kinetics model was fitted to (1/Mt-1/M0)=k·t, and the reaction rate constant (k) increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity. Ultrasound degradation did not change the primary structure of PL-N, and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that the morphology of the original PL-N was different from that of degraded PL-N fractions. Antioxidant activity assays in vitro indicated that the degraded PL-N fraction with low molecular weight had stronger hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity and higher TEAC and FRAP values.

  20. Comparative secretome analysis suggests low plant cell wall degrading capacity in Frankia symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normand Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains, the nitrogen-fixing facultative endosymbionts of actinorhizal plants, have long been proposed to secrete hydrolytic enzymes such as cellulases, pectinases, and proteases that may contribute to plant root penetration and formation of symbiotic root nodules. These or other secreted proteins might logically be involved in the as yet unknown molecular interactions between Frankia and their host plants. We compared the genome-based secretomes of three Frankia strains representing diverse host specificities. Signal peptide detection algorithms were used to predict the individual secretomes of each strain, and the set of secreted proteins shared among the strains, termed the core Frankia secretome. Proteins in the core secretome may be involved in the actinorhizal symbiosis. Results The Frankia genomes have conserved Sec (general secretory and Tat (twin arginine translocase secretion systems. The potential secretome of each Frankia strain comprised 4–5% of the total proteome, a lower percentage than that found in the genomes of other actinobacteria, legume endosymbionts, and plant pathogens. Hydrolytic enzymes made up only a small fraction of the total number of predicted secreted proteins in each strain. Surprisingly, polysaccharide-degrading enzymes were few in number, especially in strain CcI3, with more esterolytic, lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes having signal peptides. A total of 161 orthologous proteins belong to the core Frankia secretome. Of these, 52 also lack homologs in closely related actinobacteria, and are termed "Frankia-specific." The genes encoding these conserved secreted proteins are often clustered near secretion machinery genes. Conclusion The predicted secretomes of Frankia sp. are relatively small and include few hydrolases, which could reflect adaptation to a symbiotic lifestyle. There are no well-conserved secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes present in all three Frankia

  1. Antioxidant and lipoxygenase activities of polyphenol extracts from oat brans treated with polysaccharide degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisita Ratnasari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used polysaccharide degrading enzymes and protein precipitation to extract polyphenols from oats and to determine their bioactivity. Duplicate oat brans were treated with viscozyme (Vis, cellulase (Cel or no enzyme (control, CTL then, proteins were removed in one set (Vis1, Cel1, CTL1 and not in the other (Vis2, Cel2, CTL2. HPLC analyses showed that for cellulase treated brans, precipitation of proteins increased phenolic acids and avenanthramides by 14%. Meanwhile, a decreased of 67% and 20% respectively was found for viscozyme and control brans. The effect of protein precipitation on soluble polyphenols is therefore dependent of the carbohydrase, as proteins with different compositions will interact differently with other molecules. Radical scavenging data showed that Cel1 and Vis1 had higher quenching effects on ROO• radicals with activities of 22.1 ± 0.8 and 23.5 ± 1.2 μM Trolox Equivalents/g defatted brans. Meanwhile, CTL2 had the highest HO• radicals inhibition (49.4 ± 2.8% compared to 10.8–32.3% for others. Samples that highly inhibited lipoxygenase (LOX, an enzyme involved in lipid oxidation were Cel1 (23.4 ± 2.3% and CTL1 (18 ± 0.4%.

  2. Hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization and gene expression of alkane degradation genes by endophytic Enterobacter ludwigii strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousaf, Sohail [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Afzal, Muhammad [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), Faisalabad (Pakistan); Reichenauer, Thomas G. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Environmental Resources and Technologies Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Brady, Carrie L. [Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Sessitsch, Angela, E-mail: angela.sessitsch@ait.ac.at [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Bioresources Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    The genus Enterobacter comprises a range of beneficial plant-associated bacteria showing plant growth promotion. Enterobacter ludwigii belongs to the Enterobacter cloacae complex and has been reported to include human pathogens but also plant-associated strains with plant beneficial capacities. To assess the role of Enterobacter endophytes in hydrocarbon degradation, plant colonization, abundance and expression of CYP153 genes in different plant compartments, three plant species (Italian ryegrass, birdsfoot trefoil and alfalfa) were grown in sterile soil spiked with 1% diesel and inoculated with three endophytic E. ludwigii strains. Results showed that all strains were capable of hydrocarbon degradation and efficiently colonized the rhizosphere and plant interior. Two strains, ISI10-3 and BRI10-9, showed highest degradation rates of diesel fuel up to 68% and performed best in combination with Italian ryegrass and alfalfa. All strains expressed the CYP153 gene in all plant compartments, indicating an active role in degradation of diesel in association with plants. - Highlights: > E. ludwigii strains efficiently colonized plants in a non-sterile soil environment. > E. ludwigii strains efficiently expressed alkane degradation genes in plants. > E. ludwigii efficiently degraded alkane contaminations and promoted plant growth. > E. ludwigii interacted more effectively with Italian ryegrass than with other plants. > Degradation activity varied with plant and microbial genotype as well as with time. - Enterobacter ludwigii strains belonging to the E. cloacae complex are able to efficiently degrade alkanes when associated with plants and to promote plant growth.

  3. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J.; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here...... substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes....

  4. [Effects of plant polysaccharide compound agents on the photosynthetic characteristics and dry matter of soybean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wen-Bo; Song, Ji-Qing; Guo, Jin-Yi; Liu, Xing-Hai; Li, Ji-Hui

    2012-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of foliar spraying three compound agents [plant polysaccharides (P1), plant polysaccharides and 5-aminolevulinic acid (P2), and plant polysaccharides and 5-aminolevulinic acid and dimethylpiperidinium chloride (P3)] at the initial flowering stage of soybean on its leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and transpiration, dry matter accumulation and allocation, and grain yield. Within 35 days after spraying the three compound agents, the leaf chlorophyll content had obvious increase, and its decreasing trend with plant growth had somewhat delay. Compared with the control, spraying P1 and P3 increased the leaf photosynthetic rate and water use efficiency by more than 13.2% and 10.3%, respectively. With the spraying of the three compound agents, the dry matter accumulation in aerial part increased, and the allocation of dry matter from leaf to pod was also enhanced, with the contribution of post-anthesis assimilates to grain yield increased by more than 17.1%. The 100-grain mass and the pods and seeds per plant increased significantly after spraying P1 and P3, but had no significant increase after spraying P2. The grain yield of soybean treated with the three compound agents increased by more than 5.9%, compared with the control. This study showed that the three plant polysaccharide compound agents could increase the leaf chlorophyll content, delay the leaf-senescence, improve the leaf photosynthetic capacity and water status, effectively control the dry matter accumulation and post-anthesis assimilates allocation, and increase the grain yield of soybean.

  5. Isolation and characterization of agar-degrading endophytic bacteria from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Weijia; Wei, Congchong; Jiang, Tengfei; Xu, Hui; Cao, Yi; Cao, Yu; Qiao, Dairong

    2015-02-01

    Agar is a polysaccharide extracted from the cell walls of some macro-algaes. Among the reported agarases, most of them come from marine environment. In order to better understand different sources of agarases, it is important to search new non-marine native ones. In this study, seven agar-degrading bacteria were first isolated from the tissues of plants, belonging to three genera, i.e., Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Klebsiella sp. Among them, the genus Klebsiella was first reported to have agarolytic ability and the genus Pseudomonas was first isolated from non-marine environment with agarase activity. Besides, seven strains were characterized by investigating the growth and agarase production in the presence of various polysaccharides. The results showed that they could grow on several polysaccharides such as araban, carrageenan, chitin, starch, and xylan. Besides, they could also produce agarase in the presence of different polysaccharides other than agar. Extracellular agarases from seven strains were further analyzed by SDS-PAGE combined with activity staining and estimated to be 75 kDa which has great difference from most reported agarases.

  6. Seaweed Polysaccharides and Derived Oligosaccharides Stimulate Defense Responses and Protection Against Pathogens in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Moenne; Jorge Castro; Jeannette Vera; Alberto Gonzalez

    2011-01-01

    Plants interact with the environment by sensing “non-self” molecules called elicitors derived from pathogens or other sources. These molecules bind to specific receptors located in the plasma membrane and trigger defense responses leading to protection against pathogens. In particular, it has been shown that cell wall and storage polysaccharides from green, brown and red seaweeds (marine macroalgae) corresponding to ulvans, alginates, fucans, laminarin and carrageenans can trigger defense res...

  7. Mass spectrometry for characterizing plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eBauer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry is a selective and powerful technique to obtain identification and structural information on compounds present in complex mixtures. Since it requires only small sample amount it is an excellent tool for researchers interested in detecting changes in composition of complex carbohydrates of plants. This mini-review gives an overview of common mass spectrometry techniques applied to the analysis of plant cell wall carbohydrates. It presents examples in which mass spectrometry has been used to elucidate the structure of oligosaccharides derived from hemicelluloses and pectins and illustrates how information on sequence, linkages, branching and modifications are obtained from characteristic fragmentation patterns.

  8. Lignin degradation during plant litter photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; King, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant compound, after cellulose, synthesized by plants. Numerous studies have demonstrated that initial lignin concentration is negatively correlated with litter decomposition rate under both laboratory and field conditions. Thus lignin is commonly considered to be a "recalcitrant" compound during litter decomposition. However, lignin can also serve as a radiation-absorbing compound during photodegradation, the process through which solar radiation breaks down organic matter. Here, we synthesize recent studies concerning lignin degradation during litter photodegradation and report results from our study on how photodegradation changes lignin chemistry at a molecular scale. Recent field studies have found that litter with high initial lignin concentration does not necessarily exhibit high mass loss during photodegradation. A meta-analysis (King et al. 2012) even found a weak negative correlation between initial lignin concentration and photodegradation rate. Contradicting results have been reported with regard to the change in lignin concentration during photodegradation. Some studies have found significant loss of lignin during photodegradation, while others have not. In most studies, loss of lignin only accounts for a small proportion of the overall mass loss. Using NMR spectroscopy, we found significant loss of lignin structural units containing beta-aryl ether linkages during photodegradation of a common grass litter, Bromus diandrus, even though conventional forage fiber analysis did not reveal changes in lignin concentration. Both our NMR and fiber analyses supported the idea that photodegradation induced loss of hemicellulose, which was mainly responsible for the litter mass loss during photodegradation. Our results suggest that photodegradation induces degradation, but not necessarily complete breakdown, of lignin structures and consequently exposes hemicellulose and cellulose to microbial decomposition. We conclude that lignin

  9. Degradation of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Transgenic Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mnich, Ewelina

    of the monolignols coniferyl alcohol, p-coumaryl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol which during radical-mediated oxidative coupling bind together forming different linkage types. Lignin is the main obstacle in biofuel production as it forms a mechanical barrier limiting accessibility for polysaccharide hydrolyzing enzymes...... system to degrade lignin. An important step in this degradation is cleavage of the most abundant lignin linkage type, β-aryl ether. It is cleaved in a three step reaction catalyzed by a dehydrogenase, a glutathione S-transferase and a glutathione lyase. Due to the nature of the enzymatic reactions...

  10. Soft X-ray induced chemical modification of polysaccharides in vascular plant cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cody, George D. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)], E-mail: cody@gl.ciw.edu; Brandes, Jay [Skidaway Institute of Oceangraphy, Savannah, GA (United States); Jacobsen, Chris; Wirick, Susan [Department of Physics, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and micro carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (C-XANES) can provide quantitative information regarding the distribution of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in vascular plant cell walls. In the case of angiosperms, flowering plants, C-XANES may also be able to distinguish variations in lignin monomer distributions throughout the cell wall. Polysaccharides are susceptible to soft X-ray irradiation induced chemical transformations that may complicate spectral analysis. The stability of a model polysaccharide, cellulose acetate, to variable doses of soft X-rays under conditions optimized for high quality C-XANES spectroscopy was investigated. The primary chemical effect of soft X-ray irradiation on cellulose acetate involves mass loss coincident with de-acetylation. A lesser amount of vinyl ketone formation also occurs. Reduction in irradiation dose via defocusing does enable high quality pristine spectra to be obtained. Radiation induced chemical modification studies of oak cell wall reveals that cellulose and hemicellulose are less labile to chemical modification than cellulose acetate. Strategies for obtaining pristine C-XANES spectra of polysaccharides are presented.

  11. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  12. Effect of radiation-degraded chitosan on growth promotion of flower plant in tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Le Quang; Ha, Vo Thi Thu; Hai, Le; Hien, Nguyen Quoc [Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission, Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Radiation is a useful tool for degradation of polysaccharides, such as starch, carrageenan, alginate and chitin/chitosan. The viscosity molecular weight (Mw) of chitosan with 80% degree of deacetylation was reduced to 1.5 x 10{sup 5} by irradiation of 50kGy in solid phase. The solution of 10% of chitosan with Mw ca. 15 x 10{sup 5} was then irradiated at doses ranging 10-250kGy for further degradation and the products were supplemented into cultural media for testing of plant growth promotion effect. The results indicated that irradiated chitosan showed a strong growth-promotion effect on the increase of the length of shoot, the length of root and fresh biomass for flower plants namely Limonium latifolium, Eustoma grandiflorum and Chrysanthemum morifolium in tissue culture. The growth-promotion effect was obtained by the treatments with 50ppm of chitosan irradiated at the doses of 75-100kGy in 10% solution. The suitable concentrations of chitosan irradiated at 100kGy are ca. 100ppm for C. morifolium, 30ppm for E. grandiflorum and 40ppm for L. latifolium. In addition, our study also indicated that the survival ratio of transferred flower plantlets treated with irradiated chitosan was improved after acclimatizing for 30 days in the greenhouse. Accordingly, it is concluded that degraded chitosan obtained by radiation degradation technique is effective as a plant growth promoter as well as irradiated alginate. (author)

  13. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Meiling

    2014-08-18

    Enzymes that degrade dietary and host-derived glycans represent the most abundant functional activities encoded by genes unique to the human gut microbiome. However, the biochemical activities of a vast majority of the glycan-degrading enzymes are poorly understood. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing to understand the diversity of genes expressed by the human gut bacteria Bacteroides intestinalis and Bacteroides ovatus grown in monoculture with the abundant dietary polysaccharide xylan. The most highly induced carbohydrate active genes encode a unique glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 endoxylanase (BiXyn10A or BACINT-04215 and BACOVA-04390) that is highly conserved in the Bacteroidetes xylan utilization system. The BiXyn10A modular architecture consists of a GH10 catalytic module disrupted by a 250 amino acid sequence of unknown function. Biochemical analysis of BiXyn10A demonstrated that such insertion sequences encode a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that binds to xy-lose- configured oligosaccharide/polysaccharide ligands, the substrate of the BiXyn10A enzymatic activity. The crystal structures of CBM1 from BiXyn10A (1.8 Å), a cocomplex of BiXyn10A CBM1 with xylohexaose (1.14 Å), and the CBM fromits homolog in the Prevotella bryantii B 14 Xyn10C (1.68 Å) reveal an unanticipated mode for ligand binding. Aminimal enzyme mix, composed of the gene products of four of the most highly up-regulated genes during growth on wheat arabinoxylan, depolymerizes the polysaccharide into its component sugars. The combined biochemical and biophysical studies presented here provide a framework for understanding fiber metabolism by an important group within the commensal bacterial population known to influence human health.

  14. Host-Pathogen Interactions: II. Parameters Affecting Polysaccharide-degrading Enzyme Secretion by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Grown in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, P D; Jurale, J B; Albersheim, P

    1971-01-01

    The effect of a number of physiological variables on the secretion of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes by culture-grown Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Saccardo and Magnus) Scribner was determined. The number of spores used to inoculate cultures grown on isolated bean hypocotyl cell walls affects the time after inoculation at which enzyme secretion occurs, but has no significant effect on the maximal amount of enzyme ultimately secreted. Cell walls isolated from bean leaves, first internodes, or hypocotyls (susceptible to C. lindemuthianum infection), when used as carbon source for C. lindemuthianum growth, stimulate the fungus to secrete more alpha-galactosidase than do cell walls isolated from roots (resistant to infection). The concentration of carbon source used for fungal growth determines the final level of enzyme activity in the culture fluid. The level of enzyme secretion is not proportional to fungal growth; rather, enzyme secretion is induced. Maximal alpha-galactosidase activity in the culture medium is found when the concentration of cell walls used as carbon source is 1% or greater. A higher concentration of cell walls is necessary for maximal alpha-arabinosidase activity. Galactose, when used as the carbon source, stimulates alpha-galactosidase secretion but, at comparable concentrations, is less effective in doing so than are cell walls. Polysaccharide-degrading enzymes are secreted by C. lindemuthianum at different times during growth of the pathogen on isolated cell walls. Pectinase and alpha-arabinosidase are secreted first, followed by beta-xylosidase and cellulase, then beta-glucosidase, and, finally, alpha-galactosidase.

  15. Characterisation and immuno-stimulating activity of polysaccharides from Thai medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burana-Osot, J; Pattanapanyasat, K; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Sukapirom, K; Toida, T

    2010-09-01

    Water-soluble polysaccharides were isolated from the tubers of Butea superba Roxb. and Pueraria candollei Wall. Ex Benth. var. mirifica (Shaw et Suvat.) C. Niyomdham, the leaves of Centella asiatica (L.) Urb, Ocimum basilicum L., Psidium guajava and Andrographis paniculata (Burn. f.) Nees, the stems of Cymbopogon citratus (Stapf ExG), and the fruits of Psidium guajava and Scaphium scaphigerum. The immunological impacts of the polysaccharides on T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro was investigated by flow cytometric (immunofluorescence) analysis using staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) as a positive control. It was found that the polysaccharides enhanced T-lymphocyte proliferation, ranging from 4.5 to 27.0% at a concentration of 100 microg mL(-1), while the activity of SEB was 13.3%. The medicinal plants showing the highest immuno-stimulating activity were the tubers of Butea superba Roxb. The water-extracted tubers contained 60.0% (w/w) carbohydrates with 6.6% (w/w) uronic acid. The major constituent monosaccharides of the tubers were 28.2 mol% galactose, 10.5 mol% arabinose and 36.4 mol% glucose.

  16. Plant Cell Wall Degradation by Saprophytic Bacillus subtilis Strains: Gene Clusters Responsible for Rhamnogalacturonan Depolymerization▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Akihito; Itoh, Takafumi; Kawamata, Akiko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell wall degradation is a premier event when Bacillus subtilis, a typical saprophytic bacterium, invades plants. Here we show the degradation system of rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I), a component of pectin from the plant cell wall, in B. subtilis strain 168. Strain 168 cells showed a significant growth on plant cell wall polysaccharides such as pectin, polygalacturonan, and RG-I as a carbon source. DNA microarray analysis indicated that three gene clusters (yesOPQRSTUVWXYZ, ytePQRST, and ybcMOPST-ybdABDE) are inducibly expressed in strain 168 cells grown on RG-I. Cells of an industrially important bacterium, B. subtilis strain natto, fermenting soybeans also express the gene cluster including the yes series during the assimilation of soybean used as a carbon source. Among proteins encoded in the yes cluster, YesW and YesX were found to be novel types of RG lyases releasing disaccharide from RG-I. Genetic and enzymatic properties of YesW and YesX suggest that strain 168 cells secrete YesW, which catalyzes the initial cleavage of the RG-I main chain, and the resultant oligosaccharides are converted to disaccharides through the extracellular exotype YesX reaction. The disaccharide is finally degraded into its constituent monosaccharides through the reaction of intracellular unsaturated galacturonyl hydrolases YesR and YteR. This enzymatic route for RG-I degradation in strain 168 differs significantly from that in plant-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus aculeatus. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the bacterial system for complete RG-I main chain degradation. PMID:17449691

  17. Plant cell wall degradation by saprophytic Bacillus subtilis strains: gene clusters responsible for rhamnogalacturonan depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Akihito; Itoh, Takafumi; Kawamata, Akiko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2007-06-01

    Plant cell wall degradation is a premier event when Bacillus subtilis, a typical saprophytic bacterium, invades plants. Here we show the degradation system of rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I), a component of pectin from the plant cell wall, in B. subtilis strain 168. Strain 168 cells showed a significant growth on plant cell wall polysaccharides such as pectin, polygalacturonan, and RG-I as a carbon source. DNA microarray analysis indicated that three gene clusters (yesOPQRSTUVWXYZ, ytePQRST, and ybcMOPST-ybdABDE) are inducibly expressed in strain 168 cells grown on RG-I. Cells of an industrially important bacterium, B. subtilis strain natto, fermenting soybeans also express the gene cluster including the yes series during the assimilation of soybean used as a carbon source. Among proteins encoded in the yes cluster, YesW and YesX were found to be novel types of RG lyases releasing disaccharide from RG-I. Genetic and enzymatic properties of YesW and YesX suggest that strain 168 cells secrete YesW, which catalyzes the initial cleavage of the RG-I main chain, and the resultant oligosaccharides are converted to disaccharides through the extracellular exotype YesX reaction. The disaccharide is finally degraded into its constituent monosaccharides through the reaction of intracellular unsaturated galacturonyl hydrolases YesR and YteR. This enzymatic route for RG-I degradation in strain 168 differs significantly from that in plant-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus aculeatus. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the bacterial system for complete RG-I main chain degradation.

  18. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  19. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Reem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as Cell Wall Integrity control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, increased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant cell wall integrity, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens.

  20. Polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from plants of Rosaceae/Asteraceae family as potential radioprotectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbikowska, Halina Malgorzata; Szejk, Magdalena; Saluk, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Graja, Izabela; Gancarz, Roman; Olejnik, Alicja Klaudia

    2016-05-01

    Polyphenolic-polysaccharide macromolecular, water-soluble glycoconjugates, isolated from the selected medicinal plants of Rosaceae/Asteraceae family: from leaves of Fragaria vesca L., Rubus plicatus Whe. et N. E., and from flowering parts of Sanguisorba officinalis L., and Erigeron canadensis L., were investigated for their ability to protect proteins and lipids of human plasma against γ-radiation-induced oxidative damage. Treatment of plasma with plant conjugates (6, 30, 150 μg/ml) prior exposure to 100 Gy radiation resulted in a significant inhibition of lipid peroxidation, evaluated by TBARS levels; conjugates isolated from E. canadensis and R. plicatus and a reference flavonoid quercetin showed similar high potential (approx. 70% inhibition, at 6 μg/ml). The conjugates prevented radiation-induced oxidation of protein thiols and significantly improved plasma total antioxidant capacity, estimated with Ellman's reagent and ABTS(.+) assay, respectively. The results demonstrate by the first time a significant radioprotective capability of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates isolated from E. canadensis, R. plicatus, S. officinalis and to the less extent from F. vesca. The abilities of these substances to inhibit radiation-induced lipid peroxidation and thiol oxidation in plasma seems to be mediated, but not limited to ROS scavenging activity.

  1. The hypoglycemic effect of a polysaccharide (GLP) from Gracilaria lemaneiformis and its degradation products in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xubiao; Yang, Lawei; Chen, Meizhen; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Shumeng; Ju, Yaoyao

    2015-08-01

    Gracilaria lemaneiformis is cultivated on a large scale in China for industrial production of agarose, a natural polysaccharide, which has been shown to have many beneficial bioactivities such as antitumor, antiviral antioxidant activities, etc. In the present study, the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of a polysaccharide extracted from Gracilaria lemaneiformis (GLP; Mw, 121.89 kDa) and its chemically degraded products (GLP1 and GLP2: Mw, 57.02 and 14.29 kDa, respectively) were investigated in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The intragastric administration of GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 for 21 days induced an obvious decrease (P < 0.05) in blood glucose levels in comparison with untreated diabetic mice. Furthermore, GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 caused evident increases (P < 0.05) in both ant i-oxidase (SOD and GSH-Px) activities and the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver, pancreas and kidney of diabetic mice. Even though GLP, GLP1 and GLP2 did not show any significant difference in the structure and sulfation levels, GLP1 demonstrated more potent effects than GLP and GLP2 at the same dose. Histopathological examination of the pancreas and kidney revealed that the damaged tissues induced by alloxan were repaired to a certain degree after the treatments of GLP, GLP1 and GLP2.

  2. Influence of a diet rich in resistant starch on the degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in the large intestine of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonathan, M.C.; Haenen, D.; Souza Da Silva, C.; Bosch, G.; Schols, H.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of resistant starch to the degradation of other non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs) in the large intestine of pigs, two groups of pigs were fed either a diet containing digestible starch (DS) or a diet containing resistant starch (RS). Both diets contained NSPs from wheat and

  3. Influence of a diet rich in resistant starch on the degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in the large intestine of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonathan, M.C.; Haenen, D.; Souza Da Silva, C.; Bosch, G.; Schols, H.A.; Gruppen, H.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of resistant starch to the degradation of other non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs) in the large intestine of pigs, two groups of pigs were fed either a diet containing digestible starch (DS) or a diet containing resistant starch (RS). Both diets contained NSPs from wheat and

  4. Analysis of pectic epitopes recognised by hybridoma and phage display monoclonal antibodies using defined oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and enzymatic degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; Limberg, G.; Buchholt, H.C.;

    2000-01-01

    The structure of epitopes recognised by anti-pectin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been investigated using a series of model lime-pectin samples with defined degrees and patterns of methyl esterification, a range of defined oligogalacturonides and enzymatic degradation of pectic polysaccharides....... In immuno-dot-assays, the anti-homogalacturonan (HG) mAbs JIM5 and JIM7 both bound to samples with a wide range of degrees of methyl esterification in preference to fully de-esterified samples. In contrast, the anti-HG phage display mAb PAM1 bound most effectively to fully de-esterified pectin...... occurs where specific but undefined methyl-esterification patterns are present on HG domains, although fully de-esterified HG samples contain sub-optimal JIM5 epitopes. The persistence of mAb binding to epitopes in pectic antigens, with 41% blockwise esterification (P41) and 43% random esterification (F...

  5. The Dynamics of Plant Cell-Wall Polysaccharide Decomposition in Leaf-Cutting Ant Fungus Gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Moller, Isabel E.; De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Jesper Harholt; Willats, William G. T; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently establish...

  6. Plant Wall Degradative Compounds and Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The present invention relates to cell wall degradative systems, in particular to systems containing enzymes that bind to and/or depolymerize cellulose. These systems...

  7. Use of Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants for Degraded Lands Reclamation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Diagne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Degraded lands are defined by soils that have lost primary productivity due to abiotic or biotic stresses. Among the abiotic stresses, drought, salinity, and heavy metals are the main threats in tropical areas. These stresses affect plant growth and reduce their productivity. Nitrogen-fixing plants such as actinorhizal species that are able to grow in poor and disturbed soils are widely planted for the reclamation of such degraded lands. It has been reported that association of soil microbes especially the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Frankia with these actinorhizal plants can mitigate the adverse effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Inoculation of actinorhizal plants with Frankia significantly improves plant growth, biomass, shoot and root N content, and survival rate after transplanting in fields. However, the success of establishment of actinorhizal plantation in degraded sites depends upon the choice of effective strains of Frankia. Studies related to the beneficial role of Frankia on the establishment of actinorhizal plants in degraded soils are scarce. In this review, we describe some examples of the use of Frankia inoculation to improve actinorhizal plant performances in harsh conditions for reclamation of degraded lands.

  8. Influence of Nano-Crystal Metals on Texture and Biological Properties of Water Soluble Polysaccharides of Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilov, G.; Ivanycheva, J.; Kiryshin, V.

    2015-11-01

    When treating the plants seeds with nano-materials there are some quality and quantity changes of polysaccharides, the molecular mass increase and monosaccharides change that leads to the increase of physiological and pharmacological activity of carbohydrates got from medicinal plants. We have got water soluble polysaccharides and nano-metals combinations containing 0.000165-0.000017 mg/dm3 of the metal. In a case of induced anemia the blood composition has practically restored on the 10th day of the treatment with nanocomposites. The use of pectin polysaccharides (that are attributed to modifiers of biological respond) to get nano-structured materials seems to be actual relative to their physiological activity (radio nuclides persorption, heavy metals ions, bacteria cells and their toxins; lipids metabolism normalization; bowels secreting and motor functions activation and modulation of the endocrine system.

  9. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsch Roy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs. The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH families: GH11 (xylanases, GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases, and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases. Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome

  10. Research Progress on Polysaccharide-degrading Enzymes from Marine Microorganism%海洋微生物多糖降解酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文霞; 周少璐; 杨秀茳; 孙廷丽; 谢小保

    2016-01-01

    多糖降解酶是一类能够催化多糖分子内糖苷键断裂,使聚合度不断降低,最终产生寡糖的水解酶。地球上微生物数量庞大,其产多糖降解酶种类丰富,尤其是海洋微生物多糖降解酶因其特异性的催化活性,在工业生产中具有重要的应用前景。随着海洋生物技术的快速发展,海洋微生物多糖降解酶的开发和利用已逐渐引起研究者的关注。综述了海洋微生物多糖降解酶的主要类型及研究现状,并讨论了未来应用及发展趋势,以期为海洋微生物多糖降解酶的研究与开发提供参考。%Polysaccharide-degrading enzymes are a class of hydrolase that can catalyze the cleavage of glycosidic bond in polysaccharide molecules,consequently reduce the degree of polymerization,and eventually produce oligosaccharides. There are huge number of microbes on the Earth,thus the variety of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes is broad. Particularly polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from marine microorganism,due to their specific catalytic activities,presented an important industry application prospect. With the rapid development of marine biotechnology,the development and utilization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from marine microorganism have gradually attracted researchers’attentions. In this paper,the main types and the status of current research on polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from marine microorganism are reviewed,and the trends of application and development are summarized,aiming at providing references for the research and development of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes from marine microorganism.

  11. Function of Succinoglycan Polysaccharide in Sinorhizobium meliloti Host Plant Invasion Depends on Succinylation, Not Molecular Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajeewaka C. Mendis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The acidic polysaccharide succinoglycan produced by the rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 is required for this bacterium to invade the host plant Medicago truncatula and establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. S. meliloti mutants that cannot make succinoglycan cannot initiate invasion structures called infection threads in plant root hairs. S. meliloti exoH mutants that cannot succinylate succinoglycan are also unable to form infection threads, despite the fact that they make large quantities of succinoglycan. Succinoglycan produced by exoH mutants is refractory to cleavage by the glycanases encoded by exoK and exsH, and thus succinoglycan produced by exoH mutants is made only in the high-molecular-weight (HMW form. One interpretation of the symbiotic defect of exoH mutants is that the low-molecular-weight (LMW form of succinoglycan is required for infection thread formation. However, our data demonstrate that production of the HMW form of succinoglycan by S. meliloti 1021 is sufficient for invasion of the host M. truncatula and that the LMW form is not required. Here, we show that S. meliloti strains deficient in the exoK- and exsH-encoded glycanases invade M. truncatula and form a productive symbiosis, although they do this with somewhat less efficiency than the wild type. We have also characterized the polysaccharides produced by these double glycanase mutants and determined that they consist of only HMW succinoglycan and no detectable LMW succinoglycan. This demonstrates that LMW succinoglycan is not required for host invasion. These results suggest succinoglycan function is not dependent upon the presence of a small, readily diffusible form.

  12. Effect of fermentation of cereals on the degradation of polysaccharides and other macronutrients in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholly, D M; Jørgensen, H; Sutton, A L; Richert, B T; Bach Knudsen, K E

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of the present investigation was to study the impact of fermentation of cereals on the degradation of polysaccharides and other macronutrients in the small intestine and total tract of growing pigs. Eight pigs (initial BW, 34.5 ± 0.9 kg) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. Pigs were cannulated and housed individually in metabolism pens during sample collection. The 4 cereal-based diets were nonfermented liquid barley (NFLB), nonfermented liquid wheat (NFLW), fermented liquid barley (FLB), and fermented liquid wheat (FLW). The fermented feeds were prepared by storing the dietary cereals (barley and wheat) and water [1:2.75 (wt/wt)] in a closed tank at 25 °C for 2 d, after which 50% of the volume was removed and replaced with an equal amount of fresh cereals and water after each afternoon meal. At the time of feeding (0730 and 1430 h), the remaining dietary ingredients were added. Water was added to the dry nonfermented feeds [1:1 (wt/wt)] immediately before feeding. The fermentation process reduced the amount of DM in both cereals (Pfermented cereals. There was an interaction of cereal and treatment for ileal flow of DM (P=0.014), OM (P=0.013), and protein (P=0.006), which were less in pigs fed the NFLB than the FLB diets, but unchanged in pigs fed the NFLW and FLW diets. Conversely, the ileal flow of protein was similar (P=0.605) in pigs fed the barley diets (average, 47.5 ± 1.7 g/kg of DMI) and increased with the FLW diet compared with the NFLW diet (43 vs. 35 g/kg of DMI, respectively). Ileal fat and CH(2)O digestibilities were 7.6 (P=0.002) and 8.9% (Pfermented than nonfermented diets (86.5 vs. 84.5%, respectively; PFermentation reduced (PFermentation had no effect (P=0.243) on the fecal digestibility of nonstarch polysaccharides in either of the cereals but their digestibility was 10.0% greater (Pfermentation of cereal before feeding altered the dietary composition and influenced flow and composition of polysaccharides

  13. A general method for assaying homo-and hetero-transglycanase activities that act on plant cell-wall polysaccharides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lenka Frankova; Stephen C. Fry

    2015-01-01

    Transglycanases (endotransglycosylases) cleave a polysaccharide (donor-substrate) in mid-chain, and then transfer a portion onto another poly- or oligosaccharide (acceptor-substrate). Such enzymes contribute to plant cell-wall assembly and/or re-structuring. We sought a general method for revealing novel homo- and hetero-trans-glycanases, applicable to diverse polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, separating transglycanase-generated 3H-polysaccharides from unreacted 3H-oligosaccharides—the former immobilized (on filter-paper, silica-gel or glass-fiber), the latter eluted. On filter-paper, certain polysaccharides [e.g. (1!3, 1!4)-b-D-glucans] remained satisfactorily adsorbed when water-washed; others (e.g. pectins) were partially lost. Many oligosaccharides (e.g. arabinan-, galactan-, xylo-glucan-based) were successfully eluted in appropriate sol-vents, but others (e.g. [3H]xylohexaitol, [3H]mannohexaitol [3H]cellohexaitol) remained immobile. On silica-gel, all 3H-oligosaccharides left an immobile‘ghost’ spot (contaminating any 3H-polysaccharides), which was diminished but not prevented by additives e.g. sucrose or Triton X-100. The best stratum was glass-fiber (GF), onto which the reaction-mixture was dried then washed in 75%ethanol. Washing led to minimal loss or lateral migration of 3H-polysaccharides if conducted by slow percolation of acidified ethanol. The effectiveness of GF-blotting was well demonstrated for Chara vulgaris trans-b-mannanase. In conclusion, our novel GF-blotting technique efficiently frees transglycanase-gener-ated 3H-polysaccharides from unreacted 3H-oligosaccharides, enabling high-throughput screening of multiple postulated transglycanase activities utilising chemically diverse donor-and acceptor-substrates.

  14. Expression and the Functional Study of Fusion Proteins α-Amylase and Hemolysin- αas an Application in Biofilm Polysaccharide Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Yuda Sugiarta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is an aggregate of consortium bacteria that adhere to each other on a surface. It is usually protected by the exopolysaccharide layer. Various invasive medical procedures, such as catheterization, endotracheal tube installation, and contact lens utilization, are vulnerable to biofilm infection. The National Institute of Health (NIH estimates 65% of all microbial infections are caused by biofilm. Periplasmic α-amylase (MalS is an enzyme that hydrolyzes α-1, 4-glicosidic bond in glycogen, starch, and others related polysaccharides in periplasmic space. Another protein called hemolysin-α (HlyA is a secretion signal protein on C terminal of particular peptide in gram negative bacteria. We proposed a novel recombinant plasmid expressing α-amylase and hemolysin-αfusion in pSB1C3 which is cloned into E.colito enable α-amylase excretion to extracellular for degrading biofilm polysaccharides content, as in starch agar. Microtiter assay was performed to analyze the reduction percentage of biofilm by adding recombinant E.coli into media. This system is more effective in degrading biofilm from gram positive bacteria i.e.: Bacillus substilis(30.21% and Staphylococcus aureus (24.20%, and less effective degrading biofilm of gram negative i.e.: Vibrio cholera (5.30%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.50%, Klebsiella pneumonia (6.75% andE. coli (-0.6%. Gram positive bacteria have a thick layer of peptidoglycan, causing the enzyme to work more effectively in degrading polysaccharides.

  15. Biological activities of a neutral water-soluble agar polysaccharide prepared by agarase degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jingxue; Mou Haijin; Jiang Xiaolu; Guan Huashi

    2005-01-01

    Depolymerization of agar was performed using agarase, which was extracted from the cell-free medium of a culture of marine bacterial Alteromonas sp. nov. SY 37-12. After ethanol fractionation and lyophilization, the water-soluble agar polysaccharide (WSAP3) was collected. The anti-tumor activity of the product was determined by using Sarcoma 180 tumor in mouse. The tumor inhibition rate of WSAP3 reached 48.7% at a dose of 64mg kg-1 after 15 days treatment. WSAP3 enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which suggests that WSAP3 was effective in promoting the antioxidation ability and eliminating danger from free radicals. The result of flow cytometry showed that the WSAP3 had no activities of cell cycle inhibition or apoptosis-inducing activities. The anti-oxidation of WSAP3 was further confirmed by test in vitro, which might play an important role in anti-tumor activity. The immunological regulation of WSAP3, especially its effect on the phagocytosis ratio and phagocytosis index of macrophage was also assayed in test in vivo.

  16. Degradation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Phytoremediation Using Terrestrial Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushrifah Idris

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH degradation in phytoremediation of spiked diesel in sand. The diesel was added to the sand that was planted with terrestrial plants. Four selected terrestrial plants used were Paspalum vaginatum Sw, Paspalums crobiculatum L. varbispicatum Hack, Eragrotis atrovirens (Desf. Trin. ex Steud and Cayratia trifolia (L. Domin since all the plants could survive at a hydrocarbon petroleum contaminated site in Malaysia. The samplings were carried out on Day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 72. The analysis of the TPH was conducted by extracting the spiked sand using ultrasonic extraction. The determination of the TPH concentration in the sand was performed using GC-FID. The degradation of TPH depends on the plant species and time of exposure. The highest percentage degradation by P. vaginatum, P. scrobiculatum, E. atrovirens and C. trifolia were 91.9, 74.0, 68.9 and 62.9%, respectively. In conclusion, the ability to degrade TPH by plants were P. vaginatum > P. scrobiculatum > E. atrovirens> C. trifolia.

  17. Radiation degradation of alginate and some results of biological effect of degraded alginate on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, N.Q.; Hai, L.; Luan, L.Q.; Hanh, T.T. [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo; Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation degradation yields (Gd) of alginate in aqueous solution with different concentration were determined by viscometry method. The relationship between Gd and the alginate concentration was found out as: Gd=33.5 x C{sup -0.68}, with C% (w/v) and dry alginate referred to C=100%. An empirical equation for preparing degraded alginate with the desired low viscometry average molecular weight (Mv) by radiation was proposed. Alginate extracted directly horn seaweed'Sagassum, degraded by radiation was used for field experiments and results of the biological effect on plants (tea, carrot, chrysanthemum) were presented. (author)

  18. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...... material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial...

  19. Study on the growth performance of the broiler after feeding of okara meal containing with or without non-starch polysaccharides degrading enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Sinha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective was to study the growth performance of the broiler birds after feeding Okara meal containing with or without non-starch polysaccharides degrading enzyme. Materials and Methods: 220 day-old broiler chicks were individually weighed and divided randomly into five treatment groups (T1 , T2 , T3 , T4 and T5 consisting of 44 chicks each which was further subdivided into four replicates of 11 chicks. The feed consumption in each replicates of five groups was recorded daily for a total period of 6 weeks experimental feeding. Results: The average total feed consumption of six weeks was 3948.10±7.60, 4088.76±8.30, 4415.33±9.44, 4381.24±9.25 and 4728.76±10.05 (g in groups T1 , T2 , T3 , T4 and T5 respectively. The differences were statistically non-significant (P>0.05 among the various groups. The average total body weight gain and average daily weight gain in birds of group T4 were significantly higher (P<0.01 than birds of other groups except T3 group. It showed that 25 percent replacement of ground nut cake with Okara meal and addition of non-starch polysaccharides degrading enzyme (provizyme-bro had positive effect on growth performance of birds. The increase in weight in broilers of enzyme added group T4 in comparison to their counterpart without enzyme group (T2 and T3 attributed to degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in ration, thereby, enhancing the utilization of other nutrients. Conclusion: The findings indicated that 25 percent replacement of ground nut cake with Okara meal and addition of nonstarch polysaccharides degrading enzyme had positive effect on growth performance of birds. So, Okara meal feeding had no adverse effect on growth performance of the broilers. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 325-328

  20. Enantioselective degradation of Bromocyclene in sewage plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bester, K. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). FG Siedlungswasser- und Abfallwirtschaft/Inst. fuer Umweltanalytik

    2004-09-15

    Bromocyclene has been utilised as insecticide against ectoparasites, however the production in Germany was stopped around 1995. Until that time it was used in pet care as well as in sheep farming. Due to its high bioaccumulation it was detected not only in sewage systems and sewage treatment plants, but also in fresh water fish. Enatioselective determination at that time was used to obtain results on the biodegradation of Bromocyclene in fish. Considering the long time period since the phase out of Bromocyclene it was surprising it was easily identified in sludge samples from 2002.

  1. Photo-degradation of Methyl Orange by Polysaccharides/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aojie Deng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to prepare a series of composite films (polysaccharides with LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 for the degradation of methyl orange under ultraviolet irradiation. LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 was prepared by a sol-gel method, and the composite films were obtained by cross-linking reactions between polysaccharides (xylan and chitosan and LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3. Physical and chemical properties of the composite films were investigated by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and BET. Moreover, the influence of the weight ratio of polysaccharide to LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 on the methyl orange degradation reaction was also studied. Results showed that 67% of the degradation efficiency was achieved within 480 min using chitosan/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 (2:1 as photocatalysts, while 58% was for xylan/LaFe0.8Cu0.2O3 (1:1. The difference was due to the variety in the structure of chitosan and xylan.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopy and electrophoresis as a "golden means" in monitoring of polysaccharides in medical plant and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, A.

    In recent years, some bioactive polysaccharides isolated from natural sources have attracted much attention in the field of biochemistry and pharmacology. Of them, polysaccharides or their glycoconjugates were shown to exhibit multiple biological activities including anticarcinogenic, anticoagulant, immunostimulating, antioxidant, etc. Pharmacotherapy using plant-derived substances can be currently regarded as a very promising future alternative to conventional therapy. The advanced biotechnologies available today enable chemical investigation of well-defined bioactive plant components as sources of novel drugs. The need for safer drugs without side effects has led to the use of natural ingredients with proven safety. Special interest is focused on plant polysaccharides. This article attempts to review the current structural and conformational characterization of some importantly bioactive monosaccharides isolated from following plant cell-wall: Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Thymus pulegioides (thyme), Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (fenugreek), Tussilago farfara L. (coltsfoot), Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop), Althaea officinalis L. (marshmallow) and Equisetum arvense L. (horsetail). The chemical structures of monosaccharides were analysed using FTIR and Raman spectroscopies as well as cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAE). The dried plant samples were gently hydrolysed with sulphuric acid. The presence of glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, alginic acid, glucose, mannose and xylose in the hydrolysates of reference substances and non-defatted plant films was proved. The possibility of a taxonomic classification of plant cell walls based on infrared and Raman spectroscopies and the use of spectral fingerprinting for authentication and detection of adulteration of products rich in cell-wall materials are discussed. Individual bands were selected to monitor the sugar content in medical plant cell walls and to confirm the identity of the analysed plants.

  3. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  4. The distribution and degradation of chlormequat in wheat plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekhuijzen, H.M.; Vonk, C.R.

    The distribution and degradation of chlormequat chloride (2-chloro 1,2-14C ethyltrimethylammonium chloride) was determined after uptake by the roots of summer wheat seedlings. This plant regulator was readily translocated from the roots to the above ground parts and converted into choline. Choline

  5. The distribution and degradation of chlormequat in wheat plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekhuijzen, H.M.; Vonk, C.R.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution and degradation of chlormequat chloride (2-chloro 1,2-14C ethyltrimethylammonium chloride) was determined after uptake by the roots of summer wheat seedlings. This plant regulator was readily translocated from the roots to the above ground parts and converted into choline. Choline w

  6. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan Minh; MacIntyre, April; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-01

    Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases) that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  7. Escaping Underground Nets: Extracellular DNases Degrade Plant Extracellular Traps and Contribute to Virulence of the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Tran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant root border cells have been recently recognized as an important physical defense against soil-borne pathogens. Root border cells produce an extracellular matrix of protein, polysaccharide and DNA that functions like animal neutrophil extracellular traps to immobilize pathogens. Exposing pea root border cells to the root-infecting bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum triggered release of DNA-containing extracellular traps in a flagellin-dependent manner. These traps rapidly immobilized the pathogen and killed some cells, but most of the entangled bacteria eventually escaped. The R. solanacearum genome encodes two putative extracellular DNases (exDNases that are expressed during pathogenesis, suggesting that these exDNases contribute to bacterial virulence by enabling the bacterium to degrade and escape root border cell traps. We tested this hypothesis with R. solanacearum deletion mutants lacking one or both of these nucleases, named NucA and NucB. Functional studies with purified proteins revealed that NucA and NucB are non-specific endonucleases and that NucA is membrane-associated and cation-dependent. Single ΔnucA and ΔnucB mutants and the ΔnucA/B double mutant all had reduced virulence on wilt-susceptible tomato plants in a naturalistic soil-soak inoculation assay. The ΔnucA/B mutant was out-competed by the wild-type strain in planta and was less able to stunt root growth or colonize plant stems. Further, the double nuclease mutant could not escape from root border cells in vitro and was defective in attachment to pea roots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that extracellular DNases are novel virulence factors that help R. solanacearum successfully overcome plant defenses to infect plant roots and cause bacterial wilt disease.

  8. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated......The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...

  9. EFFECT OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION OF NON-STARCH POLYSACCHARIDE DEGRADING ENZYMES ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF BROILER CHICKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Nadeem, M. I. Anjum, A. G. Khan and A. Azim

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the performance and carcass parameters of broilers chicks fed diets with and without supplementing non-starch polysaccharide degrading enzymes (NSPDE at the rate of 0.5 g/kg diet. A total of 300 day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 12 sets (replicates each comprising 25 chicks and three sets per treatment group, reared on deep litter from 1-42 days post-hatch. Group A was fed diets without NSPDE supplementation, while group B was fed diets supplemented with NSPDE (0.5 g/kg. Group C was fed diets containing 50 kcal/kg less metabolizable energy (ME without NSPDE and group D was fed diets having 50 kcal/kg less ME with NSPDE (0.5 g/kg supplementation. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Feed intake and feed conversion ratio (FCR from 1-28 days and 1-42 days was significantly (p<0.05 improved in chicks fed NSPDE supplemented diets (groups B and D compared to non-supplemented diets (groups A and C. However, during 29-42 days of growing period enzymes supplementation did not influence feed intake and FCR. Body weight gain, dressing percentage and relative weights of heart, gizzard and shank at 42 days of age was found to be non-significantly different among all groups. However, liver weight reduced significantly (p<0.05 in NSPDE supplemented groups. The study suggested that NSPDE supplementation was beneficial in enhancing feed utilization during the starter phase, while its effects on weight gain, dressing percentage and weights of organs, except liver weight, were found to be non-significant.

  10. High temperature degradation in power plants and refineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtado Heloisa Cunha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants and refineries around the world share many of the same problems, namely aging equipment, high costs of replacement, and the need to produce more efficiently while being increasingly concerned with issues of safety and reliability. For equipment operating at high temperature, there are many different mechanisms of degradation, some of which interact, and the rate of accumulation of damage is not simple to predict. The paper discusses the mechanisms of degradation at high temperature and methods of assessment of such damage and of the remaining safe life for operation.

  11. Depiction of carbohydrate-active enzyme diversity in Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 at the genome level reveals insights into distinct polysaccharide degradation features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dong-Dong; Ying, Yu; Zhang, Kun-Di; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-11-01

    Thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 can utilize cellulose-, hemicellulose-containing biomass, including unpretreated wheat straw. We have conducted a bioinformatics analysis of the carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) in the genome of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32, which reveals a broad substrate range of the strain. Among 2285 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), 73 (3.2%) CAZyme encoding genes, including 44 glycoside hydrolases (GHs) distributing in 22 GH families, 6 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 3 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 21 glycosyl transferases (GTs), and 25 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) were found. An in-depth bioinformatics analysis of CAZyme families that target cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, pectin, starch, and β-1,3-1,4-glucan degradation were performed to highlight specialized polysaccharide degrading abilities of strain F32. A great number of orthologous multimodular CAZymes of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 were found in other strains of genus Caldicellulosiruptor. While, a portion of the CAZymes of Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32 showed sequence identity with proteins from strains of genus Clostridium. A thermostable β-glucosidase BlgA synergistically facilitated the enzymatic degradation of Avicel by endo-1,4-β-glucanase CelB, which indicated that the synchronous action of synergism between CAZymes enhanced the lignocellulose degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor sp. F32.

  12. Plant exudates promote PCB degradation by a rhodococcal rhizobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, Jean-Patrick; Pham, Thi Thanh My; Barriault, Diane; Sylvestre, Michel [Instiut National de la Recherche Scientifique INRS, Laval, QC (Canada). Inst. Armand-Frappier

    2012-09-15

    Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of plants grown on a PCB-contaminated soil. Strain U23A bphA exhibited 99% identity with bphA1 of Rhodococcus globerulus P6. We grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a hydroponic axenic system, collected, and concentrated the plant secondary metabolite-containing root exudates. Strain U23A exhibited a chemotactic response toward these root exudates. In a root colonizing assay, the number of cells of strain U23A associated to the plant roots (5.7 x 105 CFU g{sup -1}) was greater than the number remaining in the surrounding sand (4.5 x 104 CFU g{sup -1}). Furthermore, the exudates could support the growth of strain U23A. In a resting cell suspension assay, cells grown in a minimal medium containing Arabidopsis root exudates as sole growth substrate were able to metabolize 2,3,4'- and 2,3',4-trichlorobiphenyl. However, no significant degradation of any of congeners was observed for control cells grown on Luria-Bertani medium. Although strain U23A was unable to grow on any of the flavonoids identified in root exudates, biphenyl-induced cells metabolized flavanone, one of the major root exudate components. In addition, when used as co-substrate with sodium acetate, flavanone was as efficient as biphenyl to induce the biphenyl catabolic pathway of strain U23A. Together, these data provide supporting evidence that some rhodococci can live in soil in close association with plant roots and that root exudates can support their growth and trigger their PCB-degrading ability. This suggests that, like the flagellated Gram-negative bacteria, non-flagellated rhodococci may also play a key role in the degradation of persistent pollutants. (orig.)

  13. Degradation of textile dyes mediated by plant peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Nair, R Aswathi; Abraham, T Emilia

    2002-01-01

    The peroxidase enzyme from the plants Ipomea palmata (1.003 IU/g of leaf) and Saccharum spontaneum (3.6 IU/g of leaf) can be used as an alternative to the commercial source of horseradish and soybean peroxidase enzyme for the decolorization of textile dyes, mainly azo dyes. Eight textiles dyes currently used by the industry and seven other dyes were selected for decolorization studies at 25-200 mg/L levels using these plant enzymes. The enzymes were purified prior to use by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and ion exchange and gel permeation chromatographic techniques. Peroxidase of S. spontaneum leaf (specific activity of 0.23 IU/mg) could completely degrade Supranol Green and Procion Green HE-4BD (100%) dyes within 1 h, whereas Direct Blue, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G and Chrysoidine were degraded >70% in 1 h. Peroxidase of Ipomea (I. palmata leaf; specific activity of 0.827 U/mg) degraded 50 mg/L of the dyes Methyl Orange (26%), Crystal Violet (36%), and Supranol Green (68%) in 2-4 h and Brilliant Green (54%), Direct Blue (15%), and Chrysoidine (44%) at the 25 mg/L level in 1 to 2 h of treatment. The Saccharum peroxidase was immobilized on a hydrophobic matrix. Four textile dyes, Procion Navy Blue HER, Procion Brilliant Blue H-7G, Procion Green HE-4BD, and Supranol Green, at an initial concentration of 50 mg/L were completely degraded within 8 h by the enzyme immobilized on the modified polyethylene matrix. The immobilized enzyme was used in a batch reactor for the degradation of Procion Green HE-4BD and the reusability was studied for 15 cycles, and the half-life was found to be 60 h.

  14. Screening and identification of bacillus for degradating pumpkin polysaccharide%一株降解南瓜多糖芽孢杆菌的分离鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明丽; 唐梦瑶; 牛天贵; 李全宏

    2011-01-01

    南瓜多糖具有降血糖功能,但由于其分子量大、结构复杂等特点,不利于南瓜多糖的加工利用.实验直接从南瓜样品中分离得到一株芽孢杆菌,命名为J-6菌株,该菌能够有效地降解南瓜多糖,酶活可达3.268U/mL.通过形态观察、生理生化实验、16S rDNA同源性序列分析,初步确定J-6菌株属于芽孢杆菌属.%Pumpkin polysaccharide has been proved to have hypoglycemic function. However,because of its large molecular weight,complex structure and other characteristics,pumpkin polysaccharide can not be fully processed and utilized. An endospore-forming bacterium, designated strain J-6, was isolated from pumpkin. It presented remarkable activity to degradate pumpkin polysaccharide, up to 3.268U/mL. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics indicated that the strain J-6 belonged to the genus of bacillus.

  15. Overview of the biological activity of Plant Polysaccharides%植物多糖生物活性概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正君

    2014-01-01

    植物多糖是一类广泛存在于植物细胞壁及细胞中的一种具有多种生物学活性的天然大分子物质,是许多中草药的主要活性物质。植物多糖具有广泛的生物活性,如抗肿瘤〔1〕、抗病毒、抗炎、抗氧化、抗辐射、降血糖、降血脂﹑抗凝血等。%Plant Polysaccharides is a kind of nature macromolecule that widely distributed in the plant cells wall and cells which has a variety of biology activities ,and is main activity material in many herbs′.Plant Polysaccharides has a wide range of biological activity ,such as anti-tumor,anti-virus,anti-inflammatory,anti-oxidation,anti-radiation, lowering blood sugar and blood fat ,anti-coagulation〔2〕.

  16. Degradation of aromatic compounds in plants grown under aseptic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithaishvili, T.; Ugrekhelidze, D.; Tsereteli, B.; Sadunishvili, T.; Kvesitadze, G. [Durmishidze Inst. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Academy of Sciences of Georgia, Tbilisi (Georgia); Scalla, R. [Lab. des Xenobiotiques, INRA, Toulouse (France)

    2005-02-01

    The aim of the work is to investigate the ability of higher plants to absorb and detoxify environmental pollutants - aromatic compounds via aromatic ring cleavage. Transformation of {sup 14}C specifically labelled benzene derivatives, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-nitrobenzene, [1-6-{sup 14}C]-aniline, [1-{sup 14}C]- and [7-{sup 14}C]-benzoic acid, in axenic seedlings of maize (Zea mays L.), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.) and pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) were studied. After penetration in plants, the above xenobiotics are transformed by oxidative or reductive reactions, conjugation with cell endogenous compounds, and binding to biopolymers. The initial stage of oxidative degradation consists in hydroxylation reactions. The aromatic ring can then be cleaved and degraded into organic acids of the Krebs cycle. Ring cleavage is accompanied by {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution. Aromatic ring cleavage in plants has thus been demonstrated for different xenobiotics carrying different substitutions on their benzene ring. Conjugation with low molecular peptides is the main pathway of aromatic xenobiotics detoxification. Peptide conjugates are formed both by the initial xenobiotics (except nitrobenzene) and by intermediate transformation products. The chemical nature of the radioactive fragment and the amino acid composition of peptides participating in conjugation were identified. (orig.)

  17. Enantioselective degradation of metalaxyl in grape, tomato, and rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meiyun; Hua, Xiude; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Minghua

    2015-02-01

    Enantioselective biodegradation of chiral pesticide metalaxyl in grape, tomato, and rice plants under field conditions were studied. Metalaxyl enantiomers were completely separated with a resolution (Rs) of 5.01 by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) based on a cellulose tris (3-chloro-4-methyl phenyl carbamate) chiral column (Lux Cellulose-2). Metalaxyl enantiomers from matrixes were extracted by acetonitrile and purged using Cleanert Alumina-A solid phase extraction (SPE). The linearity, recovery, precision, sensitivity, and matrix effect of the method were assessed. The result showed that significant stereoselectivity occurred in grape, tomato, and rice plants. In grape, (+)-S-metalaxyl with a half-life of 5.5 d degraded faster than (-)-R-metalaxyl with that of 6.9 d, and the enantiomer fraction (EF) value reached 0.37 at 21 d. The same enantioselectivity was observed in tomato, and the half-life was 2.2 d for the S-enantiomer and 3.0 d for the R-enantiomer. The EF values decreased from 0.49 of 0 d to 0.26 of 14 d. On the other hand, a preferential degradation of the R-form was found in rice plants, with an EF value of 0.70 at 14 d, and the corresponding half-life was 2.3 d for the R-form and 2.8 d for the S-form. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ralstonia solanacearum extracellular polysaccharide is a specific elicitor of defense responses in wilt-resistant tomato plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Milling

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum, which causes bacterial wilt of diverse plants, produces copious extracellular polysaccharide (EPS, a major virulence factor. The function of EPS in wilt disease is uncertain. Leading hypotheses are that EPS physically obstructs plant water transport, or that EPS cloaks the bacterium from host plant recognition and subsequent defense. Tomato plants infected with R. solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 strain UW551 and tropical strain GMI1000 upregulated genes in both the ethylene (ET and salicylic acid (SA defense signal transduction pathways. The horizontally wilt-resistant tomato line Hawaii7996 activated expression of these defense genes faster and to a greater degree in response to R. solanacearum infection than did susceptible cultivar Bonny Best. However, EPS played different roles in resistant and susceptible host responses to R. solanacearum. In susceptible plants the wild-type and eps(- mutant strains induced generally similar defense responses. But in resistant Hawaii7996 tomato plants, the wild-type pathogens induced significantly greater defense responses than the eps(- mutants, suggesting that the resistant host recognizes R. solanacearum EPS. Consistent with this idea, purified EPS triggered significant SA pathway defense gene expression in resistant, but not in susceptible, tomato plants. In addition, the eps(- mutant triggered noticeably less production of defense-associated reactive oxygen species in resistant tomato stems and leaves, despite attaining similar cell densities in planta. Collectively, these data suggest that bacterial wilt-resistant plants can specifically recognize EPS from R. solanacearum.

  19. Rapid and efficient isolation of high-quality small RNAs from recalcitrant plant species rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Peng

    Full Text Available Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are important regulators of plant development and gene expression. The acquisition of high-quality small RNAs is the first step in the study of its expression and function analysis, yet the extraction method of small RNAs in recalcitrant plant tissues with various secondary metabolites is not well established, especially for tropical and subtropical plant species rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols. Here, we developed a simple and efficient method for high quality small RNAs extraction from recalcitrant plant species. Prior to RNA isolation, a precursory step with a CTAB-PVPP buffer system could efficiently remove compounds and secondary metabolites interfering with RNAs from homogenized lysates. Then, total RNAs were extracted by Trizol reagents followed by a differential precipitation of high-molecular-weight (HMW RNAs using polyethylene glycol (PEG 8000. Finally, small RNAs could be easily recovered from supernatant by ethanol precipitation without extra elimination steps. The isolated small RNAs from papaya showed high quality through a clear background on gel and a distinct northern blotting signal with miR159a probe, compared with other published protocols. Additionally, the small RNAs extracted from papaya were successfully used for validation of both predicted miRNAs and the putative conserved tasiARFs. Furthermore, the extraction method described here was also tested with several other subtropical and tropical plant tissues. The purity of the isolated small RNAs was sufficient for such applications as end-point stem-loop RT-PCR and northern blotting analysis, respectively. The simple and feasible extraction method reported here is expected to have excellent potential for isolation of small RNAs from recalcitrant plant tissues rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides.

  20. Convergent Evolution of Polysaccharide Debranching Defines a Common Mechanism for Starch Accumulation in Cyanobacteria and Plants[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Ugo; Chabi, Malika; Ducatez, Mathieu; Tirtiaux, Catherine; Nirmal-Raj, Jennifer; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Daiki; Sasaki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Eiji; Nakamura, Yasunori; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Roussel, Xavier; Durand-Terrasson, Amandine; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Vercoutter-Edouart, Anne-Sophie; Maes, Emmanuel; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Palcic, Monica; Sim, Lyann; Ball, Steven G.; Colleoni, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Starch, unlike hydrosoluble glycogen particles, aggregates into insoluble, semicrystalline granules. In photosynthetic eukaryotes, the transition to starch accumulation occurred after plastid endosymbiosis from a preexisting cytosolic host glycogen metabolism network. This involved the recruitment of a debranching enzyme of chlamydial pathogen origin. The latter is thought to be responsible for removing misplaced branches that would otherwise yield a water-soluble polysaccharide. We now report the implication of starch debranching enzyme in the aggregation of semicrystalline granules of single-cell cyanobacteria that accumulate both glycogen and starch-like polymers. We show that an enzyme of analogous nature to the plant debranching enzyme but of a different bacterial origin was recruited for the same purpose in these organisms. Remarkably, both the plant and cyanobacterial enzymes have evolved through convergent evolution, showing novel yet identical substrate specificities from a preexisting enzyme that originally displayed the much narrower substrate preferences required for glycogen catabolism. PMID:24163312

  1. Assessment of the degradation efficiency of full-scale biogas plants: A comparative study of degradation indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Nges, Ivo Achu; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Haoyu

    2017-07-29

    Increasing popularity and applications of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process has necessitated the development and identification of tools for obtaining reliable indicators of organic matter degradation rate and hence evaluate the process efficiency especially in full-scale, commercial biogas plants. In this study, four biogas plants (A1, A2, B and C) based on different feedstock, process configuration, scale and operational performance were selected and investigated. Results showed that the biochemical methane potential (BMP) based degradation rate could be use in incisively gauging process efficiency in lieu of the traditional degradation rate indicators. The BMP degradation rates ranged from 70 to 90% wherein plants A2 and C showed the highest throughput. This study, therefore, corroborates the feasibility of using the BMP degradation rate as a practical tool for evaluating process performance in full-scale biogas processes and spots light on the microbial diversity in full-scale biogas processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological activities of the sulfated polysaccharide from the vascular plant Halodule wrightii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M. C. Silva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A sulfated polysaccharide (SPSG was successfully isolated from seagrass Halodule wrightii Asch., Cymodoceaceae, and its antioxidant and anticoagulant activities were investigated. The data presented here showed that the SPSG is a 11 kDa sulfated heterogalactan with a sulfatation degree of 20.63% and it also contains glucose and xylose. SPSG antioxidant activities were evaluated using several in vitro assays and the anticoagulant activity was evaluated by aPTT and PT tests. These assays suggested that the SPSG possessed remarkable antioxidant properties in different in vitro assays and an outstanding anticoagulant activity 2.5-fold higher than that of heparin Clexane® in the aPTT test. This data represents the first reported on the sulfated polysaccharide biological activities from seagrass. These results indicate that SPSG can be considered in the future as a drug utilized in treating diseases from these systems.

  3. Immune stimulatory activity of BRP-4, an acidic polysaccharide from an edible plant, Basella rubra L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of BRP-4, an acidic polysaccharide from Basella rubra (B. rubra) L on the macrophage activity. Methods: Phagocytic activity was determined by the ingestion of Latex Beads-Rabbit IgG-FITC using the fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry analysis and nitric oxide production was measured using Griess reaction assay. Results: An enhanced production of NO was observed at 10 and 100μg/mL of BRP-4. The phagocytic activity of macrophage was enhanced in BRP-4 treated RAW264.7 cells. BRP-4 combined with concanavalin A (Con A) provided obvious promotion and strengthening of the proliferation of the splenocytes. Conclusions: BRP-4, polysaccharide isolated from B. rubra, is suggested to activate macrophage function and stimulate splenocyte proliferation. The strong immunomodulatory activity of BRP-4 confirmed its good potential as an immunotherapeutic adjuvant.

  4. Engineering temporal accumulation of a low recalcitrance polysaccharide leads to increased C6 sugar content in plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Loqué, Dominique; Lao, Jeemeng; Catena, Michela; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Herter, Thomas; Yang, Fan; Harholt, Jesper; Ebert, Berit; Baidoo, Edward E K; Keasling, Jay D; Scheller, Henrik V; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Ronald, Pamela C

    2015-09-01

    Reduced cell wall recalcitrance and increased C6 monosaccharide content are desirable traits for future biofuel crops, as long as these biomass modifications do not significantly alter normal growth and development. Mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), a cell wall polysaccharide only present in grasses and related species among flowering plants, is comprised of glucose monomers linked by both β-1,3 and β-1,4 bonds. Previous data have shown that constitutive production of MLG in barley (Hordeum vulgare) severely compromises growth and development. Here, we used spatio-temporal strategies to engineer Arabidopsis thaliana plants to accumulate significant amounts of MLG in the cell wall by expressing the rice CslF6 MLG synthase using secondary cell wall and senescence-associated promoters. Results using secondary wall promoters were suboptimal. When the rice MLG synthase was expressed under the control of a senescence-associated promoter, we obtained up to four times more glucose in the matrix cell wall fraction and up to a 42% increase in saccharification compared to control lines. Importantly, these plants grew and developed normally. The induction of MLG deposition at senescence correlated with an increase of gluconic acid in cell wall extracts of transgenic plants in contrast to the other approaches presented in this study. MLG produced in Arabidopsis has an altered structure compared to the grass glucan, which likely affects its solubility, while its molecular size is unaffected. The induction of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis in senescing tissues offers a novel engineering alternative to enhance cell wall properties of lignocellulosic biofuel crops.

  5. Biological activities of the sulfated polysaccharide from the vascular plant Halodule wrightii

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana M. C. Silva; Nednaldo Dantas-Santos; Dayanne L. Gomes; Leandro S. Costa; Sara L. Cordeiro; Costa,Mariana S. S. P.; Silva,Naisandra B.; Maria de L. Freitas; Katia Castanho Scortecci; Edda L. Leite; Rocha, Hugo A. O.

    2012-01-01

    A sulfated polysaccharide (SPSG) was successfully isolated from seagrass Halodule wrightii Asch., Cymodoceaceae, and its antioxidant and anticoagulant activities were investigated. The data presented here showed that the SPSG is a 11 kDa sulfated heterogalactan with a sulfatation degree of 20.63% and it also contains glucose and xylose. SPSG antioxidant activities were evaluated using several in vitro assays and the anticoagulant activity was evaluated by aPTT and PT tests. These assays sugge...

  6. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)p

  7. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the

  8. Arabidopsis and Brachypodium distachyon transgenic plants expressing Aspergillus nidulans acetylesterases have decreased degree of polysaccharide acetylation and increased resistance to pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Fursova, Oksana; Sundaram, Raman M; Qi, Mingsheng; Whitham, Steven A; Bogdanove, Adam J; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2013-05-01

    The plant cell wall has many significant structural and physiological roles, but the contributions of the various components to these roles remain unclear. Modification of cell wall properties can affect key agronomic traits such as disease resistance and plant growth. The plant cell wall is composed of diverse polysaccharides often decorated with methyl, acetyl, and feruloyl groups linked to the sugar subunits. In this study, we examined the effect of perturbing cell wall acetylation by making transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) plants expressing hemicellulose- and pectin-specific fungal acetylesterases. All transgenic plants carried highly expressed active Aspergillus nidulans acetylesterases localized to the apoplast and had significant reduction of cell wall acetylation compared with wild-type plants. Partial deacetylation of polysaccharides caused compensatory up-regulation of three known acetyltransferases and increased polysaccharide accessibility to glycosyl hydrolases. Transgenic plants showed increased resistance to the fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Bipolaris sorokiniana but not to the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas oryzae. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of hemicellulose and pectin acetylation in plant defense against fungal pathogens.

  9. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XVIII. An Analysis of the Extracellular Polysaccharides of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T T; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1986-04-01

    The water-soluble polysaccharides (SEPS) secreted into the medium by suspension-cultured sycamore cells were examined to determine whether the polysaccharides were the same as those present in the walls of sycamore cells. The SEPS were made more amenable to fractionation by treatment with a highly purified alpha-1,4-endopolygalacturonase (EPG). The EPG-treated SEPS were fractionated by anion-exchange and gelpermeation chromatography. The following polysaccharides were found: xyloglucan, arabinoxylan, at least two arabinogalactans, a rhamnogalacturonan-II-like polysaccharide, and a polygalacturonic acid-rich polysaccharide. The oligogalacturonide fragments expected from EPG-digested homogalacturonan were also identified. Evidence was obtained for the presence of a rhamnogalacturonan-I-like polysaccharide. All of the above polysaccharides have been isolated from or are believed to be present in sycamore cell walls. Furthermore, all of the noncellulosic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell-walls appear to be present in the SEPS.

  10. Light-driven oxidation of polysaccharides by photosynthetic pigments and a metalloenzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannella, David; Möllers, K. Benedikt; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik;

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative processes are essential for the degradation of plant biomass. A class of powerful and widely distributed oxidative enzymes, the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs), oxidize the most recalcitrant polysaccharides and require extracellular electron donors. Here we investigated...... and hemicellulose. LPMO enzymes and pigment derivatives common in the environment of plant-degrading organisms thus form a highly reactive and stable light-driven system increasing the turnover rate and versatility of LPMOs. This light-driven system may find applications in biotechnology and chemical processing....

  11. Nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes alter the microbial community and the fermentation patterns of barley cultivars and wheat products in an in vitro model of the porcine gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindelle, J.; Pieper, R.; Montoya, C.A.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Leterme, P.

    2011-01-01

    An in vitro experiment was carried out to assess how nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)-degrading enzymes influence the fermentation of dietary fiber in the pig large intestine. Seven wheat and barley products and cultivars with differing carbohydrate fractions were hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreati

  12. Influence of a diet rich in resistant starch on the degradation of non-starch polysaccharides in the large intestine of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Melliana C; Haenen, Daniëlle; Souza da Silva, Carol; Bosch, Guido; Schols, Henk A; Gruppen, Harry

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effect of resistant starch to the degradation of other non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs) in the large intestine of pigs, two groups of pigs were fed either a diet containing digestible starch (DS) or a diet containing resistant starch (RS). Both diets contained NSPs from wheat and barley. Digesta from different parts of the large intestine were collected and analysed for sugar composition and carbohydrate-degrading-enzyme activities. Resistant starch, as well as β-glucans and soluble arabinoxylan, was utilised mainly in the caecum. The utilisation of β-glucans and soluble arabinoxylan in the caecum was higher in DS-fed pigs than in RS-fed pigs. Analyses on carbohydrate-degrading-enzyme activities demonstrated that microbial enzyme production was stimulated according to the diet composition, and the enzyme profile throughout the large intestine of RS-fed pigs indicated that the presence of resistant starch shifted the utilisation of NSPs to more distal parts of the colon.

  13. Enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides: the kinetic effect of competitive adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsøe, Merete Norsker; Bloch, Line; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Insoluble potato dietary fibre, isolated from potato pulp, can be enzymatically hydrolysed with the pectolytic enzyme preparation Pectinex Ultra SP from Novo Nordisk A/S, in order to produce soluble fibre. The soluble fibre has valuable functional properties for the food industry. Cloned monocomp...

  14. REGULATION OF CHLOROPHY LL DEGRADATION IN PLANT TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syvash O. O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review was to analyze the basic biochemical processes leading to the chlorophyll degradation and ways to control this process in plant product storage. First of all, this is a complex of enzymatic reactions starting with the hydrolysis of chlorophyll with the formation of acyclic diterpene phytol and water-soluble chlorophyllide. An alternative primary reaction is the removal of magnesium from the chlorophyll tetrapyrrole ring to form pheophytin with the participation of Mg2+-dechelatase and/or low-molecular Mg2+-dechelating substances. The chlorophyll breakdown can also be caused by free radicals formed in the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction of Н2О2 with phenolic compounds or fatty acids. The unstable product of chlorophyll peroxidation, C132 –hydroxychlorophyll a decomposes to colorless low-molecular compounds. Expression of the genes of chlorophyll catabolism enzymes is controlled by phytohormones. Methods for controlling the pigment decomposition during storage of plant products are associated with the use of activators and inhibitors of chlorophyll decomposition. The best known inductor of the synthesis of catabolic enzymes is ethylene, widely used to accelerate fruit ripening. Gibberellins, cytokinins and nitric oxide, on the contrary, slow down the loss of chlorophyll.

  15. Hydrolytic bacteria in mesophilic and thermophilic degradation of plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zverlov, Vladimir V.; Hiegl, Wolfgang; Koeck, Daniela E.; Koellmeier, Tanja; Schwarz, Wolfgang H. [Department of Microbiology, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany); Kellermann, Josef [Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz, Martinsried (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Adding plant biomass to a biogas reactor, hydrolysis is the first reaction step in the chain of biological events towards methane production. Maize silage was used to enrich efficient hydrolytic bacterial consortia from natural environments under conditions imitating those in a biogas plant. At 55-60 C a more efficient hydrolyzing culture could be isolated than at 37 C. The composition of the optimal thermophilic bacterial consortium was revealed by sequencing clones from a 16S rRNA gene library. A modified PCR-RFLP pre-screening method was used to group the clones. Pure anaerobic cultures were isolated. 70% of the isolates were related to Clostridium thermocellum. A new culture-independent method for identification of cellulolytic enzymes was developed using the isolation of cellulose-binding proteins. MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and end-sequencing of peptides from prominent protein bands revealed cellulases from the cellulosome of C. thermocellum and from a major cellulase of Clostridium stercorarium. A combined culture of C. thermocellum and C. stercorarium was shown to excellently degrade maize silage. A spore preparation method suitable for inoculation of maize silage and optimal hydrolysis was developed for the thermophilic bacterial consortium. This method allows for concentration and long-term storage of the mixed culture for instance for inoculation of biogas fermenters. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Novel Alginate Lyase (Aly5) from a Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Flammeovirga sp. Strain MY04: Effects of Module Truncation on Biochemical Characteristics, Alginate Degradation Patterns, and Oligosaccharide-Yielding Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huihui; Li, Yuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases are important tools for oligosaccharide preparation, medical treatment, and energy bioconversion. Numerous alginate lyases have been elucidated. However, relatively little is known about their substrate degradation patterns and product-yielding properties, which is a limit to wider enzymatic applications and further enzyme improvements. Herein, we report the characterization and module truncation of Aly5, the first alginate lyase obtained from the polysaccharide-degrading bacterium Flammeovirga. Aly5 is a 566-amino-acid protein and belongs to a novel branch of the polysaccharide lyase 7 (PL7) superfamily. The protein rAly5 is an endolytic enzyme of alginate and associated oligosaccharides. It prefers guluronate (G) to mannuronate (M). Its smallest substrate is an unsaturated pentasaccharide, and its minimum product is an unsaturated disaccharide. The final alginate digests contain unsaturated oligosaccharides that generally range from disaccharides to heptasaccharides, with the tetrasaccharide fraction constituting the highest mass concentration. The disaccharide products are identified as ΔG units. While interestingly, the tri- and tetrasaccharide fractions each contain higher proportions of ΔG to ΔM ends, the larger final products contain only ΔM ends, which constitute a novel oligosaccharide-yielding property of guluronate lyases. The deletion of the noncatalytic region of Aly5 does not alter its M/G preference but significantly decreases the enzymatic activity and enzyme stability. Notably, the truncated protein accumulates large final oligosaccharide products but yields fewer small final products than Aly5, which are codetermined by its M/G preference to and size enlargement of degradable oligosaccharides. This study provides novel enzymatic properties and catalytic mechanisms of a guluronate lyase for potential uses and improvements. PMID:26519393

  17. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Frank O; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel M; McDonald, Bradon R; Nicora, Carrie D; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Orton, Daniel J; Monroe, Matthew E; Piehowski, Paul D; Purvine, Samuel O; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Currie, Cameron R

    2015-01-01

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous constituents of Neotropical ecosystems that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using prodigious amounts of foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain plant biomass-degrading enzymes that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as ants incorporate it into the fungus garden. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous plant biomass-degrading enzymes likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three quarters of all biomass-degrading enzymes identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 40 of these enzymes enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.

  18. Effect of fermentation of cereals on the degradation of polysaccharides and other macronutrients in the gastrointestinal tract of growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sholly, D.M.; Jørgensen, Henry Johs. Høgh; Sutton, A.L.;

    2011-01-01

    square design. Pigs were cannulated and housed individually in metabolism pens during sample collection. The 4 cerealbased diets were nonfermented liquid barley (NFLB), nonfermented liquid wheat (NFLW), fermented liquid barley (FLB), and fermented liquid wheat (FLW). The fermented feeds were prepared...... ingredients were added. Water was added to the dry nonfermented feeds [1:1 (wt/wt)] immediately before feeding. The fermentation process reduced the amount of DM in both cereals (P fermented cereals. There was an interaction of cereal.......243) on the fecal digestibility of nonstarch polysaccharides in either of the cereals but their digestibility was 10.0% greater (P fermentation of cereal before feeding altered the dietary composition and influenced flow and composition...

  19. A sycamore cell wall polysaccharide and a chemically related tomato leaf polysaccharide possess similar proteinase inhibitor-inducing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, C A; Bishop, P; Pearce, G

    1981-09-01

    A large pectic polysaccharide, called rhamnogalacturonan I, that is solubilized by a fungal endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase from the purified walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells possesses proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity similar to that of the proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor, a pectic-like oligosaccharide fraction isolated from tomato leaves. This suggests that the proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity resides in particular polysaccharide fragments which can be released when plant cell walls are exposed to appropriate enzyme degradation as a result of either wounding or pest attack.

  20. seed longevity of dominant plant species from degraded savanna in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    DEGRADED SAVANNA IN SEMI-ARID TANZANIA. HVM Lyaruu .... reclamation of degraded and marginal lands in Tanzania ..... from the Swedish International Development. Authority ... Ministry of. Natural Resources and Tourism, Forestry.

  1. Diversity and strain specificity of plant cell wall degrading enzymes revealed by the draft genome of Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margret E Berg Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ruminococcus flavefaciens is a predominant cellulolytic rumen bacterium, which forms a multi-enzyme cellulosome complex that could play an integral role in the ability of this bacterium to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides. Identifying the major enzyme types involved in plant cell wall degradation is essential for gaining a better understanding of the cellulolytic capabilities of this organism as well as highlighting potential enzymes for application in improvement of livestock nutrition and for conversion of cellulosic biomass to liquid fuels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The R. flavefaciens FD-1 genome was sequenced to 29x-coverage, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis estimates (4.4 Mb, and assembled into 119 contigs providing 4,576,399 bp of unique sequence. As much as 87.1% of the genome encodes ORFs, tRNA, rRNAs, or repeats. The GC content was calculated at 45%. A total of 4,339 ORFs was detected with an average gene length of 918 bp. The cellulosome model for R. flavefaciens was further refined by sequence analysis, with at least 225 dockerin-containing ORFs, including previously characterized cohesin-containing scaffoldin molecules. These dockerin-containing ORFs encode a variety of catalytic modules including glycoside hydrolases (GHs, polysaccharide lyases, and carbohydrate esterases. Additionally, 56 ORFs encode proteins that contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs. Functional microarray analysis of the genome revealed that 56 of the cellulosome-associated ORFs were up-regulated, 14 were down-regulated, 135 were unaffected, when R. flavefaciens FD-1 was grown on cellulose versus cellobiose. Three multi-modular xylanases (ORF01222, ORF03896, and ORF01315 exhibited the highest levels of up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The genomic evidence indicates that R. flavefaciens FD-1 has the largest known number of fiber-degrading enzymes likely to be arranged in a cellulosome architecture. Functional

  2. The Glycobiome of the Rumen Bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316T Highlights Adaptation to a Polysaccharide-Rich Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J.; Leahy, Sinead C.; Altermann, Eric; Yeoman, Carl J.; Dunne, Jonathan C.; Kong, Zhanhao; Pacheco, Diana M.; Li, Dong; Noel, Samantha J.; Moon, Christina D.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Attwood, Graeme T.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the role of rumen microbes and their enzymes in plant polysaccharide breakdown is fundamental to understanding digestion and maximising productivity in ruminant animals. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316T is a Gram-positive, butyrate-forming rumen bacterium with a key role in plant polysaccharide degradation. The 4.4Mb genome consists of 4 replicons; a chromosome, a chromid and two megaplasmids. The chromid is the smallest reported for all bacteria, and the first identified from the phylum Firmicutes. B316 devotes a large proportion of its genome to the breakdown and reassembly of complex polysaccharides and has a highly developed glycobiome when compared to other sequenced bacteria. The secretion of a range of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes which initiate the breakdown of pectin, starch and xylan, a subtilisin family protease active against plant proteins, and diverse intracellular enzymes to break down oligosaccharides constitute the degradative capability of this organism. A prominent feature of the genome is the presence of multiple gene clusters predicted to be involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. Metabolic reconstruction reveals the absence of an identifiable gene for enolase, a conserved enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of an organism lacking an enolase. Our analysis of the B316 genome shows how one organism can contribute to the multi-organism complex that rapidly breaks down plant material in the rumen. It can be concluded that B316, and similar organisms with broad polysaccharide-degrading capability, are well suited to being early colonizers and degraders of plant polysaccharides in the rumen environment. PMID:20689770

  3. The glycobiome of the rumen bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316(T highlights adaptation to a polysaccharide-rich environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Kelly

    Full Text Available Determining the role of rumen microbes and their enzymes in plant polysaccharide breakdown is fundamental to understanding digestion and maximising productivity in ruminant animals. Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316(T is a gram-positive, butyrate-forming rumen bacterium with a key role in plant polysaccharide degradation. The 4.4 Mb genome consists of 4 replicons; a chromosome, a chromid and two megaplasmids. The chromid is the smallest reported for all bacteria, and the first identified from the phylum Firmicutes. B316 devotes a large proportion of its genome to the breakdown and reassembly of complex polysaccharides and has a highly developed glycobiome when compared to other sequenced bacteria. The secretion of a range of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes which initiate the breakdown of pectin, starch and xylan, a subtilisin family protease active against plant proteins, and diverse intracellular enzymes to break down oligosaccharides constitute the degradative capability of this organism. A prominent feature of the genome is the presence of multiple gene clusters predicted to be involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis. Metabolic reconstruction reveals the absence of an identifiable gene for enolase, a conserved enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. To our knowledge this is the first report of an organism lacking an enolase. Our analysis of the B316 genome shows how one organism can contribute to the multi-organism complex that rapidly breaks down plant material in the rumen. It can be concluded that B316, and similar organisms with broad polysaccharide-degrading capability, are well suited to being early colonizers and degraders of plant polysaccharides in the rumen environment.

  4. Biochemical and physiological characterisation of the purine degradation pathway in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth is often limited by nitrogen availability in the soil. Not only do plants depend on efficient nitrogen uptake, they also require effective means to internally redistribute nitrogen during every stage of development. The purine degradation pathway contributes to this nitrogen recycling in plants. In tropical legumes it is also of central importance to the plants’ nitrogen supply under nitrogen-fixing conditions. This is the first time that the complete ureide degradation pathway h...

  5. Flavobacterium ahnfeltiae sp. nov., a new marine polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from a Pacific red alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Balabanova, Larissa A; Zhukova, Natalia V; Kim, So-Jeong; Bakunina, Irina Y; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, motile by gliding and yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain 10Alg 130(T), that displayed the ability to destroy polysaccharides of red and brown algae, was isolated from the red alga Ahnfeltia tobuchiensis. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the novel strain within the genus Flavobacterium, the type genus of the family Flavobacteriaceae, the phylum Bacteroidetes, with sequence similarities of 96.2 and 95.7 % to Flavobacterium jumunjiense KCTC 23618(T) and Flavobacterium ponti CCUG 58402(T), and 95.3-92.5 % to other recognized Flavobacterium species. The prevalent fatty acids of strain 10Alg 130(T) were iso-C15:0, iso-C15:0 3-OH, iso-C17:0 3-OH, C15:0 and iso-C17:1ω9c. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminolipids and three unknown lipids. The DNA G+C content of the type strain was 34.3 mol%. The new isolate and the type strains of recognized species of the genus Flavobacterium could strongly be distinguished by a number of phenotypic characteristics. A combination of the genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the algal isolate represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium ahnfeltiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 10Alg 130(T) (=KCTC 32467(T) = KMM 6686(T)).

  6. Biochemical Characteristics and Substrate Degradation Pattern of a Novel Exo-Type β-Agarase from the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Flammeovirga sp. Strain MY04

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Han, Wenjun; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Shumin; Liu, Huihui; Gu, Jingyan; Wu, Zhihong; Li, Fuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Exo-type agarases release disaccharide units (3,6-anhydro-l-galactopyranose-α-1,3-d-galactose) from the agarose chain and, in combination with endo-type agarases, play important roles in the processive degradation of agarose...

  7. Cell wall matrix polysaccharide distribution and cortical microtubule organization: two factors controlling mesophyll cell morphogenesis in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, P; Giannoutsou, E; Panteris, E; Apostolakos, P; Galatis, B

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the involvement of local differentiation of cell wall matrix polysaccharides and the role of microtubules in the morphogenesis of mesophyll cells (MCs) of three types (lobed, branched and palisade) in the dicotyledon Vigna sinensis and the fern Asplenium nidus. Homogalacturonan (HGA) epitopes recognized by the 2F4, JIM5 and JIM7 antibodies and callose were immunolocalized in hand-made leaf sections. Callose was also stained with aniline blue. We studied microtubule organization by tubulin immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In both plants, the matrix cell wall polysaccharide distribution underwent definite changes during MC differentiation. Callose constantly defined the sites of MC contacts. The 2F4 HGA epitope in V. sinensis first appeared in MC contacts but gradually moved towards the cell wall regions facing the intercellular spaces, while in A. nidus it was initially localized at the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces, but finally shifted to MC contacts. In V. sinensis, the JIM5 and JIM7 HGA epitopes initially marked the cell walls delimiting the intercellular spaces and gradually shifted in MC contacts, while in A. nidus they constantly enriched MC contacts. In all MC types examined, the cortical microtubules played a crucial role in their morphogenesis. In particular, in palisade MCs, cortical microtubule helices, by controlling cellulose microfibril orientation, forced these MCs to acquire a truncated cone-like shape. Unexpectedly in V. sinensis, the differentiation of colchicine-affected MCs deviated completely, since they developed a cell wall ingrowth labyrinth, becoming transfer-like cells. The results of this work and previous studies on Zea mays (Giannoutsou et al., Annals of Botany 2013; 112: : 1067-1081) revealed highly controlled local cell wall matrix differentiation in MCs of species belonging to different plant groups. This, in coordination with microtubule-dependent cellulose microfibril

  8. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity ofwell-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora ...

  9. Novel O-D-galacturonoyl esters in the pectic polysaccharides of suspension-cultured plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J A; Fry, S C

    1993-11-01

    Driselase digestion of uronate-6-14C-labeled primary walls of cultured spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cells yielded about 18 novel uronate-containing compounds, most of which could be hydrolyzed by cold dilute alkali to yield oligo-[14C]galacturonides. One typical Driselase digestion product (compound 17) yielded alpha-(1-->4)-D-[14C]galacturonotriose(GalA3) upon very mild treatment with alkali (50% yield of GalA3 in 7.2 min at pH 11 and 25 degrees C). One of the three galacturonate residues in compound 17 was reducible to a galactose residue with sodium borohydride, indicating that that GalA residue was esterified, via its--COOH group, to a putative alcohol. Compound 17 had a higher mobility than GalA3 on paper chromatography, indicating that the putative alcohol was relatively nonpolar. The putative alcohol could not have been methanol because Driselase readily hydrolyzed mono-, di-, and trimethyl esters of GalA3 to yield free galacturonic acid. Another Driselase digestion product (compound 12) was a derivative of GalA3 that apparently possessed two nonpolar esterified substituents: one about as labile as in compound 17, and the other approximately 10 times more stable. Compounds 12 and 17 could not labeled by in vivo feeding of [U-14C]cinnamate, suggesting that they were not phenolic conjugates. Similar but chromatographically distinguishable uronate-14C-labeled esters were obtained by Driselase digestion of walls of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.), Paul's Scarlet rose (Rosa sp.), and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreber) cells. In spinach, the novel compounds constituted about 5% of the total galacturonate residues of the cell wall. The observations suggest that pectic polysaccharides are linked, via O-D-galacturonoyl ester bonds, to relatively hydrophobic constituents of the primary cell wall. Their possible role in wall architecture is discussed.

  10. In Vitro Fermentative Production of Plant Lignans from Cereal Products in Relationship with Constituents of Non-Starch Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bartkiene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently special attention has been paid to dietary fibre-associated phytoestrogens such as plant lignans, which are related to the prevention of different hormone-dependent diseases. Therefore, phytoestrogens associated with dietary fibre and their metabolites are of interest for investigation. The aim of this work is to investigate the formation of enterolignans: enterolactone (ENL and enterodiol (END from their precursors by the action of intestinal microflora and their relationship with non-starch polysaccharides (NSP in various cereal products from wheat, rye, barley and oats. For the investigation of the bioconversion of plant lignans, a technique of in vitro fermentation was used and the quantitative analysis of their metabolites ENL and END was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with coulometric electrode array detection. The enterolignan formation in various cereal products ranged from 78.3 to 321.9 nmol/g depending on the product type: END from 8.7 to 149.3 nmol/g and ENL from 64.4 to 278.3 nmol/g. The lignan production in bran was about two times higher than that in whole flour of the same kind of cereals. Close correlations were found between the total NSP content and the total amount of enterolignans and ENL; between pentoses and the total amount of enterolignans and ENL; between arabinose or xylose and ENL; and between galactose and END values. Considering the correlations between hexoses and END as well as between pentoses and ENL found in cereals, it can be assumed that pentoses are closely related to the quantities of plant lignans in cereal products and their conversion to enterolignans.

  11. Biochemical Characteristics and Substrate Degradation Pattern of a Novel Exo-Type β-Agarase from the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Flammeovirga sp. Strain MY04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjun; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wang, Dandan; Wang, Shumin; Liu, Huihui; Gu, Jingyan; Wu, Zhihong; Li, Fuchuan

    2016-08-15

    Exo-type agarases release disaccharide units (3,6-anhydro-l-galactopyranose-α-1,3-d-galactose) from the agarose chain and, in combination with endo-type agarases, play important roles in the processive degradation of agarose. Several exo-agarases have been identified. However, their substrate-degrading patterns and corresponding mechanisms are still unclear because of a lack of proper technologies for sugar chain analysis. Herein, we report the novel properties of AgaO, a disaccharide-producing agarase identified from the genus Flammeovirga AgaO is a 705-amino-acid protein that is unique to strain MY04. It shares sequence identities of less than 40% with reported GH50 β-agarases. Recombinant AgaO (rAgaO) yields disaccharides as the sole final product when degrading agarose and associated oligosaccharides. Its smallest substrate is a neoagarotetraose, and its disaccharide/agarose conversion ratio is 0.5. Using fluorescence labeling and two-stage mass spectrometry analysis, we demonstrate that the disaccharide products are neoagarobiose products instead of agarobiose products, as verified by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum analysis. Therefore, we provide a useful oligosaccharide sequencing method to determine the patterns of enzyme cleavage of glycosidic bonds. Moreover, AgaO produces neoagarobiose products by gradually cleaving the units from the nonreducing end of fluorescently labeled sugar chains, and so our method represents a novel biochemical visualization of the exolytic pattern of an agarase. Various truncated AgaO proteins lost their disaccharide-producing capabilities, indicating a strict structure-function relationship for the whole enzyme. This study provides insights into the novel catalytic mechanism and enzymatic properties of an exo-type β-agarase for the benefit of potential future applications. Exo-type agarases can degrade agarose to yield disaccharides almost exclusively, and therefore, they are important tools for disaccharide

  12. Activated charcoal-mediated RNA extraction method for Azadirachta indica and plants highly rich in polyphenolics, polysaccharides and other complex secondary compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakani, Raja; Narnoliya, Lokesh; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Gupta, Vikrant

    2013-01-01

    Background High quality RNA is a primary requisite for numerous molecular biological applications but is difficult to isolate from several plants rich in polysaccharides, polyphenolics and other secondary metabolites. These compounds either bind with nucleic acids or often co-precipitate at the final step and many times cannot be removed by conventional methods and kits. Addition of vinyl-pyrollidone polymers in extraction buffer efficiently removes polyphenolics to some extent, but, it faile...

  13. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylward, Frank O.; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel; McDonald, Bradon R.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-08-28

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous Neotropical herbivores that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain lignocellulases that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as it is foraged by the ants. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous lignocellulases likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three-quarters of all lignocellulases identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 23 lignocellulases enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.

  14. Plant enhanced degradation of phenanthrene in the contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Min; XIE Xiao-mei

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics ofphenanthrene, microbial biomass carbon, plate counts of heterotrophic bacteria and most probable number (MPN) of phenanthrene degraders in non-rhizosphere or rhizosphere soils with uninoculating or inoculating phenanthrene degraders were measured. At the initial concentration of 20 mg phenanthrene/kg soil, the half-lives of phenanthrene in uninoculated non-rhizosphere soil, uninoculated rhizosphere soil, inoculated non-rhizosphere soil, and inoculated rhizosphere soil were measured to be 81.5, 47.8, 15.1 and 6.4 d, respectively, and corresponding kinetic data fitted first-order kinetics. The highest degradation rate of phenanthrene was observed in inoculated rhizosphere soil. The degradative characteristics of phenanthrene were closely related to the effects of vegetation on soil microbial process. Vegetation could enhance the magnitude ofrhizosphere microbial communities, microbial biomass content, and heterotrophic bacterial community, but barely influence those community components responsible for phenanthrene degradation. Results suggested that combination of vegetation and inoculation with degrading microorganisms of target organic contaminants was a better pathway to enhance degradation of the organic contaminants in soil.

  15. Soil and plant responses to degradation of alpine grassland in source region of the Yellow River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Land degradation has been rapidly taking place in source region of the Yellow River in China. This study was conducted during 2008 in Maduo County to investigate soil and plant changes in relation to land degradation. Several results were derived from this work. First, the soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) decreased significantly on the extremely degraded land comparing with the natural grassland. Second, soil bulk density increased as land degradation worsened. Soil bulk density of the extremely degraded land was significantly greater than that of the grassland. Third, pH showed no obvious variation pattern. Finally, aboveground biomass decreased from grassland to the moderately degraded land. But aboveground biomass increased on the extremely degraded land and very extremely degraded land with most aboveground biomass inedible for livestock.

  16. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic-polysaccharide

  17. Evaluation of the response of ruminal fermentation and activities of nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes to particle length of corn silage in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebeli, Q; Tafaj, M; Junck, B; Olschläger, V; Ametaj, B N; Drochner, W

    2008-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate effects of particle length (PL) of corn silage (CS) on distribution of dietary particle fractions, contents of physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF), cows' intake patterns and sorting activity, fermentation pro-file, and activities of nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes as well as degradation in the rumen and total tract in lactating dairy cows. Four ruminally cannulated Holstein cows, weighing 624 +/- 50 kg and 60 +/- 8 d in milk, were fed ad libitum 3 total mixed rations [about 16% crude protein, 34% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and 7 MJ of net energy of lactation/kg of dry matter (DM)] containing on DM basis 50% concentrate, 10% grass hay, and 40% CS with 3 different theoretical PL at harvesting (14, 8.1, and 5.5 mm for long, medium, and short, respectively). Results showed that the amount of DM retained on sieves with 19- and 8-mm screens of Penn State Particle Separator decreased linearly with decreasing PL of CS. The latter was reflected in a significant decrease in the content of dietary peNDF including both the DM (peNDF(>8)) and the NDF (peNDF(>8-NDF)) retained on 19- and 8-mm screens. In contrast, the fraction of particles retained between the 1.18- and 8-mm screens was increased, such that no differences among the diets were observed regarding the content of peNDF that includes DM of particles >1.18 mm (peNDF(>1.18)). The intake of particles retained between the 1.18- and 8-mm screens increased linearly, whereas the intake of peNDF(>1.18) increased quadratically with decreasing PL of CS. Sorting consumption was reduced by feeding the short CS, which was reflected in a reduced proportion of propionate and increased acetate-to-propionate ratio and butyrate pro-portion in the rumen. In contrast, no effects of PL of CS were observed on the concentration of total volatile fatty acids and pH in the rumen. In general, decreasing the PL of CS significantly increased the activities of

  18. Degradation of pheromone and plant volatile components by a same odorant-degrading enzyme in the cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Durand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Odorant-Degrading Enzymes (ODEs are supposed to be involved in the signal inactivation step within the olfactory sensilla of insects by quickly removing odorant molecules from the vicinity of the olfactory receptors. Only three ODEs have been both identified at the molecular level and functionally characterized: two were specialized in the degradation of pheromone compounds and the last one was shown to degrade a plant odorant. METHODOLOGY: Previous work has shown that the antennae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis, a worldwide pest of agricultural crops, express numerous candidate ODEs. We focused on an esterase overexpressed in males antennae, namely SlCXE7. We studied its expression patterns and tested its catalytic properties towards three odorants, i.e. the two female sex pheromone components and a green leaf volatile emitted by host plants. CONCLUSION: SlCXE7 expression was concomitant during development with male responsiveness to odorants and during adult scotophase with the period of male most active sexual behaviour. Furthermore, SlCXE7 transcription could be induced by male exposure to the main pheromone component, suggesting a role of Pheromone-Degrading Enzyme. Interestingly, recombinant SlCXE7 was able to efficiently hydrolyze the pheromone compounds but also the plant volatile, with a higher affinity for the pheromone than for the plant compound. In male antennae, SlCXE7 expression was associated with both long and short sensilla, tuned to sex pheromones or plant odours, respectively. Our results thus suggested that a same ODE could have a dual function depending of it sensillar localisation. Within the pheromone-sensitive sensilla, SlCXE7 may play a role in pheromone signal termination and in reduction of odorant background noise, whereas it could be involved in plant odorant inactivation within the short sensilla.

  19. Synthesis of oligo (1→5)-α-L- arabinofuranosides related to the plant polysaccharide pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Mathilde

    A strong fundamental understanding of plant biology is essential for meeting society’s growing demand for safe and nutritious food, dietary fibers, clothes, and renewable energy sources for an increasing global population. The plant cell wall is one of the main targets for biotechnological research...... at University of Copenhagen is also described. This includes the implementation of a covalent linker system as an alternative to bovine serum albumin (BSA) for oligosaccharides, as well as the development of a microarray-based transglycosylation assay capable of screening for novel glycosyl transferase...

  20. Addition of nonstarch polysaccharides degrading enzymes to two hulless barley varieties fed in diets for weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandini, A; Sigolo, S; Morlacchini, M; Giuberti, G; Moschini, M; Rzepus, M; Della Casa, G

    2014-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of 2 hulless barley varieties, with or without the addition of a nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) enzyme complex (β-glucanase and xylanase), on growth performance of weaned piglets in a 42-d feeding study. The study was conducted with 140 piglets (PIC × Duroc). Pigs were allocated to pens (4 castrated males or 4 females per pen) based on BW and sex, and pens were assigned to 5 experimental diets with 4 pens of castrated males and 3 pens of females per treatment. Five isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were compared: 1) control corn-based diet (CTR), 2) diet with corn and wheat bran replaced by the Astartis hulless barley variety (AS), 3) diet with corn and wheat bran replaced by the AS supplemented with the NSP enzyme complex (ASE), 4) diet with corn and wheat bran replaced by the Alamo hulless barley variety (AL), and 5) diet with corn and wheat bran replaced by the AL supplemented with the NSP enzyme complex (ALE). The diets were formulated to meet or exceed nutrient requirements and offered in 2 phases: d 0 to 14 and d 14 to 42. At the end of the study, pigs fed AS and AL had equal weights as pigs fed CTR. Pigs fed the hulless barley diets had greater (P < 0.05) ADG during the second phase (P2) and overall phase, BW at d 42, and G:F during the P2 than those fed the CTR. Pigs fed the ASE and ALE had greater (P < 0.05) ADFI during the P2 and overall ADG than those fed the AS and AL. The increases in ADG during the P2 and final BW obtained with NSP enzyme supplementation were greater in pigs fed the AS than those fed the AL (barley × enzyme, P < 0.05). On the other hand, the NSP enzyme complex increased G:F in pigs fed the AS during the P2 and overall phase, but it had no effect on those fed the AL (barley × enzyme, P < 0.05). In conclusion, hulless barley with or without the NSP enzyme complex can be a replacement ingredient for corn and wheat bran in weaned pig diets. Addition of the NSP enzyme complex to AS

  1. Plant volatiles in polluted atmospheres: stress responses and signal degradation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BLANDE, JAMES D; HOLOPAINEN, JARMO K; NIINEMETS, ÜLO

    2014-01-01

    .... Volatiles induced by herbivore feeding are among the best studied plant responses to stress and may constitute an informative message to the surrounding community and further function in plant defence processes...

  2. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin.

  3. Degradation and failure of bolting in nuclear power plants: Volume 2: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    A four-year program to resolve the generic safety issue of bolting degradation and failure in nuclear power plants has developed guidelines for material selection, bolting preload control, and plant operation, as well as a realistic method for evaluating the structural integrity of bolted joints. These measures can help improve plant availability while reducing radiation exposure and costs of maintenance and inspection. This report provides the technical basis for resolution of the generic issue of bolting degradation and failure in nuclear power plants.

  4. 植物叶多糖的提取和生物活性综述%Review on Extraction and Biological Activity of Polysaccharides from Plant Leave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许春平; 杨琛琛; 郑坚强; 毛多斌

    2014-01-01

    At present, there are many reports about polysaccharides from plant leaf. In this paper, the extraction methods and biological activities of polysaccharides from plant leave are reviewed. The main extraction methods include solvent extraction (water extraction, ethanol extraction, acid extraction, alkali extraction), ultrasonic assisted extraction, microwave assisted extraction, and enzymatic hydrolysis. Leaf polysaccharides posses various biological activities, mainly including anti-oxidant, anti-fatigue, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, immune-stimulating and antimicrobial activities, etc.%对各种植物叶多糖的研究有了很多报道,综述了植物叶多糖的提取方法和功能。主要提取方法包括溶剂提取法(水提法、醇提法、酸提法、碱提法)、超声辅助提取法、微波辅助提取法、酶解法;植物叶多糖具有多种生理功能,主要有抗氧化、抗疲劳、降血糖、降血脂、增强免疫活性以及抑菌作用等。

  5. An exocellular polysaccharide and its interactions with proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinier, R.

    1999-01-01

    In the food industry polysaccharides are used as thickening or gelling agents. Polysaccharides are usually extracted from plants. Micro-organisms are also capable of excreting polysaccharides: exocellular polysaccharides (EPSs). In some cases EPSs are produced in-situ in food products, notably in ac

  6. COMPARISON OF MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS AND MINERAL CONTENT IN EUCOMIS AUTUMNALIS (MILL. CHITT. PLANTS OBTAINED FROM BULBS TREATED WITH FUNGICIDES AND COATED WITH NATURAL POLYSACCHARIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Salachna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Eucomis autumnalis is an attractive ornamental species from the South Africa, commonly used in natural medicine. Plant protection programs, particularly those concerning plants grown for phytotherapeutics, are focused on prophylactic treatments that facilitate a limited use of pesticides negatively affecting the environment. Polysaccharides, such as chitosan and sodium alginate are exemplary non-toxic and biodegradable substances used for hydrogel coatings. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of treating E. autumnalis bulbs with fungicide or coating with natural polysaccharides on the morphological traits and content of minerals in the leaves and bulbs. Prior to planting, the bulbs were divided into three groups: (I untreated bulbs (control; (II bulbs treated with Kaptan and Topsin fungicides; (III bulbs coated with oligochitosan and sodium alginate. Bulb coating was found to exert a stimulating effect on plant height, number and length of leaf, greenness index (SPAD, number of flowers per inflorescence, fresh weight of the aboveground part and fresh weight of bulbs. The leaves and bulbs of plants grown from coated bulbs contained more nitrogen, potassium and boron. Treating the bulbs with fungicides positively affected the number of leaves, greenness index and fresh weight of the aboveground part.

  7. In vitro proliferation and production of cytokine and IgG by human PBMCs stimulated with polysaccharide extract from plants endemic to Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengome, Line Edwige; Voxeur, Aline; Akue, Jean Paul; Lerouge, Patrice

    2014-11-13

    Polysaccharides were extracted from seven plants endemic to Gabon to study their potential immunological activities. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) (5×10⁵ cells/mL) proliferation, cytokine and immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays were performed after stimulation with different concentrations of polysaccharide fractions compared with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and concanavalin A (ConA) from healthy volunteers. The culture supernatants were used for cytokine and IgG detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that pectin and hemicellulose extracts from Uvaria klainei, Petersianthus macrocarpus, Trichoscypha addonii, Aphanocalyx microphyllus, Librevillea klaineana, Neochevalierodendron stephanii and Scorodophloeus zenkeri induced production levels that were variable from one individual to another for IL-12 (3-40 pg/mL), IL-10 (6-443 pg/mL), IL-6 (7-370 pg/mL), GM-CSF (3-170 pg/mL) and IFN-γ (5-80 pg/mL). Only hemicelluloses from Aphanocalyx microphyllus produce a small amount of IgG (OD=0.034), while the proliferation of cells stimulated with these polysaccharides increased up to 318% above the proliferation of unstimulated cells. However, this proliferation of PBMCs was abolished when the pectin of some of these plants was treated with endopolygalacturonase (p<0.05), but the trend of cytokine synthesis remained the same, both before and after enzymatic treatment or saponification. This study suggests that these polysaccharides stimulate cells in a structure-dependent manner. The rhamnogalacturonan-I (RGI) fragment alone was not able to induce the proliferation of PBMC.

  8. In Vitro Proliferation and Production of Cytokine and IgG by Human PBMCs Stimulated with Polysaccharide Extract from Plants Endemic to Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Edwige Mengome

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides were extracted from seven plants endemic to Gabon to study their potential immunological activities. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC (5 × 105 cells/mL proliferation, cytokine and immunoglobulin G (IgG assays were performed after stimulation with different concentrations of polysaccharide fractions compared with lipopolysaccharides (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA from healthy volunteers. The culture supernatants were used for cytokine and IgG detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results show that pectin and hemicellulose extracts from Uvaria klainei, Petersianthus macrocarpus, Trichoscypha addonii, Aphanocalyx microphyllus, Librevillea klaineana, Neochevalierodendron stephanii and Scorodophloeus zenkeri induced production levels that were variable from one individual to another for IL-12 (3–40 pg/mL, IL-10 (6–443 pg/mL, IL-6 (7–370 pg/mL, GM-CSF (3–170 pg/mL and IFN-γ (5–80 pg/mL. Only hemicelluloses from Aphanocalyx microphyllus produce a small amount of IgG (OD = 0.034, while the proliferation of cells stimulated with these polysaccharides increased up to 318% above the proliferation of unstimulated cells. However, this proliferation of PBMCs was abolished when the pectin of some of these plants was treated with endopolygalacturonase (p < 0.05, but the trend of cytokine synthesis remained the same, both before and after enzymatic treatment or saponification. This study suggests that these polysaccharides stimulate cells in a structure-dependent manner. The rhamnogalacturonan-I (RGI fragment alone was not able to induce the proliferation of PBMC.

  9. Evaluation on degradation of cable in nuclear power plant by boric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Munhwan; Song, Geundong; Kim, Yeonku; Maeng, Wanyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Exposures to these conditions for long periods of times can cause a degradation of cable. Borated water is used in the primary systems of PWR plants to control the reactivity during normal plant operation and refueling, and under potential accident conditions. If borated water leaks from primary and secondary systems, significant corrosion problems can develop. However, little research has been carried out on the effects of cable degradation by borated water. In this experiment, TGA, indenting test, and FT-IR were performed to evaluate the degradation of cable by borated water. An evaluation of cable degradation by borated water was carried out. A TGA analysis, the measurement of cable microhardness and an FT-IR analysis before and after spraying with boric acid (B:170,000ppm). It is considered that there is no significant degradation of cables due to spraying with boric acid. More studies on long-term experiments for severe conditions are now progressing.

  10. Degradation of munitions and chlorinated solvents by aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-04-22

    Nitroreductase and dehalogenase enzymes have been isolated from sediments and soils. Using enzyme linked immunospecific assays (ELISA), a number of aquatic plants have been identified as sources of the enzymes. The plants were then brought back into the laboratory and evaluated as candidates for further remediation studies.

  11. Seonamhaeicola algicola sp. nov., a complex-polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from Gracilaria blodgettii, and emended description of the genus Seonamhaeicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Xia; Du, Zong-Jun; Chen, Guan-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, yellow, rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic, gliding bacterial strain, designated Gy8T, was isolated from the surface of Gracilaria blodgettii. This bacterium was able to degrade various polysaccharides, especially agar and alginate. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 % of the total fatty acids) were C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C15 : 0 3-OH and iso-C15 : 1. The major menaquinone was MK-6. The DNA G+C content was 35.3 mol%. The major polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine and two unknown polar lipids. Strain Gy8T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Seonamhaeicola aphaedonensis AH-M5T (95.6 %), and these two strains formed a distinct branch in phylogenetic trees generated with the neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony algorithms. The novel strain and the reference type strain of the single species described to date in the genus Seonamhaeicola contained MK-6 as the major menaquinone, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 1 as the major fatty acids, and phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown lipid as the major polar lipids. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analysis, strain Gy8T is considered to represent a novel species within the genus Seonamhaeicola in the family Flavobacteriaceae, phylum Bacteroidetes, for which the name Seonamhaeicola algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gy8T ( = KCTC 42396T = CICC 23816T).

  12. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Paolo; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Doria, Enrico; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Cella, Rino

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  13. Production by Tobacco Transplastomic Plants of Recombinant Fungal and Bacterial Cell-Wall Degrading Enzymes to Be Used for Cellulosic Biomass Saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Longoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels from renewable plant biomass are gaining momentum due to climate change related to atmospheric CO2 increase. However, the production cost of enzymes required for cellulosic biomass saccharification is a major limiting step in this process. Low-cost production of large amounts of recombinant enzymes by transgenic plants was proposed as an alternative to the conventional microbial based fermentation. A number of studies have shown that chloroplast-based gene expression offers several advantages over nuclear transformation due to efficient transcription and translation systems and high copy number of the transgene. In this study, we expressed in tobacco chloroplasts microbial genes encoding five cellulases and a polygalacturonase. Leaf extracts containing the recombinant enzymes showed the ability to degrade various cell-wall components under different conditions, singly and in combinations. In addition, our group also tested a previously described thermostable xylanase in combination with a cellulase and a polygalacturonase to study the cumulative effect on the depolymerization of a complex plant substrate. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using transplastomic tobacco leaf extracts to convert cell-wall polysaccharides into reducing sugars, fulfilling a major prerequisite of large scale availability of a variety of cell-wall degrading enzymes for biofuel industry.

  14. Naturally occurring phenanthrene degrading bacteria associated with seeds of various plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernet, Jennifer L; Lawrence, John R; Germida, James J

    2016-01-01

    Seeds of 11 of 19 plant species tested yielded naturally occurring phenanthrene degrading bacteria when placed on phenanthrene impression plates. Seed associated phenanthrene degrading bacteria were mostly detected on caragana, Canada thistle, creeping red fescue, western wheatgrass, and tall wheat grass. Based on 16S rRNA analysis the most common bacteria isolated from these seeds were strains belonging to the genera Enterobacteria, Erwinia, Burkholderia, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, and Sphingomonas. These plants may provide an excellent source of pre-adapted bacterial-plant associations highly suitable for use in remediation of contaminated soil environments.

  15. Genetic variation in degradability of wheat straw and potential for improvement through plant breeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Wagner; Magid, Jakob; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2011-01-01

    contemporary gene pool. The cultivars were grown at two different locations to assess the potential for breeding for improved degradability. The straws exhibited much variation in degradability ranging from 258 g kg1 to 407 g kg1 of dry matter. The heritability for degradability was estimated to 29% indicating...... a reasonable potential for response to selection. Inclusion of height as a regression-term, indicated that only a minor part of genetic differences are directly related to plant height and that improvements in degradability may be achieved without unacceptable changes in straw length. Finally, a lack...... of correlation between degradability and grain yield indicated that straw degradability may be improved through breeding without serious negative effect on grain yield....

  16. Effect of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes as feed additive on the rumen bacterial population in non-lactating cows quantified by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitz, J O; Guertler, P; Pfaffl, M W; Eisenreich, R; Wiedemann, S; Schwarz, F J

    2013-12-01

    The effects of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, added to a maize silage- and grass silage-based total mixed ration (TMR) at least 14 h before feeding, on the rumen bacterial population were investigated. Six non-lactating Holstein Friesian cows were allocated to three treatment groups using a duplicate 3 × 3 Latin square design with three 31-day periods (29 days of adaptation and 2 days of sampling). Treatments were control TMR [69% forage and 31% concentrates on a dry matter (DM) basis] or TMR with 13.8 or 27.7 ml/kg of feed DM of Roxazyme G2 liquid with activities (U/ml enzyme preparation) of xylanase 260 000, β-glucanase 180 000 and cellulase 8000 (DSM Nutritional Products, Basel, Switzerland). The concentrations of 16S rDNA of Anaerovibrio lipolytica, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Prevotella ruminicola, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Selenomonas ruminantium and Treponema bryantii, and their relative percentage of total bacteria in rumen samples obtained before feeding and 3 and 7 h after feeding and from two rumen fractions were determined using real-time PCR. Sampling time had only little influence, but bacterial numbers and the composition of the population differed between the transition layer between rumen fluid and the fibre mat (fraction A) and the rumen fluid (fraction B) highlighting the importance to standardize sampling. The 16S rDNA copies of total bacteria and the six bacterial species as well as the population composition were mainly unaffected by the high levels of exogenous enzymes supplemented at all sampling times and in both rumen fractions. Occasionally, the percentages of the non-fibrolytic species P. ruminicola and A. lipolytica changed in response to enzyme supplementation. Some increases in the potential degradability of the diet and decreases in lag time which occurred collaterally indicate that other factors than changes in numbers of non-particle-associated bacteria are mainly responsible for the effects of

  17. Uncovering the abilities of Agaricus bisporus to degrade plant biomass throughout its life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Post, Harm; Zhou, Miaomiao; Jurak, Edita; Heck, Albert J R; Hildén, Kristiina S; Kabel, Mirjam A; Mäkelä, Miia R; Altelaar, Maarten A F; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-08-01

    The economically important edible basidiomycete mushroom Agaricus bisporus thrives on decaying plant material in forests and grasslands of North America and Europe. It degrades forest litter and contributes to global carbon recycling, depolymerizing (hemi-)cellulose and lignin in plant biomass. Relatively little is known about how A. bisporus grows in the controlled environment in commercial production facilities and utilizes its substrate. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we showed that changes in plant biomass degradation by A. bisporus occur throughout its life cycle. Ligninolytic genes were only highly expressed during the spawning stage day 16. In contrast, (hemi-)cellulolytic genes were highly expressed at the first flush, whereas low expression was observed at the second flush. The essential role for many highly expressed plant biomass degrading genes was supported by exo-proteome analysis. Our data also support a model of sequential lignocellulose degradation by wood-decaying fungi proposed in previous studies, concluding that lignin is degraded at the initial stage of growth in compost and is not modified after the spawning stage. The observed differences in gene expression involved in (hemi-)cellulose degradation between the first and second flushes could partially explain the reduction in the number of mushrooms during the second flush.

  18. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis.

  19. The effects of grassland degradation on plant diversity, primary productivity, and soil fertility in the alpine region of Asia's headwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexia; Dong, Shikui; Yang, Bing; Li, Yuanyuan; Su, Xukun

    2014-10-01

    A 3-year survey was conducted to explore the relationships among plant composition, productivity, and soil fertility characterizing four different degradation stages of an alpine meadow in the source region of the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, China. Results showed that plant species diversity, productivity, and soil fertility of the top 30-cm soil layer significantly declined with degradation stages of alpine meadow over the study period. The productivity of forbs significantly increased with degradation stages, and the soil potassium stock was not affected by grassland degradation. The vegetation composition gradually shifted from perennial graminoids (grasses and sedges) to annual forbs along the degradation gradient. The abrupt change of response in plant diversity, plant productivity, and soil nutrients was demonstrated after heavy grassland degradation. Moreover, degradation can indicate plant species diversity and productivity through changing soil fertility. However, the clear relationships are difficult to establish. In conclusion, degradation influenced ecosystem function and services, such as plant species diversity, productivity, and soil carbon and nitrogen stocks. Additionally, both plant species diversity and soil nutrients were important predictors in different degradation stages of alpine meadows. To this end, heavy degradation grade was shown to cause shift of plant community in alpine meadow, which provided an important basis for sustaining ecosystem function, manipulating the vegetation composition of the area and restoring the degraded alpine grassland.

  20. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked soils by single and combined plants cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Sardar Alam; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Shen, Chaofeng; Tang, Xianjin; Farooq, Muhammad; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Congkai; Chen, Yingxu

    2010-05-15

    The present study was conducted to investigate the capability of four plant species (tall fescue, ryegrass, alfalfa, and rape seed) grown alone and in combination to the degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) in spiked soil. After 65 days of plant growth, plant biomass, dehydrogenase activity, water-soluble phenolic (WSP) compounds, plant uptake and accumulation and residual concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene were determined. Our results showed that presence of vegetation significantly enhanced the dissipation of phenanthrene and pyrene from contaminated soils. Higher degradation rates of PAHs were observed in the combined plant cultivation (98.3-99.2% phenanthrene and 88.1-95.7% pyrene) compared to the single plant cultivation (97.0-98.0% phenanthrene and 79.8-86.0% pyrene). Contribution of direct plant uptake and accumulation of phenanthrene and pyrene was very low compared to the plant enhanced dissipation. By contrast, plant-promoted biodegradation was the predominant contribution to the remediation enhancement. The correlation analysis indicates a negative relation between biological activities (dehydrogenase activity and WSP compounds) and residual concentrations of phenanthrene and pyrene in planted soils. Our results suggest that phytoremediation could be a feasible choice for PAHs contaminated soil. Moreover, the combined plant cultivation has potential to enhance the process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereoselective degradation of metalaxyl and metalaxyl-M in soil and sunflower plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucchini, Cesare; Zadra, C

    2002-01-01

    A high proportion of agrochemicals are chiral compounds. Since stereoisomers often show different biological and physiological properties, the biological and metabolic responses to these compounds and their fate in the environment are expected to be different. In this work we investigate a possible stereo and/or enantioselective degradation in soil and plants (sunflower) of the fungicide Metalaxyl (rac-Metalaxyl) and the new compound Metalaxyl-M ((-)-(R)-Metalaxyl) and propose procedures for extraction, cleanup, chromatographic separation of enantiomers, and determination of the R : S ratio by using an HPLC chiral column. The degradation of the two stereoisomers of Metalaxyl proved to be enantioselective and dependent on the media: the (+)-(S)-enantiomer showed a faster degradation in plants, while the (-)-(R)-enantiomer showed a faster degradation in soil. In this study there was no evidence that racemization of Metalaxyl-M took place either in soil or in sunflowers. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system. II. Distribution and degradation in the plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forczek, S T; Uhlírová, H; Gryndler, M; Albrechtová, J; Fuksová, K; Vágner, M; Schröder, P; Matucha, M

    2004-07-01

    Independently from its origin, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) as a phytotoxic substance affects coniferous trees. Its uptake, distribution and degradation were thus investigated in the Norway spruce/soil-system using 14C labeling. TCA is distributed in the tree mainly by the transpiration stream. As in soil, TCA seems to be degraded microbially, presumably by phyllosphere microorganisms in spruce needles. Indication of TCA biodegradation in trees is shown using both antibiotics and axenic plants.

  3. An insect herbivore microbiome with high plant biomass-degrading capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garret Suen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini, which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome's predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy.

  4. An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suen, Garret; Barry, Kerrie; Goodwin, Lynne; Scott, Jarrod; Aylward, Frank; Adams, Sandra; Pinto-Tomas, Adrian; Foster, Clifton; Pauly, Markus; Weimer, Paul; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Osterberger, Jolene; Harkins, Timothy; Slater, Steven; Donohue, Timothy; Currie, Cameron; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2010-09-23

    Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini), which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome?s predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy.

  5. An Insect Herbivore Microbiome with High Plant Biomass-Degrading Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Garret; Scott, Jarrod J.; Aylward, Frank O.; Adams, Sandra M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Pinto-Tomás, Adrián A.; Foster, Clifton E.; Pauly, Markus; Weimer, Paul J.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Bouffard, Pascal; Li, Lewyn; Osterberger, Jolene; Harkins, Timothy T.; Slater, Steven C.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2010-01-01

    Herbivores can gain indirect access to recalcitrant carbon present in plant cell walls through symbiotic associations with lignocellulolytic microbes. A paradigmatic example is the leaf-cutter ant (Tribe: Attini), which uses fresh leaves to cultivate a fungus for food in specialized gardens. Using a combination of sugar composition analyses, metagenomics, and whole-genome sequencing, we reveal that the fungus garden microbiome of leaf-cutter ants is composed of a diverse community of bacteria with high plant biomass-degrading capacity. Comparison of this microbiome's predicted carbohydrate-degrading enzyme profile with other metagenomes shows closest similarity to the bovine rumen, indicating evolutionary convergence of plant biomass degrading potential between two important herbivorous animals. Genomic and physiological characterization of two dominant bacteria in the fungus garden microbiome provides evidence of their capacity to degrade cellulose. Given the recent interest in cellulosic biofuels, understanding how large-scale and rapid plant biomass degradation occurs in a highly evolved insect herbivore is of particular relevance for bioenergy. PMID:20885794

  6. Sexual crossing of thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora heterothallica improved enzymatic degradation of sugar beet pulp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar-Pontes, Maria Victoria; Zhou, Miaomiao; van der Horst, Sjors; Theelen, Bart; de Vries, Ronald P.; van den Brink, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Background Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass requires a complex mixture of many different enzymes. Like most fungi, thermophilic Myceliophthora species therefore have a large set of enzymes targeting different linkages in plant polysaccharides. The majority of these enzymes have not been functi

  7. 植物多糖干预细胞黏附研究进展%Research progresses of plant polysaccharides on cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐先祥; 刁勇; 许瑞安; 孙爱静

    2012-01-01

    黏附分子介导的细胞黏附是最基本的生命现象,也是炎症、免疫、感染、血栓形成、肿瘤转移、伤口愈合等生理病理过程的细胞学基础,干预黏附己成为疾病防治的重要策略.植物多糖特别是中草药中的多糖具有抗炎、抗肿瘤、抗感染、调节免疫、保护心血管等多样的药理作用,本文综述了植物多糖对疾病过程中细胞黏附的干预作用.%Cell adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitutes essential life phenomenon. In inflammation, immunity, infection, thrombosis, tumor metastasis and wound healing, cell adhesion comes into being the basic physiological and pathological process. Intervening with cell adhesion has been the important therapeutic and prophylactic strategies for diseases. Accumulated evidence has indicated that plant polysaccharides especially those exacted from Chinese traditional and herbal drugs displayed various pharmacological effects such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, anti-infection, immunomodulation, cardiovascular protective effects and so on. In this paper, the research progress of plant polysaccharides on cell adhesion is reviewed.

  8. Soil bacteria showing a potential of chlorpyrifos degradation and plant growth enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa Akbar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Since 1960s, the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos has been widely used for the purpose of pest control. However, given its persistence and toxicity towards life forms, the elimination of chlorpyrifos from contaminated sites has become an urgent issue. For this process bioremediation is the method of choice. Results: Two bacterial strains, JCp4 and FCp1, exhibiting chlorpyrifos-degradation potential were isolated from pesticide contaminated agricultural fields. These isolates were able to degrade 84.4% and 78.6% of the initial concentration of chlorpyrifos (100 mg L-1 within a period of only 10 days. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these strains were identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans (JCp4 and Ochrobactrum sp. (FCp1. These strains exhibited the ability to degrade chlorpyrifos in sterilized as well as non-sterilized soils, and were able to degrade 93-100% of the input concentration (200 mg kg-1 within 42 days. The rate of degradation in inoculated soils ranged from 4.40 to 4.76 mg-1 kg-1 d-1 with rate constants varying between 0.047 and 0.069 d-1. These strains also displayed substantial plant growth promoting traits such as phosphate solubilization, indole acetic acid production and ammonia production both in absence as well as in the presence of chlorpyrifos. However, presence of chlorpyrifos (100 and 200 mg L-1 was found to have a negative effect on indole acetic acid production and phosphate solubilization with percentage reduction values ranging between 2.65-10.6% and 4.5-17.6%, respectively. Plant growth experiment demonstrated that chlorpyrifos has a negative effect on plant growth and causes a decrease in parameters such as percentage germination, plant height and biomass. Inoculation of soil with chlorpyrifos-degrading strains was found to enhance plant growth significantly in terms of plant length and weight. Moreover, it was noted that these strains degraded chlorpyrifos at an increased rate (5

  9. Influence of plant growth on degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in sludge-amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, G K; Egsgaard, H; Ambus, P; Jensen, E S; Grøn, C

    2001-01-01

    Widespread application of sewage sludge to agricultural soils in Denmark has led to concern about the possible accumulation and effects of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in the soil ecosystem. Therefore, we have studied the uptake and degradation of LAS in greenhouse pot experiments. Sewage sludge was incorporated into a sandy soil to give a range from very low to very high applications (0.4 to 90 Mg dry wt. ha(-1)). In addition, LAS was added as water solutions. The soil was transferred to pots and sown with barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Apex), rape (Brassica napus L. cv. Hyola 401), or carrot (Daucus carota L.). Also, plant-free controls were established. For all additions there was no plant uptake above the detection limit at 0.5 mg LAS kg(-1) d.w, but plant growth stimulated the degradation. With a growth period of 30 d, LAS concentrations in soil from pots with rape had dropped from 27 to 1.4 mg kg(-1) dry wt., but in plant-free pots the concentration decreased only to 2.4 mg kg(-1) dry wt. When LAS was added as a spike, the final concentration in soil from planted pots was 0.7 mg kg(-1) dry wt., but in pots without plants the final concentration was much higher (2.5 mg kg(-1) dry wt.). During degradation, the relative fraction of homologues C10, C11, and C12 decreased, while C13 increased.

  10. Characterization of three plant biomass-degrading microbial consortia by metagenomics- and metasecretomics-based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Schuckel, Julia; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Willats, William George Tycho; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The selection of microbes by enrichment on plant biomass has been proposed as an efficient way to develop new strategies for lignocellulose saccharification. Here, we report an in-depth analysis of soil-derived microbial consortia that were trained to degrade once-used wheat straw (WS1-M),

  11. Diurnal variation in degradation of phytic acid by plant phytase in the pig stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemme, P.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.; Mroz, Z.; Beynen, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of plant phytase on the gastric degradation of phytic acid and digestibilities of DM and P, and their diurnal variation were evaluated in pigs from 90 to 115 kg BW fitted with simple duodenal T-cannulas. Three diets were fed to three pigs in four collection periods according to a cross-o

  12. Unsaturated lipid matrices protect plant sterols from degradation during heating treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Blanca; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2016-04-01

    The interest in plant sterols enriched foods has recently enhanced due to their healthy properties. The influence of the unsaturation degree of different fatty acids methyl esters (FAME: stearate, oleate, linoletate and linolenate) on a mixture of three plant sterols (PS: campesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol) was evaluated at 180 °C for up to 180 min. Sterols degraded slower in the presence of unsaturated FAME. Both PS and FAME degradation fit a first order kinetic model (R(2)>0.9). Maximum oxysterols concentrations were achieved at 20 min in neat PS and 120 min in lipid mixtures and this maximum amount decreased with increasing their unsaturation degree. In conclusion, the presence of FAME delayed PS degradation and postponed oxysterols formation. This protective effect was further promoted by increasing the unsaturation degree of FAME. This evidence could help industries to optimize the formulation of sterol-enriched products, so that they could maintain their healthy properties during cooking or processing.

  13. Prioritization of a plant polysaccharide over a mucus carbohydrate is enforced by a Bacteroides hybrid two-component system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan B; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2012-08-01

    Bacteroides is a dominant genus within the intestinal microbiota of healthy humans. Key adaptations of the Bacteroides to the dynamic intestinal ecosystem include a diverse repertoire of genes involved in sensing and processing numerous diet- and host-derived polysaccharides. One such adaptation is the carbohydrate-sensing hybrid two-component system (HTCS) family of signalling sensors, which has been widely expanded within the Bacteroides. Using Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron as a model, we have created a chimeric HTCS consisting of the well-characterized sensing domain of one HTCS, BT1754, and the regulatory domain of another HTCS, BT0366, to explore the regulatory capabilities of these molecules. We found that the BT0366 regulatory region directly binds to and mediates induction of the adjacent polysaccharide utilization locus (PUL) using whole-genome transcriptional profiling after inducing signalling through our chimeric protein. We also found that BT0366 activation simultaneously leads to repression of distal PULs involved in mucus carbohydrate consumption. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which an HTCS enforces a nutrient hierarchy within the Bacteroides via induction and repression of multiple PULs. Thus, hybrid two-component systems provide a mechanism for prioritizing consumption of carbohydrates through simultaneous binding and regulation of multiple polysaccharide utilization loci. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Removal of the pharmaceuticals ibuprofen and iohexol by four wetland plant species in hydroponic culture: plant uptake and microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Lv, Tao; Carvalho, Pedro N; Arias, Carlos A; Chen, Zhanghe; Brix, Hans

    2016-02-01

    We aimed at assessing the effects of four wetland plant species commonly used in constructed wetland systems: Typha, Phragmites, Iris and Juncus for removing ibuprofen (IBU) and iohexol (IOH) from spiked culture solution and exploring the mechanisms responsible for the removal. IBU was nearly completely removed by all plant species during the 24-day experiment, whereas the IOH removal varied between 13 and 80 %. Typha and Phragmites were the most efficient in removing IBU and IOH, respectively, with first-order removal rate constants of 0.38 and 0.06 day(-1), respectively. The pharmaceuticals were taken up by the roots and translocated to the aerial tissues. However, at the end of the experiment, plant accumulation constituted only up to 1.1 and 5.7 % of the amount of IBU and IOH spiked initially. The data suggest that the plants mainly function by facilitating pharmaceutical degradation in the rhizosphere through release of root exudates.

  15. Combined use of alkane-degrading and plant growth-promoting bacteria enhanced phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara, Nain; Afzal, Muhammad; Ansari, Tariq M; Tahseen, Razia; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Inoculation of plants with pollutant-degrading and plant growth-promoting microorganisms is a simple strategy to enhance phytoremediation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation of different bacterial strains, possessing alkane-degradation and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1 -carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, on plant growth and phytoremediation activity. Carpet grass (Axonopus affinis) was planted in soil spiked with diesel (1% w/w) for 90 days and inoculated with different bacterial strains, Pseudomonas sp. ITRH25, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Burkholderia sp. PsJN, individually and in combination. Generally, bacterial application increased total numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere ofcarpet grass, plant biomass production, hydrocarbon degradation and reduced genotoxicity. Bacterial strains possessing different beneficial traits affect plant growth and phytoremediation activity in different ways. Maximum bacterial population, plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were achieved when carpet grass was inoculated with a consortium of three strains. Enhanced plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were associated with increased numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of carpet grass. The present study revealed that the combined use of different bacterial strains, exhibiting different beneficial traits, is a highly effective strategy to improve plant growth and phytoremediation activity.

  16. Community analysis of plant biomass-degrading microorganisms from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Palumbo, Anthony V; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2015-02-01

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels can potentially be improved by employing robust microorganisms and enzymes that efficiently deconstruct plant polysaccharides at elevated temperatures. Many of the geothermal features of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are surrounded by vegetation providing a source of allochthonic material to support heterotrophic microbial communities adapted to utilize plant biomass as a primary carbon and energy source. In this study, a well-known hot spring environment, Obsidian Pool (OBP), was examined for potential biomass-active microorganisms using cultivation-independent and enrichment techniques. Analysis of 33,684 archaeal and 43,784 bacterial quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences revealed that archaeal diversity in the main pool was higher than bacterial; however, in the vegetated area, overall bacterial diversity was significantly higher. Of notable interest was a flooded depression adjacent to OBP supporting a stand of Juncus tweedyi, a heat-tolerant rush commonly found growing near geothermal features in YNP. The microbial community from heated sediments surrounding the plants was enriched in members of the Firmicutes including potentially (hemi)cellulolytic bacteria from the genera Clostridium, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caldicellulosiruptor, and Thermoanaerobacter. Enrichment cultures containing model and real biomass substrates were established at a wide range of temperatures (55-85 °C). Microbial activity was observed up to 80 °C on all substrates including Avicel, xylan, switchgrass, and Populus sp. Independent of substrate, Caloramator was enriched at lower (65 °C) temperatures.

  17. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeasts from wastewater in the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Maryam; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Phenol and phenolic compounds are environmental pollutants present in industrial wastewaters such as coal tar, oil refineries and petrochemical plants. Phenol removal from industrial effluents is extremely important for the protection of environment. Usually, phenol degradation is carried out by physicochemical methods that are costly and produce hazardous metabolites. Recently, phenol biodegradation has been considered. Yeasts are the most important phenol biodegraders. In this study, the phenol-degrading yeast from environmental samples (soil and wastewater) was isolated from the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman. Then total heterotrophic yeasts were counted. The soil samples had higher rates of yeast degrader, in comparison to wastewater samples. After three passages, four yeasts (K1, K2, K7 and K11) that had the highest growth rate were selected for further study. Also, these yeasts were able to remove phenol measured by Gibbs reagent. The effect of four different concentrations of phenol (50, 125, 200 and 275) mgL(-1) was measured and three degradation patterns in these yeasts were observed. The hydrophobicity and emulsification activity were measured in all eleven yeasts. Finally, strong yeasts in phenol degrading yeasts were identified by molecular method using amplification of 18S rRNA gene region. The sequencing results showed that these isolated yeasts belonged to Candida tropicalis strain K1, Pichia guilliermondii strain K2, Meyerozyma guilliermondii strain K7 and C. tropicalis strain K11.

  18. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeasts from wastewater in the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Karimi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Phenol and phenolic compounds are environmental pollutants present in industrial wastewaters such as coal tar, oil refineries and petrochemical plants. Phenol removal from industrial effluents is extremely important for the protection of environment. Usually, phenol degradation is carried out by physicochemical methods that are costly and produce hazardous metabolites. Recently, phenol biodegradation has been considered. Yeasts are the most important phenol biodegraders. In this study, the phenol-degrading yeast from environmental samples (soil and wastewater was isolated from the coking plant of Zarand, Kerman. Then total heterotrophic yeasts were counted. The soil samples had higher rates of yeast degrader, in comparison to wastewater samples. After three passages, four yeasts (K1, K2, K7 and K11 that had the highest growth rate were selected for further study. Also, these yeasts were able to remove phenol measured by Gibbs reagent. The effect of four different concentrations of phenol (50, 125, 200 and 275 mg L−1 was measured and three degradation patterns in these yeasts were observed. The hydrophobicity and emulsification activity were measured in all eleven yeasts. Finally, strong yeasts in phenol degrading yeasts were identified by molecular method using amplification of 18S rRNA gene region. The sequencing results showed that these isolated yeasts belonged to Candida tropicalis strain K1, Pichia guilliermondii strain K2, Meyerozyma guilliermondii strain K7 and C. tropicalis strain K11.

  19. Radiation-induced degradation of sodium alginate and its plant growth promotion effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Abd El-Mohdy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Alginate was irradiated as a solid with 60Co gamma rays in the dose range of 20–100 kGy to investigate the effect of radiation on alginates. One of the principle factors for reducing the cost is achieving the degradation at low irradiation doses which occurs with addition of chemical initiator to NaAlg during irradiation process that leads to a synergistic effect, which remarkably increases the degradation efficiency of alginate. The factors affecting the degradation process such as irradiation dose and potassium per-sulfate (KPS addition were studied. The average molecular weight of the irradiated alginate was investigated in detail by using several complementary techniques such as chromatography and viscometry. The lowest molecular weight of alginate resulted at 100 kGy and added KPS, whereas the highest one at 20 kGy in absence of KPS. Characterization of the oligoalginates obtained by radiation degradation was performed by FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, XRD and TGA. The effect of water-soluble radiation-induced alginate fractions on the growth promotion of Faba bean plant was studied. The highest plant growth and seed yield compared with control occurred for plants sprayed with low molecular weight NaAlg fractions (treated with 100 kGy and added KPS.

  20. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. L.; Goltz, M. N.; Agrawal, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~ 1.9 mg L- 1, and initial aqueous [CAH] ~ 150 μg L- 1; cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12 ± 0.01 and 0.59 ± 0.07 d- 1, respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  1. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  2. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  3. Enhanced degradation activity by endophytic bacteria of plants growing in hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, L.; Germida, J.J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Greer, C.W. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

    2006-07-01

    The feasibility of using phytoremediation for cleaning soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons was discussed. Petroleum hydrocarbons are problematic because of their toxicity, mobility and persistence in the environment. Appropriate clean-up methods are needed, given that 60 per cent of Canada's contaminated sites contain these compounds. Phytoremediation is an in situ biotechnology in which plants are used to facilitate contaminant removal. The approach relies on a synergistic relationship between plants and their root-associated microbial communities. Previous studies on phytoremediation have focussed on rhizosphere communities. However, it is believed that endophytic microbes may also play a vital role in organic contaminant degradation. This study investigated the structural and functional dynamics of both rhizosphere and endophytic microbial communities of plants from a phytoremediation field site in south-eastern Saskatchewan. The former flare pit contains up to 10,000 ppm of F3 to F4 hydrocarbon fractions. Root samples were collected from tall wheatgrass, wild rye, saltmeadow grass, perennial ryegrass, and alfalfa. Culture-based and culture-independent methods were used to evaluate the microbial communities associated with these roots. Most probable number assays showed that the rhizosphere communities contained more n-hexadecane, diesel fuel, and PAH degraders. However, mineralization assays with 14C labelled n-hexadecane, naphthalene, and phenanthrene showed that endophytic communities had more degradation activities per standardized initial degrader populations. Total community DNA samples taken from bulk, rhizosphere, and endophytic samples, were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. It was shown that specific bacteria increased in endophytic communities compared to rhizosphere communities. It was suggested plants may possibly recruit specific bacteria in response to hydrocarbon contamination, thereby increasing degradation

  4. The degradation of potato virus M (PVM particles in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of potato virus M particles was observed in the cells of Solanum tuberosum, Solanum rostratum, Lycopersicon esculentum and Lycopersicon chilense plants infected with this virus. PVM particles found in the cytoplasm of infected parenchyma cells grouped together in the form of inclusions, often found near the tonoplast. The ends of the virus particles and the tonoplast came into close contact. Cytoplasmic protrusions containing PVM particles, reaching into vacuoles were formed in those places. In addition to a large central vacuole, small vacuoles were observed in cells containing PVM particles. Various stages of degradation of cytoplasmic protrusions were observed both in the large and small vacuoles.

  5. Degradation of biodegradable plastic mulch films in soil environment by phylloplane fungi isolated from gramineous plants

    OpenAIRE

    Koitabashi, Motoo; Noguchi, Masako T; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Suzuki, Ken; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsushima, Seiya; Kitamoto, Hiroko K.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the biodegradation of biodegradable plastic (BP) mulch films, 1227 fungal strains were isolated from plant surface (phylloplane) and evaluated for BP-degrading ability. Among them, B47-9 a strain isolated from the leaf surface of barley showed the strongest ability to degrade poly-(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate) (PBSA) and poly-(butylene succinate) (PBS) films. The strain grew on the surface of soil-mounted BP films, produced breaks along the direction of hyphal growth ind...

  6. Degradation of biodegradable plastic mulch films in soil environment by phylloplane fungi isolated from gramineous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitabashi, Motoo; Noguchi, Masako T; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Suzuki, Ken; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsushima, Seiya; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2012-08-02

    To improve the biodegradation of biodegradable plastic (BP) mulch films, 1227 fungal strains were isolated from plant surface (phylloplane) and evaluated for BP-degrading ability. Among them, B47-9 a strain isolated from the leaf surface of barley showed the strongest ability to degrade poly-(butylene succinate-co-butylene adipate) (PBSA) and poly-(butylene succinate) (PBS) films. The strain grew on the surface of soil-mounted BP films, produced breaks along the direction of hyphal growth indicated that it secreted a BP-degrading enzyme, and has directly contributing to accelerating the degradation of film. Treatment with the culture filtrate decomposed 91.2 wt%, 23.7 wt%, and 14.6 wt% of PBSA, PBS, and commercially available BP polymer blended mulch film, respectively, on unsterlized soil within 6 days. The PCR-DGGE analysis of the transition of soil microbial community during film degradation revealed that the process was accompanied with drastic changes in the population of soil fungi and Acantamoeba spp., as well as the growth of inoculated strain B47-9. It has a potential for application in the development of an effective method for accelerating degradation of used plastics under actual field conditions.

  7. Understory flora and community physiognomy of planted forests in the degraded purple soil ecosystem, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhan-yuan; YUEYong-jie; GUOJian-fen; CHENGuang-shui; XIEJin-sheng; HEZong-ming; YANGYu-sheng

    2005-01-01

    The flora and community physiognomy of degraded plantation ecosystems on purple soil were investigated in Ninghua County of Fujian Province, China to understand the relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem processes.. Four different restoration communities (labeled as ecological restoration treatment I, II, Ill and IV) were selected by space-time replacement method according to the erosion intensity in degraded purple soil ecosystem. The results showed that there were totally 86 plant species belonging to 78 genera and 43 families in the degraded purple soil ecosystem. Of the 15 types of distribution area in spermatophyte genus, 12 types were found in the purple soil ecosystem. Along restoration gradient from low to high, plant growth type and life form spectra became abundant more and more, and the spermatophyte genera for each distribution area type and genera numbers for different foliage characters increased as well. It is concluded that the plant flora and physiognomy in ecological restoration process become more complex and diverse, indicating that the forest ecosystem on purple soil tends to be more stable.

  8. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  9. S-layer homology domain proteins Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 are implicated in plant polysaccharide deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Inci; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic bacteria that grow on plant polysaccharides. The genomes of Caldicellulosiruptor species reveal certain surface layer homology (SLH) domain proteins that have distinguishing features, pointing to a role in lignocellulose deconstruction. Two of these proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (Csac_0678 and Csac_2722) were examined from this perspective. In addition to three contiguous SLH domains, the Csac_0678 gene encodes a glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) catalytic domain and a family 28 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM); orthologs to Csac_0678 could be identified in all genome-sequenced Caldicellulosiruptor species. Recombinant Csac_0678 was optimally active at 75°C and pH 5.0, exhibiting both endoglucanase and xylanase activities. SLH domain removal did not impact Csac_0678 GH activity, but deletion of the CBM28 domain eliminated binding to crystalline cellulose and rendered the enzyme inactive on this substrate. Csac_2722 is the largest open reading frame (ORF) in the C. saccharolyticus genome (predicted molecular mass of 286,516 kDa) and contains two putative sugar-binding domains, two Big4 domains (bacterial domains with an immunoglobulin [Ig]-like fold), and a cadherin-like (Cd) domain. Recombinant Csac_2722, lacking the SLH and Cd domains, bound to cellulose and had detectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrolytic activity. Antibodies directed against Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 confirmed that these proteins bound to the C. saccharolyticus S-layer. Their cellular localization and functional biochemical properties indicate roles for Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 in recruitment and hydrolysis of complex polysaccharides and the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, these results suggest that related SLH domain proteins in other Caldicellulosiruptor genomes may also be important contributors to plant biomass utilization.

  10. Mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids : degradation in OSPW and wetland plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Water Science and Technology Directorate

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids and the degradation in OSPW and wetland plants. It presented background information on the Athabasca oil sands and naphthenic acids which involve a mixture of alkanes and cycloalkane carboxylic acids with aliphatic side chains. The presentation also discussed mass spectrometry with electrospray operating in negative ion modes. Loop injection, external standard methods and solid phase extraction were reviewed along with improved analysis by removing background ions. Other topics that were presented included hydroponic test systems and wetland plant toxicity, growth and transpiration. It was concluded that dissipation included species containing oxygen, ozone, O{sub 4}, and O{sub 5}. tabs., figs.

  11. Dimethoate degradation in plants and during processing of yerba maté leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmalko Miguel E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study degradation kinetics of dimethoate in plants of Ilex paraguariensis Saint Hilaire (or yerba maté and during its processing. To determine dimethoate concentration, a capillary gas chromatography technique with a mass selective detector was used. Half-life times in plants ranked between 9.8 and 11.8 days. During processing, with a blanching and two drying steps, dimethoate concentration decayed to a 22.7% of its initial value (in dry basis; while during seasoning step (at 45degreesC, half-life time was 17.3 days. With these values, preharvest safety interval was determined.

  12. Plant species influence on soil C after afforestation of Mediterranean degraded soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria T.; García-Vargas, Carlos; Madejón, Engracia; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-04-01

    Increasing C sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is one of the main current environmental challenges to mitigate climate change. Afforestation of degraded and contaminated lands is one of the key strategies to achieve an increase in C sequestration in ecosystems. Plant species differ in their mechanisms of C-fixation, C allocation into different plant organs, and interaction with soil microorganisms, all these factors influencing the dynamics of soil C following the afforestation of degraded soils. In this work we examine the influence of different woody plant species on soil C dynamics in degraded and afforested Mediterranean soils. The soils were former agricultural lands that were polluted by a mining accident and later afforested with different native plant species. We analysed the effect of four of these species (Olea europaea var. sylvestris Brot., Populus alba L., Pistacia lentiscus L. and Retama sphaerocarpa (L.) Boiss.) on different soil C fractions, soil nutrient availability, microbial activity (soil enzyme activities) and soil CO2 fluxes 15 years after the establishment of the plantations. Results suggest that the influence of the planted trees and shrubs is still limited, being more pronounced in the more acidic and nutrient-poor soils. Litter accumulation varied among species, with the highest C accumulated in the litter under the deciduous species (Populus alba L.). No differences were observed in the amount of total soil organic C among the studied species, or in the concentrations of phenols and sugars in the dissolved organic C (DOC), which might have indicated differences in the biodegradability of the DOC. Microbial biomass and activity was highly influenced by soil pH, and plant species had a significant influence on soil pH in the more acidic site. Soil CO2 fluxes were more influenced by the plant species than total soil C content. Our results suggest that changes in total soil C stocks after the afforestation of degraded Mediterranean

  13. Predictive based monitoring of nuclear plant component degradation using support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, Statistics; Alamaniotis, Miltiadis [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Nuclear Engineering; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are large installations comprised of many active and passive assets. Degradation monitoring of all these assets is expensive (labor cost) and highly demanding task. In this paper a framework based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) for online surveillance of critical parameter degradation of NPP components is proposed. In this case, on time replacement or maintenance of components will prevent potential plant malfunctions, and reduce the overall operational cost. In the current work, we apply SVR equipped with a Gaussian kernel function to monitor components. Monitoring includes the one-step-ahead prediction of the component’s respective operational quantity using the SVR model, while the SVR model is trained using a set of previous recorded degradation histories of similar components. Predictive capability of the model is evaluated upon arrival of a sensor measurement, which is compared to the component failure threshold. A maintenance decision is based on a fuzzy inference system that utilizes three parameters: (i) prediction evaluation in the previous steps, (ii) predicted value of the current step, (iii) and difference of current predicted value with components failure thresholds. The proposed framework will be tested on turbine blade degradation data.

  14. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  15. Soil Seed Bank and Plant Community Development in Passive Restoration of Degraded Sandy Grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhui Miao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of passive restoration on soil seed bank and vegetation recovery, we measured the species composition and density of the soil seed bank, as well as the species composition, density, coverage, and height of the extant vegetation in sites passively restored for 0, 4, 7, and 12 years (S0, S4, S7, and S12 in a degraded grassland in desert land. Compared with S0, three more species in the soil seed bank at depths of 0–30 cm and one more plant species in the community was detected in S12. Seed density within the topsoil (0–5 cm was five times higher in S12 than that in S0. Plant densities in S7 and S12 were triple and quadruple than that in S0. Plant coverage was increased by 1.5 times (S4, double (S7, and triple (S12 compared with S0. Sørensen’s index of similarity in species composition between the soil seed bank and the plant community were high (0.43–0.63, but it was lower in short-term restoration sites (S4 and S7 than that in no and long-term restoration sites (S0 and S12. The soil seed bank recovered more slowly than the plant community under passive restoration. Passive restoration is a useful method to recover the soil seed bank and vegetation in degraded grasslands.

  16. Plasma Membrane Protein Ubiquitylation and Degradation as Determinants of Positional Growth in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Korbei; Christian Luschnig

    2013-01-01

    Being sessile organisms, plants evolved an unparalleled plasticity in their post-embryonic development, allowing them to adapt and fine-tune their vital parameters to an ever-changing environment. Cross-talk between plants and their environment requires tight regulation of information exchange at the plasma membrane (PM). Plasma membrane proteins mediate such communication, by sensing variations in nutrient availability, external cues as well as by controlled solute transport across the membrane border. Localiza-tion and steady-state levels are essential for PM protein function and ongoing research identified cis- and trans-acting determinants, involved in control of plant PM protein localization and turnover. In this overview, we summarize recent progress in our understanding of plant PM protein sorting and degradation via ubiquitylation, a post-translational and reversible modification of proteins. We highlight characterized components of the machinery involved in sorting of ubiquitylated PM proteins and discuss consequences of protein ubiquitylation on fate of selected PM proteins. Specifically, we focus on the role of ubiquitylation and PM protein degradation in the regulation of polar auxin transport (PAT). We combine this regulatory circuit with further aspects of PM protein sorting control, to address the interplay of events that might control PAT and polarized growth in higher plants.

  17. Modeling Hawaiian ecosystem degradation due to invasive plants under current and future climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsino, Adam E.; Fortini, Lucas B.; Amidon, Fred A.; Miller, Stephen E.; Jacobi, James D.; Price, Jonathan P.; `Ohukani`ohi`a Gon, Sam; Koob, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability projections resulted in estimates of species richness and diversity that were subsequently used to define an invasibility metric. The invasibility metric was defined from species distribution models with 0.8; True Skill Statistic >0.75) as evaluated per species. Invasibility was further projected onto a 2100 Hawaii regional climate change scenario to assess the change in potential habitat degradation. The distribution defined by the invasibility metric delineates areas of known and potential invasibility under current climate conditions and, when projected into the future, estimates potential reductions in native ecosystem extent due to climate-driven invasive incursion. We have provided the code used to develop these metrics to facilitate their wider use (Code S1). This work will help determine the vulnerability of native-dominated ecosystems to the combined threats of climate change and invasive species, and thus help prioritize ecosystem and species management actions.

  18. Modeling Hawaiian ecosystem degradation due to invasive plants under current and future climates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E Vorsino

    Full Text Available Occupation of native ecosystems by invasive plant species alters their structure and/or function. In Hawaii, a subset of introduced plants is regarded as extremely harmful due to competitive ability, ecosystem modification, and biogeochemical habitat degradation. By controlling this subset of highly invasive ecosystem modifiers, conservation managers could significantly reduce native ecosystem degradation. To assess the invasibility of vulnerable native ecosystems, we selected a proxy subset of these invasive plants and developed robust ensemble species distribution models to define their respective potential distributions. The combinations of all species models using both binary and continuous habitat suitability projections resulted in estimates of species richness and diversity that were subsequently used to define an invasibility metric. The invasibility metric was defined from species distribution models with 0.8; True Skill Statistic >0.75 as evaluated per species. Invasibility was further projected onto a 2100 Hawaii regional climate change scenario to assess the change in potential habitat degradation. The distribution defined by the invasibility metric delineates areas of known and potential invasibility under current climate conditions and, when projected into the future, estimates potential reductions in native ecosystem extent due to climate-driven invasive incursion. We have provided the code used to develop these metrics to facilitate their wider use (Code S1. This work will help determine the vulnerability of native-dominated ecosystems to the combined threats of climate change and invasive species, and thus help prioritize ecosystem and species management actions.

  19. Utilization of polysaccharides by radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation treatment has been applied for improvement or pasteurization of agro-resources to recycle the resources and to reduce the pollution of environment. By using the radiation effect for pasteurization, upgrading of cellulosic wastes of oil palm to animal feeds and mushroom has been studied under the bilateral research cooperation between JAERI and MINT (Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research). The necessary dose for pasteurization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB), which is a main cellulosic by-product of palm oil industry, was determined as 10 kGy. After pasteurization, the EFB substrate was inoculated with Pleurotus sajor-caju and fermented for 1 month. The digestibility and nutritional value of fermented products were evaluated as ruminant feeds and the mushroom can be produced as by-product. For the improvement of resources, radiation effects on polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to induce the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities. The anti-bacterial activity and elicitor activity of chitosan were induced by irradiation. The induction of phytoalexins was also observed by irradiated pectin but the higher elicitor activity for pisatin was obtained by chitosan than pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa carrageenan irradiated at 100 kGy. Furthermore, some radiation degraded polysaccharides suppressed the damage of environmental stress on plants. (author)

  20. Nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes alter the microbial community and the fermentation patterns of barley cultivars and wheat products in an in vitro model of the porcine gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindelle, Jérôme; Pieper, Robert; Montoya, Carlos A; Van Kessel, Andrew G; Leterme, Pascal

    2011-06-01

    An in vitro experiment was carried out to assess how nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)-degrading enzymes influence the fermentation of dietary fiber in the pig large intestine. Seven wheat and barley products and cultivars with differing carbohydrate fractions were hydrolyzed using pepsin and pancreatin in the presence or not of NSP-degrading enzymes (xylanase and β-glucanase) and the filter retentate was subsequently fermented with sow fecal bacteria. Dry matter, starch, crude protein and β-glucan digestibilities during hydrolysis were measured. Fermentation kinetics of the hydrolyzed ingredients were modelled. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production and molar ratio were compared after 12, 24 and 72 h. Microbial communities were analyzed after 72 h of fermentation using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. The results showed an increase of nutrient digestibility (Penzyme. SCFA and bacterial community profiles also indicated a shift from propionate to acetate and an increase in cellulolytic Ruminococcus- and xylanolytic Clostridium-like bacteria. This is explained by the increase in slowly fermentable insoluble carbohydrate and the lower proportion of rapidly fermentable β-glucan and starch in the retentate when grains were incubated with NSP-degrading enzymes. Shifts were also different for the four barley varieties investigated, showing that the efficiency of the enzymes depends on the structure of the carbohydrate fractions in cereal products and cultivars.

  1. Effects of a coal-fired power plant on the rock lichen Rhizoplaca melanophthalma: chlorophyll degradation and electrolyte leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, Jayne; Harper, Kimball T.

    1990-01-01

    Chlorophyll degradation and electrolyte leakage were measured for the umbilicate desert lichen Rhizoplaca melanophthalma (Ram.) Leuck. & Poelt in the vicinity of a coal-fired power plant near Page, Arizona. Patterns of lichen damage indicated by chlorophyll degradation were similar to those indicated by electrolyte leakage. Regression analyses of chlorophyll degradation as well as electrolyte leakage on distance from the power plant were significant (p lichen damage decreased with increasing distance from the power plant. Mean values for both variables at the two sites closest to the power plant (7 and 12 km) differed significantly from values for the two sites farthest from the plant (21 and 42 km; p < 0.001). Mean values within each group (7 and 12 km; 21 and 42 km) do not differ significantly for either parameter. It is suggested that effluents from the power plant combine with local weather factors to produce the observed levels of damage.

  2. Mountain pastures of Qilian Shan: plant communities, grazing impact and degradation status (Gansu province, NW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Alina; Schickhoff, Udo; Shunli, Wang; Ming, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Qilian Mountains are the water source region for the low arid reaches of HeiHe river basin (Gansu province, NW China). Due to overstocking and overgrazing during the last decades adverse ecological ef¬fects, in particular on soil properties and hydrological cycle, are to be expected in growing land areas. Vegetation cover is very important to prevent erosion process and to sustain stable subsurface runoff and ground water flow. The aim of this research is to identify plant communities, detecting grazing-induced and spatially differentiated changes in vegetation patterns, and to evaluate status of pasture land degradation.The study area is located in the spring/autumn pasture area of South Qilian Mountains between 2600-3600 m a.s.l., covering five main vegetation types: spruce forest, alpine shrubland, shrubby grassland, mountain grassland, degraded mountain grassland. In order to analyze gradual changes in vegetation patterns along altitudinal and grazing gradients and to classify related plant communities, quantitative and qualitative relevé data were collected (coverage, species composition, abundance of unpalatable plants, plant functional types, etc.). Vegetation was classified using hierarchical cluster analyses. Indirect Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) was used to analyze variation in relationships between vegetation, environmental factors, and grazing impact. According to DCA results, distribution of the plant communities was strongly affected by altitude and exposition. Grassland floristic gradients showed greater dependence on grazing impact, which correlated contrarily with soil organic content, soil moisture and pH. Highest numbers of species richness and alpha diversity were detected in alpine shrubland vegetation type. Comparing the monitoring data for the recent nine years, a trend of deterioration, species successions and shift in dominant species becomes obvious. Species indicating degrading site environmental conditions were identified

  3. Plant biomass degrading ability of the coprophilic ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Marie; Tangthirasunun, Narumon; Ning, Xie; Brun, Sylvain; Gautier, Valérie; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Silar, Philippe; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of plant biomass is a major challenge towards the production of bio-based compounds and materials. As key lignocellulolytic enzyme producers, filamentous fungi represent a promising reservoir to tackle this challenge. Among them, the coprophilous ascomycete Podospora anserina has been used as a model organism to study various biological mechanisms because its genetics are well understood and controlled. In 2008, the sequencing of its genome revealed a great diversity of enzymes targeting plant carbohydrates and lignin. Since then, a large array of lignocellulose-acting enzymes has been characterized and genetic analyses have enabled the understanding of P. anserina metabolism and development on plant biomass. Overall, these research efforts shed light on P. anserina strategy to unlock recalcitrant lignocellulose deconstruction.

  4. Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Martina

    2009-08-01

    A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  5. The removal of polysaccharide in three plant DNA extraction methods%3种植物DNA提取法中多糖类物质去除效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洪晓; 杨凯; 刘建斌

    2011-01-01

    To find an efficient method for the removal of polysaccharide in plant DNA extract process, the CTAB, high salt and Chlorobenzene methods were used to extract the genome DNA of three Syringa plants. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometer methods were adopted to test the DNA quality, and the concentration changes of polysaccharid in the DNA extraction process were tested with anthraquinone hydrate-sulfuric. The result showed that the removal efficiency of polysaccharide in the three methods were similar. The high salt method was safer and convenienter than the other two methods. The influence of polysaccharide in the high salt methods was removed in a special step. The result provided theoretical basis for the removal of polysaccharide in plant DNA extraction process.%为探明DNA提取过程中去除多糖的有效方法,以丁香属3种植物为材料,用3种DNA提取方法(普通CTAB法、氯苯法和高盐法)提取丁香属植物基因组DNA.对提取的DNA质量采用琼脂糖凝胶电泳和紫外分光光度计法进行检测,并采用蒽酮硫酸法测定DNA提取过程中多糖含量的变化.结果表明:3种方法的多糖去除率相近且都比较高.高盐法与前两种方法相比对人体和环境危害较小且操作简单,是最适合该属植物的DNA提取方法.该方法采用了专门的去除多糖的步骤,为DNA提取过程中多糖的去除提供了一定的理论依据.

  6. Structure of Plant Cell Walls : XXVI. The Walls of Suspension-Cultured Sycamore Cells Contain a Family of Rhamnogalacturonan-I-Like Pectic Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T; Thomas, J; Darvill, A; Albersheim, P

    1989-02-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na(2)CO(3) at 1 and 22 degrees C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for approximately 4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO(3)-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na(2)CO(3) at 1 degrees C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells.

  7. Sugar composition of the pectic polysaccharides of charophytes, the closest algal relatives of land-plants: presence of 3-O-methyl-D-galactose residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Christina; Gregson, Timothy; Murray, Lorna; Sadler, Ian H; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    During evolution, plants have acquired and/or lost diverse sugar residues as cell-wall constituents. Of particular interest are primordial cell-wall features that existed, and in some cases abruptly changed, during the momentous step whereby land-plants arose from charophytic algal ancestors. Polysaccharides were extracted from four charophyte orders [Chlorokybales (Chlorokybus atmophyticus), Klebsormidiales (Klebsormidium fluitans, K. subtile), Charales (Chara vulgaris, Nitella flexilis), Coleochaetales (Coleochaete scutata)] and an early-diverging land-plant (Anthoceros agrestis). 'Pectins' and 'hemicelluloses', operationally defined as extractable in oxalate (100 °C) and 6 m NaOH (37 °C), respectively, were acid- or Driselase-hydrolysed, and the monosaccharides analysed chromatographically. One unusual monosaccharide, 'U', was characterized by (1)H/(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and also enzymically. 'U' was identified as 3-O-methyl-D-galactose (3-MeGal). All pectins, except in Klebsormidium, contained acid- and Driselase-releasable galacturonate, suggesting homogalacturonan. All pectins, without exception, released rhamnose and galactose on acid hydrolysis; however, only in 'higher' charophytes (Charales, Coleochaetales) and Anthoceros were these sugars also efficiently released by Driselase, suggesting rhamnogalacturonan-I. Pectins of 'higher' charophytes, especially Chara, contained little arabinose, instead possessing 3-MeGal. Anthoceros hemicelluloses were rich in glucose, xylose, galactose and arabinose (suggesting xyloglucan and arabinoxylan), none of which was consistently present in charophyte hemicelluloses. Homogalacturonan is an ancient streptophyte feature, albeit secondarily lost in Klebsormidium. When conquering the land, the first embryophytes already possessed rhamnogalacturonan-I. In contrast, charophyte and land-plant hemicelluloses differ substantially, indicating major changes during terrestrialization. The presence of 3

  8. A molecular analysis of L-arabinan degradation in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipphi, M.J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a molecular study of the genetics ofL-arabinan degradation in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans. These saprophytic hyphal fungi produce an extracellular hydrolytic enzyme system to depolymerize the plant cell wall polysaccharideL<

  9. Enhanced Degradation of Diesel in the Rhizosphere of after Inoculation with Diesel-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterial Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balseiro-Romero, María; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Kidd, Petra S; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Monterroso, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The association of plants and rhizospheric bacteria provides a successful strategy to clean up contaminated soils. The purpose of this work was to enhance diesel degradation in rhizosphere by inoculation with selected bacterial strains: a diesel degrader (D), plant growth-promoting (PGP) strains, or a combination (D+PGP). Plants were set up in pots with the A or B horizon of an umbric Cambisol (A and B) spiked with diesel (1.25%, w/w). After 1 mo, the dissipation of diesel range organics (DRO) with respect to = 0 (i.e., 1 wk after preparing the pots with the seedlings) concentration was significantly higher in inoculated than in noninoculated (NI) pots: The highest DRO losses were found in A D+PGP pots (close to 15-20% higher than NI) and in B D pots (close to 10% higher). The water-extractable DRO fraction was significantly higher at = 30 d (15-25%) compared with = 0 (<5%), probably due to the effects of plant root exudates and biosurfactants produced by the degrader strain. The results of this experiment reflect the importance of the partnerships between plants and bacterial inoculants and demonstrate the relevance of the effect of bacterial biosurfactants and plant root exudates on contaminant bioavailability, a key factor for enhancing diesel rhizodegradation. The association of lupine with D and PGP strains resulted in a promising combination for application in the rhizoremediation of soils with moderate diesel contamination.

  10. Characterisation and enzymic degradation of non-starch polysccharides in lignocellulosic by-products : a study on sunflower meal and palm-kernel meal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duesterhoeft, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) constitute a potentially valuable part of plant by- products deriving from the food and agricultural industries. Their use for various applications (fuel, feed, food) requires the degradation and modification of the complex plant materials. This can be

  11. Characterisation and enzymic degradation of non-starch polysccharides in lignocellulosic by-products : a study on sunflower meal and palm-kernel meal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duesterhoeft, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) constitute a potentially valuable part of plant by- products deriving from the food and agricultural industries. Their use for various applications (fuel, feed, food) requires the degradation and modification of the complex plant materials. This can be achie

  12. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Inoculation on Plant Growth and Phthalic Ester Degradation in Two Contaminated Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rui-Rui; YIN Rui; LIN Xian-Gui; CAO Zhi-Hong

    2005-01-01

    A 60-day pot experiment was carried out using di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) as a typical organic pollutant phthalic ester and cowpea (Vigna sinensis) as the host plant to determine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation on plant growth and degradation of DEHP in two contaminated soils, a yellow-brown soil and a red soil. The air-dried soils were uniformly sprayed with different concentrations of DEHP, inoculated or left uninoculated with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, and planted with cowpea seeds. After 60 days the positive impact of AM inoculation on the growth of cowpea was more pronounced in the red soil than in the yellow-brown soil, with significantly higher (P < 0.01)mycorrhizal colonization rate, shoot dry weight and total P content in shoot tissues for the red soil. Both in the yellowbrown and red soils, AM inoculation significantly (P < 0.01) reduced shoot DEHP content, implying that AM inoculation could inhibit the uptake and translocation of DEHP from roots to the aboveground parts. However, with AM inoculation no positive contribution to the degradation of DEHP was found.

  13. Characterization of an antennal carboxylesterase from the pest moth Spodoptera littoralis degrading a host plant odorant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Durand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carboxyl/cholinesterases (CCEs are highly diversified in insects. These enzymes have a broad range of proposed functions, in neuro/developmental processes, dietary detoxification, insecticide resistance or hormone/pheromone degradation. As few functional data are available on purified or recombinant CCEs, the physiological role of most of these enzymes is unknown. Concerning their role in olfaction, only two CCEs able to metabolize sex pheromones have been functionally characterized in insects. These enzymes are only expressed in the male antennae, and secreted into the lumen of the pheromone-sensitive sensilla. CCEs able to hydrolyze other odorants than sex pheromones, such as plant volatiles, have not been identified. METHODOLOGY: In Spodoptera littoralis, a major crop pest, a diversity of antennal CCEs has been previously identified. We have employed here a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and electrophysiology approaches to functionally characterize an intracellular CCE, SlCXE10, whose predominant expression in the olfactory sensilla suggested a role in olfaction. A recombinant protein was produced using the baculovirus system and we tested its catabolic properties towards a plant volatile and the sex pheromone components. CONCLUSION: We showed that SlCXE10 could efficiently hydrolyze a green leaf volatile and to a lesser extent the sex pheromone components. The transcript level in male antennae was also strongly induced by exposure to this plant odorant. In antennae, SlCXE10 expression was associated with sensilla responding to the sex pheromones and to plant odours. These results suggest that a CCE-based intracellular metabolism of odorants could occur in insect antennae, in addition to the extracellular metabolism occurring within the sensillar lumen. This is the first functional characterization of an Odorant-Degrading Enzyme active towards a host plant volatile.

  14. Impact of fermentation and addition of non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes on microbial population and on digestibility of dried distillers grains with solubles in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venås Jakobsen, Grethe; Jensen, Bent Borg; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach;

    2015-01-01

    or with the addition of carbohydrases) and 40% of a basal diet composed mainly of maize starch: (1) a nonfermented liquid feed treatment (n-FLF); (2) a fermented liquid feed treatment (FLF); (3) the FLF supplemented with a mixture of xylanase and β-glucanase (XylGlu); and (4) the FLF supplemented with a mixture......-starch polysaccharides (NSP) compared to the fermented DDGS (from 341.8 g/kg DM to 312.9 g/kg DM, PFermenting DDGS prior to feeding led to significantly......Fluctuating prices on feedstock has led to a growing interest in alternative feed ingredients. Co-products from the biofuel industry are hence interesting to include in pig feeds, primarily due to the high protein content. Low nutritional value due to a high content of dietary fibre, however...

  15. Cryptococcus allantoinivorans sp.nov., an anamorphic basidiomycetous yeast (Tremellales) physiologically resembling other species of the Cryptococcus laurentii complex that degrade polysaccharides and C2 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelhoven, Wouter J

    2005-02-01

    A novel Cryptococcus species is proposed to accommodate a yeast strain (CBS 9604) able to assimilate allantoin as sole carbon source, a characteristic very uncommon among yeasts. By traditional methods, the strain could not be distinguished from Cryptococcus laurentii, but nucleotide sequences of the D1D2 region of the large subunit (26S) and of the ITS region of ribosomal DNA showed relationship to the Bulleromyces clade of the genus Cryptococcus (order Tremellales) with some Tremella spp. as the closest relatives. A traditional morphological and physiological description of the strain is given. Data on the assimilation of some C2 compounds and polysaccharides are provided and compared with those of other type strains of novel species of the C. laurentii complex.

  16. Hydrocarbon contamination and plant species determine the phylogenetic and functional diversity of endophytic degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vanessa; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Silva, Artur M S; Simões, Mário M Q; Smalla, Kornelia; Cunha, Ângela

    2014-03-01

    Salt marsh sediments are sinks for various anthropogenic contaminants, giving rise to significant environmental concern. The process of salt marsh plant survival in such environment is very intriguing and at the same time poorly understood. The plant–microbe interactions may play a key role in the process of environment and in planta detoxification.In this study, a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent molecular approaches [enrichment cultures, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), DNA sequencing] were used to investigate the effect of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) contamination on the structure and function[polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dioxygenase genes] of endophytic bacterial communities of salt marsh plant species (Halimione portulacoides and Sarcocornia perennis)in the estuarine system Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). Pseudomonads dominated the cultivable fraction of the endophytic communities in the enrichment cultures. In a set of fifty isolates tested, nine were positive for genes encoding for PAH dioxygenases (nahAc)and four were positive for plasmid carrying genes encoding PAH degradation enzymes(nahAc). Interestingly, these plasmids were only detected in isolates from most severely PH-polluted sites. The results revealed site-specific effects on endophytic communities,related to the level of PH contamination in the sediment, and plant-species-specific ‘imprints’ in community structure and in genes encoding for PAH dioxygenases. These results suggest a potential ecological role of bacterial plant symbiosis in the process of plant colonization in urban estuarine areas exposed to PH contamination.

  17. Steam generator tube degradation at the Doel 4 plant influence on plant operation and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheveneels, G. [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-02-01

    The steam generator tubes of Doel 4 are affected by a multitude of corrosion phenomena. Some of them have been very difficult to manage because of their extremely fast evolution, non linear evolution behavior or difficult detectability and/or measurability. The exceptional corrosion behavior of the steam generator tubes has had its drawbacks on plant operation and safety. Extensive inspection and repair campaigns have been necessary and have largely increased outage times and radiation exposure to personnel. Although considerable effort was invested by the utility to control corrosion problems, non anticipated phenomena and/or evolution have jeopardized plant safety. The extensive plugging and repairs performed on the steam generators have necessitated continual review of the design basis safety studies and the adaptation of the protection system setpoints. The large asymmetric plugging has further complicated these reviews. During the years many preventive and recently also defence measures have been implemented by the utility to manage corrosion and to decrease the probability and consequences of single or multiple tube rupture. The present state of the Doel 4 steam generators remains troublesome and further examinations are performed to evaluate if continued operation until June `96, when the steam generators will be replaced, is justified.

  18. Study of Plant Polysaccharide on Mucosal Immunity in Animal Digestive Tract%植物活性多糖对动物消化道黏膜免疫影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶浩; 魏炳栋; 于维; 陈群

    2011-01-01

    The study of plant polysaccharides has been a hot research field both in China and abroad,for they have the ability to enhance biological activities of body immunity, anti-bacterial, anti-virus, anti-oxidation, and molecular recognition.Author reviewed the effects of plant polysaccharides on intestinal mucosal immunity in animal digestive tract from the cellular and molecular levels.%植物多糖因其具有增强机体免疫力、抗菌、抗病毒、抗氧化、分子识别等多种生物活性,已成为国内外研究的热点之笔者就植物多糖从细胞和分子水平对畜禽肠道黏膜免疫的影响进行综述.

  19. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Saraceno, John Franco; Spencer, Robert G.M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)—a regulated class of DBPs—before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C-1 However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA254 suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  20. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Hernes, Peter J.; Saraceno, John Franco; Spencer, Robert G.M.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)—a regulated class of DBPs—before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C-1 However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA254 suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  1. Microbial degradation of plant leachate alters lignin phenols and trihalomethane precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, Brian A; Hernes, Peter J; Saraceno, JohnFranco; Spencer, Robert G M; Bergamaschi, Brian A

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of vascular plant-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater systems has been studied, the role of leached DOC as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during drinking water treatment is not well known. Here we measured the propensity of leachates from four crops and four aquatic macrophytes to form trihalomethanes (THMs)-a regulated class of DBPs-before and after 21 d of microbial degradation. We also measured lignin phenol content and specific UV absorbance (SUVA(254)) to test the assumption that aromatic compounds from vascular plants are resistant to microbial degradation and readily form DBPs. Leaching solubilized 9 to 26% of total plant carbon, which formed 1.93 to 6.72 mmol THM mol C(-1). However, leachate DOC concentrations decreased by 85 to 92% over the 21-d incubation, with a concomitant decrease of 67 to 92% in total THM formation potential. Carbon-normalized THM yields in the residual DOC pool increased by 2.5 times on average, consistent with the preferential uptake of nonprecursor material. Lignin phenol concentrations decreased by 64 to 96% over 21 d, but a lack of correlation between lignin content and THM yields or SUVA(254) suggested that lignin-derived compounds are not the source of increased THM precursor yields in the residual DOC pool. Our results indicate that microbial carbon utilization alters THM precursors in ecosystems with direct plant leaching, but more work is needed to identify the specific dissolved organic matter components with a greater propensity to form DBPs and affect watershed management, drinking water quality, and human health.

  2. Proteomic analysis of scallop hepatopancreatic extract provides insights into marine polysaccharide digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Qianqian; Jiao, Wenqian; Zhang, Keke; Bao, Zhenmin; Wang, Shi; Liu, Weizhi

    2016-01-01

    Marine polysaccharides are used in a variety of applications, and the enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides are of increasing interest. The main food source of herbivorous marine mollusks is seaweed, and several polysaccharide-degrading enzymes have been extracted from mollusk digestive glands (hepatopancreases). Here, we used a comprehensive proteomic approach to examine the hepatopancreatic proteins of the Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri). We identified 435 proteins, the majority of which were lysosomal enzymes and carbohydrate and protein metabolism enzymes. However, several new enzymes related to polysaccharide metabolism were also identified. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of these enzymes suggest that these polysaccharide-degrading enzymes may have a variety of potential substrate specificities. Taken together, our study characterizes several novel polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in the scallop hepatopancreas and provides an enhanced view of these enzymes and a greater understanding of marine polysaccharide digestion. PMID:27982037

  3. Physiological Effects of Plant Polysaccharide on Exercise Body and its Research status%植物多糖对机体运动影响的研究现状及趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雪颖; 池爱平; 张海猛

    2012-01-01

    The plant polysaccharide has extensive pharmacological effects, involved in various physiological metabolism of the body. With years of experimental research, this paper describes a variety of biological effects the plant polysaccharide and its relationship with the improvement of the athletic capacity. In addition, the biological mechanisms of the plant polysaccharide to increase athletic ability is explored and the prospect of its as a sports nutritional supplements development prospect.%采用文献资料法,对植物多糖对运动机体的各种生理机能及物质代谢产生的多种生物学效应进行综述:植物多糖对运动机体的免疫系统功能、抗氧化系统功能、神经系统功能、血红蛋白含量以及骨骼肌功能等方面具有一定的改善与提高作用;植物多糖的活性组分可能是其提高机体运动能力及延缓疲劳的主要因素;归纳目前植物多糖在运动领域中的研究现状,推断植物多糖作为运动营养补剂的研究趋势与应用前景。

  4. Injuries caused by animals to young imbuzeiro (Spondias tuberosa Arruda plants in native and degraded caatinga areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Teixeira de Lima Brito

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study had the objective of evaluating the injuries caused by animals to young imbu tree (Spondias tuberosa Arruda plants in native and degraded Caatinga areas, between the years 1997 and 2002. One thousand imbu tree scions were planted, being 500 in a degraded Caatinga area at the community of Alto do Angico, Petrolina-PE, and 500 in a native Caatinga area at the Caatinga Experimental Station of Embrapa Tropical Semi-Arid, Petrolina-PE. At every 30 days after having planted the scions, data were collected regarding survival and injuries caused by animals to the plants. The results showed that goats are responsible for the reduction on survival rates and for the slow development of young imbu tree in the degraded Caatinga area. In the native Caatinga area, of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu and armadillo (Euphractus sexcinctus caused the highest injury levels.

  5. Heterologous Expression of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes for Effective Production of Cellulosic Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Parisutham, Vinuselvi; Jeong, Seong Hun; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2012-01-01

    A major technical challenge in the cost-effective production of cellulosic biofuel is the need to lower the cost of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCDE), which is required for the production of sugars from biomass. Several competitive, low-cost technologies have been developed to produce PCDE in different host organisms such as Escherichia coli, Zymomonas mobilis, and plant. Selection of an ideal host organism is very important, because each host organism has its own unique features. Synthetic biology-aided tools enable heterologous expression of PCDE in recombinant E. coli or Z. mobilis and allow successful consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) in these microorganisms. In-planta expression provides an opportunity to simplify the process of enzyme production and plant biomass processing and leads to self-deconstruction of plant cell walls. Although the future of currently available technologies is difficult to predict, a complete and viable platform will most likely be available through the integration of the existing approaches with the development of breakthrough technologies. PMID:22911272

  6. Status of the steam generator tube circumferential ODSCC degradation experienced at the Doel 4 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, G. [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-02-01

    Since the 1991 outage, the Doel Unit 4 nuclear power plant is known to be affected by circumferential outside diameter intergranular stress corrosion cracking at the hot leg tube expansion transition. Extensive non destructive examination inspections have shown the number of tubes affected by this problem as well as the size of the cracks to have been increasing for the three cycles up to 1993. As a result of the high percentage of tubes found non acceptable for continued service after the 1993 in-service inspection, about 1,700 mechanical sleeves were installed in the steam generators. During the 1994 outage, all the tubes sleeved during the 1993 outage were considered as potentially cracked to some extent at the upper hydraulic transition and were therefore not acceptable for continued service. They were subsequently repaired by laser welding. Furthermore all the tubes not sleeved during the 1993 outage were considered as not acceptable for continued service and were repaired by installing laser welded sleeves. During the 1995 outage, some unexpected degradation phenomena were evidenced in the sleeved tubes. This paper summarizes the status of the circumferential ODSCC experienced in the SG tubes of the Doel 4 plant as well as the other connected degradation phenomena.

  7. Two-stage in vitro digestibility assay, a tool for formulating non-starch polysaccharide degrading enzyme combinations for commonly used feed ingredients of poultry rations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ramana Reddy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An attempt was made to assess the effect of pure enzyme combinations with the objective of formulating customized enzyme mixtures based on sugar release when subjected to two-stage in vitro digestion assay. Materials and Methods: A two-stage in vitro digestibility assay was carried out for commonly used feed ingredients for poultry viz., maize, soy bean meal, sunflower cake, and de-oiled rice bran supplemented with three concentrations of xylanase (5000; 7500 and 10000 IU/kg, cellulase (50; 100 and 400 IU/kg and â-D-glucanase (100; 200 and 400 IU/kg were used to formulate various NSP enzymes combinations. In total 27 NSP enzyme combinations (3x3x3 were formulated and the sugar released due to NSP digestion was quantified by phenol sulphuric acid method. Results: The total sugar release was significantly (P<0.05 higher with supplementation of various enzymes combinations for maize, sunflower cake and de-oiled rice bran where as no significant (P<0.05 interaction of various NSP enzymes combinations was observed for soy bean meal. The NSP digestibility was highest in combination (xylanase-5000, cellulase-50 and â-D-glucanase-400 IU/kg, (xylanase-10000, cellulase-50 and â-D-glucanase-200 IU/kg and (xylanase-7500, cellulase- 100 and â-D-glucanase-100 IU/kg for maize, sunflower cake and de-oiled rice bran respectively. In case of sunflower cake, significant (P<0.01 three way interaction was observed among the xylanase, cellulose, and â-D-glucanase enzymes and the two-way interactions between the enzymes were also significant (P<0.01. Conclusion: It is concluded that 'n' number of non-starch Polysaccharide enzymes combinations can be screened for their efficiency to digest non-starch Polysaccharides present in various feed ingredients commonly used in poultry rations by employing two-stage in vitro digestibility assay as a tool. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 525-529

  8. Application of power plant flue gas in a photobioreactor to grow Spirulina algae, and a bioactivity analysis of the algal water-soluble polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wei; Yang, Tsung-Shi; Chen, Mao-Jing; Chang, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chai-Yi; Wang, Eugene I-Chen; Ho, Chen-Lung; Huang, Kue-Ming; Yu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Feng-Ling; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lu, Ying-Chen; Chao, Louis Kuop-Ping

    2012-09-01

    A novel photobioreactor was developed with a total volume of 30 m(3) which required merely 100 m(3) of land footprint. The bioreactor was capable of utilizing CO(2) in the flue gas of a power plant as the carbon source for the growth of a freshwater alga, Spirulina platensis, mitigating the greenhouse effect caused by the same amount of CO(2) discharge. Results of the study indicated that the photobioreactor was capable of fixing 2,234 kg of CO(2) per annum. Upon deducting the energy consumption of operating the bioreactor unit, the estimated amount of CO(2) to be fixed by a scaled-up reactor would be 74 tons ha(-1)year(-1). In addition, the study prove that protein-free polysaccharides of S. platensis could induce the production of pro-IL-1 and IL-1 proteins through the mediation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPKs pathways. As a consequence, immunogenic activities of the macrophage cells were enhanced.

  9. 26+ Year Old Photovoltaic Power Plant: Degradation and Reliability Evaluation of Crystalline Silicon Modules -- South Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakonu, Kolapo

    As the use of photovoltaic (PV) modules in large power plants continues to increase globally, more studies on degradation, reliability, failure modes, and mechanisms of field aged modules are needed to predict module life expectancy based on accelerated lifetime testing of PV modules. In this work, a 26+ year old PV power plant in Phoenix, Arizona has been evaluated for performance, reliability, and durability. The PV power plant, called Solar One, is owned and operated by John F. Long's homeowners association. It is a 200 kW dc, standard test conditions (STC) rated power plant comprised of 4000 PV modules or frameless laminates, in 100 panel groups (rated at 175 kW ac). The power plant is made of two center-tapped bipolar arrays, the north array and the south array. Due to a limited time frame to execute this large project, this work was performed by two masters students (Jonathan Belmont and Kolapo Olakonu) and the test results are presented in two masters theses. This thesis presents the results obtained on the south array and the other thesis presents the results obtained on the north array. Each of these two arrays is made of four sub arrays, the east sub arrays (positive and negative polarities) and the west sub arrays (positive and negative polarities), making up eight sub arrays. The evaluation and analyses of the power plant included in this thesis consists of: visual inspection, electrical performance measurements, and infrared thermography. A possible presence of potential induced degradation (PID) due to potential difference between ground and strings was also investigated. Some installation practices were also studied and found to contribute to the power loss observed in this investigation. The power output measured in 2011 for all eight sub arrays at STC is approximately 76 kWdc and represents a power loss of 62% (from 200 kW to 76 kW) over 26+ years. The 2011 measured power output for the four south sub arrays at STC is 39 kWdc and represents a power

  10. An efficient protocol for isolation of inhibitor-free nucleic acids even from recalcitrant plants

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    For fast and easy isolation of inhibitor-free genomic DNA even from the toughest plant leaf samples, including those high in polyphenols and polysaccharides, a protocol has been developed. To prevent the solubility of polysaccharides in the DNA extract, high salt concentration (1.4 M) was used in the extraction buffer. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used for the removal of polyphenols as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. Proteins like various enzymes were degraded by proteinase K an...

  11. Leucoagaricus gongylophorus Produces Diverse Enzymes for the Degradation of Recalcitrant Plant Polymers in Leaf-Cutter Ant Fungus Gardens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylward, Frank O. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tringe, Susannah G. [Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Teiling, Clotilde [Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Tremmel, Daniel [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Moeller, Joseph [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scott, Jarrod J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Barry, Kerrie W. [Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Piehowski, Paul D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Malfatti, Stephanie [Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Monroe, Matthew E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Purvine, Samuel O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weinstock, George [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MS (United States); Gerardo, Nicole [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Suen, Garret [Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lipton, Mary S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Currie, Cameron R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smothsonian Tropical Research Inst., Balboa (Panama)

    2013-06-12

    Plants represent a large reservoir of organic carbon comprised largely of recalcitrant polymers that most metazoans are unable to deconstruct. Many herbivores gain access to nutrients in this material indirectly by associating with microbial symbionts, and leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example. These ants use fresh foliar biomass as manure to cultivate fungus gardens composed primarily of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, a basidiomycetous symbiont that produces specialized hyphal swellings that serve as a food source for the host ant colony. Although leaf-cutter ants are conspicuous herbivores that contribute substantially to carbon turnover in Neotropical ecosystems, the process through which plant biomass is degraded in their fungus gardens is not well understood. Here we present the first draft genome of L. gongylophorus, and using genomic, metaproteomic, and phylogenetic tools we investigate its role in lignocellulose degradation in the fungus gardens of both Atta cephalotes and Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutter ants. We show that L. gongylophorus produces a diversity of lignocellulases in fungus gardens, and is likely the primary driver of plant biomass degradation in these ecosystems. We also show that this fungus produces distinct sets of lignocellulases throughout the different stages of biomass degradation, including numerous cellulases and laccases that may be playing an important but previously uncharacterized role in lignocellulose degradation. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of plant biomass degradation in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens and provides insight into the molecular dynamics underlying the symbiosis between these dominant herbivores and their obligate fungal cultivar.

  12. Leucoagaricus gongylophorus produces diverse enzymes for the degradation of recalcitrant plant polymers in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Frank O; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Tringe, Susannah G; Teiling, Clotilde; Tremmel, Daniel M; Moeller, Joseph A; Scott, Jarrod J; Barry, Kerrie W; Piehowski, Paul D; Nicora, Carrie D; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Goodwin, Lynne A; Smith, Richard D; Weinstock, George M; Gerardo, Nicole M; Suen, Garret; Lipton, Mary S; Currie, Cameron R

    2013-06-01

    Plants represent a large reservoir of organic carbon comprised primarily of recalcitrant polymers that most metazoans are unable to deconstruct. Many herbivores gain access to nutrients in this material indirectly by associating with microbial symbionts, and leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example. These ants use fresh foliar biomass as manure to cultivate gardens composed primarily of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, a basidiomycetous fungus that produces specialized hyphal swellings that serve as a food source for the host ant colony. Although leaf-cutter ants are conspicuous herbivores that contribute substantially to carbon turnover in Neotropical ecosystems, the process through which plant biomass is degraded in their fungus gardens is not well understood. Here we present the first draft genome of L. gongylophorus, and, using genomic and metaproteomic tools, we investigate its role in lignocellulose degradation in the gardens of both Atta cephalotes and Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutter ants. We show that L. gongylophorus produces a diversity of lignocellulases in ant gardens and is likely the primary driver of plant biomass degradation in these ecosystems. We also show that this fungus produces distinct sets of lignocellulases throughout the different stages of biomass degradation, including numerous cellulases and laccases that likely play an important role in lignocellulose degradation. Our study provides a detailed analysis of plant biomass degradation in leaf-cutter ant fungus gardens and insight into the enzymes underlying the symbiosis between these dominant herbivores and their obligate fungal cultivar.

  13. Effect of corn plant on survival and phenanthrene degradation capacity of Pseudomonas sp. UG14LR in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouychai, Waraporn; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Upatham, Suchart; Pokethitiyook, Prayad; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung

    2012-07-01

    A study was undertaken to assess if corn (Zea mays L.) can enhance phenanthrene degradation in two soils inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. UG14Lr. Corn increased the number of UG14Lr cells in both soils, especially in the acidic soiL Phenanthrene was degraded to a greater extent in UG14Lr-inoculated or corn-planted soils than uninoculated and unplanted soils. The spiked phenanthrene was completely removed within 70 days in all the treatments in slightly alkaline soil. However, in acidic soil, complete phenanthrene removal was found only in the corn-planted treatments. The shoot and root lengths of corn grown in UG14Lr-inoculated soils were not different from those in non-inoculated soil between the treatments. The results showed that in unplanted soil, low pH adversely affected the survival and phenanthrene degradation ability of UG14Lr. Planting of corn significantly enhanced the survival of UG14Lr cells in both the bulk and rhizospheric soil, and this in turn significantly improved phenanthrene degradation in acidic soil. Re-inoculation of UG14Lr in the acidic soil increased the number of UG14Lr cells and enhanced phenanthrene degradation in unplanted soil. However, in corn-planted acidic soils, re-inoculation of UG14Lr did not further enhance the already active phenanthrene degradation occurring in both the bulk or rhizospheric soils.

  14. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides in bilberries and black currants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilz, H.

    2007-01-01

    During berry juice production, polysaccharides are released from the cell walls and cause thickening and high viscosity when the berries are mashed. Consequences are a low juice yield and a poor colour. This can be prevented by the use of enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides. To use these enzy

  15. Hydrocarbon degradation and plant colonization of selected bacterial strains isolated from the rhizsophere and plant interior of Italian ryegrass and Birdsfoot trefoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Y.; Andria, V.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading strains were isolated from the rhizosphere, root and shoot interior of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo) grown in a soil contaminated with petroleum oil. Strains were tested regarding their phylogeny and their degradation efficiency. The most efficient strains were tested regarding their suitability to be applied for phytoremediation of diesel oils. Sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soil, with and with out compost, were spiked with diesel and used for planting Italian ryegrass and birdsfoot trefoil. Four selected strains with high degradation activities, derived from the rhizosphere and plant interior, were selected for individual inoculation. Plants were harvested at flowering stage and plant biomass and hydrocarbon degradation was determined. Furthermore, it was investigated to which extent the inoculant strains were able to survive and colonize plants. Microbial community structures were analysed by 16S rRNA and alkB gene analysis. Results showed efficient colonization by the inoculant strains and improved degradation by the application of compost combined with inoculation as well as on microbial community structures will be presented.

  16. Multitrait plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacterial isolates from Brassica juncea rhizosphere : Keratin degradation and growth promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mohmmad Shahbaz; Siddique, Mohammad Tahir; Verma, Amit; Rao, Yalaga Rama; Nailwal, Tapan; Ansari, Mohammad; Pande, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) rhizobacteria, a beneficial microbe colonizing plant roots, enhanced crop productivity and offers an attractive way to replace chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and supplements. The keratinous waste which comprises feathers, hairs, nails, skin and wool creates problem of solid waste management due to presence of highly recalcitrant keratin. The multi traits rhizobacteria effective to remove both keratine from the environment by producing keratinase enzyme and to eradicate the chemical fertilizer by providing different PGP activity is novel achievement. In the present study, the effective PM2 strain of PGPR was isolated from rhizospheric soil of mustard (Brassica juncea) field, Pantnagar and they were identified on the basis of different biochemical tests as belonging to Bacillus genera. Different plant growth promoting activity, feather degradation and keratinolytic activity was performed and found very effective toward all the parameters. Furthermore, the efficient strain PM2 was identified on the basis of 16s rRNA sequencing and confirmed as Bacillus cereus. The strain PM2 might be used efficiently for keratinous waste management and PGP activity. Therefore, the present study suggests that Bacillus cereus have multi traits activity which extremely useful for different PGP activity and biotechnological process involving keratin hydrolysis, feather biodegradation or in the leather industry.

  17. Invisible floral larcenies: microbial communities degrade floral nectar of bumble bee-pollinated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carlos M; García, Isabel M; Pérez, Ricardo

    2008-09-01

    The ecology of nectarivorous microbial communities remains virtually unknown, which precludes elucidating whether these organisms play some role in plant-pollinator mutualisms beyond minor commensalism. We simultaneously assessed microbial abundance and nectar composition at the individual nectary level in flowers of three southern Spanish bumble bee-pollinated plants (Helleborus foetidus, Aquilegia vulgaris, and Aquilegia pyrenaica cazorlensis). Yeasts were frequent and abundant in nectar of all species, and variation in yeast density was correlated with drastic changes in nectar sugar concentration and composition. Yeast communities built up in nectar from early to late floral stages, at which time all nectaries contained yeasts, often at densities between 10(4) and 10(5) cells/mm3. Total sugar concentration and percentage sucrose declined, and percentage fructose increased, with increasing density of yeast cells in nectar. Among-nectary variation in microbial density accounted for 65% (H. foetidus and A. vulgaris) and 35% (A. p. cazorlensis) of intraspecific variance in nectar sugar composition, and 60% (H. foetidus) and 38% (A. vulgaris) of variance in nectar concentration. Our results provide compelling evidence that nectar microbial communities can have detrimental effects on plants and/or pollinators via extensive nectar degradation and also call for a more careful interpretation of nectar traits in the future, if uncontrolled for yeasts.

  18. A Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Xyloglucan Specificity from the Brown-Rot Fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum and Its Action on Cellulose-Xyloglucan Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    KOJIMA, Yuka; Várnai, Anikó; Ishida, Takuya; Sunagawa, Naoki; Petrovic, Dejan M.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jellison, Jody; GOODELL, BARRY; Alfredsen, Gry; Westereng, Bjørge; Vincent G H Eijsink; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungi secrete a set of glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) to degrade plant polysaccharides. Brown-rot fungi, such as Gloeophyllum trabeum, tend to have few LPMOs, and information on these enzymes is scarce. The genome of G. trabeum encodes four auxiliary activity 9 (AA9) LPMOs (GtLPMO9s), whose coding sequences were amplified from cDNA. Due to alternative splicing, two variants of GtLPMO9A seem to be produced, a single-domain variant, GtLPMO9A-1, and...

  19. Sphingomonas taxi, Isolated from Cucurbita pepo, Proves to Be a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, Jonathan D; Bottos, Eric M; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-05-14

    The draft genome of Sphingomonas taxi, a strain of the Sphingomonadaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue, is presented. This Gram-negative bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacities. An analysis of its 3.9-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE-degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2015 Eevers et al.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes, a DDE-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Cucurbita pepo

    OpenAIRE

    Eevers, Nele; Van Hamme, J.D.; Bottos, E.M.; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome of Enterobacter aerogenes, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Cucurbita pepo root tissue. This bacterium shows 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE)-degrading potential and plant growth-promoting capacity. An analysis of its 4.5-Mb draft genome will enhance the understanding of DDE degradation pathways and phytoremediation applications for DDE-contaminated soils.

  1. Review of Recent Aging-Related Degradation Occurrences of Structures and Passive Components in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.-S.; Kim, M.K.; Choi, I.-K.

    2009-04-02

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are collaborating to develop seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and passive components (SPCs) under a multi-year research agreement. To better understand the status and characteristics of degradation of SPCs in nuclear power plants (NPPs), the first step in this multi-year research effort was to identify and evaluate degradation occurrences of SPCs in U.S. NPPs. This was performed by reviewing recent publicly available information sources to identify and evaluate the characteristics of degradation occurrences and then comparing the information to the observations in the past. Ten categories of SPCs that are applicable to Korean NPPs were identified, comprising of anchorage, concrete, containment, exchanger, filter, piping system, reactor pressure vessel, structural steel, tank, and vessel. Software tools were developed to expedite the review process. Results from this review effort were compared to previous data in the literature to characterize the overall degradation trends.

  2. Degradation and failure of bolting in nuclear power plants: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1988-04-01

    These two volumes provide the documentation for industry resolution of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) generic issue B-29, Degradation and Failure of Bolting in Nuclear Power Plants. The issue was identified as a consequence of concerns about the structural integrity of component supports circa 1980. When bolting integrity became a separate issue in 1982, the utility industry responded by forming a Task Group on Bolting under the aegis of the Atomic Industrial Forum (AIF) and the Materials Properties Council (MPC). The AIF/MPC Task Group on Bolting formulated a comprehensive nineteen-task action plan aimed at resolution of the issue, with implementation of the plan, the responsibility of EPRI and the affected Owner's Groups. EPRI organized a matrix-managed Generic Bolted Joint Integrity Program to carry out the research, with the results reported herein.

  3. An efficient treatment for detoxification process of cassava starch by plant cell wall-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornyotha, Somphit; Kyu, Khin Lay; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to remove linamarin in starch from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz cv. KU-50) roots, a high-cyanogen variety by using plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, xylanase and cellulase. The combination of xylanase from Bacillus firmus K-1 and xylanase and cellulase from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus B-6 at the ratio of 1:9 showed the maximum synergism at 1.8 times for hydrolyzing cassava cortex cell walls and releasing linamarase. Combined enzyme treatment enhanced linamarin liberation from the parenchyma by 90%. In addition, when the combined enzymes were applied for detoxification during cassava starch production, a low-cyanide-product was obtained with decreased linamarin concentration (96%) compared to non-enzyme treated tissues. Based on these results, xylanase and cellulase treatment is a good method for low-cyanide-cassava starch production and could be applied for detoxification of cassava products during processing.

  4. Solar photo-degradation of a pharmaceutical wastewater effluent in a semi-industrial autonomous plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, Antonio J; Durán, Antonio; Monteagudo, José M; Acevedo, Alba

    2016-05-01

    An industrial wastewater effluent coming from a pharmaceutical laboratory has been treated in a semi-industrial autonomous solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) plant. A photo-Fenton process assisted with ferrioxalate has been used. Up to 79% of TOC can be removed in 2 h depending on initial conditions when treating an aqueous effluent containing up to 400 ppm of initial organic carbon concentration (TOC). An initial ratio of Fe(II)/TOC higher than 0.5 guarantees a high removal. It can be seen that most of TOC removal occurs early in the first hour of reaction. After this time, mineralization was very slow, although H2O2 was still present in solution. Indeed it decomposed to form oxygen in inefficient reactions. It is clear that remaining TOC was mainly due to the presence of acetates which are difficult to degrade.

  5. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, Igor [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Pape, Yann Le [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-01-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) values in the concrete biological shields of the US PWR fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to assure reliable risk assessment for NPPs extended operation.

  6. Steam generator tube support plate degradation in French plants: maintenance strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauchet, J.-P. [EDF, NPP Operations/Maintenance Dept. (France); Gillet, N. [FRAMATOME, Steam Generator Dept. (France); Stindel, M. [EDF, Central Labs. (France)

    1998-07-01

    This paper reports on the degradations of Steam Generator (SG) Tube Support Plates (TSPs) observed in French plants and the maintenance strategy adopted to continue operating the plant without any decrease of the required safety level. Only drilled carbon steel TSPs of early SGs are affected. Except the particular damage of the TSP8 of FESSENHEIM 2 caused by chemical cleaning procedures implemented in 1992, two main problems were observed almost exclusively on the upper TSP: Ligaments ruptured near the aseismic block located at 215 degrees. This degradation is perfectly detectable by bobbin coil inspection. It occurs very early in the life of the SG as can be seen from the records of previous inspections and no evolution of the signals was observed. This damage can be detected for 51M model SGs on several sites; Wastage of the ligaments resulting in enlargement of flow holes with in some cases complete consumption of a ligament. This damage was only observed for SGs of at GRAVELINES. This damage evolved cycle after cycle. Detailed studies were performed to analyze tubing behavior when a tube is not supported by the upper TSP because of missing ligaments. These studies evaluated the risk of vibratory instability, the behavior of both the TSP and the tubing in case of a seismic event or a LOCA and finally the behavior of the TSP in case of a Steam Line Break. Concerning vibratory instability it was possible to define zones where stability could not be demonstrated. Dampine, cables and sentinel plugs were then used when necessary to eliminate the risk of Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR). For accidental conditions, it could be shown that no unacceptable damage occurs and that the core cooling function of the SG is always maintained if some tubes are plugged. From this analysis, It was possible to define the inspection programs for the different plants taking into account the specific situation of each plant regarding the damages detected. These programs include

  7. Enhancement of micropollutant degradation at the outlet of small wastewater treatment plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rossi

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate low-cost and easy-to-operate engineering solutions that can be added as a polishing step to small wastewater treatment plants to reduce the micropollutant load to water bodies. The proposed design combines a sand filter/constructed wetland with additional and more advanced treatment technologies (UV degradation, enhanced adsorption to the solid phase, e.g., an engineered substrate to increase the elimination of recalcitrant compounds. The removal of five micropollutants with different physico-chemical characteristics (three pharmaceuticals: diclofenac, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, one pesticide: mecoprop, and one corrosion inhibitor: benzotriazole was studied to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed system. Separate batch experiments were conducted to assess the removal efficiency of UV degradation and adsorption. The efficiency of each individual process was substance-specific. No process was effective on all the compounds tested, although elimination rates over 80% using light expanded clay aggregate (an engineered material were observed. A laboratory-scale flow-through setup was used to evaluate interactions when removal processes were combined. Four of the studied compounds were partially eliminated, with poor removal of the fifth (benzotriazole. The energy requirements for a field-scale installation were estimated to be the same order of magnitude as those of ozonation and powdered activated carbon treatments.

  8. Effects of thermo-resistant non-starch polysaccharide degrading multi-enzyme on growth performance, meat quality, relative weights of body organs and blood profile in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Gheisar, M; Hosseindoust, A; Kim, I H

    2016-06-01

    This research was conducted to study the performance and carcass parameters of broiler chickens fed diets supplemented with heat-treated non-starch polysaccharide degrading enzyme. A total of 432 one-day old Ross 308 broiler chickens were allocated to five treatments: (i) CON (basal diet), (ii) E1: CON + 0.05% multi-enzyme, (iii) E2: CON + 0.1% multi-enzyme, (iv) E3: CON + 0.05% thermo-resistant multi-enzyme and (v) E4: CON + 0.1% thermo-resistant multi-enzyme, each treatment consisted of six replications and 12 chickens in each replication. The chickens were housed in three floor battery cages during 28-day experimental period. On days 1-7, gain in body weight (BWG) improved by feeding the diets supplemented with thermo-resistant multi-enzyme. On days 7-21 and 1-28, chickens fed the diets containing thermo-resistant multi-enzyme showed improved (p thermo-resistant multi-enzyme affected the percentage of drip loss on d 1 (p thermo-resistant multi-enzyme did not affect the relative weights of organs but compared to CON group, relative weight of breast muscle increased and abdominal fat decreased (p thermo-resistant multi-enzyme showed higher (p thermo-resistant multi-enzyme improved performance of broiler chickens.

  9. Compositional changes in cell wall polysaccharides from apple fruit callus cultures modulated by different plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayón-Luaces, Paula; Ponce, Nora M A; Mroginski, Luis A; Stortz, Carlos A; Sozzi, Gabriel O

    2012-04-01

    The cell wall composition of apples callus cultures showed changes in the presence of 5 mg l(-1) of three different plant growth regulators (PGRs), namely picloram, abscisic acid and gibberellic acid. Although the structural functions of cell walls do not generally allow for pronounced variations of the total pectin and matrix glycan content, this work provides evidence that the addition of these plant growth regulators can rule, at least partly, cell wall metabolism in apple callus cultures. The chelator- and carbonate-extracts always had the analytical characteristics of pectins, with high proportions of uronic acids, arabinose and galactose as the main monosaccharides, and a significant proportion of rhamnose, but the cross-linking glycan fractions were still rich in RG-I-like material. The application of PGRs produced shifts of uronic acid and neutral sugars between fractions. Arabinose was the neutral sugar exhibiting more variations in apple callus cell wall. Picloram and abscisic acid produced an increase of the uronic acid contents of the cell walls. The AIRs obtained from calluses treated with different PGRs did not show large amounts of high molecular weight products, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography. For the carbonate-extract only the callus treated with picloram displayed two separated peaks for products of different molecular weights. The chromatographic profiles for the 4% KOH-extract displayed two peaks for all the treatments, one very sharp with high molecular weight, and another one wider of smaller molecular weight, whereas the difference between treatments can only be appraised through the areas of the peaks. This is the first report on cell wall composition from fruit calluses supplemented with different PGRs.

  10. Studies on the mode of action of non-starch-polysaccharides (NSP)-degrading enzymes in vitro. 2. Communication: effects on nutrient release and hydration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulrich, K; Flachowsky, G

    2001-01-01

    By use of an in vitro model, the effects of NSP-degrading enzymes on the cage effect and the hydration properties were demonstrated using wheat bran. The in vitro model simulates the conditions (pH, dry matter, temperature and transit time) in the fore sections of the porcine gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) by neglecting endogenous enzyme activities. Enzyme treatment caused a dose-dependent increase in wheat bran solubility and thus resulted in improved protein and mineral release from the insoluble NSP fraction. Up to 17% protein and 40% crude ash from the insoluble NSP-fraction were dissolved after enzyme treatment. Hydrating properties of wheat bran were strongly affected by enzyme treatment and particle size. Water-binding capacity (WBC) and water-holding capacity (WHC) decreased with increasing enzyme dosage in dependence on particle size. The studies confirmed the applicability of the tested in vitro model as a useful tool for preliminary tests to estimate the effects of NSP-degrading enzymes on nutrient release and changes in some physico-chemical properties.

  11. Inventarization of potential plant for phytoremediation on degraded land and water mined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NURIL HIDAYATI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems in degraded mined ecosystem is contamination of soil and water by toxic substances, mainly heavy metal such as Pb and others such as cyanide. Phytoremediation could be used as an alternative technique to overcome this problem. Phytoremediation is defined as clean up of pollutans primarily mediated by photosynthetic plants. These plants have several beneficial characteristics such as the ability to accumulate metal in their shoots and an especially high tolerance to heavy metals. This research was carried out to study the potencies of local species to accumulate Pb and cyanide. Seventeen species were collected from mined waste area (namely tailing area and then the cyanide and Pb accumulated in each species were analyzed. The result showed that some species accumulated Pb and cyanide in high concentration such as Ipomoea sp. (35.70 ppm cyanida and Mikania cordata (Burm.f. B.L.Robinson (11.65 ppm Pb. A series of research is needed to prove that these species are potential as heavy metal and cyanide accumulators.

  12. Characterization of Radiation Fields in Biological Shields of Nuclear Power Plants for Assessing Concrete Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remec, Igor; Rosseel, Thomas M.; Field, Kevin G.; Le Pape, Yann

    2016-02-01

    Life extensions of nuclear power plants to 60 and potentially 80 years of operation have renewed interest in long-term material degradation. One material being considered is concrete, with a particular focus on radiation-induced effects. Based on the projected neutron fluence values (E > 0.1 MeV) in the concrete biological shields of the US pressurized water reactor fleet and the available data on radiation effects on concrete, some decrease in mechanical properties of concrete cannot be ruled out during extended operation beyond 60 years. An expansion of the irradiated concrete database and a reliable determination of relevant neutron fluence energy cutoff value are necessary to ensure reliable risk assessment for extended operation of nuclear power plants. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC0500OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  13. Oligo- and polysaccharide synthesis by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium meliloti.

    OpenAIRE

    Breedveld, M W

    1992-01-01

    Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species are capable of synthesizing a variety of extracellular and cellular oligo- and polysaccharides. Changes in environmental conditions may all affect the composition, physical properties, and relative amounts of oligo- and polysaccharides. Interest in the field of Rhizobium polys accharides has resulted from a development in two distinct areas, (i) the role of oligo- and polysaccharides in the microbe- plant interaction, and (ii) studies on the physico- chemic...

  14. Degradation of proteins by enzymes exuded by Allium porrum roots - a potentially important strategy for acquiring organic nitrogen by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Bartosz; Godlewski, Mirosław; Smolander, Aino; Kitunen, Veikko

    2009-10-01

    Nitrogen is one of the crucial elements that regulate plant growth and development. It is well-established that plants can acquire nitrogen from soil in the form of low-molecular-mass compounds, namely nitrate and ammonium, but also as amino acids. Nevertheless, nitrogen in the soil occurs mainly as proteins or proteins complexed with other organic compounds. Proteins are believed not to be available to plants. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest that plants can actively participate in proteolysis by exudation of proteases by roots and can obtain nitrogen from digested proteins. To gain insight into the process of organic nitrogen acquisition from proteins by leek roots (Allium porrum L. cv. Bartek), casein, bovine serum albumin and oxidized B-chain of insulin were used; their degradation products, after exposure to plant culture medium, were studied using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Casein was degraded to a great extent, but the level of degradation of bovine serum albumin and the B-chain of insulin was lower. Proteases exuded by roots cleaved proteins, releasing low-molecular-mass peptides that can be taken up by roots. Various peptide fragments produced by digestion of the oxidized B-chain of insulin suggested that endopeptidase, but also exopeptidase activity was present. After identification, proteases were similar to cysteine protease from Arabidopsis thaliana. In conclusion, proteases exuded by roots may have great potential in the plant nitrogen nutrition.

  15. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis, Zizania aquatica, and Acorus calamus. The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants. A. calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils, as compared with Z. aquatica and P. australis. Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P. australis, Z. aquatica, and A. calamus were 7.5, 9.8 and 5.4 days, respectively. Residual butachlor concentration in A. calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z. aquatica and P. australis rhizosphere soils, respectively, indicating that A. calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant. In general, microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition, despite the riparian plant types. However, rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butachlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  16. Photocatalytic degradation of oil industry hydrocarbons models at laboratory and at pilot-plant scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Ronald; Nunez, Oswaldo [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica Organica y Quimica Ambiental, Departamento de Procesos y Sistemas, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado Postal 89000, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2010-02-15

    Photodegradation/mineralization (TiO{sub 2}/UV Light) of the hydrocarbons: p-nitrophenol (PNP), naphthalene (NP) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) at three different reactors: batch bench reactor (BBR), tubular bench reactor (TBR) and tubular pilot-plant (TPP) were kinetically monitored at pH = 3, 6 and 10, and the results compared using normalized UV light exposition times. The results fit the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model; therefore, LH adsorption equilibrium constants (K) and apparent rate constants (k) are reported as well as the apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants, k{sub obs}{sup '} = kK/(1 + Kc{sub r}). The batch bench reactor is the most selective reactor toward compound and pH changes in which the reactivity order is: NP > DBT > PNP, however, the catalyst adsorption (K) order is: DBT > NP > PNP at the three pH used but NP has the highest k values. The tubular pilot-plant (TPP) is the most efficient of the three reactors tested. Compound and pH photodegradation/mineralization selectivity is partially lost at the pilot plant where DBT and NP reaches ca. 90% mineralization at the pH used, meanwhile, PNP reaches only 40%. The real time, in which these mineralization occur are: 180 min for PNP and 60 min for NP and DBT. The mineralization results at the TPP indicate that for the three compounds, the rate limiting step is the same as the degradation one. So that, there is not any stable intermediate that may accumulate during the photocatalytic treatment. (author)

  17. Characterisation of fermentation of high-gravity maize mashes with the application of pullulanase, proteolytic enzymes and enzymes degrading non-starch polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosowski, Grzegorz; Mikulski, Dawid; Czupryński, Bogusław; Kotarska, Katarzyna

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the research was to assess the possibility of the fermentation productivity rising through the increase in corn mashes extract from 16-17 to 20-21 degrees Balling, yet keeping a 3-day fermentation period. The second goal was to obtain the highest possible utilization of starch in the raw material through deep enzymatic degradation and utilization of available sugars and simultaneous maintenance of high quality spirit. It was found that fulfilling the above during the 3-day fermentation period was possible with the application of pullulanase as an additional amylolytic enzyme. Adding pullulanase resulted in the acceleration of the starch hydrolysis degree, which led to lower amounts of unhydrolyzed dextrins and higher ethanol yield. When the supportive enzymes complex (pullulanase, protease and cellulase) was used, the final ethanol concentration reached 10.86+/-0.04% v/v, with ethanol yield at 68.41+/-0.23 dm(3) of absolute ethanol (A(100)) per 100 kg of starch, which was 95.25+/-0.32% at the theoretical value. The acceleration of starch enzymatic degradation and the application of a proteolytic preparation visibly shortened both initial and main fermentation phases. This in turn increased the time of the final fermentation phase and resulted in more extensive utilization of substrates by yeasts with simultaneous reduction of the final concentration of acetaldehyde (26.0+/-0.5 mg/dm(3)A(100)) and diethyl acetal of acetaldehyde (2.5+/-0.5 mg/dm(3)A(100)). The quality of spirit obtained was positively verified also in terms of relatively low concentration of higher alcohol (3912.2+/-9.8 mg/dm(3)A(100)). Preliminary analysis of costs (without raw-material) of 1 l distillate production indicated the possibility to reduce the costs by 18-20%.

  18. Spatial organization of cellulose microfibrils and matrix polysaccharides in primary plant cell walls as imaged by multichannel atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Zheng, Yunzhen; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), complemented with electron microscopy, to characterize the nanoscale and mesoscale structure of the outer (periclinal) cell wall of onion scale epidermis - a model system for relating wall structure to cell wall mechanics. The epidermal wall contains ~100 lamellae, each ~40 nm thick, containing 3.5-nm wide cellulose microfibrils oriented in a common direction within a lamella but varying by ~30 to 90° between adjacent lamellae. The wall thus has a crossed polylamellate, not helicoidal, wall structure. Montages of high-resolution AFM images of the newly deposited wall surface showed that single microfibrils merge into and out of short regions of microfibril bundles, thereby forming a reticulated network. Microfibril direction within a lamella did not change gradually or abruptly across the whole face of the cell, indicating continuity of the lamella across the outer wall. A layer of pectin at the wall surface obscured the underlying cellulose microfibrils when imaged by FESEM, but not by AFM. The AFM thus preferentially detects cellulose microfibrils by probing through the soft matrix in these hydrated walls. AFM-based nanomechanical maps revealed significant heterogeneity in cell wall stiffness and adhesiveness at the nm scale. By color coding and merging these maps, the spatial distribution of soft and rigid matrix polymers could be visualized in the context of the stiffer microfibrils. Without chemical extraction and dehydration, our results provide multiscale structural details of the primary cell wall in its near-native state, with implications for microfibrils motions in different lamellae during uniaxial and biaxial extensions. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Disccusion on the Mechnism of Resistance of the Polysaccharide of Lentinus Edodes against Pathogenic Bacteria and Virus of Plant%香菇多糖对植物真菌和病毒病害的抗病机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰; 王开运

    2011-01-01

    香菇多糖(LNT)属于真菌多糖,具有与葡聚糖激发子类似的抑病、抗病活性,可诱导植株或细胞产生并积累抗病性物质,如植保素、几丁质酶等.综述了食用菌香菇中的有效成分香菇多糖对植物真菌及病毒病害抗病机理等方面的研究.为多糖类物质作为杀菌剂的开发和用于防治植物病毒病等病害提供一定的理论依据.%Lentinus edodes, the polysaccharide extracted from one kind of edible fungi. The polysaccharide of lentinus edodes (or lentinan) has some antiviral mechanisms, which can primary blunt virus outside and induce the host resistance (increase chitinase activity andβ-1,3- glucanase activity). Disccusion on the mechanism of resistance of the polysaccharide of Lentinus edodes against pathogenic bacteria and virus of Plant was made for its extensive application in the future.

  20. Polysaccharides for the Delivery of Antitumor Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Posocco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the several delivery materials available so far, polysaccharides represent very attractive molecules as they can undergo a wide range of chemical modifications, are biocompatible, biodegradable, and have low immunogenic properties. Thus, polysaccharides can contribute to significantly overcome the limitation in the use of many types of drugs, including anti-cancer drugs. The use of conventional anti-cancer drugs is hampered by their high toxicity, mostly depending on the indiscriminate targeting of both cancer and normal cells. Additionally, for nucleic acid based drugs (NABDs, an emerging class of drugs with potential anti-cancer value, the practical use is problematic. This mostly depends on their fast degradation in biological fluids and the difficulties to cross cell membranes. Thus, for both classes of drugs, the development of optimal delivery materials is crucial. Here we discuss the possibility of using different kinds of polysaccharides, such as chitosan, hyaluronic acid, dextran, and pullulan, as smart drug delivery materials. We first describe the main features of polysaccharides, then a general overview about the aspects ruling drug release mechanisms and the pharmacokinetic are reported. Finally, notable examples of polysaccharide-based delivery of conventional anti-cancer drugs and NABDs are reported. Whereas additional research is required, the promising results obtained so far, fully justify further efforts, both in terms of economic support and investigations in the field of polysaccharides as drug delivery materials.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of Gram-positive Arthrobacter in the phyllosphere: induction of pollutant degradation genes by natural plant phenolic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheublin, T.R.; Deusch, S.; Moreno-Forero, S.K.; Müller, J.A.; van der Meer, J.R.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 is a Gram-positive, 4-chlorophenol degrading soil bacterium that was recently shown to be an effective colonizer of plant leaf surfaces. The genetic basis for this phyllosphere competency is unknown. In this paper, we describe the genome-wide expression profile of A.

  2. Degradation of plant cuticles in soils: impact on formation and sorptive ability of humin-mineral matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2015-05-01

    Plant cuticles are important precursors for soil organic matter, in particular for soil humin, which is considered an efficient sorbent for organic pollutants. In this study, we examined degradation and transformation of cuticles isolated from fruit and leaves in loamy sand and sandy clay loessial arid brown soils. We then studied sorption of phenanthrene and carbamazepine to humin-mineral matrices isolated from the incubated soils. Low degradation (22%) was observed for agave cuticle in a sandy clay soil system, whereas high degradation (68-78%) was obtained for agave cuticle in a loamy sand soil system and for loamy sand and sandy clay soils amended with tomato cuticle. During incubation, most of the residual organic matter was accumulated in the humin fraction. Sorption of phenanthrene was significantly higher for humin-mineral matrices obtained from soils incubated with plant cuticles as compared with soils without cuticle application. Sorption of carbamazepine to humin-mineral matrices was not affected by cuticle residues. Cooperative sorption of carbamazepine on humin-mineral matrices isolated from sandy clay soil is suggested. Sorption-desorption hysteresis of both phenanthrene and carbamazepine was lower for humin-mineral matrices obtained from soils incubated with plant cuticles as compared with nonamended soils. Our results show that cuticle composition significantly affects the rate and extent of cuticle degradation in soils and that plant cuticle application influences sorption and desorption of polar and nonpolar pollutants by humin-mineral matrices.

  3. Soil-derived microbial consortia enriched with different plant biomass reveal distinct players acting in lignocellulose degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lima Brossi, Maria Julia; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Cortes Tolalpa, Larisa; van Elsas, Jan

    Here, we investigated how different plant biomass, and-for one substrate-pH, drive the composition of degrader microbial consortia. We bred such consortia from forest soil, incubated along nine aerobic sequential - batch enrichments with wheat straw (WS1, pH 7.2; WS2, pH 9.0), switchgrass (SG, pH

  4. Colonization on root surface by a phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium and its application for reducing plant phenanthrene contamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    Full Text Available A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium, Pn2, was isolated from Alopecurus aequalis Sobol grown in soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. Based on morphology, physiological characteristics and the 16S rRNA gene sequence, it was identified as Massilia sp. Strain Pn2 could degrade more than 95% of the phenanthrene (150 mg · L(-1 in a minimal salts medium (MSM within 48 hours at an initial pH of 7.0 and a temperature of 30 °C. Pn2 could grow well on the MSM plates with a series of other PAHs, including naphthalene, acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, and degrade them to different degrees. Pn2 could also colonize the root surface of ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam, invade its internal root tissues and translocate into the plant shoot. When treated with the endophyte Pn2 under hydroponic growth conditions with 2 mg · L(-1 of phenanthrene in the Hoagland solution, the phenanthrene concentrations in ryegrass roots and shoots were reduced by 54% and 57%, respectively, compared with the endophyte-free treatment. Strain Pn2 could be a novel and useful bacterial resource for eliminating plant PAH contamination in polluted environments by degrading the PAHs inside plants. Furthermore, we provide new perspectives on the control of the plant uptake of PAHs via endophytic bacteria.

  5. Biochemical Aspects of Non-Starch Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Căpriţă

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides are macromolecules of monosaccharides linked by glycosidic bonds. Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP are principally non-α-glucan polysaccharides of the plant cell wall. They are a heterogeneous group of polysaccharides with varying degrees of water solubility, size, and structure. The water insoluble fiber fraction include cellulose, galactomannans, xylans, xyloglucans, and lignin, while the water-soluble fibers are the pectins, arabinogalactans, arabinoxylans, and β-(1,3(1,4-D-glucans (β-glucans. Knowledge of the chemical structure of NSP has permitted the development of enzyme technology to overcome their antinutritional effects. The physiological effects of NSP on the digestion and absorption of nutrients in human and monogastric animals have been attributed to their physicochemical properties: hydration properties, viscosity, cation exchange capacity and organic compound absorptive properties. This paper reviews and presents information on NSPs chemistry, physicochemical properties and physiological effects on the nutrient entrapment.

  6. Targeted and non-targeted effects in cell wall polysaccharides from transgenetically modified potato tubers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex network composed mainly of polysaccharides. Cell wall polysaccharides surround and protect plant cells and are responsible for the stability and rigidity of plant tissue. Pectin is a major component of primary cell wall and the middle lamella of plants. Ho

  7. Accelerating the degradation of green plant waste with chemical decomposition agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejun, Sun; Juntao, Zhang; Ying, Chen; Zongwen, Liao; Lin, Ruan; Cong, Liu

    2011-10-01

    Degradation of green plant waste is often difficult, and excess maturity times are typically required. In this study, we used lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose assays; scanning electron microscopy; infrared spectrum analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the effects of chemical decomposition agents on the lignocellulose content of green plant waste, its structure and major functional groups and the mechanism of accelerated degradation. Our results showed that adding chemical decomposition agents to Ficus microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust reduced the contents of lignin by 0.53%-11.48% and the contents of cellulose by 2.86%-7.71%, and increased the contents of hemicellulose by 2.92%-33.63% after 24 h. With increasing quantities of alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, the lignin content decreased. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, lignocellulose tube wall thickness increased significantlyIncreases of 29.41%, 3.53% and 34.71% were observed after treatment with NaOH, alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy showed that CO and aromatic skeleton stretching absorption peaks were weakened and the C-H vibrational absorption peak from out-of-plane in positions 2 and 6 (S units) (890-900 cm(-1)) was strengthened after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, indicating a reduction in lignin content. Several absorption peaks [i.e., C-H deformations (asymmetry in methyl groups, -CH(3)- and -CH(2)-) (1450-1460 cm(-1)); Aliphatic C-H stretching in methyl and phenol OH (1370-1380 cm(-1)); CO stretching (cellulose and hemicellulose) (1040-1060 cm(-1))] that indicate the presence of a chemical bond between lignin and cellulose was reduced, indicating that the chemical bond between lignin and cellulose had been partially broken. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that Na

  8. AtHESPERIN: a novel regulator of circadian rhythms with poly(A)-degrading activity in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delis, Costas; Krokida, Afrodite; Tomatsidou, Anastasia; Tsikou, Daniela; Beta, Rafailia A.A.; Tsioumpekou, Maria; Moustaka, Julietta; Stravodimos, Georgios; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Balatsos, Nikolaos A. A.; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the identification and characterization of a novel gene, AtHesperin (AtHESP) that codes for a deadenylase in Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene is under circadian clock-gene regulation and has similarity to the mammalian Nocturnin. AtHESP can efficiently degrade poly(A) substrates exhibiting allosteric kinetics. Size exclusion chromatography and native electrophoresis coupled with kinetic analysis support that the native enzyme is oligomeric with at least 3 binding sites. Knockdown and overexpression of AtHESP in plant lines affects the expression and rhythmicity of the clock core oscillator genes TOC1 and CCA1. This study demonstrates an evolutionary conserved poly(A)-degrading activity in plants and suggests deadenylation as a mechanism involved in the regulation of the circadian clock. A role of AtHESP in stress response in plants is also depicted. PMID:26619288

  9. Microcosm studies of subsurface PAH-degrading bacteria from a former manufactured gas plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Neal D.; Wilson, Liza P.; Bouwer, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the potential for natural in situ biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) in the subsurface at the site of a former manufactured gas plant. Fifty-seven samples of unconsolidated subsurface sediments were aseptically obtained from five boreholes across the site. Bacteria capable of aerobically degrading PAH's without an acclimation period were detected throughout shallow (2.7 m) and deep (24.7 m) areas of the subsurface in both relatively clean (biodegradation (7±1% to 13±2%) in the presence of N03 was observed in two samples. Compound removals were first order with respect to substrate concentration during the first 10-15 days of incubation. Compound biodegradation plateaued in the later stages of incubation (15-40 days), most likely from diminishing bioavailability and nutrient and oxygen depletion. Population densities in the sediments were typically low, with viable aerobic counts ranging from 0 to 10 5 CFU gdw -1, viable anaerobic counts ranging from 0 to 104 CFU gdw -1, and total counts (AODC) usually 10-fold greater than viable counts. Total counts exhibited a strong ( p Bacteria were metabolically active in samples from groundwaters with low pH (3.7) and high naphthalene concentrations (11,000 μg L -1). Data from these enumeration and microcosm studies suggest that natural in situ biodegradation is occurring at the site.

  10. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changming Yang; Mengmeng Wang; Haiyan Chen; Jianhua Li

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis,Zizaaia aquatica,and Acorus calamus.The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants.A.calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils,as compared with Z aquatica and P.australis.Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P.australis,Z.aquatica,and A.calamus were 7.5,9.8 and 5.4 days,respectively.Residual butachlor concentration in A.calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z.aquatica and P.australis rhizosphere soils,respectively,indicating that A.calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant.In general,microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition,despite the riparian plant types.However,rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species.Compared to Z.aquatica and P.australis,A.calamus showed significantly larger microbial number,higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils.The results indicated that A.calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butaehlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  11. Isolation, plant colonization potential, and phenanthrene degradation performance of the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Jin, Li; Gu, Yujun; Wang, Wanqing

    2014-06-01

    This investigation provides a novel method of endophyte-aided removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from plant bodies. A phenanthrene-degrading endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6 was isolated from clover (Trifolium pratense L.) grown in a PAH-contaminated site. After being marked with the GFP gene, the colonization and distribution of strain Ph6-gfp was directly visualized in plant roots, stems, and leaves for the first time. After ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) roots inoculation, strain Ph6-gfp actively and internally colonized plant roots and transferred vertically to the shoots. Ph6-gfp had a natural capacity to cope with phenanthrene in vitro and in planta. Ph6-gfp degraded 81.1% of phenanthrene (50 mg.L-1) in a culture solution within 15 days. The inoculation of plants with Ph6-gfp reduced the risks associated with plant phenanthrene contamination based on observations of decreased concentration, accumulation, and translocation factors of phenanthrene in ryegrass. Our results will have important ramifications in the assessment of the environmental risks of PAHs and in finding ways to circumvent plant PAH contamination.

  12. Degradation Behavior of Moroxydine Hydrochloride in Rice Plant and Field Water Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Lin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Through field experiments, which were conducted in Zhaodong County of Heilongjiang Province, Zhulou County of Henan Province and Jurong County of Jiangsu Province, the degradation dynamics of moroxydine hydrochloride in rice plant and field water were investigated.The detection was performed by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in positive mode(ESI+. The results showed that the average recoveries of rice plant and field water at three spiked levels (0.005, 0.05, 0.5 mg·kg -1were found in the range of 92.50%-109.20% with RSD 6.10%-6.90% and 86.40%-107.2% with RSD 0.73%-3.10%, respectively. Limits of detection(LODof plant and water were 0.005 mg·kg -1. The degradation kinetic equation showed that the half-life of moroxydine hydrochloride in rice plant and field water was 1.2-4.7 d,1.0-3.5 d, respectively. The moroxydine hydrochloride was proved to be an easily degradable pesticide.

  13. Effects of warming on chlorophyll degradation and carbohydrate accumulation of Alpine herbaceous species during plant senescence on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changguang Shi

    Full Text Available Plant senescence is a critical life history process accompanied by chlorophyll degradation and has large implications for nutrient resorption and carbohydrate storage. Although photoperiod governs much of seasonal leaf senescence in many plant species, temperature has also been shown to modulate this process. Therefore, we hypothesized that climate warming would significantly impact the length of the plant growing season and ultimate productivity. To test this assumption, we measured the effects of simulated autumn climate warming paradigms on four native herbaceous species that represent distinct life forms of alpine meadow plants on the Tibetan Plateau. Conditions were simulated in open-top chambers (OTCs and the effects on the degradation of chlorophyll, nitrogen (N concentration in leaves and culms, total non-structural carbohydrate (TNC in roots, growth and phenology were assessed during one year following treatment. The results showed that climate warming in autumn changed the senescence process only for perennials by slowing chlorophyll degradation at the beginning of senescence and accelerating it in the following phases. Warming also increased root TNC storage as a result of higher N concentrations retained in leaves; however, this effect was species dependent and did not alter the growing and flowering phenology in the following seasons. Our results indicated that autumn warming increases carbohydrate accumulation, not only by enhancing activities of photosynthetic enzymes (a mechanism proposed in previous studies, but also by affecting chlorophyll degradation and preferential allocation of resources to different plant compartments. The different responses to warming can be explained by inherently different growth and phenology patterns observed among the studied species. The results implied that warming leads to changes in the competitive balance among life forms, an effect that can subsequently shift vegetation distribution and

  14. Depolymerization of sulfated polysaccharides under hydrothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Minoru; Takatori, Masaki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Mori, Daiki; Takashima, Osamu; Yoshida, Shinichi; Sato, Kimihiko; Kawamoto, Hitoshi; Tamura, Jun-ichi; Izawa, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-30

    Fucoidan and chondroitin sulfate, which are well known sulfated polysaccharides, were depolymerized under hydrothermal conditions (120-180°C, 5-60min) as a method for the preparation of sulfated polysaccharides with controlled molecular weights. Fucoidan was easily depolymerized, and the change of the molecular weight values depended on the reaction temperature and time. The degree of sulfation and IR spectra of the depolymerized fucoidan did not change compared with those of untreated fucoidan at reaction temperatures below 140°C. However, fucoidan was partially degraded during depolymerization above 160°C. Nearly the same depolymerization was observed for chondroitin sulfate. These results indicate that hydrothermal treatment is applicable for the depolymerization of sulfated polysaccharides, and that low molecular weight products without desulfation and deformation of the initial glycan structures can be obtained under mild hydrothermal conditions.

  15. Influence of rhizosphere microbial ecophysiological parameters from different plant species on butachlor degradation in a riparian soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Li, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. However, little research has been reported on the microbial process and degradation potential of herbicide in a riparian soil. Field sampling and incubation experiments were conducted to investigate differences in microbial parameters and butachlor degradation in the riparian soil from four plant communities in Chongming Island, China. The results suggested that the rhizosphere soil had significantly higher total organic C and water-soluble organic C relative to the nonrhizosphere soil. Differences in rhizosphere microbial community size and physiological parameters among vegetation types were significant. The rhizosphere soil from the mixed community of Phragmites australis and Acorus calamus had the highest microbial biomass and biochemical activity, followed by A. calamus, P. australis and Zizania aquatica. Microbial ATP, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and basal soil respiration (BSR) in the rhizosphere of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus were 58, 72, and 62% higher, respectively, than in the pure P. australis community. Compared with the rhizosphere soil of the pure plant communities, the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus displayed a significantly greater degradation rate of butachlor in the rhizosphere soil. Residual butachlor concentrations in rhizosphere soil of the mixed community of P. australis and A. calamus and were 48, 63, and 68% lower than three pure plant communities, respectively. Butachlor degradation rates were positively correlated to microbial ATP, DHA, and BSR, indicating that these microbial parameters may be useful in assessing butachlor degradation potential in the riparian soil.

  16. An optimized microplate assay system for quantitative evaluation of plant cell wall-degrading enzyme activity of fungal culture extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brian C; Donnelly, Marie K; Bergstrom, Gary C; Walker, Larry P; Gibson, Donna M

    2009-03-01

    Developing enzyme cocktails for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis complementary to current cellulase systems is a critical step needed for economically viable biofuels production. Recent genomic analysis indicates that some plant pathogenic fungi are likely a largely untapped resource in which to prospect for novel hydrolytic enzymes for biomass conversion. In order to develop high throughput screening assays for enzyme bioprospecting, a standardized microplate assay was developed for rapid analysis of polysaccharide hydrolysis by fungal extracts, incorporating biomass substrates. Fungi were grown for 10 days on cellulose- or switchgrass-containing media to produce enzyme extracts for analysis. Reducing sugar released from filter paper, Avicel, corn stalk, switchgrass, carboxymethylcellulose, and arabinoxylan was quantified using a miniaturized colorimetric assay based on 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Significant interactions were identified among fungal species, growth media composition, assay substrate, and temperature. Within a small sampling of plant pathogenic fungi, some extracts had crude activities comparable to or greater than T. reesei, particularly when assayed at lower temperatures and on biomass substrates. This microplate assay system should prove useful for high-throughput bioprospecting for new sources of novel enzymes for biofuel production.

  17. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Himmelsbach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo.

  18. The plant hopper Issus coleoptratus can detoxify phloem sap saponins including the degradation of the terpene core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelsbach, Markus; Weth, Agnes; Böhme, Christine; Schwarz, Martin; Bräunig, Peter; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-02-10

    Issus coleoptratus is a small plant hopper which mainly feeds on the phloem sap from ivy. Although all parts of ivy are poisonous as the plant contains saponins, especially hederasaponins, I. coleoptratus can cope with the poison. In contrast to other animals like the stick insect Carausius morosus which accumulates saponins in its body, I. coleoptratus can degrade and disintegrate not only the saponins but even the genines, i.e. the triterpene core of the substances. This is perhaps made possible by a specialised midgut and/or the salivary glands. When the glands and the gut are dissected and added to saponins in solution, the saponins, including the genines, are degraded ex vivo.

  19. Investigation of relationships between removals of tetracycline and degradation products and physicochemical parameters in municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Murat; Uslu Şenel, Gülşad; Öbek, Erdal; Arslan Topal, E Işıl

    2016-05-15

    Determination of the effect of physicochemical parameters on the removal of tetracycline (TC) and degradation products is important because of the importance of the removal of antibiotics in Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between removals of TC and degradation products and physicochemical parameters in Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (MWWTP). For this aim, (i) the removals of physicochemical parameters in a MWWTP located in Elazığ city (Turkey) were determined (ii) the removals of TC and degradation products in MWWTP were determined (iii) the relationships between removals of TC and degradation products and physicochemical parameters were investigated. TC, 4-epitetracycline (ETC), 4-epianhydrotetracycline (EATC), anhydrotetracycline (ATC), and physicochemical parameters (pH, temperature, electrical conductivity (EC), suspended solids (SS), BOD5, COD, total organic carbon (TOC), NH4(+)-N, NO2(-)-N, NO3(-)-N and O-PO4(-3)) were determined. The calculation of the correlation coefficients of relationships between the physicochemical parameters and TC, EATC, ATC showed that, among the investigated parameters, EATC and SS most correlated. The removals of other physicochemical parameters were not correlated with TC, EATC and ATC.

  20. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system.

  1. High Potential Source for Biomass Degradation Enzyme Discovery and Environmental Aspects Revealed through Metagenomics of Indian Buffalo Rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex microbiomes of the rumen functions as an effective system for plant cell wall degradation, and biomass utilization provide genetic resource for degrading microbial enzymes that could be used in the production of biofuel. Therefore the buffalo rumen microbiota was surveyed using shot gun sequencing. This metagenomic sequencing generated 3.9 GB of sequences and data were assembled into 137270 contiguous sequences (contigs. We identified potential 2614 contigs encoding biomass degrading enzymes including glycoside hydrolases (GH: 1943 contigs, carbohydrate binding module (CBM: 23 contigs, glycosyl transferase (GT: 373 contigs, carbohydrate esterases (CE: 259 contigs, and polysaccharide lyases (PE: 16 contigs. The hierarchical clustering of buffalo metagenomes demonstrated the similarities and dissimilarity in microbial community structures and functional capacity. This demonstrates that buffalo rumen microbiome was considerably enriched in functional genes involved in polysaccharide degradation with great prospects to obtain new molecules that may be applied in the biofuel industry.

  2. Structure of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-10-30

    Two polysaccharides were obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2 isolated from the rhizosphere of a pearl millet. The following structures of the polysaccharides were established by sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: [Formula: see text] Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide from A. brasilense S17 (Fedonenko YP, Konnova ON, Zdorovenko EL, Konnova SA, Zatonsky GV, Shaskov AS, Ignatov VV, Knirel YA. Carbohydr Res 2008;343:810-6), whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  3. Determinants of farmers' tree planting investment decision as a degraded landscape management strategy in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gessesse

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation due to lack of sustainable land management practices are one of the critical challenges in many developing countries including Ethiopia. This study explores the major determinants of farm level tree planting decision as a land management strategy in a typical framing and degraded landscape of the Modjo watershed, Ethiopia. The main data were generated from household surveys and analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression model. The model significantly predicted farmers' tree planting decision (Chi-square = 37.29, df = 15, P<0.001. Besides, the computed significant value of the model suggests that all the considered predictor variables jointly influenced the farmers' decision to plant trees as a land management strategy. In this regard, the finding of the study show that local land-users' willingness to adopt tree growing decision is a function of a wide range of biophysical, institutional, socioeconomic and household level factors, however, the likelihood of household size, productive labour force availability, the disparity of schooling age, level of perception of the process of deforestation and the current land tenure system have positively and significantly influence on tree growing investment decisions in the study watershed. Eventually, the processes of land use conversion and land degradation are serious which in turn have had adverse effects on agricultural productivity, local food security and poverty trap nexus. Hence, devising sustainable and integrated land management policy options and implementing them would enhance ecological restoration and livelihood sustainability in the study watershed.

  4. Enzymatic production of polysaccharides from gum tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Plant polysaccharides, relating to the field of natural probiotic components, can comprise structures similar to human milk oligosaccharides. A method for enzymatic hydrolysis of gum tragacanth from the bush-like legumes of the genus Astragalus, using a combination of pectin hydrolases...

  5. Comparing anthracene and fluorene degradation in anthracene and fluorene-contaminated soil by single and mixed plant cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somtrakoon, Khanitta; Chouychai, Waraporn; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    The ability of three plant species (sweet corn, cucumber, and winged bean) to remediate soil spiked with 138.9 and 95.9 mg of anthracene and fluorene per kg of dry soil, respectively, by single and double plant co-cultivation was investigated. After 15 and 30 days of transplantation, plant elongation, plant weight, chlorophyll content, and the content of each PAH in soil and plant tissues were determined. Based on PAH removal and plant health, winged bean was the most effective plant for phytoremediation when grown alone; percentage of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the rhizospheric soil after 30 days were 7.8% and 24.2%, respectively. The most effective combination of plants for phytoremediation was corn and winged bean; on day 30, amounts of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the winged bean rhizospheric soil were 3.4% and 14.3%, respectively; amounts of fluorene and anthracene remaining in the sweet corn rhizospheric soil were 4.1% and 8.8%, respectively. Co-cultivation of sweet corn and cucumber could remove fluorene to a higher extent than anthracene from soil within 15 days, but these plants did not survive and died before day 30. The amounts of fluorene remaining in the rhizospheric soil of corn and cucumber were only 14% and 17.3%, respectively, on day 15. No PAHs were detected in plant tissues. This suggests that phytostimulation of microbial degradation in the rhizosphere was most likely the mechanism by which the PAHs were removed from the spiked soil. The results show that co-cultivation of plants has merit in the phytoremediation of PAH-spiked soil.

  6. Inositol Metabolism in Plants. III. Conversion of Myo-inositol-2-H to Cell Wall Polysaccharides in Sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R M; Loewus, F

    1966-11-01

    Prolonged growth of cell cultures of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) on agar medium containing myo-inositol-2-(3)H resulted in incorporation of label predominately into uronosyl and pentosyl units of cell wall polysaccharides. Procedures normally used to distinguish between pectic substance and hemicellulose yielded carbohydrate-rich fractions with solubility characteristics ranging from pectic substance to hemicellulose yet the uronic acid and pentose composition of these fractions was decidedly pectic. Galacturonic acid was the only uronic acid present in each fraction. Subfractionation of alkali-soluble (hemicellulosic) polysaccharide by neutralization followed by ethanol precipitation gave 3 fractions, a water-insoluble, an ethanol-insoluble, and an ethanol-soluble fraction, each progressively poorer in galacturonic acid units and progressively richer in arabinose units; all relatively poor in xylose units.Apparently, processes involved in biosynthesis of primary cell wall continued to produce pectic substance during cell enlargement while processes leading to biosynthesis of typically secondary cell wall polysaccharide such as 4-0-methyl glucuronoxylan were not activated.

  7. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  8. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Boutard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq, and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  9. Identification and Assessment of Material Models for Age-Related Degradation of Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Kim, M. K.; Choi, I-K.

    2009-04-27

    When performing seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants (NPPs), the potential effects of age-related degradation on structures, systems, and components (SSCs) should be considered. To address the issue of aging degradation, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has embarked on a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which will include the consideration of aging of structures and components in NPPs. Three specific areas that are included in the KAERI research project, related to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), are probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and a plant seismic risk analysis. To support the development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components, KAERI entered into a collaboration agreement with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 2007. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period with the goal of developing seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of SSCs, and using these results as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations that will be performed in the subsequent evaluations in the years that follow. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. This report

  10. Structural modification of polysaccharides: A biochemical-genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.

    1991-01-01

    Polysaccharides have a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. An industry trend is underway towards the increased use of bacteria to produce polysaccharides. Long term goals of this work are the adaptation and enhancement of saccharide properties for electronic and optic applications. In this report we illustrate the application of enzyme-bearing bacteriophage on strains of the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, which produces a polysaccharide with the relatively rare rheological property of drag-reduction. This has resulted in the production of new polysaccharides with enhanced rheological properties. Our laboratory is developing techniques for processing and structurally modifying bacterial polysaccharides and oligosaccharides which comprise their basic polymeric repeat units. Our research has focused on bacteriophage which produce specific polysaccharide degrading enzymes. This has lead to the development of enzymes generated by bacteriophage as tools for polysaccharide modification and purification. These enzymes were used to efficiently convert the native material to uniform-sized high molecular weight polymers, or alternatively into high-purity oligosaccharides. Enzyme-bearing bacteriophage also serve as genetic selection tools for bacteria that produce new families of polysaccharides with modified structures.

  11. Assessment of hydrocarbon degradation potentials in plant-microbe interaction system with oil sludge contamination: A sustainable solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhote, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Jajoo, Anjana; Juwarkar, Asha

    2017-05-25

    A pot culture experiment was conducted for 90 days for evaluation of oil and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation in vegetated and non-vegetated treatments of real field oil sludge contaminated soil. Five different treatments include, (T1) control, 2% oil sludge contaminated soil; (T2), augmentation of microbial consortium; (T3), Vertiver zizanioide; (T4), bio-augmentation along with Vertiver zizanioide and (T5), bio-augmentation with Vertiver zizanioide and bulking agent. During the study, oil reduction, TPH and degradation of its fractions was determined. Physic-chemical and microbiological parameters of soil were also monitored simultaneously. At the end of the experimental period, oil content (85%) was reduced maximally in bio-augmented rhizospheric treatments (T4 and T5) as compared to control (27%). TPH reduction was observed to be 88% and 89% in bio-augmented rhizospheric soil (T4 and T5 treatments), whereas in non-rhizospheric and control (T2 and T1) TPH reduction was 78% and 37% respectively. Degradation of aromatic fraction after 90 days in bio-augmented rhizosphere of treatment T4 and T5 was found to 91% and 92%. In microbial (T2) and Vertiver treatment (T3) degradation of aromatic fraction was 83% and 68% respectively. A threefold increase in soil dehydrogenase activity and noticeable changes in organic carbon content, water holding capacity were also observed which indicated maximum degradation of oil and its fractions in combined treatment of plants and microbes. It is concluded that plant-microbe-soil system helps to restore soil quality and can be used as an effective tool for remediation of oil sludge contaminated sites.

  12. Effects of combination of plant and microorganism on degradation of simazine in soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of simazine (SIM), microbial biomass carbon, plate counts of heterotrophic bacteria and most probably number (MPN) of SIM degraders in uninoculated non-rhizosphere soil, uninoculated rhizosphere soil, inoculated nonrhizosphere soil, and inoculated rhizosphere soil were measured. At the initial concentration of 20 mg SIM/kg soil, the half-lives of SIM in the four treated soils were measured to be 73.0, 52.9, 16.9, and 7.8 d, respectively, and corresponding kinetic data fitted first-order kinetics. The experimental results indicated that higher degradation rates of SIM were observed in rhizosphere soils, especially in inoculated rhizosphere soil. The degradative characteristics of SIM were closely related to microbial process. Vegetation could enhance the magnitude of rhizosphere microbial communities, microbial biomass content, and heterotrophic bacterial community, but did little to influence those community components responsible for SIM degradation. This suggested that rhizosphere soil inoculated with microorganisms-degrading target herbicides was a useful pathway to achieve rapid degradation of the herbicides in soil.

  13. Galactomannan: a versatile biodegradable seed polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Nagar, Bhanu J; Naikwadi, Nikhil N; Variya, Bhavesh C

    2013-09-01

    Polysaccharides have been finding, in the last decades, very interesting and useful applications in the biomedical and, specifically, in the biopharmaceutical field. Galactomannans are a group of storage polysaccharides from various plant seeds that reserve energy for germination in the endosperm. There are four major sources of seed galactomannans: locust bean (Ceratonia siliqua), guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba), tara (Caesalpinia spinosa Kuntze), and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.). Through keen references of reported literature on galactomannans, in this review, we have described occurrence of various galactomannans, its physicochemical properties, characterization, applications, and overview of some major galactomannans.

  14. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  15. Repair Effect of Seaweed Polysaccharides with Different Contents of Sulfate Group and Molecular Weights on Damaged HK-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Bhadja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure–activity relationships and repair mechanism of six low-molecular-weight seaweed polysaccharides (SPSs on oxalate-induced damaged human kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 were investigated. These SPSs included Laminaria japonica polysaccharide, degraded Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide, degraded Gracilaria lemaneiformis polysaccharide, degraded Sargassum fusiforme polysaccharide, Eucheuma gelatinae polysaccharide, and degraded Undaria pinnatifida polysaccharide. These SPSs have a narrow difference of molecular weight (from 1968 to 4020 Da after degradation by controlling H2O2 concentration. The sulfate group (–SO3H content of the six SPSs was 21.7%, 17.9%, 13.3%, 8.2%, 7.0%, and 5.5%, respectively, and the –COOH contents varied between 1.0% to 1.7%. After degradation, no significant difference was observed in the contents of characteristic –SO3H and –COOH groups of polysaccharides. The repair effect of polysaccharides was determined using cell-viability test by CCK-8 assay and cell-morphology test by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results revealed that these SPSs within 0.1–100 μg/mL did not express cytotoxicity in HK-2 cells, and each polysaccharide had a repair effect on oxalate-induced damaged HK-2 cells. Simultaneously, the content of polysaccharide –SO3H was positively correlated with repair ability. Furthermore, the low-molecular-weight degraded polysaccharides showed better repair activity on damaged HK-2 cells than their undegraded counterpart. Our results can provide reference for inhibiting the formation of kidney stones and for developing original anti-stone polysaccharide drugs.

  16. Bacterial Structure and Characterization of Plant Growth Promoting and Oil Degrading Bacteria from the Rhizospheres of Mangrove Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    do Carmo, Flavia Lima; dos Santos, Henrique Fragoso; Martins, Edir Ferreira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2011-01-01

    Most oil from oceanic spills converges on coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance. Particular bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of local plant species can stimulate plant development through various mechanisms; it would be advantageous if t

  17. Bacterial Structure and Characterization of Plant Growth Promoting and Oil Degrading Bacteria from the Rhizospheres of Mangrove Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    do Carmo, Flavia Lima; dos Santos, Henrique Fragoso; Martins, Edir Ferreira; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    Most oil from oceanic spills converges on coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, which are threatened with worldwide disappearance. Particular bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of local plant species can stimulate plant development through various mechanisms; it would be advantageous if

  18. A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

    2012-01-30

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

  19. Preparation, characterization, and microbial degradation of specifically radiolabeled [C]lignocelluloses from marine and freshwater macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, R; Maccubbin, A E; Hodson, R E

    1984-02-01

    Specifically radiolabeled [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were prepared from the aquatic macrophytes Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemerianus, Rhizophora mangle, and Carex walteriana by using [C]phenylalanine, [C]tyrosine, and [C]cinnamic acid as precursors. Specifically radiolabeled [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses were prepared by using [C]glucose as precursor. The rates of microbial degradation varied among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses labeled with different lignin precursors within the same plant species. To determine the causes of these differential rates, [C-lignin]lignocelluloses were thoroughly characterized for the distribution of radioactivity in nonlignin contaminants and within the lignin macromolecule. In herbaceous plants, significant amounts (8 to 24%) of radioactivity from [C]phenylalanine and [C]tyrosine were found associated with protein, although very little (3%) radioactivity from [C]cinnamic acid was associated with protein. Microbial degradation of radiolabeled protein resulted in overestimation of lignin degradation rates in lignocelluloses derived from herbaceous aquatic plants. Other differences in degradation rates among [C-lignin]lignocelluloses from the same plant species were attributable to differences in the amount of label being associated with ester-linked subunits of peripheral lignin. After acid hydrolysis of [C-polysaccharide]lignocelluloses, radioactivity was detected in several sugars, although most of the radioactivity was distributed between glucose and xylose. After 576 h of incubation with salt marsh sediments, 38% of the polysaccharide component and between 6 and 16% of the lignin component (depending on the precursor) of J. roemerianus lignocellulose was mineralized to CO(2); during the same incubation period, 30% of the polysaccharide component and between 12 and 18% of the lignin component of S. alterniflora lignocellulose was mineralized.

  20. Monitoring the alkane monooxygenase gene alkB in different soil interfaces during plant litter degradation of C3 and C4 plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S.; Munch, J. C.; Schloter, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrocarbons like n-alkanes are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of anthropogenic contamination (e.g. oil spills) as well as a part of an ecosystem's biomass. For example n-alkanes become released during plant litter degradation; consequently they become a high abundant carbon source for microorganism. One possibility for the prokaryotic hydrocarbon metabolisation is an aerobic degradation pathway where the initial step is catalysed by the membrane bound alkane monooxygenase alkB. We analysed the influence of alkanes on the abundance of the alkB gene in different interfaces of the litter-soil system during the degradation of maize and pea litter. Therefore soil samples of a sandy and a loamy soil have been incubated with straw of maize and pea plants up to 30 weeks with constant soil moisture and temperature. Using quantitative real-time PCR we were able to monitor the changes of the abundance and the expression rates of alkB. In our experiments we focused on the straw layer, the litter/soil interface and the soil 1 cm below this interface (bulk soil). Our results clearly demonstrate time and space dependent abundance patterns of alkB genes and transcripts in the different layers studied, which are additionally shaped by the soil type used.

  1. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Determinants of farmers' tree-planting investment decisions as a degraded landscape management strategy in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessesse, Berhan; Bewket, Woldeamlak; Bräuning, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Land degradation due to lack of sustainable land management practices is one of the critical challenges in many developing countries including Ethiopia. This study explored the major determinants of farm-level tree-planting decisions as a land management strategy in a typical farming and degraded landscape of the Modjo watershed, Ethiopia. The main data were generated from household surveys and analysed using descriptive statistics and a binary logistic regression model. The model significantly predicted farmers' tree-planting decisions (χ2 = 37.29, df = 15, P labour force availability, the disparity of schooling age, level of perception of the process of deforestation and the current land tenure system had a critical influence on tree-growing investment decisions in the study watershed. Eventually, the processes of land-use conversion and land degradation were serious, which in turn have had adverse effects on agricultural productivity, local food security and poverty trap nexus. Hence, the study recommended that devising and implementing sustainable land management policy options would enhance ecological restoration and livelihood sustainability in the study watershed.

  3. Determinants of farmers' tree planting investment decision as a degraded landscape management strategy in the central highlands of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessesse, B.; Bewket, W.; Bräuning, A.

    2015-11-01

    Land degradation due to lack of sustainable land management practices are one of the critical challenges in many developing countries including Ethiopia. This study explores the major determinants of farm level tree planting decision as a land management strategy in a typical framing and degraded landscape of the Modjo watershed, Ethiopia. The main data were generated from household surveys and analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression model. The model significantly predicted farmers' tree planting decision (Chi-square = 37.29, df = 15, Plabour force availability, the disparity of schooling age, level of perception of the process of deforestation and the current land tenure system have positively and significantly influence on tree growing investment decisions in the study watershed. Eventually, the processes of land use conversion and land degradation are serious which in turn have had adverse effects on agricultural productivity, local food security and poverty trap nexus. Hence, devising sustainable and integrated land management policy options and implementing them would enhance ecological restoration and livelihood sustainability in the study watershed.

  4. [Feasibility of the use of degraded inedible biomass of plants as a nutrient liquid for hydroponic cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S S; Ai, W D; Hou, W H; Shi, W W

    2001-10-01

    Objective. To demonstrate that the recycled liquid, which originated from lettuce inedible biomass degraded by fixed microorganism (correction of microorgannism) and enzyme, can be used as a nutrient solution for lettuce hydroponic cultivation. Method. After biologically degrading the weighted, oven-dried and milled leaves and roots of lettuce in a biological reactor under aerobic condition, the original effluent and its supplemented effluent were used as nutrients for lettuce hydroponic cultivation. Result. The average dried weight (ADW) of lettuce from the original effluent group was approximately half of that from the control group, and the ADW from supplemented effluent group was about equal to that from the control group; some qualities of the lettuce such as a relatively lower content of NO3- from both the original effluent group and the supplemented effluent one improved, and some of those such as a relatively higher content of NO2- dropped. Conclusion. The biologically-degraded effluent was able to be used as nutrient solution for lettuce hydroponic cultivation, although the effects of the inorganic ion-supplemented effluent were much better; the plants of lettuce from the biologically-degraded effluent were safely edible.

  5. Post-genomic analyses of fungal lignocellulosic biomass degradation reveal the unexpected potential of the plant pathogen Ustilago maydis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couturier Marie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are potent biomass degraders due to their ability to thrive in ligno(hemicellulose-rich environments. During the last decade, fungal genome sequencing initiatives have yielded abundant information on the genes that are putatively involved in lignocellulose degradation. At present, additional experimental studies are essential to provide insights into the fungal secreted enzymatic pools involved in lignocellulose degradation. Results In this study, we performed a wide analysis of 20 filamentous fungi for which genomic data are available to investigate their biomass-hydrolysis potential. A comparison of fungal genomes and secretomes using enzyme activity profiling revealed discrepancies in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes sets dedicated to plant cell wall. Investigation of the contribution made by each secretome to the saccharification of wheat straw demonstrated that most of them individually supplemented the industrial Trichoderma reesei CL847 enzymatic cocktail. Unexpectedly, the most striking effect was obtained with the phytopathogen Ustilago maydis that improved the release of total sugars by 57% and of glucose by 22%. Proteomic analyses of the best-performing secretomes indicated a specific enzymatic mechanism of U. maydis that is likely to involve oxido-reductases and hemicellulases. Conclusion This study provides insight into the lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms by filamentous fungi and allows for the identification of a number of enzymes that are potentially useful to further improve the industrial lignocellulose bioconversion process.

  6. Physical, Rheological, Functional, and Film Properties of a Novel Emulsifier: Frost Grape Polysaccharide from Vitis riparia Michx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, William T; Vaughn, Steven F; Byars, Jeffrey A; Selling, Gordon W; Holthaus, Derek M; Price, Neil P J

    2017-10-04

    A novel emulsifier, Frost grape polysaccharide (FGP), isolated from natural exudate of the species Vitis riparia Michx, was physically and rheologically characterized. The determination of the physical, structural, thermodynamic, emulsification, film, and rheological properties of FGP provide essential details for the commercial adoption of this novel plant polysaccharide. FGP is capable of producing exceptionally stable emulsions when compared with the industrially ubiquitous gum arabic (GA). The FGP isolate contained a negligible amount of nitrogen (0.03%), indicating that it does not contain an associated glycoprotein, unlike GA. Solutions of FGP have a high degree of thermostability, displaying no loss in viscosity with temperature cycling and no thermal degradation when held at 90 °C. FGP is an excellent film former, producing high tensile strength films which remain intact at temperatures up to 200 °C. This work identified a number of potential food and pharmaceutical applications where FGP is significantly superior to GA.

  7. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  8. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  9. AepA of Pectobacterium is not involved in the regulation of extracellular plant cell wall degrading enzymes production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõiv, Viia; Andresen, Liis; Mäe, Andres

    2010-06-01

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDE) are the major virulence determinants in phytopathogenic Pectobacterium, and their production is controlled by many regulatory factors. In this study, we focus on the role of the AepA protein, which was previously described to be a global regulator of PCWDE production in Pectobacterium carotovorum (Murata et al. in Mol Plant Microbe Interact 4:239-246, 1991). Our results show that neither inactivation nor overexpression of aepA affects PCWDE production in either Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 or Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum SCC3193. The previously published observation based on the overexpression of aepA could be explained by the presence of the adjacent regulatory rsmB gene in the constructs used. Our database searches indicated that AepA belongs to the YtcJ subfamily of amidohydrolases. YtcJ-like amidohydrolases are present in bacteria, archaea, plants and some fungi. Although AepA has 28% identity with the formamide deformylase NfdA in Arthrobacter pascens F164, AepA was unable to catalyze the degradation of NdfA-specific N-substituted formamides. We conclude that AepA is a putative aminohydrolase not involved in regulation of PCWDE production.

  10. Heavy metals in a degraded soil treated with sludge from water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Sandra Tereza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of water treatment sludge (WTS to degraded soil is an alternative for both residue disposal and degraded soil reclaim. This study evaluated effects of the application of water treatment sludge to a Typic Hapludox soil degraded by tin mining in the National Forest of Jamari, State of Rondonia, Brazil, on the content of heavy metals. A completely randomized experimental design with five treatments was used: control (n = 4; chemical control, which received only liming (n = 4; and rates D100, D150 and D200, which corresponded to 100, 150 and 200 mg of N-sludge kg-1 soil (n = 20, respectively. Thirty days after liming, period in which soil moisture was kept at 70% of the retention capacity, soil samples were taken and analyzed for total and extractable Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, and Cr. The application of WTS increased heavy-metal contents in the degraded soil. Although heavy metals were below their respective critical limits, sludge application onto degraded areas may cause hazardous environmental impact and thus must be monitored.

  11. Phytoremediation potential of Petunia grandiflora Juss., an ornamental plant to degrade a disperse, disulfonated triphenylmethane textile dye Brilliant Blue G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watharkar, Anuprita D; Khandare, Rahul V; Kamble, Apurva A; Mulla, Asma Y; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2013-02-01

    Phytoremediation provides an ecofriendly alternative for the treatment of pollutants like textile dyes. The purpose of this study was to explore phytoremediation potential of Petunia grandiflora Juss. by using its wild as well as tissue-cultured plantlets to decolorize Brilliant Blue G (BBG) dye, a sample of dye mixture and a real textile effluent. In vitro cultures of P. grandiflora were obtained by seed culture method. The decolorization experiments were carried out using wild as well as tissue-cultured plants independently. The enzymatic analysis of the plant roots was performed before and after decolorization of BBG. Metabolites formed after dye degradation were analyzed using UV-vis spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Phytotoxicity studies were performed. Characterization of dye mixture and textile effluent was also studied. The wild and tissue-cultured plants of P. grandiflora showed the decolorized BBG up to 86 %. Significant increase in the activities of lignin peroxidase, laccase, NADH-2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol reductase, and tyrosinase was found in the roots of the plants. Three metabolites of BBG were identified as 3-{[ethyl(phenyl)amino]methyl}benzenesulfonic acid, 3-{[methyl (phenyl)amino]methyl}benzenesulfonic amino acid, and sodium-3-[(cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylideneamino)methyl]benzenesulfonate. Textile effluent sample and a synthetic mixture of dyes were also decolorized by P. grandiflora. Phytotoxicity test revealed the nontoxic nature of metabolites. P. grandiflora showed the potential to decolorize and degrade BBG to nontoxic metabolites. The plant has efficiently treated a sample of dye mixture and textile effluent.

  12. Fragility Analysis Methodology for Degraded Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants - Illustrated using a Condensate Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y.; Kim, M.; Choi, I.

    2010-06-30

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is conducting a five-year research project to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The KAERI research project includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA): (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. Since 2007, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has entered into a collaboration agreement with KAERI to support its development of seismic capability evaluation technology for degraded structures and components. The collaborative research effort is intended to continue over a five year period. The goal of this collaboration endeavor is to assist KAERI to develop seismic fragility analysis methods that consider the potential effects of age-related degradation of structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The research results of this multi-year collaboration will be utilized as input to seismic PRAs. In the Year 1 scope of work, BNL collected and reviewed degradation occurrences in US NPPs and identified important aging characteristics needed for the seismic capability evaluations. This information is presented in the Annual Report for the Year 1 Task, identified as BNL Report-81741-2008 and also designated as KAERI/RR-2931/2008. The report presents results of the statistical and trending analysis of this data and compares the results to prior aging studies. In addition, the report provides a description of U.S. current regulatory requirements, regulatory guidance documents, generic communications, industry standards and guidance, and past research related to aging degradation of SSCs. In the Year 2 scope of work, BNL carried out a research effort to identify and assess degradation models for the long-term behavior of dominant materials that are

  13. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp.JM2 isolated from active sewage sludge of chemical plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ma; Li Xu; Lingyun Jia

    2012-01-01

    It is important to screen strains that can decompose polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) completely and rapidly with good adaptability for bioremediation in a local area.A bacterial strain JM2,which uses phenanthrene as its sole carbon source,was isolated from the active sewage sludge from a chemical plant in Jilin,China and identified as Pseudomonas based on 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis.Although the optimal growth conditions were determined to be pH 6.0 and 37℃,JM2 showed a broad pH and temperature profile.At pH 4.5 and 9.3,JM2 could degrade more than 40% of fluorene and phenanthrene (50 mg/L each) within 4 days.In addition,when the temperature was as low as 4℃,JM2 could degrade up to 24% fluorene and 12% phenanthrene.This showed the potential for JM2 to be applied in bioremediation over winter or in cold regions.Moreover,a nutrient augmentation study showed that adding formate into media could promote PAH degradation,while the supplement of salicylate had an inhibitive effect.Furthermore,in a metabolic pathway study,salicylate,phthaiic acid,and 9-fluorenone were detected during the degradation of fluorene or phenanthrene.In conclusion,Pseudomonas sp.JM2 is a high performance strain in the degradation of fluorene and phenanthrene under extreme pH and temperature conditions.It might be useful in the bioremediation of PAHs.

  14. Characterization of natural co-cultures of Piromyces with Methanobrevibacter ruminantium from yaks grazing on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: a microbial consortium with high potential in plant biomass degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ya-Qin; Yang, Hong-Jian; Long, Rui-Jun; Wang, Zhi-Ye; Cao, Bin-Bin; Ren, Qin-Chang; Wu, Tian-Tian

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic fungi reside in the gut of herbivore and synergize with associated methanogenic archaea to decompose ingested plant biomass. Despite their potential for use in bioconversion industry, only a few natural fungus-methanogen co-cultures have been isolated and characterized. In this study we identified three co-cultures of Piromyces with Methanobrevibacter ruminantium from the rumen of yaks grazing on the Qinghai Tibetan Plateau. The representative co-culture, namely (Piromyces + M. ruminantium) Yak-G18, showed remarkable polysaccharide hydrolase production, especially xylanase. Consequently, it was able to degrade various lignocellulose substrates with a biodegrading capability superior to most previously identified fungus or fungus-methanogen co-culture isolates. End-product profiling analysis validated the beneficial metabolic impact of associated methanogen on fungus as revealed by high-yield production of methane and acetate and sustained growth on lignocellulose. Together, our data demonstrated a great potential of (Piromyces + M. ruminantium) Yak-G18 co-culture for use in industrial bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass.

  15. Partial degradation of five pesticides and an industrial pollutant by ozonation in a pilot-plant scale reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, M.I. [PSA - Plataforma Solar de Almeria, CIEMAT, Crta Senes km 4, Tabernas, Almeria 04200 (Spain); Malato, S. [PSA - Plataforma Solar de Almeria, CIEMAT, Crta Senes km 4, Tabernas, Almeria 04200 (Spain); Perez-Estrada, L.A. [PSA - Plataforma Solar de Almeria, CIEMAT, Crta Senes km 4, Tabernas, Almeria 04200 (Spain); Gernjak, W. [PSA -Plataforma Solar de Almeria, CIEMAT, Crta Senes km 4, Tabernas, Almeria 04200 (Spain); Oller, I. [PSA - Plataforma Solar de Almeria, CIEMAT, Crta Senes km 4, Tabernas, Almeria 04200 (Spain); Domenech, Xavier [Departament de Quimica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Peral, Jose [Departament de Quimica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.peral@uab.es

    2006-11-16

    Aqueous solutions of a mixture of several pesticides (alachlor, atrazine, chlorfenvinphos, diuron and isoproturon), considered PS (priority substances) by the European Commission, and an intermediate product of the pharmaceutical industry ({alpha}-methylphenylglycine, MPG) chosen as a model industrial pollutant, have been degraded at pilot-plant scale using ozonation. This study is part of a large research project [CADOX Project, A Coupled Advanced Oxidation-Biological Process for Recycling of Industrial Wastewater Containing Persistent Organic Contaminants, Contract No.: EVK1-CT-2002-00122, European Commission, http://www.psa.es/webeng/projects/cadox/index.html[1

  16. Fate of psychoactive compounds in wastewater treatment plant and the possibility of their degradation using aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackuľak, Tomáš; Mosný, Michal; Škubák, Jaroslav; Grabic, Roman; Birošová, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    In this study we analyzed and characterized 29 psychoactive remedies, illicit drugs and their metabolites in single stages of wastewater treatment plants in the capital city of Slovakia. Psychoactive compounds were present within all stages, and tramadol was detected at a very high concentration (706 ng/L). Significant decreases of codeine, THC-COOH, cocaine and buprenorphine concentration were observed in the biological stage. Consequently, we were interested in the possibility of alternative tertiary post-treatment of effluent water with the following aquatic plants: Cabomba caroliniana, Limnophila sessiliflora, Egeria najas and Iris pseudacorus. The most effective plant for tertiary cleansing was I. pseudacorus which demonstrated the best pharmaceutical removal capacity. After 48 h codeine and citalopram was removed with 87% efficiency. After 96 h were all analyzed compounds were eliminated with efficiencies above 58%.

  17. Polysaccharides isolated from Acai fruit induce innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Holderness

    Full Text Available The Açaí (Acai fruit is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly enhances immune system function. These anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing immune responses to the Acai polyphenol fraction. Previously, we characterized γδ T cell responses to both polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions from several plant-derived nutritional supplements. Similar polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions are found in Acai fruit. Thus, we hypothesized that one or both of these fractions could activate γδ T cells. Contrary to previous reports, we did not identify agonist activity in the polyphenol fraction; however, the Acai polysaccharide fraction induced robust γδ T cell stimulatory activity in human, mouse, and bovine PBMC cultures. To characterize the immune response to Acai polysaccharides, we fractionated the crude polysaccharide preparation and tested these fractions for activity in human PBMC cultures. The largest Acai polysaccharides were the most active in vitro as indicated by activation of myeloid and γδ T cells. When delivered in vivo, Acai polysaccharide induced myeloid cell recruitment and IL-12 production. These results define innate immune responses induced by the polysaccharide component of Acai and have implications for the treatment of asthma and infectious disease.

  18. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  19. Cytochemical Localization of Polysaccharides in Dendrobium officinale and the Involvement of DoCSLA6 in the Synthesis of Mannan Polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunmei; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; Liu, Xuncheng; Zeng, Songjun; Yu, Zhenming; Zhang, Xinghua; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Deng, Rufang; Tan, Jianwen; Luo, Jianping; Duan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale is a precious traditional Chinese medicinal plant because of its abundant polysaccharides found in stems. We determined the composition of water-soluble polysaccharides and starch content in D. officinale stems. The extracted water-soluble polysaccharide content was as high as 35% (w/w). Analysis of the composition of monosaccharides showed that the water-soluble polysaccharides were dominated by mannose, to a lesser extent glucose, and a small amount of galactose, in a molar ratio of 223:48:1. Although starch was also found, its content was less than 10%. This result indicated that the major polysaccharides in D. officinale stems were non-starch polysaccharides, which might be mannan polysaccharides. The polysaccharides formed granules and were stored in plastids similar to starch grains, were localized in D. officinale stems by semi-thin and ultrathin sections. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE A (CSLA) family members encode mannan synthases that catalyze the formation of mannan polysaccharides. To determine whether the CSLA gene from D. officinale was responsible for the synthesis of mannan polysaccharides, 35S:DoCSLA6 transgenic lines were generated and characterized. Our results suggest that the CSLA family genes from D. officinale play an important role in the biosynthesis of mannan polysaccharides.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Micromonospora Strain L5, a Potential Plant-Growth-Regulating Actinomycete, Originally Isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia Root Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, A. M.; Alvarado, J.; Bruce, D.; Chertkov, O.; De Hoff, P. L.; Detter, J. C.; Fujishige, N. A.; Goodwin, L. A.; Han, J.; Han, S.; Ivanova, N.; Land, M. L.; Lum, M. R.; Milani-Nejad, N.; Nolan, M.; Pati, A.; Pitluck, S.; Tran, S. S.; Woyke, T.; Valdes, M.

    2013-08-29

    Micromonospora species live in diverse environments and exhibit a broad range of functions including antibiotic production, biocontrol, and ability to degrade complex polysaccharides. To learn more about these versatile actinomycetes, we sequenced the genome of strain L5, originally isolated from root nodules of an actinorhizal plant growing in Mexico.

  1. Endosperm degradation during seed development of Echinocystis lobata (Cucurbitaceae) as a manifestation of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Marzena; Olszewska, Maria J

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an active, genetically controlled process that ultimately leads to elimination of unnecessary or damaged cells from multicellular organism. It occurs during normal growth and development or in response to a variety of environmental triggers and is indispensable for survival of the organism. In Echinocystis lobata the endosperm, an ephemeral tissue in angiosperm plants, undergoes distinct cytological, physiological and molecular changes during seed development and maturation. As a result, mature seeds are deprived of this tissue. The endosperm was analyzed at the consecutive stages of seed development. The morphological changes of cells were studied at light and electron microscope levels. In this paper we report that endosperm cells undergo morphological and biochemical changes characteristic of apoptosis, a particular type of PCD, i.e. cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and cytoplasm degradation, while the ultrastructure of mitochondria seems to be less changed. Furthermore, the progression of DNA degradation has been shown by agarose gel electrophoresis (ladder pattern of DNA fragmentseparation), TUNEL and comet assay. It isconcluded that during seed maturation, endosperm degradation process is accompanied by typical PCD-related changes of cell morphology and internucleosomal DNA cleavage.

  2. Effect of genotype on chemical composition, ruminal degradability and in vitro fermentation characteristics of maize residual plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, F M E; Edmunds, B L; Schwarz, F J

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes to residual plant feeding value of early- and late-maturing maize varieties. The influence of the cell wall carbohydrate composition, in terms of neutral and acid detergent fibre (NDF and ADF) content, NDF and dry matter (DM) degradability, and in vitro organic matter digestibility and gas production on the feeding value of a range of maize genotypes, was measured. The different genotypes were allotted into two maturity groups (MG I--early to mid-early: S210-S240; MG II--mid-late to late: S 250-S280) and harvested at four different harvest dates (depending on the DM content of the kernels). The maize varieties of MG I had lower NDF and ADF contents and higher ruminal DM degradability, in vitro digestibility and gas production and thus a higher feeding value than MG II at the same stage of physiological maturity. A strong negative relationship between NDF content and the ruminal DM degradability (r = -0.81) was observed. The data indicate that the early-maturing varieties permit a larger flexibility in harvesting due to a longer period of starch inclusion into the kernel whilst simultaneously maintaining a good supply of rumen-available fibre. Conclusively, the higher feeding value of the early-maturing varieties, based on lower NDF and high DM digestibility, permits more flexibility in the harvesting period over the later-maturing varieties.

  3. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T. A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Walton, B. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and 14C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of 14C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the 14C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  4. Comparative plant uptake and microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizospheres of five plant species-- implications for bioremediation of contaminated surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)); Walton, B.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to collect data that would provide a foundation for the concept of using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation of contaminated surface soils. Soil and vegetation (Lespedeza cuneata, Paspalum notatum, Pinus taeda, and Solidago sp.) samples from the Miscellaneous Chemicals Basin (MCB) at the Savannah River Site were used in tests to identify critical plant and microbiological variables affecting the fate of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the root zone. Microbiological assays including phospholipid acid analyses, and {sup 14}C-acetate incorporation were conducted to elucidate differences in rhizosphere and nonvegetated soil microbial communities from the MCB. The microbial activity, biomass, and degradation of TCE in rhizosphere soils were significantly greater than corresponding nonvegetated soils. Vegetation had a positive effect on microbial degradation of {sup 14}C-TCE in whole-plant experiments. Soils from the MCB containing Lespedeza cuneata, Pinus taeda, and Glycine max mineralized greater than 25% of the {sup 14}C- TCE added compared with less than 20% in nonvegetated soils. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the positive role of vegetation in enhancing biodegradation.

  5. Bacterial community analysis of an industrial wastewater treatment plant in Colombia with screening for lipid-degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Bedoya, Lina Marcela; Sánchez-Pinzón, María Solange; Cadavid-Restrepo, Gloria Ester; Moreno-Herrera, Claudia Ximena

    2016-11-01

    The operation of wastewater treatment technologies depends on a combination of physical, chemical and biological factors. Microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plants play essential roles in the degradation and removal of organic waste and xenobiotic pollutants. Several microorganisms have been used in complementary treatments to process effluents rich in fats and oils. Microbial lipases have received significant industrial attention because of their stability, broad substrate specificity, high yields, and regular supply, as well as the fact that the microorganisms producing them grow rapidly on inexpensive media. In Colombia, bacterial community studies have focused on populations of cultivable nitrifying, heterotrophic and nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in constructed wetlands. In this study, culture-dependent methods, culture-independent methods (TTGE, RISA) and enzymatic methods were used to estimate bacterial diversity, to monitor temporal and spatial changes in bacterial communities, and to screen microorganisms that presented lipolytic activity. The dominant microorganisms in the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) examined in this study belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The enzymatic studies performed indicated that five bacterial isolates and three fungal isolates possessed the ability to degrade lipids; additionally, the Serratia, Kosakonia and Mucor genera presented lipase-mediated transesterification activity. The implications of these findings in regard to possible applications are discussed later in this paper. Our results indicate that there is a wide diversity of aerobic Gram-negative bacteria inhabiting the different sections of the WWTP, which could indicate its ecological condition, functioning and general efficiency.

  6. In situ degradation of phenol and promotion of plant growth in contaminated environments by a single Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujing; Song, Jing; Zhao, Wei; He, Xiaoli; Chen, Jun; Xiao, Ming

    2011-08-15

    For bioremediation of contaminated environments, a bacterial strain, SZH16, was isolated and found to reduce phenol concentration in a selective medium. Using the reaction vessel containing the soil mixed with phenol and bacteria, we found that the single strain degraded efficiently the phenol level in soil samples. The strain was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the basis of biochemical tests and by comparison of 16S rDNA sequences, and phosphate solubilization and IAA production were not observed in the strain. Simultaneous examination of the role of strain SZH16 in the plant growth and phenol biodegradation was performed. Results showed that inoculation of the single strain in the phenol-spiked soil resulted in corn growth promotion and in situ phenol degradation and the increase in plant biomass correlated with the decrease in phenol content. Colonization experiments showed that the population of the SZH16 strain remained relatively constant. All these findings indicated that the corn growth promotion might be due to reduction in phytotoxicity, a result of phenol biodegradation by the single strain SZH16. Furthermore, the strain was found to stimulate corn growth and reduce phenol concentration simultaneously in phenol-containing water, and even historically contaminated field soils. It is attractive for environment remediation and agronomic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, Stuart E.

    2002-06-01

    Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

  8. Effect of food processing on plant DNA degradation and PCR-based GMO analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryson, Nicolas

    2010-03-01

    The applicability of a DNA-based method for GMO detection and quantification depends on the quality and quantity of the DNA. Important food-processing conditions, for example temperature and pH, may lead to degradation of the DNA, rendering PCR analysis impossible or GMO quantification unreliable. This review discusses the effect of several food processes on DNA degradation and subsequent GMO detection and quantification. The data show that, although many of these processes do indeed lead to the fragmentation of DNA, amplification of the DNA may still be possible. Length and composition of the amplicon may, however, affect the result, as also may the method of extraction used. Also, many techniques are used to describe the behaviour of DNA in food processing, which occasionally makes it difficult to compare research results. Further research should be aimed at defining ingredients in terms of their DNA quality and PCR amplification ability, and elaboration of matrix-specific certified reference materials.

  9. Engineering a catabolic pathway in plants for the degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Benitez, Gilda L; Gandia-Herrero, Fernando; Graham, Stuart; Larson, Tony R; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; French, Christopher E; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Bruce, Neil C

    2008-07-01

    Plants are increasingly being employed to clean up environmental pollutants such as heavy metals; however, a major limitation of phytoremediation is the inability of plants to mineralize most organic pollutants. A key component of organic pollutants is halogenated aliphatic compounds that include 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA). Although plants lack the enzymatic activity required to metabolize this compound, two bacterial enzymes, haloalkane dehalogenase (DhlA) and haloacid dehalogenase (DhlB) from the bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10, have the ability to dehalogenate a range of halogenated aliphatics, including 1,2-DCA. We have engineered the dhlA and dhlB genes into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'Xanthi') plants and used 1,2-DCA as a model substrate to demonstrate the ability of the transgenic tobacco to remediate a range of halogenated, aliphatic hydrocarbons. DhlA converts 1,2-DCA to 2-chloroethanol, which is then metabolized to the phytotoxic 2-chloroacetaldehyde, then chloroacetic acid, by endogenous plant alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities, respectively. Chloroacetic acid is dehalogenated by DhlB to produce the glyoxylate cycle intermediate glycolate. Plants expressing only DhlA produced phytotoxic levels of chlorinated intermediates and died, while plants expressing DhlA together with DhlB thrived at levels of 1,2-DCA that were toxic to DhlA-expressing plants. This represents a significant advance in the development of a low-cost phytoremediation approach toward the clean-up of halogenated organic pollutants from contaminated soil and groundwater.

  10. Development of evaluation technique on ageing degradation of organic polymer in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Nho, Young Chang; Jung, Sung Hee; Park, Eun Hee

    1999-03-01

    Radiation degradation of chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE, Hypalon), crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), and ethylene rubber (EPR) of experimental formulation as cable insulating and sheathing materials were performed by accelerated ageing tests and was investigated by measuring the properties such as tensile strength, elongation, insulation resistance, melting temperature, oxygen index and thermal stimulated current. The status of radiation ageing test was reviewed and the requirement of qualification of nuclear equipment was documented.

  11. Small-scale barriers mitigate desertification processes and enhance plant recruitment in a degraded semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Stephen E; Decker, Cheryl E.; Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic desertification is a problem that plagues drylands globally; however, the factors which maintain degraded states are often unclear. In Canyonlands National Park on the Colorado Plateau of southeastern Utah, many degraded grasslands have not recovered structure and function >40 yr after release from livestock grazing pressure, necessitating active restoration. We hypothesized that multiple factors contribute to the persistent degraded state, including lack of seed availability, surficial soil-hydrological properties, and high levels of spatial connectivity (lack of perennial vegetation and other surface structure to retain water, litter, seed, and sediment). In combination with seeding and surface raking treatments, we tested the effect of small barrier structures (“ConMods”) designed to disrupt the loss of litter, seed and sediment in degraded soil patches within the park. Grass establishment was highest when all treatments (structures, seed addition, and soil disturbance) were combined, but only in the second year after installation, following favorable climatic conditions. We suggest that multiple limiting factors were ameliorated by treatments, including seed limitation and microsite availability, seed removal by harvester ants, and stressful abiotic conditions. Higher densities of grass seedlings on the north and east sides of barrier structures following the summer months suggest that structures may have functioned as artificial “nurse-plants”, sheltering seedlings from wind and radiation as well as accumulating wind-blown resources. Barrier structures increased the establishment of both native perennial grasses and exotic annuals, although there were species-specific differences in mortality related to spatial distribution of seedlings within barrier structures. The unique success of all treatments combined, and even then only under favorable climatic conditions and in certain soil patches, highlights that restoration success (and

  12. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  13. Understanding and Modelling the Effect of Dissolved Metals on Solvent Degradation in Post Combustion CO2 Capture Based on Pilot Plant Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjana Dhingra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides, most of the models fail to recognize the catalytic effect of metals. The objective of this work is to develop a representative kinetic model based on an apparent auto-catalytic reaction mechanism between solvent degradation, corrosion and ammonia emissions. Measurements from four different pilot plants: (i EnBW’s plant at Heilbronn, Germany (ii TNO’s plant at Maasvlakte, The Netherlands; (iii CSIRO’s plants at Loy Yang and Tarong, Australia and (iv DONG Energy’s plant at Esbjerg, Denmark are utilized to propose a degradation kinetic model for 30 wt % ethanolamine (MEA as the capture solvent. The kinetic parameters of the model were regressed based on the pilot plant campaign at EnBW. The kinetic model was validated by comparing it with the measurements at the remaining pilot campaigns. The model predicted the trends of ammonia emissions and metal concentration within the same order of magnitude. This study provides a methodology to establish a quantitative approach for predicting the onset of unacceptable degradation levels which can be further used to devise counter-measure strategies such as reclaiming and metal removal.

  14. Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Strand

    2004-09-27

    The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

  15. Metagenomics of the Svalbard reindeer rumen microbiome reveals abundance of polysaccharide utilization loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip B Pope

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass remains a largely untapped source of renewable energy predominantly due to its recalcitrance and an incomplete understanding of how this is overcome in nature. We present here a compositional and comparative analysis of metagenomic data pertaining to a natural biomass-converting ecosystem adapted to austere arctic nutritional conditions, namely the rumen microbiome of Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus. Community analysis showed that deeply-branched cellulolytic lineages affiliated to the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes are dominant, whilst sequence binning methods facilitated the assemblage of metagenomic sequence for a dominant and novel Bacteroidales clade (SRM-1. Analysis of unassembled metagenomic sequence as well as metabolic reconstruction of SRM-1 revealed the presence of multiple polysaccharide utilization loci-like systems (PULs as well as members of more than 20 glycoside hydrolase and other carbohydrate-active enzyme families targeting various polysaccharides including cellulose, xylan and pectin. Functional screening of cloned metagenome fragments revealed high cellulolytic activity and an abundance of PULs that are rich in endoglucanases (GH5 but devoid of other common enzymes thought to be involved in cellulose degradation. Combining these results with known and partly re-evaluated metagenomic data strongly indicates that much like the human distal gut, the digestive system of herbivores harbours high numbers of deeply branched and as-yet uncultured members of the Bacteroidetes that depend on PUL-like systems for plant biomass degradation.

  16. Characterization of three plant biomass-degrading microbial consortia by metagenomics- and metasecretomics-based approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Brossi, Maria Julia de Lima; Schückel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ), switchgrass (SG-M) and corn stover (CS-M) under aerobic and mesophilic conditions. Molecular fingerprintings, bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicon sequencing and metagenomic analyses showed that the three microbial consortia were taxonomically distinct. Based on the taxonomic affiliation......). The highest degradation rates of lignin (~59 %) were observed with SG-M, whereas CS-M showed a high consumption of cellulose and hemicellulose. Analyses of the carbohydrate-active enzymes in the three microbial consortia showed the dominance of glycosyl hydrolases (e.g. of families GH3, GH43, GH13, GH10, GH29...

  17. How mycorrhizal plant-soil interactions affect formation and degradation of soil organic matter in boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Bartosz; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; Ahvenainen, Anu; Strakova, Petra; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Forest soil organic matter (SOM) contains more carbon (C) than all the flora and atmosphere combined and that is why C release as CO2 from SOM may have drastic consequences for climate globally. SOM is enormous C sink which has the potential to become C source (IPCC 2013). To predict long-term soil C storage and climate feedbacks we need profound understanding of dynamics and drivers of SOM decomposition. Ecosystem processes associated with C cycle are constrained by C and N interactions. At the level of ecosystem boreal forest is N-limited, as most of soil N is stored in recalcitrant organic form bound or complexed with soil compounds such as polyphenols. To improve N uptake, also from less available pools, plant species form symbioses with mycorrhizal fungi able to degrade recalcitrant N and sharing it with plants. As a feedback, plants provide to fungal symbiont assimilated C. Climate change through elevated CO2 level led to increases in photosynthesis which enhance the C flow belowground accelerating N uptake by plants also from more recalcitrant N pools. Increased SOM decomposition would possibly result also in increase of CO2 production from soil. Our field experiment was conducted at Hyytiälä forestry field station (SMEAR II, University of Helsinki) located in southern Finland (61°84'N, 24°26'E). In this 3-year long experiment, we discriminated SOM decomposition with different mesh bags filled with humus. These mesh bags allowed for the entrance of mycorrhiza and fine roots (1mm mesh size), or only mycorrhiza (50µm), or both were excluded (1µm). We followed changes in SOM content, N pools and enzymatic activity. The results suggests that plant-mycorrhiza interactions increase recalcitrant pool of organic N in SOM due to root-derived tannins, but mycorrhizal plants have still access to this N. Although mycorrhizal plant-soil interaction seems to strongly affect the formation of recalcitrant SOM, the net decomposition is not hindered by these chemical

  18. Restoration of Degraded Soil in the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest with Native Tree Species: Effect of Indigenous Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andimuthu Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of a highly degraded forest, which had lost its natural capacity for regeneration, was attempted in the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest in Eastern Ghats of India. In field experiment, 12 native tree species were planted. The restoration included inoculation with a consortium of 5 native plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB, with the addition of small amounts of compost and a chemical fertilizer (NPK. The experimental fields were maintained for 1080 days. The growth and biomass varied depending on the plant species. All native plants responded well to the supplementation with the native PGPB. The plants such as Pongamia pinnata, Tamarindus indica, Gmelina arborea, Wrightia tinctoria, Syzygium cumini, Albizia lebbeck, Terminalia bellirica, and Azadirachta indica performed well in the native soil. This study demonstrated, by using native trees and PGPB, a possibility to restore the degraded forest.

  19. Restoration of Degraded Soil in the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest with Native Tree Species: Effect of Indigenous Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Andimuthu; Radhapriya, Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of a highly degraded forest, which had lost its natural capacity for regeneration, was attempted in the Nanmangalam Reserve Forest in Eastern Ghats of India. In field experiment, 12 native tree species were planted. The restoration included inoculation with a consortium of 5 native plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), with the addition of small amounts of compost and a chemical fertilizer (NPK). The experimental fields were maintained for 1080 days. The growth and biomass varied depending on the plant species. All native plants responded well to the supplementation with the native PGPB. The plants such as Pongamia pinnata, Tamarindus indica, Gmelina arborea, Wrightia tinctoria, Syzygium cumini, Albizia lebbeck, Terminalia bellirica, and Azadirachta indica performed well in the native soil. This study demonstrated, by using native trees and PGPB, a possibility to restore the degraded forest. PMID:27195310

  20. Enzymatic degradation of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in aquatic plants and relations to biological Fenton reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A R; Sakakibara, Y

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the removal performance of trace phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by aquatic plants, batch and continuous experiments were conducted using floating and submerged plants. The EDCs used in this study were bisphenol A, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-tert-octylphenol, pentachlorophenol, and nonylphenol. The feed concentration of each EDC was set at 100 μg/L. Continuous experiments showed that every EDC except pentachlorophenol was efficiently removed by different aquatic plants through the following reaction, catalyzed by peroxidases: EDCs+H(2)O(2)→Products+H(2)O(2). Peroxidases were able to remove phenolic EDCs in the presence of H(2)O(2) over a wide pH range (from 3 to 9). Histochemical localization of peroxidases showed that they were located in every part of the root cells, while highly concentrated zones were observed in the epidermis and in the vascular tissues. Although pentachlorophenol was not removed in the continuous treatment, it was rapidly removed by different aquatic plants when Fe(2+) was added, and this removal occurred simultaneously with the consumption of endogenous H(2)O(2). These results demonstrated the occurrence of a biological Fenton reaction and the importance of H(2)O(2) as a key endogenous substance in the treatment of EDCs and refractory toxic pollutants.

  1. Synergistic effect of different plant cell wall degrading enzymes is important for virulence of Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccanaro, Maria Chiara; Sella, Luca; Castiglioni, Carla; Giacomello, Francesca; Martinez-Rocha, Ana Lilia; D'Ovidio, Renato; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Favaron, Francesco

    2017-08-11

    Endo-polygalacturonases (PGs) and xylanases have been shown to play an important role during pathogenesis of some fungal pathogens of dicot plants, whilst their role in monocot pathogens is less defined. Pg1 and xyr1 genes of the wheat pathogen Fusarium graminearum encode the main PG and the major regulator of xylanase production, respectively. Single and double disrupted mutants for these genes were obtained to assess their contribution to fungal infection. Compared to wild-type strain, the ∆pg mutant showed a nearly abolished PG activity, slight reduced virulence on soybean seedlings but no significant difference in disease symptoms on wheat spikes; the ∆xyr mutant was strongly reduced in xylanase activity and moderately reduced in cellulase activity but was as virulent as wild-type on both soybean and wheat plants. Consequently, the ΔpgΔxyr double mutant was impaired in xylanase, PG and cellulase activities, but, differently from single mutants, was significantly reduced in virulence on both plants. These findings demonstrate that the concurrent presence of PG, xylanase and cellulase activities is necessary for full virulence. The observation that the uronides released from wheat cell wall after a F. graminearum PG treatment were largely increased by the fungal xylanases suggests that these enzymes act synergistically in deconstructing the plant cell wall.

  2. Plant science meets food science: genetic effects of glucosinolate degradation during food processing in Brassica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennig, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background

    Phytochemicals in plant-based foods have been linked to a reduced incidence and progression of diseases. Glucosinolates (GLs) are phytochemicals that are typical for Brassicaand other Cruciferousplants, such as cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Chinese

  3. Coal mining activities change plant community structure due to air pollution and soil degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bhanu; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coal mining activities on the community structures of woody and herbaceous plants. The response of individual plants of community to defilement caused by coal mining was also assessed. Air monitoring, soil physico-chemical and phytosociological analyses were carried around Jharia coalfield (JCF) and Raniganj coalfield. The importance value index of sensitive species minified and those of tolerant species enhanced with increasing pollution load and altered soil quality around coal mining areas. Although the species richness of woody and herbaceous plants decreased with higher pollution load, a large number of species acclimatized to the stress caused by the coal mining activities. Woody plant community at JCF was more affected by coal mining than herbaceous community. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that structure of herbaceous community was mainly driven by soil total organic carbon, soil nitrogen, whereas woody layer community was influenced by sulphur dioxide in ambient air, soil sulphate and soil phosphorus. The changes in species diversity observed at mining areas indicated an increase in the proportion of resistant herbs and grasses showing a tendency towards a definite selection strategy of ecosystem in response to air pollution and altered soil characteristics.

  4. Degradation and detoxification of tar water from a gasification plant in a biogas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelidaki, I.; Torry-Smith, M.; Petersen, L.; Ahring, B.K. [Denmarks Technical Univ., Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    During gasification of biomass, toxic tar and tar-water (TW) are produced. The produced TW is saturated by soluble phenolic compound. In this project we have attempted detoxification of the produced TW by either wet oxidation where the TW is heated under pressure and addition of excess oxygen, and then subsequent treatment of the formed wet oxidized product in a biogas reactor. Alternatively, we treated the TW directly in a biogas reactor. Reduction in phenolic compounds, which constitute the major toxic compounds in TW, was used as a success parameter evaluating the detoxification of TW. The TW could successfully be degraded in a biogas reactor when co-digested with manure at a concentration up to 5%. Wet oxidized tar water (WOTW) could be degraded when added at a concentration of 30%. A biogas potential of approx. 0.19 L CH/g-VS was achieved for both the TW and WOTW. The biogas production per kg waste was 30 and 10 L CH/kg waste for the TW and the WOTW, respectively. The reason for the much lower methane production of the WOTW was that a large part of the organic content of the TW was converted to carbon dioxide during the wet oxidation process. The effluent concentrations of phenolic were in all cases much lower than the concentrations found in normally in undigested manure, showing that biomethanation of toxic wastes in co-digestion with manure could be an easy and cheap way to detoxify specific toxic wastes. (au)

  5. Rhizoremediation of Diesel-Contaminated Soil with Two Rapeseed Varieties and Petroleum degraders Reveals Different Responses of the Plant Defense Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojtera-Kwiczor, Joanna; Żukowska, Weronika; Graj, Weronika;

    2014-01-01

    -up process. To understand the response of plants upon bioaugmentation, the antioxidative and detoxification system was analyzed in high and low erucic acid rapeseed varieties (HEAR and LEAR, respectively), after 8 weeks of their treatment with petroleum degraders and 6000 mg diesel oil/kg dry soil...... nor HEAR experienced any changes in the photosynthetic capacity upon diesel pollution and presence of petroleum degraders, which supports the usefulness of rhizoremediation with rapeseed....

  6. The immunostimulating role of lichen polysaccharides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gajendra; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has capacity to suppress the development or progression of various malignancies including cancer. Research on the immunomodulating properties of polysaccharides obtained from plants, microorganisms, marine organisms, and fungi is growing rapidly. Among the various potential sources, lichens, symbiotic systems involving a fungus and an alga and/or a cyanobacterium, show promise as a potential source of immunomodulating compounds. It is well known that lichens produce an abundance of structurally diverse polysaccharides. However, only a limited number of studies have explored the immunostimulating properties of lichen polysaccharides. Published studies have shown that some lichen polysaccharides enhance production of nitrous oxide (NO) by macrophages and also alter the production levels of various proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-12, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-α/β) by macrophages and dendritic cells. Although there are only a limited number of studies examining the role of lichen polysaccharides, all results suggest that lichen polysaccharides can induce immunomodulatory responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Thus, a detailed evaluation of immunomodulatory capacity of lichen polysaccharides could provide a unique opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents.

  7. Isolation of bacterial strains able to degrade biphenyl, diphenyl ether and the heat transfer fluid used in thermo-solar plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Moreno, Rafael; Sáez, Lara P; Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Roldán, M Dolores; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2017-03-25

    Thermo-solar plants use eutectic mixtures of diphenyl ether (DE) and biphenyl (BP) as heat transfer fluid (HTF). Potential losses of HTF may contaminate soils and bioremediation is an attractive tool for its treatment. DE- or BP-degrading bacteria are known, but up to now bacteria able to degrade HTF mixture have not been described. Here, five bacterial strains which are able to grow with HTF or its separate components DE and BP as sole carbon sources have been isolated, either from soils exposed to HTF or from rhizospheric soils of plants growing near a thermo-solar plant. The organisms were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Achromobacter piechaudii strain BioC1, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain 6.1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains HBD1 and HBD3, and Pseudomonas oleovorans strain HBD2. Activity of 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase (BphC), a key enzyme of the biphenyl upper degradation pathway, was detected in all isolates. Pseudomonas strains almost completely degraded 2000ppm HTF after 5-day culture, and even tolerated and grew in the presence of 150,000ppm HTF, being suitable candidates for in situ soil bioremediation. Degradation of both components of HTF is of particular interest since in the DE-degrader Sphingomonas sp. SS3, growth on DE or benzoate was strongly inhibited by addition of BP.

  8. Antibacterial and antiviral study of dialdehyde polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Le

    Concerns for microbial contamination and infection to the general population, especially the spread of drug-resistant microorganisms, have greatly increased. Polymeric biocides have been found to be a feasible strategy to inactivate drug-resistant bacteria. However, current polymeric biocide systems involve multi-step chemical reactions and they are not cost-effective. Desirable antimicrobial systems need to be designed to be environmentally friendly, broad-spectrum effective against microorganisms, flexible for various delivery methods and economically affordable. We demonstrated that dialdehyde polysaccharides (including dialdehyde starch and dialdehdye cellulose) were broad-spectrum polymeric biocides against gram-positive/negative bacteria, bacteriophages and human virus. These polymers can be easily converted from starch and cellulose through one-step periodate oxidation. Destructions of microorganism by dialdehyde polysaccharides have been achieved in aqueous suspension or by solid surface contact. The dialdehdye functions of dialdehdye polysaccharides were found to be the dominant action against microorganism. The reactivity of the dialdehyde functionality was found to be pH-dependent as well as related to the dispersion of dialdehyde polysaccharides. Degradation of dialdehyde starch during cooking was confirmed. Degradation of dialdehyde starch was more liable in alkaline condition. Carboxylic acid and conjugated aldehyde functionalities were the two main degradation products, confirmed from the spectroscopic studies. The pH effect on the polysaccharide structure and the corresponding antimicrobial activity was very complicated. No decisive conclusions could be obtained from this study. Liner inactivation kinetics was found for dialdehyde starch aqueous suspension against bacteria. This linear inactivation kinetics was derived from the pseudo-first chemical reaction between the dialdehyde starch and the bacteria. The established inactivation kinetics was

  9. Geochemical and Geophysical Study in a Degraded Area Used for Disposal of Sludge from a Water Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cosme Arraes Moreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of disposal of sludge from water treatment plant (WTS in area damaged by laterite extraction and its consequences to soil and groundwater were investigated. Therefore, the presence and concentration of anthropogenic elements and chemical compounds were determinated. WTS disposal's influence was characterized by electroresistivity method. The WTS's geochemical dispersion was noticed in the first meters of the nonsaturated zone from the lending area. Lateritic profiles were characterized due to the large variation in chemical composition between the horizons. Infiltration and percolation of rainwater through the WTS have caused migration of total dissolved solids to the groundwater. WTS's disposing area has more similarities to local preserved vegetation than to gravel bed area. WTS can be considered a noninert residue if disposed in degraded areas located in regions with similar geological and hydrochemical characteristics.

  10. An overview of environmental degradation of materials in nuclear power plant piping systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    Piping in light water reactor (LWR) power systems is affected by several types of environmental degradation: intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) has required research, inspection, and mitigation programs that will ultimately cost several billion dollars; erosion-corrosion of carbon steel piping has been observed frequently in the secondary systems of both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs); the effect of the BWR environment can greatly diminish the design margin inherent in the ASME Section III fatigue design curves for carbon steel piping; and cast stainless steels are subject to embrittlement after extended thermal aging at reactor operating temperatures. These problems are being addressed by wide-ranging research programs in this country and abroad. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of the accomplishments of these programs and to note some of the remaining unanswered questions.

  11. Long-term creep strength degradation in T122/P122 steels for USC power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, M.; Yoshizawa, M. [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Hyogo (Japan); Iseda, A. [Tubular Products Technology Department, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuo, H.; Kan, T. [Quality Control and Technical Service Department, Hyogo (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Creep rupture and deformation behavior of KA-SUS410J3 type steels (equivalent to ASME P122/T122) with different Cr content and the resultant matrix phases such as {alpha}' (martensite) and {alpha}'+ {delta} (martensite and deltaferrite) has been studied using creep testing and a detailed TEM observation. New allowable tensile stress values of the steels with two different Cr content levels set using the region splitting method in Japan are tabulated. Long-term creep rupture strength, in particular, of the {alpha}'+ {delta} dual phase steel is found to be lower than that expected from the short-term creep testing. Fine grain microstructure is found to enhance the creep deformation at lower stress region and decrease in fine MX and unequal distribution of MX in the ferrite matrix are to be the major causes of the strength degradation in the {alpha}'+ {delta} dual phase steel with the higher Cr content. It is concluded that the heterogeneous creep deformation is much more pronounced at lower stress level in the dual phase steel, which is due to inhomogeneous microstructure consisting of {alpha}'+{delta} phase matrix and the relevant heterogeneous distribution of fine precipitates such as MX and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the {delta} ferrite matrix and near the interface between the soft {delta} ferrite and the hard martensite ({alpha}') phases. Homogeneous microstructure is a key for achieving the long-term creep strength in the advanced ferritic steels at elevated temperatures over 600 C. KA-SUS410J2TB steel (designated as HCM12) is found to exhibit a similar creep strength degradation, which is mainly due to a similar microstructure of KA-SUS410J3 type steel with the higher Cr content. (orig.)

  12. Surface Soil Preparetion for Leguminous Plants Growing in Degraded Areas by Mining Located in Amazon Forest-Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irio Ribeiro, Admilson; Hashimoto Fengler, Felipe; Araújo de Medeiros, Gerson; Márcia Longo, Regina; Frederici de Mello, Giovanna; José de Melo, Wanderley

    2015-04-01

    The revegetation of areas degraded by mining usually requires adequate mobilization of surface soil for the development of the species to be implemented. Unlike the traditional tillage, which has periodicity, the mobilization of degraded areas for revegetation can only occur at the beginning of the recovery stage. In this sense, the process of revegetation has as purpose the establishment of local native vegetation with least possible use of inputs and superficial tillage in order to catalyze the process of natural ecological succession, promoting the reintegration of areas and minimizing the negative impacts of mining activities in environmental. In this context, this work describes part of a study of land reclamation by tin exploitation in the Amazon ecosystem in the National Forest Jamari- Rondonia Brazil. So, studied the influence of surface soil mobilization in pit mine areas and tailings a view to the implementation of legumes. The results show that the surface has areas of mobilizing a significant effect on the growth of leguminous plants, areas for both mining and to tailings and pit mine areas.

  13. Degradation Dynamics and Dietary Risk Assessments of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides during Lonicera japonica Planting, Drying, and Tea Brewing Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qingkui; Shi, Yanhong; Cao, Haiqun; Tong, Zhou; Xiao, Jinjing; Liao, Min; Wu, Xiangwei; Hua, Rimao

    2017-03-01

    The degradation dynamics and dietary risk assessments of thiamethoxam and thiacloprid during Lonicera japonica planting, drying, and tea brewing processes were systematically investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography. The half-lives of thiamethoxam and thiacloprid were 1.0-4.1 d in the honeysuckle flowers and leaves, with degradation rate constants k ranging from -0.169 to -0.696. The safety interval time was 7 d. The sun- and oven-drying (70 °C) percent digestions were 59.4-81.0% for the residues, which were higher than the shade- and oven-drying percentages at lower temperatures (30, 40, 50, and 60 °C, which ranged from 37.7% to 57.0%). The percent transfers of thiamethoxam and thiacloprid were 0-48.4% and 0-25.2%, respectively, for the different tea brewing conditions. On the basis of the results of this study, abiding by the safety interval time is important, and using reasonable drying methods and tea brewing conditions can reduce the transfer of thiamethoxam and thiacloprid to humans.

  14. Detection of Inulin, a Prebiotic Polysaccharide, in Maple Syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Seeram, Navindra P; Rowley, David C

    2016-09-28

    Maple syrup is a widely consumed plant-derived natural sweetener produced by concentrating xylem sap collected from certain maple (Acer) species. During thermal evaporation of water, natural phytochemical components are concentrated in maple syrup. The polymeric components from maple syrup were isolated by ethanol precipitation, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography and structurally characterized by glycosyl composition analysis, glycosyl linkage analysis, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the maple syrup polysaccharides, one neutral polysaccharide was characterized as inulin with a broad molecular weight distribution, representing the first isolation of this prebiotic carbohydrate from a xylem sap. In addition, two acidic polysaccharides with structural similarity were identified as arabinogalactans derived from rhamnogalacturonan type I pectic polysaccharides.

  15. Degradation of the plant defence hormone salicylic acid by the biotrophic fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Franziska; Ajami-Rashidi, Ziba; Doehlemann, Gunther; Kahmann, Regine; Djamei, Armin

    2013-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key plant defence hormone which plays an important role in local and systemic defence responses against biotrophic pathogens like the smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Here we identified Shy1, a cytoplasmic U. maydis salicylate hydroxylase which has orthologues in the closely related smuts Ustilago hordei and Sporisorium reilianum. shy1 is transcriptionally induced during the biotrophic stages of development but not required for virulence during seedling infection. Shy1 activity is needed for growth on plates with SA as a sole carbon source. The trigger for shy1 transcriptional induction is SA, suggesting the possibility of a SA sensing mechanism in this fungus.

  16. RECOVERY OF AN OXISOL DEGRADED BY THE CONSTRUCTION OF A HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseane Carina Borges de Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The removal of thick layers of soil under native scrubland (Cerrado on the right bank of the Paraná River in Selvíria (State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil for construction of the Ilha Solteira Hydroelectric Power Plant caused environmental damage, affecting the revegetation process of the stripped soil. Over the years, various kinds of land use and management systems have been tried, and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of these attempts to restore the structural quality of the soil. The experiment was conducted considering five treatments and thirty replications. The following treatments were applied: stripped soil without anthropic intervention and total absence of plant cover; stripped soil treated with sewage sludge and planted to eucalyptus and grass a year ago; stripped soil developing natural secondary vegetation (capoeira since 1969; pastureland since 1978, replacing the native vegetation; and soil under native vegetation (Cerrado. In the 0.00-0.20 m layer, the soil was chemically characterized for each experimental treatment. A 30-point sampling grid was used to assess soil porosity and bulk density, and to assess aggregate stability in terms of mean weight diameter (MWD and geometric mean diameter (GMD. Aggregate stability was also determined using simulated rainfall. The results show that using sewage sludge incorporated with a rotary hoe improved the chemical fertility of the soil and produced more uniform soil pore size distribution. Leaving the land to develop secondary vegetation or turning it over to pastureland produced an intermediate level of structural soil quality, and these two treatments produced similar results. Stripped soil without anthropic intervention was of the lowest quality, with the lowest values for cation exchange capacity (CEC and macroporosity, as well as the highest values of soil bulk density and percentage of aggregates with diameter size <0.50 mm, corroborated by its lower

  17. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THERMOBIFIDA FUSCA GENES INVOLVED IN PLANT CELL WALL DEGRADATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Wilson

    2006-01-23

    Micro-array experiments identified a number of Thermobifida fusca genes which were upregulated by growth on cellulose or plant biomass. Five of these genes were cloned, overexpressed in E. coli and the expressed proteins were purified and characterized. These were a xyloglucanase,a 1-3,beta glucanase, a family 18 hydrolase and twocellulose binding proteins that contained no catalytic domains. The catalyic domain of the family 74 endoxyloglucanase with a C-terminal, cellulose binding module was crystalized and its 3-dimensional structure was determined by X-ray crystallography.

  18. Plant biomass degradation by gut microbiomes: more of the same or something new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Mark; Pope, Phillip B; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2009-06-01

    Herbivores retain within their gastrointestinal tract a microbiome that specializes in the rapid hydrolysis and fermentation of lignocellulosic plant biomass. With the emergence of high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies and related 'omics' approaches, along with demands to better utilize lignocellulose materials as a feedstock for second-generation biofuels, these gut microbiomes are thought to be a potential source of novel biotechnologies relevant to meeting these needs. This review provides an insight into the new findings that have arisen from the (meta)genomic analysis of specialist cellulolytic bacteria and gut microbiomes of herbivorous insects, ruminants, native Australian marsupials, and other obligate herbivores. In addition to there being more of the same in terms of cellulases and cellulosomes, there also appears to be something 'new' in terms of the compositional and functional attributes of the plant cell wall deconstruction systems employed by these bacteria. However, future dissection and capture of useful biotechnologies via metagenomics will need more than the production of data using next generation sequencing technologies.

  19. Degradation of phenanthrene by Novosphingobium sp. HS2a improved plant growth in PAHs-contaminated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Conde, Sara; Molina, Lázaro; González, Paola; García-Puente, Alicia; Segura, Ana

    2016-12-01

    At the same time that the European Union (EU) policy recommend to direct efforts towards reductions of heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and mining residues, there is the need to increase the cultivable areas within Europe to cope with the increasing demands for food and energy crops. Bioremediation is a good technique for the restoration of contaminated soils; however, it has not been used extensively because of the variability of the outcome. This variability is frequently due to a bad establishment of foreign degrading populations in soil. We have demonstrated that Novosphingobium sp. HS2aR (i) is able to compete with other root colonizers and with indigenous bacteria, (ii) is able to establish in high numbers in the contaminated environments and (iii) is able to remove more than 90 % of the extractable phenanthrene in artificially contaminated soils. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the capacity to remove phenanthrene is linked to the ability to promote plant growth in contaminated environments. The fact that the presence of Novosphingobium sp. HS2aR improves the growth of plants in contaminated soil suggests that it may be a useful strain for utilization in amelioration of soil quality while improving the growth of economically important energy crops, thus adding value to the bioremediation strategy.

  20. Evaluating nurse plants for restoring native woody species to degraded subtropical woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelenik, Stephanie G.; DiManno, Nicole; D’Antonio, Carla M.

    2015-01-01

    Harsh habitats dominated by invasive species are difficult to restore. Invasive grasses in arid environments slow succession toward more desired composition, yet grass removal exacerbates high light and temperature, making the use of “nurse plants” an appealing strategy. In this study of degraded subtropical woodlands dominated by alien grasses in Hawai'i, we evaluated whether individuals of two native (Dodonaea viscosa, Leptocophylla tameiameia) and one non-native (Morella faya) woody species (1) act as natural nodes of recruitment for native woody species and (2) can be used to enhance survivorship of outplanted native woody species. To address these questions, we quantified the presence and persistence of seedlings naturally recruiting beneath adult nurse shrubs and compared survival and growth of experimentally outplanted seedlings of seven native woody species under the nurse species compared to intact and cleared alien-grass plots. We found that the two native nurse shrubs recruit their own offspring, but do not act as establishment nodes for other species. Morella faya recruited even fewer seedlings than native shrubs. Thus, outplanting will be necessary to increase abundance and diversity of native woody species. Outplant survival was the highest under shrubs compared to away from them with few differences between nurse species. The worst habitat for native seedling survival and growth was within the unmanaged invasive grass matrix. Although the two native nurse species did not differentially affect outplant survival, D. viscosa is the most widespread and easily propagated and is thus more likely to be useful as an initial nurse species. The outplanted species showed variable responses to nurse habitats that we attribute to resource requirements resulting from their typical successional stage and nitrogen fixation capability.

  1. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu...

  2. Medicinal mushrooms as a source of antitumor and immunomodulating polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, S P

    2002-11-01

    The number of mushrooms on Earth is estimated at 140,000, yet maybe only 10% (approximately 14,000 named species) are known. Mushrooms comprise a vast and yet largely untapped source of powerful new pharmaceutical products. In particular, and most importantly for modern medicine, they represent an unlimited source of polysaccharides with antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Many, if not all, Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active polysaccharides in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, culture broth. Data on mushroom polysaccharides have been collected from 651 species and 7 infraspecific taxa from 182 genera of higher Hetero- and Homobasidiomycetes. These polysaccharides are of different chemical composition, with most belonging to the group of beta-glucans; these have beta-(1-->3) linkages in the main chain of the glucan and additional beta-(1-->6) branch points that are needed for their antitumor action. High molecular weight glucans appear to be more effective than those of low molecular weight. Chemical modification is often carried out to improve the antitumor activity of polysaccharides and their clinical qualities (mostly water solubility). The main procedures used for chemical improvement are: Smith degradation (oxydo-reducto-hydrolysis), formolysis, and carboxymethylation. Most of the clinical evidence for antitumor activity comes from the commercial polysaccharides lentinan, PSK (krestin), and schizophyllan, but polysaccharides of some other promising medicinal mushroom species also show good results. Their activity is especially beneficial in clinics when used in conjunction with chemotherapy. Mushroom polysaccharides prevent oncogenesis, show direct antitumor activity against various allogeneic and syngeneic tumors, and prevent tumor metastasis. Polysaccharides from mushrooms do not attack cancer cells directly, but produce their antitumor effects by activating different immune responses in the host. The antitumor action of

  3. Guidance proposal for using available DegT50 values for estimation of degradation rates of plant protection products in Dutch surface water and sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Tiktak, A.; Linden, van der A.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The degradation rate of plant protection products and their transformation products in surface water and sediment may influence their concentrations in Dutch surface water. Therefore the estimation of these rates may be an important part of the assessment of the exposure of aquatic organisms. We

  4. Treatment of municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents with modified photo-Fenton as a tertiary treatment for the degradation of micro pollutants and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamerth, Nikolaus; Malato, Sixto; Agüera, Ana; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo; Mailhot, Gilles

    2012-03-06

    The goal of this paper was to develop a modified photo-Fenton treatment able to degrade micro pollutants in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) effluents at a neutral pH with minimal iron and H(2)O(2) concentrations. Complexation of Fe by ethylenediamine-N,N'-disuccinic acid (EDDS) leads to stabilization and solubilization of Fe at natural pH. Photo-Fenton experiments were performed in a pilot compound parabolic collector (CPC) solar plant. Samples were treated with solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by HPLC-Qtrap-MS. The rapid degradation of contaminants within the first minutes of illumination and the low detrimental impact on degradation of bicarbonates present in the water suggested that radical species other than HO(•) are responsible for the efficiency of such photo-Fenton process. Disinfection of MWTP effluents by the same process showed promising results, although disinfection was not complete.

  5. 不同施肥种类、种植密度和采收期对川芎多糖含量的影响研究%The Effect of Different Fertilizers, Planting Densities and Harvest Time on the Polysaccharide Content in Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐绯; 赵致

    2011-01-01

    针对不同施肥种类、种植密度、采收期3个因素,通过单因素试验研究了它们对川芎中多糖含量的影响,使用正交试验设计研究了各因素间的相互作用并优选出最佳组合.结果表明:不同施肥种类、种植密度、采收期对川芎多糖含量存在显著影响,当每亩施用复合肥40kg,种植行距为30 cm,窝距为20 cm,翌年7月20日采收时,川芎中多糖含量最高.各因素中,施肥种类对多糖含量影响最大,其次为种植密度,采收期对多糖含量的影响最小.%Using a three-factor experiment, the effect of different fertilizers, planting densities and harvest time on the Polysaccharide content in ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. had been determined in the current work.The interaction within factors had been investigated and the best combination of factors had been selected by orthogonal design. Result showed that those factors had significant effect on Polysaccharide content in ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. Supplied with compound fertilizer, the density of 20 cm × 30 cm gave the highest Polysaccharide content harvested on 20th July of next year after planting. Therefore, the best factor affecting Polysaccharide content in ligusticum chuanxiong Hort is fertilizer, followed by planting density and harvest time.

  6. Bioinformatics Evaluation of Plant Chlorophyllase, the Key Enzyme in Chlorophyll Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Sharafi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Chlorophyllase catalyzes the hydrolysis of chlorophylls to chlorophyllide and phytol. Recently, several applications including removal of chlorophylls from vegetable oils, use in laundry detergents and production of chlorophyllides have been described for chlorophyllase. However, there is little information about the biochemical characteristics of chlorophyllases.Material and Methods: 35 chlorophyllase protein sequences were obtained from the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database. All of the sequences were analyzed using bioinformatics tools for their conserved domain, phylogenetic relationships and biochemical characteristics.Results and Conclusion: The overall domain architecture of chlorophyllases consisted of the esterases/lipases superfamily domain over their full length and the alpha/beta hydrolase family domain over the middle part of their sequences. Plant chlorophyllases could be classified into 4 clades. Molecular weight and pI of the chlorophyllases ranged 32.65-37.77 kDa and 4.80-8.97, respectively. The most stable chlorophyllase is probably obtained from Malus domestica. Chlorophyllases form Solanum pennellii, Triticum aestivum, Triticum urartu, Arabidopsis lyrata, Pachira macrocarpa, Prunus mume and Malus domestica were predicted to be soluble upon overexpression in Escherichia coli, Beta vulgaris and Chenopodium album chlorophyllases were predicted to form no disulfide bond. Chlorophyllases from Jatropha curcas, Amborella trichopod, Setaria italica, Piper betle, Triticum urartu and Arabidopsis thaliana were predicted to be in non-N-glycosylated form.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  7. Biotemplated Mesoporous TiO2/SiO2 Composite Derived from Aquatic Plant Leaves for Efficient Dye Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The biotemplating technique is an environmental-protective high-efficiency new technology by which the resulting TiO2 may simultaneously attain the duplication of structure and self-doping elements from biotemplate materials, which is highly desirable for photocatalytic applications. In this paper, aquatic plant leaves—including reed, water hyacinth, and duckweed—were used as both templates and silicon precursors to successfully synthesize biomorphic TiO2/SiO2 composite with mesoporous structures. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption–desorption, and UV–visible diffuse reflectance spectra were applied to characterize the microstructures of the samples. The results show that all TiO2/SiO2 composites are mainly composed of an anatase phase with mesoporous structure and possess high specific surface area. Compared with commercial Degussa P25 TiO2, all TiO2/SiO2 samples display intensive light-harvesting efficiency, particularly in the visible light range. The activities were evaluated by using gentian violet as a target for photocatalytic degradation experiments under simulated solar irradiation. The TiO2/SiO2 samples templated by reed and water hyacinth leaves exhibit high activity, while the TiO2/SiO2 samples obtained from duckweed are inferior to P25 in the degradation of gentian violet. A synergistic effect of SiO2 incorporation and structural construction through biotemplating is proposed to be beneficial to photocatalytic activity.

  8. Deciphering Cyanide-Degrading Potential of Bacterial Community Associated with the Coking Wastewater Treatment Plant with a Novel Draft Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Lili; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Biotreatment processes fed with coking wastewater often encounter insufficient removal of pollutants, such as ammonia, phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially for cyanides. However, only a limited number of bacterial species in pure cultures have been confirmed to metabolize cyanides, which hinders the improvement of these processes. In this study, a microbial community of activated sludge enriched in a coking wastewater treatment plant was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina sequencing to characterize the potential cyanide-degrading bacteria. According to the classification of these pyro-tags, targeting V3/V4 regions of 16S rRNA gene, half of them were assigned to the family Xanthomonadaceae, implying that Xanthomonadaceae bacteria are well-adapted to coking wastewater. A nearly complete draft genome of the dominant bacterium was reconstructed from metagenome of this community to explore cyanide metabolism based on analysis of the genome. The assembled 16S rRNA gene from this draft genome showed that this bacterium was a novel species of Thermomonas within Xanthomonadaceae, which was further verified by comparative genomics. The annotation using KEGG and Pfam identified genes related to cyanide metabolism, including genes responsible for the iron-harvesting system, cyanide-insensitive terminal oxidase, cyanide hydrolase/nitrilase, and thiosulfate:cyanide transferase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these genes had homologs in previously identified genomes of bacteria within Xanthomonadaceae and even presented similar gene cassettes, thus implying an inherent cyanide-decomposing potential. The findings of this study expand our knowledge about the bacterial degradation of cyanide compounds and will be helpful in the remediation of cyanides contamination.

  9. The effect of protease, amylase, and nonstarch polysaccharide-degrading enzyme supplementation on nutrient utilization and growth performance of broiler chickens fed corn-soybean meal-based diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, S A; Rogiewicz, A; Mogielnicka, M; Rutkowski, A; Jones, R O; Slominski, B A

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine if amylase and protease addition would improve nutrient digestion during the first 2 wk of growth. The experimental treatments included a control corn-soybean meal-based diet and diets supplemented with either amylase or amylase plus protease. No effect of enzyme supplementation was observed on BW gain and feed conversion ratio. This was corroborated by similar ileal starch and protein digestibility values, which averaged 96.8, 96.8, and 96.9% and 83.9, 80.1, and 79.6%, respectively, for the control and for the amylase or amylase plus protease supplemented diets. Total tract digestibility of starch averaged 97.8, 97.7 and 97.7% for the 3 diets and was followed by a similar diet with AMEn values of 3,129, 3,129, and 3,106 kcal/kg. In another study, a 2(3) factorial arrangement of 8 dietary treatments was used to evaluate the effect of corn particle size (conventional or coarse vs. fine) and the addition of a nonstarch polysaccharide enzyme, amylase, or both on growth performance and nutrient utilization of broiler chickens from 1 to 21 d of age. Chickens fed a diet containing a conventionally ground corn (geometric mean diameter of 736 µm) showed higher (P starch digestion in the upper gut. Addition of nonstarch polysaccharide enzymes was effective for both diets, with the most pronounced effects observed in feed conversion ratio for the conventional corn-containing diet (1.27 vs. 1.23) and BW gain (750 vs. 789 g/bird) for the fine corn-containing diet. This was followed by the same magnitude of difference in diet AMEn content, which increased from 2,972 to 3,042 and 2,852 to 3,009 kcal/kg following enzyme addition.

  10. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected. The endophyte P. putida W619-TCE degrades TCE during its transport through the xylem, leading to reduced TCE concentrations in poplar, and decreased TCE evapotranspiration.

  11. Activity of glycosidases from freshwater heterotrophic microorganisms on the degradation of extracellular polysaccharide produced by Anabaena spiroides (Cyanobacteria Atividade de glicosidases liberadas por microorganismos heterotróficos de água doce na degradação do polissacarídeo extracelular produzido por Anabaena spiroides (Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Colombo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity of specific glycosidases during the degradation of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS produced by Anabaena spiroides was determined using MUF-substrates (MUF-monosaccharides. Polysaccharide degradation was found to occur in a two-phase process. The first consisted of high enzymatic activity that consumed 41% of the EPS at a relatively high rate, while the second consumed the remaining polysaccharide (59% at a slower rate. A transition phase from the higher to the slower degradation rates was marked by a replacement of bacterial populations from coccoid to bacillus cells. During the degradation process, the bacterial biomass increased with the decrease of EPS, as revealed by bacterial cell counts. The enzymatic activity detected through the substrates MUF-alpha-D- and MUF-beta-D-glucoside was higher than that detected by other substrates tested. The remaining glycosides were MUF-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside, MUF-beta-D-galactoside, MUF-alpha-D-mannopyranoside, MUF-beta-D-fucoside, MUF-beta-D-mannopyranoside, MUF-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, and MUF-beta-L-fucoside. The fluorescence emitted by each MUF-substrate was proportional to the concentration of the corresponding monosaccharide in A. spiroides EPS. This demonstrates the susceptibility of EPS produced by A. spiroides to enzymatic attack by bacterial populations.A atividade de glicosidases durante a degradação do polissacarídeo extracelular (EPS produzido por Anabaena spiroides foi detectada e quantificada utilizando-se MUF-substratos (MUF-monossacarídeos. O consumo total do polissacarídeo efetuou-se em duas fases, uma primeira de alta atividade enzimática que rapidamente consumiu 41% do polissacarídeo e uma segunda, mais lenta, que consumiu o polissacarídeo restante (59%. A mudança de fase coincidiu com a sucessão de uma população de bactérias cocóides por outra de bacilos. A biomassa bacteriana, quantificada por contagens de células, aumentou com a degradação do

  12. cis-Encoded Small RNAs, a Conserved Mechanism for Repression of Polysaccharide Utilization in Bacteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanlu; Förstner, Konrad U; Vogel, Jörg; Smith, C Jeffrey

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides is a major component of the human gut microbiota which has a broad impact on the development and physiology of its host and a potential role in a wide range of disease syndromes. The predominance of this genus is due in large part to expansion of paralogous gene clusters, termed polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), dedicated to the uptake and catabolism of host-derived and dietary polysaccharides. The nutritive value and availability of polysaccharides in the gut vary greatly; thus, their utilization is hierarchical and strictly controlled. A typical PUL includes regulatory genes that induce PUL expression in response to the presence of specific glycan substrates. However, the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms has been predicted to explain phenomena such as hierarchical control and catabolite repression. In this report, a previously unknown layer of regulatory control was discovered in Bacteroides fragilis Exploratory transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed the presence of cis-encoded antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) associated with 15 (30%) of the B. fragilis PULs. A model system using the Don (degradation of N-glycans) PUL showed that the donS sRNA negatively regulated Don expression at the transcriptional level, resulting in a decrease in N-glycan utilization. Additional studies performed with other Bacteroides species indicated that this regulatory mechanism is highly conserved and, interestingly, that the regulated PULs appear to be closely linked to the utilization of host-derived glycans rather than dietary plant polysaccharides. The findings described here demonstrate a global control mechanism underlying known PUL regulatory circuits and provide insight into regulation of Bacteroides physiology. The human gut is colonized by a dense microbiota which is essential to the health and normal development of the host. A key to gut homeostasis is the preservation of a stable, diverse microbiota. Bacteroides is a dominant genus

  13. Marine derived polysaccharides for biomedical applications: chemical modification approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ayala, Giovanna Gomez; Malinconico, Mario; Laurienzo, Paola

    2008-09-03

    Polysaccharide-based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical fields such as tissue regeneration, particularly for cartilage, drug delivery devices and gelentrapment systems for the immobilization of cells. Important properties of the polysaccharides include controllable biological activity, biodegradability, and their ability to form hydrogels. Most of the polysaccharides used derive from natural sources; particularly, alginate and chitin, two polysaccharides which have an extensive history of use in medicine, pharmacy and basic sciences, and can be easily extracted from marine plants (algae kelp) and crab shells, respectively. The recent rediscovery of poly-saccharidebased materials is also attributable to new synthetic routes for their chemical modification, with the aim of promoting new biological activities and/or to modify the final properties of the biomaterials for specific purposes. These synthetic strategies also involve the combination of polysaccharides with other polymers. A review of the more recent research in the field of chemical modification of alginate, chitin and its derivative chitosan is presented. Moreover, we report as case studies the results of our recent work concerning various different approaches and applications of polysaccharide-based biomaterials, such as the realization of novel composites based on calcium sulphate blended with alginate and with a chemically modified chitosan, the synthesis of novel alginate-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers and the development of a family of materials based on alginate and acrylic polymers of potential interest as drug delivery systems.

  14. Marine Derived Polysaccharides for Biomedical Applications: Chemical Modification Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Laurienzo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharide-based biomaterials are an emerging class in several biomedical fields such as tissue regeneration, particularly for cartilage, drug delivery devices and gelentrapment systems for the immobilization of cells. Important properties of the polysaccharides include controllable biological activity, biodegradability, and their ability to form hydrogels. Most of the polysaccharides used derive from natural sources; particularly, alginate and chitin, two polysaccharides which have an extensive history of use in medicine, pharmacy and basic sciences, and can be easily extracted from marine plants (algae kelp and crab shells, respectively. The recent rediscovery of poly-saccharidebased materials is also attributable to new synthetic routes for their chemical modification, with the aim of promoting new biological activities and/or to modify the final properties of the biomaterials for specific purposes. These synthetic strategies also involve the combination of polysaccharides with other polymers. A review of the more recent research in the field of chemical modification of alginate, chitin and its derivative chitosan is presented. Moreover, we report as case studies the results of our recent work concerning various different approaches and applications of polysaccharide-based biomaterials, such as the realization of novel composites based on calcium sulphate blended with alginate and with a chemically modified chitosan, the synthesis of novel alginate-poly(ethylene glycol copolymers and the development of a family of materials based on alginate and acrylic polymers of potential interest as drug delivery systems.

  15. Sll1783, a monooxygenase associated with polysaccharide processing in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hélder; Immerzeel, Peter; Gerber, Lorenz; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Lind, Sara Bergström; Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia; Mamedov, Fikret; Lindblad, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Cyanobacteria play a pivotal role as the primary producer in many aquatic ecosystems. The knowledge on the interacting processes of cyanobacteria with its environment - abiotic and biotic factors - is still very limited. Many potential exocytoplasmic proteins in the model unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 have unknown functions and their study is essential to improve our understanding of this photosynthetic organism and its potential for biotechnology use. Here we characterize a deletion mutant of Synechocystis PCC 6803, Δsll1783, a strain that showed a remarkably high light resistance which is related with its lower thylakoid membrane formation. Our results suggests Sll1783 to be involved in a mechanism of polysaccharide degradation and uptake and we hypothesize it might function as a sensor for cell density in cyanobacterial cultures. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Effect of bacterial polysaccharides on the growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasík, J; Stanĕk, M; Vancura, V; Wurst, M

    1979-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. and related species which in the soil and in the rhizosphere of wheat accompany the fungus Gaemannomyces graminis var. tritici and cause take-all of the wheat roots produced polysaccharides in pure cultures (glucans, mannoglucans and galactomannoglucans). These polysaccharides were utilized better by the mycelium of G. graminis than glucose and polysaccharides of plant origin that occurred on the surface of wheat roots (the so-called mucigel). At lower concentrations these bacterial polysaccharides stimulated growth of wheat roots, higher concentrations (more than 0.1%) were inhibitory. Bacteria inoculated on the surface of wheat first inhibited and then stimulated the development of the plants and their growth. Changes in the growth rate of wheat, the rhizosphere of which was colonized by bacteria simultaneously with the fungus G. graminis and also some changes in the course of the disease of wheat roots caused by the fungus can be explained by the inhibitory or stimulatory effect of polysaccharides of accompanying bacteria.

  17. Screening of polysaccharides from tamarind, fenugreek and jackfruit seeds as pharmaceutical excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2015-08-01

    The paper describes the isolation and screening of plant polysaccharides namely tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP), fenugreek seed mucilage (FSM) and jackfruit seed starch (JFSS) from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seeds, fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seeds and jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus L.) seeds, respectively. The yields of isolated dried TSP, FSM and JFSS were 47.00%, 17.36% and 18.86%, respectively. Various physicochemical properties like colour, odour, taste, solubility in water, pH and viscosity of these isolated plant polysaccharides were assessed. Isolated polysaccharide samples were subjected to some phytochemical identification tests. FTIR and (1)H NMR analyses of isolated polysaccharides were performed, which suggest the presence of sugar residues. Isolated TSP, FSM and JFSS can be used as pharmaceutical excipients in various pharmaceutical formulations.

  18. Structural studies of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharides of Azospirillum brasilense Sp246 and SpBr14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Grinev, Vyacheslav S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2014-10-29

    Lipopolysaccharides from closely related Azospirillum brasilense strains, Sp246 and SpBr14, were obtained by phenol-water extraction. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharides followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in polysaccharide mixtures. On the basis of sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy data, it was concluded that both bacteria possess the same two distinct polysaccharides having structures 1 and 2: [structure: see text]. Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide of A. brasilense 54 [Fedonenko et al., 2011] whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  19. Evaluation of Protein Extraction Methods for Proteomic Analysis of Non-Model Recalcitrant Plant Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Plant tissues contain relatively low amounts of proteins whose extraction is often difficult due to the presence of interfering compounds such as rigid cellulosic cell wall, storage polysaccharides, lipids and other contaminants that can cause protein degradation or modification. Therefore it is important to optimize protein extraction and to establish a robust protocol for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and downstream processing. In this study, acetone, trichloroacetic acid/aceto...

  20. Comparative analysis of the secretomes of Schizophyllum commune and other wood-decay basidiomycetes during solid-state fermentation reveals its unique lignocellulose-degrading enzyme system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ning; Liu, Jiawen; Yang, Jinshui; Lin, Yujian; Yang, Yi; Ji, Lei; Li, Meng; Yuan, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Schizophyllum commune encodes a diverse repertoire of degradative enzymes for plant cell wall breakdown. Recent comparative genomics study suggests that this wood decayer likely has a mode of biodegradation distinct from the well-established white-rot/brown-rot models. However, much about the extracellular enzyme system secreted by S. commune during lignocellulose deconstruction remains unknown and the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, extracellular proteins of S. commune colonizing Jerusalem artichoke stalk were analyzed and compared with those of two white-rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and a brown-rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Under solid-state fermentation (SSF) conditions, S. commune displayed considerably higher levels of hydrolytic enzyme activities in comparison with those of P. chrysosporium, C. subvermispora and G. trabeum. During biodegradation process, this fungus modified the lignin polymer in a way which was consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, similar to that of G. trabeum. The crude enzyme cocktail derived from S. commune demonstrated superior performance over a commercial enzyme preparation from Trichoderma longibrachiatum in the hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass at low enzyme loadings. Secretomic analysis revealed that compared with three other fungi, this species produced a higher diversity of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, especially hemicellulases and pectinases acting on polysaccharide backbones and side chains, and a larger set of enzymes potentially supporting the generation of hydroxyl radicals. In addition, multiple non-hydrolytic proteins implicated in enhancing polysaccharide accessibility were identified in the S. commune secretome, including lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) and expansin-like proteins. Plant lignocellulose degradation by S. commune involves a hydroxyl radical-mediated mechanism for lignocellulose modification

  1. Polysaccharides of the red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, Anatolii I

    2011-01-01

    Red algae (Rhodophyta) are known as the source of unique sulfated galactans, such as agar, agarose, and carrageenans. The wide practical uses of these polysaccharides are based on their ability to form strong gels in aqueous solutions. Gelling polysaccharides usually have molecules built up of repeating disaccharide units with a regular distribution of sulfate groups, but most of the red algal species contain more complex galactans devoid of gelling ability because of various deviations from the regular structure. Moreover, several red algae may contain sulfated mannans or neutral xylans instead of sulfated galactans as the main structural polysaccharides. This chapter is devoted to a description of the structural diversity of polysaccharides found in the red algae, with special emphasis on the methods of structural analysis of sulfated galactans. In addition to the structural information, some data on the possible use of red algal polysaccharides as biologically active polymers or as taxonomic markers are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shazia; Aslam, Hina; Ahmad, Aqeel; Khan, Shakeel Ahmed; Sohail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase) using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP) for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  3. Production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes by monoculture and co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus under SSF of banana peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Rehman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are considered to be the most important group of microorganisms for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE, in solid state fermentations. In this study, two fungal strains Aspergillus niger MS23 and Aspergillus terreus MS105 were screened for plant CWDE such as amylase, pectinase, xylanase and cellulases (β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and filterpaperase using a novel substrate, Banana Peels (BP for SSF process. This is the first study, to the best of our knowledge, to use BP as SSF substrate for plant CWDE production by co-culture of fungal strains. The titers of pectinase were significantly improved in co-culture compared to mono-culture. Furthermore, the enzyme preparations obtained from monoculture and co-culture were used to study the hydrolysis of BP along with some crude and purified substrates. It was observed that the enzymatic hydrolysis of different crude and purified substrates accomplished after 26 h of incubation, where pectin was maximally hydrolyzed by the enzyme preparations of mono and co-culture. Along with purified substrates, crude materials were also proved to be efficiently degraded by the cocktail of the CWDE. These results demonstrated that banana peels may be a potential substrate in solid-state fermentation for the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes to be used for improving various biotechnological and industrial processes.

  4. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, A.; O' Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  5. Novel ideas for maximising dew collection to aid plant establishment to combat desertification and restore degraded dry and arid lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzen, Benz

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the potential of dew to provide water to plants and potentially to people as well in remote and difficult to reach areas where rainfall and underground water cannot be harvested. The combat of desertification and the restoration of degraded and desertified dry and arid lands has never been more urgent. A key practical component of this strategy is the restoration of habitat with planting. But for habitat and planting to survive there needs to be an adequate supply of water. In most cases providing water to the plant's roots is vital. In some areas where habitats have been destroyed, sufficient water is immediately available, for example through seasonal rainfall, or it can be harvested to concentrate adequate supplies of water to the roots. However, in arid and hyper arid areas, as well as in some dryland areas, a consistent and adequate supply of water cannot be provided by any conventional proven method. Thus, as the need to combat desertification and to restore desertified dry and arid land increases, so the need to find novel methods of establishing and maintaining planting and thus habitat increases. In more traditional land management scenarios this can be achieved through manipulating landform on a micro and macro scale, for example, by creating catchments, thereby collecting precipitation and directing it to the plants. Where this cannot be done, other means of water supply are usually required. Bainbridge (2007) and others have shown that supplying water to plants is possible through a number of traditional methods, for example, using clay pots. But most of these techniques require an introduced source of water, for example, obtained through water harvesting methods or by delivering water to site in tanks and by water bowser. This can work but requires continuous manpower. It is expensive and can be physically prohibitive in areas where access is difficult and/or remote. The concept of using dew to supply water in drylands is not new

  6. Synthesis of Oligosaccharide Fragments of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharova, Alexandra

    Pectin is a highly heterogeneous polysaccharide of plant origin. It is found in the primary cell wall and contributes to various cell functions, including support, defense, signaling, and cell adhesion. Pectin also plays important role as a food additive, serving as stabilizing and thickening age...

  7. Why Were Polysaccharides Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoguzov, Vladimir

    2004-12-01

    The main idea of this paper is that the primordial soup may be modelled by food systems whose structure-property relationship is based on non-specific interactions between denatured biopolymers. According to the proposed hypothesis, polysaccharides were the first biopolymers that decreased concentration of salts in the primordial soup, `compatibilised' and drove the joint evolution of proto-biopolymers. Synthesis of macromolecules within the polysaccharide-rich medium could have resulted in phase separation of the primordial soup and concentration of the polypeptides and nucleic acids in the dispersed phase particles. The concentration of proto-biopolymer mixtures favoured their cross-linking in hybrid supermacromolecules of conjugates. The cross-linking of proto-biopolymers could occur by hydrophobic, electrostatic interactions, H-bonds due to freezing aqueous mixed biopolymer dispersions and/or by covalent bonds due to the Maillard reaction. Cross-linking could have increased the local concentration of chemically different proto-biopolymers, fixed their relative positions and made their interactions reproducible. Attractive-repulsive interactions between cross-linked proto-biopolymer chains could develop pairing of the monomer units, improved chemical stability (against hydrolysis) and led to their mutual catalytic activity and coding. Conjugates could probably evolve to the first self-reproduced entities and then to specialized cellular organelles. Phase separation of the primordial soup with concentration of conjugates in the dispersed particles has probably resulted in proto-cells.

  8. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic Acid Biosynthesis Leads to Swollen Plant Cell Walls and Severe Developmental Defects Associated with Changes in Pectic Polysaccharides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation. PMID:21949134

  9. Down-regulation of UDP-glucuronic acid biosynthesis leads to swollen plant cell walls and severe developmental defects associated with changes in pectic polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Rebecca; Geserick, Claudia; Pabst, Martin; Frey, Beat; Wittmann, Doris; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Léonard, Renaud; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2011-11-18

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGD) plays a key role in the nucleotide sugar biosynthetic pathway, as its product UDP-glucuronic acid is the common precursor for arabinose, xylose, galacturonic acid, and apiose residues found in the cell wall. In this study we characterize an Arabidopsis thaliana double mutant ugd2,3 that lacks two of the four UGD isoforms. This mutant was obtained from a cross of ugd2 and ugd3 single mutants, which do not show phenotypical differences compared with the WT. In contrast, ugd2,3 has a strong dwarfed phenotype and often develops seedlings with severe root defects suggesting that the UGD2 and UGD3 isoforms act in concert. Differences in its cell wall composition in comparison to the WT were determined using biochemical methods indicating a significant reduction in arabinose, xylose, apiose, and galacturonic acid residues. Xyloglucan is less substituted with xylose, and pectins have a reduced amount of arabinan side chains. In particular, the amount of the apiose containing side chains A and B of rhamnogalacturonan II is strongly reduced, resulting in a swollen cell wall. The alternative pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid with the key enzyme myo-inositol oxygenase is not up-regulated in ugd2,3. The pathway also does not complement the ugd2,3 mutation, likely because the supply of myo-inositol is limited. Taken together, the presented data underline the importance of UDP GlcA for plant primary cell wall formation.

  10. Polysaccharides purified from wild Cordyceps activate FGF2/FGFR1c signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yangyang; Han, Zhangrun; Yu, Guangli; Hao, Jiejie; Zhang, Lijuan

    2015-02-01

    Land animals as well as all organisms in ocean synthesize sulfated polysaccharides. Fungi split from animals about 1.5 billion years ago. As fungi make the evolutionary journey from ocean to land, the biggest changes in their living environment may be a sharp decrease in salt concentration. It is established that sulfated polysaccharides interact with hundreds of signaling molecules and facilitate many signaling transduction pathways, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor signaling pathway. The disappearance of sulfated polysaccharides in fungi and plants on land might indicate that polysaccharides without sulfation might be sufficient in facilitating protein ligand/receptor interactions in low salinity land. Recently, it was reported that plants on land start to synthesize sulfated polysaccharides in high salt environment, suggesting that fungi might be able to do the same when exposed in such environment. Interestingly, Cordyceps, a fungus habituating inside caterpillar body, is the most valued traditional Chinese Medicine. One of the important pharmaceutical active ingredients in Cordyceps is polysaccharides. Therefore, we hypothesize that the salty environment inside caterpillar body might allow the fungi to synthesize sulfated polysaccharides. To test the hypothesis, we isolated polysaccharides from both lava and sporophore of wild Cordyceps and also from Cordyceps militaris cultured without or with added salts. We then measured the polysaccharide activity using a FGF2/FGFR1c signaling-dependent BaF3 cell proliferation assay and found that polysaccharides isolated from wild Cordyceps activated FGF2/FGFR signaling, indicating that the polysaccharides synthesized by wild Cordyceps are indeed different from those by the cultured mycelium.

  11. Polysaccharides Purified from Wild Cordyceps Activate FGF2/FGFR1c Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yangyang; HAN Zhangrun; YU Guangli; HAO Jiejie; ZHANG Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Land animals as well as all organisms in ocean synthesize sulfated polysaccharides. Fungi split from animals about 1.5 billion years ago. As fungi make the evolutionary journey from ocean to land, the biggest changes in their living environment may be a sharp decrease in salt concentration. It is established that sulfated polysaccharides interact with hundreds of signaling molecules and facilitate many signaling transduction pathways, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor signaling pathway. The disappearance of sulfated polysaccharides in fungi and plants on land might indicate that polysaccharides without sulfation might be sufficient in facilitating protein ligand/receptor interactions in low salinity land. Recently, it was reported that plants on land start to synthesize sulfated polysaccharides in high salt environment, suggesting that fungi might be able to do the same when ex-posed in such environment. Interestingly, Cordyceps, a fungus habituating inside caterpillar body, is the most valued traditional Chi-nese Medicine. One of the important pharmaceutical active ingredients in Cordyceps is polysaccharides. Therefore, we hypothesize that the salty environment inside caterpillar body might allow the fungi to synthesize sulfated polysaccharides. To test the hypothesis, we isolated polysaccharides from both lava and sporophore of wild Cordyceps and also fromCordyceps militaris cultured without or with added salts. We then measured the polysaccharide activity using a FGF2/FGFR1c signaling-dependent BaF3 cell proliferation assay and found that polysaccharides isolated from wild Cordyceps activated FGF2/FGFR signaling, indicating that the polysaccha-rides synthesized by wild Cordyceps are indeed different from those by the cultured mycelium.

  12. Hydrocarbon degradation potential and plant growth-promoting activity of culturable endophytic bacteria of Lotus corniculatus and Oenothera biennis from a long-term polluted site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Małgorzata; Cania, Barbara; Thijs, Sofie; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2017-07-06

    Many endophytic bacteria exert beneficial effects on their host, but still little is known about the bacteria associated with plants growing in areas heavily polluted by hydrocarbons. The aim of the study was characterization of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading endophytic bacteria associated with Lotus corniculatus L. and Oenothera biennis L. collected in long-term petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted site using culture-dependent and molecular approaches. A total of 26 hydrocarbon-degrading endophytes from these plants were isolated. Phylogenetic analyses classified the isolates into the phyla Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The majority of strains belonged to the genera Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Rhodococcus. More than 90% of the isolates could grow on medium with diesel oil, approximately 20% could use n-hexadecane as a sole carbon and energy source. PCR analysis revealed that 40% of the isolates possessed the P450 gene encoding for cytochrome P450-type alkane hydroxylase (CYP153). In in vitro tests, all endophytic strains demonstrated a wide range of plant growth-promoting traits such as production of indole-3-acetic acid, hydrogen cyanide, siderophores, and phosphate solubilization. More than 40% of the bacteria carried the gene encoding for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase (acdS). Our study shows that the diversity of endophytic bacterial communities in tested plants was different. The results revealed also that the investigated plants were colonized by endophytic bacteria possessing plant growth-promoting features and a clear potential to degrade hydrocarbons. The properties of isolated endophytes indicate that they have the high potential to improve phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted soils.

  13. Sugarcane glycoproteins may act as signals for the production of xanthan in the plant-associated bacterium Xanthomonas albilineans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz, María-Estrella; Blanch, María; Piñón, Dolores; Santiago, Rocío; Fontaniella, Blanca; Blanco, Yolanda; Solas, María-Teresa; Vicente, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    Visual symptoms of leaf scald necrosis in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) leaves develop in parallel to the accumulation of a fibrous material invading exocellular spaces and both xylem and phloem. These fibers are produced and secreted by the plant-associated bacterium Xanthomonas albilineans. Electron microscopy and specific staining methods for polysaccharides reveal the polysaccharidic nature of this material. These polysaccharides are not present in healthy leaves or in those from diseased plants without visual symptoms of leaf scald. Bacteria in several leaf tissues have been detected by immunogold labelling. The bacterial polysaccharide is not produced in axenic culture but it is actively synthesized when the microbes invade the host plant. This finding may be due to the production of plant glycoproteins after bacteria infection, which inhibit microbial proteases. In summary, our data are consistent with the existence of a positive feedback loop in which plant-produced glycoproteins act as a cell-to-bacteria signal that promotes xanthan production, by protecting some enzymes of xanthan biosynthesis against from bacterial proteolytic degradation

  14. Polysaccharides: Molecular and Supramolecular Structures. Terminology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinze, Thomas; Petzold-Welcke, Katrin; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter summarises important issues
    about the molecular and supramolecular structure
    of polysaccharides. It describes the terminology
    of polysaccharides systematically. The
    polysaccharides are divided regarding the
    molecular structures in glucans, polyoses,
    polysaccharid

  15. Deciphering the signaling mechanisms of the plant cell wall degradation machinery in Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udatha, D. B. R. K. Gupta; Topakas, Evangelos; Salazar, Margarita Pena;

    2015-01-01

    . oryzae genome were only partially explained by the chemical similarity of the enzyme inducers. Genes encoding enzymes that have attracted considerable interest such as cellobiose dehydrogenases and copper-dependent polysaccharide mono-oxygenases presented a substrate-specific induction. Several homology...... in 2360 reactions in the genome scale metabolic network of A. oryzae, was performed through a two-step molecular docking against the binding pockets of the transcription factors AoXlnR and AoAmyR. A total of six metabolites viz., sulfite (H2SO3), sulfate (SLF), uroporphyrinogen III (UPGIII), ethanolamine...

  16. Development of an Accelerated Methodology to Study Degradation of Materials in Supercritical Water for Application in High Temperature Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David

    The decreasing supply of fossil fuel sources, coupled with the increasing concentration of green house gases has placed enormous pressure to maximize the efficiency of power generation. Increasing the outlet temperature of these power plants will result in an increase in operating efficiency. By employing supercritical water as the coolant in thermal power plants (nuclear reactors and coal power plants), the plant efficiency can be increased to 50%, compared to traditional reactors which currently operate at 33%. The goal of this dissertation is to establish techniques to characterize the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of materials exposed to supercritical water. Traditionally, these tests have been long term exposure tests spanning months. The specific goal of this dissertation is to develop a methodology for accelerated estimation of corrosion rates in supercritical water that can be sued as a screening tool to select materials for long term testing. In this study, traditional methods were used to understand the degradation of materials in supercritical water and establish a point of comparison to the first electrochemical studies performed in supercritical water. Materials studied included austenitic steels (stainless steel 304, stainless steel 316 and Nitronic 50) and nickel based alloys (Inconel 625 and 718). Surface chemistry of the oxide layer was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Stainless steel 304 was subjected to constant tensile load creep tests in water at a pressure of 27 MPa and at temperatures of 200 °C, 315 °C and supercritical water at 450 °C for 24 hours. It was determined that the creep rate for stainless steel 304 exposed to supercritical water would be unacceptable for use in service. It was observed that the formation of hematite was favored in subcritical temperatures, while magnetite was formed in the supercritical region. Corrosion of

  17. Polysaccharide enhances Radix Saposhnikoviae efficacy through inhibiting chromones decomposition in intestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-Ming; Jiang, Hua; Dai, Hong-Liang; Wang, Zi-Wei; Jia, Gui-Zhi; Meng, Xiang-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Vegetative but not reproductive stage of Saposhnikovia divaricate (Turxz.) schischk possesses pharmacological activities. However, our recent study showed that reproductive S. divaricate supplemented with polysaccharide showed evidently elevated pharmacological activities and increased cimifugin content in rat serum. The aims of present study were to assess the influence of polysaccharides on the chromones pharmacological activities in Radix Saposhnikoviae (RS), the dried root of vegetative stage of S. divaricate, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Only cimifugin was detected in the plasma of chromone treated animals and RS polysaccharide significantly increased the plasma content of cimifugin. It was shown that neither cimifugin absorption nor glycoside components transformation in simulated digestive fluid was affected by RS polysaccharide. However, a significant promotion of transformation of cimifugin to more stable prime-O-glucosylcimifugin (PGCN) by RS polysaccharide, and a protective effect of polysaccharide on chromone components were observed in small intestine solutions. Meanwhile, RS polysaccharide produced a significant elevation of cimifugin and PGCN concentration in vivo. Based on these findings, we concluded that RS polysaccharide could greatly increase the content of cimifugin, which might be related to its degradation-proof effect on cimifugin, via transforming cimifugin to comparatively more stable PGCN and spatial structure protection. PMID:27595868

  18. Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a coking wastewater treatment plant residual by an O3/ultraviolet fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chong; Zhang, Wanhui; Yuan, Mengyang; Feng, Chunhua; Ren, Yuan; Wei, Chaohai

    2014-09-01

    Coking wastewater treatment plant (CWWTP) represents a typical point source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the water environment and threatens the safety of drinking water in downstream regions. To enhance the removal of residual PAHs from bio-treated coking wastewater, a pilot-scale O3/ultraviolet (UV) fluidized bed reactor (O3/UV FBR) was designed and different operating factors including UV irradiation intensity, pH, initial concentration, contact time, and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were investigated at an ozone level of 240 g h(-1) and 25 ± 3 °C. A health risk evaluation and cost analysis were also carried out under the continuous-flow mode. As far as we know, this is the first time an O3/UV FBR has been explored for PAHs treatment. The results indicated that between 41 and 75 % of 18 target PAHs were removed in O3/UV FBR due to synergistic effects of UV irradiation. Both increased reaction time and increased pH were beneficial for the removal of PAHs. The degradation of the target PAHs within 8 h can be well fitted by the pseudo-first-order kinetics (R (2) > 0.920). The reaction rate was also positively correlated with the initial concentrations of PAHs. The health risk assessment showed that the total amount of carcinogenic substance exposure to surface water was reduced by 0.432 g day(-1). The economic analysis showed that the O3/UV FBR was able to remove 18 target PAHs at a cost of US$0.34 m(-3). These results suggest that O3/UV FBR is efficient in removing residuals from CWWTP, thus reducing the accumulation of persistent pollutant released to surface water.

  19. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyens, Nele; Truyens, Sascha; Dupae, Joke; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1) TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l(-1) TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected.

  20. Evaluation of the degradation of the service water system in nuclear plants; Evaluacion de la degradacion del sistema de agua de servicio en plantas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaices A, E. [IIE, Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The service water system, the circulation water system, the cooling water system and the protection against fires system so much in nuclear plants as in fossils plants they are being degraded by a wide variety of mechanisms. These mechanisms include microbiologically influenced corrosion, cavitation, erosion-corrosion, erosion by solid particles, corrosion in cracks, stings, general corrosion, galvanic corrosion, sedimentation and obstructions and incrustations in the heat exchangers. In the last years were developed predictive models for the more common degradation forms and were installed in a new application of the CHECWORKS{sup TM} code called Cooling Water Application (CWA). This application of the code provides a new technology that so much nuclear facilities as fossil ones can use to modelling specific systems and to carry out corrosion predictions in each one of its components. Presently work the results of the employment of the CHECWORKS CWA code are described to carry out predictions of 12 different corrosion mechanisms that affect to the service water system of a nuclear plant, as well as the recommendations and options that the plant can to consider to reduce indexes of damages. This work can be used for to optimize inspections to the service water system and it gives the bases for similar changes in other nuclear plants. (Author)

  1. New Role for an Old Rule: N-end Rule-Mediated Degradation of Ethylene Responsive Factor Proteins Governs Low Oxygen Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Licausi; Chiara Pucciariello; Pierdomenico Perata

    2013-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway regulates protein degradation,which depends on exposed N-terminal sequences in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.In plants,conserved and specific enzymes stimulate selective proteolysis.Although a number of developmental and growth phenotypes have been reported for mutants in the N-end rule,its function has remained unrelated to specific physiological pathways.The first report of the direct involvement of the N-end rule in stress responses focused on hypoxic signaling and how the oxygen-dependent oxidation of cystein promotes the N-end rule-mediated degradation of ethylene responsive factor (ERF)-Ⅶ proteins,the master regulators of anaerobic responses.It has been suggested that plants have evolved specific mechanisms to tune ERF-Ⅶ availability in the nucleus.In this review,we speculate that ERF-Ⅶ proteins are reversibly protected from degradation via membrane sequestration.The oxidative response in plants subjected to anoxic conditions suggests that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species) may interact or interfere with the N-end rule pathway-mediated response to hypoxia.

  2. Sugar catabolism in Aspergillus and other fungi related to the utilization of plant biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Claire; Benocci, Tiziano; Battaglia, Evy; Benoit, Isabelle; de Vries, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are found in all natural and artificial biotopes and can use highly diverse carbon sources. They play a major role in the global carbon cycle by decomposing plant biomass and this biomass is the main carbon source for many fungi. Plant biomass is composed of cell wall polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin) and lignin. To degrade cell wall polysaccharides to different monosaccharides, fungi produce a broad range of enzymes with a large variety in activities. Through a series of enzymatic reactions, sugar-specific and central metabolic pathways convert these monosaccharides into energy or metabolic precursors needed for the biosynthesis of biomolecules. This chapter describes the carbon catabolic pathways that are required to efficiently use plant biomass as a carbon source. It will give an overview of the known metabolic pathways in fungi, their interconnections, and the differences between fungal species.

  3. Microwave-assisted extraction of polysaccharides from solanum nigrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-qing; LIU-qin; JIANG xin-yu; ZENG fan

    2005-01-01

    The microwave-assisted method was used to extract polysaccharides from solanum nigrum. The optimum experimental parameters, mechanism of the extraction and the effect of microwave-assisted extraction process on the structures of polysaccharides were investigated. The extract was analyzed by the modified phenol-sulfuric acid method at 490 nm. The optimum experimental parameters were obtained by orthogonal experiments as follows: extraction time 15 min, microwave radiation power 455 W and the process ratio of materials mass to solvent volume 1∶20. The results show that compared with the conventional reflux extraction, the microwave-assisted extraction has a higher yield in shorter time, with no effect on the finally obtained polysaccharides as seen from the FT-IR spectra. The scanning electron microscopy images reveal that the mechanism of the extraction is related to the structural changes of the plant cells in different extracting conditions.

  4. Potential for Microbial Degradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride in Streambed Sediment at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant, Missouri, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of carbon-14 (14C) radiotracer-based microcosm experiments was conducted to assess the mechanisms and products of degradation of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) in streambed sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy, Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri. The focus of the investigation was the potential for biotic and abiotic cis-DCE and VC degradation in surficial and underlying hyporheic sediment from the Blue River and its tributaries, Indian Creek and Boone Creek. Substantial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14C-carbon dioxide (14CO2) was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms prepared under oxic conditions. No significant accumulation of reductive dechlorination products was observed under these oxic incubation conditions. The results indicate that microbial mineralization processes involving direct oxidation or co-metabolic oxidation are the primary mechanisms of cis-DCE and VC biodegradation in oxic stream sediment at the Kansas City Plant. Substantial mineralization of [1,2-14C] VC also was observed in all viable surficial sediment microcosms incubated in the absence of detectable oxygen (dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 25 micrograms per liter). In general, the accumulation of mineralization products (14CO2 and 14C-methane [14CH4]) predominated with only trace-level detection of the reductive dechlorination product, 14C-ethene. In contrast, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE by reductive dechlorination or mineralization was not significant in the absence of detectable oxygen. The potential for [1,2-14C] VC biodegradation also was significant in sediments from the deeper hyporheic zones under oxic conditions and in the absence of detectable oxygen. In this study, microbial degradation of [1,2-14C] cis-DCE was not significant in hyporheic sediment treatments under either oxygen condition. Taken together, the results indicate that microbial mineralization processes in

  5. Bioaugmentation with Petroleum-Degrading Consortia Has a Selective Growth-Promoting Impact on Crop Plants Germinated in Diesel Oil-Contaminated Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graj, Weronika; Lisiecki, Piotr; Szulc, Alicja

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoremediation is a complex type of green clean-up technology that involves both plants and the rhizosphere-associated microorganisms to decompose hazardous compounds. The success of the strategy strongly depends on plant tolerance towards the pollutant, as well as plant's interactions with the......Rhizoremediation is a complex type of green clean-up technology that involves both plants and the rhizosphere-associated microorganisms to decompose hazardous compounds. The success of the strategy strongly depends on plant tolerance towards the pollutant, as well as plant's interactions...... with the rhizospheric microbes. The microorganisms may be stimulated by the secreted root exudates, which results in an increased breakdown of contaminants in the rhizosphere. The main goal of this study was to establish a potential rhizoremediation combination for a diesel-polluted site. Inoculation of plant roots...... or seeds with indigenous rhizospheric populations is a common approach in the rhizoremediation. However, we introduced hydrocarbon-degrading consortia (M10, R3, and K52) that were previously isolated from crude oil-contaminated soil instead of indigenous microbes. Bioaugmentation with these petroleum...

  6. Water deficit induces chlorophyll degradation via the 'PAO/phyllobilin' pathway in leaves of homoio- (Craterostigma pumilum) and poikilochlorophyllous (Xerophyta viscosa) resurrection plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Bastien; Egert, Aurélie; Süssenbacher, Iris; Kräutler, Bernhard; Bartels, Dorothea; Peters, Shaun; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm resurrection plants exhibit poikilo- or homoiochlorophylly as a response to water deficit. Both strategies are generally considered as effective mechanisms to reduce oxidative stress associated with photosynthetic activity under water deficiency. The mechanism of water deficit-induced chlorophyll (Chl) degradation in resurrection plants is unknown but has previously been suggested to occur as a result of non-enzymatic photooxidation. We investigated Chl degradation during dehydration in both poikilochlorophyllous (Xerophyta viscosa) and homoiochlorophyllous (Craterostigma pumilum) species. We demonstrate an increase in the abundance of PHEOPHORBIDE a OXYGENASE (PAO), a key enzyme of Chl breakdown, together with an accumulation of phyllobilins, that is, products of PAO-dependent Chl breakdown, in both species. Phyllobilins and PAO levels diminished again in leaves from rehydrated plants. We conclude that water deficit-induced poikilochlorophylly occurs via the well-characterized PAO/phyllobilin pathway of Chl breakdown and that this mechanism also appears conserved in a resurrection species displaying homoiochlorophylly. The roles of the PAO/phyllobilin pathway during different plant developmental processes that involve Chl breakdown, such as leaf senescence and desiccation, fruit ripening and seed maturation, are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Solar CPC pilot plant photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A in waters and wastewaters using suspended and supported-TiO2. Influence of photogenerated species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggioro, Enrico Mendes; Oliveira, Anabela Sousa; Pavesi, Thelma; Tototzintle, Margarita Jiménez; Maldonado, Manuel Ignacio; Correia, Fábio Verissimo; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2014-11-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) in waters and wastewaters in the presence of titanium dioxide (TiO2) was performed under different conditions. Suspensions of the TiO2 were used to compare the degradation efficiency of BPA (20 mg L(-1)) in batch and compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactors. A TiO2 catalyst supported on glass spheres was prepared (sol-gel method) and used in a CPC solar pilot plant for the photodegradation of BPA (100 μg L(-1)). The influence of OH·, O2 (·-), and h (+) on the BPA degradation were evaluated. The radicals OH· and O2 (·-) were proved to be the main species involved on BPA photodegradation. Total organic carbon (TOC) and carboxylic acids were determined to evaluate the BPA mineralization during the photodegradation process. Some toxicological effects of BPA and its photoproducts on Eisenia andrei earthworms were evaluated. The results show that the optimal concentration of suspended TiO2 to degrade BPA in batch or CPC reactors was 0.1 g L(-1). According to biological tests, the BPA LC50 in 24 h for E. andrei was of 1.7 × 10(-2) mg cm(-2). The photocatalytic degradation of BPA mediated by TiO2 supported on glass spheres suffered strong influence of the water matrix. On real municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) secondary effluent, 30 % of BPA remains in solution; nevertheless, the method has the enormous advantage since it eliminates the need of catalyst removal step, reducing the cost of treatment.

  8. Computer simulation and experimental study of the polysaccharide-polysaccharide interaction in the bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefeva, Oksana A.; Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Tolmachev, Sergey A.; Kupadze, Machammad S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the conformational properties and molecular dynamics of polysaccharides by using molecular modeling methods. Theoretical and experimental results of polysaccharide-polysaccharide interactions are described.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer and functional diversification of plant cell wall degrading polygalacturonases: Key events in the evolution of herbivory in beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Roy; Gramzow, Lydia; Theißen, Günter; Siegfried, Blair D; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Heckel, David G; Pauchet, Yannick

    2014-09-01

    Plant cell walls are the largest reservoir of organic carbon on earth. To breach and utilize this carbohydrate-rich protective barrier, microbes secrete plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) targeting pectin, cellulose and hemicelluloses. There is a growing body of evidence that genomes of some herbivorous insects also encode PCWDEs, raising questions about their evolutionary origins and functions. Among herbivorous beetles, pectin-degrading polygalacturonases (PGs) are found in the diverse superfamilies Chrysomeloidea (leaf beetles, long-horn beetles) and Curculionoidea (weevils). Here our aim was to test whether these arose from a common ancestor of beetles or via horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and whether PGs kept their ancestral function in degrading pectin or evolved novel functions. Transcriptome data derived from 10 beetle species were screened for PG-encoding sequences and used for phylogenetic comparisons with their bacterial, fungal and plant counterparts. These analyses revealed a large family of PG-encoding genes of Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea sharing a common ancestor, most similar to PG genes of ascomycete fungi. In addition, 50 PGs from beetle digestive systems were heterologously expressed and functionally characterized, showing a set of lineage-specific consecutively pectin-degrading enzymes, as well as conserved but enzymatically inactive PG proteins. The evidence indicates that a PG gene was horizontally transferred ∼200 million years ago from an ascomycete fungus to a common ancestor of Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea. This has been followed by independent duplications in these two lineages, as well as independent replacement in two sublineages of Chrysomeloidea by two other subsequent HGTs. This origin, leading to subsequent functional diversification of the PG gene family within its new hosts, was a key event promoting the evolution of herbivory in these beetles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of polysaccharides in different molecular weights from Ulva pertusa Kjellm (Chorophyta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Pengzhan; ZHANG Quanbin; ZHANG Hong; NIU Xizhen; LI Zhien

    2004-01-01

    As molecular weight controls the biological activities of polysaccharides, screening the optimal molecular weight of polysaccharides is important in drug research and application. In this study, hydrogen peroxide was employed as oxidant, and temperature, reaction time, and concentration of polysaccharides and hydrogen peroxide were examined for their effects on the preparation of polysaccharides in different molecular weights from Ulva pertusa. Our experiment suggested that the optimal degradation concentrations for polysaccharides and hydrogen peroxide were 2.5% (w/v) and 8.0% (v/v), respectively. The range of degradation measured by relative viscosity was mainly controlled by temperature and time. Results revealed that 35℃ was the optimal temperature for obtaining low-degradation samples, and 50℃ was the most favorable temperature to accelerate the reaction to yield highly-degraded samples. Four samples in different molecular weights A, B, C and D were finally prepared. The controllability was evaluated by the relative standard deviation (RSD) of relative viscosity, and the peak molecular weights and the polydispersity indexes (Mw/Mn) of molecular weights were measured by high performance gel permeation chromatography (HPGPC).

  11. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  12. Effectiveness of Low-Cost Planting Techniques for Improving Water Availability to Olea europaea Seedlings in Degraded Drylands

    OpenAIRE

    Valdecantos Dema, Alejandro; Fuentes Delgado, David; Smanis, Athanasios; Llovet López, Joan; Morcillo Juliá, Luna; Bautista Aguilar, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Reforestation projects in semiarid lands often yield poor results. Water scarcity, poor soil fertility, and structure strongly limit the survival and growth of planted seedlings in these areas. At two experimental semiarid sites, we evaluated a variety of low-cost planting techniques in order to increase water availability to plants. Treatments included various combinations of traditional planting holes; water-harvesting microcatchments; stone or plastic mulches; small waterproof sheets to in...

  13. 植物纤维预处理与降解方法研究%Discussion on the means of Pretreatment and Degradation of Plant Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘昌华; 孙可伟

    2012-01-01

    Plant fiber contains large amounts of cellulose, which is the largest rerLewable resources in the world,however,most of the plant fiber are treated as waste at present, which is a waste of the resources. This paper summarizes the characteristics of the plant fiber structure and the means of pretreatment and deg- radation plant fiber,and points out that the reasonable choice of the pretreatment and degradation means of plant fiber is crucial to effectively utilize the plant fiber.%指出了植物纤维含有大量纤维素,是世界上最大的可再生资源,但目前大部分作为废弃物处理造成了资源浪费。探讨了植物纤维结构特点、植物纤维的预处理方法和降解的主要手段等,提出了预处理方法和降解方法的合理选择是有效地资源化利用植物纤维的关键。

  14. Optimization of ultrasonic circulating extraction of polysaccharides from Asparagus officinalis using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingsheng; Kennedy, John F; Wang, Xiaodong; Yuan, Xiaofan; Zhao, Bing; Peng, Youshun; Huang, Yunxiang

    2011-08-01

    Polysaccharides were extracted from Asparagus officinalis. A novel ultrasonic circulating extraction (UCE) technology was applied for the polysaccharide extraction. Three-factor-three-level Box-Behnken design was employed to optimize ultrasonic power, extraction time and the liquid-solid ratio to obtain a high polysaccharide yield. The optimal extraction conditions were as follows: ultrasonic power was 600 W, extraction time was 46 min, the liquid-solid ratio was 35 mL/g. Under these conditions, the experimental yield of polysaccharides was 3.134%, which was agreed closely to the predicted value. The average molecular weight of A. officinalis polysaccharide was about 6.18×10(4) Da. The polysaccharides were composed of glucose, fucose, arabinose, galactose and rhamnose in a ratio of 2.18:1.86:1.50:0.98:1.53. Compared with hot water extraction (HWE), UCE showed time-saving, higher yield and no influence on the structure of asparagus polysaccharides. The results indicated that ultrasonic circulating extraction technology could be an effective and advisable technique for the large scale production of plant polysaccharides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  16. Effects of Alien Plants on Ecosystem Structure and Functioning and Implications for Restoration: Insights from Three Degraded Sites in South African Fynbos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Mirijam; Richardson, David M.; Privett, Sean D. J.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the type and extent of degradation at three sites on the Agulhas Plain, South Africa: an old field dominated by the alien grass Pennisetum clandestinum Pers . (kikuyu), an abandoned Eucalyptus plantation, and a natural fynbos community invaded by nitrogen fixing—Australian Acacia species. These forms of degradation are representative of many areas in the region. By identifying the nature and degree of ecosystem degradation we aimed to determine appropriate strategies for restoration in this biodiversity hotspot. Vegetation surveys were conducted at degraded sites and carefully selected reference sites. Soil-stored propagule seed banks and macro- and micro-soil nutrients were determined. Species richness, diversity and native cover under Eucalyptus were extremely low compared to the reference site and alterations of the soil nutrients were the most severe. The cover of indigenous species under Acacia did not differ significantly from that in reference sites, but species richness was lower under Acacia and soils were considerably enriched. Native species richness was much lower in the kikuyu site, but soil nutrient status was similar to the reference site. Removal of the alien species alone may be sufficient to re-initiate ecosystem recovery at the kikuyu site, whereas active restoration is required to restore functioning ecosystems dominated by native species in the Acacia thicket and the Eucalyptus plantation. To restore native plant communities we suggest burning, mulching with sawdust and sowing of native species.

  17. Microanalysis of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obel, N.; Erben, V.; Schwarz, T.; Kühnel, S.; Fodor, A.; Pauly, M.

    2009-01-01

    Oligosaccharide Mass Profiling (OLIMP) allows a fast and sensitive assessment of cell wall polymer structure when coupled with Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Time Of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The short time required for sample preparation and analysis makes possible the s

  18. Galactosaminogalactan, a new immunosuppressive polysaccharide of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Fontaine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new polysaccharide secreted by the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus has been characterized. Carbohydrate analysis using specific chemical degradations, mass spectrometry, ¹H and ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance showed that this polysaccharide is a linear heterogeneous galactosaminogalactan composed of α1-4 linked galactose and α1-4 linked N-acetylgalactosamine residues where both monosacharides are randomly distributed and where the percentage of galactose per chain varied from 15 to 60%. This polysaccharide is antigenic and is recognized by a majority of the human population irrespectively of the occurrence of an Aspergillus infection. GalNAc oligosaccharides are an essential epitope of the galactosaminogalactan that explains the universal antibody reaction due to cross reactivity with other antigenic molecules containing GalNAc stretches such as the N-glycans of Campylobacter jejuni. The galactosaminogalactan has no protective effect during Aspergillus infections. Most importantly, the polysaccharide promotes fungal development in immunocompetent mice due to its immunosuppressive activity associated with disminished neutrophil infiltrates.

  19. A Study on the Hypolipemic and Nonenzymatic Glycosylation Activity in Vitro of Crude Polysaccharide form Nine Plants%9种植物粗多糖体外降脂及抑制非酶糖基化活性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文君; 欧阳克蕙; 许文凤; 徐明生; 上官新晨; 蒋艳

    2013-01-01

    对9种植物中的多糖进行提取,并对其体外降脂和抑制蛋白质非酶糖基化的作用进行了测定.分别将9种植物样品经粉碎、脱脂、脱色处理后,用超声辅助70%乙醇浸提得粗多糖.以葡萄糖为标准样品,用紫外分光光度法测其在510 nm处吸光度值并绘制标准曲线,以同样的方法测定样品中多糖的含量.随后进行体外降脂实验,通过比较有无抑制剂(提取液)加入的情况下,脂肪酶的活性差异,所得各提取物的抑制率,比较降脂活性大小;再进行体外非酶糖基化实验,去1 mL提取液(加氨基胍做阳性对照,加水做阴性对照)与1mL磷酸缓冲液混合,90℃水浴40 min,然后与乙二醛和牛血清白蛋白混合,反应液于37℃孵育15 d,用荧光法在发射波长440 nm激发波长365 nm处测定糖基化产物的自发荧光值,计算9种植物粗提多糖对体外非酶糖基化反应的抑制率.结果表明9种植物多糖粗提物对脂肪酶均有较强的抑制作用,以蛇接骨草的抑制活性最强.在体外非酶糖基化试验中,9种植物对非酶糖基化终产物的生成均有较强的抑制作用,以芦荟粗多糖非酶糖基化抑制活性最强.%In this study,the hypolipemic and nonenzymatic glycosylation activity in vitro of rough polysaccharide from nine different plants were studied.The plant samples were smashed,degreased,bleached,then the rough polysaccharide was extracted with 70% ethanol and supersonic.The hypolipemic effect of the pelysaccharide from nine plants was detected in vitro by measuring the activity of pancreatic lipase.In the nonenzymatic glycosylation experiment,the pelysaccharide solution (1 mL) was mixed separately with PBS(1 mL),and water heated at 90 ℃ for 40 min to remove ethanol.Then the samples mixed with the reactive solution containing glyoxal and bovine serum albumin were incubated at 37 ℃ for 15 d,added with the aminoguanidine as the positive control while pure water as the

  20. Can ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and belowground plant traits be used as ecological tools to mitigate erosion on degraded slopes in the ultramafic soils of New Caledonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenois, Julien; Carriconde, Fabian; Rey, Freddy; Stokes, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    New Caledonia is an archipelago in the South West Pacific located just above the Tropic of Capricorn. The main island is bisected by a continuous mountain chain whose highest peaks reach more than 1 600 m. With mean annual rainfall above 2 000 mm in the South of the main island, frequent downpours and steep slopes, its soils are prone to water erosion. Deforestation, fires and mining activity are the main drivers of water erosion. Stakes are high to mitigate the phenomenon: extraction of nickel from ultramafic substrates (one third of the whole territory) is the main economic activity; New Caledonia is considered as a biodiversity hotspot. Restoration ecology is seen as a key approach for tackling such environmental challenges. Soil microorganisms could play significant roles in biological processes such as plant nutrition and plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Microorganisms could increase soil aggregate stability and thus mitigate soil erodibility. Plant roots increase soil cohesion through exudation and decomposition processes. To date, few studies have collected data on the soil aggregate stability of steep slopes affected by erosion and, to our knowledge, interactions between ectomycorrhizas (ECM), roots and erodibility of ultramafic soils have never been considered. The objective of our study is to assess the influence of ECM symbiosis and plant root traits on the erodibility of ultramafic soils of New Caledonia and answer the following questions: 1/ What is the influence of plant root traits of vegetal communities and ECM fungal diversity on soil erodibility? 2/ What are the belowground plant traits of some mycorrhized endemic species used in ecological restoration? 3/ What is the influence of plant root traits and ECM fungal inoculation on soil erodibility? At the scale of plant communities, five types of vegetation have been chosen in the South of the main island: degraded ligno-herbaceous shrubland, ligno-herbaceous shrubland, degraded humid

  1. Potential for plant growth promotion by a consortium of stress-tolerant 2,4-dinitrotoluene-degrading bacteria: isolation and characterization of a military soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Sofie; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2014-07-01

    The presence of explosives in soils and the interaction with drought stress and nutrient limitation are among the environmental factors that severely affect plant growth on military soils. In this study, we seek to isolate and identify the cultivable bacteria of a 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) contaminated soil (DS) and an adjacent grassland soil (GS) of a military training area aiming to isolate new plant growth-promoting (PGP) and 2,4-DNT-degrading strains. Metabolic profiling revealed disturbances in Ecocarbon use in the bare DS; isolation of cultivable strains revealed a lower colony-forming-unit count and a less diverse community associated with DS in comparison with GS. New 2,4-DNT-tolerant strains were identified by selective enrichments, which were further characterized by auxanography for 2,4-DNT use, resistance to drought stress, cold, nutrient starvation and PGP features. By selecting multiple beneficial PGP and abiotic stress-resistant strains, efficient 2,4-DNT-degrading consortia were composed. After inoculation, consortium UHasselt Sofie 3 with seven members belonging to Burkholderia, Variovorax, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Ralstonia species was capable to successfully enhance root length of Arabidopsis under 2,4-DNT stress. After 9 days, doubling of main root length was observed. Our results indicate that beneficial bacteria inhabiting a disturbed environment have the potential to improve plant growth and alleviate 2,4-DNT stress.

  2. Characterizing the Status (Disturbed, Hybrid or Novel) of Swamp Forest Fragments in a Caribbean Ramsar Wetland: The Impact of Anthropogenic Degradation and Invasive Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospere, Kurt; McLaren, Kurt P.; Wilson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The last remaining Amazonian-type swamp forest fragments in Black River Lower Morass, Jamaica, have been subjected to a myriad of anthropogenic disturbances, compounded by the establishment and spread of several invasive plant species. We established 44 permanent sample plots (covering 3.92 ha) across 10 of these swamp forest fragments and sampled all non-woody plants and all trees ≥2 cm DBH found in the plots. These data were used to (1) identify thresholds of hybridity and novelty, (2) derive several diversity and structural descriptors used to characterize the swamp forest fragments and (3) identify possible indicators of anthropogenic degradation. These were incorporated into a framework and used to determine the status of the swamp forest fragments so that appropriate management and conservation measures can be implemented. We recorded 43 woody plant species (9 endemic, 28 native and 4 non-native) and 21 non-tree species. The composition and structure of all the patches differed significantly due to the impact of the herbaceous invasive plant Alpinia allughas, the presence and diversity of other non-native plants, and differing intensities of anthropogenic disturbance (e.g., burning, cutting and harvesting of non-timber forest products). We ranked forest patches along a continuum representing deviations from a historical proxy (least disturbed) swamp forest to those with dramatically altered structural and floristic attributes (=novel swamp forests). Only one fragment overrun with A. allughas was classified as novel. If effective conservation and management does not come to the BRLM, the remaining swamp forest fragments appear doomed to further degradation and will soon disappear altogether.

  3. Characterizing the Status (Disturbed, Hybrid or Novel) of Swamp Forest Fragments in a Caribbean Ramsar Wetland: The Impact of Anthropogenic Degradation and Invasive Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospere, Kurt; McLaren, Kurt P; Wilson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The last remaining Amazonian-type swamp forest fragments in Black River Lower Morass, Jamaica, have been subjected to a myriad of anthropogenic disturbances, compounded by the establishment and spread of several invasive plant species. We established 44 permanent sample plots (covering 3.92 ha) across 10 of these swamp forest fragments and sampled all non-woody plants and all trees ≥2 cm DBH found in the plots. These data were used to (1) identify thresholds of hybridity and novelty, (2) derive several diversity and structural descriptors used to characterize the swamp forest fragments and (3) identify possible indicators of anthropogenic degradation. These were incorporated into a framework and used to determine the status of the swamp forest fragments so that appropriate management and conservation measures can be implemented. We recorded 43 woody plant species (9 endemic, 28 native and 4 non-native) and 21 non-tree species. The composition and structure of all the patches differed significantly due to the impact of the herbaceous invasive plant Alpinia allughas, the presence and diversity of other non-native plants, and differing intensities of anthropogenic disturbance (e.g., burning, cutting and harvesting of non-timber forest products). We ranked forest patches along a continuum representing deviations from a historical proxy (least disturbed) swamp forest to those with dramatically altered structural and floristic attributes (=novel swamp forests). Only one fragment overrun with A. allughas was classified as novel. If effective conservation and management does not come to the BRLM, the remaining swamp forest fragments appear doomed to further degradation and will soon disappear altogether.

  4. Effect of phosphorylation on antioxidant activities of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady godiva) polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Ni, Yuanying; Hu, Xiaosong; Li, Quanhong

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of pumpkin polysaccharide with different degree of substitution were synthesized using POCl3 and pyridine. Antioxidant activities and cytoprotective effects of unmodified polysaccharide and phosphorylated derivatives were investigated employing various in vitro systems. Results showed that high ratio of POCl3/pyridine could increase the degree of substitution and no remarkable degradation occurred in the phosphorylation process. Characteristic absorption of phosphorylation appeared both in the IR and (31)P NMR spectrum. The df values between 2.27 and 2.55 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the phosphorylated derivatives. All the phosphorylated polysaccharides exhibited higher antioxidant activities. H2O2-induced oxidative damages on rat thymic lymphocyte were also prevented by the derivatives. In general, phosphorylation could improve the antioxidant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide both in vitro and in a cell system.

  5. In Silico Comparison of the Hemicelluloses Xyloglucan and Glucuronoarabinoxylan in Protecting Cellulose from Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrakumar Vetharaniam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a previously developed simulation model of a plant cell wall and its enzymatic degradation to compare the abilities of two hemicelluloses, glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX and xyloglucan (XG, to protect cellulose microfibrils (CMFs from attack by cellulose-degrading enzymes. Additionally, we investigated the effect of XG abundance on the degradation rate of CMFs in the presence of the same enzymes. Simulations were run using hypothetical cell-wall compositions in which the numbers and arrangement of CMFs and (1,3;1,4-β-glucan were kept constant, but the proportions of GAX and XG were altered. Scenarios considered walls with low and equal proportions of either GAX or XG, and also low, medium and high proportions of XG in the absence of GAX. The rate of CMF degradation was much lower in walls with GAX than walls with XG, except for early in the simulation when the reverse held, suggesting that XGs were protecting CMFs by competitive inhibition. Increasing XG content reduced both the degradation rate of CMFs and the percent of XG degraded, indicating that activity of enzymes decreased with XG density despite XG being degradable. Glucose oligosaccharide breakdown products were analysed on the basis of the originating polysaccharide and their degree of polymerisation (DP. The presence of GAX as opposed to equal amounts of XG had some significant effects on the amount and profile of breakdown products from XG and CMFs.

  6. Polysaccharides Isolated from Açaí Fruit Induce Innate Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Holderness; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Brett Freedman; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Hedges, Jodi F.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    The Açaí (Acai) fruit is a popular nutritional supplement that purportedly enhances immune system function. These anecdotal claims are supported by limited studies describing immune responses to the Acai polyphenol fraction. Previously, we characterized γδ T cell responses to both polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions from several plant-derived nutritional supplements. Similar polyphenol and polysaccharide fractions are found in Acai fruit. Thus, we hypothesized that one or both of these fr...

  7. Isolation of porphyran-degrading marine microorganisms from the surface of red alga, Porphyra yezoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Takashi; Tsuge, Keisuke; Sumi, Toshihisa; Yoshiki, Masahiro; Tsuruta, Yumi; Abe, Shin-ichi; Nishino, Shiduo; Sanematsu, Seigo; Koganemaru, Kazuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    Marine microorganisms degrading porphyran (POR) were found on the surface of thalli of Porphyra yezoensis. Fifteen crude microorganism groups softened and liquefied the surface of agar-rich plate medium. Among these, 11 microorganism groups degraded porphyran that consisted of sulfated polysaccharide in Porphyra yezoensis. Following isolation, 7 POR-degradable microorganisms were isolated from the 11 POR-degradable microorganism groups.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-06-23

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations.

  9. Proteomic Investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 Identifies Secretome and Mycelial Proteins with roles in Plant Cell Wall Degradation and Virulence

    KAUST Repository

    Lakshman, Dilip

    2016-03-28

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Here we used a proteomics approach to characterize both intracellular proteins and the secretome of R. solani AG 4 isolate Rs23A under several growth conditions; the secretome being highly important in pathogenesis. From over 500 total secretome and soluble intracellular protein spots from 2-D gels, 457 protein spots were analyzed and 318 proteins positively matched with fungal proteins of known function by comparison with available R. solani genome databases specific for anastomosis groups 1-IA, 1-IB, and 3. These proteins were categorized to possible cellular locations and functional groups; and for some proteins their putative roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence. The majority of the secreted proteins were grouped to extracellular regions and contain hydrolase activity.

  10. Characterization of cysteine-degrading and H2S-releasing enzymes of higher plants - From the field to the test tube and back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jutta, Papenbrock; Anja, Riemenschneider; Kamp, Anja;

    2007-01-01

    in plants which might be involved in SIR, such as high levels of thiols, glucosinolates, cysteine-rich proteins, phytoalexins, elemental sulfur, or H2S. Probably more than one strategy is used by plants. Species- or even variety-dependent differences in the development of SIR are probably used. Our research...... focussed mainly on the release of H2S as defence strategy. In field experiments using different Brassica napus genotypes it was shown that the genetic differ- ences among Brassica genotypes lead to differences in sulfur content and L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity. Another field ex- periment demonstrated...... that sulfur supply and infection with Pyrenopeziza brassica influenced L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity in Brassica napus. Cysteine-degrading enzymes such as cysteine desulfhydrases are hypothesized to be involved in H2S release. Several L- and D-cysteine-specific desulfhydrase candidates have been isolated...

  11. Characterization of cysteine-degrading and H2S-releasing enzymes of higher plants - From the field to the test tube and back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jutta, Papenbrock; Anja, Riemenschneider; Kamp, Anja

    2007-01-01

    in plants which might be involved in SIR, such as high levels of thiols, glucosinolates, cysteine-rich proteins, phytoalexins, elemental sulfur, or H2S. Probably more than one strategy is used by plants. Species- or even variety-dependent differences in the development of SIR are probably used. Our research...... focussed mainly on the release of H2S as defence strategy. In field experiments using different Brassica napus genotypes it was shown that the genetic differ- ences among Brassica genotypes lead to differences in sulfur content and L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity. Another field ex- periment demonstrated...... that sulfur supply and infection with Pyrenopeziza brassica influenced L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity in Brassica napus. Cysteine-degrading enzymes such as cysteine desulfhydrases are hypothesized to be involved in H2S release. Several L- and D-cysteine-specific desulfhydrase candidates have been isolated...

  12. 非淀粉多糖酶对玉米加工副产品氨基酸及养分真代谢率的影响%Non-Starch Polysaccharide-Degrading Enzymes: Effects on True Amino Acid and Nutrient Metabolic Rates of Corn By-Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林谦; 王照群; 蒋桂韬; 王向荣; 张旭; 张建华; 戴求仲

    2013-01-01

    To study the effects of non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes on true amino acid and nutrient metabolic rates of corn by-products,a complete randomized design and three metabolic test periods had been taken,and 56 healthy adult yellow-feathered roosters with an average body weight of (2.5 ± 0.2) kg were randomly divided into 7 groups with 8 replicates in each group and 1 rooster in each replicate.The roosters were force-fed with a single raw material and the material with non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes to determine the true amino acid metabolic rates of corn and its by-products before and after the enzyme addition.Results showed that before the enzyme addition,the average true amino acid metabolic rate of corn was the highest,and the lowest one was germ (no spray,from Jining).After the enzyme was added,the true amino acid metabolic rates of corn by-products were between 70.77% to 99.29%,and the enzyme increased the true amino acid metabolic rates of corn by-products by 0.96% to 3.52%.The true metabolic rates of many amino acids in corn and corn gluten meal [crude protein (CP) 50% and CP 55%] were significantly increased by the supplementation of the enzyme (P < 0.05).And the effective nutrient improvement values (ENIV) of true available amino acid contents of corn by-products were in the range of 0.03 to 1.87 g/kg,the highest was corn gluten meal (CP 55%),and the lowest one was corn fiber feed.The supplementation of the enzyme can improve the metabolic rates of true CP,dry matter (DM) and ether extract (EE) of varieties of corn by-products (P > 0.05),and for some by-products it could significantly increase the true metabolic rates of DM and CP (P < 0.05).The enzyme could also significantly enhance the true crude fiber (CF) metabolic rate of all corn by-products (P < 0.05).Generally speaking,complex non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes can improve the true amino acid and nutrient metabolic rates of corn and its by

  13. Pilot-plant scale separation and reuse of TiO{sub 2}- photo-catalyst in degrading reactions; Photo reacteur solaire pilote pour separation et reutilisation du catalyseur TiO{sub 2} utilise pour des reactions de degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, P.; Blanco, J.; Malato, S. [CIEMAT, Centro de Investigacion Energica Medioambiental y Technologia, Plataforma Solar de Almeria (Spain); Las Nieves, F.J. de [University of Almeria, Dept. of Applied Physics, Almeria (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    TiO{sub 2}-catalyst suspensions work very efficiently in photo-catalysis for waste-water treatment. Nevertheless, once photo-catalysis is complete, separation of the catalyst from solution becomes the main problem. The catalyst has been recovered by introducing accelerated sedimentation of TiO{sub 2} particles. This paper reports on the reuse of two types of TiO{sub 2} catalysts for photo-catalysis of tetra-chloro-ethylene at pilot plant scale (50L). One is the well-known Degussa P25 and the other was obtained from ENEL Labs (Italy). Two procedures for reuse were tested: the reuse of slurry after degradation without separation of the catalyst and reuse of the catalyst after it has settled to the bottom. (authors)

  14. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  15. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu......(II) state show differences in thenature of the Cu-ligand with and without cellulosic substrate bound and provide structural insight into themechanistic action of LPMOs. Interestingly, for an LsAA9A complex structure with a hemicellulosicsubstrate (xylooligosaccharide) a corresponding difference...

  16. Solar CPC Pilot Plant Photocatalytic Degradation of Indigo Carmine Dye in Waters and Wastewaters Using Supported-TiO2: Influence of Photodegradation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Mendes Saggioro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic degradation of indigo carmine (IC dye in the presence of titanium dioxide under different conditions was reported. Several factors which interfere with the photodegradation efficiency as catalyst concentration, pH, initial concentration of dye, presence of inorganic anions, temperature, and the addition of hydrogen peroxide were studied under artificial irradiation with a 125 W mercury vapor lamp. Additionally, the catalyst supported on glass spheres was used for the photocatalytic degradation of the dye present in several types of waters in a CPC solar pilot plant. The photocatalytic products, carboxylic acids, and SO42- and NH4+ were followed during IC mineralization. Formate, acetate, and oxalate were detected in real MWWTP secondary effluent. The mineralization efficiency was of 42 and 21% using in suspension and supported TiO2, respectively. In order to evaluate biological effects, Eisenia andrei earthworms were used as a model organism. No significant difference (P>0.05 of weight was observed in the earthworm submitted to different concentrations of IC and its photoproducts. The photocatalytic degradation of IC on TiO2 supported on glass spheres suffered strong influence of the water matrix; nevertheless the method has the enormous advantage that it eliminates the need for the final catalyst removal step, reducing therefore the cost of treatment.

  17. Phytoplasma effector SAP54 hijacks plant reproduction by degrading MADS-box proteins and promotes insect colonization in a RAD23-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson M MacLean

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that rely upon multiple hosts to complete their life cycles often modify behavior and development of these hosts to coerce them into improving pathogen fitness. However, few studies describe mechanisms underlying host coercion. In this study, we elucidate the mechanism by which an insect-transmitted pathogen of plants alters floral development to convert flowers into vegetative tissues. We find that phytoplasma produce a novel effector protein (SAP54 that interacts with members of the MADS-domain transcription factor (MTF family, including key regulators SEPALLATA3 and APETALA1, that occupy central positions in the regulation of floral development. SAP54 mediates degradation of MTFs by interacting with proteins of the RADIATION SENSITIVE23 (RAD23 family, eukaryotic proteins that shuttle substrates to the proteasome. Arabidopsis rad23 mutants do not show conversion of flowers into leaf-like tissues in the presence of SAP54 and during phytoplasma infection, emphasizing the importance of RAD23 to the activity of SAP54. Remarkably, plants with SAP54-induced leaf-like flowers are more attractive for colonization by phytoplasma leafhopper vectors and this colonization preference is dependent on RAD23. An effector that targets and suppresses flowering while simultaneously promoting insect herbivore colonization is unprecedented. Moreover, RAD23 proteins have, to our knowledge, no known roles in flower development, nor plant defence mechanisms against insects. Thus SAP54 generates a short circuit between two key pathways of the host to alter development, resulting in sterile plants, and promotes attractiveness of these plants to leafhopper vectors helping the obligate phytoplasmas reproduce and propagate (zombie plants.

  18. The elevation effect on water-soluble polysaccharides and DPPH free radical scavenging activity of Ganoderma lucidum K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsih, C.; Apriyana, W.; Nur Hayati, S.; Taufika Rosyida, V.; Hernawan; Dewi Poeloengasih, C.

    2017-02-01

    Water soluble polysaccharide is one of the important phytochemical in Ganoderma lucidum K. Phytochemicals in the plants, microorganisms, and plants were affected by internal and external factors. The objective of the research was to evaluate the effect of elevation on the water-soluble polysaccharides and its DPPH radical scavenging activity. We found that the water-polysaccharides in mushroom from Godean (elevation free radical scavenging activity of Ganoderma lucidum K from Godean (IC50 11.5 ± 0.29 mg/mL) higher than Kaliurang (IC50 14.4 ± 0.27%).

  19. Structure and genetics of biosynthesis of the glycosyl phosphate-containing O-polysaccharide of Escherichia coli O160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Guo, Xi; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-11-19

    On mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O160, the O-polysaccharide was cleaved by acid-labile glycosyl phosphate linkages in the main chain. The resultant oligosaccharide and the alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide were studied by sugar analysis along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopies, and the following structure of the branched pentasaccharide repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: The O-antigen gene cluster of E. coli O160 was found to be consistent with the O-polysaccharide structure established.

  20. Polysaccharide-modified synthetic polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Aaron D; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an overview of polysaccharide-conjugated synthetic polymers and their use in tissue-engineered scaffolds and drug-delivery applications. This topic will be divided into four categories: (1) polymeric materials modified with non-mammalian polysaccharides such as alginate, chitin, and dextran; (2) polymers modified with mammalian polysaccharides such as hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate, and heparin; (3) multi-polysaccharide-derivatized polymer conjugate systems; and (4) polymers containing polysaccharide-mimetic molecules. Each section will discuss relevant conjugation techniques, analysis, and the impact of these materials as micelles, particles, or hydrogels used in in-vitro and in-vivo biomaterial applications. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Influence of the Plant Tannins on in vitro Ruminal Degradation and Improving Nutritive Value of Sunflower Meal in Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mohammadabadi* and M. Chaji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 30 g/kg dry matter (DM from the tannins of oak leaves and fruit (OL, OF, pistachio hull and leaves (PH, PL on in vitro ruminal degradation, gas production parameters and nutritive value of sunflower meal (SM in ruminants. In vitro gas production, organic matter digestibility (OMD, metabolizable energy (ME and fermentative parameters of samples were measured. Kinetics of gas production was fitted to an exponential model. The results showed that tannin of oak leaves and pistachio hull did not influence the fermentable fraction (b and gas production rate constant (c, but tannin of oak fruit and pistachio leaves reduced these parameters (P0.05. The ammonia-N (NH3-N concentrations of culture fluid decreased (P<0.05 when SM was treated with all tannins sources used in this experiment. Concentration of NH3-N and short chain fatty acid (SCFA was lowest for SM treated by oak fruit tannin. The results showed that in vitro degradation; fermentation and nutritive value of sunflower meal are decreased by 30 g/kg DM tannin of oak fruit and pistachio leaves. Therefore, tannin of oak leaves and pistachio hull was proper than the other tannin sources to improving ruminal degradation and nutritive value of sunflower meal.

  2. Characterization of diferuloylated pectic polysaccharides from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa WILLD.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Daniel; Gmeiner, Bianca M; Tyl, Catrin E; Bunzel, Mirko

    2015-08-01

    In plants belonging to the order of Caryophyllales, pectic neutral side chains can be substituted with ferulic acid. The ability of ferulic acid to form intra- and/or intermolecular polysaccharide cross-links by dimerization was shown by the isolation and characterization of diferulic acid oligosaccharides from monocotyledonous plants. In this study, two diferulic acid oligosaccharides were isolated from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of seeds of the dicotyledonous pseudocereal quinoa by gel permeation chromatography and preparative HPLC and unambiguously identified by LC-MS(2) and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. The isolated oligosaccharides are comprised of 5-5- and 8-O-4-diferulic acid linked to the O2-position of the nonreducing residue of two (1→5)-linked arabinobioses. To get insight into the structure and the degree of phenolic acid substitution of the diferuloylated polysaccharides, polymeric sugar composition, glycosidic linkages, and polysaccharide-bound monomeric phenolic acids and diferulic acids were analyzed. This study demonstrates that diferulic acids are involved into intramolecular and/or intermolecular cross-linking of arabinan chains and may have a major impact on cell wall architecture of quinoa and other dicotyledonous plants of the order of Caryophyllales.

  3. Autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis from a degraded Mediterranean area can be used to improve physiological traits and performance of a plant of agronomic interest under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, Elisabeth; Azcón, Rosario; López-Castillo, Olga M; Calvo-Polanco, Mónica; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that some microorganisms autochthonous from stressful environments are beneficial when used with autochthonous plants, but these microorganisms rarely have been tested with allochthonous plants of agronomic interest. This study investigates the effectiveness of drought-adapted autochthonous microorganisms [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and a consortium of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi] from a degraded Mediterranean area to improve plant growth and physiology in Zea mays under drought stress. Maize plants were inoculated or not with B. thuringiensis, a consortium of AM fungi or a combination of both microorganisms. Plants were cultivated under well-watered conditions or subjected to drought stress. Several physiological parameters were measured, including among others, plant growth, photosynthetic efficiency, nutrients content, oxidative damage to lipids, accumulation of proline and antioxidant compounds, root hydraulic conductivity and the expression of plant aquaporin genes. Under drought conditions, the inoculation of Bt increased significantly the accumulation of nutrients. The combined inoculation of both microorganisms decreased the oxidative damage to lipids and accumulation of proline induced by drought. Several maize aquaporins able to transport water, CO2 and other compounds were regulated by the microbial inoculants. The impact of these microorganisms on plant drought tolerance was complementary, since Bt increased mainly plant nutrition and AM fungi were more active improving stress tolerance/homeostatic mechanisms, including regulation of plant aquaporins with several putative physiological functions. Thus, the use of autochthonous beneficial microorganisms from a degraded Mediterranean area is useful to protect not only native plants against drought, but also an agronomically important plant such as maize.

  4. Polysaccharides as cell carriers for tissue engineering: the use of cellulose in vascular wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačáková, L; Novotná, K; Pařízek, M

    2014-01-01

    Polysaccharides are long carbohydrate molecules of monosaccharide units joined together by glycosidic bonds. These biological polymers have emerged as promising materials for tissue engineering due to their biocompatibility, mostly good availability and tailorable properties. This complex group of biomolecules can be classified using several criteria, such as chemical composition (homo- and heteropolysaccharides), structure (linear and branched), function in the organism (structural, storage and secreted polysaccharides), or source (animals, plants, microorganisms). Polysaccharides most widely used in tissue engineering include starch, cellulose, chitosan, pectins, alginate, agar, dextran, pullulan, gellan, xanthan and glycosaminoglycans. Polysaccharides have been applied for engineering and regeneration of practically all tissues, though mostly at the experimental level. Polysaccharides have been tested for engineering of blood vessels, myocardium, heart valves, bone, articular and tracheal cartilage, intervertebral discs, menisci, skin, liver, skeletal muscle, neural tissue, urinary bladder, and also for encapsulation and delivery of pancreatic islets and ovarian follicles. For these purposes, polysaccharides have been applied in various forms, such as injectable hydrogels or porous and fibrous scaffolds, and often in combination with other natural or synthetic polymers or inorganic nanoparticles. The immune response evoked by polysaccharides is usually mild, and can be reduced by purifying the material or by choosing appropriate crosslinking agents.

  5. Depolymerization of polysaccharides from Opuntia ficus indica: Antioxidant and antiglycated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouch, Mohamed Aymen; Hafsa, Jawhar; Rihouey, Christophe; Le Cerf, Didier; Majdoub, Hatem

    2015-08-01

    The extraction, purification and degradation of polysaccharides from Opuntia ficus indica cladodes, as well as the evaluation of their antioxidant and antiglycated activities in vitro were investigated. The optimization of the extraction showed that extraction by ultrasound at 40 °C presented the best carbohydrates yield. The degradation of the extracted polysaccharides was achieved by free radical depolymerization with H2O2 in the presence of copper(II) acetate for various reaction times. Sugar contents were determined by colorimetric assays. The macromolecular characteristics of the different isolated and degraded carbohydrates were carried by size exclusion chromatography (SEC/MALS/VD/DRI). These experiments showed that all samples are polysaccharides, which are probably pectins and that molecular weight (Mw) has decreased from 6,800,000 to 14,000 g/mol after 3 h of depolymerization without changing the structure. Preliminary antioxidant and antiglycated tests indicated that degraded polysaccharides for 2 and 3 h showed even better antioxidant and antiglycated activities.

  6. Understanding the distribution, degradation and fate of organophosphate esters in an advanced municipal sewage treatment plant based on mass flow and mass balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kang; Liu, Jingfu

    2016-02-15

    Although organophosphate esters (OPEs) in the ambient environment are from sewage treatment plants due to the discharge of effluent and application of sludge, the distribution, degradation and fate of OPEs in advanced municipal sewage treatment plants remain unclear. This work focused on the use of mass flow and mass balance analysis to understand the behaviors and fate of 14 OPEs in an advanced municipal sewage treatment plant. OPEs were detected in all sewage water and sludge samples with total OPEs (ΣOPEs) concentrations of 1399 ± 263 ng/L in raw sewage aqueous phase, 833 ± 175 ng/L in tertiary effluent aqueous phase, and 315 ± 89 ng/g dry weight in dewatered sludge. The dissolved concentrations of ΣOPEs significantly decreased during biological treatment, whereas negligible decrease was observed in mechanical and physical-chemical treatments. For individual OPE, the chlorinated tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) did not decrease but increased during both biological treatment and physical-chemical treatment. Mass flow analysis indicated the total removal efficiency of ΣOPEs in aqueous phase was 40.5%, and the polarity-specific removal efficiencies for individual OPE were positively related to their solid-water partition coefficients (Kd). Furthermore, mass balance results showed that 53.1% and 6.3% of the initial OPE mass flow were eventually transferred to the effluents and dewatered sludge, respectively, while the remaining 39.9% and 0.7% were lost due to biodegradation and physical-chemical treatment, respectively. It was indicated that the activated sludge treatment system with anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic bioreactors was a major factor in the removal of OPEs from the raw sewage, while transfer to dewatered sludge governed by hydrophobic interactions was limited during the sewage treatment. Meanwhile, the degradation difference of OPEs in activated sludge treatment was more related with their molecular

  7. Discovery of novel algae-degrading enzymes from marine bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Johansen, Mikkel; Bech, Pernille Kjersgaard; Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine

    and functional screening. This resulted in the discovery of a novel marine bacterium which displays a large enzymatic potential for degradation of red algal polysaccharides e.g. agar and carrageenan. In addition, we searched metagenome sequence data and identified new enzyme candidates for degradation...

  8. Rice transformation with cell wall degrading enzyme genes from Trichoderma atroviride and its effect on plant growth and resistance to fungal pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mei; Sun Zong-Xiu; Zhu Jie; Xu Tong; Gary E Harman; Matteo Lorito; Sheri Woo

    2004-01-01

    @@ Three genes encoding for fungal cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), ech42, nag70 and gluc78from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride were inserted into the binary vector pCAMBIA1305. 2 singly and in all possible combinations. The coding sequences were placed downstream of the rice actin promoter and all vectors were used to transform rice plants. A total of more than 1,800 independently regenerated plantlets in seven different populations (for each of the three genes and each of the four gene combinations) were obtained. Expression in plant was obtained for all the fungal genes used singly or in combinations. The ech42 gene encoding for an endochitinase increased resistance to sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, while the exochitinase-encoding gene, nag70, had a lesser effect. The expression level of endochitinase but not of the exochitinase was correlated with disease resistance. Nevertheless, exochitinase enhanced the positive effect of endochitinase on disease resistance when two genes were co-expressed in transgenic rice. Improved resistance to Magnaporthe grisea was found in all types of regenerated plants, including those with the gluc78 gene alone, while a few lines expressing either ech42 or nag70 appeared to be immune to this pathogen. Transgenic plants expressing the gluc78 gene alone were stunted and only few of them survived, even though they showed resistance to M. grisea. However, combination with either one of the two other genes ( ech42, nag70 ) as included in the same T-DNA region, reduced the negative effect of gluc78 on plant growth. This is the first report of single or multiple of expression of transgens encoding CWDEs that results in resistance to blast and sheath blight in rice.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of polysaccharide from Schizophyllum commune as affected by ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Zeng, Huansong; Yang, Yuedong; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Baojun

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound treatment was applied to modify the physicochemical properties of an exopolysaccharide from mycelial culture of Schizophyllum commune. Molecular weight (MW) degradation, viscosity and anti-inflammatory property of ultrasonic treated polysaccharide were optimized with response surface methodology. The best ultrasonic parameters were obtained with a three-variable-three-level Box-Behnken design. The optimized conditions for efficient anti-inflammatory activity are initial concentration at 0.4%, ultrasonic power at 600W, and duration of ultrasonic irradiation for 9min. Under these conditions, the nitric oxide inhibition rate was 95±0.03% which agreed closely with the predicted value (96%). Average MW of polysaccharide decreased after ultrasonic treatments. The viscosity of degraded polysaccharide dropped compared with native polysaccharide. The anti-inflammatory activity was improved by ultrasound treatment. The results suggested that ultrasound treatment is an effective approach to decrease the MW of polysaccharide with high anti-inflammatory activity. Ultrasonic treatment is a viable modification technology for high MW polymer materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Occurrence and fate of tetracycline and degradation products in municipal biological wastewater treatment plant and transport of them in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Murat; Arslan Topal, E Işıl

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the fate of tetracycline (TC) and degradation products (DPs) in municipal biological wastewater treatment plant (MBWWTP) located in Elazığ City (Turkey) and to determine the occurrence and transport of TC and DPs in surface water (SW) (Kehli Stream) which the effluents of the plant discharged. The aqueous phase removal of TC, 4-epitetracycline (ETC), 4-epianhydrotetracycline (EATC), and anhydrotetracycline (ATC) in the studied treatment plant was 39.4 ± 1.9, 31.8 ± 1.5, 15.1 ± 0.7, and 16.9 ± 0.8%, respectively. According to the analyses' results of SW samples taken from downstream at every 500-m distance, TC and DPs decreased by the increase in the distance. In downstream, at 2000 m, TC, ETC, EATC, and ATC were 4.12 ± 0.20, 6.70 ± 0.33, 8.31 ± 0.41, and 3.57 ± 0.17 μg/L, respectively. As a result, antibiotic pollution in the SW that takes the effluent of MBWWTP exists.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Polysaccharides from Two Ecological Types of Leymus chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-jing; BI Hong-tao; YAN Ji-hong; SUN Fang; FAN Sha-sha; CAO Gang; ZHOU Yi-fa; CHEN Xi-guang

    2012-01-01

    Leymus chinensis(Trin.) Tzvel.,widely distributed at eastern Eurasian steppe and divided into gray-green type and yellow-green type,has different stress resistance to environment.In the present study,the water-soluble polysaccharides from two ecotypes ofL.chinensis were analyzed in detail,and the differences between polysaccharides from the two ecotypes ofL.chinensis in the yield,monosaccharide composition,molecular weight and structure were clarified.The polysaccharides of L.chinensis were composed of both neutral and acidic polysaccharides.The neutral polysaccharides contained mannose,glucose,galactose,xylose and arabinose,and mainly consisted of β-1,4-Glcp,α-1,3-Galp and α-1,2-Xylp residues.The acidic polysaccharides contained mannose,rhamnose,glucuronic acid,galacturonic acid,glucose,galactose,xylose and arabinose.However,the yields,monosaccharides contents and the molecular weights of the polysaccharides from the two ecotypes of L.chinensis were different.Moreover,the resistance type(gray-green type) of L.chinensis contained a number of α-1,3-Manp and reducing end of β-Glcp residues,and much more O-methyl groups than normal type(yellow-green type) of L.chinensis.The differences of the polysaccharides of the two ecotypes ofL.chinensis might be due to the long-term environmental adaptability of plant,and the differences of the polysaccharides might influence the stress resistance of L.chinensis.

  12. An Optimized Microplate Assay System for Quantitative Evaluation of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzyme Activity of Fungal Culture Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing enzyme cocktails for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis complementary to current cellulase systems is a critical step needed for economically viable biofuels production. Recent genomic analysis indicates that some plant pathogenic fungi are likely a largely untapped resource in which to prospe...

  13. Advanced oxidation to eliminate growth inhibition and to degrade plant protection products in a recirculating nutrient solution in Rose cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Maas, van der A.A.; Meijer, R.J.M.; Khodabaks, M.R.; Blok, C.; Enthoven, N.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    The EU Water Framework Directive demands a sound ecological and chemical basis for ground and surface waters. This has motivated the Dutch greenhouse industry to seek more sustainable water management procedures which will enable a zero-emission of nutrients and plant protection products (PPP) in th

  14. Enzymatic and chemical degradation of curdlan targeting the production of β-(1 → 3) oligoglucans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandpierre, C.; Janssen, H.-G.; Laroche, C.; Michaud, P.; Warrand, J.

    2008-01-01

    Obtaining biologically active oligosaccharides from hydrolysed polysaccharides is nowadays of great interest. Curdlan is one of the polysaccharides with interesting properties and represents the main source for β-(1 → 3)-oligoglucans. Curdlan degradation remains a challenge due to its high

  15. Plant Research '75

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    Research is reported on stomatal regulation of the gas exchanges between plant and environment; inhibitory effects in flower formation; plant growth and development through hormones; hormone action; development and nitrogen fixation in algae; primary cell wall glycoprotein ectensin; enzymic mechanisms and control of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis; molecular studies of membrane studies; sensory transduction in plants; regulation of formation of protein complexes and enzymes in higher plant cell and mechanism of sulfur dioxide toxicity in plants. (PCS)

  16. Kinetic and morphometric evaluation of fucoidan‐degrading fungal strains

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa María; Mussatto, Solange I.; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Aguilar Gonzalez, Cristobal Noé; Teixeira, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Fucoidan is a sulfated fucose hetero‐polysaccharide found in brown algae. This compound has a wide variety of biological activities including anticoagulant, antithrombotic, antitumoral and antiviral (Alexeeva et al. 2002; Ellouali et al. 1993; McClure et al. 1992). Specific enzymes able to degrade fucoidan matrix are important tools to establish structural characteristics and biological functions of this polysaccharide. Such enzymes, called fucoidanases, have been only isolated fr...

  17. Soil CO2 efflux in a degraded raised bog is regulated by water table depth rather than recent plant assimilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.H. Kritzler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the climatic and biological factors that regulate soil carbon dioxide (CO2 efflux is crucial in peatlands because they contain a large proportion of terrestrial carbon (C. We predicted that rainfall reduction would increase soil CO2 efflux, and that cessation of below-ground allocation of recent plant assimilate would reduce soil CO2 efflux. These predictions were tested in the field using rainfall shelters that allowed a maximum of 40 % of rainfall onto 2 × 2 m plots by diverting rainwater from the shelter roofs with guttering, and by girdling stems of the dominant plant, Calluna vulgaris, for two years. We also used 13CO2-pulse labelling of intact monoliths at ambient CO2 concentrations to trace recent assimilate from plant shoots to roots, bulk soil, leachate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and soil CO2 efflux . Soil CO2 efflux in the sheltered plots increased in Year 1 but not in Year 2, and we found a positive relationship between soil CO2 efflux and water table depth. Our data indicate that lowering the water table below a critical threshold (15–20 cm affects soil CO2 efflux. Girdling of C. vulgaris shoots resulted in no measurable reduction in soil CO2 efflux, while only ~3 % of 13C fixed by shoots was recovered in soil CO2 efflux and DOC in the 20 days after labelling. Our findings show that below-ground allocation of recent assimilate from C. vulgaris plants > 6 years old has little impact on soil CO2 efflux.

  18. Soil CO2 efflux in a degraded raised bog is regulated by water table depth rather than recent plant assimilate

    OpenAIRE

    U.H. Kritzler; Artz, R. R. E.; Johnson, D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the climatic and biological factors that regulate soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux is crucial in peatlands because they contain a large proportion of terrestrial carbon (C). We predicted that rainfall reduction would increase soil CO2 efflux, and that cessation of below-ground allocation of recent plant assimilate would reduce soil CO2 efflux. These predictions were tested in the field using rainfall shelters that allowed a maximum of 40 % of rainfall onto 2 × 2 m plots by diver...

  19. Restoration of areas degraded by alluvial sand mining: use of soil microbiological activity and plant biomass growth to assess evolution of restored riparian vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venson, Graziela R; Marenzi, Rosemeri C; Almeida, Tito César M; Deschamps-Schmidt, Alexandre; Testolin, Renan C; Rörig, Leonardo R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2017-03-01

    River or alluvial sand mining is causing a variety of environmental problems in the Itajaí-açú river basin in Santa Catarina State (south of Brazil). When this type of commercial activity degrades areas around rivers, environmental restoration programs need to be executed. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the evolution of a restored riparian forest based on data on the soil microbial activity and plant biomass growth. A reference site and three sites with soil degradation were studied over a 3-year period. Five campaigns were performed to determine the hydrolysis of the soil enzyme fluorescein diacetate (FDA), and the biomass productivity was determined at the end of the studied period. The variation in the enzyme activity for the different campaigns at each site was low, but this parameter did differ significantly according to the site. Well-managed sites showed the highest biomass productivity, and this, in turn, showed a strong positive correlation with soil enzyme activity. In conclusion, soil enzyme activity could form the basis for monitoring and the early prediction of the success of vegetal restoration programs, since responses at the higher level of biological organization take longer, inhibiting the assessment of the project within an acceptable time frame.

  20. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed.